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Sample records for algae activates plant

  1. Cytotoxic, virucidal, and antiviral activity of South American plant and algae extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faral-Tello, Paula; Mirazo, Santiago; Dutra, Carmelo; Pérez, Andrés; Geis-Asteggiante, Lucía; Frabasile, Sandra; Koncke, Elina; Davyt, Danilo; Cavallaro, Lucía; Heinzen, Horacio; Arbiza, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection has a prevalence of 70% in the human population. Treatment is based on acyclovir, valacyclovir, and foscarnet, three drugs that share the same mechanism of action and of which resistant strains have been isolated from patients. In this aspect, innovative drug therapies are required. Natural products offer unlimited opportunities for the discovery of antiviral compounds. In this study, 28 extracts corresponding to 24 plant species and 4 alga species were assayed in vitro to detect antiviral activity against HSV-1. Six of the methanolic extracts inactivated viral particles by direct interaction and 14 presented antiviral activity when incubated with cells already infected. Most interesting antiviral activity values obtained are those of Limonium brasiliense, Psidium guajava, and Phyllanthus niruri, which inhibit HSV-1 replication in vitro with 50% effective concentration (EC(50)) values of 185, 118, and 60 μg/mL, respectively. For these extracts toxicity values were calculated and therefore selectivity indexes (SI) obtained. Further characterization of the bioactive components of antiviral plants will pave the way for the discovery of new compounds against HSV-1.

  2. Cytotoxic, Virucidal, and Antiviral Activity of South American Plant and Algae Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Faral-Tello

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection has a prevalence of 70% in the human population. Treatment is based on acyclovir, valacyclovir, and foscarnet, three drugs that share the same mechanism of action and of which resistant strains have been isolated from patients. In this aspect, innovative drug therapies are required. Natural products offer unlimited opportunities for the discovery of antiviral compounds. In this study, 28 extracts corresponding to 24 plant species and 4 alga species were assayed in vitro to detect antiviral activity against HSV-1. Six of the methanolic extracts inactivated viral particles by direct interaction and 14 presented antiviral activity when incubated with cells already infected. Most interesting antiviral activity values obtained are those of Limonium brasiliense, Psidium guajava, and Phyllanthus niruri, which inhibit HSV-1 replication in vitro with 50% effective concentration (EC50 values of 185, 118, and 60 μg/mL, respectively. For these extracts toxicity values were calculated and therefore selectivity indexes (SI obtained. Further characterization of the bioactive components of antiviral plants will pave the way for the discovery of new compounds against HSV-1.

  3. Extraction of essential oils from native plants and algae from the coast of Peniche (Portugal: antimicrobial and antioxidant activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clélia Neves Afonso

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Coastal areas are highly complex and dynamic ecosystem of interface between land, sea and atmosphere, which also suffer biotic influences. These areas play several important ecological functions, and here we can find an enormous biodiversity. The coastline of Portugal features a high number of endemic flora and vegetation with the potential to provide functional compounds that may provide physiological benefits at nutritional and therapeutic levels, as sources of bioactive substances with antimicrobial, antioxidant, antifungal, antitumalr and anti-inflammatory activity. Among these compounds, we find essential oils, also known as volatile oils, which are a result of secondary metabolism of aromatic plants, containing a large number of substances with varied chemical composition that can be obtained by different methods of extraction. The aim of this study was to extract essential oils of native plants and seaweeds from the coast of Peniche by hydrodistillation in Clevenger apparatus, with optimization of the purification process. Extracted essential oils were tested as to their ability as antibacterial and antifungal agents, and also as antioxidants. The plants studied for this purpose were Inula chritmoides L., Juniperus phoenicea subsp. turbinata (Guss. Nyman, Daucus carota spp. halophilus and the seaweeds Fucus spiralis L., Codium tomentosum Stackhouse, Stypocaulon scoparium (Linnaeus Kützing and Plocamium cartilagineum (Linnaeus P.S.Dixon. The antimicrobial ability was tested in two bacteria species, Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli and in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using standard procedures. The antioxidant potential was evaluated and from the results obtained, we can conclude that the essential oils extracted by the hydrodistillation method of plants and algae contain bioactive compounds present in its constitution with interesting bio-activity that can offer significant benefits and biotechnological relevance.

  4. Serpins in plants and green algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, Thomas Hugh; Hejgaard, Jørn

    2008-01-01

    . Serpins have been found in diverse species of the plant kingdom and represent a distinct clade among serpins in multicellular organisms. Serpins are also found in green algae, but the evolutionary relationship between these serpins and those of plants remains unknown. Plant serpins are potent inhibitors...... of mammalian serine proteinases of the chymotrypsin family in vitro but, intriguingly, plants and green algae lack endogenous members of this proteinase family, the most common targets for animal serpins. An Arabidopsis serpin with a conserved reactive centre is now known to be capable of inhibiting...

  5. Antioxidant Activity of Hawaiian Marine Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony D. Wright

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine algae are known to contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, many of which have commercial applications in pharmaceutical, medical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food and agricultural industries. Natural antioxidants, found in many algae, are important bioactive compounds that play an important role against various diseases and ageing processes through protection of cells from oxidative damage. In this respect, relatively little is known about the bioactivity of Hawaiian algae that could be a potential natural source of such antioxidants. The total antioxidant activity of organic extracts of 37 algal samples, comprising of 30 species of Hawaiian algae from 27 different genera was determined. The activity was determined by employing the FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assays. Of the algae tested, the extract of Turbinaria ornata was found to be the most active. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract led to the isolation of a variety of different carotenoids as the active principles. The major bioactive antioxidant compound was identified as the carotenoid fucoxanthin. These results show, for the first time, that numerous Hawaiian algae exhibit significant antioxidant activity, a property that could lead to their application in one of many useful healthcare or related products as well as in chemoprevention of a variety of diseases including cancer.

  6. Antioxidant activity of Hawaiian marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Dovi; Posner, Ellen Kromkowski; McDermid, Karla J; Tabandera, Nicole K; Wright, Patrick R; Wright, Anthony D

    2012-02-01

    Marine algae are known to contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, many of which have commercial applications in pharmaceutical, medical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food and agricultural industries. Natural antioxidants, found in many algae, are important bioactive compounds that play an important role against various diseases and ageing processes through protection of cells from oxidative damage. In this respect, relatively little is known about the bioactivity of Hawaiian algae that could be a potential natural source of such antioxidants. The total antioxidant activity of organic extracts of 37 algal samples, comprising of 30 species of Hawaiian algae from 27 different genera was determined. The activity was determined by employing the FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power) assays. Of the algae tested, the extract of Turbinaria ornata was found to be the most active. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract led to the isolation of a variety of different carotenoids as the active principles. The major bioactive antioxidant compound was identified as the carotenoid fucoxanthin. These results show, for the first time, that numerous Hawaiian algae exhibit significant antioxidant activity, a property that could lead to their application in one of many useful healthcare or related products as well as in chemoprevention of a variety of diseases including cancer.

  7. Ion and metabolite transport in the chloroplast of algae: lessons from land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Justine; Heydarizadeh, Parisa; Schoefs, Benoît; Spetea, Cornelia

    2018-03-14

    Chloroplasts are endosymbiotic organelles and play crucial roles in energy supply and metabolism of eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms (algae and land plants). They harbor channels and transporters in the envelope and thylakoid membranes, mediating the exchange of ions and metabolites with the cytosol and the chloroplast stroma and between the different chloroplast subcompartments. In secondarily evolved algae, three or four envelope membranes surround the chloroplast, making more complex the exchange of ions and metabolites. Despite the importance of transport proteins for the optimal functioning of the chloroplast in algae, and that many land plant homologues have been predicted, experimental evidence and molecular characterization are missing in most cases. Here, we provide an overview of the current knowledge about ion and metabolite transport in the chloroplast from algae. The main aspects reviewed are localization and activity of the transport proteins from algae and/or of homologues from other organisms including land plants. Most chloroplast transporters were identified in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, reside in the envelope and participate in carbon acquisition and metabolism. Only a few identified algal transporters are located in the thylakoid membrane and play role in ion transport. The presence of genes for putative transporters in green algae, red algae, diatoms, glaucophytes and cryptophytes is discussed, and roles in the chloroplast are suggested. A deep knowledge in this field is required because algae represent a potential source of biomass and valuable metabolites for industry, medicine and agriculture.

  8. Antihyperglycemic effect of crude extracts of some Egyptian plants and algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbouZid, Sameh Fekry; Ahmed, Osama Mohamed; Ahmed, Rasha Rashad; Mahmoud, Ayman; Abdella, Ehab; Ashour, Mohamed Badr

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major global health problem. Various plant extracts have proven antidiabetic activity and are considered as promising substitution for antidiabetic drugs. The antihyperglycemic effect of 16 plants and 4 algae, commonly used in Egypt for the treatment of diabetes mellitus, was investigated. A diabetes model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of nicotinamide (120 mg/kg body weight [b.wt.]), then streptozotocin (200 mg/kg b.wt.) after 15 min. Hydroethanolic extracts (80%) of the plants and algae under investigation were prepared. The extracts were orally administered to nicotinamide-streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice by a gastric tube at doses 10 or 50 mg/kg b.wt. for 1 week. The antidiabetic activity was assessed by detection of serum glucose concentrations at the fasting state and after 2 h of oral glucose loading (4.2 mg/kg b.wt.). Extracts prepared from Cassia acutifolia, Fraxinus ornus, Salix aegyptiaca, Cichorium intybus, and Eucalyptus globulus showed the highest antihyperglycemic activity among the tested plants. Extracts prepared from Sonchus oleraceus, Bougainvillea spectabilis (leaves), Plantago psyllium (seeds), Morus nigra (leaves), and Serena repens (fruits) were found to have antihyperglycemic potentials. Extracts prepared from Caulerpa lentillifera and Spirulina versicolor showed the most potent antihyperglycemic activity among the tested algae. However, some of the tested plants have insulinotropic effects, all assessed algae have not. Identification of lead compounds from these plants and algae for novel antidiabetic drug development is recommended.

  9. Preliminary Study of Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Activities of Algae from South Sulawesi Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Zainuddin, Elmi Nurhaidah

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will cover recent progress from our laboratory into South Sulawesi marine algae and their microbial symbionts, as a source of cytotoxic and antimicrobial compounds. Preliminary data on the activities of algae extracts against human, aquaculture organism and plant pathogens will be presented along with the identification and characterization of microbial symbionts and pathogens.

  10. Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Bachy, Charles; Sudek, Sebastian; Wong, Chee-Hong; Jiménez, Valeria; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Ngan, Chew Yee; Reistetter, Emily N; van Baren, Marijke J; Price, Dana C; Wei, Chia-Lin; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Lagarias, J Clark; Worden, Alexandra Z

    2014-11-04

    Phytochrome photosensors control a vast gene network in streptophyte plants, acting as master regulators of diverse growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle. In contrast with their absence in known chlorophyte algal genomes and most sequenced prasinophyte algal genomes, a phytochrome is found in Micromonas pusilla, a widely distributed marine picoprasinophyte (plants. These analyses reveal a monophyletic clade containing streptophyte, prasinophyte, cryptophyte, and glaucophyte phytochromes implying an origin in the eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. Transcriptomic measurements reveal diurnal regulation of phytochrome and bilin chromophore biosynthetic genes in Micromonas. Expression of these genes precedes both light-mediated phytochrome redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased expression of photosynthesis-associated genes. Prasinophyte phytochromes perceive wavelengths of light transmitted farther through seawater than the red/far-red light sensed by land plant phytochromes. Prasinophyte phytochromes also retain light-regulated histidine kinase activity lost in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Our studies demonstrate that light-mediated nuclear translocation of phytochrome predates the emergence of land plants and likely represents a widespread signaling mechanism in unicellular algae.

  11. Evolution and diversity of plant cell walls: from algae to flowering plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popper, Zoë A; Michel, Gurvan; Hervé, Cécile; Domozych, David S; Willats, William G T; Tuohy, Maria G; Kloareg, Bernard; Stengel, Dagmar B

    2011-01-01

    All photosynthetic multicellular Eukaryotes, including land plants and algae, have cells that are surrounded by a dynamic, complex, carbohydrate-rich cell wall. The cell wall exerts considerable biological and biomechanical control over individual cells and organisms, thus playing a key role in their environmental interactions. This has resulted in compositional variation that is dependent on developmental stage, cell type, and season. Further variation is evident that has a phylogenetic basis. Plants and algae have a complex phylogenetic history, including acquisition of genes responsible for carbohydrate synthesis and modification through a series of primary (leading to red algae, green algae, and land plants) and secondary (generating brown algae, diatoms, and dinoflagellates) endosymbiotic events. Therefore, organisms that have the shared features of photosynthesis and possession of a cell wall do not form a monophyletic group. Yet they contain some common wall components that can be explained increasingly by genetic and biochemical evidence.

  12. Algae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raven, John A.; Giordano, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 13 (2014), s. 590-595 ISSN 0960-9822 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : algae * life cycle * evolution Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.571, year: 2014

  13. Antioxidant Activity of Hawaiian Marine Algae

    OpenAIRE

    Kelman, Dovi; Posner, Ellen Kromkowski; McDermid, Karla J.; Tabandera, Nicole K.; Wright, Patrick R.; Wright, Anthony D.

    2012-01-01

    Marine algae are known to contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, many of which have commercial applications in pharmaceutical, medical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food and agricultural industries. Natural antioxidants, found in many algae, are important bioactive compounds that play an important role against various diseases and ageing processes through protection of cells from oxidative damage. In this respect, relatively little is known about the bioactivity of Hawaiian algae that cou...

  14. Antimicrobial Activity of Extracts from Six Green Algae from Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Mtolera, M.S.P.; Semesi, A.

    1996-01-01

    Many algae species have been shown to have bactericidal or bacteriostatic substances (Glombitza, I979;Michaneck, 1979; Caccamese et al., 1980; Fenical & Paul, 1984; Niang& Hung, 1984). The antibacterialagents found in the algae include amino acids, terpenoids, phlorotannins, acrylic acid, phenoliccompounds, steroids, halogenated ketones and alkanes, cyclic polysulphides and fatty acids. In a large numberof marine algae antimicrobial activities are attributed to the presence of acrylic acid.

  15. Evaluation of the activated carbon prepared from the algae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of the activated carbon prepared from the algae Gracilaria for the biosorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... This study shows the benefit of using activated carbon from marine red algae as a low cost sorbent for the removal of copper from aqueous solution wastewater.

  16. Metabolic engineering of higher plants and algae for isoprenoid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempinski, Chase; Jiang, Zuodong; Bell, Stephen; Chappell, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a class of compounds derived from the five carbon precursors, dimethylallyl diphosphate, and isopentenyl diphosphate. These molecules present incredible natural chemical diversity, which can be valuable for humans in many aspects such as cosmetics, agriculture, and medicine. However, many terpenoids are only produced in small quantities by their natural hosts and can be difficult to generate synthetically. Therefore, much interest and effort has been directed toward capturing the genetic blueprint for their biochemistry and engineering it into alternative hosts such as plants and algae. These autotrophic organisms are attractive when compared to traditional microbial platforms because of their ability to utilize atmospheric CO2 as a carbon substrate instead of supplied carbon sources like glucose. This chapter will summarize important techniques and strategies for engineering the accumulation of isoprenoid metabolites into higher plants and algae by choosing the correct host, avoiding endogenous regulatory mechanisms, and optimizing potential flux into the target compound. Future endeavors will build on these efforts by fine-tuning product accumulation levels via the vast amount of available "-omic" data and devising metabolic engineering schemes that integrate this into a whole-organism approach. With the development of high-throughput transformation protocols and synthetic biology molecular tools, we have only begun to harness the power and utility of plant and algae metabolic engineering.

  17. Recent Advances in Marine Algae Polysaccharides: Isolation, Structure, and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shu-Ying; Huang, Xuesong; Cheong, Kit-Leong

    2017-12-13

    Marine algae have attracted a great deal of interest as excellent sources of nutrients. Polysaccharides are the main components in marine algae, hence a great deal of attention has been directed at isolation and characterization of marine algae polysaccharides because of their numerous health benefits. In this review, extraction and purification approaches and chemico-physical properties of marine algae polysaccharides (MAPs) are summarized. The biological activities, which include immunomodulatory, antitumor, antiviral, antioxidant, and hypolipidemic, are also discussed. Additionally, structure-function relationships are analyzed and summarized. MAPs' biological activities are closely correlated with their monosaccharide composition, molecular weights, linkage types, and chain conformation. In order to promote further exploitation and utilization of polysaccharides from marine algae for functional food and pharmaceutical areas, high efficiency, and low-cost polysaccharide extraction and purification methods, quality control, structure-function activity relationships, and specific mechanisms of MAPs activation need to be extensively investigated.

  18. Ecotoxicological effects of carbon nanomaterials on algae, fungi and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiuk, Elena V; Ochoa-Olmos, Omar E; De la Mora-Estrada, León F

    2011-04-01

    The ecotoxicological effects of carbon nanomateriales (CNMs), namely fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, on algae, fungi and plants are analyzed. In different toxicity tests, both direct and indirect effects were found. The direct effects are determined by nanomaterial chemical composition and surface reactivity, which might catalyze redox reactions in contact with organic molecules and affect respiratory processes. Some indirect effects of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) are physical restraints or release of toxic ions. Accumulation of CNPs in photosynthetic organs provokes obstruction in stomata, foliar heating and alteration in physiological processes. The phytotoxicity studies of CNMs should be focused on determining phytotoxicity mechanisms, size distribution of CNPs in solution, uptake and translocation of nanoparticles by plants, on characterization of their physical and chemical properties in rhizosphere and on root surfaces. More studies on plants and algae, as a part of food chain, are needed to understand profoundly the toxicity and health risks of CNMs as ecotoxicological stressors. Correct and detailed physical and chemical characterization of CNMs is very important to establish the exposure conditions matching the realistic ones. Ecotoxicity experiments should include examinations of both short and long-term effects. One must take into account that real carbon nanomaterials are complex mixtures of carbon forms and metal residues of variable chemistry and particle size, and the toxicity reported may reflect these byproducts/residues/impurities rather than the primary material structure. One more recommendation is not only to focus on the inherent toxicity of nanoparticles, but also consider their possible interactions with existing environmental contaminants.

  19. The cellulose synthase superfamily in fully sequenced plants and algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Ying

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cellulose synthase superfamily has been classified into nine cellulose synthase-like (Csl families and one cellulose synthase (CesA family. The Csl families have been proposed to be involved in the synthesis of the backbones of hemicelluloses of plant cell walls. With 17 plant and algal genomes fully sequenced, we sought to conduct a genome-wide and systematic investigation of this superfamily through in-depth phylogenetic analyses. Results A single-copy gene is found in the six chlorophyte green algae, which is most closely related to the CslA and CslC families that are present in the seven land plants investigated in our analyses. Six proteins from poplar, grape and sorghum form a distinct family (CslJ, providing further support for the conclusions from two recent studies. CslB/E/G/H/J families have evolved significantly more rapidly than their widely distributed relatives, and tend to have intragenomic duplications, in particular in the grape genome. Conclusion Our data suggest that the CslA and CslC families originated through an ancient gene duplication event in land plants. We speculate that the single-copy Csl gene in green algae may encode a mannan synthase. We confirm that the rest of the Csl families have a different evolutionary origin than CslA and CslC, and have proposed a model for the divergence order among them. Our study provides new insights about the evolution of this important gene family in plants.

  20. Brown algae as a model for plant organogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaert, Kenny A; Arun, Alok; Coelho, Susana M; De Clerck, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Brown algae are an extremely interesting, but surprisingly poorly explored, group of organisms. They are one of only five eukaryotic lineages to have independently evolved complex multicellularity, which they express through a wide variety of morphologies ranging from uniseriate branched filaments to complex parenchymatous thalli with multiple cell types. Despite their very distinct evolutionary history, brown algae and land plants share a striking amount of developmental features. This has led to an interest in several aspects of brown algal development, including embryogenesis, polarity, cell cycle, asymmetric cell division and a putative role for plant hormone signalling. This review describes how investigations using brown algal models have helped to increase our understanding of the processes controlling early embryo development, in particular polarization, axis formation and asymmetric cell division. Additionally, the diversity of life cycles in the brown lineage and the emergence of Ectocarpus as a powerful model organism, are affording interesting insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying haploid-diploid life cycles. The use of these and other emerging brown algal models will undoubtedly add to our knowledge on the mechanisms that regulate development in multicellular photosynthetic organisms.

  1. Anti-phytopathogenic activities of macro-algae extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Edra; Dorta, Fernando; Medina, Cristian; Ramírez, Alberto; Ramírez, Ingrid; Peña-Cortés, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Aqueous and ethanolic extracts obtained from nine Chilean marine macro-algae collected at different seasons were examined in vitro and in vivo for properties that reduce the growth of plant pathogens or decrease the injury severity of plant foliar tissues following pathogen infection. Particular crude aqueous or organic extracts showed effects on the growth of pathogenic bacteria whereas others displayed important effects against pathogenic fungi or viruses, either by inhibiting fungal mycelia growth or by reducing the disease symptoms in leaves caused by pathogen challenge. Organic extracts obtained from the brown-alga Lessonia trabeculata inhibited bacterial growth and reduced both the number and size of the necrotic lesion in tomato leaves following infection with Botrytis cinerea. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the red-alga Gracillaria chilensis prevent the growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi, showing a response which depends on doses and collecting-time. Similarly, aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the brown-alga Durvillaea antarctica were able to diminish the damage caused by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in tobacco leaves, and the aqueous procedure is, in addition, more effective and seasonally independent. These results suggest that macro-algae contain compounds with different chemical properties which could be considered for controlling specific plant pathogens.

  2. Anti-Phytopathogenic Activities of Macro-Algae Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Ramírez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous and ethanolic extracts obtained from nine Chilean marine macro-algae collected at different seasons were examined in vitro and in vivo for properties that reduce the growth of plant pathogens or decrease the injury severity of plant foliar tissues following pathogen infection. Particular crude aqueous or organic extracts showed effects on the growth of pathogenic bacteria whereas others displayed important effects against pathogenic fungi or viruses, either by inhibiting fungal mycelia growth or by reducing the disease symptoms in leaves caused by pathogen challenge. Organic extracts obtained from the brown-alga Lessonia trabeculata inhibited bacterial growth and reduced both the number and size of the necrotic lesion in tomato leaves following infection with Botrytis cinerea. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the red-alga Gracillaria chilensis prevent the growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi, showing a response which depends on doses and collecting-time. Similarly, aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the brown-alga Durvillaea antarctica were able to diminish the damage caused by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV in tobacco leaves, and the aqueous procedure is, in addition, more effective and seasonally independent. These results suggest that macro-algae contain compounds with different chemical properties which could be considered for controlling specific plant pathogens.

  3. The Occurrence of Hormesis in Plants and Algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cedergreen, Nina; Streibig, Jens C; Kudsk, Per

    2007-01-01

    This paper evaluated the frequency, magnitude and dose/concentration range of hormesis in four species: The aquatic plant Lemna minor, the micro-alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and the two terrestrial plants Tripleurospermum inodorum and Stellaria media exposed to nine herbicides and one...... compared to relative growth rates. Evaluating hormesis for relative growth rates for all species showed that 25% to 76% of the curves for each species had treatments above 105% of the control. Fitting the data with a dose-response model including a parameter for hormesis showed that the average growth...... increase ranged from 9±1% to 16±16% of the control growth rate, while if measured on a dry weight basis the response increase was 38±13% and 43±23% for the two terrestrial species. Hormesis was found in >70% of the curves with the herbicides glyphosate and metsulfuron-methyl, and in >50% of the curves...

  4. The ice nucleation activity of extremophilic algae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvíderová, Jana; Hájek, J.; Worland, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2013), s. 137-148 ISSN 0143-2044 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB601630808; GA AV ČR KJB600050708 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Ice nucleation * snow algae * lichen photobionts Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.640, year: 2013

  5. A screening method for cardiovascular active compounds in marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agatonovic-Kustrin, S; Kustrin, E; Angove, M J; Morton, D W

    2018-05-18

    The interaction of bioactive compounds from ethanolic extracts of selected marine algae samples, separated on chromatographic plates, with nitric/nitrous acid was investigated. The nature of bioactive compounds in the marine algae extracts was characterised using UV absorption spectra before and after reaction with diluted nitric acid, and from the characteristic colour reaction after derivatization with anisaldehyde. It was found that diterpenes from Dictyota dichotoma, an edible brown algae, and sterols from green algae Caulerpa brachypus, bind nitric oxide and may act as a nitric oxide carrier. Although the carotenoid fucoxanthin, found in all brown marine algae also binds nitric oxide, the bonds between nitrogen and the fucoxanthin molecule are much stronger. Further studies are required to evaluate the effects of diterpenes from Dictyota dichotoma and sterols from green algae Caulerpa brachypus to see if they have beneficial cardiovascular effects. The method reported here should prove useful in screening large numbers of algae species for compounds with cardiovascular activity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Triacylglycerol Accumulation in Photosynthetic Cells in Plants and Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhi-Yan; Benning, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Plant and algal oils are some of the most energy-dense renewable compounds provided by nature. Triacylglycerols (TAGs) are the major constituent of plant oils, which can be converted into fatty acid methyl esters commonly known as biodiesel. As one of the most efficient producers of TAGs, photosynthetic microalgae have attracted substantial interest for renewable fuel production. Currently, the big challenge of microalgae based TAGs for biofuels is their high cost compared to fossil fuels. A conundrum is that microalgae accumulate large amounts of TAGs only during stress conditions such as nutrient deprivation and temperature stress, which inevitably will inhibit growth. Thus, a better understanding of why and how microalgae induce TAG biosynthesis under stress conditions would allow the development of engineered microalgae with increased TAG production during conditions optimal for growth. Land plants also synthesize TAGs during stresses and we will compare new findings on environmental stress-induced TAG accumulation in plants and microalgae especially in the well-characterized model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and a biotechnologically relevant genus Nannochloropsis.

  7. Overcoming Microalgae Harvesting Barrier by Activated Algae Granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiron, Olga; Bumbac, Costel; Manea, Elena; Stefanescu, Mihai; Nita Lazar, Mihai

    2017-07-05

    The economic factor of the microalgae harvesting step acts as a barrier to scaling up microalgae-based technology designed for wastewater treatment. In view of that, this study presents an alternative microalgae-bacteria system, which is proposed for eliminating the economic obstacle. Instead of the microalgae-bacteria (activated algae) flocs, the study aimed to develop activated algae granules comprising the microalgae Chlorella sp. as a target species. The presence of the filamentous microalgae (Phormidium sp.) was necessary for the occurrence of the granulation processes. A progressive decrease in frequency of the free Chlorella sp. cells was achieved once with the development of the activated algae granules as a result of the target microalgae being captured in the dense and tangled network of filaments. The mature activated algae granules ranged between 600 and 2,000 µm, and were characterized by a compact structure and significant settling ability (21.6 ± 0.9 m/h). In relation to the main aim of this study, a microalgae recovery efficiency of higher than 99% was achieved only by fast sedimentation of the granules; this performance highlighted the viability of the granular activated algae system for sustaining a microalgae harvesting procedure with neither cost nor energy inputs.

  8. Anti-Phytopathogenic Activities of Macro-Algae Extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez, Edra; Dorta, Fernando; Medina, Cristian; Ramírez, Alberto; Ramírez, Ingrid; Peña-Cortés, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Aqueous and ethanolic extracts obtained from nine Chilean marine macro-algae collected at different seasons were examined in vitro and in vivo for properties that reduce the growth of plant pathogens or decrease the injury severity of plant foliar tissues following pathogen infection. Particular crude aqueous or organic extracts showed effects on the growth of pathogenic bacteria whereas others displayed important effects against pathogenic fungi or viruses, either by inhibiting fungal myceli...

  9. Green Algae and the Origins of Multicellularity in the Plant Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umen, James G.

    2014-01-01

    The green lineage of chlorophyte algae and streptophytes form a large and diverse clade with multiple independent transitions to produce multicellular and/or macroscopically complex organization. In this review, I focus on two of the best-studied multicellular groups of green algae: charophytes and volvocines. Charophyte algae are the closest relatives of land plants and encompass the transition from unicellularity to simple multicellularity. Many of the innovations present in land plants have their roots in the cell and developmental biology of charophyte algae. Volvocine algae evolved an independent route to multicellularity that is captured by a graded series of increasing cell-type specialization and developmental complexity. The study of volvocine algae has provided unprecedented insights into the innovations required to achieve multicellularity. PMID:25324214

  10. Detection and activity of iodine-131 in brown algae collected in the Japanese coastal areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Takami; Niwa, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Ken; Kasai, Hiromi; Yamada, Haruya; Nishiutch, Kou; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Godo, Waichiro; Taino, Seiya; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Takeno, Koji; Nishigaki, Tomokazu; Fujiwara, Kunihiro; Aratake, Hisamichi; Kamonoshita, Shingo; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Takuya; Otosaka, Sigeyoshi; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2010-07-15

    Iodine-131 (physical half-life: 8.04 days) was detected in brown algae collected off the Japanese coast. Brown algae have been extensively used as bioindicators for radioiodine because of their ability to accumulate radionuclides in high concentration factors. The maximum measured specific activity of (131)I in brown algae was 0.37 + or - 0.010 Bq/kg-wet. Cesium-137 was also detected in all brown algal samples used in this study. There was no correlation between specific activities of (131)I and (137)Cs in these seaweeds. The specific activity of (137)Cs ranged from 0.0034 + or - 0.00075 to 0.090 + or - 0.014 Bq/kg-wet. Low specific activity and minimal variability of (137)Cs in brown algae indicated that past nuclear weapon tests were the source of (137)Cs. Although nuclear power stations and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants are known to be pollution sources of (131)I, there was no relationship between the sites where (131)I was detected and the locations of nuclear power facilities. Most of the sites where (131)I was detected were near big cities with large populations. Iodine-131 is frequently used in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. On the basis of the results, we suggest that the likely pollution source of (131)I, detected in brown seaweeds, is not nuclear power facilities, but nuclear medicine procedures. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Detection and activity of iodine-131 in brown algae collected in the Japanese coastal areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Takami, E-mail: takam@affrc.go.jp [Fisheries Research Agency, 15F Queen' s Tower B, Minato Mirai Nishi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 220-6115 (Japan); Niwa, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Ken; Kasai, Hiromi; Yamada, Haruya; Nishiutch, Kou [Fisheries Research Agency, 15F Queen' s Tower B, Minato Mirai Nishi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 220-6115 (Japan); Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Godo, Waichiro [Ushimado Marine Laboratory, Okayama University, 130-17, Kashino 130-17, Ushimado, Setouchi, Okayama 701-43 (Japan); Taino, Seiya; Hayashi, Yoshihiro [Kochi Prefectural Fisheries Experimental Station, Uranoutchhaigata 1153-23, Susaki, Kouch, 785-0167 Japan (Japan); Takeno, Koji; Nishigaki, Tomokazu; Fujiwara, Kunihiro [Kyoto Prefectural Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Technology Research Center, Odashukuno, Miyazu, Kyoto, 626-0052 Japan (Japan); Aratake, Hisamichi [Miyazaki Prefectural Fisheries Experimental Station, Aoshima 6-16-3, Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-2162 Japan (Japan); Kamonoshita, Shingo [Ibaragi Prefectural Fisheries Experimental Station, Mitsuzuka3551-8, Hiraiso, Hitachnaka, Ibaragi, 311-1203 Japan (Japan); Hashimoto, Hiroshi [Fukui Prefectural Fisheries Experimental Station, Urasoko 23-1, Tsuruga, Fukui, 914-0843 Japan (Japan); Kobayashi, Takuya; Otosaka, Sigeyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai, Ibaraki, 319-1195 Japan (Japan); Imanaka, Tetsuji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Osaka, 590-0494 Japan (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    Iodine-131 (physical half-life: 8.04 days) was detected in brown algae collected off the Japanese coast. Brown algae have been extensively used as bioindicators for radioiodine because of their ability to accumulate radionuclides in high concentration factors. The maximum measured specific activity of {sup 131}I in brown algae was 0.37 {+-} 0.010 Bq/kg-wet. Cesium-137 was also detected in all brown algal samples used in this study. There was no correlation between specific activities of {sup 131}I and {sup 137}Cs in these seaweeds. The specific activity of {sup 137}Cs ranged from 0.0034 {+-} 0.00075 to 0.090 {+-} 0.014 Bq/kg-wet. Low specific activity and minimal variability of {sup 137}Cs in brown algae indicated that past nuclear weapon tests were the source of {sup 137}Cs. Although nuclear power stations and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants are known to be pollution sources of {sup 131}I, there was no relationship between the sites where {sup 131}I was detected and the locations of nuclear power facilities. Most of the sites where {sup 131}I was detected were near big cities with large populations. Iodine-131 is frequently used in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. On the basis of the results, we suggest that the likely pollution source of {sup 131}I, detected in brown seaweeds, is not nuclear power facilities, but nuclear medicine procedures.

  12. Evidence for land plant cell wall biosynthetic mechanisms in charophyte green algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Harholt, Jesper; Ulvskov, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The charophyte green algae (CGA) are thought to be the closest living relatives to the land plants, and ancestral CGA were unique in giving rise to the land plant lineage. The cell wall has been suggested to be a defining structure that enabled the green algal ancestor......-cellulosic polysaccharides, such as xyloglucan, embedded in a matrix of pectic polysaccharides. How the land plant cell wall evolved is currently unknown: early-divergent chlorophyte and prasinophyte algae genomes contain a low number of glycosyl transferases (GTs), while land plants contain hundreds. The number of GTs...

  13. Use of prolines for improving growth and other properties of plants and algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Knight, Thomas J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.

    2003-07-15

    Increasing the concentration of prolines, such as 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline, in the foliar portions of plants has been shown to cause an increase in carbon dioxide fixation, growth rate, dry weight, nutritional value (amino acids), nodulation and nitrogen fixation, photosynthetically derived chemical energy, and resistance to insect pests over the same properties for wild type plants. This can be accomplished in four ways: (1) the application of a solution of the proline directly to the foliar portions of the plant by spraying these portions; (2) applying a solution of the proline to the plant roots; (3) genetically engineering the plant and screening to produce lines that over-express glutamine synthetase in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of the metabolite, 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (this proline is also known as 2-oxoglutaramate); and (4) impairing the glutamine synthetase activity in the plant roots which causes increased glutamine synthetase activity in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline. Prolines have also been found to induce similar effects in algae.

  14. Use of prolines for improving growth and other properties of plants and algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, Pat J. (Los Alamos, NM); Knight, Thomas J. (Portland, ME); Martinez, Rodolfo A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2004-12-14

    Increasing the concentration of prolines, such as 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline, in the foliar portions of plants has been shown to cause an increase in carbon dioxide fixation, growth rate, dry weight, nutritional value (amino acids), nodulation and nitrogen fixation, photosynthetically derived chemical energy, and resistance to insect pests over the same properties for wild type plants. This can be accomplished in four ways: (1) the application of a solution of the proline directly to the foliar portions of the plant by spraying these portions; (2) applying a solution of the proline to the plant roots; (3) genetically engineering the plant and screening to produce lines that over-express glutamine synthetase in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of the metabolite, 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (this proline is also known as 2-oxoglutaramate); and (4) impairing the glutamine synthetase activity in the plant roots which causes increased glutamine synthetase activity in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline. Prolines have also been found to induce similar effects in algae.

  15. Use of prolines for improving growth and other properties of plants and algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, Pat J. (Los Alamos, NM); Knight, Thomas J. (Portland, ME); Martinez, Rodolfo A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2003-04-29

    Increasing the concentration of prolines such as 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline, in the foliar portions of plants has been shown to cause an increase in carbon dioxide fixation, growth rate, dry weight, nutritional value (amino acids), nodulation and nitrogen fixation, photosynthetically derived chemical energy, and resistance to insect pests over the same properties for wild type plants. This can be accomplished in four ways: (1) the application of a solution of the proline directly to the foliar portions of the plant by spraying these portions; (2) applying a solution of the proline to the plant roots; (3) genetically engineering the plant and screening to produce lines that overexpress glutamine synthetase in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of the metabolite, 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (this proline is also known as 2-oxoglutaramnate); and (4) impairing the glutamine synthetase activity in the plant roots which causes increased glutamine synthetase activity in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline. Prolines have also been found to induce similar effects in algae.

  16. Method and apparatus using an active ionic liquid for algae biofuel harvest and extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Roberto Di; Reich, Alton; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Teixeira, Rodrigo

    2012-11-06

    The invention relates to use of an active ionic liquid to dissolve algae cell walls. The ionic liquid is used to, in an energy efficient manner, dissolve and/or lyse an algae cell walls, which releases algae constituents used in the creation of energy, fuel, and/or cosmetic components. The ionic liquids include ionic salts having multiple charge centers, low, very low, and ultra low melting point ionic liquids, and combinations of ionic liquids. An algae treatment system is described, which processes wet algae in a lysing reactor, separates out algae constituent products, and optionally recovers the ionic liquid in an energy efficient manner.

  17. soil algae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timothy Ademakinwa

    Also, the importance of algae in soil formation and soil fertility improvement cannot be over emphasized as the world is working ... farms further establishes the role of blue green algae in soil nutrients for plant growth. Key words- Soil Fertility, Soil ... with sunlight will promote the growth of soil algae and their contribution to ...

  18. Nitrogen and sulfur assimilation in plants and algae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giordano, Mario; Raven, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 2 (2014), s. 45-61 ISSN 0304-3770 Grant - others:University of Dundee(GB) SC 015096; Italian Ministry for Agriculture(IT) MIPAF, Bioforme project; Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs(IT) MAE. Joint Italian-Israel Cooperation Program Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : nitrogen * sulfur * assimilation * algae Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.608, year: 2014

  19. Structural characteristics and biological activity of Fucoidans from the brown algae Alaria sp. and Saccharina japonica of different reproductive status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishchuk, Olesya S; Tarbeeva, Dariya V; Ermakova, Svetlana P; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N

    2012-04-01

    Structural characteristics and the antitumor activity of fucoidans isolated from vegetative and reproductive tissue of the brown algae Alaria sp. and Saccharina japonica were studied. The reproductive status of the brown algae affected the yield of fucoidans and their structural characteristics. The fucoidan yield was 5.7% (w/w on the basis of the dried algae weight) for fertile and 3.8% for sterile Alaria sp. and 1.42 and 0.71% for fertile and sterile S. japonica, respectively. The fucoidans from fertile Alaria sp. and S. japonica had a slightly higher degree of sulfation and a somewhat more homogeneous monosaccharide composition, with predominate amounts of fucose and galactose, than those isolated from sterile algae tissue. The fucoidans from both the sterile and fertile brown algae tissue tested possessed selective cytotoxicity towards human breast cancer (T-47D) and melanoma (RPMI-7951) cell lines, but not to normal mouse epidermal cells (JB6 Cl41), and effectively inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of the breast cancer and melanoma cell lines. The fucoidans from reproductive tissue of brown algae possessed higher antitumor activity than those from vegetative plants. Copyright © 2012 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  20. Extracts of marine algae show inhibitory activity against osteoclast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells that play a crucial role in bone resorption. The imbalance between bone resorption and bone formation results in osteoporosis. Therefore, substances that can suppress osteoclast formation are potential candidate materials for drug development or functional foods. There have been reports that extracts or purified compounds from marine micro- and macroalgae can suppress osteoclast differentiation. Symbioimine, isolated from the cultured dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp., had suppressive effects against osteoclast differentiation in osteoclast-like cells. Norzoanthamine, isolated from the colonial zoanthid Zoanthas sp., has been shown to have antiosteoporosis activity in ovariectomized mice. With regard to marine extracts, the fucoxanthin-rich component from brown algae has been shown to have suppressive effects against osteoclast differentiation. An extract of Sargassum fusiforme has recently been shown to have antiosteoporosis activity. This extract suppressed both osteoclast differentiation and accelerated osteoblast formation in separate in vitro experiments. It also showed antiosteoporosis activity in ovariectomized mice by regulating the balance between bone resorption and bone formation. These marine algae and their extracts may be sources of marine medicinal foods for the prevention of osteoporosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Physiological aspects of the production and conversion of DMSP in marine algae and higher plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stefels, J

    Dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) is a compound produced in several classes of algae and higher plants that live in the marine environment. Considering its generally high intracellular concentrations, DMSP has a function in the osmotic protection of algal cells. Due to the relatively slow

  2. Alpha-amylase inhibitory activity and sterol composition of the marine algae, Sargassum glaucescens

    OpenAIRE

    Nasrin Payghami; Shahla Jamili; Abdolhossein Rustaiyan; Soodabeh Saeidnia; Marjan Nikan; Ahmad Reza Gohari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sargassum species (phaeophyceae) are economically important brown algae in southern parts of Iran. Sargassum is mainly harvested as a row material in alginate production industries and is a source of plant foods or plant bio-stimulants even a component of animal foods. Objective: In this study, Sargassum glaucescens, collected from the seashore of Chabahar, was employed for phytochemical and biological evaluations. Materials and Methods: For that purpose, the dried algae was extra...

  3. Antibacterial activity of extracts of marine algae from the Red Sea of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibacterial activity of extracts of marine algae from the Red Sea of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... The antibacterial activities of petroleum ether, diethyl ether, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of marine algae belonging to the Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta and Rhodophyta were studied.

  4. The Evolution of Cell Division: From Streptophyte Algae to Land Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Henrik; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-10-01

    The mechanism of cell division has undergone significant alterations during the evolution from aquatic streptophyte algae to land plants. Two new structures evolved, the cytokinetic phragmoplast and the preprophase band (PPB) of microtubules, whereas the ancestral mechanism of cleavage and the centrosomes disappeared. We map cell biological data onto the recently emerged phylogenetic tree of streptophytes. The tree suggests that, after the establishment of the phragmoplast mechanism, several groups independently lost their centrosomes. Surprisingly, the phragmoplast shows reductions in the Zygnematophyceae (the sister to land plants), many of which returned to cleavage. The PPB by contrast evolved stepwise and, most likely, originated in the algae. The phragmoplast/PPB mechanism established in this way served as a basis for the 3D development of land plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Heterotrimeric G proteins in green algae: an early innovation in the evolution of the plant lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins, hereafter) are important signaling components in all eukaryotes. The absence of these proteins in the sequenced genomes of Chlorophyaceaen green algae has raised questions about their evolutionary origin and prevalence in the plant lineage. The existence of G-proteins has often been correlated with the acquisition of embryophytic life-cycle and/or terrestrial habitats of plants which occurred around 450 million years ago. Our discovery of functional G-proteins in Chara braunii, a representative of the Charophycean green algae, establishes the existence of this conserved signaling pathway in the most basal plants and dates it even further back to 1-1.5 billion years ago. We have now identified the sequence homologs of G-proteins in additional algal families and propose that green algae represent a model system for one of the most basal forms of G-protein signaling known to exist to date. Given the possible differences that exist between plant and metazoan G-protein signaling mechanisms, such basal organisms will serve as important resources to trace the evolutionary origin of proposed mechanistic differences between the systems as well as their plant-specific functions.

  6. The super-excess energy dissipation in diatom algae: comparative analysis with higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruban, Alexander; Lavaud, Johann; Rousseau, Bernard; Guglielmi, Gerard; Horton, Peter; Etienne, Anne-Lise

    2004-01-01

    When grown at intermittent light regime, diatom alga Phaeodactylum tricornutum is able to form photoprotective non-photochemical chlorophyll fluorescence quenching (NPQ) three to five times larger than that observed in the higher plants. This quenching is sustained in the dark for 5 to 10 min, reverses completely within approximately 1 h and seems to be very tightly related to the presence of the zeaxanthin analogue, diatoxanthin. Addition of the uncoupler NH4Cl before illumination can completely abolish formation of NPQ, revealing the DeltapH-dependency of the xanthophyll cycle activity. Once established, NPQ can also be almost completely reversed by the uncoupler. However, the higher NPQ is formed the more time is required for its reversal. At the point when the fluorescence was approximately 90% recovered the level of illumination-induced diatoxanthin was found to be only partially reduced. This indicates that the proton gradient is a key triggering factor of NPQ. It was also noticed that NPQ in Phaeodactylum cells was absent even when majority of reaction centers were closed and the plastoquinone pool was significantly reduced. The absence of NPQ at these conditions could be due to very low levels of DeltapH. It is likely that in diatoms alternative sources of protons such as the PS I cyclic electron transfer and/or chlororespiration are important in generating the proton gradient sufficient to trigger NPQ. Absorption changes associated with the xanthophyll cycle activity were found to be larger than those for higher plants. The position of the positive maximum in the difference spectrum illuminated-minus-dark was 512-514 nm in comparison to the 505-508 nm for leaves. The 535 nm band associated with NPQ in plants is absent in Phaeodactylum. An uncoupler-sensitive absorption change at 522 nm was discovered. Kinetics of NPQ showed linear correlation with the 522 nm absorption change.

  7. Chemical Synthesis of Oligosaccharides related to the Cell Walls of Plants and Algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnaert, Christine; Daugaard, Mathilde; Nami, Faranak

    2017-01-01

    Plant cell walls are composed of an intricate network of polysaccharides and proteins that varies during the developmental stages of the cell. This makes it very challenging to address the functions of individual wall components in cells, especially for highly complex glycans. Fortunately, struct......, and arabinogalactans, as well as glycans unique to algae. Representative synthetic routes within each class are discussed in detail and the progress in carbohydrate chemistry over recent decades is highlighted....

  8. Bioactivity of marine organisms. Part 3. Screening of marine algae of Indian coast for biological activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kamat, S.Y.; Wahidullah, S.; Naik, C.G.; DeSouza, L.; Jayasree, V.; Ambiye, V.; Bhakuni, D.S.; Goel, A.K.; Garg, H.S.; Srimal, R.C.

    Ethanolic extracts from Indian marine algae have been tested for anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-fertility, hypoglycaemic and a wide range of pharmacological activities. Of 34 species investigated 17 appeared biologically active. Six...

  9. Environmental behavior and ecotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles to algae, plants, and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Enrique; Baun, Anders; Behra, Renata; Hartmann, Nanna B; Filser, Juliane; Miao, Ai-Jun; Quigg, Antonietta; Santschi, Peter H; Sigg, Laura

    2008-07-01

    Developments in nanotechnology are leading to a rapid proliferation of new materials that are likely to become a source of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to the environment, where their possible ecotoxicological impacts remain unknown. The surface properties of ENPs are of essential importance for their aggregation behavior, and thus for their mobility in aquatic and terrestrial systems and for their interactions with algae, plants and, fungi. Interactions of ENPs with natural organic matter have to be considered as well, as those will alter the ENPs aggregation behavior in surface waters or in soils. Cells of plants, algae, and fungi possess cell walls that constitute a primary site for interaction and a barrier for the entrance of ENPs. Mechanisms allowing ENPs to pass through cell walls and membranes are as yet poorly understood. Inside cells, ENPs might directly provoke alterations of membranes and other cell structures and molecules, as well as protective mechanisms. Indirect effects of ENPs depend on their chemical and physical properties and may include physical restraints (clogging effects), solubilization of toxic ENP compounds, or production of reactive oxygen species. Many questions regarding the bioavailability of ENPs, their uptake by algae, plants, and fungi and the toxicity mechanisms remain to be elucidated.

  10. Is the tier-1 effect assessment for herbicides protective for aquatic algae and vascular plant communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijngaarden, René P A; Arts, Gertie H P

    2018-01-01

    In the aquatic tier-1 effect assessment for plant protection products with an herbicidal mode of action in Europe, it is usually algae and/or vascular plants that determine the environmental risks. This tier includes tests with at least 2 algae and 1 macrophyte (Lemna). Although such tests are considered to be of a chronic nature (based on the duration of the test in relation to the life cycle of the organism), the measurement endpoints derived from the laboratory tests with plants (including algae) and used in the first-tier effect assessment for herbicides are acute effect concentrations affecting 50% of the test organisms (EC50 values) and not no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) or effect concentrations affecting 10% of the test organisms (EC10) values. Other European legislative frameworks (e.g., the Water Framework Directive) use EC10 values. The present study contributes to a validation of the tiered herbicide risk assessment approach by comparing the standard first-tier effect assessment with results of microcosm and mesocosm studies. We evaluated EC50 and EC10 values for standard test algae and macrophytes based on either the growth rate endpoint (E r C50) or the lowest available endpoint for growth rate or biomass/yield (E r /E y C50). These values were compared with the regulatory acceptable concentrations for the threshold option as derived from microcosm and mesocosm studies. For these studies, protection is maintained if growth rate is taken as the regulatory endpoint instead of the lowest value of either growth rate or biomass/yield in conjunction with the standard assessment factor of 10. Based on a limited data set of 14 herbicides, we did not identify a need to change the current practice. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:175-183. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  11. Biosynthesis and biotransformation of lipids in plant cell cultures and algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangold, H.K.

    1986-01-01

    The biosynthesis and metabolism of lipids in plant cell cultures grown photoautotrophically, has been studied since 1970. The most prominently occuring lipids in cell cultures and whole plants are phospholipids, glycolipids, triglycerides and glycosides. Radioactively labelled lipids have been produced from soybean cell cultures incubated with 14 C-linoleic acid, and the fate of the phospholipid formed was investigated. Freshwater and marine algae cultured under different conditions of light, temperature and nutrient media have also been investigated for their lipid and fatty acid content. The exploitation of biotechnological processes for producing valuable lipids is encouraged. (U.K.)

  12. Cytotoxic activity of marine algae against cancerous cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Élica A. C. Guedes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation on the cytotoxic activity in human tumor cell from dichloromethane, chloroform, methanol, ethanol, water extracts, and hexane and chloroform fractions from green, brown and red algae collected at Riacho Doce Beach, north coast of Alagoas, Brazil, against the cancer cells K562 (chronic myelocytic leukemia, HEp-2 (laryngeal epidermoid carcinoma and NCI-H292 (human lung mucoepidermoid carcinoma through the MTT colorimetric method. The dichloromethane extract and chloroform fraction of Hypnea musciformis showed the best cytotoxic activity against K562 (3.8±0.2 µg.mL-1 and 6.4±0.4 µg.mL-1, respectively. Dichloromethane extracts of Dictyota dichotoma (16.3±0.3 µg.mL-1 and the chloroform fraction of H. musciformis (6.0±0.03 µg.mL-1 and chloroform fraction of P. gymnospora (8.2±0.4 were more active against HEp-2 as well as ethanol extracts of P. gymnospora (15.9±2.8 µg.mL-1 and chloroform fraction of H. musciformis (15.0±1.3 µg.mL-1 against the cell NCI-H292. The constituents with higher anticancer action are present in the extracts of dichloromethane and chloroform and in the chloroform fraction of H. musciformis, Digenea simplex, P. gymnospora, and D.dichotoma. In the case of the seaweed S. vulgare, the anticancer constituents are present in the aqueous extract.

  13. Plant architecture without multicellularity: quandaries over patterning and the soma-germline divide in siphonous algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriya eConeva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Multicellularity has independently evolved numerous times throughout the major lineages of life. Often, multicellularity can enable complex, macroscopic organismal architectures but it is not required for the elaboration of morphology. Several alternative cellular strategies have arisen as solutions permitting exquisite forms. The green algae class Ulvophyceae, for example, contains truly multicellular organisms, as well as macroscopic siphonous cells harboring one or multiple nuclei, and siphonocladous species, which are multinucleate and multicellular. These diverse cellular organizations raise a number of questions about the evolutionary and molecular mechanisms underlying complex organismal morphology in the green plants. Importantly, how does morphological patterning arise in giant coenocytes, and do nuclei, analogous to cells in multicellular organisms, take on distinct somatic and germline identities? Here, we comparatively explore examples of patterning and differentiation in diverse coenocytic and single-cell organisms and discuss possible mechanisms of development and nuclear differentiation in the siphonous algae.

  14. Conserved and Diversified Gene Families of Monovalent Cation/H+ Antiporters from Algae to Flowering Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salil eChanroj

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available All organisms have evolved strategies to regulate ion and pH homeostasis in response to developmental and environmental cues. One strategy is mediated by cation-proton antiporters (CPA. CPA1 genes found in bacteria, fungi, metazoa and plants have been functionally-characterized; though roles of plant CPA2 genes in KEA (K+-efflux antiporter and CHX (cation/H+ exchanger families are largely unknown. Phylogenetic analysis showed that three clades of the Na+-H+ exchanger (NHX family have been conserved from single-celled alga to Arabidopsis. These are i plasma membrane-bound SOS1/AtNHX7 that share ancestry with prokaryote NhaP, ii endosomal AtNHX5/6 that is part of the eukaryote Intracellular-NHE clade, and iii a vacuolar NHX clade (AtNHX1-4 specific to plants. Early diversification of KEA genes possibly from ancestral genes of a cyanobacterium is suggested for three K+-efflux antiporter clades (KEA/Kef seen in all plants. Intriguingly, the CHX gene family blossomed from a few members in early land plants to >40 genes in legumes. Homologs from spirogyra or moss share high similarity with guard cell-specific AtCHX20, suggesting that AtCHX20 and its relatives (AtCHX16-19 are founders of the family. Evolutionary analysis suggests pollen-expressed CHX genes appeared later in monocots and early eudicots. AtCHX proteins have been localized to intracellular and plasma membrane of plants, and shown to mediate K+ transport and pH homeostasis. Thus KEA genes are conserved from green algae to angiosperms, and their presence in red algae and secondary endosymbionts suggest a role in plastids. In contrast, AtNHX1-4 subtype evolved in ancestral plants to handle ion homeostasis of vacuoles in all cell types. The strong presence of CHX genes in land plants, but not in metazoa or fungi, would infer a role of ion and pH homeostasis at dynamic endomembranes to support vegetative and reproductive success of flowering plants.

  15. Zonarol, a sesquiterpene from the brown algae Dictyopteris undulata, provides neuroprotection by activating the Nrf2/ARE pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hiroya; Koyama, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Sohsuke; Lipton, Stuart A; Satoh, Takumi

    2015-02-20

    Seaweed-origin electrophilic compounds are proposed as a class of neuroprotective compounds that provide neuroprotection through activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Electrophilic hydroquinones are of particular interest due to their ability to become electrophilic quinones upon auto-oxidation. Although many marine plants produce a variety of electrophilic compounds, the detailed mechanism of action of these compounds remain unknown. Here, we focused on the neuroprotective effects of zonarol (ZO), a para-hydroquinone-type pro-electrophilic compound from the brown algae Dictyopteris undulata. We show that ZO activates the Nrf2/ARE pathway, induces phase-2 enzymes, and protects neuronal cells from oxidative stress. ZO is the first example of a neuroprotective pro-electrophilic compound obtained from brown algae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduction in toxicity of wastewater from three wastewater treatment plants to alga (Scenedesmus obliquus) in northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Sun, Qing; Zhou, Jiti; Masunaga, Shigeki; Ma, Fang

    2015-09-01

    The toxicity of municipal wastewater to the receiving water bodies is still unknown, due to the lack of regulated toxicity based index for wastewater discharge in China. Our study aims at gaining insight into the acute toxic effects of local municipal wastewater on alga, Scenedesmus obliquus. Four endpoints, i.e. cell density, chlorophyll-A concentration, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and cell membrane integrity, of alga were analyzed to characterize the acute toxicity effects of wastewater from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with different treatment techniques: sequencing batch reactor (SBR), Linpor and conventional activated sludge. Influent and effluent from each treatment stage in these three WWTPs were sampled and evaluated for their acute toxicity. Our results showed that all three techniques can completely affect the algal chlorophyll-A synthesis stimulation effects of influent; the algal cell growth stimulation effect was only completely removed by the secondary treatment process in conventional activated sludge technique; toxic effects on cell membrane integrity of two influents from WWTPs with SBR and conventional activated sludge techniques were completely removed; the acute toxicity on SOD activity was partially reduced in SBR and conventional activated sludge techniques while not significantly reduced by Linpor system. As to the disinfection unit, NaClO disinfection enhanced wastewater toxicity dramatically while UV radiation had no remarkable influence on wastewater toxicity. Our results illustrated that SOD activity and chlorophyll-A synthesis were relatively sensitive to municipal wastewater toxicity. Our results would aid to understand the acute toxicity of municipal wastewater, as well as the toxicity removal by currently utilized treatment techniques in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evidence for land plant cell wall biosynthetic mechanisms in charophyte green algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Maria D.; Harholt, Jesper; Ulvskov, Peter; Johansen, Ida E.; Fangel, Jonatan U.; Doblin, Monika S.; Bacic, Antony; Willats, William G. T.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The charophyte green algae (CGA) are thought to be the closest living relatives to the land plants, and ancestral CGA were unique in giving rise to the land plant lineage. The cell wall has been suggested to be a defining structure that enabled the green algal ancestor to colonize land. These cell walls provide support and protection, are a source of signalling molecules, and provide developmental cues for cell differentiation and elongation. The cell wall of land plants is a highly complex fibre composite, characterized by cellulose cross-linked by non-cellulosic polysaccharides, such as xyloglucan, embedded in a matrix of pectic polysaccharides. How the land plant cell wall evolved is currently unknown: early-divergent chlorophyte and prasinophyte algae genomes contain a low number of glycosyl transferases (GTs), while land plants contain hundreds. The number of GTs in CGA is currently unknown, as no genomes are available, so this study sought to give insight into the evolution of the biosynthetic machinery of CGA through an analysis of available transcriptomes. Methods Available CGA transcriptomes were mined for cell wall biosynthesis GTs and compared with GTs characterized in land plants. In addition, gene cloning was employed in two cases to answer important evolutionary questions. Key Results Genetic evidence was obtained indicating that many of the most important core cell wall polysaccharides have their evolutionary origins in the CGA, including cellulose, mannan, xyloglucan, xylan and pectin, as well as arabino-galactan protein. Moreover, two putative cellulose synthase-like D family genes (CSLDs) from the CGA species Coleochaete orbicularis and a fragment of a putative CSLA/K-like sequence from a CGA Spirogyra species were cloned, providing the first evidence that all the cellulose synthase/-like genes present in early-divergent land plants were already present in CGA. Conclusions The results provide new insights into the evolution of

  18. Larvicidal Activity against Aedes aegypti and Molluscicidal Activity against Biomphalaria glabrata of Brazilian Marine Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elíca Amara Cecília Guedes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the biological activities of five benthic marine algae collected from Northeastern Region of Brazil. The tested activities included larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti, molluscicidal activity against Biomphalaria glabrata, and toxicity against Artemia salina. Extracts of Ulva lactuca (Chlorophyta, Padina gymnospora, Sargassum vulgare (Phaeophyta, Hypnea musciformis, and Digenea simplex (Rhodophyta were prepared using different solvents of increasing polarity, including dichloromethane, methanol, ethanol, and water. Of the extracts screened, the dichloromethane extracts of H. musciformis and P. gymnospora exhibited the highest activities and were subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation in hexane and chloroform. The chloroform fractions of the P. gymnospora and H. musciformis extracts showed molluscicidal activity at values below 40 μg·mL−1 (11.1460 μg·mL−1 and 25.8689 μg·mL−1, resp., and the chloroform and hexane fractions of P. gymnospora showed larvicidal activity at values below 40 μg·mL−1 (29.018 μg·mL−1 and 17.230 μg·mL−1, resp.. The crude extracts were not toxic to A. salina, whereas the chloroform and hexane fractions of P. gymnospora (788.277 μg·mL−1 and 706.990 μg·mL−1 showed moderate toxicity, indicating that the toxic compounds present in these algae are nonpolar.

  19. Larvicidal Activity against Aedes aegypti and Molluscicidal Activity against Biomphalaria glabrata of Brazilian Marine Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Elíca Amara Cecília; de Carvalho, Cenira M; Ribeiro Junior, Karlos Antonio Lisboa; Lisboa Ribeiro, Thyago Fernando; de Barros, Lurdiana Dayse; de Lima, Maria Raquel Ferreira; Prado Moura, Flávia de Barros; Goulart Sant'ana, Antônio Euzebio

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the biological activities of five benthic marine algae collected from Northeastern Region of Brazil. The tested activities included larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti, molluscicidal activity against Biomphalaria glabrata, and toxicity against Artemia salina. Extracts of Ulva lactuca (Chlorophyta), Padina gymnospora, Sargassum vulgare (Phaeophyta), Hypnea musciformis, and Digenea simplex (Rhodophyta) were prepared using different solvents of increasing polarity, including dichloromethane, methanol, ethanol, and water. Of the extracts screened, the dichloromethane extracts of H. musciformis and P. gymnospora exhibited the highest activities and were subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation in hexane and chloroform. The chloroform fractions of the P. gymnospora and H. musciformis extracts showed molluscicidal activity at values below 40  μ g·mL(-1) (11.1460  μ g·mL(-1) and 25.8689  μ g·mL(-1), resp.), and the chloroform and hexane fractions of P. gymnospora showed larvicidal activity at values below 40  μ g·mL(-1) (29.018  μ g·mL(-1) and 17.230  μ g·mL(-1), resp.). The crude extracts were not toxic to A. salina, whereas the chloroform and hexane fractions of P. gymnospora (788.277  μ g·mL(-1) and 706.990  μ g·mL(-1)) showed moderate toxicity, indicating that the toxic compounds present in these algae are nonpolar.

  20. Antibacterial and antioxidant activities of the red algae Hypnea charoides from coasts of Chabahar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ghaderi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Marine macro algae are one of the most economically important resources of the oceans which contain important biologically active secondary metabolites. So they can be widely used in various applications. Due to the limited research work on the bioactive metabolites from Iranian algae, the red seaweed, Hypnea charoides, collected from intertidal coasts of Chabahar was selected for the present study. Methods: The algae sample was dried in shade and then powdered. Methanol was used for extraction. Antibacterial activity of the algae was determined by serial dilution method in 96 well plate and finally minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the extract was evaluated against three bacteria. Cefixime was used as the standard antibiotic. The free radical scavenging activity of the methanol extract was measured by DPPH assay with BHT as the positive control. Results: MIC values of the extract for three bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia and Pseudomonas   aeruginosa were 64 mg/mL and values for Cefixime was 8 µg/mL, 16 µg/mL and 128 µg/mL, respectively. IC50 of DPPH for sample and the standard were determined as 6.24 mg/mL and 0.16 mg/mL, respectively. Conclusion: According to the presence of biological active compounds in the selected algae, it seems that further studies can lead compounds of pharmaceutical importance.

  1. New methodologies for the integration of power plants with algae ponds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, K.; Gijp, S. van der; Stel, R.W van der; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally recognized that algae could be an interesting option for reducing CO2 emissions. Based on light and CO2, algae can be used for the production various economically interesting products. Current algae cultivation techniques, however, still present a number of limitations. Efficient

  2. Response of snap bean growth and seed yield to seed size, plant density and foliar application with algae extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehia I. Abu Seif

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Two field experiments were conducted during the two growing summer seasons of 2013 and 2014, at the experimental farm of vegetables at Kaha, Qalyubia Governorate, Agriculture Research Center (ARC, Egypt, in order to investigate the effect of seed size, plant density and foliar application with some algae extracts on growth and seed yield of snap bean cv. valentino. A split–split plot design was used with three replications, where three sizes i.e., large, small and control (without grading were randomly distributed in the main plots, two plant density rates (22 and 33 plants per m2 arranged in subplots and foliar spray with seaweed extract (algost, fresh water algae (spirulina, mixture of them and control (sprayed with distilled water allocated in sub–subplots. Results showed a clear positively enhancement of plant vegetative growth parameters, chlorophyll, N, P, and K contents of leaves and seed yield quantity and quality positively by sowing large seeds compared with other seed sizes. Meanwhile, higher plant density (33 plants per m2 gave the highest values of plant length and seed yield per feddan, while the lower plant density (22 plants per m2 gave the highest values in other studied parameters except weight of 100 seeds where there were no significant differences between the two plant densities. All foliar applications with algae extracts significantly increased all the studied parameters compared to the control treatment. The superior application was the mixture of seaweeds and fresh water algae extracts together followed by seaweed extract alone in the two seasons, respectively.

  3. Plasmodesmata of brown algae

    OpenAIRE

    Terauchi, Makoto; Nagasato, Chikako; Motomura, Taizo

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are intercellular connections in plants which play roles in various developmental processes. They are also found in brown algae, a group of eukaryotes possessing complex multicellularity, as well as green plants. Recently, we conducted an ultrastructural study of PD in several species of brown algae. PD in brown algae are commonly straight plasma membrane-lined channels with a diameter of 10?20?nm and they lack desmotubule in contrast to green plants. Moreover, branched PD ...

  4. Biochemical activity of di- and polyamines in the green alga Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck (Chlorophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romuald Czerpak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns on the influence of diamines (agmatine, putrescine and polyamines (spermine, spermidine upon the growth and the content of chlorophyll a and b, monosaccharides and proteins in the cells of alga Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck (Chlorophyceae. In the experiments agmatine, putrescine, spermine and spermidine in the range of concentrations 10-6-10-3 M were used. At the concentration 10-3 M and the 1st day of cultivation, they have a toxic effect on growth of the algae. It was found that di- and polyamines used within the range of concentration 10-6-10-4 M stimulate the growth and the contents of analysed biochemical parameters in the cells of C. vulgaris. The most stimulating influence on metabolism of the alga was demonstrated by spermidine and putrescine at concentration of 10-4 M. Agmatine and spermine were characterised by a lower biological activity than spermidine and putrescine demonstrated the most stimulating influence.

  5. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for green algae growth inhibition by polymer particles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolte, Tom M; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Hendriks, A Jan; van de Meent, Dik

    After use and disposal of chemical products, many types of polymer particles end up in the aquatic environment with potential toxic effects to primary producers like green algae. In this study, we have developed Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) for a set of highly structural

  6. Evaluation of in vitro antiviral activity of a brown alga ( Cystoseira ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hot water extract of a brown marine alga, Cystoseira myrica, from the Persian Gulf was evaluated as an antiviral compound against KOS strain of HSV-1 in cell culture. The extract exhibited antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) not only during absorption of virus to the cells, but also on post ...

  7. In vitro antitumor activity of Gracilaria corticata (a red alga) against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) assay. The results showed that 9.336 and 9.726 μg/μl of algal extract were the most effective concentrations against Jurkat and molt-4 cells, respectively. The water crude extract of red alga G. corticata had significant anticancer activity and it ...

  8. Heterotrimeric G-proteins in green algae. An early innovation in the evolution of the plant lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins, hereafter) are important signaling components in all eukaryotes. The absence of these proteins in the sequenced genomes of Chlorophycean green algae has raised questions about their evolutionary origin and prevalence in the plant lineage. The existence of G-proteins has often been correlated with the acquisition of embryophytic life-cycle and/or terrestrial habitats of plants which occurred around 450 million years ago. Our discovery of functional G-proteins in Chara braunii, a representative of the Charophycean green algae, establishes the existence of this conserved signaling pathway in the most basal plants and dates it even further back to 1-1.5 billion years ago. We have now identified the sequence homologs of G-proteins in additional algal families and propose that green algae represent a model system for one of the most basal forms of G-protein signaling known to exist to date. Given the possible differences that exist between plant and metazoan G-protein signaling mechanisms, such basal organisms will serve as important resources to trace the evolutionary origin of proposed mechanistic differences between the systems as well as their plant-specific functions.

  9. Energetic metabolism response in algae and higher plant species from simulation experiments with the clinostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilenko, A.; Popova, A. F.

    Adenylate state is acknowledged to be among the most convenient approaches in the study of physiological changes in plant cells under simulation of altered gravity condition with the clinostat. Adenylate levels and the ATP/ADP ratio in cytoplasmic and mitochondrial extracts of cultivated cells of Haplopappus gracilis and algae cells of Chlorella vulgaris under initial stages of the fast-rotating and slow-rotating clinorotation, as well as the long-term clinorotation, have been investigated. For analysis of ATP and ADP levels in the plant cells under the clinorotation, we applied a high-sensitive bioluminescence method using the luciferase and piruvate kinase enzyme systems. It has been shown that the adenylate ratio is already increased during at the start of clinorotation with the different speed of rotation in the biological material tested. The considerable changes in mitochondrial ultrastructure of Chlorella cells, as well as the rising ATP level and dropping of the ATP/ADP ratio appear after long-duration clinorotation if compared to control material. It is probably connected with the distinctions in ATP-synthetase functioning in mitochondria of the cells under the clinorotation conditions.

  10. Natural history of coral-algae competition across a gradient of human activity in the Line Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barott, K.L.; Williams, G.J.; Vermeij, M.J.A.; Harris, J.; Smith, J.E.; Rohwer, F.L.; Sandin, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Competition between corals and benthic algae is prevalent on coral reefs worldwide and has the potential to influence the structure of the reef benthos. Human activities may influence the outcome of these interactions by favoring algae to become the superior competitor, and this type of change in

  11. Instrumental neutron activation analysis study of elemental concentrations in some species of marine algae form different regions of Libyan coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abugassa, I. O.; Al-Dalem, B. S.

    2012-12-01

    Algae are an ideal marine species to study responses to different environmental factors free complication inherent in research with more complex higher plants. One of the advantages of environmental study using algae is the possibility to achieve and observe many generations during relative short time period. Algae materials have been used as ecological and environmental indicators to monitor and control in many fields of study such as freshwater and marine ecosystems, soil fertility, industrial applications, etc. It also has been shown that algae assemblages could be used as indicators of clean or polluted water. Previous studies proved high sensitivity of the most algae towards changing of environmental conditions, especially as consequences of water pollution. Algae respond rapidly and predictably to a wide range of pollutants and potentially use full early warning signals of deteriorating conditions and possible causes. Because of their nutritional needs and their position at the base of aquatic food web, algae indicators provide relativity unique information concerning ecosystem conditions compared with commonly used animal indicators. In most cases ecologically relevant signals of ecosystem changes are being provided that can be used to distinguish acceptable from unacceptable environmental conditions. Algae indicators are also a cost-effective monitoring tool as well. (Author)

  12. The stimulatory activities of polysaccharide compounds derived from algae extracts on insulin secretion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Fujii, Isao; Lin, Changzheng; Ito, Kaori; Guan, Huashi; Zhao, Ji'en; Shinohara, Makoto; Matsukura, Makoto

    2008-05-01

    We prepared two series of polysaccharide compounds derived from algae extracts and investigated their stimulatory activity on insulin secretion in vitro using the rat pancreatic cell line, RIN-5F. Several of the compounds exhibited significant stimulatory activity in a dose-dependent manner without apparent cytotoxicity at concentrations above 10 microM. Glybenclamide, a commonly prescribed sulfonylurea (SU) against diabetes mellitus type II, was used as a positive control and showed moderate cytotoxicity in the cell culture assay system. Amylin (IAPP; islet amyloid polypeptide), an inhibitor for glybenclamide, did not inhibit the activity of the isolated compounds, suggesting that they act through a mechanism(s) different from glybenclamide. Algae-derived extracts could be candidates for a new class of anti-diabetic drugs.

  13. Arsenic and other heavy metal accumulation in plants and algae growing naturally in contaminated area of West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N K; Raghubanshi, A S; Upadhyay, A K; Rai, U N

    2016-08-01

    The present study was conducted to quantify the arsenic (As) and other heavy metal concentrations in the plants and algae growing naturally in As contaminated blocks of North-24-Pargana and Nandia district, West Bengal, India to assess their bioaccumulation potential. The plant species included five macrophytes and five algae were collected from the nine selected sites for estimation of As and other heavy metals accumulated therein by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrophotometer (ICP-MS). Results revealed that maximum As concentration (117mgkg(-1)) was recorded in the agricultural soil at the Barasat followed by Beliaghat (111mgkg(-1)) sites of North-24-Pargana. Similarly, concentration of selenium (Si, 249mgkg(-1)), lead (Pb, 79.4mgkg(-1)), chromium (Cr, 138mgkg(-1)) was also found maximum in the soil at Barasat and cadmium (Cd, 163mgkg(-1)) nickel (Ni, 36.5mgkg(-1)) at Vijaynagar site. Among the macrophytes, Eichhornia crassipes found more dominating species in As contaminated area and accumulate As (597mgkg(-1)) in the shoot at kanchrapara site. The Lemna minor found to accumulate maximum As (735mgkg(-1)) in the leaves at Sonadanga and Pistia stratiotes accumulated minimum As (24.5mgkg(-1)) in the fronds from Ranaghat site. In case of diatoms, maximum As (760mgkg(-1)) was accumulated at Kanchrapara site followed by Hydrodictiyon reticulatum (403mgkg(-1)) at the Ranaghat site. High concentration of As and other heavy metal in soil indicates long term effects of irrigation with contaminated ground water, however, high concentration of heavy metals in naturally growing plants and algae revealed their mobilization through leaching and possible food chain contamination. Therefore, efficient heavy metal accumulator macrophytes Eichhornia crassipes, Lemna minor, Spirodela polyrhiza may be exploited in removing metals from contaminated water by developing a plant based treatment system. However, As accumulator algal species may be used as a bioresource for

  14. Cultivation of phagotrophic algae with waste activated sludge as a fast approach to reclaim waste organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cong; Xiao, Suo; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2016-03-15

    Substantial energy is reserved in waste activated sludge (WAS) organics but much of it is difficult to recover because the solid organics require long time to solubilize. In this work we introduced the new approach of recovering WAS organics into the biomass of phagotrophic algae. Phagotrophic algae have the unique ability to grow by ingesting insoluble organic particles including microbial cells. This phagotrophic ability renders the solubilization of WAS organics unnecessary and makes this approach remarkably fast. The approach consists of two stages: a short anaerobic digestion treatment followed by the algal growth on treated WAS. The short anaerobic digestion was exploited to release discrete bacteria from WAS flocs. Phagotrophic algae could then grow rapidly with the released bacteria as well as the solubilized nutrients in the treated WAS. The results showed that WAS organics could be quickly consumed by phagotrophic algae. Among all studied conditions the highest WAS volatile solids (VS) reduction was achieved with 72 h anaerobic digestion and 24 h algal growth. In this optimal process, 28% of WAS VS was reduced, and 41% and 20% of the reduced VS were converted into algal biomass and lipids, respectively. In comparison, only 18% WAS VS were reduced after the same time of aerobic digestion without algae addition. Through this approach, the amount of WAS organics requiring further treatment for final disposal is significantly reduced. With the production of significant amounts of algal biomass and lipids, WAS treatment is expected to be more economical and sustainable in material recycling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of moisture content and water activity in algae and fish by thermoanalytical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Mota da Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The water content in seafoods is very important since it affects their sensorial quality, microbiological stability, physical characteristics and shelf life. In this study, thermoanalytical techniques were employed to develop a simple and accurate method to determine water content (moisture by thermogravimetry (TG and water activity from moisture content values and freezing point depression using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The precision of the results suggests that TG is a suitable technique to determine moisture content in biological samples. The average water content values for fish samples of Lutjanus synagris and Ocyurus chrysurus species were 76.4 ± 5.7% and 63.3 ± 3.9%, respectively, while that of Ulva lactuca marine algae species was 76.0 ± 4.4%. The method presented here was also successfully applied to determine water activity in two species of fish and six species of marine algae collected in the Atlantic coastal waters of Bahia, in Brazil. Water activity determined in fish samples ranged from 0.946 - 0.960 and was consistent with values reported in the literature, i.e., 0.9 - 1.0. The water activity values determined in marine algae samples lay within the interval of 0.974 - 0.979.

  16. Effect of Algae and Plant Lectins on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Clinically Relevant Bacteria and Yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayron Alves Vasconcelos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the abilities of plant and algae lectins to inhibit planktonic growth and biofilm formation in bacteria and yeasts. Initially, ten lectins were tested on Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and C. tropicalis at concentrations of 31.25 to 250 μg/mL. The lectins from Cratylia floribunda (CFL, Vatairea macrocarpa (VML, Bauhinia bauhinioides (BBL, Bryothamnion seaforthii (BSL, and Hypnea musciformis (HML showed activities against at least one microorganism. Biofilm formation in the presence of the lectins was also evaluated; after 24 h of incubation with the lectins, the biofilms were analyzed by quantifying the biomass (by crystal violet staining and by enumerating the viable cells (colony-forming units. The lectins reduced the biofilm biomass and/or the number of viable cells to differing degrees depending on the microorganism tested, demonstrating the different characteristics of the lectins. These findings indicate that the lectins tested in this study may be natural alternative antimicrobial agents; however, further studies are required to better elucidate the functional use of these proteins.

  17. Green Algae from Coal Bed Methane Ponds as a Source of Fertilizer for Economically Important Plants of Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunsakin, O. R.; Apple, M. E.; Zhou, X.; Peyton, B.

    2016-12-01

    The Tongue River Basin of northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana is the location of natural gas reserves and coal bed methane (CBM) acreage. Although the water that emanates from CBM extraction varies with site, it is generally of higher quality than the waters produced by conventional oil and gas wells, in part because it is low in volatile organic compounds. However, since CBM water contains dissolved solids, including sodium (Na), bicarbonate (HCO3) and chloride (Cl) ions, the water must be treated before it can be discharged into the river or wetlands, or used for stock ponds or irrigation. Several ponds have been constructed to serve as a holding facility for CBM water. Algae from the CBM ponds of the Tongue River Basin have the potential to be utilized as fertilizer on economically important plants of Montana. Two very important crop plants of Montana are wheat, Triticum aestivum, and potatoes, Solanum tuberosum. To explore this potential, isolates of unicellular green algae (Chlorella sp.) from the CBM ponds were cultured in aerated vessels with Bold's Basic Growth Medium and natural and/or supplemental light. Algal biomass was condensed in and collected from a valved funnel, after which cell density was determined via light microscopy and a hemacytometer. Algal/water slurries with known nutrient contents were added to seedlings of hard winter wheat, T.aestivum, grown in a greenhouse for three months before harves. When compared to wheat provided with just water, or with water and a commercially available fertilizer, the wheat fertilized with algae had a higher chlorophyll content, more tillers (side shoots), and a higher ratio of influorescences (groups of flowers) per stem. In a related experiment, Ranger Russet seed potatoes, S. tuberosum were given just water, water and Hoagland's nutrient solution, or water with algae in order to compare aboveground growth and potato production among the treatments. The results of this study suggest that

  18. Antimicrobial Activities of Bacteria Associated with the Brown Alga

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ismail, A.; Ktari, L.; Bolhuis, H.; Ahmed, M.; Boudabbous, A.; Stal, L.J.; Cretoiu, M.S.; El Bour, M.

    2016-01-01

    Macroalgae belonging to the genus Padina are known to produce antibacterial compounds that may inhibit growth of human- and animal pathogens. Hitherto, it was unclear whether this antibacterial activity is produced by the macroalga itself or by secondary metabolite producing epiphytic bacteria. Here

  19. A cost-effective microbial fuel cell to detect and select for photosynthetic electrogenic activity in algae and cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luimstra, V.M.; Kennedy, S.J.; Güttler, J.; Wood, S.A.; Williams, D.E.; Packer, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the development of an easily constructed, cost-effective photosynthetic microbial fuel cell design with highly reproducible electrochemical characteristics that can be used to screen algae and cyanobacteria for photosynthetic electrogenic activity. It is especially suitable for

  20. Isolation, antimicrobial activity, and metabolites of fungus Cladosporium sp. associated with red alga Porphyra yezoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ling; Qin, Song; Li, Fuchao; Chi, Xiaoyuan; Laatsch, Hartmut

    2008-03-01

    Cladosporium sp. isolate N5 was isolated as a dominant fungus from the healthy conchocelis of Porphyra yezoensis. In the re-infection test, it did not cause any pathogenic symptoms in the alga. Twenty-one cultural conditions were chosen to test its antimicrobial activity in order to obtain the best condition for large-scale fermentation. Phenylacetic acid, p-hydroxyphenylethyl alcohol, and L-beta-phenyllactic acid were isolated from the crude extract as strong antimicrobial compounds and they are the first reported secondary metabolites for the genus Cladosporium. In addition, the Cladosporium sp. produced the reported Porphyra yezoensis growth regulators phenylacetic acid and p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid. No cytotoxicity was found in the brine shrimp lethality test, which indicated that the environmental-friendly Cladosporium sp. could be used as a potential biocontrol agent to protect the alga from pathogens.

  1. Light-harvesting antenna complexes in the moss Physcomitrella patens: implications for the evolutionary transition from green algae to land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Masakazu; Yokono, Makio

    2017-06-01

    Plants have successfully adapted to a vast range of terrestrial environments during their evolution. To elucidate the evolutionary transition of light-harvesting antenna proteins from green algae to land plants, the moss Physcomitrella patens is ideally placed basally among land plants. Compared to the genomes of green algae and land plants, the P. patens genome codes for more diverse and redundant light-harvesting antenna proteins. It also encodes Lhcb9, which has characteristics not found in other light-harvesting antenna proteins. The unique complement of light-harvesting antenna proteins in P. patens appears to facilitate protein interactions that include those lost in both green algae and land plants with regard to stromal electron transport pathways and photoprotection mechanisms. This review will highlight unique characteristics of the P. patens light-harvesting antenna system and the resulting implications about the evolutionary transition during plant terrestrialization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemical Composition and Biological Activities of Trans-Himalayan Alga Spirogyra porticalis (Muell.) Cleve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jatinder; Dhar, Priyanka; Tayade, Amol B.; Gupta, Damodar; Chaurasia, Om P.; Upreti, Dalip K.; Toppo, Kiran; Arora, Rajesh; Suseela, M. R.; Srivastava, Ravi B.

    2015-01-01

    The freshwater alga Spirogyra porticalis (Muell.) Cleve, a filamentous charophyte, collected from the Indian trans-Himalayan cold desert, was identified on the basis of morpho-anatomical characters. Extracts of this alga were made using solvents of varying polarity viz. n-hexane, acetonitrile, methanol and water. The antioxidant capacities and phenolic profile of the extracts were estimated. The methanol extract showing highest antioxidant capacity and rich phenolic attributes was further investigated and phytochemical profiling was conducted by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) hyphenated technique. The cytotoxic activity of methanol extract was evaluated on human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and colon carcinoma RKO cell lines. The anti-hypoxic effect of methanol extract of the alga was tested on in vivo animal system to confirm its potential to ameliorate oxidative stress. The antioxidant assays viz. ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenging capacities, β-carotene-linoleic acid bleaching property and lipid peroxidation exhibited analogous results, wherein the algal extracts showed significantly high antioxidant potential. The extracts were also found to possess high content of total proanthocyanidin, flavonoid and polyphenol. GC/MS analysis revealed the presence of thirteen chemotypes in the methanol extract representing different phytochemical groups like fatty acid esters, sterols, unsaturated alcohols, alkynes etc. with substantial phyto-pharmaceutical importance. The methanol extract was observed to possess anticancer activity as revealed from studies on HepG2 and RKO cell lines. In the present study, S. porticalis methanol extract also provided protection from hypoxia-induced oxidative stress and accelerated the onset of adaptative changes in rats during exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. The

  3. Bioinformatics Reveal Five Lineages of Oleosins and the Mechanism of Lineage Evolution Related to Structure/Function from Green Algae to Seed Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Der; Huang, Anthony H C

    2015-09-01

    Plant cells contain subcellular lipid droplets with a triacylglycerol matrix enclosed by a layer of phospholipids and the small structural protein oleosin. Oleosins possess a conserved central hydrophobic hairpin of approximately 72 residues penetrating into the lipid droplet matrix and amphipathic amino- and carboxyl (C)-terminal peptides lying on the phospholipid surface. Bioinformatics of 1,000 oleosins of green algae and all plants emphasizing biological implications reveal five oleosin lineages: primitive (in green algae, mosses, and ferns), universal (U; all land plants), and three in specific organs or phylogenetic groups, termed seed low-molecular-weight (SL; seed plants), seed high-molecular-weight (SH; angiosperms), and tapetum (T; Brassicaceae) oleosins. Transition from one lineage to the next is depicted from lineage intermediates at junctions of phylogeny and organ distributions. Within a species, each lineage, except the T oleosin lineage, has one to four genes per haploid genome, only approximately two of which are active. Primitive oleosins already possess all the general characteristics of oleosins. U oleosins have C-terminal sequences as highly conserved as the hairpin sequences; thus, U oleosins including their C-terminal peptide exert indispensable, unknown functions. SL and SH oleosin transcripts in seeds are in an approximately 1:1 ratio, which suggests the occurrence of SL-SH oleosin dimers/multimers. T oleosins in Brassicaceae are encoded by rapidly evolved multitandem genes for alkane storage and transfer. Overall, oleosins have evolved to retain conserved hairpin structures but diversified for unique structures and functions in specific cells and plant families. Also, our studies reveal oleosin in avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp and no acyltransferase/lipase motifs in most oleosins. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Evaluation of supercritical extracts of algae as biostimulants of plant growth in field trials

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    Izabela Michalak

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the field trials was to determine the influence of supercritical algal extracts on the growth and development of winter wheat (variety Akteur. As a raw material for the supercritical fluid extraction (SFE, the biomass of microalga Spirulina plantensis, brown seaweed – Ascophyllum nodosum and Baltic green macroalgae was used. Forthial and Asahi SL constituted the reference products. It was found that the tested biostimulants did not influence statistically significantly the plant height, length of ear and shank length. The ear number per square meter was the highest in the group where the Baltic macroalgae extract was applied in the dose 1.0 L/ha (statistically significant differences. Number of grains in ear (statistically significant differences and shank length was the highest in the group treated with Spirulina at the dose 1.5 L/ha. In the group with Ascophyllum at the dose 1.0 L/ha, the highest length of ear was observed. The yield was comparable in all the experimental groups (lack of statistically significant differences.Among the tested supercritical extracts, the best results were obtained for Spirulina (1.5 L/ha. The mass of 1000 grains was the highest for extract from Baltic macroalgae and was 3.5% higher than for Asahi, 4.0% higher than for Forthial and 18.5% higher than for the control group (statistically significant differences. Future work is needed to fully characterize the chemical composition of the applied algal extracts. A special attention should be paid to the extracts obtained from Baltic algae because they are inexpensive source of naturally occurring bioactive compounds, which can be used in sustainable agriculture and horticulture.

  5. Evaluation of Supercritical Extracts of Algae as Biostimulants of Plant Growth in Field Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Izabela; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Dmytryk, Agnieszka; Wilk, Radosław; Gramza, Mateusz; Rój, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the field trials was to determine the influence of supercritical algal extracts on the growth and development of winter wheat (variety Akteur ). As a raw material for the supercritical fluid extraction, the biomass of microalga Spirulina plantensis , brown seaweed - Ascophyllum nodosum and Baltic green macroalgae was used. Forthial and Asahi SL constituted the reference products. It was found that the tested biostimulants did not influence statistically significantly the plant height, length of ear, and shank length. The ear number per m 2 was the highest in the group where the Baltic macroalgae extract was applied in the dose 1.0 L/ha (statistically significant differences). Number of grains in ear (statistically significant differences) and shank length was the highest in the group treated with Spirulina at the dose 1.5 L/ha. In the group with Ascophyllum at the dose 1.0 L/ha, the highest length of ear was observed. The yield was comparable in all the experimental groups (lack of statistically significant differences). Among the tested supercritical extracts, the best results were obtained for Spirulina (1.5 L/ha). The mass of 1000 grains was the highest for extract from Baltic macroalgae and was 3.5% higher than for Asahi, 4.0% higher than for Forthial and 18.5% higher than for the control group (statistically significant differences). Future work is needed to fully characterize the chemical composition of the applied algal extracts. A special attention should be paid to the extracts obtained from Baltic algae because they are inexpensive source of naturally occurring bioactive compounds, which can be used in sustainable agriculture and horticulture.

  6. Wound Healing Activity of Brown Algae plus Polyherbal Extract in Normal and Alloxan-induced Diabetic Rats

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    Fedekar F. Madkour

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess the wound healing efficacy of the experimental medicinal extract mixture (EMEM composed of brown algae, Cystoseira trinodis, plus three medicinal plants (garlic, liquorice and ginger. The extract was applied on induced excised wounds in rats, either healthy or induced hyperglycemia by alloxan. Healing activity was evaluated for up to 21 days after wounding in terms of decrease in surface area of wound, percentage of wound closure and tissue regeneration using digital planimetry analysis and histopathological examination. The study revealed that topical application of the extract improved and enhanced the healing process in diabetic rat model when compared with diabetic non-treated rats. The extract promoted wound contraction, reduced the wound closure time and induced proliferation of fibroblast as well as angiogenesis and re-epithelialization.

  7. The Charophycean green algae as model systems to study plant cell walls and other evolutionary adaptations that gave rise to land plants

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, Iben; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.; Doyle, Jeff J.; Domozych, David S.; Willats, William G.T.

    2012-01-01

    The Charophycean green algae (CGA) occupy a key phylogenetic position as the evolutionary grade that includes the sister group of the land plants (embryophytes), and so provide potentially valuable experimental systems to study the development and evolution of traits that were necessary for terrestrial colonization. The nature and molecular bases of such traits are still being determined, but one critical adaptation is thought to have been the evolution of a complex cell wall. Very little is ...

  8. Antimicrobial and antiparasitic activities of three algae from the northwest coast of Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghania, Aissaoui; Nabila, Belyagoubi-Benhammou; Larbi, Belyagoubi; Elisabeth, Mouray; Philippe, Grellier; Mariem, Benmahdjoub; Khadidja, Kerzabi-Kanoun; Wacila, Benguedda-Rahal; Fawzia, Atik-Bekkara

    2017-11-22

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biological activities of Algerian algae, Sargassum vulgare, Cladostephus hirsutus and Rissoella verruculosa. Antimicrobial activity of the crude extracts and their fractions was assessed using the disc diffusion assay, the minimum inhibitory concentration and the minimum bactericidal concentration. Antiparasitic activity was studied in vitro against the blood stream forms of Trypanosoma brucei brucei and the intraerythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Ethyl acetate (EA) fractions of the three tested algae showed more potent antimicrobial activity against S. aureus (7-14.5 mm) and B. cereus (7-10.75 mm), MIC values ranged from 0.9375 to 7.5 mg mL -1 and MBC values > 15 mg mL -1 . Concerning the antiparasitic activity, EA factions of S. vulgare (IC 50  = 9.3 μg mL -1 ) and R. verruculosa (IC 50  = 11.0 μg mL -1 ) were found to be more effective against T. brucei brucei, whereas the three EA fractions were little active against P. falciparum.

  9. [Effect of sulfated polysaccharides from brown algae on proliferative and cytotoxic activity of mice splenocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenkova, I D; Semenova, I B; Akhmatova, N K; Besednova, N N; Zviagintseva, T N; Ermakova, S P

    2012-01-01

    Study effect of fucoidans from brown algae on proliferative and cytotoxic activity of mice splenocytes. Proliferative and cytotoxic activity of mice splenocytes in vitro and ex vivo were studied in lymphocyte blast transformation reaction and in cytotoxic MTT-test on K562 human erythroblast leucosis cell line. Microphotography and microscopy were performed by using Axiocam HS photosystem and computer program AxioVision 4 (Germany). Fucoidans from brown algae Fucus evanescens, Laminaria cichorioides and Laminaria japonica in vitro and ex vivo systems were established to increase proliferative activity of mice splenocytes which is evidenced by an increase of stimulation index. Results of in vitro and ex vivo cytotoxic activity studies demonstrate that fucoidans which are various by chemical structure stimulate activity of NK-cells and facilitate an increase of splenocyte cytotoxic potential level against NK sensitive K562 cell line. The data obtained from the study demonstrate an ability of fucoidans to stimulate splenocyte proliferation and NK-cell killer activity, and studies of relation between structure and functions of sulfated polysaccharides facilitate a more detailed understanding of aspects of their mechanism of action on innate immunity system, thus providing the basis for development of new immunobiologic preparations - modifiers/agonists of innate immunity.

  10. Evaluation of Antioxidant Activity of Extracts of Marine Algae Halimeda tuna Collected from the Chabahar Bay

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    Ali Taheri

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Seaweeds are one of the richest sources of natural antioxidants. Antioxidants are main factors of free radical scavenging, which prevent from chronic diseases and food deterioration. These compounds can also be extracted from seaweeds. In this study, the antioxidant activity of the extracts from marine algae Halimeda tuna collected from the coast of Chabahar, was evaluated. Methods: This is an in vitro study. The antioxidant activity of methanol, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and n-hexanic extracts of the algae, were evaluated using three methods of DPPH, ferrous ion chelating activity, and reduction power methods. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey test at the probability level of 95%. Results: In this study, the highest antioxidant capacity according to DPPH, was related to the chloroform extract (72.85% inhibition at the concentration of 1mg/ml. In the ferrous ion chelating activity, the highest percentage of chelating was allocated to the methanol extract (81.46%. Based on the data from the reduction power test, the highest reduction activity was related to the methanol extract with absorption of 0.553 (concentration, 1mg/ml. Conclusion: Based on the results of this research, the extracts of Halimeda tuna have the potential for application in medicine and pharmaceutical industry and must be confirmed by preclinical and clinical studies.

  11. Turnover of Mature miRNAs and siRNAs in Plants and Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Heriberto; Ibrahim, Fadia

    2011-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) play important roles in gene regulation and defense responses against transposons and viruses in eukaryotes. These small RNAs generally trigger the silencing of cognate sequences through a variety of mechanisms, including RNA degradation, translational inhibition and transcriptional repression. In the past few years, the synthesis and the mode of action of miRNAs and siRNAs have attracted great attention. However, relatively little is known about mechanisms of quality control during small RNA biogenesis as well as those that regulate mature small RNA stability. Recent studies in Arabidopsis thaliana and Caenorhabditis elegans have implicated 3'-to-5' (SDNs) and 5'-to-3' (XRN-2) exoribonucleases in mature miRNA turnover and the modulation of small RNA levels and activity. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a nucleotidyltransferase (MUT68) and an exosome subunit (RRP6) are involved in the 3' untemplated uridylation and the degradation of miRNAs and siRNAs. The latter enzymes appear to function as a quality control mechanism to eliminate putative dysfunctional or damaged small RNA molecules. Several post-transcriptional modifications of miRNAs and siRNAs such as 3' terminal methylation and untemplated nucleotide additions have also been reported to affect small RNA stability. These collective findings are beginning to uncover a new layer of regulatory control in the pathways involving small RNAs. We anticipate that understanding the mechanisms of mature miRNA and siRNA turnover will have direct implications for fundamental biology as well as for applications of RNA interference technology.

  12. Antibacterial and Anti-oxidant activity of three species of green, brown and red algae from Northern coast of Persian Gulf

    OpenAIRE

    Mohseen Heidari; Hossen Zolgharnine; Nasrin Sakhaei; Ali Mirzaei; Abdolali movahedinia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Marine algae are shown to contain a wide range of bioactive compounds, which have commercial application in pharmaceutical, medical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food and agricultural industries. The biological activity of the natural bio-active compounds in algae has wide effects on bacteria, tumors and antioxidant activities. The purpose of this study was to determine antioxidant and antibacterial activity of the marine algae. Materials and Methods: The ethanol extracts of three spe...

  13. Biological activity and chemical constituents of red and brown algae from the persian gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassbi, Amir Reza; Mohabati, Maryam; Eslami, Saba; Sohrabipour, Jelveh; Miri, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    Different solvent extracts of a red algae, Hypnea flagelliformis, and two brown algae, Cystoseira myrica and Sargassum boveanum, which were collected from the Persian Gulf coast were subjected to different bioassays, including: 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay, antibacterial and antifungal activity by thin layer chromatography (TLC)-bioautography, agar disc diffusion (ADD) and nutrient-broth micro-dilution (NBMD) bioassays. The water extracts were found to have the most antioxidant activity. The antibacterial minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the active extracts were determined for the susceptible organisms, Staphylococcus aurous and Bacillus subtilis, using NBMD bioassays. The active substances were identified as free fatty acids (FFA), by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). After derivatization to their methyl esters, their concentrations were measured by using GC- lame ionization detection (GC-FID). In addition to the fatty acids, fucosterol, cholesterol and 22-dehydroxychlosterol were detected as the major sterols in S. boveanum extract using GC-MS analyses.

  14. Isolation and characterization of fucoidans from five brown algae and evaluation of their antioxidant activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Guiyan; Liu, Xu; Wang, Dongfeng; Yuan, Yi; Han, Lijun

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the chemical property and antioxidant activity of fucoidans isolated from brown algae, Laminaria japonica (LJF), Lessonia nigrescens (LNF), Lessonia trabeculata (LTF), Ascophyllum mackaii (AMF), and Ecklonia maxima (EMF). LJF was less in sulfate content (14.16%) and more in galactose and mannose content (1.08 and 0.68) than the documented early. EMF contained 20%-30% of sulfate and fucose, 0.97 in molar ratio which was lower than that of sulfate to other four fucoidans (1.21-1.41). AMF (162 kDa) and EMF (150 kDa) were the first two largest in molecular weight, which were followed by LJP (126 kDa), LNF (113 kDa) and LTF (105 kDa). The fucoidans isolated these algae showed a wide range of antioxidant activity in vitro. It was found that the reducing power of the isolated fucoidans was positively correlated with their sulfate content and molecular weight. In addition, LNF and LTF at low concentrations exhibited high superoxide and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity. This demonstrated that low molecular weight fucoidans may perform a high antioxidant activity.

  15. Active ingredients fatty acids as antibacterial agent from the brown algae Padina pavonica and Hormophysa triquetra

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    Gihan Ahmed El Shoubaky

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To estimate the fatty acids content in the brown algae Padina pavonica (P. pavonica and Hormophysa triquetra (H. triquetra and evaluate their potential antimicrobial activity as bioactive compounds. Methods: The fatty acid compositions of the examined species were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The antimicrobial activity of crude and fatty acids was assessed using the agar plug technique. Results: The fatty acids profile ranged from C8:0 to C20:4. Concentration of saturated fatty acids in P. pavonica was in the order palmitic>myristic>stearic whereas concentration of the unsaturated fatty acids was oleic acid>palmitoleic>9-cis-hexadecenoic>linoleic acid>α- linolenic>arachidonic> elaidic acid. H. triquetra contained high concentration of saturated fatty acids than those of P. pavonica which was in the order as follows: palmitic>margaric>myristic> nonadecyclic>stearic>caprylic>tridecylic>pentadecylic>lauric while the unsaturated fatty acids consisted of oleic>nonadecenoic>non adecadienoate>margaroleic. The crude and fatty acid extracts of H. triquetra and P. pavonica were biologically active on the tested pathogens. H. triquetra exhibited a larger inhibitory zone than P. pavonica. Conclusions: The brown algae P. pavonica and H. triquetra have high efficient amount of fatty acids and showed strong antibacterial activity, especially H. triquetra.

  16. In vitro study of antibacterial activity of the alga Sargassum oligocystum from the Persian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajbakhsh, S; Pouyan, M; Zandi, K; Bahramian, P; Sartavi, K; Fouladvand, M; Asayesh, G; Barazesh, A

    2011-03-01

    With due attention to the development of drug-resistant bacteria, discovering of new antibacterial compounds is needed. Algae produce numerous bioactive substances which may have pharmacological properties such as antibacterial activity. The objective of this investigation was to in vitro study of antibacterial activity of brown alga Sargassum oligocystum collected along the Bushehr coast of Persian Gulf (south west of Iran). Hot water extract, cold water extract, and hot glycerin extract were prepared. The effect of the extracts were investigated on Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 14990), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), and Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922). Hot water extract exhibited antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Cold water extract and hot glycerin extract did not show antibacterial activity on any of the four test bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of hot water extract for both Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis was 3.175 mg/ml. However, the MIC of this extract for Pseudomonas aeruginosa was 9.556 mg/ml. In this study gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible to hot water extract than gram-negative bacteria. Extract of Sargassum oligocystum could be a candidate for purification and further in vivo studies.

  17. Structural characterization and Biological Activity of Sulfolipids from selected Marine Algae

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    El Baz, F. K.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The sulfolipid classes (SLs in the total lipids of five species of marine algae, two species of Rhodophyta (Laurencia popillose, Galaxoura cylindriea, one species of Chlorophyta (Ulva fasciata, and two species of Phaeophyta (Dilophys fasciola, Taonia atomaria were separated and purified on DEAE-cellulose column chromatography. The SLs component was identified by IR, gas chromatography MS/MS and liquid chromatography MS/MS. The level of SLs contents va ried from 1.25% (in L. papillose to 11.82% (in D. fasciola of the total lipid contents. However, no significant differences in sulfate content (0.13 – 0.21% were observed among all these algae species. All SLs were characterized by high contents of palmitic acid (C 16:0, which ranged from 30.91% in G. cylindriea to 63.11% in T. atomatia. The main constitutes of algal sulfolipids were identified as sulfoquinovosyl-di-acylglycerol and sulfoquinovosyl acylglycerol. The sulfolipids of different algal species exhibited remarkable antiviral activity against herps simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 with an IC50 ranging from 18.75 to 70. 2 μg mL–1. Moreover, algal sulfolipid inhibited the growth of the tumor cells of breast and liver human cancer cells with IC50 values ranging from 0.40 to 0.67 μg mL–1 for human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF7.Se separaron diferentes clases sulfolípidos (SL a partir de los lípidos totales de cinco especies de algas marinas: una especie de Chlorophyta (Ulva fasciata, dos especies de Phaeophyta (Dilophys fasciola, Taonia atomaria y dos especies de Rhodophyta (Laurencia popillose, Galaxoura cylindriea que se purificaron mediante cromatografía en columna de DEAE-celulosa. Los components de SLs fueron identificados por IR, cromatografía de gases MS/MS y cromatografía líquida MS/ MS. Los contenidos de SL en relación al total de lípidos varió de 1,25% (en L. papilosa al 11,82% (en D. fasciola. Sin embargo, no hay diferencias significativas en el contenido de sulfato

  18. Estrogenic activity in extracts and exudates of cyanobacteria and green algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychrová, E; Štěpánková, T; Nováková, K; Bláha, L; Giesy, J P; Hilscherová, K

    2012-02-01

    Here is presented some of the first information on interactions of compounds produced by cyanobacteria and green algae with estrogen receptor signaling. Estrogenic potency of aqueous extracts and exudates (culture spent media with extracellular products) of seven species of cyanobacteria (10 different laboratory strains) and two algal species were assessed by use of in vitro trans-activation assays. Compounds produced by cyanobacteria and algae, and in particular those excreted from the cells, were estrogenic. Most exudates were estrogenic with potencies expressed at 50% of the maximum response under control of the estrogen receptor ranging from 0.2 to 7.2 ng 17β-estradiol (E(2)) equivalents (EEQ)/L. The greatest estrogenic potency was observed for exudates of Microcystis aerigunosa, a common species that forms water blooms. Aqueous extracts of both green algae, but only one species of cyanobacteria (Aphanizomenon gracile) elicited significant estrogenicity with EEQ ranging from 15 to 280 ng 17β-estradiol (E(2))/g dry weight. Scenedesmus quadricauda exudates and extracts of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae were antagonistic to the ER when coexposed to E(2). The EEQ potency was not correlated with concentrations of cyanotoxins, such as microcystin and cylindrospermopsin, which suggests that the EEQ was comprised of other compounds. The study demonstrates some differences between the estrogenic potency of aqueous extracts prepared from the same species, but of different origin, while the effects of exudates were comparable within species. The observed estrogenic potencies are important namely in relation to the possible mass expansion of cyanobacteria and release of the active compounds into surrounding water. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Biological activities of the red algae Galaxaura rugosa and Liagora hawaiiana butters

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    Nouf M. Al-Enazi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological activities; antimicrobial, antioxidant and anticancer, of the red algae Galaxaura rugosa and Liagora hawaiiana were determined. The total ethanol, lipoidal matters, chloroform, n-butanol, aqueous extracts and powder of both algae showed and bacterial and antifungal activities. However, the chloroform extract of Galaxaura rugosa showed antibacterial activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae (24 mm, 0.15 mg/ml higher than gentamycin (23 mm, 0.49 mg/ml. Moreover, the total ethanol, lipoidal matter and chloroform extracts showed antifungal activity (21, 22 and 25 mm, 1.25, 0.312 and 0.156 mg/ml similar to the antibiotic Ketoconazole activity (23, 24 and 27 mm, 1.25, 0.312 and 0.156 mg/ml against Aspergillus fumigatus, A. niger and Candida trobicalis, respectively. A good antioxidant activity (80.96%, IC50 = 27.8 µg/ml was provided by Galaxaura rugosa. The anticancer activity results revealed that the lipoidal matters of Galaxaura rugosa and Liagora hawaiiana possessed antitumor activity (IC50 = 15 ± 1.7 and 21.2 ± 1.6, respectively against lung carcinoma (A-549 better than vinblastine sulfate (IC50 = 24.6 ± 0.7. Although, the lipoidal matters of Galaxaura rugosa and Liagora hawaiiana antitumor activity against cervical carcinoma (HeLa and intestinal carcinoma (CACO-2 (IC50 = 10.2 ± 0.6 and 12.2 ± 0.6, respectively preferable than vinblastine sulfate (IC50 = 59.7 ± 2.1 and 30.3 ± 1.4, respectively.

  20. Biological activities of the red algaeGalaxaura rugosaandLiagora hawaiianabutters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Enazi, Nouf M; Awaad, Amani S; Alqasoumi, Saleh I; Alwethairi, Metab F

    2018-01-01

    The biological activities; antimicrobial, antioxidant and anticancer, of the red algae Galaxaura rugosa and Liagora hawaiiana were determined. The total ethanol, lipoidal matters, chloroform, n-butanol, aqueous extracts and powder of both algae showed and bacterial and antifungal activities. However, the chloroform extract of Galaxaura rugosa showed antibacterial activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae (24 mm, 0.15 mg/ml) higher than gentamycin (23 mm, 0.49 mg/ml). Moreover, the total ethanol, lipoidal matter and chloroform extracts showed antifungal activity (21, 22 and 25 mm, 1.25, 0.312 and 0.156 mg/ml) similar to the antibiotic Ketoconazole activity (23, 24 and 27 mm, 1.25, 0.312 and 0.156 mg/ml) against Aspergillus fumigatus , A. niger and Candida trobicalis , respectively. A good antioxidant activity (80.96%, IC 50  = 27.8 µg/ml) was provided by Galaxaura rugosa . The anticancer activity results revealed that the lipoidal matters of Galaxaura rugosa and Liagora hawaiiana possessed antitumor activity (IC 50  = 15 ± 1.7 and 21.2 ± 1.6, respectively) against lung carcinoma (A-549) better than vinblastine sulfate (IC 50  = 24.6 ± 0.7). Although, the lipoidal matters of Galaxaura rugosa and Liagora hawaiiana antitumor activity against cervical carcinoma (HeLa) and intestinal carcinoma (CACO-2) (IC 50  = 10.2 ± 0.6 and 12.2 ± 0.6, respectively) preferable than vinblastine sulfate (IC 50  = 59.7 ± 2.1 and 30.3 ± 1.4, respectively).

  1. Transcriptomics of desiccation tolerance in the streptophyte green alga Klebsormidium reveal a land plant-like defense reaction.

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    Andreas Holzinger

    Full Text Available Water loss has significant effects on physiological performance and survival rates of algae. However, despite the prominent presence of aeroterrestrial algae in terrestrial habitats, hardly anything is known about the molecular events that allow aeroterrestrial algae to survive harsh environmental conditions. We analyzed the transcriptome and physiology of a strain of the alpine aeroterrestrial alga Klebsormidium crenulatum under control and strong desiccation-stress conditions.For comparison we first established a reference transcriptome. The high-coverage reference transcriptome includes about 24,183 sequences (1.5 million reads, 636 million bases. The reference transcriptome encodes for all major pathways (energy, carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, sugars, nearly all deduced pathways are complete or missing only a few transcripts. Upon strong desiccation, more than 7000 transcripts showed changes in their expression levels. Most of the highest up-regulated transcripts do not show similarity to known viridiplant proteins, suggesting the existence of some genus- or species-specific responses to desiccation. In addition, we observed the up-regulation of many transcripts involved in desiccation tolerance in plants (e.g. proteins similar to those that are abundant in late embryogenesis (LEA, or proteins involved in early response to desiccation ERD, and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFO known to act as osmolytes. Major physiological shifts are the up-regulation of transcripts for photosynthesis, energy production, and reactive oxygen species (ROS metabolism, which is supported by elevated cellular glutathione content as revealed by immunoelectron microscopy as well as an increase in total antiradical power. However, the effective quantum yield of Photosystem II and CO2 fixation decreased sharply under the applied desiccation stress. In contrast, transcripts for cell integrative functions such as

  2. The Identification of a SIRT6 Activator from Brown Algae Fucus distichus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnasto-Rilla, Minna K; McLoughlin, Padraig; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Doyle, Maire; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Lahtela-Kakkonen, Maija; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hayes, Maria; Moaddel, Ruin

    2017-06-21

    Brown seaweeds contain many bioactive compounds, including polyphenols, polysaccharides, fucosterol, and fucoxantin. These compounds have several biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, anti-tumor, anti-hypertensive, and anti-diabetic activity, although in most cases their mechanisms of action are not understood. In this study, extracts generated from five brown algae ( Fucus dichitus , Fucus vesiculosus (Linnaeus), Cytoseira tamariscofolia , Cytoseira nodacaulis , Alaria esculenta ) were tested for their ability to activate SIRT6 resulting in H3K9 deacetylation. Three of the five macroalgal extracts caused a significant increase of H3K9 deacetylation, and the effect was most pronounced for F. dichitus . The compound responsible for this in vitro activity was identified by mass spectrometry as fucoidan.

  3. Study on the concentration and seasonal variation of inorganic elements in 35 species of marine algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Yan, X.J.

    1998-01-01

    The concentrations of five major and 28 trace elements in 35 marine algae collected along the coast of China were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The concentrations of halogens, rare earth elements and many transition metal elements in marine algae are remarkably higher than...... those in terrestrial plants. The concentration factors for 31 elements in all collected algae were calculated, those for tri- and tetra-valent elements were higher than those of the mono- and di-valent elements in marine algae. The biogeochemical characteristics of inorganic elements in marine algae...

  4. Chemical composition and antioxidant activities of Jeddah corniche algae, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amoudi, Omar A; Mutawie, Hawazin H; Patel, Asmita V; Blunden, Gerald

    2009-07-01

    The increased use of natural product in the pharmaceutical industry has led to an increase in demand for screening for bioactive compounds in marine algae. An important economic algae, through chemical composition analysis and their antioxidant activities were investigated in this study. Chemical composition analysis of three algal samples from the Chlorophyta Ulva lactuca (U), Phaeophyta Sargassum crassifolia (S) and Rhodophyta Digenea simplex (D) was tested. Main components were sugars (57.40-185.13 mg/g dry weight), uronic acids (29.3-45.26 mg/g dry weight), sulfate (94.7-181.2 mg/g dry weight), amino acids (7.6-16.7 mg/g dry weight) and small amounts of betaines (2.38-8.47 mg/g dry weight). Hydrolyzed chemical composition analysis fractions of algal extract was shown a great proportion of sugars plus sulfate (as polysaccharide composed) ranges between 332 and 538.2 mg/g dry weight with trace amounts of uronic acids (⩽9%). All three algal extract showed antioxidant activities on lipoxygenase, DPPH and on Ames test. Two of aqueous extracts (U and D) inhibited lipoxygenase activity by less than 50%, where as the methanolic extract (S) caused 76% inhibition of the control. In all cases, the methanolic extract were more inhibitory than the aqueous extract. The (S) showed the highest antioxidant activity with DPPH (69%) in aqueous extract and in methanol extract with Ames test (85%). Both U and D showed antioxidant activity with DPPH in hexane by less of 25% where as in both aqueous and methanolic extracts by less than 50% of the control. Aqueous and methanolic extracts of U and D showed high inhibition by Ames test which caused 70% and 75% respectively. IR spectra of algal extracts (U; D and S) range from 1450 to 750 cm(-1) were very similar absorption band at 1430, 1370, 1250, 1130, 1110, 1050 and 1020 cm(-1). Absorption bands were due to uronic acids, glucosides and sulfate. The presence of sulfated polysaccharide material in the fractions UF2, DF2 and

  5. The "Martian" flora: new collections of vascular plants, lichens, fungi, algae, and cyanobacteria from the Mars Desert Research Station, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freebury, Colin E.; Hamilton, Paul B.; Saarela, Jeffery M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Mars Desert Research Station is a Mars analog research site located in the desert outside of Hanksville, Utah, U.S.A. Here we present a preliminary checklist of the vascular plant and lichen flora for the station, based on collections made primarily during a two-week simulated Mars mission in November, 2014. Additionally, we present notes on the endolithic chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and the identification of a fungal genus also based on these collections. Altogether, we recorded 38 vascular plant species from 14 families, 13 lichen species from seven families, six algae taxa including both chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and one fungal genus from the station and surrounding area. We discuss this floristic diversity in the context of the ecology of the nearby San Rafael Swell and the desert areas of Wayne and Emery counties in southeastern Utah. PMID:27350765

  6. Functional Characterization of UDP-apiose Synthases from Bryophytes and Green Algae Provides Insight into the Appearance of Apiose-containing Glycans during Plant Evolution*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James; Yang, Yiwen; Levy, Shahar; Adelusi, Oluwatoyin Oluwayemi; Hahn, Michael G.; O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2016-01-01

    Apiose is a branched monosaccharide that is present in the cell wall pectic polysaccharides rhamnogalacturonan II and apiogalacturonan and in numerous plant secondary metabolites. These apiose-containing glycans are synthesized using UDP-apiose as the donor. UDP-apiose (UDP-Api) together with UDP-xylose is formed from UDP-glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcA) by UDP-Api synthase (UAS). It was hypothesized that the ability to form Api distinguishes vascular plants from the avascular plants and green algae. UAS from several dicotyledonous plants has been characterized; however, it is not known if avascular plants or green algae produce this enzyme. Here we report the identification and functional characterization of UAS homologs from avascular plants (mosses, liverwort, and hornwort), from streptophyte green algae, and from a monocot (duckweed). The recombinant UAS homologs all form UDP-Api from UDP-glucuronic acid albeit in different amounts. Apiose was detected in aqueous methanolic extracts of these plants. Apiose was detected in duckweed cell walls but not in the walls of the avascular plants and algae. Overexpressing duckweed UAS in the moss Physcomitrella patens led to an increase in the amounts of aqueous methanol-acetonitrile-soluble apiose but did not result in discernible amounts of cell wall-associated apiose. Thus, bryophytes and algae likely lack the glycosyltransferase machinery required to synthesize apiose-containing cell wall glycans. Nevertheless, these plants may have the ability to form apiosylated secondary metabolites. Our data are the first to provide evidence that the ability to form apiose existed prior to the appearance of rhamnogalacturonan II and apiogalacturonan and provide new insights into the evolution of apiose-containing glycans. PMID:27551039

  7. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for green algae growth inhibition by polymer particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Tom M; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Hendriks, A Jan; van de Meent, Dik

    2017-07-01

    After use and disposal of chemical products, many types of polymer particles end up in the aquatic environment with potential toxic effects to primary producers like green algae. In this study, we have developed Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) for a set of highly structural diverse polymers which are capable to estimate green algae growth inhibition (EC50). The model (N = 43, R 2  = 0.73, RMSE = 0.28) is a regression-based decision tree using one structural descriptor for each of three polymer classes separated based on charge. The QSAR is applicable to linear homo polymers as well as copolymers and does not require information on the size of the polymer particle or underlying core material. Highly branched polymers, non-nitrogen cationic polymers and polymeric surfactants are not included in the model and thus cannot be evaluated. The model works best for cationic and non-ionic polymers for which cellular adsorption, disruption of the cell wall and photosynthesis inhibition were the mechanisms of action. For anionic polymers, specific properties of the polymer and test characteristics need to be known for detailed assessment. The data and QSAR results for anionic polymers, when combined with molecular dynamics simulations indicated that nutrient depletion is likely the dominant mode of toxicity. Nutrient depletion in turn, is determined by the non-linear interplay between polymer charge density and backbone flexibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The anti-allergic activity of polyphenol extracted from five marine algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Lin, Hong; Li, Zhenxing; Mou, Quangui

    2015-08-01

    Natural polyphenol has been widely believed to be effective in allergy remission. Currently, most of the natural polyphenol products come from terrestrial sources such as tea, grape seeds among others, and few polyphenols have been developed from algae for their anti-allergic activity. The aim of the study was to screen some commercial seaweed for natural extracts with anti-allergic activity. Five algae including Laminaria japonica, Porphyra sp., Spirulina platensis, Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Scytosiphon sp. were extracted with ethanol, and the extracts were evaluated for total polyphenol contents and anti-allergic activity with the hyaluronidase inhibition assay. Results showed that the total polyphenol contents in the ethanol extracts ranged from 1.67% to 8.47%, while the highest was found in the extract from Scytosiphon sp. Hyaluronidase inhibition assay showed that the extracts from Scytosiphon sp. had the lowest IC50, 0.67 mg mL-1, while Chlorella pyrenoidosa extract had the highest IC50, 15.07 mg mL-1. The anti-allergic activity of Scytosiphon sp. extract was even higher than the typical anti-allergic drug Disodium Cromoglycate (DSCG) (IC50 = 1.13 mg mL-1), and was similar with natural polyphenol from Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) (IC50 = 0.56 mg mL-1). These results indicated that the ethanol extract of Scytosiphon sp. contains a high concentration of polyphenol with high anti-allergic activity. Potentially Scytosiphon sp. can be developed to a natural anti-allergic compound for allergy remission.

  9. Transitions between marine and freshwater environments provide new clues about the origins of multicellular plants and algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittami, Simon M; Heesch, Svenja; Olsen, Jeanine L; Collén, Jonas

    2017-08-01

    Marine-freshwater and freshwater-marine transitions have been key events in the evolution of life, and most major groups of organisms have independently undergone such events at least once in their history. Here, we first compile an inventory of bidirectional freshwater and marine transitions in multicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes. While green and red algae have mastered multiple transitions in both directions, brown algae have colonized freshwater on a maximum of six known occasions, and angiosperms have made the transition to marine environments only two or three times. Next, we review the early evolutionary events leading to the colonization of current habitats. It is commonly assumed that the conquest of land proceeded in a sequence from marine to freshwater habitats. However, recent evidence suggests that early photosynthetic eukaryotes may have arisen in subaerial or freshwater environments and only later colonized marine environments as hypersaline oceans were diluted to the contemporary level. Although this hypothesis remains speculative, it is important to keep these alternative scenarios in mind when interpreting the current habitat distribution of plants and algae. Finally, we discuss the roles of structural and functional adaptations of the cell wall, reactive oxygen species scavengers, osmoregulation, and reproduction. These are central for acclimatization to freshwater or to marine environments. We observe that successful transitions appear to have occurred more frequently in morphologically simple forms and conclude that, in addition to physiological studies of euryhaline species, comparative studies of closely related species fully adapted to one or the other environment are necessary to better understand the adaptive processes. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  10. Cytotoxicity and antimicrobial activity of marine macro algae (Dictyotaceae and Ulvaceae) from the Persian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashjoor, Sakineh; Yousefzadi, Morteza; Esmaeili, Mohamad Ali; Rafiee, Roya

    2016-10-01

    Pharmaceutical industry now accept the worlds ocean which contains a vast array of organisms with unique biological properties, as a major frontier for medical investigation. Bioactive compounds with different modes of action, such as, antiproliferative, antioxidant, antimicrotubule, have been isolated from marine sources, specifically macro and micro algae, and cyanobacteria. The aim of this work was to investigate antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of the extracts of marine macro algae Ulva flexuosa, Padina antillarum and Padina boergeseni from the northern coasts of the Persian Gulf, Qeshm Island, Iran, against three cell lines including MCF7, HeLa and Vero, as well as their inhibitory effects against a wide array (i.e. n = 11) of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Antimicrobial activity of the marine macro algal extracts was assessed using a disc diffusion method; an MTT cytotoxicity assay was employed to test the effects of the extracts on each cancer cell line. The algal extracts showed considerable antimicrobial activity against the majority of the tested bacteria and fungi. Both ethyl acetate and methanol extracts at the highest concentration (100 µg/ml) caused cell death, with the IC50 values calculated for each cell type and each algal extracts. Results are exhibited a higher decrease in the viability of the cells treated at the highest concentration of marine macro algal ethyl acetate extracts compared to the methanol extracts (78.9 % death in Vero cells by ethyl acetate extracts from U. flexuosa). Despite, the ethyl acetate extracts with lower dose- response of cells, exhibited better cytotoxic activity than methanol extracts (IC50: 55.26 μg/ml in Vero cells by ethyl acetate extracts from U. flexuosa). Based on the findings, it is concluded that the marine macro algal extracts from the Persian Gulf possess antibacterial and cytotoxic potential, which could be considered for future applications in medicine and identifying novel drugs from the

  11. Antibacterial and Anti-oxidant activity of three species of green, brown and red algae from Northern coast of Persian Gulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohseen Heidari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Marine algae are shown to contain a wide range of bioactive compounds, which have commercial application in pharmaceutical, medical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food and agricultural industries. The biological activity of the natural bio-active compounds in algae has wide effects on bacteria, tumors and antioxidant activities. The purpose of this study was to determine antioxidant and antibacterial activity of the marine algae. Materials and Methods: The ethanol extracts of three species of green, brown and red algae were done by soaking method from northern coast of the Persian Gulf in Busheher province. Antibacterial activity of L. monocytogenes and E. Coli were performed using disk diffusion and well method, and also antioxidant activities of ethanol extracts of added three species accomplished using DPPH, FRAP and PMB tests. Results: The highest antioxidant activity was belonged to brown algae C. trinodis. Meanwhile Algae extraction was not revealed antibacterial activity against E. coli, but showed antibacterial activity against L. monocytogenes. Conclusion: In this study algae species was exhibited excellent antioxidant activity when compared with their antibacterial effects. The highest anti-oxidant activitie was found in brown algae C. trinodis.

  12. Algae Derived Biofuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahan, Kauser [Rowan Univ., Glassboro, NJ (United States)

    2015-03-31

    One of the most promising fuel alternatives is algae biodiesel. Algae reproduce quickly, produce oils more efficiently than crop plants, and require relatively few nutrients for growth. These nutrients can potentially be derived from inexpensive waste sources such as flue gas and wastewater, providing a mutual benefit of helping to mitigate carbon dioxide waste. Algae can also be grown on land unsuitable for agricultural purposes, eliminating competition with food sources. This project focused on cultivating select algae species under various environmental conditions to optimize oil yield. Membrane studies were also conducted to transfer carbon di-oxide more efficiently. An LCA study was also conducted to investigate the energy intensive steps in algae cultivation.

  13. Ecological Traits of the Algae-Bearing Tetrahymena utriculariae (Ciliophora) from Traps of the Aquatic Carnivorous Plant Utricularia reflexa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimek, Karel; Pitsch, Gianna; Salcher, Michaela M; Sirová, Dagmara; Shabarova, Tanja; Adamec, Lubomír; Posch, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Trap fluid of aquatic carnivorous plants of the genus Utricularia hosts specific microbiomes consisting of commensal pro- and eukaryotes of largely unknown ecology. We examined the characteristics and dynamics of bacteria and the three dominant eukaryotes, i.e. the algae-bearing ciliate Tetrahymena utriculariae (Ciliophora), a green flagellate Euglena agilis (Euglenophyta), and the alga Scenedesmus alternans (Chlorophyta), associated with the traps of Utricularia reflexa. Our study focused on ecological traits and life strategies of the highly abundant ciliate whose biomass by far exceeds that of other eukaryotes and bacteria independent of the trap age. The ciliate was the only bacterivore in the traps, driving rapid turnover of bacterial standing stock. However, given the large size of the ciliate and the cell-specific uptake rates of bacteria we estimated that bacterivory alone would likely be insufficient to support its apparent rapid growth in traps. We suggest that mixotrophy based on algal symbionts contributes significantly to the diet and survival strategy of the ciliate in the extreme (anaerobic, low pH) trap-fluid environment. We propose a revised concept of major microbial interactions in the trap fluid where ciliate bacterivory plays a central role in regeneration of nutrients bound in rapidly growing bacterial biomass. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  14. Antibacterial activities of bioactive compounds extracted from Marine algae Gracilaria salicornia against Aeromonas hydrophila

    OpenAIRE

    Somayeh Rasooli; Masoud Sattari; Zohreh Ramezanpour; Javid Imanpour Namin

    2015-01-01

    Herbal medicinal products have attracted significant research interest in recent years. Considering the efficiency of algae products in controlling pathogenic bacteria and also easy access to large resources of algae, this study was conducted to evaluate the effects of methanolic, chloroformic and aqueous extracts of Gracilaria salicornia against Aeromonas hydrophila, a heterotrophic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium found mainly in warm climate. Algae samples were collected from Qeshm Isl...

  15. Radiation degradation of carbohydrates and their biological activities for plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, T.; Nagasawa, N.; Matsuhashi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation effects on carbohydrates such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated to improve the biological activities. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and induced various kinds of biological activities such as anti-bacterial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress, phytoalexins induction. Pectic fragments obtained from degraded pectin induced the phytoalexins such as glyceollins in soybean and pisatin in pea. The irradiated chitosan shows the higher elicitor activity for pisatin than that of pectin. For the plant growth promotion, alginate derived from brown marine algae, chitosan and ligno-cellulosic extracts show a strong activity. Kappa and iota carrageenan derived from red marine algae can promote growth of rice and the highest effect was obtained with kappa irradiated at 100 kGy. Some radiation degraded carbohydrates suppressed the damage of heavy metals on plants. The effects of irradiated carbohydrates on transportation of heavy metals have been investigated by PETIS (Positron Emitting Tracer Imaging System) and autoradiography using 48 V and 62 Zn. (author)

  16. Radiation degradation of carbohydrates and their biological activities for plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kume, T.; Nagasawa, N.; Matsuhashi, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment] [and others

    2000-03-01

    Radiation effects on carbohydrates such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated to improve the biological activities. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and induced various kinds of biological activities such as anti-bacterial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress, phytoalexins induction. Pectic fragments obtained from degraded pectin induced the phytoalexins such as glyceollins in soybean and pisatin in pea. The irradiated chitosan shows the higher elicitor activity for pisatin than that of pectin. For the plant growth promotion, alginate derived from brown marine algae, chitosan and ligno-cellulosic extracts show a strong activity. Kappa and iota carrageenan derived from red marine algae can promote growth of rice and the highest effect was obtained with kappa irradiated at 100 kGy. Some radiation degraded carbohydrates suppressed the damage of heavy metals on plants. The effects of irradiated carbohydrates on transportation of heavy metals have been investigated by PETIS (Positron Emitting Tracer Imaging System) and autoradiography using {sup 48}V and {sup 62}Zn. (author)

  17. Anaerobic accumulation of short-chain fatty acids from algae enhanced by damaging cell structure and promoting hydrolase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Leiyu; Chen, Yunzhi; Chen, Xutao; Duan, Xu; Xie, Jing; Chen, Yinguang

    2018-02-01

    Short-chain fatty acid (SCFAs) produced from harvested algae by anaerobic fermentation with uncontrolled pH was limited due to the solid cell structure of algae. This study, therefore, was undertaken to enhance the generation of SCFAs from algae by controlling the fermentation pH. pH influenced not only the total SCFAs production, but the percentage of individual SCFA. The maximal yield of SCFAs occurred at pH 10.0 and fermentation time of 6 d (3161 mg COD/L), which mainly contained acetic and iso-valeric acids and was nearly eight times that at uncontrolled pH (392 mg COD/L). Mechanism exploration revealed at alkaline pH, especially at pH 10.0, not only the cell structure of algae was damaged effectively, but also activities and relative quantification of hydrolases as well as the abundance of microorganisms responsible for organics hydrolysis and SCFAs production were improved. Also, the released microcystins from algae were removed efficiently during alkaline anaerobic fermentation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Induced modifications on algae photosynthetic activity monitored by pump-and-probe technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbini, R.; Colao, F.; Fantoni, R.; Palucci, A.; Ribezzo, S. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dip. Innovazione; Tarzillo, G.; Carlozzi, P.; Pelosi, E. [CNR, Florence (Italy). Centro Studi Microorganismi Autotrofi

    1995-12-01

    The lidar fluorosensor system available at ENEA Frascati has been used for a series of laboratory measurements on brackish-water and marine phytoplankton grown in laboratory with the proper saline solution. The system, already used to measure the laser induced fluorescence spectra of different algae species and their detection limits, has been upgraded with a short pulse Nd:YAG laser and rearranged to test a new technique based on laser pump and probe excitation. Results of this new technique for remote monitoring of the in-vivo photosynthetic activity will be presented, as measured during a field campaign carried out in Florence during the Autumn 1993, where the effects of an actinic saturating light and different chemicals have also been checked.

  19. Proposals to clarify and enhance the naming of fungi under the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawksworth, David L

    2015-06-01

    Twenty-three proposals to modify the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants adopted in 2011 with respect to the provisions for fungi are made, in accordance with the wishes of mycologists expressed at the 10(th) International Mycological Congress in Bangkok in 2014, and with the support of the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF), the votes of which are presented here. The proposals relate to: conditions for epitypification, registration of later typifications, protected lists of names, removal of exemptions for lichen-forming fungi, provision of a diagnosis when describing a new taxon, citation of sanctioned names, avoiding homonyms in other kingdoms, ending preference for sexually typified names, and treatment of conspecific names with the same epithet. These proposals are also being published in Taxon, will be considered by the Nomenclature Committee for Fungi and General Committee on Nomenclature, and voted on at the 19(th) International Botanical Congress in Shenzhen, China, in 2017.

  20. Occurrence of arsenic species in algae and freshwater plants of an extreme arid region in northern Chile, the Loa River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Albert; Márquez, Anna; López-Sánchez, José Fermín; Rubio, Roser; Barbero, Mercedes; Stegen, Susana; Queirolo, Fabrizio; Díaz-Palma, Paula

    2013-01-01

    This study reports data on arsenic speciation in two green algae species (Cladophora sp. and Chara sp.) and in five aquatic plants (Azolla sp., Myriophyllum aquaticum, Phylloscirpus cf. desserticola, Potamogeton pectinatus, Ruppia filifolia and Zannichellia palustris) from the Loa River Basin in the Atacama Desert (northern Chile). Arsenic content was measured by Mass spectrometry coupled with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP-MS), after acidic digestion. Liquid chromatography coupled to ICP-MS was used for arsenic speciation, using both anionic and cationic chromatographic exchange systems. Inorganic arsenic compounds were the main arsenic species measured in all samples. The main arsenic species in the extracts of freshwater algae and plants were arsenite and arsenate, whereas glycerol-arsenosugar (gly-sug), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and methylarsonic acid (MA) were present only as minor constituents. Of the samples studied, algae species accumulated more arsenic than aquatic plants. Total arsenic content ranged from 182 to 11100 and from 20 to 248 mg As kg(-1) (d.w.) in algae and freshwater plants, respectively. In comparison with As concentration in water samples, there was hyper-accumulation (>0.1% d.w.) in Cladophora sp. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fibonacci spirals in a brown alga [Sargassum muticum (Yendo Fensholt] and in a land plant [Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh.]: a case of morphogenetic convergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Peaucelle

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the morphology of a brown alga is revisited and compared to the phyllotaxis of land plants. The alga, Sargassum muticum (Yendo Fensholt has a highly organized thallus with a stipe, the stem-like main axis, and hierarchically organized lateral branches of successive orders. Around each of these axes, the lateral organs: blades, side-branches, and receptacles grow in a spiral disposition. As in land plants, this organization is related to an apical mode of growth. Measurements performed along the mature differentiated axes as well as in their meristematic regions confirm the similarity of the large-scale organization of this brown alga with that of the land plants. In particular, the divergence angle between successive elements has similar values and it results from the existence around the meristem of parastichies having the same Fibonacci ordering. This is remarkable in view of the fact that brown algae (Phaeophyceae and land plants (Embryophyta are two clades that diverged approximately 1800 million years ago when they were both unicellular organisms. We argue that the observed similarity results from a morphogenetic convergence. This is in strong support of the genericity and robustness of self-organization models in which similar structures, here Fibonacci related spirals, can be obtained in various situations in which the genetic and physiological implementation of development can be of a different nature.

  2. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of brown algae from the Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZELIHA DEMIREL

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to evaluate the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of methanol, dichloromethane and hexane extracts, as well as the essential oils of brown algae (Phaeophyta Colpomenia sinuosa, Dictyota dichotoma, Dictyota dichotoma var. implexa, Petalonia fascia and Scytosiphon lomentaria. The essential oil of the macroalgae was obtained by steam distillation and analyzed by GC and GC/MS. The antioxidant activity of the algal extracts was determined using the procedures of inhibition of b-carotene bleaching and ABTS+ methods. The antioxidant effects of the extracts were compared with those of commercial antioxidants, such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT, butylated hydroxyanisol (BHA and a-tocopherol. The hexane extracts of D. dichofoma var. implexa had a higher phenolic content than the other extracts. The dichloromethane extract of S. lomentaria was found to be more active in the decolorization of ABTS+ than the other extracts and generally the dichloromethane extracts were more active than the methanol and hexane extracts. Antimicrobial activities of the extracts were assessed against Gram (+ and Gram (– bacteria and one yeast strain by the disk diffusion method. According to the re¬sults, the dichloromethane extracts generally showed more potent antimicro¬bial activity than the methanol and hexane extracts at concentrations 1.5 and 1.0 mg/disk.

  3. XET activity is found near sites of growth and cell elongation in bryophytes and some green algae: new insights into the evolution of primary cell wall elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sandt, Vicky S T; Stieperaere, Herman; Guisez, Yves; Verbelen, Jean-Pierre; Vissenberg, Kris

    2007-01-01

    In angiosperms xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET)/hydrolase (XTH) is involved in reorganization of the cell wall during growth and development. The location of oligo-xyloglucan transglucosylation activity and the presence of XTH expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the earliest diverging extant plants, i.e. in bryophytes and algae, down to the Phaeophyta was examined. The results provide information on the presence of an XET growth mechanism in bryophytes and algae and contribute to the understanding of the evolution of cell wall elongation in general. Representatives of the different plant lineages were pressed onto an XET test paper and assayed. XET or XET-related activity was visualized as the incorporation of fluorescent signal. The Physcomitrella genome database was screened for the presence of XTHs. In addition, using the 3' RACE technique searches were made for the presence of possible XTH ESTs in the Charophyta. XET activity was found in the three major divisions of bryophytes at sites corresponding to growing regions. In the Physcomitrella genome two putative XTH-encoding cDNA sequences were identified that contain all domains crucial for XET activity. Furthermore, XET activity was located at the sites of growth in Chara (Charophyta) and Ulva (Chlorophyta) and a putative XTH ancestral enzyme in Chara was identified. No XET activity was identified in the Rhodophyta or Phaeophyta. XET activity was shown to be present in all major groups of green plants. These data suggest that an XET-related growth mechanism originated before the evolutionary divergence of the Chlorobionta and open new insights in the evolution of the mechanisms of primary cell wall expansion.

  4. Structural Features and Anti-coagulant Activity of the Sulphated Polysaccharide SPS-CF from a Green Alga Capsosiphon fulvescens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Synytsya, A.; Choi, D. J.; Pohl, Radek; Na, Y. S.; Capek, P.; Lattová, E.; Taubner, T.; Choi, J. W.; Lee, C. W.; Park, J. K.; Kim, W. J.; Kim, S. M.; Lee, J.; Park, Y. I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 6 (2015), s. 718-735 ISSN 1436-2228 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : alga Maesaengi (Capsosiphon fulvescens) * ulvan * monosaccharide composition * structure * anti-coagulant activity Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 3.062, year: 2015

  5. Overview on Biological Activities and Molecular Characteristics of Sulfated Polysaccharides from Marine Green Algae in Recent Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingchong; Wang, Xiangyu; Wu, Hao; Liu, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Among the three main divisions of marine macroalgae (Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta and Rhodophyta), marine green algae are valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds and remain largely unexploited in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical areas. Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed to isolate novel sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) from marine green algae because of their numerous health beneficial effects. Green seaweeds are known to synthesize large quantities of SPs and are well established sources of these particularly interesting molecules such as ulvans from Ulva and Enteromorpha, sulfated rhamnans from Monostroma, sulfated arabinogalactans from Codium, sulfated galacotans from Caulerpa, and some special sulfated mannans from different species. These SPs exhibit many beneficial biological activities such as anticoagulant, antiviral, antioxidative, antitumor, immunomodulating, antihyperlipidemic and antihepatotoxic activities. Therefore, marine algae derived SPs have great potential for further development as healthy food and medical products. The present review focuses on SPs derived from marine green algae and presents an overview of the recent progress of determinations of their structural types and biological activities, especially their potential health benefits. PMID:25257786

  6. Overview on Biological Activities and Molecular Characteristics of Sulfated Polysaccharides from Marine Green Algae in Recent Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingchong Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the three main divisions of marine macroalgae (Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta and Rhodophyta, marine green algae are valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds and remain largely unexploited in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical areas. Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed to isolate novel sulfated polysaccharides (SPs from marine green algae because of their numerous health beneficial effects. Green seaweeds are known to synthesize large quantities of SPs and are well established sources of these particularly interesting molecules such as ulvans from Ulva and Enteromorpha, sulfated rhamnans from Monostroma, sulfated arabinogalactans from Codium, sulfated galacotans from Caulerpa, and some special sulfated mannans from different species. These SPs exhibit many beneficial biological activities such as anticoagulant, antiviral, antioxidative, antitumor, immunomodulating, antihyperlipidemic and antihepatotoxic activities. Therefore, marine algae derived SPs have great potential for further development as healthy food and medical products. The present review focuses on SPs derived from marine green algae and presents an overview of the recent progress of determinations of their structural types and biological activities, especially their potential health benefits.

  7. Overview on biological activities and molecular characteristics of sulfated polysaccharides from marine green algae in recent years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingchong; Wang, Xiangyu; Wu, Hao; Liu, Rui

    2014-09-25

    Among the three main divisions of marine macroalgae (Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta and Rhodophyta), marine green algae are valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds and remain largely unexploited in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical areas. Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed to isolate novel sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) from marine green algae because of their numerous health beneficial effects. Green seaweeds are known to synthesize large quantities of SPs and are well established sources of these particularly interesting molecules such as ulvans from Ulva and Enteromorpha, sulfated rhamnans from Monostroma, sulfated arabinogalactans from Codium, sulfated galacotans from Caulerpa, and some special sulfated mannans from different species. These SPs exhibit many beneficial biological activities such as anticoagulant, antiviral, antioxidative, antitumor, immunomodulating, antihyperlipidemic and antihepatotoxic activities. Therefore, marine algae derived SPs have great potential for further development as healthy food and medical products. The present review focuses on SPs derived from marine green algae and presents an overview of the recent progress of determinations of their structural types and biological activities, especially their potential health benefits.

  8. Solar PAR and UVR modify the community composition and photosynthetic activity of sea ice algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enberg, Sara; Piiparinen, Jonna; Majaneva, Markus; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Autio, Riitta; Rintala, Janne-Markus

    2015-10-01

    The effects of increased photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and ultraviolet radiation (UVR) on species diversity, biomass and photosynthetic activity were studied in fast ice algal communities. The experimental set-up consisted of nine 1.44 m(2) squares with three treatments: untreated with natural snow cover (UNT), snow-free (PAR + UVR) and snow-free ice covered with a UV screen (PAR). The total algal biomass, dominated by diatoms and dinoflagellates, increased in all treatments during the experiment. However, the smaller biomass growth in the top 10-cm layer of the PAR + UVR treatment compared with the PAR treatment indicated the negative effect of UVR. Scrippsiella complex (mainly Scrippsiella hangoei, Biecheleria baltica and Gymnodinium corollarium) showed UV sensitivity in the top 5-cm layer, whereas Heterocapsa arctica ssp. frigida and green algae showed sensitivity to both PAR and UVR. The photosynthetic activity was highest in the top 5-cm layer of the PAR treatment, where the biomass of the pennate diatom Nitzschia frigida increased, indicating the UV sensitivity of this species. This study shows that UVR is one of the controlling factors of algal communities in Baltic Sea ice, and that increased availability of PAR together with UVR exclusion can cause changes in algal biomass, photosynthetic activity and community composition. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Screening for antibacterial and antifungal activities in some marine algae from the Fujian coast of China with three different solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Chen, Yin-Shan; Lu, Hai-Sheng

    2001-12-01

    Three different solvents viz ethanol, acetone and methanol-toluene (3:1) were used to extract antibiotics from 23 species of marine algae belonging to the Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta and Rhodophyta. Their crude extracts were tested for antibacterial and antifungal activities. Among them, the ethanol extract showed the strongest activity against the bacteria and fungi tested. Four species of the Rhodophyta ( Laurencia okamurai, Dasya scoparia, Grateloupia filicina and plocamium telfairiae) showed a wide spectrum of antibacterial activity. Every solvent extract from the four species was active against all the bacteria tested. The test bacterium Pseudomonas solancearum and the fungus Penicilium citrinum were most sensitive to the extracts of marine algae. In general, the extracts of seaweeds inhibited bacteria more strongly than fungi and species of the Rhodophyta showed the greatest activity against the bacteria and fungi tested.

  10. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity from algae of the genus Caulerpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Matta, Carolina Babosa Brito; de Souza, Everton Tenório; de Queiroz, Aline Cavalcanti; de Lira, Daysianne Pereira; de Araújo, Morgana Vital; Cavalcante-Silva, Luiz Henrique Agra; de Miranda, George Emmanuel C; de Araújo-Júnior, João Xavier; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; de Oliveira Santos, Bárbara Viviana; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana

    2011-03-02

    Marine natural products have been the focus of discovery for new products of chemical and pharmacological interest. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of the methanolic (ME), acetate (AE), hexanic (HE) and chloroform (CE) extracts obtained from Caulerpa mexicana, and ME, CE and HE obtained from Caulerpa sertularioides. These marine algae are found all over the world, mainly in tropical regions. Models such as the writhing test, the hot plate test and formalin-induced nociception test were used to evaluate antinociceptive activity in laboratory mice. In the writhing test, all the extracts were administered orally at a concentration of 100 mg/kg, and induced high peripheral antinociceptive activity, with a reduction in the nociception induced by acetic acid above 65%. In the hot plate test, treatment with extracts from C. sertularioides (100 mg/kg, p.o.) did not significantly increase the latency of response, although the ME, AE and HE from C. mexicana showed activity in this model. This result suggests that these extracts exhibit antinociceptive activity. In the formalin test, it was observed that ME, AE and HE obtained from C. mexicana reduced the effects of formalin in both phases. On the other hand only CE from C. sertularioides induced significant inhibition of the nociceptive response in the first phase. To better assess the potential anti-inflammatory activity of the extracts, the carrageenan-induced peritonitis test was used to test Caulerpa spp. extracts on cell migration into the peritoneal cavity. In this assay, all extracts evaluated were able to significantly inhibit leukocyte migration into the peritoneal cavity in comparison with carrageenan. These data demonstrate that extracts from Caulerpa species elicit pronounced antinociceptive and anti-inflamatory activity against several nociception models. However, pharmacological and chemical studies are continuing in order to characterize the mechanism(s) responsible for the

  11. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activity from Algae of the Genus Caulerpa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Viviana de Oliveira Santos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine natural products have been the focus of discovery for new products of chemical and pharmacological interest. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of the methanolic (ME, acetate (AE, hexanic (HE and chloroform (CE extracts obtained from Caulerpa mexicana, and ME, CE and HE obtained from Caulerpa sertularioides. These marine algae are found all over the world, mainly in tropical regions. Models such as the writhing test, the hot plate test and formalin-induced nociception test were used to evaluate antinociceptive activity in laboratory mice. In the writhing test, all the extracts were administered orally at a concentration of 100 mg/kg, and induced high peripheral antinociceptive activity, with a reduction in the nociception induced by acetic acid above 65%. In the hot plate test, treatment with extracts from C. sertularioides (100 mg/kg, p.o. did not significantly increase the latency of response, although the ME, AE and HE from C. mexicana showed activity in this model. This result suggests that these extracts exhibit antinociceptive activity. In the formalin test, it was observed that ME, AE and HE obtained from C. mexicana reduced the effects of formalin in both phases. On the other hand only CE from C. sertularioides induced significant inhibition of the nociceptive response in the first phase. To better assess the potential anti-inflammatory activity of the extracts, the carrageenan-induced peritonitis test was used to test Caulerpa spp. extracts on cell migration into the peritoneal cavity. In this assay, all extracts evaluated were able to significantly inhibit leukocyte migration into the peritoneal cavity in comparison with carrageenan. These data demonstrate that extracts from Caulerpa species elicit pronounced antinociceptive and anti-inflamatory activity against several nociception models. However, pharmacological and chemical studies are continuing in order to characterize the mechanism

  12. The hepatoprotective activity of blue green algae in Schistosoma mansoni infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Azza H; Osman, Gamalat Y; Salem, Tarek A; Elmalawany, Alshimaa M

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the immunomodulatory effects of a natural product, blue green algae (BGA) (100 mg/kg BW), alone or combined with praziquantel PZQ (250 mg/kg BW) on granulomatous inflammation, liver histopathology, some biochemical and immunological parameters in mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Results showed that the diameter and number of egg granuloma were significantly reduced after treatment of S. mansoni-infected mice with BGA, PZQ and their combination. The histopathological alterations observed in the liver of S. mansoni-infected mice were remarkably inhibited after BGA treatments. BGA decreased the activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as well as the level of total protein (TP) while the level of albumin was increased. Treatment of infected mice with BGA, PZQ as well as their combination led to significant elevation in the activities of hepatic antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) as compared with control group. Combination of BGA and PZQ resulted in significant reduction in the level of intercellular adhesion molecules-1 (ICAM-1), vascular adhesion molecules-1 (VCAM-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) when compared to those of the S. mansoni-infected group. Overall, BGA significantly inhibited the liver damage accompanied with schistosomiasis, exhibited a potent antioxidant and immunoprotective activities. This study suggests that BGA can be considered as promising for development a complementary and/or alternative medicine against schistosomiasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A comprehensive phylogeny reveals functional conservation of the UV-B photoreceptor UVR8 from green algae to higher plants

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    María Belén Fernández

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available UV-B is present in sunlight (280- 315 nm and has diverse effects on living organisms. Low fluence rate of exposure induces a specific photomorphogenic response regulated by the UV-B response locus 8 UVR8 receptor. UVR8 was first described in Arabidopsis thaliana. In the absence of stimuli is located in the cytoplasm as a homodimer, however, upon UV-B irradiation, it switches to a monomer and interacts with the ubiquitin ligase E3 COP1 via the UVR8 β- propeller domain and the VP core. This induces the expression of the transcription factor HY5 leading to changes in the expression of genes associated with UV-B acclimation and stress tolerance. UVR8 senses UV-B through tryptophan residues being Trp233 and 285 the most important. Here we report a comprehensive phylogeny of UVR8, trying to identify UVR8 homologs and the ancestral organism where this gene could be originated based on the comparison and analysis of UVR8 functionally important motifs. Results obtained showed that Chlorophytes are the first organisms from the Viridiplantae group where UVR8 appear. UVR8 is present in green algae, bryophytes, lycophytes and angiosperms. All the sequences identified contain tryptophans 233 and 285, arginines involved in homodimerization and the VP domain suggesting they are true UVR8 photoreceptors. We also determined that some species from bryophytes and angiosperms contain more than one UVR8 gene copy opening the question if UVR8 could constitute a gene family in these species. In conclusion, we described the functional conservation among UVR8 proteins from green algae to higher plants.

  14. Evaluation of in vitro anti-Leishmanial activity of some brown, green and red algae from the Persian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouladvand, M; Barazesh, A; Farokhzad, F; Malekizadeh, H; Sartavi, K

    2011-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a protozoan parasitic disease which is transmitted by the female Phlebotomus sand fly and is prevalent in four continents.The first-choice treatment for the leishmaniasis is pentavalent antimonials, which are potentially toxic and often ineffective and use of them exhibit therapeutic failure. These pharmaceutical problems point towards the need to develop novel chemotherapeutic agents. Seaweeds are considered as source of bioactive metabolites characterized by a broad spectrum of biological activities. In this experimental study, cold and hot water crude extracts of four species of green, brown and red marine algae "Caulerpa sertularioides, Gracilaria corticata, Gracillaria salicornia and Sargassum oligocystum" collected along the Bushehr coast of the Persian Gulf (southwest of Iran), prepared and their in vitro activities against Leishmania major promastigote were evaluated by using the MTT assay test. The cold and hot water crude extracts of four algae species exhibited different anti-Leishmanial activities. The minimum inhibitory concentration of hot water extracts calculated as IC50 was as follows: Caulerpa sertularioides (IC50 125 microg/ml) for Caulerpa Sertularioides (IC50 >65 microg/ml) for Gracilaria corticata (IC50 >74 microg/ml) for Gracilaria salicornia and (IC50 >105 microg/ml) for Sargassum oligocystum, IC50 values for reference drug (Amphotericin B) was (0.16-0.2 microg/ml). According to the results, inhibitory effects of the crude extracts from these four species algae specially hot water crude extracts from "Gracilaria corticata, Gracillaria salicornia and Sargassum oligocystum" are significant and in accordance with other studies that has been done on different algae species. So these results are sufficiently promising to be followed with further studies on isolation and characterization of pure compounds from these algae species as well as in vivo experiments, a work that is already under way in our laboratory.

  15. Regulation of Fatty Acid Production and Release in Benthic Algae: Could Parallel Allelopathy Be Explained with Plant Defence Theories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Joey L; Ten-Hage, Loïc; Leflaive, Joséphine

    2018-04-01

    Many organisms produce chemical compounds, generally referred as secondary metabolites, to defend against predators and competitors (allelopathic compounds). Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the interaction between environmental factors and secondary metabolites production. However, microalgae commonly use simple metabolites having a role in primary metabolism as allelopathic compounds. The aim of this study was to determine whether classical theories of plant chemical defences could be applied to microalgae producing allelochemicals derived from the primary metabolism. Our study was designed to investigate how growth phase, algal population density, nutrient limitation and carbon assimilation affect the production and release of allelopathic free fatty acids (FFAs) among other FFAs. The model species used was Uronema confervicolum, a benthic filamentous green alga that produces two allelopathic FFAs (linoleic and α-linolenic acids) inhibiting diatom growth. FFAs have been quantified in algal biomass and in culture medium. Our results were analysed according to two classical plant defence theories: the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH) and the optimal defence theory (ODT), based on the metabolic capacities for defence production and on the need for defence, respectively. While a higher production of allelopathic compounds under increased light conditions supports the use of GDBH with this microalga, the observation of a negative feedback mechanism mostly supports ODT. Therefore, both theories were insufficient to explain all the observed effects of environmental factors on the production of these allelochemicals. This highlights the needs of new theories and models to better describe chemical interactions of microalgae.

  16. Antibacterial activity of selected marine macro algae against vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecalis

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    Manivachagam Chandrasekaran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of different extracts of Caulerpa chemnitzia (Epser J.V. Lamououx, Caulerpa racemosa (Frosk. Weber-van-Bosse (C. racemosa, Caulerpa scalpelliformis (R.Br. Weber-van-Bosse, Ulva lactuca Lin, Ulva fasciata Dellie, Ulva reticulata Forsk, Stoechospermum marginatum (Ag. Kutz (S. marginatum, Sargassum wightii Grev, Gracilaria verrucosa (Huds. Papenfuss and Gracilaria edulis (S.G. Gemelin P.C. Silva against Enterococcus faecalis (MTCC 439 (E. faecalis and one clinical isolate of vancomycin resistant E. faecalis. Methods: The selected marine macro algae were extracted with different solvents viz., hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol. Antibacterial assay was carried out by using disc diffusion method, determination of minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration. Results: The maximum antibacterial activity was recorded in the ethyl acetate extracts of S. marginatum and C. racemosa than the other extracts. The mean zone of inhibition produced by the extracts in agar diffusion assays against the tested bacterial strains ranged from 7.1 to 14.5 mm. The minimum inhibitory concentration was between 250 and 500 µg/mL, while the minimum bactericidal concentration was from 500 to 1 000 µg/mL. The ethyl acetate extracts of the seaweeds showed the presence of strong terpenoids, tannins and phenolic compounds compared with the other solvent extracts. Conclusions: These findings suggest that ethyl acetate extracts of S. marginatum and C. racemosa can be used as an antibacterial substance for the treatment of infection caused by E. faecalis.

  17. Assessment of the Antimicrobial Activity of Algae Extracts on Bacteria Responsible of External Otitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Gianluca; Cacciola, Gabriele; Giacco, Elisabetta; Mariottini, Gian Luigi; Coppo, Erika

    2015-10-20

    External otitis is a diffuse inflammation around the external auditory canal and auricle, which is often occurred by microbial infection. This disease is generally treated using antibiotics, but the frequent occurrence of antibiotic resistance requires the development of new antibiotic agents. In this context, unexplored bioactive natural candidates could be a chance for the production of targeted drugs provided with antimicrobial activity. In this paper, microbial pathogens were isolated from patients with external otitis using ear swabs for over one year, and the antimicrobial activity of the two methanol extracts from selected marine (Dunaliella salina) and freshwater (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) microalgae was tested on the isolated pathogens. Totally, 114 bacterial and 11 fungal strains were isolated, of which Staphylococcus spp. (28.8%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) (24.8%) were the major pathogens. Only three Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) strains and 11 coagulase-negative Staphylococci showed resistance to methicillin. The two algal extracts showed interesting antimicrobial properties, which mostly inhibited the growth of isolated S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella spp. with MICs range of 1.4 × 10⁸ to 2.2 × 10(10) cells/mL. These results suggest that the two algae have potential as resources for the development of antimicrobial agents.

  18. The Charophycean green algae as model systems to study plant cell walls and other evolutionary adaptations that gave rise to land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Iben; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Doyle, Jeff J; Domozych, David S; Willats, William G T

    2012-01-01

    The Charophycean green algae (CGA) occupy a key phylogenetic position as the evolutionary grade that includes the sister group of the land plants (embryophytes), and so provide potentially valuable experimental systems to study the development and evolution of traits that were necessary for terrestrial colonization. The nature and molecular bases of such traits are still being determined, but one critical adaptation is thought to have been the evolution of a complex cell wall. Very little is known about the identity, origins and diversity of the biosynthetic machinery producing the major suites of structural polymers (i. e., cell wall polysaccharides and associated molecules) that must have been in place for land colonization. However, it has been suggested that the success of the earliest land plants was partly based on the frequency of gene duplication, and possibly whole genome duplications, during times of radical habitat changes. Orders of the CGA span early diverging taxa retaining more ancestral characters, through complex multicellular organisms with morphological characteristics resembling those of land plants. Examination of gene diversity and evolution within the CGA could help reveal when and how the molecular pathways required for synthesis of key structural polymers in land plants arose.

  19. Alpha-amylase Inhibition and Antioxidant Activity of Marine Green Algae and its Possible Role in Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, P S; Suthindhiran, K; Jayasri, M A

    2015-10-01

    In the continuing search for safe and efficient antidiabetic drug, marine algae become important source which provide several compounds of immense therapeutic potential. Alpha-amylase, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, and antioxidant compounds are known to manage diabetes and have received much attention recently. In the present study, four green algae (Chaetomorpha aerea, Enteromorpha intestinalis, Chlorodesmis, and Cladophora rupestris) were chosen to evaluate alpha-amylase, alpha-glucosidase inhibitory, and antioxidant activity in vitro. The phytochemical constituents of all the extracts were qualitatively determined. Antidiabetic activity was evaluated by inhibitory potential of extracts against alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase by spectrophotometric assays. Antioxidant activity was determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and nitric oxide scavenging assay. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis was carried out to determine the major compound responsible for its antidiabetic action. Among the various extracts screened, chloroform extract of C. aerea (IC50 - 408.9 μg/ml) and methanol extract of Chlorodesmis (IC50 - 147.6 μg/ml) showed effective inhibition against alpha-amylase. The extracts were also evaluated for alpha-glucosidase inhibition, and no observed activity was found. Methanol extract of C. rupestris showed notable free radical scavenging activity (IC50 - 666.3 μg/ml), followed by H2O2 (34%) and nitric oxide (49%). Further, chemical profiling by GC-MS revealed the presence of major bioactive compounds. Phenol, 2,4-bis (1,1-dimethylethyl) and z, z-6,28-heptatriactontadien-2-one were predominantly found in the methanol extract of C. rupestris and chloroform extract of C. aerea. Our results demonstrate that the selected algae exhibit notable alpha-amylase inhibition and antioxidant activity. Therefore, characterization of active compounds and its in vivo assays will be noteworthy. Four green algae were

  20. Antifertility activity of medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniyal, Muhammad; Akram, Muhammad

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive summary of medicinal plants used as antifertility agents in females throughout the world by various tribes and ethnic groups. We undertook an extensive bibliographic review by analyzing classical text books and peer reviewed papers, and further consulting well accepted worldwide scientific databases. We performed CENTRAL, Embase, and PubMed searches using terms such as "antifertility", "anti-implantation", "antiovulation", and "antispermatogenic" activity of plants. Plants, including their parts and extracts, that have traditionally been used to facilitate antifertility have been considered as antifertility agents. In this paper, various medicinal plants have been reviewed for thorough studies such as Polygonum hydropiper Linn, Citrus limonum, Piper nigrum Linn, Juniperis communis, Achyanthes aspera, Azadirachta indica, Tinospora cordifolia, and Barleria prionitis. Many of these medicinal plants appear to act through an antizygotic mechanism. This review clearly demonstrates that it is time to expand upon experimental studies to source new potential chemical constituents from medicinal plants; plant extracts and their active constituents should be further investigated for their mechanisms. This review creates a solid foundation upon which to further study the efficacy of plants that are both currently used by women as traditional antifertility medicines, but also could be efficacious as an antifertility agent with additional research and study. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  1. Antifertility activity of medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Daniyal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive summary of medicinal plants used as antifertility agents in females throughout the world by various tribes and ethnic groups. We undertook an extensive bibliographic review by analyzing classical text books and peer reviewed papers, and further consulting well accepted worldwide scientific databases. We performed CENTRAL, Embase, and PubMed searches using terms such as “antifertility”, “anti-implantation”, “antiovulation”, and “antispermatogenic” activity of plants. Plants, including their parts and extracts, that have traditionally been used to facilitate antifertility have been considered as antifertility agents. In this paper, various medicinal plants have been reviewed for thorough studies such as Polygonum hydropiper Linn, Citrus limonum, Piper nigrum Linn, Juniperis communis, Achyanthes aspera, Azadirachta indica, Tinospora cordifolia, and Barleria prionitis. Many of these medicinal plants appear to act through an antizygotic mechanism. This review clearly demonstrates that it is time to expand upon experimental studies to source new potential chemical constituents from medicinal plants; plant extracts and their active constituents should be further investigated for their mechanisms. This review creates a solid foundation upon which to further study the efficacy of plants that are both currently used by women as traditional antifertility medicines, but also could be efficacious as an antifertility agent with additional research and study.

  2. New chemical constituents from Oryza sativa straw and their algicidal activities against blue-green algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ateeque; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Ali, Mohd; Park, Inmyoung; Kim, Jin-Seog; Kim, Eun-Hye; Lim, Ju-Jin; Kim, Seul-Ki; Chung, Ill-Min

    2013-08-28

    Five new constituents, 5,4'-dihydroxy-7,3'-dimethoxyflavone-4'-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(2a→1b)-2a-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(2b→1c)-2b-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-2c-octadecanoate (1), 5,4'-dihydroxy-7,3'-dimethoxyflavone-4'-O-α-D-xylopyranosyl-(2a→1b)-2a-O-α-D-xylopyranosyl-(2b→1c)-2b-O-α-D-xylopyranosyl-(2c→1d)-2c-O-α-D-xylopyranosyl-2d-octadecanoate (2), kaempferol-3-O-α-D-xylopyranosyl-(2a→1b)-2a-O-α-D-xylopyranosyl-(2b→1c)-2b-O-α-D-xylopyranosyl-(2c→1d)-2c-O-α-D-xylopyranosyl-2d-hexadecanoate (3), methyl salicylate-2-O-α-D-xylopyranosyl-(2a→1b)-2a-O-α-D-xylopyranosyl-(2b→1c)-2b-O-α-D-xylopyranosyl-(2c→1d)-2c-O-α-D-xylopyranosyl-(2d→1e)-2d-O-α-D-xylopyranosyl-(2e→1f)-2e-O-α-D-xylopyranosyl-(2f→1g)-2f-O-α-D-xylopyranosyl-(2g→1h)-2g-O-α-D-xylopyranosyl-2h-geranilan-8',10'-dioic acid-1'-oate (4), and oleioyl-β-D-arabinoside (5), along with eight known compounds, were isolated from a methanol extract of Oryza sativa straw. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated using one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopies in combination with IR, ESI/MS, and HR-ESI/FTMS. In bioassays with blue-green algae, the efficacies of the algicidal activities of the five new compounds (1-5) were evaluated at concentrations of 1, 10, and 100 mg/L. Compound 5 had the highest growth inhibition (92.6 ± 0.3%) for Microcystis aeruginosa UTEX 2388 at a concentration of 100 ppm (mg/L). Compound 5 has high potential for the ecofriendly control of weeds and algae harmful to water-logged rice.

  3. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, and Anticancer Activities of Biosynthesized Silver Nanoparticles Using Marine Algae Ecklonia cava

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    Jayachandran Venkatesan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs has gained great interest as a simple and eco-friendly alternative to conventional chemical methods. In this study, AgNPs were synthesized by using extracts of marine algae Ecklonia cava as reducing and capping agents. The formation of AgNPs using aqueous extract of Ecklonia cava was confirmed visually by color change and their surface plasmon resonance peak at 418 nm, measured by UV-visible spectroscopy. The size, shape, and morphology of the biosynthesized AgNPs were observed by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis. The biosynthesized AgNPs were nearly spherical in shape with an average size around 43 nm. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR analysis confirmed the presence of phenolic compounds in the aqueous extract of Ecklonia cava as reducing and capping agents. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis was also carried out to demonstrate the crystalline nature of the biosynthesized AgNPs. Antimicrobial results determined by an agar well diffusion assay demonstrated a significant antibacterial activity of the AgNPs against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Antioxidant results determined by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH scavenging assay revealed an efficient antioxidant activity of the biosynthesized AgNPs. The biosynthesized AgNPs also exhibited a strong apoptotic anticancer activity against human cervical cancer cells. Our findings demonstrate that aqueous extract of Ecklonia cava is an effective reducing agent for green synthesis of AgNPs with efficient antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities.

  4. Anti-proliferative activity of phlorotannin extracts from brown algae Laminaria japonica Aresch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huicheng; Zeng, Mingyong; Dong, Shiyuan; Liu, Zunying; Li, Ruixue

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the anti-proliferative activity of phlorotannins derived from brown algae Laminaria japonica Aresch extracts on the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell (BEL-7402) and on murine leukemic cells (P388) by MTT assay. Cells were incubated with 100 μg/mL of the phlorotannin extract (PE) for 48 h. The inhibitory rate of PE on BEL-7402 and P388 cells was 30.20±1.16% and 43.44±1.86%, respectively, and the half-inhibitory concentration of PE (IC50) on P388 and BEL-7402 cells was 120 μg/mL and >200 μg/mL, respectively. Microscopic observation shows that the morphologic features of tumor cells treated with PE and 5-fluorouracil are markedly different from the normal control group. The inhibitory rate of fraction A2 isolated from PE by sephadex LH-20 for BEL-7402 and P388 cells at the sample concentration of 70.42 μg/mL was 61.96±7.02% and 40.47±8.70%, respectively. The apoptosis peak for fraction A2 was the most profound of all fractions used in the flow cytometry assay. The results indicate that the anti-proliferative of this algal extract is associated with the total phlorotannin content.

  5. Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activity of Green Algae Halimeda gracilis from Seribu Island District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Basir

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Seaweeds have ecological functions as primary producers in marine waters. It also has an important economic value as a producer of hydrocolloids (alginate, agar and carrageenan that is used in various industries of food and pharmaceuticals. This study aimed to determine the antibacterial and antioxidant activity of green algae Halimeda gracilis. The study was conducted in several stages, sample collection and preparation, extraction of bioactive compound, fractionation, antibacterial and antioxidant test, and phytochemical. Extraction was done by maceration method using methanol and concentrated by rotary evaporator. The methanol extracts of H. gracilis were tested against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Methanol extract of H. gracilis formed inhibition zone against the test bacteria with diameter of inhibition zone was 10 mm and 6 mm, respectively. After liquid-liquid partition (water: ethyl acetate, inhibition zone was only seen in the ethyl acetate fraction of H. gracilis with diameter of inhibition zone was 6 mm and 7.50±1.71 mm, respectively. Antioxidant test methanol extracts and ethyl acetate fractions of H. gracilis each show IC50 value of 290.49 ppm and 375.50 ppm. Phytochemical test showed methanol extract of H. gracilis contains phenols and steroids.

  6. Prediction of toxicity of phenols and anilines to algae by quantitative structure-activity relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guang-Hua; Wang, Chao; Guo, Xiao-Ling

    2008-06-01

    To measure the toxicity of phenol, aniline, and their derivatives to algae and to assess, model, and predict the toxicity using quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method. Oxygen production was used as the response endpoint for assessing the toxic effects of chemicals on algal photosynthesis. The energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E(LUMO)) and the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (E(HOMO)) were obtained from the ChemOffice 2004 program using the quantum chemical method MOPAC, and the frontier orbital energy gap (deltaE) was obtained. The compounds exhibited a reasonably wide range of algal toxicity. The most toxic compound was alpha-naphthol, whereas the least toxic one was aniline. A two-descriptor model was derived from the algal toxicity and structural parameters: log1/EC50 = 0.268,logKow - 1.006deltaE + 11.769 (n = 20, r2 = 0.946). This model was stable and satisfactory for predicting toxicity. CONCLUSION Phenol, aniline, and their derivatives are polar narcotics. Their toxicity is greater than estimated by hydrophobicity only, and addition of the frontier orbital energy gap deltaE can significantly improve the prediction of logKow-dependent models.

  7. Quantitative structure-activity relationships of nitroaromatics toxicity to the algae (Scenedesmus obliguus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiu-Fen; Xiao, He-Ming; Gong, Xue-Dong; Ju, Xue-Hai

    2005-04-01

    The DFT-B3LYP method, with the basis set 6-311G( * *), was employed to calculate the molecular geometries and electronic structures of 25 nitroaromatics. The acute toxicity (-lgEC(50)) of these compounds to the algae (Scenedesmus obliguus) along with hydrophobicity described by logK(OW), and two quantum chemical parameters-energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, E(LUMO), and the charge of the nitro group, [ForQ(NO2), were used to establish the quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs). For 18 mononitro derivatives, the hydrophobicity parameter logK(OW) could interpret the toxic mechanism successfully. Dinitro aromatic compounds were susceptible to be reduced to aniline for their electrophilic nature. Their toxicity was controlled mainly by electronic factors instead of hydrophobicity. The electronic parameters, E(LUMO) and Q(NO2), were used to yield the following model: -lg EC(50) = 3.746 - 25.053 E(LUMO) + 6.481 Q(NO2) (n=22, R=0.926, SE=0.206, F=56.854, Ptoxic values using the above equation are in good agreement with the experimental values.

  8. Plasmodesmata of brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Makoto; Nagasato, Chikako; Motomura, Taizo

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are intercellular connections in plants which play roles in various developmental processes. They are also found in brown algae, a group of eukaryotes possessing complex multicellularity, as well as green plants. Recently, we conducted an ultrastructural study of PD in several species of brown algae. PD in brown algae are commonly straight plasma membrane-lined channels with a diameter of 10-20 nm and they lack desmotubule in contrast to green plants. Moreover, branched PD could not be observed in brown algae. In the brown alga, Dictyota dichotoma, PD are produced during cytokinesis through the formation of their precursor structures (pre-plasmodesmata, PPD). Clustering of PD in a structure termed "pit field" was recognized in several species having a complex multicellular thallus structure but not in those having uniseriate filamentous or multiseriate one. The pit fields might control cell-to-cell communication and contribute to the establishment of the complex multicellular thallus. In this review, we discuss fundamental morphological aspects of brown algal PD and present questions that remain open.

  9. Carbon isotope variability in monosaccharides and lipids of aquatic algae and terrestrial plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Dongen, B.E. van; Schouten, S.

    2002-01-01

    The stable carbon-isotope compositions of individual monosaccharides and lipids, as well as the bulk stable carbon-isotope composition of total cell material from different aquatic and terrestrial plants were determined. With the exception of a Phaeocystis sp. bloom sample, monosaccharides were

  10. Genome-wide analysis of tandem repeats in plants and green algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhixin Zhao; Cheng Guo; Sreeskandarajan Sutharzan; Pei Li; Craig Echt; Jie Zhang; Chun Liang

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) extensively exist in the genomes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Based on the sequenced genomes and gene annotations of 31 plant and algal species in Phytozome version 8.0 (http://www.phytozome.net/), we examined TRs in a genome-wide scale, characterized their distributions and motif features, and explored their putative biological functions. Among...

  11. The fucoidans from brown algae of Far-Eastern seas: anti-tumor activity and structure-function relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishchuk, Olesya S; Ermakova, Svetlana P; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N

    2013-11-15

    The sulfated polysaccharides from brown algae - the fucoidans - are known to be a topic of numerous studies, due to their beneficial biological activities including anti-tumour activity. In this study the effect of fucoidans isolated from brown algae Saccharina cichorioides, Fucus evanescens, and Undaria pinnatifida on the proliferation, neoplastic transformation, and colony formation of mouse epidermal cells JB6 Cl41, human colon cancer DLD-1, breast cancer T-47D, and melanoma RPMI-7951 cell lines was investigated. The algal fucoidans specifically and markedly suppressed the proliferation of human cancer cells with less cytotoxic effects against normal mouse epidermal cells. The highly sulfated (1→3)-α-l-fucan from S. cichorioides was found to be vitally important in the inhibition of EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 Cl41 cells. In colony formation assay the fucoidans from different species of brown algae showed selective anti-tumour activity against different types of cancer, which depended on unique structures of the investigated polysaccharides. These results provide evidence for further exploring the use of the fucoidans from S. cichorioides, F. evanescens, and U. pinnatifida as novel chemotherapeutics against different types of cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of Supercritical Extracts of Algae as Biostimulants of Plant Growth in Field Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Michalak, Izabela; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Dmytryk, Agnieszka; Wilk, Rados?aw; Gramza, Mateusz; R?j, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the field trials was to determine the influence of supercritical algal extracts on the growth and development of winter wheat (variety Akteur). As a raw material for the supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), the biomass of microalga Spirulina plantensis, brown seaweed – Ascophyllum nodosum and Baltic green macroalgae was used. Forthial and Asahi SL constituted the reference products. It was found that the tested biostimulants did not influence statistically significantly the plant...

  13. The Study of Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushforth, Samuel R.

    1977-01-01

    Included in this introduction to the study of algae are drawings of commonly encountered freshwater algae, a summary of the importance of algae, descriptions of the seven major groups of algae, and techniques for collection and study of algae. (CS)

  14. Epithermal neutron activation analysis of blue-green algae Spirulina Platensis as a matrix for selenium-containing pharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosulishvili, L.M.; Kirkesali, E.I.; Belokobyl'skij, A.I.; Khizanishvili, A.I.; Frontas'eva, M.V.; Gundorina, S.F.; Oprea, C.D.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the potentiality of the blue-green algae Spirulina Platensis as a matrix for the production of Se-containing pharmaceuticals, the background levels of 31 major, minor and trace elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni (using (n,p)-reaction), As, Br, Zn, Rb, Mo, Ag, Sb, I, Ba, Sm, Tb, Tm, Hf, Ta, W, Au, Hg, Th) in Spirulina Platensis biomass were determined by means of epithermal neutron activation analysis. The possibility of the purpose-oriented incorporation of Se into Spirulina Platensis biomass was demonstrated. The polynomial dependence of the Se accumulation on nutritional medium loading was revealed. The employed analytical technique allows one to reliably control the amount of toxic elements in algae Spirulina Platensis. Based on this study, a conclusion of the possibility to use Spirulina Platensis as a matrix for the production of Se-containing pharmaceuticals was drawn

  15. Application of Ulva lactuca and Systoceira stricta algae-based activated carbons to hazardous cationic dyes removal from industrial effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salima, Attouti; Benaouda, Bestani; Noureddine, Benderdouche; Duclaux, Laurent

    2013-06-15

    Marine algae Ulva lactuca (ULV-AC) and Systoceira stricta (SYS-AC) based activated carbons were investigated as potential adsorbents for the removal of hazardous cationic dyes. Both algae were surface oxidised by phosphoric acid for 2 and subsequently air activated at 600 °C for 3 h. Dyes adsorption parameters such as solution pH, contact time, carbon dosage, temperature and ionic strength were measured in batch experiments. Adsorption capacities of 400 and 526 mg/g for Malachite green and Safranine O by the SYS-AC and ULV-AC respectively were significantly enhanced by the chemical treatments. Model equations such as Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms were used to analyse the adsorption equilibrium data and the best fits to the experimental data were provided by the first two isotherm models. BET, FT-IR, iodine number and methylene blue index determination were also performed to characterize the adsorbents. To describe the adsorption mechanism, kinetic models such as pseudo-second-order and the intra particle diffusion were applied. Thermodynamic analysis of the adsorption processes of both dyes confirms their spontaneity and endothermicity. Increasing solution ionic strength increased significantly the adsorption of Safranine O. This study shows that surface modified algae can be an alternative to the commercially available adsorbents for dyes removal from liquid effluents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Antiangiogenic Effect of Ethanolic Extract of Green Algae (Spirogyra SP.) Against Expression Cox-2 in T47d Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Widyaningsih, Wahyu; Salamah, Nina; Susanti, Hari; Fitriani, Dwi

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases that arise when a cell or group of cells that regulate out of control growth. Green algae (Spirogyra sp.) is one of the medicinal plants used in traditional medicine for the treatment of cancer. Green algae (Spirogyra sp.) has active substances such as melatonin. Melatonin which is a compound that has been examined by researchers world as anticancer drugs and antioxidants. This study aims to determine the effect of ethanol extract of green algae (Spirogyra sp.) o...

  17. ANTIANGIOGENIC EFFECT OF ETHANOLIC EXTRACT OF GREEN ALGAE (Spirogyra sp.) AGAINST EXPRESSION COX-2 IN T47D CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Widyaningsih, Wahyu; Salamah, Nina; Susanti, Hari; Fitriani, Dwi

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases that arise when a cell or group of cells that regulate out of control growth. Green algae (Spirogyra sp.) is one of the medicinal plants used in traditional medicine for the treatment of cancer. Green algae (Spirogyra sp.) has active substances such as melatonin. Melatonin which is a compound that has been examined by researchers world as anticancer drugs and antioxidants. This study aims to determine the effect of ethanol extract of green algae (Spirogyra sp.) o...

  18. Microscopic Gardens: A Close Look at Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Mary Ann

    1983-01-01

    Describes classroom activities using algae, including demonstration of eutrophication, examination of mating strains, and activities with Euglena. Includes on algal morphology/physiology, types of algae, and field sources for collecting these organisms. (JN)

  19. Cytotoxic activity of some marine brown algae against cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHNAZ KHANAVI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro cytotoxic activity of total extract of MeOH (70% and partition fractions of hexan, chloroform (CHCL3, ethylacetate (EtOAc and MeOH-H2O of brown algae species (Sargassum swartzii, Cystoseira myrica, Colpomenia sinuosa found in the Persian Gulf against in different cell lines including HT-29, Caco-2, T47D, MDA-MB468 and NIH 3T3 cell lines by MTT and AnnexinV-PI assay. The hexan fraction of S. swartzii and C. myrica showed selective cytotoxicity against proliferation of Caco-2 cells (IC50<100 μg/ml T47D cell line (IC50<100 μg/ml, respectively. S. swartzii and C. myrica were also observed for increasing apoptosis in Caco-2 and T47D cells. Total extract and fractions of C. sinuosa did not show any significant cytotoxicity against the studied cell lines. MDA-MB468 cells were more sensitive to C. myrica than was T47D (IC50 99.9±8.11 vs. 56.50‘± 0.88. This reflects an estrogen receptor independent mechanism for cytotoxicity of the extract. The IC50 of the hexan fraction of C. myrica on T47D parent cells was lower than it was on T47D-TR cells (IC50 99.9±8.11 vs. 143.15 ± 7.80. This finding suggests a role for the MDR-1 in the development of possible future tolerance to the extract.

  20. Quantitative structure-activity analysis of the algae toxicity of nitroaromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, H; Altenburger, R; Jastorff, B; Schüürmann, G

    2000-06-01

    Proliferation toxicity toward the algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus in a 24 h one-generation reproduction assay was determined for nitrobenzene and 18 derivatives, including two phenols. The resultant EC(50) values covering more than 4 orders of magnitude were subjected to a quantitative structure-activity analysis (QSAR) using hydrophobicity in terms of the octanol/water partition coefficient in logarithmic form, log K(ow), and 16 quantum chemical descriptors of molecular reactivity that were calculated with the AM1 scheme. For 13 mononitro derivatives and the highly hydrophobic trifluralin, a narcotic-type mode of action can explain most of the toxicity variation. Correction of log K(ow) for ionization for the phenols and quantification of the molecular susceptibility for one-electron reduction as apparently rate-determining biotransformation step by the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, E(LUMO), yields a highly significant QSAR for all 19 compounds (r(adj)(2) = 0.90), which can be further improved when adding the maximum net atomic charge at the nitro nitrogen, q(nitro)(-)(N), as the third descriptor (r(adj)(2) = 0.93). Comparison of the energy of the singly occupied molecular orbital, E(SOMO), of the radical anions as initial metabolites with the E(SOMO) of known redox cyclers suggests that dinitrobenzenes and TFM as well as multiply chlorinated nitrobenzenes may also exert oxidative stress. This is based on an E(SOMO) window of -0.30 to 0. 55 eV as a tentative criterion for molecular structures to have the potential for redox cycling, derived from a set of eight known redox cyclers. The discussion includes a detailed analysis of apparently relevant metabolic pathways and associated modes of toxic action of nitroaromatics.

  1. Medicinal Plants with Antiplatelet Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haouari, Mohammed; Rosado, Juan A

    2016-07-01

    Blood platelets play an essential role in the hemostasis and wound-healing processes. However, platelet hyperactivity is associated to the development and the complications of several cardiovascular diseases. In this sense, the search for potent and safer antiplatelet agents is of great interest. This article provides an overview of experimental studies performed on medicinal plants with antiplatelet activity available through literature with particular emphasis on the bioactive constituents, the parts used, and the various platelet signaling pathways modulated by medicinal plants. From this review, it was suggested that medicinal plants with antiplatelet activity mainly belong to the family of Asteraceae, Rutaceae, Fabaceae, Lamiaceae, Zygophyllaceae, Rhamnaceae, Liliaceae, and Zingiberaceae. The antiplatelet effect is attributed to the presence of bioactive compounds such as polyphenols, flavonoids, coumarins, terpenoids, and other substances which correct platelet abnormalities by interfering with different platelet signalization pathways including inhibition of the ADP pathway, suppression of TXA2 formation, reduction of intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, and phosphoinositide breakdown, among others. The identification and/or structure modification of the plant constituents and the understanding of their action mechanisms will be helpful in the development of new antiplatelet agents based on medicinal plants which could contribute to the prevention of thromboembolic-related disorders by inhibiting platelet aggregation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Estrogenic activity in extracts and exudates of cyanobacteria and green algae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sychrová, E.; Štěpánkdová, T.; Nováková, K.; Bláha, Luděk; Giesy, J.P.; Hilscherová, K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 1 (2012), s. 134-140 ISSN 0160-4120 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/08/0496 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : cyanobacteria * endocrine disruption * estrogenicity * algae * phytoplankton Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 6.248, year: 2012

  3. Evolution of Daily Gene Co-expression Patterns from Algae to Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro de los Reyes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Daily rhythms play a key role in transcriptome regulation in plants and microalgae orchestrating responses that, among other processes, anticipate light transitions that are essential for their metabolism and development. The recent accumulation of genome-wide transcriptomic data generated under alternating light:dark periods from plants and microalgae has made possible integrative and comparative analysis that could contribute to shed light on the evolution of daily rhythms in the green lineage. In this work, RNA-seq and microarray data generated over 24 h periods in different light regimes from the eudicot Arabidopsis thaliana and the microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Ostreococcus tauri have been integrated and analyzed using gene co-expression networks. This analysis revealed a reduction in the size of the daily rhythmic transcriptome from around 90% in Ostreococcus, being heavily influenced by light transitions, to around 40% in Arabidopsis, where a certain independence from light transitions can be observed. A novel Multiple Bidirectional Best Hit (MBBH algorithm was applied to associate single genes with a family of potential orthologues from evolutionary distant species. Gene duplication, amplification and divergence of rhythmic expression profiles seems to have played a central role in the evolution of gene families in the green lineage such as Pseudo Response Regulators (PRRs, CONSTANS-Likes (COLs, and DNA-binding with One Finger (DOFs. Gene clustering and functional enrichment have been used to identify groups of genes with similar rhythmic gene expression patterns. The comparison of gene clusters between species based on potential orthologous relationships has unveiled a low to moderate level of conservation of daily rhythmic expression patterns. However, a strikingly high conservation was found for the gene clusters exhibiting their highest and/or lowest expression value during the light transitions.

  4. The Green Tetrahymena utriculariae n. sp. (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophorea) with Its Endosymbiotic Algae (Micractinium sp.), Living in Traps of a Carnivorous Aquatic Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsch, Gianna; Adamec, Lubomír; Dirren, Sebastian; Nitsche, Frank; Šimek, Karel; Sirová, Dagmara; Posch, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    The genus Tetrahymena (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophorea) probably represents the best studied ciliate genus. At present, more than forty species have been described. All are colorless, i.e. they do not harbor symbiotic algae, and as aerobes they need at least microaerobic habitats. Here, we present the morphological and molecular description of the first green representative, Tetrahymena utriculariae n. sp., living in symbiosis with endosymbiotic algae identified as Micractinium sp. (Chlorophyta). The full life cycle of the ciliate species is documented, including trophonts and theronts, conjugating cells, resting cysts and dividers. This species has been discovered in an exotic habitat, namely in traps of the carnivorous aquatic plant Utricularia reflexa (originating from Okavango Delta, Botswana). Green ciliates live as commensals of the plant in this anoxic habitat. Ciliates are bacterivorous, however, symbiosis with algae is needed to satisfy cell metabolism but also to gain oxygen from symbionts. When ciliates are cultivated outside their natural habitat under aerobic conditions and fed with saturating bacterial food, they gradually become aposymbiotic. Based on phylogenetic analyses of 18S rRNA and mitochondrial cox1 genes T. utriculariae forms a sister group to Tetrahymena thermophila. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  5. Algae extracts and methyl jasmonate anti-cancer activities in prostate cancer: choreographers of ‘the dance macabre’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooqi Ammad Ahmad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is an overwhelmingly increasing trend of analysis of naturally occurring ingredients in treatment of prostate cancer. Substantial fraction of information has been added that highlights activity at various levels and steps of deregulated cellular proliferation, metastasis and apoptosis. Among such ingredients, algae extracts and jasmonates are documented to have anti-cancer activity in vitro and in vivo and induce growth inhibition in cancer cells, while leaving the non-transformed cells intact. In this short review we outline systematically, how these ingredients predispose prostate cancer cells to undergo apoptosis.

  6. Algae extracts and methyl jasmonate anti-cancer activities in prostate cancer: choreographers of 'the dance macabre'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Butt, Ghazala; Razzaq, Zubia

    2012-11-26

    There is an overwhelmingly increasing trend of analysis of naturally occurring ingredients in treatment of prostate cancer. Substantial fraction of information has been added that highlights activity at various levels and steps of deregulated cellular proliferation, metastasis and apoptosis. Among such ingredients, algae extracts and jasmonates are documented to have anti-cancer activity in vitro and in vivo and induce growth inhibition in cancer cells, while leaving the non-transformed cells intact. In this short review we outline systematically, how these ingredients predispose prostate cancer cells to undergo apoptosis.

  7. Growth responses of selected freshwater algae to trace elements and scrubber ash slurry generated by coal-fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vocke, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    The development and implementation of standard toxicity tests is a necessity if consistent and reliable data are to be obtained for water quality criteria. The adapted EPA AAPBT is an ideal static algal toxicity test system. The algal test medium has a chemical composition similar to natural unpolluted waters of low ionic strength. It is appropriate to use MATC water quality criteria when assessing the potential impact of pollutants generated by coal-fired power stations because these energy-generated pollutants typically enter aquatic systems in small quantities over long periods. The MATC water quality criteria are estimates of trace element and SASE levels, based on the most sensitive alga investigated, that will not cause significant changes in naturally-functioning algal populations. These levels are 0.016f mg L/sup -1/ As(V), 0.001 mg L/sup -1/ Cd(II), 0.004 mg L/sup -1/ Hg(II), 0.006 mg L/sup -1/ Se(VI), and 0.344% SASE. To provide viable working water quality criteria, an extrapolation from the laboratory to the natural environment must be made. Therefore, those oxidation states of the trace elements were selected which are the dominant states occurring in natural, unpolluted, slightly alkaline freshwaters. It must be pointed out that these MATC values are based on algal responses to single toxicants and no allowance is made for synergistic, additive, or antagonistic relationships which could occur in natural aquatic systems. Additionally, natural chelation may influence toxicity. The highly toxic nature of potential pollutants from coal-fired generating plants emphasizes the need for minimizing stack effluent pollutants and retaining scrubber ash slurry for proper disposal in an effort to maintain trace elements in concentration ranges compatible with naturally-functioning ecosystems.

  8. Management of Powdery Mildew in Squash by Plant and Alga Extract Biopesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouan Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Although many fungicides are registered for use to control powdery mildew on cucurbits, management of resistance to fungicides in pathogen populations still remains a major challenge. Two biopesticides Regalia SC and HMO 736 were evaluated in the greenhouse and field for their efficacy against powdery mildew in squash. In greenhouses, Regalia SC alone significantly (P < 0.05 reduced powdery mildew compared to the nontreated control, and was as effective as the chemical standard Procure 480SC (triflumizole. In alternation with Procure 480SC, Regalia SC demonstrated greater or equivalent effects on reducing the disease. HMO 736 alone showed varying levels of disease control, but alternating with Procure 480SC significantly improved control efficacy. In addition, application of Regalia SC or HMO 736 each in alternation with Procure 480SC significantly increased the chlorophyll content in leaves and the total fresh weight of squash plants, when compared with the water control, Regalia SC and HMO 736 alone. In field trials, application of Regalia SC and HMO 736 each alone significantly reduced disease severity in one of two field trials during the early stage of disease development, but not during later stages when disease pressure became high. Both Regalia SC and HMO 736 each applied in alternation with Procure 480SC significantly improved the control efficacy compared to Procure 480SC alone. Results from this study demonstrated that an integrated management program can be developed for powdery mildew in squash by integrating the biopesticides Regalia SC, HMO 736 with the chemical fungicide Procure 480SC.

  9. Screening of marine algae for potential tyrosinase inhibitor: those inhibitors reduced tyrosinase activity and melanin synthesis in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Seon-Heui; Ko, Seok-Chun; Kim, Daekyung; Jeon, You-Jin

    2011-04-01

    In order to find new anti-browning and whitening agents in this study, we investigated 43 indigenous marine algae for tyrosinase inhibitory activity. The extracts from Endarachne binghamiae, Schizymenia dubyi, Ecklonia cava (EC) and Sargassum silquastrum (SS) evidenced potent tyrosinase inhibitory activity similar to that of positive control, kojic acid. Among those marine algae, EC and SS are distributed abundantly on Jeju Island. Therefore, we selected those two species for further studies. Our results evidenced that both species reduced cellular melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity. On the other hand, we utilized zebrafish as an alternative in vivo model. All the tested samples evidenced excellent inhibitory effects on the pigmentation of zebrafish, most likely due to their potential tyrosinase inhibitory activity. In simultaneous in vivo toxicity tests, no toxicity was observed in either algal species, on the other hand, toxicity was observed in positive controls. These results provided that EC and SS extract could be used as an ingredient for whiting cosmetics and that zebrafish is an alternative in vivo model. © 2010 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  10. Anti-Proliferative Activity of Meroditerpenoids Isolated from the Brown Alga Stypopodium flabelliforme against Several Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Valentao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The sea constitutes one of the most promising sources of novel compounds with potential application in human therapeutics. In particular, algae have proved to be an interesting source of new bioactive compounds. In this work, six meroditerpenoids (epitaondiol, epitaondiol diacetate, epitaondiol monoacetate, stypotriol triacetate, 14-ketostypodiol diacetate and stypodiol isolated from the brown alga Stypopodium flabelliforme were tested for their cell proliferation inhibitory activity in five cell lines. Cell lines tested included human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2, human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y, rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3, murine macrophages (RAW.267 and Chinese hamster fibroblasts (V79. Antimicrobial activity of the compounds was also evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Proteus mirabilis, Bacillus cereus, Enterococcus faecalis and Micrococcus luteus. Overall, the compounds showed good activity against all cell lines, with SH-SY5Y and RAW.267 being the most susceptible. Antimicrobial capacity was observed for epitaondiol monoacetate, stypotriol triacetate and stypodiol, with the first being the most active. The results suggest that these molecules deserve further studies in order to evaluate their potential as therapeutic agents.

  11. Aquatic macro algae of a region under Almirante Alvaro Alberto nuclear power plant influence. I. Spatial seasonal evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrini, A.G.; Universidade Santa Ursula, Rio de Janeiro, RJ; Cassano, V.; Coelho, L.G.; Labronici, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    Marine macro algae from the area which is under in fluence of the heated and chlorate liquid effluent to the CNAAA were observed (1981-1983) at 3 collection points: Pingo Dagua, Velho Beach, discharge point. A total of 121 taxa were found: 29 Chlorophyta, 26 Phaeophyta and 66 Rhodophyta. The spring season was the richest in taxa (78) while autumn was the poorest (85). Overall, the data suggest that the point A (Pingo Dagua) macro algae community (which is similar to the discharge point (0,80) is adequate for the control of the CNAAA effluent impact ad Piraquara de Fora. (author). 11 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  12. Antioxidant Activity and Gas Chromatographic-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Extracts of the Marine Algae, Caulerpa peltata and Padina Gymnospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Kavitha; Iyer, Vidhya V

    2014-01-01

    The results of our previous investigations on extracts of selected marine algae showed that Caulerpa peltata and Padina gymnospora had more promising antiproliferative and antioxidant activities than Gelidiella acerosa and Sargassum wightii. Based on these results, the more active chloroform extract of C. peltata and ethyl acetate extract of P. gymnospora were further analyzed for their constituents by using gas chromatography in tandem with mass spectrometry. The GC-MS analysis (GC % peak area given in parentheses) showed that fucosterol (12.45%) and L-(+)-ascorbic acid 2, 6-dihexadecanoate (8.13%) were the major compounds present in P. gymnospora ethyl acetate extract. On the other hand, C. peltata chloroform extract had 1-heptacosanol (10.52%), hexacosanol acetate (9.28%), tetradecyl ester of chloroacetic acid (7.22%), Z,Z-6, 28-heptatriactontadien-2-one (6.77%) and 10, 13-dimethyl-methyl ester of tetradecanoic acid (5.34%) as major compounds. Also described in the report are the beta-carotene bleaching inhibitory and total reducing activities of the chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts of C. peltata and P. gymnospora, respectively, relative to the other three extracts (aqueous, methanol, chloroform or ethyl acetate) of the two algae.

  13. Algae Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    Algae are highly efficient at producing biomass, and they can be found all over the planet. Many use sunlight and nutrients to create biomass, which contain key components—including lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates— that can be converted and upgraded to a variety of biofuels and products. A functional algal biofuels production system requires resources such as suitable land and climate, sustainable management of water resources, a supplemental carbon dioxide (CO2) supply, and other nutrients (e.g., nitrogen and phosphorus). Algae can be an attractive feedstock for many locations in the United States because their diversity allows for highpotential biomass yields in a variety of climates and environments. Depending on the strain, algae can grow by using fresh, saline, or brackish water from surface water sources, groundwater, or seawater. Additionally, they can grow in water from second-use sources such as treated industrial wastewater; municipal, agricultural, or aquaculture wastewater; or produced water generated from oil and gas drilling operations.

  14. Relative rates of evolution among the three genetic compartments of the red alga Porphyra differ from those of green plants and do not correlate with genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David R; Hua, Jimeng; Lee, Robert W; Keeling, Patrick J

    2012-10-01

    In photosynthetic eukaryotes, relative silent-site nucleotide substitution rates (which can be used to approximate relative mutation rates) among mitochondrial, plastid, and nuclear genomes (mtDNAs, ptDNAs, and nucDNAs) are estimated to be 1:3:10 respectively for seed plants and roughly equal for green algae. These estimates correlate with certain genome characteristics, such as size and coding density, and have therefore been taken to support a relationship between mutation rate and genome architecture. Plants and green algae, however, represent a small fraction of the major eukaryotic plastid-bearing lineages. Here, we investigate relative rates of mutation within the model red algal genus Porphyra. In contrast to plants, we find that the levels of silent-site divergence between the Porphyra purpurea and Porphyra umbilicalis mtDNAs are three times that of their ptDNAs and five times that of their nucDNAs. Moreover, relative mutation rates do not correlate with genome architecture: despite an estimated three-fold difference in their mutation rate, the mitochondrial and plastid genome coding densities are equivalent - an observation that extends to organisms with secondary red algal plastids. These findings are supported by within-species silent-site polymorphism data from P. purpurea. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Antiproliferative activity of methanolic extracts from two green algae, Enteromorpha intestinalis and Rizoclonium riparium on HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Subhabrata; Kundu, Rita

    2013-12-19

    Natural compounds can be alternative sources for finding new lead anti-cancer molecules. Marine algae have been a traditional source for bioactive compounds. Enteromorpha intestinalis and Rhizoclonium riparium are two well distributed saline/brackish water algae from Sundarbans. There's no previous report of these two for their anti-proliferative activities. Cytotoxicity of the algal methanolic extracts (AMEs) on HeLa cells were assayed by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay. Morphological examinations were done by Haematoxylin, Hoechst 33258 and Acridine orange staining. DNA fragmentation was checked. Gene expressions of Cysteine aspartate protease (Caspase) 3, Tumor protein (TP) 53, Bcl-2 associated protein X (Bax) were studied by Reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) keeping Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as internal control. Protein expressions were studied for Caspase 3, phospho-p53, Bax, Microtubule associated proteins-1/ light chain B (MAP1/LC3B) by western blot. The AMEs were found to be cytotoxic with Inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) values 309.048 ± 3.083 μg/ml and 506.081 ± 3.714 μg/ml for E. intestinalis and R. riparium extracts respectively. Treated cells became round with blebbings with condensed nuclei. Acidic lysosomal vacuoles formation occurred in treated cells. Expression of apoptotic genes in both mRNA and protein level was lowered. Expression of LC3B-II suggested occurrence of autophagy in treated cells. These two algae can be potent candidates for isolating new lead anticancer molecules. So they need further characterization at both molecular and structural levels.

  16. Phytotoxic effects of terrestrial dissolved organic matter on a freshwater cyanobacteria and green algae species is affected by plant source and DOM chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilen, Amanda D; Hawker, Darryl W; O'Brien, Katherine R; Burford, Michele A

    2017-10-01

    Here we link plant source phylogeny to its chemical characteristics and determine parameters useful for predicting DOM phytotoxicity towards algal monocultures. We found that DOM characterised using UV-visible spectroscopic indices and elemental analysis is useful for distinguishing DOM plant sources. Specifically, combined values of absorbance at 440 nm and coefficients for the spectral slope ratio, were used to distinguish between gymnosperm-leached DOM and that from angiosperms. In our bioassays, DOM leached from 4 g leaf L -1 resulted in over 40% inhibition of photosynthetic yield for the cyanobacterium, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, for eight of the nine plants tested. Significant variables for predicting inhibition of yield were DOM exposure time and plant source, or using an alternate model, exposure time and spectroscopic and elemental measures. Our study proposes spectroscopic indices which can estimate a plant source's contribution to aquatic DOM, may provide insights into ecological outcomes, such as phytotoxicity to algae. The cyanobacterium (C. raciborskii) was more sensitive to DOM than a green algae (Monoraphidium spp.), as identified in a subsequent dose-response experiment with five different DOM plant sources. Low level additions of angiosperm derived-DOM (i.e. 0.5 g L -1 ) were slight phytotoxic to Monoraphidium spp. causing 30% inhibition of yield, while C. raciborskii was not affected. Higher DOM additions (i.e. 2 g L -1 ) caused 100% inhibition of yield for C. raciborskii, while Monoraphidium spp. inhibition remained under 30%. The divergence in algal sensitivity to DOM indicates that in aquatic systems, DOM derived from catchment vegetation has the potential to affect algal assemblages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of the anticancer and antioxidant activity of the brown algae (Cystoseira indica extract against the colorectal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Taheri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, numerous studies have been conducted on the use of bioactive compounds as anti-cancer agents regarding their antioxidant activities. The current study aimed to assess the anti-cancer and anti-oxidant activities of organic and water extracts of brown algae (Cystoseira indica collected from the shores of Chabahar, Iran. Materials and Methods: The extraction was performed based on the method of immersion by n-hexane, ethanol, methanol, chloroform and distilled water as solvent during 24 hours. The reducing power, free radical (DPPH scavenging activity, metal chelating activity and cytotoxicity against colorectal cancer cells were examined by the MTT test. Results: The chloroform extract showed the best reducing power compared to the other infusions, with an average of 0.36±0.02 µg/µL. Also, chloroform extract showed the best metal chelating activity with an average of 62.18±0.86 µg/µL (P<0.05. The best free radical scavenging activity observed in the ethanol and methanol extracts with concentrations of 15.83 and 33.21 µg/µL, respectively; the inhibitory activity of methanol extracts was better than ethanol extract (P<0.05. Regarding the anti-cancer properties, methanol extract (30±1.33 µg/µL showed the greatest effect on cancer cell death and the water extract showed the least effect (66.67±1.11 µg/µL (P<0.05. Conclusion: The extract of the brown algae (Cystoseira indica can be proposed as an antioxidant and anticancer compound for preclinical and clinical studies.

  18. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-01-01

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  19. Antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extracts from algae against Penicillium expansum Link (Trichocomaceae, Ascomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argus Cezar da Rocha Neto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2015v28n4p23 Penicillium expansum is a cosmopolitan, highly aggressive pathogen that causes blue mold, a disease of great importance that leads to losses in quality and quantity of harvested fruits. The application of chemicals is traditionally used as a control method. However, algae bioprospecting has revealed many antifungal compounds that can be used to control pathogens. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of ethanolic extracts from seven microalgae and five macroalgae against P. expansum. The antifungal potential was evaluated by analyzing germination percentage, the size of the germ tube, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, and the median effective concentration (EC50. The spectrophotometric profile was determined for extracts that showed an inhibitory effect. Among the investigated algae, the Chlorella sp. and H. pluvialis extracts, which had final concentrations of 18.8 and 125.95mg.mL-1, inhibited 100% and 91% germination, respectively. The EC50 was 2.93 and 61.20 mg.mL-1 for Chlorella sp. and H. pluvialis, respectively. Chlorella sp. showed absorption peaks in the range of chlorophyll-a and H. pluvialis presented a peak in the range of phenolic compounds. Although further studies are required to characterize the extracts, Chlorella sp. and H. pluvialis showed promising antifungal effects on the control of P. expansum.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extracts from algae against Penicillium expansum Link (Trichocomaceae, Ascomycota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argus Cezar da Rocha Neto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Penicillium expansum is a cosmopolitan, highly aggressive pathogen that causes blue mold, a disease of great importance that leads to losses in quality and quantity of harvested fruits. The application of chemicals is traditionally used as a control method. However, algae bioprospecting has revealed many antifungal compounds that can be used to control pathogens. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of ethanolic extracts from seven microalgae and five macroalgae against P. expansum. The antifungal potential was evaluated by analyzing germination percentage, the size of the germ tube, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, and the median effective concentration (EC50. The spectrophotometric profile was determined for extracts that showed an inhibitory effect. Among the investigated algae, the Chlorella sp. and H. pluvialis extracts, which had final concentrations of 18.8 and 125.95mg.mL-1, inhibited 100% and 91% germination, respectively. The EC50 was 2.93 and 61.20 mg.mL-1 for Chlorella sp. and H. pluvialis, respectively. Chlorella sp. showed absorption peaks in the range of chlorophyll-a and H. pluvialis presented a peak in the range of phenolic compounds. Although further studies are required to characterize the extracts, Chlorella sp. and H. pluvialis showed promising antifungal effects on the control of P. expansum.

  1. Biodiesel and poly-unsaturated fatty acids production from algae and crop plants - a rapid and comprehensive workflow for lipid analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhashi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takemichi; Fragner, Lena; Roustan, Valentin; Schön, Verena; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2016-10-01

    Fatty acid methyl ester analysis (FAME) by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a widely used technique in biodiesel/bioproduct (e.g. poly-unsaturated fatty acids, PUFA) research but typically does not allow distinguishing between bound and free fatty acids. To understand and optimize biosynthetic pathways, however, the origin of the fatty acid is an important information. Furthermore the annotation of PUFAs is compromised in classical GC-EI-MS because the precursor molecular ion is missing. In the present protocol an alkaline methyl esterification step with TMS derivatization enabling the simultaneous analysis of bound and free fatty acids but also further lipids such as sterols in one GC-MS chromatogram is combined. This protocol is applied to different lipid extracts from single cell algae to higher plants: Chlorella vulgaris, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Coffea arabica, Pisum sativum and Cuscuta japonica. Further, field ionization (GC-FI-MS) is introduced for a better annotation of fatty acids and exact determination of the number of double bonds in PUFAs. The proposed workflow provides a convenient strategy to analyze algae and other plant crop systems with respect to their capacity for third generation biodiesel and high-quality bioproducts for nutrition such as PUFAs. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Enhancement of Antioxidant Enzymes Activities, Drought Stress Tolerances and Quality of Potato Plants as Response to Algal Foliar Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Baky, Hanaa H; Nofal, Osama A; El Baroty, Gamal S

    2016-01-01

    Different types of environmental stress may induce several physiological, biochemical and molecular responses in several crop plants. According to a patent study, several types of low antioxidant defense compounds and the activity of various antioxidant defense enzymes are induced in plants grown under various biotic and abiotic stress factors. In this work, the responses of potatoes plant treated with algae extract to drought stress were examined by evaluating the crop yield of tuber, cellular biological compounds (total carbohydrates and proteins), mineral composition and enzyme and non-enzyme antioxidant systems and total oxidative compounds. The yield of tuber, concentration of low antioxidant defense compounds (glutathione, ascorbate, carotenoids, total phenol, flavonoids and tocopherols) and the activity of various antioxidant defense enzymes (catalase CAT; peroxidase POD; ascorbate peroxidase APX and superoxide dismutase SOD) in tuber of treated potato plants with algae extract were significantly increased compared with that in non-treated plants. In addition, essential elements: Fe, K, Ca, Mg and P were accumulated at high concentration in treated plant than that in untreated plants. The screening of antioxidant activity of the ethanolic extract of tubers potatoes treated with algae extracts using the di-(phenyl)-(2,4,6- trinitrophenyl) iminoazanium radical (DPPH) assay radical-scavenging showed an appreciable reduction of the stable radical DPPH with an IC50 of 75 µg/ml. The results suggest that the algae foliar extracts application can improve non-enzymatic and enzymatic antioxidant defense systems in potatoes plant cultivated under drought stress conditions, and it may be recommended for application in arid and semiarid regions.

  3. Stable transformation and reverse genetic analysis of Penium margaritaceum: a platform for studies of charophyte green algae, the immediate ancestors of land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Iben; Fei, Zhangjun; Andreas, Amanda; Willats, William G T; Domozych, David S; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2014-02-01

    The charophyte green algae (CGA, Streptophyta, Viridiplantae) occupy a key phylogenetic position as the immediate ancestors of land plants but, paradoxically, are less well-studied than the other major plant lineages. This is particularly true in the context of functional genomic studies, where the lack of an efficient protocol for their stable genetic transformation has been a major obstacle. Observations of extant CGA species suggest the existence of some of the evolutionary adaptations that had to occur for land colonization; however, to date, there has been no robust experimental platform to address this genetically. We present a protocol for high-throughput Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Penium margaritaceum, a unicellular CGA species. The versatility of Penium as a model for studying various aspects of plant cell biology and development was illustrated through non-invasive visualization of protein localization and dynamics in living cells. In addition, the utility of RNA interference (RNAi) for reverse genetic studies was demonstrated by targeting genes associated with cell wall modification (pectin methylesterase) and biosynthesis (cellulose synthase). This provided evidence supporting current models of cell wall assembly and inter-polymer interactions that were based on studies of land plants, but in this case using direct observation in vivo. This new functional genomics platform has broad potential applications, including studies of plant organismal biology and the evolutionary innovations required for transition from aquatic to terrestrial habitats. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Removal of toxic chromium from aqueous solution, wastewater and saline water by marine red alga Pterocladia capillacea and its activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed El Nemr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pterocladia capillacea, a red marine macroalgae, was tested for its ability to remove toxic hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution. A new activated carbon obtained from P. capillacea via acid dehydration was also investigated as an adsorbent for toxic chromium. The experiments were conducted to study the effect of important parameters such as pH, chromium concentration and adsorbent weight. Batch equilibrium tests at different pH conditions showed that at pH 1.0, a maximum chromium uptake was observed for both inactivated dried red alga P. capillacea and its activated carbon. The maximum sorption capacities for dried red alga and its activated carbon were about 12 and 66 mgg−1, respectively, as calculated by Langmuir model. The ability of inactivated red alga P. capillacea and developed activated carbon to remove chromium from synthetic sea water, natural sea water and wastewater was investigated as well. Different isotherm models were used to analyze the experimental data and the models parameters were evaluated. This study showed that the activated carbon developed from red alga P. capillacea is a promising activated carbon for removal of toxic chromium.

  5. Fuel From Algae: Scaling and Commercialization of Algae Harvesting Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Led by CEO Ross Youngs, AVS has patented a cost-effective dewatering technology that separates micro-solids (algae) from water. Separating micro-solids from water traditionally requires a centrifuge, which uses significant energy to spin the water mass and force materials of different densities to separate from one another. In a comparative analysis, dewatering 1 ton of algae in a centrifuge costs around $3,400. AVS’s Solid-Liquid Separation (SLS) system is less energy-intensive and less expensive, costing $1.92 to process 1 ton of algae. The SLS technology uses capillary dewatering with filter media to gently facilitate water separation, leaving behind dewatered algae which can then be used as a source for biofuels and bio-products. The biomimicry of the SLS technology emulates the way plants absorb and spread water to their capillaries.

  6. Global Activities and Plant Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger

    2014-01-01

    the highest exit rates. Moreover, the exit rates of globally engaged plants seem to be unaffected by increased foreign presence, whereas there appears to be a negative impact on the survival rates of non-exporting non-MNE plants. Finally, the result reveals that the survival ratio of plants of acquired...

  7. Effects of UV-B irradiation on isoforms of antioxidant enzymes and their activities in red alga Grateloupia filicina (Rhodophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiqiang; Li, Lixia

    2014-11-01

    Macroalgae in a littoral zone are inevitably exposed to UV-B irradiance. We analyzed the effects of UV-B on isoenzyme patterns and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) of red algae Grateloupia filicina (Lamour.) C. Agardh. The activities of SOD, CAT, and APX changed in response to UV-B in a time- and dose-dependent manner. POX activity increased significantly under all three UV-B treatments. The enzymatic assay showed three distinct bands of SODI (Mn-SOD), SODII (Fe-SOD), and SODIII (CuZn-SOD) under a low (Luv) and medium (Muv) dose of UV-B irradiation, while SODI and SODIII activities decreased significantly when exposed to a high dose of UV-B irradiation (Huv). The activity of POX isoenzymes increased significantly after exposure to UV-B, which is consistent with the total activity. In addition, a clear decrease in activity of CATIV was detected in response to all the three doses of UV treatments. Some bands of APX isoenzyme were also clearly influenced by UV-B irradiation. Correspondingly, the daily growth rate declined under all the three exposure doses, and was especially significant under Muv and Huv treatments. These data suggest that, although the protection mechanisms of antioxidant defense system are partly inducible by UV-B to prevent the damage, G. filicina has incomplete tolerance to higher UV-B irradiation stress.

  8. Antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxic activities exhibited by endophytic fungi from the Brazilian marine red alga Bostrychia tenella (Ceramiales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de Felício

    Full Text Available Abstract Marine environment is one of the most important sources regarding natural products research. Besides, marine microorganisms have been denominated as a talented natural source for discovery of new leads. Although the association of macroalgae and fungi has been described regarding ecological issues, there is a lack of studies about marine seaweed endophytic fungi. In this context, the goal of this study was to evaluate cytotoxic, antifungal and antibacterial activities of endophytic fungi isolated from the Brazilian marine seaweed Bostrychia tenella (J.V. Lamouroux J. Agardh (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta. Forty-five endophytic microorganism strains were isolated from B. tenella. Crude extracts and organic fractions of ten selected strains were obtained after growth in rice medium. Samples were evaluated for cytotoxicity, antifungal and antibacterial assays. Penicillium strains showed positive results in a diversity of assays, and other five strains were active in at least one test. In addition, cytochalasin D was isolated from Xylaria sp. This alga is composed of a microbiological potential, since its endophytic strains exhibited remarkable biological properties. Moreover, cytochalasin D isolation has confirmed chemical potential of marine endophytic strains. This is the first study in which cultured fungi isolates from the Brazilian macroalga B. tenella were evaluated concerning biological properties. Results corroborated that this species could be a pharmaceutical source from marine environment. Furthermore, Acremonium implicatum is being firstly described as marine endophyte and Xylaria sp., Trichoderma atroviride and Nigrospora oryzae as marine seaweed endophytes. Thus, this work reports the first study relating detailed isolation, cultivation and biological evaluation (cytotoxic, antifungal and antibacterial of endophytes Penicillium decaturense and P. waksmanii from the Brazilian marine red alga B. tenella. We are also reporting the

  9. The physiological responses of Vallisneria natans to epiphytic algae with the increase of N and P concentrations in water bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu-Zhi; Wang, Jin-Qi; Gao, Yong-Xia; Xie, Xue-Jian

    2015-06-01

    To reveal the mechanism of submerged plants decline in progressively eutrophicated freshwaters, physiological responses of Vallisneria natans to epiphytic algae were studied in simulation lab by measuring plant physiological indexes of chlorophyll content, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity based on a 2 × 4 factorial design with two epiphytic conditions (with epiphytic algae and without) and four levels of N and P concentrations in water (N-P[mg.L(-1)]: 0.5, 0.05; 2.5, 0.25; 4.5, 0.45; 12.5, 1.25). Compared with control (non-presence of epiphytic algae), chlorophyll contents of V. natans were significantly decreased (p algae under any concentrations of N and P in water bodies. While the presence of epiphytic algae induced peroxidation of membrane lipids, MDA contents of V. natans had significantly increased (p algae in the treatments of T2 and T3 in the whole culture process by comparing with control, sometimes reaching an extremely significant level (p algae (p algae on chlorophyll content and SOD activity in the leaves of V. natans were increased at first and then decreased with the concentrations of N and P in water, and MDA content became higher with the increase of N and P. concentrations. Repeated measurement data testing showed that the effects of epiphytic algae on the chlorophyll content and MDA content and SOD activity were significant, respectively (p algae were combining with effects of concentrations of N and P (p algae directly produced adverse effects on physiology of V. natans and epiphytic algal biomass were positively correlated with nutrient available in the water column.

  10. Clean recovery of antioxidant compounds from plant foods, by-products and algae assisted by ultrasounds processing. Modeling approaches to optimize processing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roselló-Soto, Elena; Galanakis, Charis M.; Brnčić, Mladen

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound treatment is an alternative affordable, effective and reproducible method for the improved recovery of bioactive compounds from various processing streams. The objective of this review is to discuss the impact of ultrasound-assisted extraction on the recovery of polyphenols, carotenoids...... and chlorophylls from vegetal and algae matters. Optimization strategies will need to focus on appropriate equipment design and configuration of ultrasonic components, and extrinsic and intrinsic control parameters including ultrasonic power, temperature and extraction time to maximize the yield and biological...... activity of the extract. Modeling strategies to characterize and optimize ultrasound processes are also be highlighted in the manuscript....

  11. Polysaccharides from brown algae Sargassum duplicatum: the structure and anticancer activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usoltseva, Roza V; Anastyuk, Stanislav D; Shevchenko, Natalia M; Surits, Valerii V; Silchenko, Artem S; Isakov, Vladimir V; Zvyagintseva, Tatiana N; Thinh, Pham Duc; Ermakova, Svetlana P

    2017-11-01

    The laminaran SdL and fucoidan SdF were isolated from brown algae Sargassum duplicatum. SdL was 1,3;1,6-β-d-glucan (1,3:1,6=6:1) with a main chain, represented by 1,3-linked glucose residues, due to NMR spectroscopy data. Single glucose residues could form branches at C6. Unusual structure of fucoidan SdF was studied by chemical and enzymatic methods, NMR spectroscopy of desulfated and deacetylated polysaccharide and mass spectrometry of fucoidan fragments labeled with 18 O. Fucoidan was sulfated (31.7%) and acetylated galactofucan (Fuc:Gal∼1:1) with a main chain of 1,4-linked alternating α-l-fucose and β-d-galactose residues. Side chains were represented by extensive (DP≥5) 1,3-linked 2,4-disulfated α-l-fucose residues with branching points at C2. Fucose residues in the main chain were sulfated at C2 and less at C3, while galactose residues were sulfated at C2, C3, and less at C4, C6. The fucoidan SdF was effective against colony formation of colon cancer cells in vitro. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Understanding the biological activity of high rate algae ponds through the calculation of oxygen balances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbib, Zouhayr; de Godos Crespo, Ignacio; Corona, Enrique Lara; Rogalla, Frank

    2017-06-01

    Microalgae culture in high rate algae ponds (HRAP) is an environmentally friendly technology for wastewater treatment. However, for the implementation of these systems, a better understanding of the oxygenation potential and the influence of climate conditions is required. In this work, the rates of oxygen production, consumption, and exchange with the atmosphere were calculated under varying conditions of solar irradiance and dilution rate during six months of operation in a real scale unit. This analysis allowed determining the biological response of these dynamic systems. The rates of oxygen consumption measured were considerably higher than the values calculated based on the organic loading rate. The response to light intensity in terms of oxygen production in the bioreactor was described with one of the models proposed for microalgae culture in dense concentrations. This model is based on the availability of light inside the culture and the specific response of microalgae to this parameter. The specific response to solar radiation intensity showed a reasonable stability in spite of the fluctuations due to meteorological conditions. The methodology developed is a useful tool for optimization and prediction of the performance of these systems.

  13. Influence of active marine organic matter on electrochemical corrosion. Study on brown algae polyphenol's action on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shi-de; Yan, Xiao-Jun; Fan, Xiao; Chen, Yu-Min; Fang, Guo-Ming; Du, Ai-Ling

    1999-12-01

    Chemical means were used to extract polyphenols from healthy brown algae collected in littoral seawater. Experiments on corrosion of A3 steel, the time-potential curve, and polarization curve in polyphenols seawater showed stronger cathodic polarization compared with that in common seawater. This indicates that brown algae polyphenols might feasibly be used as corrosion inhibitor in seawater.

  14. Production of Bacillus subtilis-fermented red alga Porphyra dentata suspension with fibrinolytic and immune-enhancing activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong-Ting Victor; Hwang, Pai-An; Lin, Tzu-Chun; Tsai, Guo-Jane

    2014-01-01

    The fermented marine alga Porphyra dentata suspension was tested for its fibrinolytic and immune-enhancing activities. An isolated Bacillus subtilis N2 strain was selected for its fibrinolytic activity on fibrin plates. After investigating the effects of biomass amounts of P. dentata powder in water, various additives including sugars, nitrogen-containing substances, lipids and minerals, and cultural conditions of temperature and agitation in flask, the highest fibrinolytic activity in the cultural filtrate was obtained by cultivating N2 strain in 3% (w/v) P. dentata powder suspension containing 1% peanut oil at 37 °C, 150 rpm for 48 h. A fermentor system was further established using the same medium with controlled pH value of 7.0 at 37 °C, 150 rpm, 2.0 vvm for 48 h for the best fibrinolytic activity. The fermented product also showed its immune-enhancing activity by increasing cell proliferation and stimulating the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in J774.1 cells.

  15. The comparison of structure and anticancer activity in vitro of polysaccharides from brown algae Alaria marginata and A. angusta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usoltseva Menshova, Roza V; Anastyuk, Stanislav D; Shevchenko, Natalia M; Zvyagintseva, Tatiana N; Ermakova, Svetlana P

    2016-11-20

    Laminaran and three fucoidan fractions were obtained from the brown alga Alaria marginata. Alaria angusta, studied earlier by us, has the same polysaccharide composition. Galactofucan AmF3 from A. marginata has a main chain of →3)-α-l-Fucp-(2,4-SO3(-))-(1→residues, similar to galactofucan from A. angusta. However, the structure of the branches in fucoidan AmF3 can differ from those in the fucoidan from A. angusta. The following fragments were identified in AmF3: HexA-(1→2)-Fuc, HexA-(1→2)-Gal, Gal-(1→4)-HexA, Fuc-(1→2)-Gal-6-SO3(-), Fuc-4-SO3(-)-(1→6)-Gal, Gal-(1→2)-Gal-2-SO3(-), Gal-4-SO3(-)-(1 →6)-Gal, Gal-4-SO3(-)-(1→3)-Fuc-(1→3)-Fuc, Fuc-4-SO3(-)-(1→6)-Gal-(1→4)-Gal, Gal-(1→4)-Gal-(1→3)-Fuc, Gal-2-SO3(-)-(1→4)-Gal-(1→4)-Gal, Gal-(1→4)-Gal-6-SO3(-)-(1→2)-Gal. Chains of galactose residues (DP up to 9) were found in AmF3 fucoidan. The laminarans, galactofucans and their derivatives from both algae exhibited no cytotoxicity in vitro. Polysaccharides from A. angusta were more effective against colony formation of HT-29 cells, while those from A. marginata had a greater effect on T-47D cells. Sulfated and desulfated fucoidans possessed weak antitumor activity using SK-MEL-28 cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Immunological cross-reactions between P700 chlorophyll-proteins isolated from two marine green algae and one higher plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaonan; Zhou, Baicheng; Tseng, C. K.

    1991-06-01

    P700 Chl-protein was isolated from a marine green alga Bryopsis corticulans with SDS-resolved thylakoid membranes by SDS-PAGE. After elution from the gel, the recovered protein revealed a 100 KD polypeptide by re-electrophoresis. The same SDS-PAGE procedure was used to isolate P700 Chl-proteins from spinach ( Spinacea oleracea) and another marine green alga Codium fragile. Polyclonal antibodies to Bryopsis P700 protein were raised in rabbits. The antibodies were shown to cross-react with P700 Chl-protein and Chl-protein complexes containing P700 protein from B. Corticulans, C. f ragile, and even spinach. Results indicate similarity of the amino acid sequences of the P700 Chl-proteins and the highly conserved structure of the apoproteins of phylogenetically distant species over evolution. The antibodies cross-react with none of the components of PSII in the species tested, indicating an independent pathway of evolution of photosystem I and photosystem II of later origin.

  17. Inhibitory action of marine algae extracts on the Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase activity and on the protozoan growth in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nara, Takeshi; Kamei, Yuto; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Annoura, Takeshi; Hirota, Kenichiro; Iizumi, Kyoichi; Dohmoto, Yuki; Ono, Takeaki; Aoki, Takashi

    2005-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, replicates in mammalian cells and relies on the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway that supplies essential precursors for nucleic acid synthesis. The protozoan dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD), the fourth enzyme of the pathway catalyzing production of orotate from dihydroorotate, markedly differs from the human enzyme. This study was thus aimed to search for potent inhibitors against T. cruzi DHOD activity, and a number of methanol extracts prepared from green, brown, and red algae were assayed. The extracts from two brown algae, Fucus evanescens and Pelvetia babingtonii, yielded 59 and 58% decrease in the recombinant DHOD activity, respectively, at the concentration of 50 microg/ml. Inhibition by these extracts was noncompetitive with respect to dihydroorotate, with apparent Ki values of 35.3+/-5.9 and 10.3+/-4.4 microg/ml, respectively. Further, in an in vitro T. cruzi-HeLa cell infection system, ethanol-reconstituted F. evanescens and P. babingtonii extracts at the concentration of 1 microg/ml, respectively, decreased significantly the infection rate of host cells and the average parasite number per infected cell. These results imply that F. evanescens and P. babingtonii contain inhibitor(s) against the T. cruzi DHOD activity and against the protozoan infection and proliferation in mammalian cells. Identification of inhibitor(s) in these two brown algae and further screening of other marine algae may facilitate the discovery of new, anti-trypanosomal lead compounds.

  18. Impact of e-publication changes in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (Melbourne Code, 2012) - did we need to "run for our lives"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolson, Nicky; Challis, Katherine; Tucker, Allan; Knapp, Sandra

    2017-05-25

    At the Nomenclature Section of the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne, Australia (IBC), the botanical community voted to allow electronic publication of nomenclatural acts for algae, fungi and plants, and to abolish the rule requiring Latin descriptions or diagnoses for new taxa. Since the 1st January 2012, botanists have been able to publish new names in electronic journals and may use Latin or English as the language of description or diagnosis. Using data on vascular plants from the International Plant Names Index (IPNI) spanning the time period in which these changes occurred, we analysed trajectories in publication trends and assessed the impact of these new rules for descriptions of new species and nomenclatural acts. The data show that the ability to publish electronically has not "opened the floodgates" to an avalanche of sloppy nomenclature, but concomitantly neither has there been a massive expansion in the number of names published, nor of new authors and titles participating in publication of botanical nomenclature. The e-publication changes introduced in the Melbourne Code have gained acceptance, and botanists are using these new techniques to describe and publish their work. They have not, however, accelerated the rate of plant species description or participation in biodiversity discovery as was hoped.

  19. The brown algae Pl.LSU/2 group II intron-encoded protein has functional reverse transcriptase and maturase activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Zerbato

    Full Text Available Group II introns are self-splicing mobile elements found in prokaryotes and eukaryotic organelles. These introns propagate by homing into precise genomic locations, following assembly of a ribonucleoprotein complex containing the intron-encoded protein (IEP and the spliced intron RNA. Engineered group II introns are now commonly used tools for targeted genomic modifications in prokaryotes but not in eukaryotes. We speculate that the catalytic activation of currently known group II introns is limited in eukaryotic cells. The brown algae Pylaiella littoralis Pl.LSU/2 group II intron is uniquely capable of in vitro ribozyme activity at physiological level of magnesium but this intron remains poorly characterized. We purified and characterized recombinant Pl.LSU/2 IEP. Unlike most IEPs, Pl.LSU/2 IEP displayed a reverse transcriptase activity without intronic RNA. The Pl.LSU/2 intron could be engineered to splice accurately in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and splicing efficiency was increased by the maturase activity of the IEP. However, spliced transcripts were not expressed. Furthermore, intron splicing was not detected in human cells. While further tool development is needed, these data provide the first functional characterization of the PI.LSU/2 IEP and the first evidence that the Pl.LSU/2 group II intron splicing occurs in vivo in eukaryotes in an IEP-dependent manner.

  20. Evolution of photoprotection mechanisms upon land colonization: evidence of PSBS-dependent NPQ in late Streptophyte algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerotto, Caterina; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2013-12-01

    Light is the energy source for photosynthetic organisms but, if absorbed in excess, it can drive to the formation of reactive oxygen species and photoinhibition. One major mechanism to avoid oxidative damage in plants and algae is the dissipation of excess excitation energy as heat, called non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Eukaryotic algae and plants, however, rely on two different proteins for NPQ activation, the former mainly depending on LHCSR (Lhc-like protein Stress Related; previously called Li818, Light Induced protein 818), whereas in the latter the major role is played by a distinct protein, PSBS (photosystem II subunit S). In the moss Physcomitrella patens, which diverged from vascular plants early after land colonization, both these proteins were found to be present and active in inducing NPQ, suggesting that during plants evolution both mechanisms co-existed. In order to investigate in more detail NPQ adaptation toward land colonization, we analyzed Streptophyte algae, the latest organisms to diverge from the land plants ancestors. Among them we found evidence of a PSBS-dependent NPQ in species belonging to Charales, Coleochaetales and Zygnematales, the latest groups to diverge from land plants ancestors. On the contrary earlier diverging algae, as Mesostigmatales and Klebsormidiales, likely rely on LHCSR for their NPQ activation. Presented evidence thus suggests that PSBS-dependent NPQ, although possibly present in some Chlorophyta, was stably acquired in the Cambrian period about 500 million years ago, before late Streptophyte algae diverged from plants ancestors. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  1. Bioactivity of marine organisms. Part 3. Screening of marine algae of Indian coast for biological activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kamat, S.Y.; Wahidullah, S.; Naik, C.G.; DeSouza, L.; Jayasree, V.; Ambiye, V.; Bhakuni, D.S.; Goel, A.K.; Garg, H.S.; Srimal, R.C.

    were diuretic, 3 hypoglycaemic, 3 hypotensive, 4 exhibited anti- implantation activity, cytokinin activity was observed in one and one showed adrenergic blocking action. The extracts neither , had anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-viral activities...

  2. Antimicrobial activity of Serratia sp isolated from the coralline red algae Amphiroa anceps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Karthick, P.; Mohanraju, R.; Murthy, K.N.; Ramesh, Ch.; Mohandass, C.; Rajasabapathy, R.; Vellai, K.S.

    of a single red pigmented strain AA1 was found to show activity against (12) bacterial pathogens and (1) fungi Higher range of antibacterial activity was observed against Staphylococcus aureus and antifungal activity against Rhizopus sp, while moderate...

  3. Anti-photoaging activity and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) by marine red alga, Corallina pilulifera methanol extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Bo Mi [Department of Chemistry, Pukyoung National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Qian Zhongji [Marine Bioprocess Research Center, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moon-Moo [Department of Chemistry, Dong-Eui University, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Ki Wan [Department of Marine Biology, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se-Kwon [Department of Chemistry, Pukyoung National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Marine Bioprocess Research Center, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: sknkim@pknu.ac.kr

    2009-02-15

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a key component in photoaging of the skin due to exposure to ultraviolet A, appear to be increased by UV-irradiation-associated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, the alga Corallina pilulifera methanol (CPM) extract has been shown to exert a potent antioxidant activity and protective effect on UVA-induced oxidative stress of human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cell. Antioxidant evaluated by various antioxidant assays. These include reducing power, total antioxidant, DPPH radical scavenging, hydroxyl radical scavenging and protective effect on DNA damage caused by hydroxyl radicals generated. Further, the ROS level was detected using a fluorescence probe, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), which could be converted to highly fluorescent dichlorofluorescein (DCF) with the presence of intracellular ROS on HT-1080 cells. Those various antioxidant activities were compared to standard antioxidants such as {alpha}-tocopherol. In addition, the in vitro activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in HDF cell were inhibited by C. pilulifera methanol extract dose dependently by using gelatin zymography method. The results obtained in the present study suggested that the C. pilulifera methanol extract may be a potential source of natural anti-photoaging.

  4. Anti-photoaging activity and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) by marine red alga, Corallina pilulifera methanol extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, BoMi; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Kim, Moon-Moo; Nam, Ki Wan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2009-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a key component in photoaging of the skin due to exposure to ultraviolet A, appear to be increased by UV-irradiation-associated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, the alga Corallina pilulifera methanol (CPM) extract has been shown to exert a potent antioxidant activity and protective effect on UVA-induced oxidative stress of human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cell. Antioxidant evaluated by various antioxidant assays. These include reducing power, total antioxidant, DPPH radical scavenging, hydroxyl radical scavenging and protective effect on DNA damage caused by hydroxyl radicals generated. Further, the ROS level was detected using a fluorescence probe, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), which could be converted to highly fluorescent dichlorofluorescein (DCF) with the presence of intracellular ROS on HT-1080 cells. Those various antioxidant activities were compared to standard antioxidants such as α-tocopherol. In addition, the in vitro activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in HDF cell were inhibited by C. pilulifera methanol extract dose dependently by using gelatin zymography method. The results obtained in the present study suggested that the C. pilulifera methanol extract may be a potential source of natural anti-photoaging.

  5. The Shewanella algae strain YM8 produces volatiles with strong inhibition activity against Aspergillus pathogens and aflatoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andong eGong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxigenic Aspergillus fungi and associated aflatoxins are ubiquitous in the production and storage of food/feed commodities. Controlling these pests is a challenge. In this study, the Shewanella algae strain YM8 was found to produce volatiles that have strong antifungal activity against Aspergillus pathogens. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling revealed 15 volatile organic compounds (VOCs emitted from YM8, of which dimethyl trisulfide was the most abundant. We obtained authentic reference standards for six of the VOCs; these all significantly reduced mycelial growth and conidial germination in Aspergillus; dimethyl trisulfide and 2,4-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl-phenol showed the strongest inhibitory activity. YM8 completely inhibited Aspergillus growth and aflatoxin biosynthesis in maize and peanut samples stored at different water activity levels, and scanning electron microscopy revealed severely damaged conidia and a complete lack of mycelium development and conidiogenesis. YM8 also completely inhibited the growth of eight other agronomically important species of phytopathogenic fungi: A. parasiticus, A. niger, Alternaria alternate, Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium oxysporum, Monilinia fructicola, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. This study demonstrates the susceptibility of Aspergillus and other fungi to VOCs from marine bacteria and indicates a new strategy for effectively controlling these pathogens and the associated mycotoxin production in the field and during storage.

  6. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of extracts of freshwater green algae, Cladophora glomerata Kützing andMicrospora floccosa (Vaucher Thuret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratiphan Laungsuwon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater macroalgae, Cladophora glomerata Kützing and Microspora floccosa (Vaucher Thuret, harvested from Nan River in northern Thailand, were extracted with hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol and hot water. The extracts were screened for antibacterial activities. Hexane and ethyl acetate extracts of both algae showed the activities against Bacillus cereus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The extracts were further separated using column chromatography and chemically characterized by GC–MS in order to be tentative identify the compounds responsible for such activities. The main compositions were fatty acid and other organic compounds, in which have not been reported in these algae. These results indicate that extracts of C. glomerata and M. floccosa exhibited appreciable antimicrobial activity and could be a source of valuable bioactive materials for health products.

  7. [Toxicity of Coptis chinensis Rhizome Extracts to Green Algae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-nan; Yuan, Ling

    2015-05-01

    Coptis chinensis contains antiseptic alkaloids and thus its rhizomes and preparations are widely used for the treatment of.fish diseases. In order to realize the risk of water ecosystems produced by this medical herb and preparations used in aquaculture, the present experiment was carried out to study the toxicity of Coptis chinensis rhizome extract (CRE) to Scenedesmus oblique and Chlorella pyrenoidosa grown in culture solution with 0.00 (CK), 0.088 (Tl), 0.44 (T2) and 1.76 mg · L(-1) (T3) of CRE, respectively. The results show that low concentration of CRE (T1) inhibited the growth rate of the alga and high CRE (T2 and T3) ceased growth and reproductions. CRE also decreased the chlorophyll and proteins in alga cells, indicating the inhibition of photosynthesis and protein biosynthesis, which could be direct reasons for the low growth rate and death of green alga. The efflux of protons and substances from alga cells led to pH reduction and conductivity increment in culture solution with CRE. Furthermore, the activity of superoxide dismutase in alga increased at the beginning of CRE in T1 and T2 treatments but decreased as time prolonged which was in contrast to high CRE treatment. And the long exposure to low CRE treatment behaved otherwise. This suggests that the low concentration of CRE could induce the resistant reactions in alga at initial time but high CRE concentration or long exposure even at low CRE concentration could inhibit the enzyme synthesis. Similarly, malondialdehyde in alga increased as CRE concentrations increased in culture solutions, implying the damage and high permeability of cell membrane. In general, Chlorella pyrenoidosa was more sensitive to CRE. The abuse of rhizomes and preparations in aquaculture and intensive cultivation of Coptis chinensis plants in a large scale might produce ecological risks to primary productivity of water ecosystems.

  8. Algae commensal community in Genlisea traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Wołowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The community of algae occurring in Genlisea traps and on the external traps surface in laboratory conditions were studied. A total of 29 taxa were found inside the traps, with abundant diatoms, green algae (Chlamydophyceae and four morphotypes of chrysophytes stomatocysts. One morphotype is described as new for science. There are two ways of algae getting into Genlisea traps. The majority of those recorded inside the traps, are mobile; swimming freely by flagella or moving exuding mucilage like diatoms being ablate to colonize the traps themselves. Another possibility is transport of algae by invertebrates such as mites and crustaceans. In any case algae in the Genlisea traps come from the surrounding environment. Two dominant groups of algae (Chladymonas div. and diatoms in the trap environment, show ability to hydrolyze phosphomonoseters. We suggest that algae in carnivorous plant traps can compete with plant (host for organic phosphate (phosphomonoseters. From the spectrum and ecological requirements of algal species found in the traps, environment inside the traps seems to be acidic. However, further studies are needed to test the relations between algae and carnivorous plants both in laboratory conditions and in the natural environment. All the reported taxa are described briefly and documented with 74 LM and SEM micrographs.

  9. Overview on Biological Activities and Molecular Characteristics of Sulfated Polysaccharides from Marine Green Algae in Recent Years

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lingchong; Wang, Xiangyu; Wu, Hao; Liu, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Among the three main divisions of marine macroalgae (Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta and Rhodophyta), marine green algae are valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds and remain largely unexploited in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical areas. Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed to isolate novel sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) from marine green algae because of their numerous health beneficial effects. Green seaweeds are known to synthesize large quantities of SPs and...

  10. Biological importance of marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gamal, Ali A

    2010-01-01

    Marine organisms are potentially prolific sources of highly bioactive secondary metabolites that might represent useful leads in the development of new pharmaceutical agents. Algae can be classified into two main groups; first one is the microalgae, which includes blue green algae, dinoflagellates, bacillariophyta (diatoms)… etc., and second one is macroalgae (seaweeds) which includes green, brown and red algae. The microalgae phyla have been recognized to provide chemical and pharmacological novelty and diversity. Moreover, microalgae are considered as the actual producers of some highly bioactive compounds found in marine resources. Red algae are considered as the most important source of many biologically active metabolites in comparison to other algal classes. Seaweeds are used for great number of application by man. The principal use of seaweeds as a source of human food and as a source of gums (phycocollides). Phycocolloides like agar agar, alginic acid and carrageenan are primarily constituents of brown and red algal cell walls and are widely used in industry.

  11. Medicinally important aromatic plants with radioprotective activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarth, Ravindra M; Samarth, Meenakshi; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2017-11-01

    Aromatic plants are often used as natural medicines because of their remedial and inherent pharmacological properties. Looking into natural resources, particularly products of plant origin, has become an exciting area of research in drug discovery and development. Aromatic plants are mainly exploited for essential oil extraction for applications in industries, for example, in cosmetics, flavoring and fragrance, spices, pesticides, repellents and herbal beverages. Although several medicinal plants have been studied to treat various conventional ailments only a handful studies are available on aromatic plants, especially for radioprotection. Many plant extracts have been reported to contain antioxidants that scavenge free radicals produced due to radiation exposure, thus imparting radioprotective efficacy. The present review focuses on a subset of medicinally important aromatic plants with radioprotective activity.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of some Iranian medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasemi Pirbalouti Abdollah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The major aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of the extracts of eight plant species which are endemic in Iran. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts of eight Iranian traditional plants, including Hypericum scabrum, Myrtus communis, Pistachia atlantica, Arnebia euchroma, Salvia hydrangea, Satureja bachtiarica, Thymus daenensis and Kelussia odoratissima, were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes and Candida albicans by agar disc diffusion and serial dilution assays. Most of the extracts showed a relatively high antimicrobial activity against all the tested bacteria and fungi. Of the plants studied, the most active extracts were those obtained from the essential oils of M. communis and T. daenensis. The MIC values for active extract and essential oil ranged between 0.039 and 10 mg/ml. It can be said that the extract and essential oil of some medicinal plants could be used as natural antimicrobial agents in food preservation. .

  13. Algae. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskern, Diana, Comp.

    The plants and plantlike organisms informally grouped together as algae show great diversity of form and size and occur in a wide variety of habitats. These extremely important photosynthesizers are also economically significant. For example, some species contaminate water supplies; others provide food for aquatic animals and for man; still others…

  14. Streptophyte algae and the origin of embryophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Burkhard; Marin, Birger

    2009-05-01

    Land plants (embryophytes) evolved from streptophyte green algae, a small group of freshwater algae ranging from scaly, unicellular flagellates (Mesostigma) to complex, filamentous thalli with branching, cell differentiation and apical growth (Charales). Streptophyte algae and embryophytes form the division Streptophyta, whereas the remaining green algae are classified as Chlorophyta. The Charales (stoneworts) are often considered to be sister to land plants, suggesting progressive evolution towards cellular complexity within streptophyte green algae. Many cellular (e.g. phragmoplast, plasmodesmata, hexameric cellulose synthase, structure of flagellated cells, oogamous sexual reproduction with zygote retention) and physiological characters (e.g. type of photorespiration, phytochrome system) originated within streptophyte algae. Phylogenetic studies have demonstrated that Mesostigma (flagellate) and Chlorokybus (sarcinoid) form the earliest divergence within streptophytes, as sister to all other Streptophyta including embryophytes. The question whether Charales, Coleochaetales or Zygnematales are the sister to embryophytes is still (or, again) hotly debated. Projects to study genome evolution within streptophytes including protein families and polyadenylation signals have been initiated. In agreement with morphological and physiological features, many molecular traits believed to be specific for embryophytes have been shown to predate the Chlorophyta/Streptophyta split, or to have originated within streptophyte algae. Molecular phylogenies and the fossil record allow a detailed reconstruction of the early evolutionary events that led to the origin of true land plants, and shaped the current diversity and ecology of streptophyte green algae and their embryophyte descendants. The Streptophyta/Chlorophyta divergence correlates with a remarkably conservative preference for freshwater/marine habitats, and the early freshwater adaptation of streptophyte algae was a major

  15. Algae: putting carbon dioxide in a bind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewers, J.; Wiechers, G. [RWE Power (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    German utility RWE Power has initiated a cutting edge project that is investigating the use of marine microalgae to capture carbon dioxide produced during lignite combustion. At its Niederaussem power plant, a pilot plant has been erected for the production of microalgae. Flue gas is withdrawn from the lignite-based power plant and transported through polyethylene pipes to the microalgae production plant. The CO{sub 2} in the flue gas is dissolved in the algae suspension and adsorbed by the algae for growth in photobioreactors, developed by Noragreen Projektmanagement GmbH. The photobioreactors which consist of clear plastic hoses, fixed in V shape to supports. The study is aiming to optimise the entire algae production process and subsequent conversion and use of the algae biomass produced. Uses being investigated include hydrothermal carbonization to obtain hydrocarbon products. 1 figs., 1 photo.

  16. Red algae (Gelidium amansii reduces adiposity via activation of lipolysis in rats with diabetes induced by streptozotocin-nicotinamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Han Yang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Gelidium amansii (GA is an edible red algae that is distributed mainly in northeastern Taiwan. This study was designed to investigate the effects of GA on plasma glucose, lipids, and adipocytokines in rats with streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetes. Rats were divided into four groups: (1 rats without diabetes fed a high-fat diet (control group; (2 rats with diabetes fed a high-fat diet; (3 rats with diabetes fed a high-fat diet with thiazolidinedione in the diet; and (4 rats with diabetes fed a high-fat diet and GA. The experimental diet and drinking water were available ad libitum for 11 weeks. After the 11-week feeding study, plasma glucose, triglyceride, and cholesterol concentrations were lower in rats with diabetes fed the GA diet than in animals with diabetes fed the control diet. In addition, cholesterol and triglyceride excretion were significantly higher in rats with diabetes fed the GA diet. Moreover, GA feeding induced lipolysis in both paraepididymal and perirenal adipose tissues. Adipose tissue (paraepididymal and perirenal weight and triglyceride contents were lower after GA treatment. Plasma adipocytokines including tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 were reduced by GA feeding in rats with diabetes. The results of the current study suggest that GA feeding may regulate plasma glucose and lipid levels and prevent adipose tissue accumulation in rats with diabetes.

  17. Evaluation of the Marine Algae Gracilaria and its Activated Carbon for the Adsorption of Ni(II from Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Esmaeili

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The batch removal of Ni2+ from aqueous solution and wastewater using marine dried (MD red algae Gracilaria and its activated carbon (AC was studied. For these experiments, adsorption of Ni2+ was used to form two biomasses of AC and MD. Both methods used different pH values, biomass and initial concentration of Ni2+. Subsequently adsorption models and kinetic studies were carried out. The maximum efficiencies of Ni2+ removal were 83.55% and 99.04% for MD and AC respectively developed from it. The experimental adsorption data were fitted to the Langmuir adsorption model. The nickel(II uptake by the biosorbents was best described by pseudo-second order rate model. The kinetic studies showed that the heavy metal uptake was observed more rapidly by the AC with compared to MD. AC method developed from MD biomass exhibited higher biosorption capacity. Adsorption capacity is related to the pH of solution, pH 5.0 is optimal for nickel. The maximum efficiencies of Ni2+ removal were for AC method. The capacity is related to the pH of solution, pH 5.0 is optimal for nickel. The equilibrium adsorption data are correlated by Langmuir isotherm equation. The adsorption kinetic data can be described by the second order kinetic models

  18. Evaluation of marine brown algae Sargassum ilicifolium extract for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpi, Chandraraj C.; Nagathan, Channabasappa V.; Karajgi, Santosh R.; Kalyane, Navanath V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The methanolic extract of Sargassum ilicifolium (Pheophyceae) was used to evaluate its analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity in the present study. Materials and Methods: Analgesic activity was tested using Acetic acid writhing method and Eddy hot plate method in Male albino mice and Wister rats respectively at a dose level of 1, 10, 50, 100mg/kg p.o. At the same dose, its anti-inflammatory activity was also tested using Carrageenan induced rat paw edema method Result Acetic acid writhing test and Eddy's hot plate episodes were significantly and dose dependently reduced. Carrageenan (a standard inflammatory agent) induced paw edema in rats was significantly reduced after intraperitonal administration of methanolic extract. Results: showed dose dependant significant activity in comparison with standard and control. Conclusion: Methanolic extracts of the brown seaweeds Sargassum ilicifolium have potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity at moderate doses. PMID:23900805

  19. Active condensation of water by plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokhorov Alexey Anatolievich

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to some peculiarities of water condensation on the surface of plants . Arguments in support of the hypothesis that in decreasing temperature of leaves and shoots below the dew point, the plant can actively condense moisture from the air, increasing the duration of dewfall are presented. Evening dewfall on plant surfaces begins before starting the formation of fog. Morning condensation continues for some time after the air temperature exceeds the dew point . The phenomenon in question is found everywhere, but it is particularly important for plants in arid ecosystems.

  20. Eco-friendly synthesis of silver nanoparticles using green algae (Caulerpa serrulata): reaction optimization, catalytic and antibacterial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboelfetoh, Eman F; El-Shenody, Rania A; Ghobara, Mohamed M

    2017-07-01

    Stable colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized using Caulerpa serrulata (green marine algae) aqueous extract as an efficient reducing and stabilizing agent. This method is considered to be a sustainable alternate to the more complicated chemical procedures. To achieve the optimization synthesis of AgNPs, several effects such as extract concentration, contact time, pH values, and temperature were examined. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, FT-IR, XRD, and HR-TEM. The synthesized AgNPs showed an intense surface plasmon resonance band at 412 nm at the optimal conditions (20% (v/v) extract and 95 °C). TEM reveal that higher extract concentration and higher temperature leading to the formation of spherical AgNPs with an average particle size of 10 ± 2 nm. The synthesized AgNPs showed excellent catalytic reduction activity of Congo red (CR) dye from aqueous solutions. The degradation percentage of CR with AgNPs accelerated by increasing either NaBH 4 concentration or catalytic dosage. The AgNPs synthesized at higher temperature (e.g., 10Ag-95) exhibited the highest catalytic activity. The reaction kinetics was found to be pseudo first order with respect to the dye concentration. Moreover, the AgNPs displayed antibacterial activity at lower concentration against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella sp., Salmonella typhi, and Escherichia coli and may be a good alternative therapeutic approach. The outcomes of the current study confirmed that the synthesized AgNPs had an awesome guarantee for application in catalysis and wastewater treatment.

  1. Antibacterial activity of selected Myanmar medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nwe Yee Win; Nyunt Wynn; Mar Mar Nyein; Win Myint; Saw Hla Myint; Myint Khine

    2001-01-01

    Thirteen plants which are traditionally used for the treatment of dysentery and diarrhoea in Myanmar were selected and tested for antibacterial activity by using agar disc diffusion technique. Polar and nonpolar solvents were employed for extraction of plants. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the extracts with the most significant predominant activity were evaluated by plate dilution method. The plants Eugenia jambolana, Quisqualis indica, Leucaena glauca and Euphorbia splendens var. 1 were found to show significant antibacterial activity. It was also observed that extracts using nonpolar solvents did not show any antibacterial activity and extracts using polar solvents showed antibacterial activity on tested bacteria, indicating that the active chemical compound responsible for the antibacterial action must be a polar soluble compound. (author)

  2. Monitoring Biological Activity at Geothermal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Pryfogle

    2005-09-01

    The economic impact of microbial growth in geothermal power plants has been estimated to be as high as $500,000 annually for a 100 MWe plant. Many methods are available to monitor biological activity at these facilities; however, very few plants have any on-line monitoring program in place. Metal coupon, selective culturing (MPN), total organic carbon (TOC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respirometry, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) characterizations have been conducted using water samples collected from geothermal plants located in California and Utah. In addition, the on-line performance of a commercial electrochemical monitor, the BIoGEORGE?, has been evaluated during extended deployments at geothermal facilities. This report provides a review of these techniques, presents data on their application from laboratory and field studies, and discusses their value in characterizing and monitoring biological activities at geothermal power plants.

  3. Mutualism between the territorial intertidal limpet Patella longicosta and the crustose alga Ralfsia verrucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Christopher D; Froneman, Pierre W

    1993-10-01

    Mutualistic relations between plants and animals are well documented on land but have received less attention in marine systems. This study examined the relationship between the territorial intertidal limpet Patella longicosta and the crustose brown alga Ralfsia verrucosa. Adult Patella are found exclusively in association with Ralfsia, on which they feed, while Ralfsia occurs primarily, but not exclusively, in Patella territories. Ralfsia benefits directly from both the presence and the territorial behaviour of Patella. Algal productivity was assessed by measuring oxygen evolution and utilization in situ and deriving photosynthesis/irradiance curves. Productivity was increased by about 30% by the presence of Patella in both summer (P max of grazed algae 0.0098; ungrazed algae 0.0063 mg C · cm -2 · h -1 ) and winter (P max grazed algae 0.0081; ungrazed algae 0.0053 mg -2 · C · h -1 ). Algal growth rates were not significantly increased by the application of limpet mucus in the laboratory. We did not examine nutrient regeneration by the limpet, but the increase in photosynthetic rate may depend on the limpet's grazing pattern which creates secondary sites for growth. Ralfsia also benefited from the territorial behaviour of Patella. The effects of different grazing regimes were investigated in different seasons by removing territorial limpets and either excluding all limpets using copper-based antifouling paint, or allowing access to non-territorial limpets (mostly P. oculus) using partial paint barriers. Exclusion of all limpets resulted in rapid overgrowth of Ralfsia plants by the foliose green alga Ulva sp.. Where non-territorial limpets had access to the plants overgrowth was reduced but Ralfsia plants were entirely removed by destructive grazing. Non-territorial grazers removed 90% of Ralfsia plants within 4 weeks in summer and 60% in winter. In control treatments P. longicosta prevented overgrowth by Ulva and actively excluded vagrant grazers, preventing

  4. Suppression of Tla1 gene expression for improved solar conversion efficiency and photosynthetic productivity in plants and algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Anastasios; Mitra, Mautusi

    2010-06-29

    The invention provides method and compositions to minimize the chlorophyll antenna size of photosynthesis by decreasing TLA1 gene expression, thereby improving solar conversion efficiencies and photosynthetic productivity in plants, e.g., green microalgae, under bright sunlight conditions.

  5. Carbon Partitioning in Green Algae (Chlorophyta and the Enolase Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen E. W. Polle

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The exact mechanisms underlying the distribution of fixed carbon within photoautotrophic cells, also referred to as carbon partitioning, and the subcellular localization of many enzymes involved in carbon metabolism are still unknown. In contrast to the majority of investigated green algae, higher plants have multiple isoforms of the glycolytic enolase enzyme, which are differentially regulated in higher plants. Here we report on the number of gene copies coding for the enolase in several genomes of species spanning the major classes of green algae. Our genomic analysis of several green algae revealed the presence of only one gene coding for a glycolytic enolase [EC 4.2.1.11]. Our predicted cytosolic localization would require export of organic carbon from the plastid to provide substrate for the enolase and subsequent re-import of organic carbon back into the plastids. Further, our comparative sequence study of the enolase and its 3D-structure prediction may suggest that the N-terminal extension found in green algal enolases could be involved in regulation of the enolase activity. In summary, we propose that the enolase represents one of the crucial regulatory bottlenecks in carbon partitioning in green algae.

  6. Analgesic activity of some Indian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malairajan, P; Geetha Gopalakrishnan; Narasimhan, S; Jessi Kala Veni, K

    2006-07-19

    In the present study of some of the Indian medicinal plants Sida acuta whole plant (Malvaeae), Stylosanthes fruticosa (whole plant) (Papilionaceae), Toona ciliata (heart wood) (Meliaceao), Bougainvilla spectabilis (leaves) (Nyctaginaceae), Ficus glomerata (bark, leaves) (Moraceae) and Polyalthia longifolia (leaves) (Annonaceae). The different plants were used in folklore medicine in the treatment of toothache and strengthening of gums, anthelmintic, kidney diseases, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, antihyperglycaemic, antihyperglycaemic and anticancer. The extract was prepared using powdered material with ethanol, concentrated under vacuo and were evaluated for analgesic activity by analgesiometer at three dose level (100, 300 and 500mg/kg). Analgesic activity was significant with Toona ciliata (heart wood) ethanolic extract when compared with other extracts and its activity was confirmed by tail immersion method.

  7. α-Glucosidase and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitory Activity of Plastoquinones from Marine Brown Alga Sargassum serratifolium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Yousof Ali

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sargassum serratifolium C. Agardh (Phaeophyceae, Fucales is a marine brown alga that belongs to the family Sargassaceae. It is widely distributed throughout coastal areas of Korea and Japan. S. serratifolium has been found to contain high concentrations of plastoquinones, which have strong anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and neuroprotective activity. This study aims to investigate the anti-diabetic activity of S. serratifolium and its major constituents through inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B, α-glucosidase, and ONOO−-mediated albumin nitration. S. serratifolium ethanolic extract and fractions exhibited broad PTP1B and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (IC50, 1.83~7.04 and 3.16~24.16 µg/mL for PTP1B and α-glucosidase, respectively. In an attempt to identify bioactive compounds, three plastoquinones (sargahydroquinoic acid, sargachromenol and sargaquinoic acid were isolated from the active n-hexane fraction of S. serratifolium. All three plastoquinones exhibited dose-dependent inhibitory activity against PTP1B in the IC50 range of 5.14–14.15 µM, while sargachromenol and sargaquinoic acid showed dose-dependent inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase (IC50 42.41 ± 3.09 and 96.17 ± 3.48 µM, respectively. In the kinetic study of PTP1B enzyme inhibition, sargahydroquinoic acid and sargaquinoic acid led to mixed-type inhibition, whereas sargachromenol displayed noncompetitive-type inhibition. Moreover, plastoquinones dose-dependently inhibited ONOO−-mediated albumin nitration. Docking simulations of these plastoquinones demonstrated negative binding energies and close proximity to residues in the binding pocket of PTP1B and α-glucosidase, indicating that these plastoquinones have high affinity and tight binding capacity towards the active site of the enzymes. These results demonstrate that S. serratifolium and its major plastoquinones may have the potential as functional food ingredients for the

  8. Streptomycin affects the growth and photochemical activity of the alga Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; García, Roberto Velasco; Gómez-Juárez, Evelyn Alicia; Salcedo-Álvarez, Martha Ofelia; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2016-10-01

    Antibiotics are increasingly being used in human and veterinary medicine, as well as pest control in agriculture. Recently, their emergence in the aquatic environment has become a global concern. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of streptomycin on growth and photosynthetic activity of Chlorella vulgaris after 72h exposure. We found that growth, photosynthetic activity and the content of the D1 protein of photosystem II decreased. Analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence emission shows a reduction in the energy transfer between the antenna complex and reaction center. Also the activity of the oxygen evolution complex and electron flow between QA and QB were significantly reduced; in contrast, we found an increase in the reduction rate of the acceptor side of photosystem I. The foregoing can be attributed to the inhibition of the synthesis of the D1 protein and perhaps other coded chloroplast proteins that are part of the electron transport chain which are essential for the transformation of solar energy in the photosystems. We conclude that micromolar concentrations of streptomycin can affect growth and photosynthetic activity of Chlorella vulgaris. The accumulation of antibiotics in the environment can become an ecological problem for primary producers in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Glutathione peroxidase activity in the selenium-treated alga Scenedesmus quadricauda

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vítová, Milada; Bišová, Kateřina; Hlavová, Monika; Zachleder, Vilém; Rucki, M.; Čížková, Mária

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 102, 1-2 (2011), s. 87-94 ISSN 0166-445X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/09/0102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Cell cycle * Enzyme activity * Glutathione peroxidase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.761, year: 2011

  10. ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF BENTHIC MARINE ALGAE EXTRACTS FROM THE MEDITERRANEAN COAST OF MOROCCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanaâ Zbakh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine organisms are potentially prolific sources of highly bioactive secondary metabolites that might represent useful leads in the development of new pharmaceutical agents. The Moroccan marine biodiversity including macroalgae remains partially unexplored in term of their potential bioactivities. Antibacterial activity of methanolic extracts from 20 species of macroalgae (9 Chlorophyta, 3 Phaeophyta and 8 Rhodophyta collected from Moroccan Mediterranean coasts was evaluated against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. The extracts of the studied Rhodophyceae inhibited considerably the growth of the three tested bacterial strains and gave inhibition zones between 20 and 24 mm. The results indicate that these species of seaweed present a significant capacity of antibacterial activities, which makes them interesting for screening for natural products.

  11. Seasonal variation of the lipoidal matters and hypolipidaemic activity of the red alga Corallina officinalis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, N E; Selim, M A; Saleh, M M; Matloub, A A

    2003-01-01

    The lipoidal matters of Corallina officinalis L. showed a seasonal nonsignificant quantitative variation. However, the fatty acids revealed a relative increase in the summer and winter, while unsaponifiable matter exhibited a slight increase in the spring. The GC/MS analysis of saponifiable and unsaponifiable matter of the algal samples collected in different seasons revealed that samples collected in the spring contained a low cholesterol content and high steroidal compounds as well as high polyunsaturated fatty acids. The alcohol extract, hexane extract and fatty acid fraction of this algal sample exhibited a significant hypolipidaemic activity. Also, two biologically active fractions of hydrocarbons were isolated by CC technique from the hexane fraction of C. officinalis L. and identified by GC/MS. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Immune-modulating activities of polysaccharides extracted from brown algae Hizikia fusiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sang Chul; Jeong, Yong Tae; Lee, Sang Myung; Kim, Jin Hee

    2015-01-01

    The immuno-modulating activities of seaweed (Hizikia fusiforme) extracts on murine macrophage and splenocyte were studied in vitro. Polysaccharide (HFP) exhibited the potential macrophage stimulating effects than water extract (HFW) such as NO production and enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokines on the Raw 264.7 cells and splenocytes. From the mono-sugar composition, HFP-associated fucose based on HFP of H. fusiforme acts as immune modulator.

  13. Antibacterial, cytotoxicity and anticoagulant activities from Hypnea esperi and Caulerpa prolifera marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Samy; Amin, Abeer; Hassan, Sherif; Hagazey, Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    Extracts from 2 algal species (Hypnea esperi and Caulerpa prolifera) from Suez Canal region, Egypt were screened for the production of antibacterial compounds against some pathogenic bacteria. The bacteria tested included Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Algal species displayed antibacterial activity. The methanolic extracts showed variable response by producing various zones of inhibition against studied bacteria. The tested Gram-negative bacteria were less affected by studied algal extracts than Gram-positive bacteria. We determined some biopotentials properties such as cytotoxicity and anticoagulant activity of most potent algal active extracts. The secondary metabolites of only Hypnea esperi algal extract effectively prevented the blood clotting to the extent of 120 seconds. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) indicated that all potent tested algal extract C inhibits Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was between 1 and 1.4mg/ml. The algal isolates from Egypt have been found showing promising results against infectious bacteria instead of some synthetic antibiotics.

  14. Anti- Sporothrix spp. activity of medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Bressan Waller

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cases of sporotrichosis in humans and animals without satisfactory clinical response have increased, a warning sign of strains resistant to conventional antifungal agents. The urgent search for alternative therapies was an incentive for research on medicinal plants with anti-Sporothrix spp. properties. A bibliographic survey was performed based on scientific papers about in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity of essential oils and extracts of plants in differents solvents against the fungal of the Sporothrix schenckii complex. The study methodology consisted of a literature review in Google Scholar, Science Direct, Pubmed, Bireme and Springer link with papers from 1986 to 2015. We found 141 species of plants that were investigated, of which 100 species were concentrated in 39 botanical families that had confirmed anti-Sporothrix activity. Combretaceae, Asteraceae and Lamiaceae represented the botanical families with the greatest number of plants species with antifungal potential, using different methodologies. However, there are few studies with medicinal plants in experimental infection in animals that prove their activity in the treatment of sporotrichosis. It reinforces the need for further research related to standardization of in vitro methodologies and in vivo studies related to safety and to toxicity potential of these plants with anti-Sporothrix spp. activity.

  15. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using brown algae Cystoseira baccata: Its activity in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ballesteros, N; Prado-López, S; Rodríguez-González, J B; Lastra, M; Rodríguez-Argüelles, M C

    2017-05-01

    This study is the first dealt with the use of brown macroalgae Cystoseira baccata (CB) extracts in obtaining gold nanoparticles (Au@CB) through an eco-friendly, fast, one-pot synthetic route. The formation of spherical, stable, polycrystalline nanoparticles with mean diameter of 8.4±2.2nm was demonstrated by UV-vis spectroscopy, TEM, HRTEM, STEM and zeta potential measurements. The extract appears to act as a protective agent where the particles are embedded, keeping them separated, avoiding aggregation and coalescence. The EELS and EDS analyses confirmed the elemental composition of the extract and nanoparticles. Moreover, the functional group of biomolecules present in CB and Au@CB were characterized by FTIR. The effects of CB extract and Au@CB were tested in vitro on the colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and Caco-2, as well as on normal primary neonatal dermal fibroblast cell line PCS-201-010. Results show a stronger cytotoxic effect against HT-29 than that on Caco-2; interestingly, a lack of toxicity on PCS-201-010 was obtained. Finally, the apoptotic activity was determined; Au@CB is able to induce apoptosis activation by the extrinsic and mitochondrial pathway in our CRC in vitro model. These encouraging results suggest that Au@CB has a significant potential for the treatment of colon rectal cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Isolation of fucoidan from Sargassum polycystum brown algae: Structural characterization, in vitro antioxidant and anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, Subramanian; Vinosha, Manoharan; Marudhupandi, Thangapandi; Rajasekar, Periyannan; Prabhu, Narayanan Marimuthu

    2017-09-01

    In this study antioxidant and anticancer effect of fucoidan isolated from brown seaweed Sargassum polycystum was investigated. The total yield of fucoidan was 4.51±0.24%, of these, 46.8% of fucose and 22.35±0.23% of sulphate respectively. The structural characteristic of fucoidan was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance. The antioxidant properties were determined by DPPH scavenging, reducing power and total antioxidant assays. The maximum DPPH scavenging activity (61.2±0.33%), reducing ability (67.56±0.26%) and total antioxidant activity (65.3±0.66%) were obtained at 1000μg/ml of fucoidan. The cytotoxicity effect of fucoidan showed a higher percentage (90.4±0.25%) of inhibition against the MCF-7 cell line at 150μg/ml with an estimated IC 50 at 50μg/ml. Further, cytomorphological and apoptosis changes of fucoidan treated cells were observed under inverted light microscope and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). The results demonstrated that the isolated fucoidan from S. polycystum possessed potent antioxidant and anticancer properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cytotoxic activity of ten algae from the Persian Gulf and Oman Sea on human breast cancer cell lines; MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and T-47D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfani, Nasrollah; Nazemosadat, Zahra; Moein, Mahmoodreza

    2015-01-01

    Seaweeds have proven to be a promising natural source of bioactive metabolites for drug development. This study aimed to monitor the ethanol extract of ten algae from the Persian Gulf and Oman Sea, for their in vitro cytotoxic activity on three human breast cancer cell lines. Three human breast cancer cell lines including MDA-MB-231(ER(-)), MCF-7(ER(+)), and T-47D (ER(+)) were treated by different concentrations of total ethanol (90%) algae extracts and the cytotoxic effects were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Doxorubicin (Ebewe, Austria) was used as a positive control. After 72 h of incubation, the cytotoxic effect of the algae was calculated and presented as 50%-inhibitory concentration (IC50). The results indicated Gracilaria foliifera and Cladophoropsis sp. to be the most active algae in terms of cytotoxic effects on the investigated cancer cell lines. The IC50 values against MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and T-47D cells were, respectively, 74.89 ± 21.71, 207.81 ± 12.07, and 203.25 ± 30.98 µg/ml for G. foliifera and 66.48 ± 4.96, 150.86 ± 51.56 and >400 µg/ml for Cladophoropsis sp. The rest of the algal extracts were observed not to have significant cytotoxic effects in the concentration range from 6.25 µg/ml to 400 µg/ml. Our data conclusively suggest that G. foliifera and Cladophoropsis sp. may be good candidates for further fractionation to obtain novel anticancer substances. Moreover, stronger cytotoxic effects on estrogen negative breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231(ER(-))) in comparison to estrogen positive cells (MCF-7 and T-47D) suggest that the extract of G. foliifera and Cladophoropsis sp. may have an estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor-independent mechanism for their cellular growth inhibition.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of South African medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vuuren, S F

    2008-10-28

    This paper reviews the antimicrobial research undertaken on South African medicinal plants during the period 1997-2008. Antimicrobial methods (disc diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), bio-autography) are briefly discussed and an analysis of the publications reviewed indicates that the majority of papers use MIC assays for antimicrobial determination. Antimicrobial investigations on extracts are presented where the most active plants are identified from screening publications. A summary of some bioactive compounds are given with data restricted to papers reporting quantitative antimicrobial activity equivalent to or below 200 microg/ml. Antimicrobial activities on the essential oils of indigenous medicinal aromatic plants are also reviewed. An overview is given on what activities (extracts, compounds and oils) should be considered noteworthy for publication. Studies focusing on geographical ethnobotany, specific pathogenesis, formulation aspects and in vivo investigations are examined. Future recommendations to consider include pathogen selection, interactive studies and dosage administrations.

  19. Antibacterial activity of Venda medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, Vanessa; Fernandes, Anthony C; van Rensburg, Constance E J

    2007-12-01

    Crude methanol and water extracts of 36 plants, employed in the treatment of diseases of probable bacterial etiology by the Venda people, were screened for antibacterial activity. Combretum molle, Peltophorum africanum, Piper capense, Terminalia sericea and Zanthoxylum davyi were the most active and presented MIC values < or =1.00 mg/ml.

  20. Anti-HIV activity of extracts and compounds from marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Karadeniz, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, elucidation of novel bioactive substances from different marine organisms is gaining importance rapidly not only from the research and publications but also from controlled clinical studies of natural product-derived substances. They offer important leads for the development of antiviral drugs against viral infections caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Regarding this issue, numerous anti-HIV-1 therapeutic agents from marine resources have been reported for their potential medicine/medical application as novel functional ingredients in anti-HIV therapy. In detail, marine macroalgae have attracted much of attention as a reliable source for potential anti-HIV compounds. Up to date, several types of compounds such as tannins, polysaccharides, lectins, and derivatives have been isolated, identified, and reported to possess significant anti-HIV-1 activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. High cytotoxicity and anti-proliferative activity of algae extracts on an in vitro model of human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Celso; Pinteus, Susete; Horta, André; Pedrosa, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Cancer represents a serious threat for human health with high social and economic impacts worldwide. Therefore, the development of new anticancer drugs is of most importance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antitumor potential of twelve algae from Portugal coast on an in vitro model of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG-2 cells). Both extracts of Asparagopsis armata (1000 µg/ml; 24 h) presented high cytotoxicity with 11.22 ± 2.98 and 1.51 ± 0.38 % of HepG-2 live cells, respectively. Sphaerococcus coronopifolius methanolic and dichloromethane extracts (1000 µg/ml) also generated high reduction on HepG-2 viability (14.04 ± 2.62 and 12.84 ± 3.82 % of HepG-2 live cells, respectively). The most potent anti-proliferative activity was induced by dichloromethane extract (1000 µg/ml; 24 h) of Sphaerococcus coronopifolius, Asparagopsis armata and Plocamium cartilagineum with 99.61 ± 0.27, 98.56 ± 0.81 and 85.13 ± 1.04 % of cell's proliferation reduction, respectively. Sphaerococcus coronopifolius dichloromethane extract exhibited the highest potency both on cytotoxicity and anti-proliferation assays with an IC50 of 14.1 and 32.3 μg/ml, respectively. Sphaerococcus coronopifolius is a promising source of new molecules with possible application on cancer therapeutics.

  2. The Effect of Kanamycin and Tetracycline on Growth and Photosynthetic Activity of Two Chlorophyte Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khawaja Muhammad Imran Bashir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are routinely used in microalgae culture screening, stock culture maintenance, and genetic transformation. By studying the effect of antibiotics on microalgae growth, we can estimate the least value to inhibit growth of undesired pathogens in algal culture. We studied the effect of kanamycin and tetracycline on the growth and photosynthetic activity of two chlorophyte microalgae, Dictyosphaerium pulchellum and Micractinium pusillum. We measured CFU mL−1 on agar plates, optical density, fluorescence yields, and photosynthetic inhibition. Our results showed a significant effect of kan and tet on the tested microalgae species except tet, which showed a minor effect on M. pusillum. Both antibiotics are believed to interact with the protein synthesis machinery; hence, the inhibitory effect of the tested antibiotics was further confirmed by isolation and quantification of the whole cell protein. A significant reduction in protein quantity was observed at concentrations more than 5 mg L−1, except M. pusillum, which showed only a slight reduction in protein quantity even at the maximum tested concentration of tet (30 mg L−1. This study can further aid in aquaculture industry, for the maintenance of the microalgae stock cultures and it can also help the microalgae genetic engineers in the construction of molecular markers.

  3. Conserved and species-specific oxylipin pathways in the wound-activated chemical defense of the noninvasive red alga Gracilaria chilensis and the invasive Gracilaria vermiculophylla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Rempt

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Chemical defense of the invasive red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla has been studied and compared to that of the noninvasive but related Gracilaria chilensis. Both species rely on a wound-activated chemical defense that makes them less attractive to the herbivorous sea snail Echinolittorina peruviana. The chemical stress response of both species was monitored by LC–ESIMS-based metabolic profiling and revealed commonalities and differences. Both algae rely on a rapid lipoxygenase mediated transformation of arachidonic acid to known and novel oxylipins. Common products are 7,8-dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and a novel eicosanoid with an unusual γ-lactone moiety. Several prostaglandins were predominantly formed by the invasive species. The role of some of these metabolites was investigated by surveying the attachment of E. peruviana on artificial food containing the respective oxylipins. Both algae species are defended against this general herbivore by 7,8-dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, whereas the prostaglandins and the novel oxylipins were inactive at naturally occurring concentrations. The role of different oxylipins in the invasive potential of Gracilaria spp. is discussed.

  4. Determination of essential elements in edible seaweed by neutron activation analysis; Determinacao de elementos essenciais em algas marinhas comestiveis por analise por ativacao neutronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Cassio Bessa Lima; Maihara, Vera Akiko, E-mail: cassio_man@hotmail.com, E-mail: vmaihara@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Comestible marine algae are gaining wider global trade, not only because of the taste but also the nutritional quality they present. They are rich in protein, fiber, vitamins and are excellent sources of essential elements due to their ability to absorb substances storing them in their bodies. its chemical composition varies according to the species, habitat, maturity and environmental conditions which are submitted. The method of Neutron Activation Analysis was used to determine the essential elements Cl, K, Mg, Mn and Na present in marine algae from different countries, which are sold in the city of Sao Paulo. A total of 6 samples of marine algae were analyzed, 4 species of Nori (Porphyra umbilicates) from China, Korea, Japan and USA; 1 of Hijiki (Hijikia fusiforme) species from Japan; and 1 species of Kombu (Laminaria sp.) of South Korea. To validate the methodology used was the reference material NIST SRM 1577b Bovine Liver. The concentrations range from 5265-1175 μg/g to CL; from 14413-90261 μg/g to K; from 3007-7091 μg/g to Mg; from 2,3-33,8 μg/g to Mn and from 5161-24973 μg/g to Na.

  5. Magnetic separation of algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Pulak; Twary, Scott N.

    2016-04-26

    Described herein are methods and systems for harvesting, collecting, separating and/or dewatering algae using iron based salts combined with a magnetic field gradient to separate algae from an aqueous solution.

  6. Evolution of the Phosphatidylcholine Biosynthesis Pathways in Green Algae: Combinatorial Diversity of Methyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, Takashi; Toyoshima, Masakazu; Moriyama, Takashi; Sato, Naoki

    2018-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is one of the most common phospholipids in eukaryotes, although some green algae such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are known to lack PC. Recently, we detected PC in four species in the genus Chlamydomonas: C. applanata NIES-2202, C. asymmetrica NIES-2207, C. debaryana NIES-2212, and C. sphaeroides NIES-2242. To reveal the PC biosynthesis pathways in green algae and the evolutionary scenario involved in their diversity, we analyzed the PC biosynthesis genes in these four algae using draft genome sequences. Homology searches suggested that PC in these species is synthesized by phosphoethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEAMT) and/or phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT), both of which are absent in C. reinhardtii. Recombinant PEAMTs from these algae showed methyltransferase activity for phosphoethanolamine but not for monomethyl phosphoethanolamine in vitro, in contrast to land plant PEAMT, which catalyzes the three methylations from phosphoethanolamine to phosphocholine. This suggested an involvement of other methyltransferases in PC biosynthesis. Here, we characterized the putative phospholipid-N-methyltransferase (PLMT) genes of these species by genetic and phylogenetic analysis. Complementation assays using a PC biosynthesis-deficient yeast suggested that the PLMTs of these algae can synthesize PC from phosphatidylethanolamine. These results indicated that the PC biosynthesis pathways in green algae differ from those of land plants, although the enzymes involved are homologous. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the PEAMTs and PLMTs in these algae were inherited from the common ancestor of green algae. The absence of PC biosynthesis in many Chlamydomonas species is likely a result of parallel losses of PEAMT and PLMT in this genus.

  7. SSMILes: Measuring the Nutrient Tolerance of Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgepeth, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity integrating mathematics and science intended to introduce students to the use of metric measurement of mass as a way to increase the meaningfulness of observations about variables in life sciences. Involves measuring the nutrient tolerance of algae. Contains a reproducible algae nutrient graph. (Author/MKR)

  8. Plants and chemical constituents with giardicidal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia M.M. Amaral

    Full Text Available Intestinal infection caused by Giardia lamblia represents a serious public health problem, with increased rates of prevalence in numerous countries. Increased resistance of the parasite and the side-effects of the reference drugs employed in the treatment of giardiasis make necessary to seek new therapeutic agents. Natural products, especially of plant origin, represent excellent starting point for research. The objective of this study is to review the literature on plant extracts, fractions and chemical constituents whose giardicidal activity has been investigated in vitro. The review describes 153 (one hundred and fifty-three plant species from 69 (sixty-nine families that were evaluated for their giardicidal activity. The geographical distribution of the plant species, the part used, preparation, strain of Giardia lamblia tested and the results obtained by the authors are also given. One hundred and one compounds isolated from plant species, classified by chemical class, are presented. Recent aspects of research on natural products of plant origin employed in the treatment of giardiasis are also discussed.

  9. Inhibitory effects of brown algae extracts on histamine production in mackerel muscle via inhibition of growth and histidine decarboxylase activity of Morganella morganii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Koth Bong Woo Ri; Cho, Ji Young; Ahn, Dong Hyun

    2014-04-01

    This study was performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of brown algae extracts on histamine production in mackerel muscle. First, antimicrobial activities of brown algae extracts against Morganella morganii were investigated using a disk diffusion method. An ethanol extract of Ecklonia cava (ECEE) exhibited strong antimicrobial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ECEE was 2 mg/ml. Furthermore, the brown algae extracts were examined for their ability to inhibit crude histidine decarboxylase (HDC) of M. morganii. The ethanol extract of Eisenia bicyclis (EBEE) and ECEE exhibited significant inhibitory activities (19.82% and 33.79%, respectively) at a concentration of 1 mg/ml. To obtain the phlorotannin dieckol, ECEE and EBEE were subjected to liquid-liquid extraction, silica gel column chromatography, and HPLC. Dieckol exhibited substantial inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.61 mg/ml, and exhibited competitive inhibition. These extracts were also tested on mackerel muscle. The viable cell counts and histamine production in mackerel muscle inoculated with M. morganii treated with ≥2.5 MIC of ECEE (weight basis) were highly inhibited compared with the untreated sample. Furthermore, treatment of crude HDC-inoculated mackerel muscle with 0.5% ECEE and 0.5% EBEE (weight basis), which exhibited excellent inhibitory activities against crude HDC, reduced the overall histamine production by 46.29% and 56.89%, respectively, compared with the untreated sample. Thus, these inhibitory effects of ECEE and EBEE should be helpful in enhancing the safety of mackerel by suppressing histamine production in this fish species.

  10. Biologically Active and Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos E. Salas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application.

  11. [Comparative chemical composition of the Barents Sea brown algae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obluchinskaia, E D

    2008-01-01

    Comparative study of phytochemical compositions of the most widespread brown algae species (one laminarian and four fucoid algae) from Barents Sea has been performed. A modified technique for mannitol determination in brown algae is proposed. It was revealed that fucus algae (fam. Fucaceae) contain 3% (of total dry weight) less mannitol than laminaria (Laminaria saccharina). The contents of alginic acid and laminaran in the Barents Sea fucoids are more than 10% less compared to laminaria. The alga L. saccharina contains almost two times more iodine than the species of fam. Fucaceae. The amounts of fucoidan and sum lipids in the Barents Sea fucoid algae is higher than in Laminaria saccharina (4-7% and 1-3%, respectively). In terms of contents of main biologically active compounds, fucus and laminarian algae from Barents Sea are inferior to none of the Far-Eastern species. The Barents Sea algae may become an important source of biologically active compounds.

  12. High-performance thin-layer chromatography HPTLC-direct bioautography as a method of choice for alpha-amylase and antioxidant activity evaluation in marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agatonovic-Kustrin, Snezana; Morton, David W

    2017-12-29

    High-Performance Thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) combined with DPPH free radical method and α-amylase bioassay was used to compare antioxidant and antidiabetic activities in ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts from 10 marine macroalgae species (3 Chlorophyta, 4 Phaeophyta and 3 Rhodophyta) from Blue Lagoon beach (Malaysia). Samples were also evaluated for their phenolic and stigmasterol content. On average, higher antioxidant activity was observed in the ethyl acetate extracts (55.1mg/100g gallic acid equivalents (GAE) compared to 35.0mg/100g GAE) while, as expected, phenolic content was higher in ethanol extracts (330.5mg/100g GAE compared to 289.5mg/100g GAE). Amounts of fucoxanthin, stigmasterol and α-amylase inhibitory activities were higher in ethyl acetate extracts. Higher enzyme inhibition is therefore related to higher concentrations of triterpenes and phytosterols (Note: these compounds are more soluble in ethyl acetate). Ethyl acetate extracts from Caulerpa racemosa and Padina minor, had the highest α-amylase inhibitory activity, and also showed moderately high antioxidant activities, stigmasterol content and polyphenolic content. Caulerpa racemose, being green algae, does not contain fucoxanthin, while Padina minor, being brown algae, contains high amounts of fucoxanthin. Therefore, it is very unlikely that fucoxanthin contributes to α-amylase inhibitory activity as previously reported. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Long-term protection against tobacco mosaic virus induced by the marine alga oligo-sulphated-galactan Poly-Ga in tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Jeannette; Castro, Jorge; González, Alberto; Barrientos, Herna; Matsuhiro, Betty; Arce, Patricio; Zuñiga, Gustavo; Moenne, Alejandra

    2011-06-01

    In order to study the antiviral effect of the oligo-sulphated galactan Poly-Ga, the leaves of tobacco plants Xhanti(NN) were sprayed with water (control), with increasing concentrations of Poly-Ga, for increasing numbers of treatments or cultivated for increasing times after treatment. Control and treated plants were infected with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and the numbers of necrotic lesions were measured in infected leaves. The number of necrotic lesions decreased with increasing concentrations of Poly-Ga, with increasing numbers of treatments and with increasing time after treatment, indicating a long-term protection against TMV that mimicks vaccination. In addition, control Xhanti(nn) plants and plants treated with Poly-Ga and cultivated for increasing times after treatment were infected with TMV in the middle part of the plant, and the levels of TMV-capsid protein (CP) transcripts were measured in apical leaves. TMV-CP transcripts decreased in distant leaves, indicating that Poly-Ga induces systemic protection against TMV. The activities of the defence enzymes phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and lipoxygenase (LOX) and the amounts of several phenylpropanoid compounds (PPCs) were measured in control and treated plants without infection. A progressive increase in PAL activity was observed with increasing time after treatment, together with the accumulation of free and conjugated PPCs. In contrast, LOX activity remained unchanged. Interestingly, the increase in PAL activity showed a linear correlation with the decrease in necrotic lesions and the decrease in TMV-CP transcript level. Thus, Poly-Ga induced systemic and long-term protection against TMV in tobacco plants that is determined, at least in part, by a sustained activation of PAL and the accumulation of PPCs with potential antiviral activity. © 2011 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology © 2011 BSPP and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Inventory of North-West European algae initiatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, J.

    2015-01-01

    In 2012 an inventory of North-West European (NWE) algae initiatives was carried out to get an impression of the market and research activities on algae production and refinery, especially for bioenergy purposes. A questionnaire was developed that would provide the EnAlgae project with information on

  15. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITIES OF SELECTED ORNAMENTAL PLANTS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The MeOH extracts of Ixora brachypoda. Polyscies bolfouriana and Scindapsus aureus exhibited significant broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Escherichia coli and yeast organism Saccharamyces cerevisiae at a concentration of 2.5mg/ml. Key Words: Ornamental plants; Ixora brachypoda, ...

  16. Antimicrobial activity of Nigerian medicinal plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanwu, Madubuike Umunna; Okoye, Rosemary Chinazam

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is currently one of the major threats facing mankind. The emergence and rapid spread of multi- and pan-drug-resistant organisms (such as vancomycin-, methicillin-, extended-spectrum β-lactam-, carbapenem- and colistin-resistant organisms) has put the world in a dilemma. The health and economic burden associated with AMR on a global scale are dreadful. Available antimicrobials have been misused and are almost ineffective with some of these drugs associated with dangerous side effects in some individuals. Development of new, effective, and safe antimicrobials is one of the ways by which AMR burden can be reduced. The rate at which microorganisms develop AMR mechanisms outpaces the rate at which new antimicrobials are being developed. Medicinal plants are potential sources of new antimicrobial molecules. There is renewed interest in antimicrobial activities of phytochemicals. Nigeria boasts of a huge heritage of medicinal plants and there is avalanche of researches that have been undertaken to screen antimicrobial activities of these plants. Scientific compilation of these studies could provide useful information on the antimicrobial properties of the plants. This information can be useful in the development of new antimicrobial drugs. This paper reviews antimicrobial researches that have been undertaken on Nigerian medicinal plants. PMID:28512606

  17. [Inhibiting activity of the in vitro growth of Plasmodium falciparum of extracts from algae of genus Laurencia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiola Martínez, Judith; Hernández, Hilda; Acuña, Deyanira; Esquivel, Macario; Scull Lizama, Ramón; Abreu Payrol, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Several terpenoids have been identified in the genus Laurencia showing antimalarial activity; however it is a genus of great chemical complexity worldwide. The majority of these substances have been extracted from collections made in Philippines and Brazil. In order to know the presence of antimalarial activity in organisms of this genus from the North West Coast of Cuba, we prepared extracts in ethanol with the whole plant of specimens of L. obtusa and L. corallopsis and evaluated the inhibition produced by them against growth of Plasmodium falciparum, strain F32. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations against P. falciparum determined for Laurencia extracts were in the range of 44 and 162 microg/ml, and values of median inhibitory concentrations were between 14.82 and 51.3 microg/mL. The results are similar to those obtained for extracts from medicinal plants. The extracts did not improve chloroquine results. L. obtusa extracts gave strong reactions to the assays for terpenoids and for lactonic/coumarine compounds, but we also detected the presence of alkaloids, free reducing sugars, saponins and flavonoids. Several molecules could contribute to the observed antiplasmodial activity of the extracts, so research is in progress for the isolation and purification of new active principles.

  18. Antifungal activity of 10 Guadeloupean plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biabiany, Murielle; Roumy, Vincent; Hennebelle, Thierry; François, Nadine; Sendid, Boualem; Pottier, Muriel; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Rouaud, Isabelle; Lohézic-Le Dévéhat, Françoise; Joseph, Henry; Bourgeois, Paul; Sahpaz, Sevser; Bailleul, François

    2013-11-01

    Screening of the antifungal activities of ten Guadeloupean plants was undertaken to find new extracts and formulations against superficial mycoses such as onychomycosis, athlete's foot, Pityriasis versicolor, as well as the deep fungal infection Pneumocystis pneumonia. For the first time, the CMI of these plant extracts [cyclohexane, ethanol and ethanol/water (1:1, v/v)] was determined against five dermatophytes, five Candida species, Scytalidium dimidiatum, a Malassezia sp. strain and Pneumocystis carinii. Cytotoxicity tests of the most active extracts were also performed on an HaCat keratinocyte cell line. Results suggest that the extracts of Bursera simaruba, Cedrela odorata, Enterolobium cyclocarpum and Pluchea carolinensis have interesting activities and could be good candidates for developing antifungal formulations. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. MORPHOLOGICAL ANATOMICAL AND PHITOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SOME ALGAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Kaysheva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphological and anatomical features of thalluses of brown (Laminaria saccharina, Fucus vesiculosus and red (Ahnfeltia plicata algae, procured at a coastal strip of the Northern basin in gulfs of Ura-Guba and Palkina-Guba at different depths. Compliance of Fucus and Ahnfeltia with pharmacopoeial norms and merchandising indices for Laminaria was established, except for high concentration of sand in Ahnfeltia thalluses. The identity of algae between each other was shown based on the results of qualitative analysis on polysaccharides, alginic acids, reducing sugars, iodine, mannitol, amino acids presence. Quantitative content of polysaccharides, alginic acids, reducing sugars, pentosans, iodine, cellulose, mannitol, proteins, lipids, agar was determined. In comparison with Fucus and Ahnfeltia higher concentration of the following content was noted in Laminaria: alginic acids (1.4 and 5.75 times higher, polysaccharides (1.3 and 1.4 times, iodine (4.5 and 1.8 times, mannatol (1.5 and 2.5 times (data received is statistically reliable. Impropriety of storm algae for processing was shown as law quality raw material. The highest concentration of active substances was revealed in Laminaria thalluses which were procured at the depth of 10 m in a period from September to October. Active accumulation of sodium, potassium, calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese corresponding to similar sea water composition was established in algae. Mathematical equations of regression between protein and manganese, protein and iron content in algae were deduced. Under proper conditions of drying and storage high quality of the materials can be preserved during 3 years. Based on the findings of photochemical researches, taking into account squares of plantations and possible exploitation stocks, the possibility and prospectivity of industrial processing of Fucus vesiculosus and Ahnfeltia plicata together with Laminaria saccharina as plant sources of polysaccharides (mainly

  20. Phosphogypsum as a soil fertilizer: Ecotoxicity of amended soil and elutriates to bacteria, invertebrates, algae and plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hentati, Olfa, E-mail: olfa_hentati@yahoo.fr [High Institute of Biotechnology of Sfax, University of Sfax, Route de Soukra Km 4.5 P.O. Box 1175, 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Abrantes, Nelson [Departamento de Ambiente da Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM - Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Caetano, Ana Luísa [Departamento de Biologia da Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM - Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Bouguerra, Sirine [High Institute of Biotechnology of Sfax, University of Sfax, Route de Soukra Km 4.5 P.O. Box 1175, 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Departamento de Biologia da Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre s/n, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Gonçalves, Fernando [Departamento de Biologia da Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM - Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Römbke, Jörg [ECT Oekotoxikologie GmbH, Böttgerstrasse 2-14, D-65439 Flörsheim am Main (Germany); Pereira, Ruth [Departamento de Biologia da Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre s/n, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal)

    2015-08-30

    observed. Terrestrial and aquatic plants were the most tolerant species, which is in line with studies supporting the application of PG to increase crop yields. Nevertheless, no stimulatory effects on growth were observed for any of the species tested despite the high levels of phosphorus added to soils by PG. Given the importance of soil invertebrates for several soil functions and services, this study gives rise to new serious concerns about the consequences of PG applications on agricultural soils.

  1. Phosphogypsum as a soil fertilizer: Ecotoxicity of amended soil and elutriates to bacteria, invertebrates, algae and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentati, Olfa; Abrantes, Nelson; Caetano, Ana Luísa; Bouguerra, Sirine; Gonçalves, Fernando; Römbke, Jörg; Pereira, Ruth

    2015-08-30

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a metal and radionuclide rich-waste produced by the phosphate ore industry, which has been used as soil fertilizer in many parts of the world for several decades. The positive effects of PG in ameliorating some soil properties and increasing crop yields are well documented. More recently concerns are emerging related with the increase of metal/radionuclide residues on soils and crops. However, few studies have focused on the impact of PG applications on soil biota, as well as the contribution to soils with elements in mobile fractions of PG which may affect freshwater species as well. In this context the main aim of this study was to assess the ecotoxicity of soils amended with different percentages of Tunisian phosphogypsum (0.0, 4.9, 7.4, 11.1, 16.6 and 25%) and of elutriates obtained from PG - amended soil (0.0, 6.25, 12.5 and 25% of PG) to a battery of terrestrial (Eisenia andrei, Enchytraeus crypticus, Folsomia candida, Hypoaspis aculeifer, Zea mays, Lactuca sativa) and aquatic species (Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna, Raphidocelis subcapitata, Lemna minor). Both for amended soils and elutriates, invertebrates (especially D. magna and E. andrei) were the most sensitive species, displaying acute (immobilization) and chronic (reproduction inhibition) effects, respectively. Despite the presence of some concerning metals in PG and elutriates (e.g., zinc and cadmium), the extremely high levels of calcium found in both test mediums, suggest that this element was the mainly responsible for the ecotoxicological effects observed. Terrestrial and aquatic plants were the most tolerant species, which is in line with studies supporting the application of PG to increase crop yields. Nevertheless, no stimulatory effects on growth were observed for any of the species tested despite the high levels of phosphorus added to soils by PG. Given the importance of soil invertebrates for several soil functions and services, this study gives rise to new serious

  2. Potential biomedical applications of marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Min David; Li, Xiao-Chun; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2017-11-01

    Functional components extracted from algal biomass are widely used as dietary and health supplements with a variety of applications in food science and technology. In contrast, the applications of algae in dermal-related products have received much less attention, despite that algae also possess high potential for the uses in anti-infection, anti-aging, skin-whitening, and skin tumor treatments. This review, therefore, focuses on integrating studies on algae pertinent to human skin care, health and therapy. The active compounds in algae related to human skin treatments are mentioned and the possible mechanisms involved are described. The main purpose of this review is to identify serviceable algae functions in skin treatments to facilitate practical applications in this high-potential area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Look Back at the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program: Biodiesel from Algae; Close-Out Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehan, J.; Dunahay, T.; Benemann, J.; Roessler, P.

    1998-07-01

    The Aquatic Species Program was a relatively small research effort intended to look at the use of aquatic plants as sources of energy. Its history dates back to 1978, but much of the research from 1978 to 1982 focused on using algae to produce hydrogen. The program switched emphasis to other transportation fuels, particularly biodiesel, beginning in the early 1980's. This report summarizes the research activities carried out from 1980 to 1996, with an emphasis on algae for biodiesel production.

  4. Insecticidal activity of certain medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavela, Roman

    2004-12-01

    The methanol extracts of eight species of medicinal plants were tested for insecticidal activity in third instar larvae of Egyptian cottonworm (Spodoptera littoralis). All extracts showed a certain degree of larval toxicity. The extracts of Ocimum basilicum, Origanum majorana and Salvia officinalis appeared to be highly toxic. The extracts significantly affected the growth indexes [relative growth rate (RGR), efficiency of conversion of ingested food (ECI), efficiency of conversion of digested food (ECD)].

  5. Red algae (Gelidium amansii) reduces adiposity via activation of lipolysis in rats with diabetes induced by streptozotocin-nicotinamide

    OpenAIRE

    Tsung-Han Yang; Hsien-Tsung Yao; Meng-Tsan Chiang

    2015-01-01

    Gelidium amansii (GA) is an edible red algae that is distributed mainly in northeastern Taiwan. This study was designed to investigate the effects of GA on plasma glucose, lipids, and adipocytokines in rats with streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetes. Rats were divided into four groups: (1) rats without diabetes fed a high-fat diet (control group); (2) rats with diabetes fed a high-fat diet; (3) rats with diabetes fed a high-fat diet with thiazolidinedione in the diet; and (4) rats with...

  6. Modulation of Neurogenesis through the Promotion of Energy Production Activity Is behind the Antidepressant-Like Effect of Colonial Green Alga,Botryococcus braunii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kazunori; Othman, Mahmoud B; Demura, Mikihide; Watanabe, Makoto; Isoda, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    Algae have been recognized as important resources providing functional components due to their capacity to exert beneficial effects on health. Therefore, there is increasing interest in investigating the biological activity of algae. In this study, we evaluated the antidepressant-like effect of the administration of 100 mg/kg/day of the ethanol extract of colonial green alga Botryococcus braunii (EEB) for 14 consecutive days in the forced swimming test (FST)-induced depression in imprinting control region (ICR) mice. Imipramine, a commercial antidepressant drug, was used as a positive control. In addition, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of EEB by measuring ATP production and by assessing any change in gene expression at the end of the treatment using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and microarray assays. We showed that the immobility time in the water-administered control (FST stress) group gradually increased from day 1 to day 14. However, treatment with EEB caused a significant decrease of immobility time in the FST compared with that in the FST stress group. Microarray and real-time PCR results revealed that EEB treatment induced variation in the expression of several genes associated with neurogenesis, energy metabolism, and dopamine synthesis. Interestingly, we revealed that only EEB treatment enhanced the promotion of energy production, while treatment with imipramine was ineffective. Our study provides the first evidence that B. braunii enhances energy production, which may contribute to the modulation of neurogenesis and to the enhancement of dopaminergic function, in turn potentially underlying the antistress- and antidepressant-like effects that we observed.

  7. Effect of Different Light Qualities on Growth, Pigment Content, Chlorophyll Fluorescence, and Antioxidant Enzyme Activity in the Red Alga Pyropia haitanensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huanyang

    2016-01-01

    Spectral light changes evoke different morphogenetic and photosynthetic responses that can vary among different algae species. The aim of this study is to investigate the photosynthetic characteristics of the red macroalgae grown under different spectrum environments. In this study, Pyropia haitanensis were cultured under blue, red, and green LED and fluorescent tubes light. The growth rate, photopigment composition, chlorophyll fluorescence, and antioxidative enzymes activities in different light spectrums were investigated. The results revealed that growth rate was significantly higher in the thalli grown under blue, green, and fluorescent tubes light. Contents of Chl a and phycobiliprotein in red light were lower among all the growth conditions. Furthermore, a striking increase in SOD and CAT activity was observed in red light treatment along with the NPQ increase. The results revealed that the photosynthetic efficiency and increased growth rate of P. haitanensis benefitted from light spectrums such as blue, green, and fluorescent tubes light by pigment composition and photochemical efficiency manipulation, whereas red light has disadvantageous effects. Accordingly, the results for improving quality and the economic yield of algae species in some extent and the combination of different wavelengths could allow better economic resource exploitation.

  8. Effect of Different Light Qualities on Growth, Pigment Content, Chlorophyll Fluorescence, and Antioxidant Enzyme Activity in the Red Alga Pyropia haitanensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanyang Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectral light changes evoke different morphogenetic and photosynthetic responses that can vary among different algae species. The aim of this study is to investigate the photosynthetic characteristics of the red macroalgae grown under different spectrum environments. In this study, Pyropia haitanensis were cultured under blue, red, and green LED and fluorescent tubes light. The growth rate, photopigment composition, chlorophyll fluorescence, and antioxidative enzymes activities in different light spectrums were investigated. The results revealed that growth rate was significantly higher in the thalli grown under blue, green, and fluorescent tubes light. Contents of Chl a and phycobiliprotein in red light were lower among all the growth conditions. Furthermore, a striking increase in SOD and CAT activity was observed in red light treatment along with the NPQ increase. The results revealed that the photosynthetic efficiency and increased growth rate of P. haitanensis benefitted from light spectrums such as blue, green, and fluorescent tubes light by pigment composition and photochemical efficiency manipulation, whereas red light has disadvantageous effects. Accordingly, the results for improving quality and the economic yield of algae species in some extent and the combination of different wavelengths could allow better economic resource exploitation.

  9. Antileishmanial activity and cytotoxicity of Brazilian plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Tatiana G; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel A; Valadares, Diogo G; Franca, Juçara R; Lage, Paula S; Duarte, Mariana C; Andrade, Pedro H R; Martins, Vivian T; Costa, Lourena E; Arruda, Ana L A; Faraco, André A G; Coelho, Eduardo A F; Castilho, Rachel O

    2014-08-01

    Leishmaniasis is a major public health problem, and the alarming spread of parasite resistance has increased the importance of discovering new therapeutic products. The present study aimed to investigate the in vitro leishmanicidal activity from 16 different Brazilian medicinal plants. Stationary-phase promastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis and murine macrophages were exposed to 44 plant extracts or fractions for 48 h at 37°C, in order to evaluate their antileishmanial activity and cytotoxicity, respectively. The most potent extracts against L. amazonensis were the hexanic extract of Dipteryx alata (IC50 of 0.08 μg/mL), the hexanic extract of Syzygium cumini (IC50 of 31.64 μg/mL), the ethanolic and hexanic extracts of leaves of Hymenaea courbaril (IC50 of 44.10 μg/mL and 35.84 μg/mL, respectively), the ethanolic extract of H. stignocarpa (IC50 of 4.69 μg/mL), the ethanolic extract of Jacaranda caroba (IC50 of 13.22 μg/mL), and the ethanolic extract of J. cuspidifolia leaves (IC50 of 10.96 μg/mL). Extracts of D. alata and J. cuspidifolia presented higher selectivity index, with high leishmanicidal activity and low cytotoxicity in the mammalian cells. The capacity in treated infected macrophages using the extracts and/or fractions of D. alata and J. cuspidifolia was also analyzed, and reductions of 95.80%, 98.31%, and 97.16%, respectively, in the parasite burden, were observed. No nitric oxide (NO) production could be observed in the treated macrophages, after stimulation with the extracts and/or fractions of D. alata and J. cuspidifolia, suggesting that the biological activity could be due to mechanisms other than macrophage activation mediated by NO production. Based on phytochemistry studies, the classes of compounds that could contribute to the observed activities are also discussed. In conclusion, the data presented in this study indicated that traditional medicinal plant extracts present effective antileishmanial activity. Future studies could focus on

  10. Hyperspectral imaging of snow algae and green algae from aeroterrestrial habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Andreas; Allen, Michael C.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-01-01

    Snow algae and green algae living in aeroterrestrial habitats are ideal obbjects to study adaptation to high light irradiation. Here, we used a detailed description of the spectral properties as a proxy for photo-acclimation/protection in snow algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis, Chlainomonas sp. and Chloromonas sp.) and charopyhte green algae (Zygnema sp., Zygogonium ericetorum and Klebsormidium crenulatum). The hyperspectral microscopic mapping and imaging technique allowed us to acquire total absorbance spectra of these microalgae in the waveband of 400-900 nm. Particularly in Chlamydomonas nivalis and Chlainomonas sp., a high absorbance in the wave band of 400-550 nm was observed, due to naturally occurring secondary carotenoids; in Chloromonas sp. and in the charopyhte algae this was missing, the latter being close relatives to land plants. To investigate if cellular water loss has an influence on the spectral properties, the cells were plasmolysed in sorbitol or desiccated at ambient air. While in snow algae, these treatments did not change the spectral properties, in the charopyhte algae the condensation of the cytoplasm and plastids increased the absorbance in the lower waveband of 400 – 500 nm. These changes might be ecologically relevant and photoprotective, as aeroterrestrial algae are naturally exposed to occasional water limitation, leading to desiccation, which are conditions usually occurring together with higher irradiation. PMID:27442511

  11. Hyperspectral imaging of snow algae and green algae from aeroterrestrial habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Andreas; Allen, Michael C; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2016-09-01

    Snow algae and green algae living in aeroterrestrial habitats are ideal objects to study adaptation to high light irradiation. Here, we used a detailed description of the spectral properties as a proxy for photo-acclimation/protection in snow algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis, Chlainomonas sp. and Chloromonas sp.) and charophyte green algae (Zygnema sp., Zygogonium ericetorum and Klebsormidium crenulatum). The hyperspectral microscopic mapping and imaging technique allowed us to acquire total absorption spectra of these microalgae in the waveband of 400-900nm. Particularly in Chlamydomonas nivalis and Chlainomonas sp., a high absorbance between 400-550nm was observed, due to naturally occurring secondary carotenoids; in Chloromonas sp. and in the charopyhte algae this high absorbance was missing, the latter being close relatives to land plants. To investigate if cellular water loss has an influence on the spectral properties, the cells were plasmolysed in sorbitol or desiccated at ambient air. While in snow algae, these treatments did hardly change the spectral properties, in the charopyhte algae the condensation of the cytoplasm and plastids increased the absorbance in the lower waveband of 400-500nm. These changes might be ecologically relevant and photoprotective, as aeroterrestrial algae are naturally exposed to occasional water limitation, leading to desiccation, which are conditions usually occurring together with higher irradiation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Photosynthetic electron transport in thylakoid preparations from two marine red algae (Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A C; Larkum, A W

    1983-01-01

    Thylakoid membrane preparations active in photosynthetic electron transport have been obtained from two marine red algae, Griffithsia monilis and Anotrichium tenue. High concentrations (0.5-1.0 M) of salts such as phosphate, citrate, succinate and tartrate stabilized functional binding of phycobilisomes to the membrane and also stabilized Photosystem II-catalysed electron-transport activity. High concentrations (1.0 M) of chloride and nitrate, or 30 mM-Tricine/NaOH buffer (pH 7.2) in the absence of salts, detached phycobilisomes and inhibited electron transport through Photosystem II. The O2-evolving system was identified as the electron-transport chain component that was inhibited under these conditions. Washing membranes with buffers containing 1.0-1.5 M-sorbitol and 5-50 mM concentrations of various salts removed the outer part of the phycobilisome but retained 30-70% of the allophycocyanin 'core' of the phycobilisome. These preparations were 30-70% active in O2 evolution compared with unwashed membranes. In the sensitivity of their O2-evolving apparatus to the composition of the medium in vitro, the red algae resembled blue-green algae and differed from other eukaryotic algae and higher plants. It is suggested that an environment of structured water may be essential for the functional integrity of Photosystem II in biliprotein-containing algae. PMID:6860312

  13. Enzyme inhibitory activity of selected Philippine plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasotona, Joseph S.; Hernandez, Christine C.

    2015-01-01

    In the Philippines, the number one cause of death are cardiovascular diseases. Diseases linked with inflammation are proliferating. This research aims to identify plant extracts that have potential activity of cholesterol-lowering, anti-hypertension, anti-gout, anti-inflammatory and fat blocker agents. Although there are commercially available drugs to treat the aforementioned illnesses, these medicine have adverse side-effects, aside from the fact that they are expensive. The results of this study will serve as added knowledge to contribute to the development of cheaper, more readily available, and effective alternative medicine. 100 plant extracts from different areas in the Philippines have been tested for potential inhibitory activity against Hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA), Lipoxygenase, and Xanthine Oxidase. The plant samples were labeled with codes and distributed to laboratories for blind testing. The effective concentration of the samples tested for Xanthine oxidase is 100 ppm. Samples number 9, 11, 14, 29, 43, 46, and 50 have shown significant inhibitory activity at 78.7%, 78.4%, 70%, 89.2%, 79%, 67.4%, and 67.5% respectively. Samples tested for Lipoxygenase inhibition were set at 33ppm. Samples number 2, 37, 901, 1202, and 1204 have shown significant inhibitory activity at 66, 84.9%, 88.55%, 93.3%, and 84.7% respectively. For HMG-CoA inhibition, the effective concentration of the samples used was 100 ppm. Samples number 1 and 10 showed significant inhibitory activity at 90.1% and 81.8% respectively. (author)

  14. The charophycean green algae as model systems to study plant cell walls and other evolutionary adaptations that gave rise to land plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Iben; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.; Doyle, Jeff J.

    2012-01-01

    for terrestrial colonization. The nature and molecular bases of such traits are still being determined, but one critical adaptation is thought to have been the evolution of a complex cell wall. Very little is known about the identity, origins and diversity of the biosynthetic machinery producing the major suites......, during times of radical habitat changes. Orders of the CGA span early diverging taxa retaining more ancestral characters, through complex multicellular organisms with morphological characteristics resembling those of land plants. Examination of gene diversity and evolution within the CGA could help...

  15. The Pleasures and the Pitfalls of Plant Science Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, David R.

    2000-01-01

    Classroom plant activities have long been inexpensive, easy to do, and fun for students, and have become more central to biology teaching. Introduces some plant science activities and their pleasures and pitfalls. (ASK)

  16. Plant essential oils as active antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Yi Xin; Yeo, Chia Rou; Chung, Hui Ling; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2014-01-01

    Essential oils derived from plants have been recognized for decades to exhibit biological activities, including antioxidant, anticancer, and antimicrobial attributes. Antimicrobial activities of these natural plant materials have been intensively explored in recent years, mainly in response to the overwhelming concern of consumers over the safety of synthetic food additives. Gram-negative organisms are believed to be slightly less sensitive to essential oils than Gram-positive bacteria. Generally, a higher concentration is required to obtain the same efficacy in foods than in synthetic media. The combinations of different types of essential oils or with other food additives have been found to potentially exhibit synergistic if not additive effects. This suggests a cost-efficient and wholesome alternative to both food industry and consumers, at the same time adhering to the hurdle technology in inhibiting proliferation of foodborne pathogens. This review aims to examine the conventional methods commonly used for assessment of antimicrobial activities of essential oils and phytochemicals, the use of these substances as antimicrobials in food products, factors that affect their efficacy, synergism between components or with available food preservatives as well as the challenges and future directions of using essential oils and phytochemicals as natural food preservatives.

  17. [Harmful algae and health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankaanpää, Harri T

    2011-01-01

    Harmful algae are a worldwide problem. Phycotoxins is a general term for toxic compounds produced by harmful species of the phytoplankton. This review deals with the occurrence of harmful algae and phycotoxins in the Baltic Sea and other domestic waters, the ways of getting exposed to them, and their effects. Advice on how to avoid the exposure is provided.

  18. Sulfated polysaccharides as bioactive agents from marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Dai-Hung; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-11-01

    Recently, much attention has been paid by consumers toward natural bioactive compounds as functional ingredients in nutraceuticals. Marine algae are considered as valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds. Marine algae are rich in sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) such as carrageenans in red algae, fucoidans in brown algae and ulvans in green algae. These SPs exhibit many health beneficial nutraceutical effects such as antioxidant, anti-allergic, anti-human immunodeficiency virus, anticancer and anticoagulant activities. Therefore, marine algae derived SPs have great potential to be further developed as medicinal food products or nutraceuticals in the food industry. This contribution presents an overview of nutraceutical effects and potential health benefits of SPs derived from marine algae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Seaweed extracts and unsaturated fatty acid constituents from the green alga Ulva lactuca as activators of the cytoprotective Nrf2–ARE pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Paul, Valerie J.; Luesch, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Increased amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in many pathological conditions, including cancer. The major machinery that the cell employs to neutralize excess ROS is through the activation of the antioxidant-response element (ARE) that controls the activation of many phase II detoxification enzymes. The transcription factor that recognizes the ARE, Nrf2, can be activated by a variety of small molecules, most of which contain an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl system. In the pursuit of chemopreventive agents from marine organisms, we built, fractionated, and screened a library of 30 field-collected eukaryotic algae from Florida. An edible green alga, Ulva lactuca, yielded multiple active fractions by ARE–luciferase reporter assay. We isolated three monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) derivatives as active components, including a new keto-type C18 fatty acid (1), the corresponding shorter chain C16 acid (2), and an amide derivative (3) of the C18 acid. Their chemical structures were elucidated by NMR and mass spectrometry. All three contain the conjugated enone motif between C7 and C9, which is thought to be responsible for the ARE activity. Subsequent biological studies focused on 1, the most active and abundant ARE activator isolated. C18 acid 1 induced the expression of ARE-regulated cytoprotective genes, including NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, heme oxygenase 1, thioredoxin reductase 1, both subunits of the glutamate–cysteine ligase (catalytic subunit and modifier subunit), and the cystine/glutamate exchange transporter, in IMR-32 human neuroblastoma cells. Its cellular activity requires the presence of Nrf2 and PI3K function, based on RNA interference and pharmacological inhibitor studies, respectively. Treatment with 1 led only to Nrf2 activation, and not the increase in production of NRF2 mRNA. To test its ARE activity and cytoprotective potential in vivo, we treated mice with a single dose of a U. lactuca fraction that was enriched

  20. Fluorescence Properties of Chlorella sp. Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Teplicky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Water quality and its fast and reliable monitoring is the challenge of the future. Design of appropriate biosensors that would be capable of non-invasive identification of water pollution is an important prerequisite for such challenge. Chlorophylls are pigments, naturally presented in all plants that absorb light. The main forms of chlorophyll in algae are chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b, other pigments include xantophylls and beta-carotenes. Our aim was to characterize endogenous fluorescence of the Chlorella sp. algae, present naturally in drinking water. We recorded spatial, spectral and lifetime fluorescence distribution in the native algae. We noted that the fluorescence was evenly distributed in the algae cytosol, but lacked in the nucleus and reached maximum at 680-690 nm. Fluorescence decay of chlorella sp. was double-exponential, and clearly shorter than that of its isolated pigments. For the first time, fluorescence lifetime image of the algae is presented. Study of the fluorescence properties of algae is aimed at the improvement of water supply contamination detection and cleaning.

  1. Antimicrobial activity of some Indian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabur, Rajesh; Gupta, Amita; Mandal, T K; Singh, Desh Deepak; Bajpai, Vivek; Gurav, A M; Lavekar, G S

    2007-02-16

    The antimicrobial potential of seventy-seven extracts from twenty-four plants was screened against eight bacteria and four pathogenic fungi, using microbroth dilution assay. Lowest concentration of the extract, which inhibits any visual microbial growth after treatment with p-iodonitrotetrazolium violet, was considered to be minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Water extracts of Acacia nilotica, Justicia zelanica, Lantana camara and Saraca asoca exhibited good activity against all the bacteria tested and the MIC was recorded in range of 9.375-37.5 microg/ml and 75.0-300.0 microg/ml against the bacterial and fungal pathogens, respectively. The other extracts of Phyllanthus urinaria, Thevetia nerifolia, Jatropha gossypifolia Saraca asoca, Tamarindus indica, Aegle marmelos, Acacia nilotica, Chlorophytum borivilianum, Mangifera indica, Woodfordia fruticosa and Phyllanthus emblica showed antimicrobial activity in a range of 75-1200 microg/ml.

  2. Importance of algae oil as a source of biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirbas, Ayhan; Fatih Demirbas, M.

    2011-01-01

    Algae are the fastest-growing plants in the world. Industrial reactors for algal culture are open ponds, photobioreactors and closed systems. Algae are very important as a biomass source. Algae will some day be competitive as a source for biofuel. Different species of algae may be better suited for different types of fuel. Algae can be grown almost anywhere, even on sewage or salt water, and does not require fertile land or food crops, and processing requires less energy than the algae provides. Algae can be a replacement for oil based fuels, one that is more effective and has no disadvantages. Algae are among the fastest-growing plants in the world, and about 50% of their weight is oil. This lipid oil can be used to make biodiesel for cars, trucks, and airplanes. Microalgae have much faster growth-rates than terrestrial crops. the per unit area yield of oil from algae is estimated to be from 20,000 to 80,000 l per acre, per year; this is 7-31 times greater than the next best crop, palm oil. The lipid and fatty acid contents of microalgae vary in accordance with culture conditions. Most current research on oil extraction is focused on microalgae to produce biodiesel from algal oil. Algal-oil processes into biodiesel as easily as oil derived from land-based crops.

  3. Reviewing surveillance activities in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    This document provides guidance to Operational Safety Review Teams (OSARTs) for reviewing surveillance activities at a nuclear power plant. In addition, the document contains reference material to support the review of surveillance activities, to assist within the Technical Support area and to ensure consistency between individual reviews. Drafts of the document have already been used on several OSART missions and found to be useful. The document first considers the objectives of an excellent surveillance programme. Investigations to determine the quality of the surveillance programme are then discussed. The attributes of an excellent surveillance programme are listed. Advice follows on how to phrase questions so as to obtain an informative response on surveillance features. Finally, specific equipment is mentioned that should be considered when reviewing functional tests. Four annexes provide examples drawn from operating nuclear power plants. They were selected to supplement the main text of the document with the best international practices as found in OSART reviews. They should in no way limit the acceptance and development of alternative approaches that lead to equivalent or better results. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Managing Siting Activities for Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to ''seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world''. One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property.' The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. The introduction of nuclear power brings new challenges to States - one of them being the selection of appropriates sites. It is a project that needs to begin early, be well managed, and deploy good communications with all stakeholders; including regulators. This is important, not just for those States introducing nuclear power for the first time, but for any State looking to build a new nuclear power plant. The purpose of the siting activities goes beyond choosing a suitable site and acquiring a licence. A large part of the project is about producing and maintaining a validated

  5. Proteolytic activity during senescence of plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffaker, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    Although information has rapidly developed concerning the intracellular localization of plant proteins, relatively few reports concern the intracellular location of endo- and exo-proteolytic activities. Relatively few proteases have been purified, characterized, and associated with a specific cellular location. With the exception of the processing proteases involved in transport of proteins across membranes, little progress has yet been made concerning determination of in vivo products of specific proteases. Information on the turnover of individual proteins and the assessment of rate-limiting steps in pathways as proteins are turned over is steadily appearing. Since chloroplasts are the major site of both protein synthesis and, during senescence, degradation, it was important to show unambiguously that chloroplasts can degrade their own constituents. Another important contribution was to obtain evidence that the chloroplasts contain proteases capable of degrading their constituents. This work has been more tenuous because of the low activities found and the possibility of contamination by vacuolar enzymes during the isolation of organelles. The possible targeting of cytoplasmic proteins for degradation by facilitating their transport into vacuoles is a field which hopefully will develop more rapidly in the future. Information on targeting of proteins for degradation via the ubiquitin (Ub) degradation pathway is developing rapidly. Future research must determine how much unity exists across the different eukaryotic systems. At present, it has important implications for protein turnover in plants, since apparently Ub is involved in the degradation of phytochrome. Little information has been developed regarding what triggers increased proteolysis with the onset of senescence, although it appears to involve protein synthesis. Thus far, the evidence indicates that the complement of proteases prior to senescence is sufficient to carry out the observed protein

  6. Abiotic Stress Tolerance of Charophyte Green Algae: New Challenges for Omics Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Holzinger, Andreas; Pichrtov?, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Charophyte green algae are a paraphyletic group of freshwater and terrestrial green algae, comprising the classes of Chlorokybophyceae, Coleochaetophyceae, Klebsormidiophyceae, Zygnematophyceae, Mesostigmatophyceae, and Charo- phyceae. Zygnematophyceae (Conjugating green algae) are considered to be closest algal relatives to land plants (Embryophyta). Therefore, they are ideal model organisms for studying stress tolerance mechanisms connected with transition to land, one of the most important...

  7. Influence of the Brown Marine Algae on the Physicochemical and Sensory Characteristcs of the Sausages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Dan Sălăgean

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available  The aim of this study was to asses the influence of the brown algae on the quality in manufacturing of a certain halfsmoked sausages assortment.  Exploiting the natural plant resources as well as reducing the animal fat in the finished product by replacing it with proteins, fibers and minerals (provided by the brown marine algae were also intended. Two technological variants with different ratios of algae (V1-10% respectively V2-15% from those 25% of fat (the remaining of 75% beeing represented, in each case, by beef were experienced and compared with the control sample (VM, without algae, 75% beef and 25% fat. The finished products were analyzed in terms of organoleptic and physicochemical, in different stages of storage, at 24 hours after obtaining and seven days of storage at 10 to 12 degrees. The correlations between investigated quality parameters and the ratios of algae were also established. The physicochemical analysis highlighted the highest values regarding the protein, moisture, sodium chloride and the lowest fat content values in the case of the V2 variant compared to the V1 and VM variants. Furthermore, an increase in protein, fat, sodium chloride and a decrease of the moisture content have been found in all variants observed during the storage. The shelf life of the product was not negatively affected by the addition of algae due to their antimicrobial activity. The addition of algae in combination with beef components led to obtaining a higher quality product with functional characteristics.

  8. Effect of chromium oxide (III) nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species and photosystem II activity in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Cristina Henning da; Perreault, François; Oukarroum, Abdallah; Melegari, Sílvia Pedroso; Popovic, Radovan; Matias, William Gerson

    2016-01-01

    With the growth of nanotechnology and widespread use of nanomaterials, there is an increasing risk of environmental contamination by nanomaterials. However, the potential implications of such environmental contamination are hard to evaluate since the toxicity of nanomaterials if often not well characterized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of a chromium-based nanoparticle, Cr 2 O 3 -NP, used in a wide diversity of industrial processes and commercial products, on the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The deleterious impacts of Cr 2 O 3 -NP were characterized using cell density measurements, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), esterase enzymes activity, and photosystem II electron transport as indicators of toxicity. Cr 2 O 3 -NP exposure inhibited culture growth and significantly lowered cellular Chlorophyll a content. From cell density measurements, EC50 values of 2.05 ± 0.20 and 1.35 ± 0.06 g L −1 Cr 2 O 3 -NP were obtained after 24 and 72 h of exposure, respectively. In addition, ROS levels were increased to 160.24 ± 2.47% and 59.91 ± 0.15% of the control value after 24 and 72 h of exposition to 10 g L −1 Cr 2 O 3 -NP. At 24 h of exposure, the esterase activity increased to 160.24% of control value, revealing a modification of the short-term metabolic response of algae to Cr 2 O 3 -NP exposure. In conclusion, the metabolism of C. reinhardtii was the most sensitive to Cr 2 O 3 -NP after 24 h of treatment. - Highlights: • Cr 2 O 3 nanoparticles are unstable and form large aggregates in the medium. • EC50 for growth inhibition of C. reinhardtii is 1.35 g L −1 at 72 h. • Cr 2 O 3 nanoparticles increase ROS levels at 10 g L −1 . • Cr 2 O 3 nanoparticles affect photosynthetic electron transport.

  9. Sustainable Algae Biodiesel Production in Cold Climates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudras Baliga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This life cycle assessment aims to determine the most suitable operating conditions for algae biodiesel production in cold climates to minimize energy consumption and environmental impacts. Two hypothetical photobioreactor algae production and biodiesel plants located in Upstate New York (USA are modeled. The photobioreactor is assumed to be housed within a greenhouse that is located adjacent to a fossil fuel or biomass power plant that can supply waste heat and flue gas containing CO2 as a primary source of carbon. Model results show that the biodiesel areal productivity is high (19 to 25 L of BD/m2/yr. The total life cycle energy consumption was between 15 and 23 MJ/L of algae BD and 20 MJ/L of soy BD. Energy consumption and air emissions for algae biodiesel are substantially lower than soy biodiesel when waste heat was utilized. Algae's most substantial contribution is a significant decrease in the petroleum consumed to make the fuel.

  10. Influence of the uronic acid composition on the gastroprotective activity of alginates from three different genus of Tunisian brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Hiba Hadj; Lajili, Sirine; Sakly, Nawfel; Cherif, Dora; Rihouey, Christophe; Le Cerf, Didier; Bouraoui, Abderrahman; Majdoub, Hatem

    2018-01-15

    Alginates from three genus of Tunisian brown algae were isolated and characterized by size exclusion chromatography and Solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Alginate from Padina pavonica (APP) had the highest molecular weight (Mw) with 147,000g/mol while it was 85,000g/mol for alginate from Cystoseira compressa (ACC) and 58,000g/mol for alginate from Dictyopteris membranaceae (ADM). The mannuronate (M) to guluronate (G) ratios were estimated from spectral deconvolution of the 13 C CP/MAS spectra and the results has shown that all the extracts are mannuronic acid-rich alginates with M/G ratio increased in the order ADM - ACC - APP. An interesting gastroprotective effect was observed for the extracts; ADM and ACC exhibited the highest inhibition of gastric lesions, at 50mg/kg, with 83.41% and 75.39% respectively. Otherwise, it has been shown that the gastroprotective effect of alginates depends mainly on their uronic acid composition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Growing swimming algae for bioenergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croze, Ottavio

    Biofuel production from photosynthetic microalgae is not commercially viable due to high processing costs. New engineering and biological solutions are being sought to reduce these costs by increasing processing efficiency (productivity per energy input). Important physics, however, is ignored. For example, the fluid dynamics of algal suspensions in photobioreactors (ponds or tube arrays) is non-trivial, particularly if the algae swim. Cell reorientation by passive viscous and gravitational torques (gyrotaxis) or active reorientation by light (phototaxis) cause swimming algae in suspension to structure in flows, even turbulent ones. This impacts the distribution and dispersion of swimmers, with significant consequences for photobioreactor operation and design. In this talk, I will describe a theory that predicts swimmer dispersion in laminar pipe flows. I will then then present experimental tests of the theory, as well as new results on the circadian suspension dynamics of the algaChlamydomonas reinhardtii in lab-scale photobioreactors. Finally, I will briefly consider the implications of our work, and related active matter research, for improving algal bioprocessing efficiency. Winton Programme for the Physics of Sustainability.

  12. Antibacterial activity of eight medicinal plants against Diarrhoea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The studies involve the phytochemical screening and antibacterial activity of leaf extracts eight medicinal plants. The selected plants were Timarindus indica, Guiera senegalensis, Prosopis africana, Deterium microcarpum, Citrus aurantifolia, Psidium guajava, Acacia nilotica and Momordica charantia. Methanolics and ...

  13. PLANTS WITH ANTIDIABETIC ACTIVITIES AND THEIR MEDICINAL VALUES

    OpenAIRE

    B. V. Raman; A. Naga Vamsi Krishna; B. Narasimha Rao; M. Pardha Saradhi; M. V. Basaveswara Rao

    2012-01-01

    The anti-diabetic drugs from plants in current clinical use and their similar mechanism of action of herbal components are preferred mainly due to lesser side effects and low cost. So many medicinal plants with anti-diabetic activity related beneficial effects and of herbal drugs used in diabetes is pressurized. The present review focused on the some of the herbal plants and their medicinal uses have shown experimental or clinical anti-diabetic activity. The essential values of some plants ha...

  14. Blue-Green Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people with hepatitis C or hepatitis B. HIV/AIDS. Research on the effects of blue-green algae in people with HIV/AIDS has been inconsistent. Some early research shows that taking 5 grams of blue-green ...

  15. Bibliographical review of radioactive cesium uptake capacity and processes in aquatic plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pally, Monique; Foulquier, Luc.

    1981-11-01

    Both freshwater and marine plants are included in this survey covering 217 reports published between 1954 and 1979. These articles involve the radiocesium abundance found in areas either directly or indirectly affected by liquid waste releases. They specify the concentration factors determined from field measurements and laboratory works. Other areas covered include contamination kinetics, radiocesium distribution in higher plants, effects of biological and environmental factors. Radiocesium uptake potential is higher in freshwater algae and plants than in marine algae. Radiocesium adsorption phenomena seem to predominate in algae over absorption, while in the higher freshwater plants absorption is the primary phenomena. In areas not directly affected by liquid wastes, plant activity levels increased until they reached 10000 pCi/kg wet weight in 1965, and reduced thereafter. In areas directly affected by waste discharges, the activity levels range from 10 to 16000 pCi/kg wet weight in seawater, and from practically zero to 230000 pCi/kg in fresh water. This variability also affects the concentration factors. In most cases, the values measured in marine algae range from 10 to 100; the highest radiocesium uptake is found in brown algae and red algae. The concentration factors measured in freshwater mosses and algae are most often around 4000, while they are about 2000 in submerged, floating and emergent plants. Some plants, specially mosses and algae, proved to be better bioindicators than others. The biological half-lives range from 2 to 21 days in marine algae, and from 1 to 65 days in freshwater plants. This survey underscores the necessity of allowing for the ecological characteristics of each site when evaluating the impact of nuclear plants [fr

  16. Biofuels and algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    Bio-fuels based on micro-algae are promising, their licensing for being used in plane fuels in a mix containing 50% of fossil kerosene is expected in the coming months. In United-States research on bio-fuels has been made more important since 2006 when 2 policies were launched: 'Advanced energy initiative' and 'Twenty-in-ten', the latter aiming to develop alternative fuels. In Europe less investment has been made concerning micro-algae fuels but research programs were launched in Spain, United-Kingdom and France. In France 3 important projects were launched: SHAMASH (2006-2010) whose aim is to produce lipidic fuels from micro-algae, ALGOHUB (2008-2013) whose aim is to use micro-algae as a raw material for humane and animal food, medicine and cosmetics, SYMBIOSE (2009-2011) whose aim is the optimization of the production of methane through the anaerobic digestion of micro-algae, SALINALGUE (2010-2016) whose aim is to grow micro-algae for the production of bio-energies and bio-products. (A.C.)

  17. The Red Algae Compound 3-Bromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde Protects Human Keratinocytes on Oxidative Stress-Related Molecules and Pathways Activated by UVB Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Mei Jing; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Ryu, Yea Seong; Shilnikova, Kristina; Park, Jeong Eon; Hyun, Yu Jae; Zhen, Ao Xuan; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Koh, Young Sang; Ahn, Mee Jung; Hyun, Jin Won

    2017-01-01

    Skin exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excessive ROS cause aging of the skin via basement membrane/extracellular matrix degradation by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We recently demonstrated that 3-bromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (BDB), a natural compound of red algae, had a photo-protective effect against UVB-induced oxidative stress in human keratinocytes. The present study focused on the effect of BDB on UVB-irradiated photo-aging in HaCaT keratinocytes and the underlying mechanism. BDB significantly impeded MMP-1 activation and expression, and abrogated the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and intracellular Ca2+ level in UVB-irradiated HaCaT cells. Moreover, BDB decreased the expression levels of c-Fos and phospho-c-Jun and the binding of activator protein-1 to the MMP-1 promoter induced by UVB irradiation. These results offer evidence that BDB is potentially useful for the prevention of UVB-irradiated skin damage. PMID:28841171

  18. Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryther, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    The red alga Gracilaria tikvahiae may be grown outdoors year-round in central Florida with yields averaging 35.5 g dry wt/m/sup 2/.day, greater than the most productive terrestrial plants. This occurs only when the plants are in a suspended culture, with vigorous aeration and an exchange of 25 or more culture volumes of enriched seawater per day, which is not cost-effective. A culture system was designed in which Gracilaria, stocked at a density of 2 kg wet wt/m/sup 2/, grows to double its biomass in one to two weeks; it is then harvested to its starting density, and anaerobically digested to methane. The biomass is soaked for 6 hours in the digester residue, storing enough nutrients for two weeks' growth in unenriched seawater. The methane is combusted for energy and the waste gas is fed to the culture to provide mixing and CO/sub 2/, eliminating the need for aeration and seawater exchange. The green alga Ulva lactuca, unlike Gracilaria, uses bicarbonate as a photosynthesis carbon source, and can grow at high pH, with little or no free CO/sub 2/. It can therefore produce higher yields than Gracilaria in low water exchange conditions. It is also more efficiently converted to methane than is Gracilaria, but cannot tolerate Florida's summer temperatures so cannot be grown year-round. Attempts are being made to locate or produce a high-temperature tolerant strain.

  19. Effects of epiphytic algae on biomass and physiology of Myriophyllum spicatum L. with the increase of nitrogen and phosphorus availability in the water body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu-Zhi; Wang, Jin-Qi; Gao, Yong-Xia

    2017-04-01

    The disappearance of submerged vascular macrophytes in shallow eutrophic lakes is a common phenomenon in the world. To explore the mechanism of the decline in submerged macrophyte abundance due to the growth of epiphytic algae along a nutrient gradient in eutrophic water, a 2 × 3 factorial experiment was performed over 4 weeks with the submerged macrophyte (Myriophyllum spicatum L.) by determining the plant's biomass and some physiological indexes, such as chlorophyll (Chl) content, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the leaves of M. spicatum L. on days 7, 14, 21, and 28, which are based on three groups of nitrogen and phosphorus levels in the water body (N-P [mg L -1 ]: NP1 0.5-0.05, NP2 2.5-0.25, NP3 4.5-0.45) and two levels of epiphytic algae (the epiphytic algae group and the control group). Epiphytic algal biomass was also assayed. The results indicated that epiphytic algal biomass remarkably enhanced in the course of the experiment with elevated levels of nitrogen and phosphorus in the water. Under the same level of nutrient condition, plants' biomass accumulation and Chl content were higher in the control group than that in the epiphytic algae group, respectively, while MDA content and SOD activity in the former were lower than that in the latter. The influences of epiphytic algae on the biomass accumulation and Chl content and MDA content became greater and greater with elevated levels of nutrients. In general, in this experiment, water nutrients promoted the growth of both epiphytic algae and submerged plants, while the growth of epiphytic algae hindered submerged macrophytes' growth by reducing Chl content and promoting peroxidation of membrane lipids in plants.

  20. Health Benefits of Blue-Green Algae: Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ku, Chai Siah; Yang, Yue; Park, Youngki; Lee, Jiyoung

    2013-01-01

    Blue-green algae (BGA) are among the most primitive life forms on earth and have been consumed as food or medicine by humans for centuries. BGA contain various bioactive components, such as phycocyanin, carotenoids, γ-linolenic acid, fibers, and plant sterols, which can promote optimal health in humans. Studies have demonstrated that several BGA species or their active components have plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride-lowering properties due to their modulation of intestinal cholester...

  1. Effect of ferrate on green algae removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiňáková, Emília; Híveš, Ján; Gál, Miroslav; Fašková, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    Green algae Cladophora aegagropila, present in cooling water of thermal power plants, causes many problems and complications, especially during summer. However, algae and its metabolites are rarely eliminated by common removal methods. In this work, the elimination efficiency of electrochemically prepared potassium ferrate(VI) on algae from cooling water was investigated. The influence of experimental parameters, such as Fe(VI) dosage, application time, pH of the system, temperature and hydrodynamics of the solution on removal efficiency, was optimized. This study demonstrates that algae C. aegagropila can be effectively removed from cooling water by ferrate. Application of ferrate(VI) at the optimized dosage and under the suitable conditions (temperature, pH) leads to 100% removal of green algae Cladophora from the system. Environmentally friendly reduction products (Fe(III)) and coagulation properties favour the application of ferrate for the treatment of water contaminated with studied microorganisms compared to other methods such as chlorination and use of permanganate, where harmful products are produced.

  2. Radiation effects on algae and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, Rakesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The effects of radiation on algae have been summarized in this article. Today, algae are being considered to have the great potential to fulfill the demand of food, fodder, fuel and various pharmaceutical products. Red algae are particularly rich in the content of polysaccharides present in their cell wall. For isolation of these polysaccharides, separation of cells cemented together by middle lamella is essential. The gamma rays are known to bring about biochemical changes in the cell wall and cause the breakdown of the middle lamella. These rays ate also known to speed up the starch sugar inter-conversion in the cells which is very useful for the tapping the potential of algae to be used as biofuel as well as in pharmaceutical industries. Cyanobacteria, among algae and other plants are more resistant to the radiation. In some cyanobacteria the radiation treatment is known to enhance the resistance against the antibiotics. Radiation treatment is also known to enhance the diameter of cell and size of the nitrogen fixing heterocyst. (author)

  3. Inhibitory effect of a Brazilian marine brown alga Spatoglossum schröederi on biological activities of Lachesis muta snake venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaisa Francielle Souza Domingos

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of crude extracts of the brown seaweed Spatoglossum schröederi to counteract some of the biological activities of Lachesis muta snake venom was evaluated. In vitro assays showed that only the extract of S. schröederi prepared in ethyl acetate was able to inhibit the clotting of fibrinogen induced by L. muta venom. On the other hand, all extracts were able to inhibit partially the hemolysis caused by venom and those prepared in dichloromethane or ethyl acetate fully neutralized the proteolysis and hemorrhage produced by the venom. Moreover, the dichloromethane or ethyl acetate extracts inhibited the hemolysis induced by an isolated phospholipase A2 from L. muta venom, called LM-PLA2-I. In contrast, the hexane extract failed to protect mice from hemorrhage or to inhibit proteolysis and clotting. These results show that the polarity of the solvent used to prepare the extracts of S. schröederi algae influenced the potency of the inhibitory effect of the biological activities induced by L. muta venom. Thus, the seaweed S. schröederi may be a promising source of natural inhibitors of the enzymes involved in biological activities of L. muta venom.

  4. Application of plackett-burman experimental design to optimize the cold-active alpha amylase biosynthesis by psychrotrophic Streptomyces 4 Alga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela COTÂRLEŢ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to optimize the cultural and production parameters through the statistical approach for the synthesis of cold active alpha amylase by Streptomyces 4 Alga in submerged fermentation. The process parameters influencing the enzyme production were identified using Plackett-Burman design. Among the various variables screened, the yeast extract and CaCl2 were the most significant. The optimum levels of these significant parameterswere determined employing the Response Surface Methodology and theCentral Composite Design. The most significant variables were determined as follows: yeast extract (5.00 g% and CaCl2 (0.25 g%. By using the optimal fermentation medium, the cold-active alpha amylase production was increased up to 23.96 AU, an approximate 4.4-fold improvement over the previous production (5.44 AU with un-optimized medium. The cold-active alpha amylases could be used in bioethanol production at lower temperatures, waste-water treatment and bioremediation in cold climates.

  5. Antioxidant and antibacterial activities of different plants extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antioxidant and antibacterial activities of different plants extracts against Staphylococcus aureus isolated from soccer player's shoes and knowledge and applications about foot hygiene of the soccer players.

  6. Anticancer Activity of Extracts from some Endemic Tanzanian Plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anticancer Activity of Extracts from some Endemic Tanzanian Plants. CM Nshimo, A Kamuhabwa, Z Mbwambo, P De Witte. Abstract. Plants have shown to be good sources of a variety of drugs for human ailments including cancer. Tanzania is rich in plant species most of which have not been investigated for any biological ...

  7. Antileishmanial activity of some plants growing in Algeria: Juglans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current study was undertaken to evaluate in vitro the antileishmanial activity of three plants growing wild in Algeria : Juglans regia, Lawsonia inermis and Salvia officinalis. The hydroalcoholic extracts of these plants were tested on the growth of the promastigotes of Leishmania major. The plant extract effects were ...

  8. Further screening of Venda medicinal plants for activity against HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of medicinal plants for AIDS-related conditions is common in South Africa. In order to establish an antiviral rationale for the use of these plants we screened fractions of the methanol extracts of medicinal plants for activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN). The n-butanol fraction obtained ...

  9. Cytotoxic activity of four Mexican medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Avila, Elisa; Espejo-Serna, Adolfo; Alarcón-Aguilar, Francisco; Velasco-Lezama, Rodolfo

    2009-01-01

    Ibervillea sonorae Greene, Cucurbita ficifolia Bouché, Tagetes lucida Cav and Justicia spicigera Scheltdd are Mexican native plants used in the treatment of different illnesses. The ethanolic extract of J. spicigera and T. lucida as well as aqueous extracts from I. sonorae, C. ficifolia, T. lucida and J. spicigera were investigated using sulforhodamine B assay. These extracts were assessed using two cell line: T47D (Human Breast cancer) and HeLa (Human cervix cancer). Colchicine was used as the positive control. Data are presented as the dose that inhibited 50% control growth (ED50). All of the assessed extracts were cytotoxic (ED50 < 20 microg/ml) against T47D cell line, meanwhile only the aqueous extract from T. lucida and the ethanolic extract from J. spicigera were cytotoxic to HeLa cell line. Ethanolic extract from J. spicigera presented the best cytotoxic effect. The cytotoxic activity of J. spicigera correlated with one of the popular uses, the treatment of cancer.

  10. Seaweed extracts and unsaturated fatty acid constituents from the green alga Ulva lactuca as activators of the cytoprotective Nrf2-ARE pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Paul, Valerie J; Luesch, Hendrik

    2013-04-01

    Increased amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in many pathological conditions, including cancer. The major machinery that the cell employs to neutralize excess ROS is through the activation of the antioxidant-response element (ARE) that controls the activation of many phase II detoxification enzymes. The transcription factor that recognizes the ARE, Nrf2, can be activated by a variety of small molecules, most of which contain an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl system. In the pursuit of chemopreventive agents from marine organisms, we built, fractionated, and screened a library of 30 field-collected eukaryotic algae from Florida. An edible green alga, Ulva lactuca, yielded multiple active fractions by ARE-luciferase reporter assay. We isolated three monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) derivatives as active components, including a new keto-type C18 fatty acid (1), the corresponding shorter chain C16 acid (2), and an amide derivative (3) of the C18 acid. Their chemical structures were elucidated by NMR and mass spectrometry. All three contain the conjugated enone motif between C7 and C9, which is thought to be responsible for the ARE activity. Subsequent biological studies focused on 1, the most active and abundant ARE activator isolated. C18 acid 1 induced the expression of ARE-regulated cytoprotective genes, including NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, heme oxygenase 1, thioredoxin reductase 1, both subunits of the glutamate-cysteine ligase (catalytic subunit and modifier subunit), and the cystine/glutamate exchange transporter, in IMR-32 human neuroblastoma cells. Its cellular activity requires the presence of Nrf2 and PI3K function, based on RNA interference and pharmacological inhibitor studies, respectively. Treatment with 1 led only to Nrf2 activation, and not the increase in production of NRF2 mRNA. To test its ARE activity and cytoprotective potential in vivo, we treated mice with a single dose of a U. lactuca fraction that was enriched with

  11. The Extracts of Some Marine Invertebrates and Algae Collected off the Coast Waters of Vietnam Induce the Inhibitory Effects on the Activator Protein-1 Transcriptional Activity in JB6 Cl41 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Fedorov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has previously been shown that inhibition of the transcriptional activity of the oncogenic nuclear factor AP-1 can result in cancer prevention. Marine invertebrates and alga are a rich source of natural compounds that possess various biological activities. The inhibitory effects of the extracts of Vietnamese marine organisms in relation to the AP-1 transcriptional activity were examined by the luciferase method using JB6 Cl41 cells stably expressing a luciferase reporter gene controlled by AP-1 DNA binding sequence. As was found, 71 species of marine sponges out of 148 species studied contain inhibitors of the AP-1 transcriptional activity. Therefore, marine organisms as a source of biologically active compounds have a great potential for isolation of the new cancer preventive compounds that inhibit the oncogenic AP-1 nuclear factor.

  12. Anticoagulant effect of marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Wijesekara, Isuru

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed in the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries to isolate natural anticoagulant compounds from marine resources. Among marine resources, marine algae are valuable sources of novel bioactive compounds with anticoagulant effect. Phlorotannins and sulfated polysaccharides such as fucoidans in brown algae, carrageenans in red algae, and ulvans in green algae have been recognized as potential anticoagulant agents. Therefore, marine algae-derived phlorotannins and SPs have great potential for developing as anticoagulant drugs in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical areas. This chapter focuses on the potential anticoagulant agents in marine algae and presents an overview of their anticoagulant effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of some Mexican medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Bustos, E; Velazquez, C; Garibay-Escobar, A; García, Z; Plascencia-Jatomea, M; Cortez-Rocha, M O; Hernandez-Martínez, J; Robles-Zepeda, R E

    2009-12-01

    In Mexico about 4,000 plant species have some medicinal use. The aim of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of six Mexican medicinal plants against fungi and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methanolic extracts were prepared from the Mexican medicinal plants Amphypteringium adstrigens, Castella tortuosa, Coutarea latiflora, Ibervillea sonorae, Jatropha cuneata, and Selaginella lepidophylla. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the plants were determined by the broth microdilution method and the radial growth inhibition assay, respectively. All Mexican plants tested showed antimicrobial activity. Among the six plant extracts analyzed, J. cuneata showed the highest growth-inhibitory activity against fungi, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (J. cuneata > A. adstrigens > C. latiflora > C. tortuosa > I. sonorae approximately S. lepidophylla). Shigella flexneri and Staphylococcus aureus were the most susceptible bacteria to plant extracts. Complete inhibition of S. flexneri growth was observed with J. cuneata methanolic extract at 90 microg/mL. This plant extract also showed the strongest antifungal activity against Fusarium verticillioides and Aspergillus niger. Our data suggest that the medicinal plants tested have important antimicrobial properties. This is the first report describing the antimicrobial activities of several of the Mexican medicinal plants used in this study.

  14. Cell cycle activation by plant parasitic nematodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goverse, A.; Almeida Engler, de J.; Verhees, J.; Krol, van der S.; Helder, J.; Gheysen, G.

    2000-01-01

    Sedentary nematodes are important pests of crop plants. They are biotrophic parasites that can induce the (re)differentiation of either differentiated or undifferentiated plant cells into specialized feeding cells. This (re)differentiation includes the reactivation of the cell cycle in specific

  15. Antioxidant activity of a proanthocyanidin-rich extract from grape seed in whey protein isolate stabilized algae oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2004-08-11

    Algae oil-in-water emulsions stabilized with 0.2% whey protein isolate (WPI) at pH 3.0 and 7.0 were chosen to evaluate antioxidant activity of a proanthocyanidin-rich extract from grape seed. In this emulsion system, (+)-catechin and ascorbic acid (620 microM) were found to be prooxidative at pH 3.0 and ineffective at pH 7.0. Grape seed extract was not able to effectively inhibit both lipid hydroperoxides and propanal formation when added to the emulsion at 124 microM. However, increasing the concentration of the grape seed extract to 620 microM resulted in inhibition of both lipid hydroperoxide and propanal formation at pH 3.0 and 7.0. None of the antioxidants tested had any effect on the physical stability of the WPI-stabilized emulsion. The superior antioxidant activity of the grape seed extract is likely due to the presence of oligomeric procyanidins which are better antioxidants compared to their monomeric counterparts.

  16. Effect of chromium oxide (III) nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species and photosystem II activity in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Cristina Henning da [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Perreault, François [School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-3005 (United States); Oukarroum, Abdallah [Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec in Montréal, 2101, Jeanne Mance Street, Station Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H2X 2J6 (Canada); Melegari, Sílvia Pedroso [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Center of Marine Studies, Federal University of Parana, Beira-mar Avenue, 83255-976, Pontal do Parana, PR (Brazil); Popovic, Radovan [Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec in Montréal, 2101, Jeanne Mance Street, Station Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H2X 2J6 (Canada); Matias, William Gerson, E-mail: william.g.matias@ufsc.br [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    With the growth of nanotechnology and widespread use of nanomaterials, there is an increasing risk of environmental contamination by nanomaterials. However, the potential implications of such environmental contamination are hard to evaluate since the toxicity of nanomaterials if often not well characterized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of a chromium-based nanoparticle, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP, used in a wide diversity of industrial processes and commercial products, on the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The deleterious impacts of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP were characterized using cell density measurements, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), esterase enzymes activity, and photosystem II electron transport as indicators of toxicity. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP exposure inhibited culture growth and significantly lowered cellular Chlorophyll a content. From cell density measurements, EC50 values of 2.05 ± 0.20 and 1.35 ± 0.06 g L{sup −1} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP were obtained after 24 and 72 h of exposure, respectively. In addition, ROS levels were increased to 160.24 ± 2.47% and 59.91 ± 0.15% of the control value after 24 and 72 h of exposition to 10 g L{sup −1} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP. At 24 h of exposure, the esterase activity increased to 160.24% of control value, revealing a modification of the short-term metabolic response of algae to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP exposure. In conclusion, the metabolism of C. reinhardtii was the most sensitive to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP after 24 h of treatment. - Highlights: • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles are unstable and form large aggregates in the medium. • EC50 for growth inhibition of C. reinhardtii is 1.35 g L{sup −1} at 72 h. • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles increase ROS levels at 10 g L{sup −1}. • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles affect photosynthetic electron transport.

  17. Long term effects on petrochemical activated sludge on plants and soil. Plant growth and metal absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedesco, M.J.; Gianello, C. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Solos; Ribas, P.I.F.; Carvalho, E.B. [CORSAN-SITEL, Triunfo, RS (Brazil). Polo Petroquimico do Sul. Dept. de Operacao e Manutencao

    1993-12-31

    An experiment to study the effects of several application rates of excess activated sludge on plants, soil and leached water was started in 1985. Sludge was applied for six years and increased plant growth due to its nitrogen and phosphorous contribution, even though the decomposition rate in soil is low. Plant zinc, cadmium and nickel content increased with sludge application, while liming decreased the amounts of these metals taken up by plants. 9 refs., 8 tabs.

  18. In Vivo and in Vitro Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Neorogioltriol, a New Diterpene Extracted from the Red Algae Laurencia glandulifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riadh Kharrat

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Neorogioltriol is a tricyclic brominated diterpenoid isolated from the organic extract of the red algae Laurencia glandulifera. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effects of neorogioltriol were evaluated both in vivo using carrageenan-induced paw edema and in vitro on lipopolysaccharide (LPS-treated Raw264.7 macrophages. The in vivo study demonstrated that the administration of 1 mg/kg of neorogioltriol resulted in the significant reduction of carregeenan-induced rat edema. In vitro, our results show that neorogioltriol treatment decreased the luciferase activity in LPS-stimulated Raw264.7 cells, stably transfected with the NF-κB-dependent luciferase reporter. This effect on NF-κB activation is not mediated through MAPK pathways. The inhibition of NF-κB activity correlates with decreased levels of LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα present in neorogioltriol treated supernatant cell culture. Further analyses indicated that this product also significantly inhibited the release of nitric oxide and the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in LPS-stimulated Raw264.7 cells. These latter effects could only be observed for neorogioltriol concentrations below 62.5 µM. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing a molecule derived from Laurencia glandulifera with anti-inflammatory activity both in vivo and in vitro. The effect demonstrated in vitro may be explained by the inhibition of the LPS-induced NF-κB activation and TNFα production. NO release and COX-2 expression may reinforce this effect.

  19. Selenium accumulation and metabolism in algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Michela; Ertani, Andrea; Parrasia, Sofia; Vecchia, Francesca Dalla

    2017-08-01

    Selenium (Se) is an intriguing element because it is metabolically required by a variety of organisms, but it may induce toxicity at high doses. Algae primarily absorb selenium in the form of selenate or selenite using mechanisms similar to those reported in plants. However, while Se is needed by several species of microalgae, the essentiality of this element for plants has not been established yet. The study of Se uptake and accumulation strategies in micro- and macro-algae is of pivotal importance, as they represent potential vectors for Se movement in aquatic environments and Se at high levels may affect their growth causing a reduction in primary production. Some microalgae exhibit the capacity of efficiently converting Se to less harmful volatile compounds as a strategy to cope with Se toxicity. Therefore, they play a crucial role in Se-cycling through the ecosystem. On the other side, micro- or macro-algae enriched in Se may be used in Se biofortification programs aimed to improve Se content in human diet via supplementation of valuable food. Indeed, some organic forms of selenium (selenomethionine and methylselenocysteine) are known to act as anticarcinogenic compounds and exert a broad spectrum of beneficial effects in humans and other mammals. Here, we want to give an overview of the developments in the current understanding of Se uptake, accumulation and metabolism in algae, discussing potential ecotoxicological implications and nutritional aspects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Antimicrobial Activity Of Some Medicinal Plants Used By Herbalists ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aqueous extracts from medicinal plants commonly used by herbalists in Mbeere, and Embu districts of Eastern province, Kenya, were tested for their inhibitory activity against three selected strains of bacteria. All the selected plant extracts (infusions: 1.0g sample in 100 ml water) investigated showed activity against ...

  1. anti-inflammatory activity of selected nigerian medicinal plants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extracts of nineteen plant species from an inventory of Nigerian medicinal plants were screened for activity in two in vitro anti-inflammatory model test systems, inhibition of prostaglandin biosynthesis and PAF-induced elastase release from neutrophilis. Anacardium occidentale and Acalipha hispida were active in both test ...

  2. Antibacterial activity of two local medicinal plants, Utazi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... others also showed marked antibacterial activities. The only resistance observed was with Staph. Aureus to the methanolic extracts of both plants. Keywords: antibacterial activities, medicinal plants, gongronema latifolium, ocimium gratissimium. International Journal of Natural and Applied Sciences Vol. 1(1) 2005: 36-39 ...

  3. Antisickling activities of two ethnomedicinal plant recipes used for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two plant recipes used in the management of Sickle Cell Anaemia (SCA) by the indigenous people of Ibadan, Nigeria were studied for their antisickling activities. Using methanolic extracts of powdered plant parts, in vitro studies antisickling activities of the extracts were evaluated using p-hydroxybenzoic acids and normal ...

  4. Antimicrobial activity of some endemic plant species from Turkey

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-06

    Aug 6, 2007 ... Antibacterial and antifungal activity of Heracleum sphondylium subsp. arvinense. Afr. J. Biotechnol. 5: 1087-1089. Ertürk Ö (2006). Antibacterial and antifungal activity of ethanolic extracts from eleven spice plants. Biologia. 61: 275-278. Fazly Bazzaz BS, Haririzadeh G (2003). Screening of Iranian plants for.

  5. Gain and loss of polyadenylation signals during evolution of green algae

    OpenAIRE

    Wodniok, Sabina; Simon, Andreas; Glöckner, Gernot; Becker, Burkhard

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The Viridiplantae (green algae and land plants) consist of two monophyletic lineages: the Chlorophyta and the Streptophyta. Most green algae belong to the Chlorophyta, while the Streptophyta include all land plants and a small group of freshwater algae known as Charophyceae. Eukaryotes attach a poly-A tail to the 3' ends of most nuclear-encoded mRNAs. In embryophytes, animals and fungi, the signal for polyadenylation contains an A-rich sequence (often AAUAAA or related seq...

  6. Uptake by benthic algae of critical radionuclides to be released in the liquid effluent of the Angra dos Reis Nuclear Power Plant, R.J., Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, J.R.D.

    1982-06-01

    In vitro interaction of benthic algae from the Angra dos Reis region, R.J., Brazil, was studied with critical radionuclides to be released in the liquid effluent of CNAAA (unit I). 137 Cs- 60 Co - and 125 I uptake and loss by Sargassum filipendula, Padina Vickersiae and Acanthophora Spicifera were observed. Biological half-lives and bioaccumulation factors (B.F.) were estimated. Co and I uptake were fast (apparent equilibrium in 3 to 7 days). Cs uptake was slower (2 to 3 weeks). Loss followed an inverse pattern (fast for Cs, slow for Co and I). B.F. ranged from 10 1 for Cs, to 10 3 for I and 10 3 -10 4 for Co. Higher B.F. for Co and I were found for P. vickersiae (up to 1,4 X 10 4 ) an A. spicifera (up to 7 X 10 3 ) respectively. These species represent important potential media for the transference of Co-I-and-to a much lesser extent - Cs isotopes, through food-webs. They exhibited high capacity to compete with local sandy sediments for the retention of Co and I. High B.F., rapid uptake and moderate to long biological half-lives enable S. filipendula, P. vickersiae and A. specifera to be powerful aids in the monitoring of radioactive contamination by Co and I isotopes. Since the majority of marine organisms tends to exhibit Cs B.F. similars to those reported here, these algae may also be used as monitors for Cs isotopes, the low B.F. being compensated by their abundance, wide distribution and facility of collection. (M.A.) [pt

  7. Research and development for algae-based technologies in Korea: a review of algae biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Won; Jo, Seung-Woo; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2015-03-01

    This review covers recent research and development (R&D) activities in the field of algae-based biofuels in Korea. As South Korea's energy policy paradigm has focused on the development of green energies, the government has funded several algae biofuel R&D consortia and pilot projects. Three major programs have been launched since 2009, and significant efforts are now being made to ensure a sustainable supply of algae-based biofuels. If these R&D projects are executed as planned for the next 10 years, they will enable us to overcome many technical barriers in algae biofuel technologies and help Korea to become one of the leading countries in green energy by 2020.

  8. Study on the effect of irradiation on algae by proteomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong Il; Yoon, Yo Han; Kim, Jae Hun

    2010-06-01

    Algae has been utilized as food material from long time ago, and recently newly recognized as functional materials and the source of bio-fuel. But, the study on the algae is just beginning and the study on protein expression and growth by the change of condition was not reported. In this study, the effect of radiation on the protein expression was investigated for the protection mechanisms and new genome source and furthermore, isolation of new mutant strains. To monitor the growth of algae, absorbance and FDA staining methods were developed and the content of lipid of algae species were measured. With these methods, the radiation sensitivity of algae species was determined. To investigate the proteome of algae, 2D-electrophoresis methods was applied. From the comparison of proteomes, the radiation specific expressed protein was identified as thioredoxin-h and its nucleotide sequences was defined. The expression of thioredoxin-h was further defined on the mRNA level. Also, the extract of algae species was analyzed for its antioxidant activity and polyphenolic content. The changes in antioxidant activity of extract by radiation was investigated. From the radiation experiments, mutant Spirogyra species having higher resistant against radical stress was obtained. The mutant strain has higher antioxidant activity. This results can provide the proteome date and mutation technology of algae and further contribute in the activation of fishery industry and national health enhancement

  9. EnAlgae Decision Support Toolset: model validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenny, Philip; Visser, de Chris; Skarka, Johannes; Sternberg, Kirstin; Schipperus, Roelof; Silkina, Alla; Ginnever, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    One of the drivers behind the EnAlgae project is recognising and addressing the need for increased availability of information about developments in applications of algae biotechnology for energy, particularly in the NW Europe area, where activity has been less intense than in other areas of the

  10. LIGHT-REGULATED PHOTOSYNTHETIC GENE EXPRESSION AND PHOSPHORIBULOKINASE ENZYME ACTIVITY IN THE HETEROKONT ALGA VAUCHERIA LITOREA (XANTHOPHYCEAE) AND ITS SYMBIOTIC MOLLUSKAN PARTNER ELYSIA CHLOROTICA (GASTROPODA)(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soule, Kara M; Rumpho, Mary E

    2012-04-01

    Photosynthesis is composed of tightly coupled reactions requiring finely tuned nucleocytosolic-plastid interaction. Herein, we examined the influence of light on select photosynthetic gene expression and enzyme activity in the plastid-containing mollusk (sea slug) Elysia chlorotica and its heterokont algal prey Vaucheria litorea C. Agardh. Transcript levels of nuclear photosynthetic genes (psbO and prk) were significantly lower in E. chlorotica compared with V. litorea, whereas plastid photosynthesis genes (psaA and rbcL) were more comparable, although still lower in the animal. None of the genes responded similarly to changes in light conditions over a 24 h period in the sea slug compared with the alga. Activity of the nuclear-encoded photosynthetic enzyme phosphoribulokinase (PRK) exhibited redox regulation in vitro in crude extracts of both organisms sequentially treated with oxidizing and reducing agents. However, PRK was differentially affected in vivo by redox and light versus dark treatment in V. litorea, but not in E. chlorotica. Overall, these results support the active transcription of algal nuclear and plastid genes in E. chlorotica, as well as sustained activity of a nuclear-encoded plastid enzyme, even after several months of starvation (absence of algal prey). The apparent absence of tight transcriptional regulation and redox control suggests that essential nuclear-encoded regulatory factors in V. litorea are probably not present in the sea slug. These findings are discussed relative to light regulation of photosynthetic gene expression in the green and red algal lineages and in the context of the sea slug/algal plastid kleptoplastic association. © 2012 Phycological Society of America.

  11. Composición química y actividad antioxidante del alga marina roja Bryothamnion triquetrum (S.G.Gmelin Howe Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of the red marine algae Bryothamnion triquetrum (S.G.Gmelin Howe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Vidal

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available En la actualidad existe un marcado interés por la búsqueda de antioxidantes de fuentes naturales, incluidas las algas marinas. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la composición química y propiedades antioxidantes del alga Bryothamnion triquetrum. Se estudió la composición centesimal y de minerales, identificación de ácidos grasos y sustancias antioxidantes. La composición centesimal es la siguiente: Proteínas (9,5%, Lípidos (1,3%, Carbohidratos (5,9%, Fibras (10,2% y Cenizas (43%. Los resultados de la actividad antioxidante para las diferentes metodologías empleadas fueron: atrapamiento de radicales DPPH• (38%, 4 mg de liofilizado, beta-Caroteno-Linoleico (12%, 4 mg de liofilizado, actividad atrapadora de radicales O2•- (CI50 0,36 mg/mL, de radicales OH• (CI50 2,11 mg/mL y unión al Fe (CI50 0,37 mg/mL. Las propiedades antioxidantes de esta alga parecen explicarse por la capacidad atrapadora de radicales libres, particularmente relacionada con mecanismos de dismutación de radicales O2•-, inactivación de radicales OH• y quelación de Fe. En trabajos previos se identificaron ácidos cinámicos y fenólicos como moléculas que pudieran explicar la actividad antioxidante, sin embargo adicionalmente se debe considerar un efecto sumatorio y/o sinérgico de otros componentes antioxidantes del extracto, como los descritos en este trabajo, incluidos minerales, carotenoides y vitamina C.An increasing interest has been growing during the past years for the search of natural origin antioxidants, particularly those from marine algae. In this context, the main objective of current research was to evaluate the chemical composition and some antioxidant properties of the aqueous extract of the seaweed Bryothamnion triquetrum. The extracts contains: Proteins (9.5%, Lipids (1.3%, Carbohydrates (5.9%, Fibers (10.2% and Ashes (43%. In current approach, the following results were obtained for the different procedures assessed: DPPH

  12. Plant active components - a resource for antiparasitic agents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Jean-Paul; Fyfe, Lorna; Smith, Huw

    2005-10-01

    Plant essential oils (and/or active components) can be used as alternatives or adjuncts to current antiparasitic therapies. Garlic oil has broad-spectrum activity against Trypanosoma, Plasmodium, Giardia and Leishmania, and Cochlospermum planchonii and Croton cajucara oils specifically inhibit Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania amazonensis, respectively. Some plant oils have immunomodulatory effects that could modify host-parasite immunobiology, and the lipid solubility of plant oils might offer alternative, transcutaneous delivery routes. The emergence of parasites resistant to current chemotherapies highlights the importance of plant essential oils as novel antiparasitic agents.

  13. Uptake of technetium by marine algae: autoradiographic localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonotto, S.; Nuyts, G.; Robbrecht, V.; Cogneau, M.; Ben, D. van der

    1988-02-01

    The uptake of technetium (sup(95m)Tc) by marine algae was localized by autoradiography. In the brown (Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus spiralis and F. vesiculosus) as well as in the red (Porphyra umbilicalis) species, the distribution of technetium was heterogeneous, this radioelement being mostly accumulated in the parts of the plant which bear reproductive cells or which contain young tissues. Since brown algae have high concentration factors, they could constitute an important link in the transfer of technetium through the food chain. On the contrary, the edible alga Porphyra umbilicalis shows a very low incorporation of technetium.

  14. Chemical examination of the brown alga Stoechospermum marginatum (C. Agardh)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wahidullah, S.; DeSouza, L.; Kamat, S.Y.

    The crude methalonic extract of marine algae Stoechospermum marginatum from west coast of India was found to have spasmolytic activity. Search for the pharmacologically active compounds led to the isolation of steroids, fatty acids and an ester...

  15. Characterization of phosphorus forms in lake macrophytes and algae by solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquatic macrophytes and algae are important sources of phosphorus (P) in the lake environment that cause blooms of algae under certain biogeochemical conditions. However, the knowledge of forms of P in these plants and algae and their contribution to internal loads of lake P is very limited. Witho...

  16. A novel pyrimidin-like plant activator stimulates plant disease resistance and promotes growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tie-Jun Sun

    Full Text Available Plant activators are chemicals that induce plant defense responses to a broad spectrum of pathogens. Here, we identified a new potential plant activator, 5-(cyclopropylmethyl-6-methyl-2-(2-pyridylpyrimidin-4-ol, named PPA (pyrimidin-type plant activator. Compared with benzothiadiazole S-methyl ester (BTH, a functional analog of salicylic acid (SA, PPA was fully soluble in water and increased fresh weight of rice (Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis plants at low concentrations. In addition, PPA also promoted lateral root development. Microarray data and real-time PCR revealed that PPA-treated leaves not challenged with pathogen showed up-regulation of genes related to reactive oxygen species (ROS, defenses and SA. During bacterial infection, Arabidopsis plants pretreated with PPA showed dramatically decreased disease symptoms and an earlier and stronger ROS burst, compared with plants pretreated with BTH. Microscopy revealed that H2O2 accumulated in the cytosol, plasma membrane and cell wall around intracellular bacteria, and also on the bacterial cell wall, indicating that H2O2 was directly involved in killing bacteria. The increase in ROS-related gene expression also supported this observation. Our results indicate that PPA enhances plant defenses against pathogen invasion through the plant redox system, and as a water-soluble compound that can promote plant growth, has broad potential applications in agriculture.

  17. Modulation of the pharmacological effects of enzymatically-active PLA2 by BTL-2, an isolectin isolated from the Bryothamnion triquetrum red alga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagano Celso S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An interaction between lectins from marine algae and PLA2 from rattlesnake was suggested some years ago. We, herein, studied the effects elicited by a small isolectin (BTL-2, isolated from Bryothamnion triquetrum, on the pharmacological and biological activities of a PLA2 isolated from rattlesnake venom (Crotalus durissus cascavella, to better understand the enzymatic and pharmacological mechanisms of the PLA2 and its complex. Results This PLA2 consisted of 122 amino acids (approximate molecular mass of 14 kDa, its pI was estimated to be 8.3, and its amino acid sequence shared a high degree of similarity with that of other neurotoxic and enzymatically-active PLA2s. BTL-2 had a molecular mass estimated in approximately 9 kDa and was characterized as a basic protein. In addition, BTL-2 did not exhibit any enzymatic activity. The PLA2 and BTL-2 formed a stable heterodimer with a molecular mass of approximately 24–26 kDa, estimated by molecular exclusion HPLC. In the presence of BTL-2, we observed a significant increase in PLA2 activity, 23% higher than that of PLA2 alone. BTL-2 demonstrated an inhibition of 98% in the growth of the Gram-positive bacterial strain, Clavibacter michiganensis michiganensis (Cmm, but only 9.8% inhibition of the Gram-negative bacterial strain, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv passiflorae (Xap. PLA2 decreased bacterial growth by 27.3% and 98.5% for Xap and Cmm, respectively, while incubating these two proteins with PLA2-BTL-2 inhibited their growths by 36.2% for Xap and 98.5% for Cmm. PLA2 significantly induced platelet aggregation in washed platelets, whereas BTL-2 did not induce significant platelet aggregation in any assay. However, BTL-2 significantly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by PLA2. In addition, PLA2 exhibited strong oedematogenic activity, which was decreased in the presence of BTL-2. BTL-2 alone did not induce oedema and did not decrease or abolish the oedema induced by the 48

  18. Differential growth inhibition of cancer cell lines and antioxidant activity of extracts of red, brown, and green marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Kavitha; Iyer, Vidhya V

    2013-05-01

    As the use of various anticancer drugs is associated with many undesirable side effects, there is an urgent need for the discovery of new, better, and specific anticancer compounds. Antioxidant and antiproliferative activities as well as effects on cell morphology were investigated for methanol (M), chloroform (C), ethyl acetate (E), and aqueous (A) extracts of Caulerpa peltata, Gelidiella acerosa, Padina gymnospora, and Sargassum wightii using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging, ferrous ion chelation, and resazurin-based growth inhibition (in A549, HCT-15, MG-63, and PC-3 cell lines) assays. A general trend was the greater extraction of phenols and flavonoids by chloroform and ethyl acetate, which showed higher activity in many assays. These non-polar C and E extracts showed higher DPPH radical-scavenging and growth inhibitory activities in A549, HCT-15, and PC-3 cells. However, higher ferrous ion chelation (A extracts) and growth inhibition in MG-63 cells (M and A extracts) were seen for the polar extracts. Furthermore, P. gymnospora and C. peltata emerged as promising sources for antiproliferative agents that could be explored for their own activity and as leads for the development of other compounds.

  19. Seasonal and diel changes in photosynthetic activity of the snow algae Chlamydomonas nivalis (Chlorophyceae) from Svalbard determined by PAM fluorometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stibal, Marek; Elster, Josef; Šabacká, Marie; Kaštovská, Klára

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 59, - (2007), s. 265-273 ISSN 0168-6496 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB6005409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Chlamydomonas nivalis * photosynthetic activity * PAM fluorometry Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.039, year: 2007

  20. Isolation of stigmast-5,24-dien-3-ol from marine brown algae Sargassum tenerrimum and its antipredatory activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Majik, M.S.; Adel, H.; Shirodkar, D.; Tilvi, S.; Furtado, J.

    .e. proliferation of T47D cells, T47D and HT-29 cell.11 Additionally, it is also known for its antidiabatic and antioxidant activity.13 The antioxidant capacity of compounds has been related to the prevention of several diseases including cancer, coronary heart...

  1. Phytochemical and Biological Activities of Four Wild Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Shad, Anwar Ali; Ahmad, Shabir; Ullah, Riaz; AbdEl-Salam, Naser M.; Fouad, H.; Rehman, Najeeb Ur; Hussain, Hidayat; Saeed, Wajid

    2014-01-01

    The fruits of four wild plants, namely, Capparis decidua, Ficus carica, Syzygium cumini, and Ziziphus jujuba, are separately used as traditional dietary and remedial agents in remote areas of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The results of our study on these four plants revealed that the examined fruits were a valuable source of nutraceuticals and exhibited good level of antimicrobial activity. The fruits of these four investigated plants are promising source of polyphenols, flavonoids, alkaloid...

  2. Use of Spring-Coiled Shaped Green Algae for Determination of 137Cs and Potassium Bioaccumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonen, R.; Katorza, E.; German, U.; Pelled, O.; Dody, A.; Marco, R.; Cohen, E.; Alfassi, Z.B.

    2006-01-01

    One of the useful technologies for removing pollutants from the environment is phyto remediation. By this method, living or dead plants (including various algae and cyanobacteria) are used to concentrate pollutants from soil or from water sources by biologically active or by passive processes. We isolated from one of the water pools in the Negev green filamentous algae. They exhibited a regular spring-coiled shape typical to Spirulina filaments, but lacked the beaded filaments seen in Anabaena which belongs also to the cyanobacteria. The easily growing algae at the high temperatures of the Negev summers (35-45 degrees C) and under extremely alkaline conditions (pH=9-11), were used to test their potential to accumulate radio-isotopes. We performed our investigations by using 137 Cs, which is a fission product and is regarded as an environmental contaminant. Cesium, Rubidium, Lithium and Sodium follow the uptake route of the macro nutrient potassium and appear to share the K + transport carrier, therefore they are easily transported into plant cells. Potassium is generally considered as an effective inhibitor for radio-cesium uptake by plant roots. It was also shown that C.a. and Mag depressed the Cs uptake). Bioaccumulation factors were used to predict radionuclide concentrations in whole organisms or their tissues

  3. Antioxidant and anticancer activities of freshwater green algae, Cladophora glomerata and Microspora floccosa, from Nan River in northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warawut Chulalaksananukul

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Organic solvent and hot water extracts of freshwater macroalgae, Cladophora glomerata and Microspora floccosa, harvested from Nan River in northern Thailand were screened for antioxidant and anticancer activities using DPPH free radical scavenging assay and inhibition of proliferation of the KB human oral cancer cell lines respectively. The ethyl acetate extract of C. glomerata showed the highest total phenol content (18.1±2.3 mg GAE/g, radical scavenging activity (49.8±2.7% DPPH scavenging at 100 g/ml and in vitro growth inhibition (IC50=1420.0±66 g/g of the KB cell lines. These results indicate that C. glomerata could be a source of valuable bioactive materials.

  4. Fucoidans — sulfated polysaccharides of brown algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usov, Anatolii I.; Bilan, M. I.

    2009-08-01

    The methods of isolation of fucoidans and determination of their chemical structures are reviewed. The fucoidans represent sulfated polysaccharides of brown algae, the composition of which varies from simple fucan sulfates to complex heteropolysaccharides. The currently known structures of such biopolymers are presented. A variety of the biological activities of fucoidans is briefly summarised.

  5. Bromophenols in Marine Algae and Their Bioactivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ming, Liu; Hansen, Poul Erik; Lin, Xiukun

    2011-01-01

    Marine algae contain various bromophenols that have been shown to possess a variety of biological activities, including antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-diabetic, and anti-thrombotic effects. Here, we briefly review the recent progress of these marine algal biomaterials, with respect...

  6. An Investigation on the antimicrobial activity of some endemic plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study performed on six endemic plant species, antimicrobial activity was observed in Campanula lyrata subsp.lyrata and Abies nordmanniana subsp. bornmuelleriana plants. The minimum inhibitory concentration of C. lyrata subsp. lyrata (leaf and flower) extract was found to be 29 mg/ml for Baccillus subtilis and 14.5 ...

  7. Antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities of plant extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty-two species of medicinal plants collected in the Mexican state of Morelos were selected to evaluate their free radical scavenging and antioxidant activities. The extracts from the aerial parts of the plants were obtained using hexane, acetone and methanol (66 extracts). The initial qualitative screening of antioxidants ...

  8. The antibacterial activity of some medicinal plants used in Meru ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antibacterial activity of some medicinal plants used in Meru Central District, Kenya. JK Musau, JM Mbaria, DW Gakuya. Abstract. Five medicinal plants used by traditional medical health practitioners (TMP) in Meru central district namely: Piliostigma thonningii, Ajuga remota, Ocimum suave, Erythrina abyssinica and ...

  9. In-vitro antibacterial activity of selected medicinal plants from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Current strategies to overcome the global problem of antimicrobial resistance include research in finding new and innovative antimicrobials from plants. This study was carried out to determine the antibacterial activity of plant extracts of Olea africana stem-bark, Psidium guajava leaves, Vernonia amygdalina ...

  10. Antimicrobial Activities of Some Medicinal Plants from Soba-Zaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six medicinal plants commonly used by traditional herbalists for treatment of various microbial infections in soba- Zaria, were collected for a study of their antibacterial activities. The plants studied are: Jacaranda mimosaides (J. mimosaides); Striga hermonthetica (S. hermonthetica); Psidium quajava (P. quajava); ...

  11. Antibacterial activity of some selected plants traditionally used as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibacterial activity of some selected plants traditionally used as medicine in Manipur. ... Hence these plants can be used to discover bioactive natural products that may serve as leads in the development of the new pharmaceuticals. Keywords: Antibacterial, human pathogens, methanolic extract, traditional medicine

  12. Antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities of plant extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-17

    Jun 17, 2008 ... Twenty-two species of medicinal plants collected in the Mexican state of Morelos were selected to evaluate their free radical scavenging and antioxidant activities. The extracts from the aerial parts of the plants were obtained using hexane, acetone and methanol (66 extracts). The initial qualitative screening.

  13. Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Activity of Some Medicinal Plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the anti-enterobacterial potential of nine ethnobotanically selected plants traditionally used in different parts of India for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders such as cholera, diarrhea or dysentery. Methods: The methanol extracts of these plants were screened for antibacterial activity against 11 ...

  14. Plant products and secondary metabolites with acaricide activity against ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado-Aguilar, J A; Arjona-Cambranes, K; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Rodríguez-Vivas, R I; Bolio-González, M E; Ortega-Pacheco, A; Alzina-López, A; Gutiérrez-Ruiz, E J; Gutiérrez-Blanco, E; Aguilar-Caballero, A J

    2017-04-30

    The present review documents the results of studies evaluating the acaricidal activity of different plant products and secondary metabolites against ticks that are resistant and susceptible to conventional acaricides. Studies published from 1998 to 2016 were included. The acaricidal activity of plant extracts, essential oils and secondary compounds from plants have been evaluated using bioassays with ticks in the larval and adult stages. There is variable effectiveness according to the species of plant and the concentrations used, with observed mortalities ranging from 5 to 100% against the Rhipicephalus (Boophilus), Amblyomma, Dermacentor, Hyalomma, and Argas genera. A number of plants have been reported to cause high mortalities and/or affect the reproductive capacity of ticks in the adult phase. In the majority of these trials, the main species of plants evaluated correspond to the families Lamiaceae, Fabaceae, Asteraceae, Piperaceae, Verbenaceae, and Poaceae. Different secondary metabolites such as thymol, carvacrol, 1,8-cineol and n-hexanal, have been found to be primarily responsible for the acaricidal activity of different essential oils against different species of ticks, while nicotine, dibenzyldisulfide and dibenzyltrisulfide have been evaluated for plant extracts. Only thymol, carvacrol and 1,8-cineol have been evaluated for acaricidal activity under in vivo conditions. The information in the present review allows the conclusion that the secondary metabolites contained in plant products could be used as an alternative for the control of ticks that are susceptible or resistant to commercial acaricides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Antimicrobial Activity of some Medicinal Plant Extracts | El Astal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial activity of aqueous, ethanolic, methanolic and phenolic compound extracts from three Palestinian folkloric medicinal plants, in addition to their commercial oils, were evaluated against ten pathogenic microorganisms. The plants used were sage, thyme and parsley. Five concentrations of leaf extract of the ...

  16. Molluscicidal activity against Biomphalaria glabrata of Brazilian Cerrado medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, J C B; Silva, I A; Ferreira, H D; Ferri, P H; Santos, S C

    2002-08-01

    Alcoholic extracts of six Brazilian Cerrado medicinal plants were evaluated for their molluscicidal activity against Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host of schistosomiasis. Stryphnodendron polyphyllum bark extract, rich in condensed tannins, was the most promising as molluscicide.

  17. Larvicidal activity of six Nigerian plant species against Anopheles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the larvicidal activity of extracts from six Nigerian plant species (Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides, Piper guineense, Nicotianat abacum, Erythrophleum suaveoleus, Jatropha curcas and Petiveria alliacea) against laboratory-bred Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti larvae. Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides ...

  18. In Vivo Antimalarial Activities of Plants Used in Ethiopian Traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Vivo Antimalarial Activities of Plants Used in Ethiopian Traditional Medicine, Delomenna, Southeast Ethiopia. Ashenafi Asefa, Kelbassa Urga, Mulugeta Guta, Waleleng Mekonene, Daniel Melaku, Kise Mudie, Tesgayae Kidanemariam ...

  19. Genomics of Volvocine Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umen, James G.; Olson, Bradley J.S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Volvocine algae are a group of chlorophytes that together comprise a unique model for evolutionary and developmental biology. The species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri represent extremes in morphological diversity within the Volvocine clade. Chlamydomonas is unicellular and reflects the ancestral state of the group, while Volvox is multicellular and has evolved numerous innovations including germ-soma differentiation, sexual dimorphism, and complex morphogenetic patterning. The Chlamydomonas genome sequence has shed light on several areas of eukaryotic cell biology, metabolism and evolution, while the Volvox genome sequence has enabled a comparison with Chlamydomonas that reveals some of the underlying changes that enabled its transition to multicellularity, but also underscores the subtlety of this transition. Many of the tools and resources are in place to further develop Volvocine algae as a model for evolutionary genomics. PMID:25883411

  20. Transcriptomics in brown algae

    OpenAIRE

    Heinrich, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Brown algae are distributed worldwide on rocky shores. They are importenet components of ecosystems, they provide habitat, shelter and serve as nurseries for various marine organisms. The geographic as well as depth distribution of macroalgae is constrained by abiotic factors, especially light and temperature. It is therefore likely that due to the global change, distribution patterns of these organisms will change. In this work the molecular acclimation of two prominent brown macroalgae, Sac...

  1. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Phlorotannins from Edible Brown Algae,Eisenia bicyclisAgainst Streptomycin-ResistantListeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo-Jung; Dasagrandhi, Chakradhar; Kim, Song-Hee; Kim, Bo-Geum; Eom, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Young-Mog

    2018-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is an important food borne pathogen responsible for listeriosis. Further, LM is an etiological agent associated with life threatening conditions like meningitis and encephalitis. Biofilm forming and drug resistant LM may potentially become difficult to treat infections and hence effective controlling measures are required to prevent LM infections. In view of this, the present study evaluated an anti-listerial potential of edible brown seaweed, Eisenia bicyclis , by disc diffusion and micro-dilution methods. The results of the present study suggested that the anti-listerial activity of various phlorotannins isolated form E. bicyclis were in the range of 16-256 µg/ml. Among the phlorotannins isolated, fucofuroeckol-A (FAA) exhibited the highest anti-listerial potential (MIC range 16-32 µg/ml) against LM strains tested. Further, in checker board synergy assays, FFA-streptomycin combination exhibited significant synergy (fractional inhibitory concentration index, ∑FIC < 0.5) against aminoglycoside resistant clinical strains of LM. The results of the present study suggested the potential use of edible seaweed E. bicyclis as a source of natural phlorotannins to control food borne pathogenic infections.

  2. Antibacterial activity of some medicinal plants grown in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masadeh, Majed Mohammad; Alkofahi, Ahmad Suleiman; Tumah, Haitham Najeeb; Mhaidat, Nizar Mahmoud; Alzoubi, Karem Hasan

    2013-03-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activity of 16 Jordanian medicinal plant extracts against four reference bacteria; Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter faecalis, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella typhi. For that purpose, whole plants were extracted and antimicrobial susceptibility testing and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were determined. Ethanolic extracts of most medicinal plants exerted a dose-dependent cytotoxiciy against different reference bacteria. Origanum syriaca, Varthemia iphionoides, Psidium guajava, Sarcopoterium spinosa plant extracts were most active against S. aureus (MIC; 70 μg/mL), E. faecalis (MIC; 130 μg/mL), E. coli (MIC; 153 μg/mL), and S. typhi (MIC; 110 μg/mL), respectively. Results indicate that medicinal plants grown in Jordan might be a valuable source of starting materials for the extraction and/or isolation of new antibacterial agents.

  3. Potential pharmacological applications of polyphenolic derivatives from marine brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Noel Vinay; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2011-11-01

    Recently, the isolation and characterization of the biologically active components from seaweeds have gained much attention from various research groups across the world. The marine algae have been studied for biologically active components and phlorotannins are one among them. Among marine algae, brown algal species such as Ecklonia cava, Eisenia arborea, Ecklonia stolinifera and Eisenia bicyclis have been studied for their potential biological activities. Majority of the investigations on phlorotannins derived from brown algae have exhibited their potentiality as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antitumor, antihypertensive, anti-allergic, hyaluronidase enzyme inhibition and in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) inhibition activity. In this review, we have made an attempt to discuss the potential biological activities of phlorotannins from marine brown algae and their possible candidature in the pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Study on extraction process and activity of plant polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaogen; Wang, Xiaojing; Fan, Shuangli; Chen, Jiezhong

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that plant polysaccharides have many pharmacological activities, such as hypoglycemic, anti-inflammatory and tumor inhibition. The pharmacological activities of plant polysaccharides were summarized. The extraction methods of plant polysaccharides were discussed. Finally, the extraction process of Herba Taraxaci polysaccharides was optimized by ultrasonic assisted extraction. Through single factor experiments and orthogonal experiment to optimize the optimum extraction process from dandelion polysaccharide, optimum conditions of dandelion root polysaccharide by ultrasonic assisted extraction method for ultrasonic power 320W, temperature 80°C, extraction time 40min, can get higher dandelion polysaccharide extract.

  5. Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1985-07-01

    This report presents cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1984. Also presented are data on units that were canceled during 1984. Three types of information are included: plant characteristics and ownership; construction costs; construction schedules; and milestone dates. The reactor-specific cost data presented include estimated final costs for plants in construction and disbursed costs for each unit (funds already expended and funds committed but not yet expended) as of December 31, 1984, as reported by the utilities. In EIA's last report on nuclear construction costs, published in November 1984, 43 units were reported to be under construction or completed but not in commercial operation as of March 31, 1984; 12 units were reported to be deferred as of March 31, 1984; and 2 units were planned. The status of those units as of December 31, 1984, is summarized. Of the 43 units under construction, 4 entered commercial operation, 38 were still under construction, and 1 was reported as deferred. Of the 12 units deferred as of March 31, 1984, 6 remained in deferred status, and 6 were canceled. The 2 planned units remained in the planning stage as of December 31, 1984.

  6. Antibacterial activity of alimentary plants against Staphylococcus aureus growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, C; Anesini, C

    1994-01-01

    Alimentary plants were screened for antibacterial activity against a penicillin G resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus. Twenty-five samples of plant material corresponding to 21 species from 13 families were used. Both aqueous and ethanol extracts were obtained from them. Antibacterial activity was determined by the agar-well diffusion method, using cephazolin as a standard antibiotic. Seventeen ethanol extracts were found active. Eugenia caryophyllata (clavo de olor*) flowers, Myristica fragans (nuez moscada*) seeds, Theobroma cacao (cacao*) seed bark, Triticum sp (trigo*) fruit, Zea mays (maíz*) fruit and Piper nigrum (pimienta*) ripe fruit produced some of the more active extracts (* = Argentine vulgar names).

  7. Marine Bacteria from Danish Coastal Waters Show Antifouling Activity against the Marine Fouling Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain S91 and Zoospores of the Green Alga Ulva australis Independent of Bacteriocidal Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernbom, Nete; Ng, Yoke Yin; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    attaching to steel surfaces. P. piscicida killed S91 bacteria in the suspension cultures, whereas P. tunicata and P. ulvae did not; however, they did prevent adhesion by nonbactericidal mechanism(s). Seven Pseudoalteromonas species, including P. piscicida and P. tunicata, reduced the number of settling Ulva......, representing the major taxonomic groups, different seasons, and isolation strategies, were tested for antiadhesive effect against the marine biofilm-forming bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain S91 and zoospores of the green alga Ulva australis. The antiadhesive effects were assessed by quantifying...... the number of strain S91 or Ulva spores attaching to a preformed biofilm of each of the 22 strains. The strongest antifouling activity was found in Pseudoalteromonas strains. Biofilms of Pseudoalteromonas piscicida, Pseudoalteromonas tunicata, and Pseudoalteromonas ulvae prevented Pseudoalteromonas S91 from...

  8. Evaluation of Effective MMP Inhibitors from Eight Different Brown Algae in Human Fibrosarcoma HT1080 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Min Joo; Karadeniz, Fatih; Ahn, Byul-Nim; Kong, Chang-Suk

    2015-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are crucial extracellular matrices degrading enzymes that have important roles in metastasis of cancer progression as well as other significant conditions such as oxidative stress and hepatic fibrosis. Marine plants are on the rise for their potential to provide natural products that exhibit remarkable health benefits. In this context, brown algae species have been of much interest in the pharmaceutical field with reported instances of isolation of bioactive compounds against tumor growth and MMP activity. In this study, eight different brown algae species were harvested, and their extracts were compared in regard to their anti-MMP effects. According to gelatin zymography results, Ecklonia cava, Ecklonia bicyclis, and Ishige okamurae showed higher inhibitory effects than the other samples on MMP-2 and -9 activity at the concentrations of 10, 50, and 100 μg/mL. However, only I. okamurae was able to regulate the MMP activity through the expression of MMP and tissue inhibitor of MMP observed by mRNA levels. Overall, brown algae species showed to be good sources for anti-MMP agents, while I. okamurae needs to be further studied for its potential to yield pharmaceutical molecules that can regulate MMP-activity through cellular pathways as well as enzymatic inhibition.

  9. Traps of carnivorous pitcher plants as a habitat: composition of the fluid, biodiversity and mutualistic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlassnig, Wolfram; Peroutka, Marianne; Lendl, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Carnivorous pitcher plants (CPPs) use cone-shaped leaves to trap animals for nutrient supply but are not able to kill all intruders of their traps. Numerous species, ranging from bacteria to vertrebrates, survive and propagate in the otherwise deadly traps. This paper reviews the literature on phytotelmata of CPPs. Fluid as a Habitat The volumes of pitchers range from 0·2 mL to 1·5 L. In Nepenthes and Cephalotus, the fluid is secreted by the trap; the other genera collect rain water. The fluid is usually acidic, rich in O(2) and contains digestive enzymes. In some taxa, toxins or detergents are found, or the fluid is extremely viscous. In Heliamphora or Sarracenia, the fluid differs little from pure water. Diversity Pitcher inquilines comprise bacteria, protozoa, algae, fungi, rotifers, crustaceans, arachnids, insects and amphibia. The dominant groups are protists and Dipteran larvae. The various species of CPPs host different sets of inquilines. Sarracenia purpurea hosts up to 165 species of inquilines, followed by Nepenthes ampullaria with 59 species, compared with only three species from Brocchinia reducta. Reasons for these differences include size, the life span of the pitcher as well as its fluid. MUTUALISTIC: Activities Inquilines closely interact with their host. Some live as parasites, but the vast majority are mutualists. Beneficial activities include secretion of enzymes, feeding on the plant's prey and successive excretion of inorganic nutrients, mechanical break up of the prey, removal of excessive prey and assimilation of atmospheric N(2). There is strong evidence that CPPs influence their phytotelm. Two strategies can be distinguished: (1) Nepenthes and Cephalotus produce acidic, toxic or digestive fluids and host a limited diversity of inquilines. (2) Genera without efficient enzymes such as Sarracenia or Heliamphora host diverse organisms and depend to a large extent on their symbionts for prey utilization.

  10. Chemical examination of the Red alga Acanthophora spicifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wahidullah, S.; Kamat, S.Y.

    Analyses of petroleum ether and chloroform extracts of the marine alga Acanthophora spicifera exhibiting antifertility activity led to the isolation of sterols and fatty acids as well as the rare dipeptides aurantiamides. All the compounds were...

  11. Ectocarpus: a model organism for the brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Susana M; Scornet, Delphine; Rousvoal, Sylvie; Peters, Nick T; Dartevelle, Laurence; Peters, Akira F; Cock, J Mark

    2012-02-01

    The brown algae are an interesting group of organisms from several points of view. They are the dominant organisms in many coastal ecosystems, where they often form large, underwater forests. They also have an unusual evolutionary history, being members of the stramenopiles, which are very distantly related to well-studied animal and green plant models. As a consequence of this history, brown algae have evolved many novel features, for example in terms of their cell biology and metabolic pathways. They are also one of only a small number of eukaryotic groups to have independently evolved complex multicellularity. Despite these interesting features, the brown algae have remained a relatively poorly studied group. This situation has started to change over the last few years, however, with the emergence of the filamentous brown alga Ectocarpus as a model system that is amenable to the genomic and genetic approaches that have proved to be so powerful in more classical model organisms such as Drosophila and Arabidopsis.

  12. Antimicrobial Activity of Five Medicinal Plants on Candida Albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Masomi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, drug resistance to human pathogenic fungi has been increased. Medicinal plants are one way to overcome antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal and inhibitory activity of five medicinal plants on the growth of Candida albicans. Methods: This study was done in the Microbiology Lab of Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Iran in 2015. Five medicinal plants include: Trachyspermum ammi (seed, Teucrium polium (leaf, Piper nigrum (seed, Pistachia vera (skin, Camelia sinensis (leaf were collected. Collected plant materials were extracted by ethanol and methanol solvent with maceration method. Antifungal activity of the ethanolic and methanolic extracts was evaluated by paper disc diffusion and agar well diffusion methods. Besides, MIC and MBC of each extract was determined. Results: All plant extracts had sufficient inhibitory effect against C. albicans but the extracts of P. vera had the best inhibitory effect on C. albicans (ZOI: 40 mm. The lowest antifungal effect between these five plants related to Piper nigrum (ZOI: 13 mm. Besides, the P. vera extracts had the best MIC and MBC values (6.25 and 12.5 mg/ml. Conclusion: This study strongly evidence the maximum antimicrobial activity of medicinal plants against C. albicans that this inhibitory effect varies with the different solvent-extract form. A more comprehensive study need to identify the effective compounds that have these antifungal properties.

  13. Lead action on activity of some enzymes of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolyov, A.N.; Koshkaryova, A.I.

    2008-01-01

    Lead action on activity of some enzymes of young plants of barley double-row (Hordeum distichon L.) families of cereals (Grominea). It is established that activity urease, catalase, ascorbatoxidase is in dependence as from a lead dose in a nutritious solution, and term ontogenesis. At later stages ontogenesis the increase in concentration of lead in an inhabitancy leads to sharp decrease in activity ascorbatoxidase. In the same conditions activity urease and catalase raises.

  14. Antioxidant activity of medicinal plant polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardosová, A; Machová, E

    2006-07-01

    Eleven polysaccharides have been isolated from the leaves of Arctium lappa var. herkules, Aloe barbadensis, Althaea officinalis var. robusta, Plantago lanceolata var. libor, aerial parts and roots of Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii, stems of Mahonia aquifolium, and peach-tree (Prunus persica) gum exudates. The polysaccharides were investigated for their ability to inhibit peroxidation of soyabean lecithin liposomes by OH radicals. The highest inhibition was found with glucuronoxylans of A. officinalis var. robusta and P. lanceolata var. libor, aerial parts. Their antioxidant activity accounted for approximately 69% of the activity of the reference compound alpha-tocopherol. The activity of eight polysaccharides ranged from 20 to 45%, while the fructofuranan from P. lanceolata var. libor roots was practically inactive.

  15. Antibacterial activities of medicinal plants used in Mexican traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Flores-Vallejo, Rosario Del Carmen; Cardoso-Taketa, Alexandre; Villarreal, María Luisa

    2017-08-17

    We provide an extensive summary of the in vitro antibacterial properties of medicinal plants popularly used in Mexico to treat infections, and we discuss the ethnomedical information that has been published for these species. We carried out a bibliographic investigation by analyzing local and international peer-reviewed papers selected by consulting internationally accepted scientific databases from 1995 to 2014. We provide specific information about the evaluated plant parts, the type of extracts, the tested bacterial strains, and the inhibitory concentrations for each one of the species. We recorded the ethnomedical information for the active species, as well as their popular names and local distribution. Information about the plant compounds that has been identified is included in the manuscript. This review also incorporates an extensive summary of the available toxicological reports on the recorded species, as well as the worldwide registries of plant patents used for treating bacterial infections. In addition, we provide a list with the top plant species with antibacterial activities in this review RESULTS: We documented the in vitro antibacterial activities of 343 plant species pertaining to 92 botanical families against 72 bacterial species, focusing particularly on Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The plant families Asteraceae, Fabaceae, Lamiaceae and Euphorbiaceae included the largest number of active species. Information related to popular uses reveals that the majority of the plants, in addition to treating infections, are used to treat other conditions. The distribution of Mexican plants extended from those that were reported to grow in just one state to those that grow in all 32 Mexican states. From 75 plant species, 225 compounds were identified. Out of the total plant species, only 140 (40.57%) had at least one report about their toxic effects. From 1994 to July 2014 a total of 11

  16. Reassessing the Potential Activities of Plant CGI-58 Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Khatib

    Full Text Available Comparative Gene Identification-58 (CGI-58 is a widespread protein found in animals and plants. This protein has been shown to participate in lipolysis in mice and humans by activating Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL, the initial enzyme responsible for the triacylglycerol (TAG catabolism cascade. Human mutation of CGI-58 is the cause of Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome, an orphan disease characterized by a systemic accumulation of TAG which engenders tissue disorders. The CGI-58 protein has also been shown to participate in neutral lipid metabolism in plants and, in this case, a mutation again provokes TAG accumulation. Although its roles as an ATGL coactivator and in lipid metabolism are quite clear, the catalytic activity of CGI-58 is still in question. The acyltransferase activities of CGI-58 have been speculated about, reported or even dismissed and experimental evidence that CGI-58 expressed in E. coli possesses an unambiguous catalytic activity is still lacking. To address this problem, we developed a new set of plasmids and site-directed mutants to elucidate the in vivo effects of CGI-58 expression on lipid metabolism in E. coli. By analyzing the lipid composition in selected E. coli strains expressing CGI-58 proteins, and by reinvestigating enzymatic tests with adequate controls, we show here that recombinant plant CGI-58 has none of the proposed activities previously described. Recombinant plant and mouse CGI-58 both lack acyltransferase activity towards either lysophosphatidylglycerol or lysophosphatidic acid to form phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidic acid and recombinant plant CGI-58 does not catalyze TAG or phospholipid hydrolysis. However, expression of recombinant plant CGI-58, but not mouse CGI-58, led to a decrease in phosphatidylglycerol in all strains of E. coli tested, and a mutation of the putative catalytic residues restored a wild-type phenotype. The potential activities of plant CGI-58 are subsequently discussed.

  17. Trading Activity and Ethnodomestication of Plants by Manipuri Muslims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Mustaque AHMED

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Long distance traveling and trading activity of Muslims from great antiquity brought plants into Manipur (Indo-Burma-China region. The indigenous traveling vehicles, horses needed poppy as their essential medicinal food as well as horse diet. Some words such as- Turushka, Pasha (Pasa, Pangal, Pathan, Mangal, Mughal, are found to be synonymous with the word Muslims and these words were associated with the plants. Ethno-domestication of 18 (eighteen plants in their kitchen garden, flower garden, courtyard, fields, orchards etc, was found. Survey of literature couples with field survey was carried out with an aim to understand the sustainable use of bio-resources. Uses of plants among Manipuri community in various purposes were known to this community. To this aspect, an approach of traditional plant stalk conservation is observed from time immemorial.

  18. Activity profiles of fourteen selected medicinal plants from Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fourteen plants used in traditional medicine in the Venda region of South Africa were screened for activity against fifteen bacterial species. Methanol, acetone and hexane extracts and in some cases essential oils were tested using the disc diffusion and the microdilution methods. Most of the extracts were active against at ...

  19. Antioxidant activity in some selected Indian medicinal plants | Kumar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to determine the antioxidant activity of selected medicinal plants namely Albizia amara, Achyranthes aspera, Cassia fistula, Cassia auriculata and Datura stramonium by inhibition of lipid peroxidation technique. The highest inhibition of lipid peroxidation activity was observed in A. amara (96%) ...

  20. Plant Pigment Identification: A Classroom and Outreach Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Kathleen C. A.; Odendaal, Antoinette Y.; Carlson, Erin E.

    2013-01-01

    Anthocyanins are a class of pigments responsible for the bright colors of many flowers, fruits, and vegetables typically resulting in shades of red, blue, and purple. Students were asked to perform an activity to enable them to identify which anthocyanin was present in one of several possible plant materials through a hands-on activity. Students…

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Bacteriophage Endolysin Produced in Nicotiana benthamiana Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalskaya, Natalia; Foster-Frey, Juli; Donovan, David M; Bauchan, Gary; Hammond, Rosemarie W

    2016-01-01

    The increasing spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has raised the interest in alternative antimicrobial treatments. In our study, the functionally active gram-negative bacterium bacteriophage CP933 endolysin was produced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants by a combination of transient expression and vacuole targeting strategies, and its antimicrobial activity was investigated. Expression of the cp933 gene in E. coli led to growth inhibition and lysis of the host cells or production of trace amounts of CP933. Cytoplasmic expression of the cp933 gene in plants using Potato virus X-based transient expression vectors (pP2C2S and pGR107) resulted in death of the apical portion of experimental plants. To protect plants against the toxic effects of the CP933 protein, the cp933 coding region was fused at its Nterminus to an N-terminal signal peptide from the potato proteinase inhibitor I to direct CP933 to the delta-type vacuoles. Plants producing the CP933 fusion protein did not exhibit the severe toxic effects seen with the unfused protein and the level of expression was 0.16 mg/g of plant tissue. Antimicrobial assays revealed that, in contrast to gram-negative bacterium E. coli (BL21(DE3)), the gram-positive plant pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis was more susceptible to the plant-produced CP933, showing 18% growth inhibition. The results of our experiments demonstrate that the combination of transient expression and protein targeting to the delta vacuoles is a promising approach to produce functionally active proteins that exhibit toxicity when expressed in plant cells.

  2. Neuroenzymatic activity and physiological energetics in Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, during short-term sublethal exposure to harmful alga, Heterocapsa circularisquama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basti, Leila; Nagai, Satoshi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Oda, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    The harmful alga, Heterocapsa circularisquama, causes recurrent mortalities of bivalve molluscs in Japan, with demonstrated hemolysis and cytotoxicity in rabbit erythrocytes, HeLa cells, and bivalve tissues. Nonetheless, the effects of exposure to sublethal cell densities on the physiological energetics of bivalves have not been investigated, nor the potential involvement of neurotoxicity. In the present study, two sets of experiments were conducted with adult clams, Ruditapes philippinarum. In the first set, the clearance rate (CR), respiration rate (RR), absorption efficiency (AE), ingestion rate (IR), and absorption rate (AR) were examined in clams exposed to H. circularisquama to quantify the scope for growth (SFG) as an indicative of the bioenergetic status of clams (5, 50, 2.5×10(2), and 5×10(2)cellsml(-1); under 15°C and 20°C). In the second set, the activity of the biomarker of neurotoxic exposure, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), was monitored following 3, 6, 24, and 48h of exposure (5, 50, 5×10(2), and 10(3)cellsml(-1), at 20°C) in gills of R. philippinarum, and compared to that in Mediterranean mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis; a species also affected by H. circualrisquama and in which AChE activity was more extensively studied. At 15°C, CR, IR, and AR were decreased for exposures to 50-5×10(2) cells ml(-1) resulting in a significant decrease in the absorbed energy (A), and a significant decrease in SFG at 5×10(2)cellsml(-1). At 20°C, AE was null for exposures to 2.5×10(2) and 5×10(2)cellsml(-1). RR was decreased at 2.5×10(2) and 5×10(2)cellsml(-1), CR, IR, and AR were decreased at 5-5×10(2)cellsml(-1), and the AE was null for 2.5×10(2)-5×10(2)cellsml(-1) resulting in a significant decrease in the respired energy (R), but mainly in (A) especially at 2.5×10(2) and 5×10(2)cellsml(-1) decreasing the SFG over the entire range of cell density with negative values for 2.5×10(2) and 5×10(2)cellsml(-1). The activity of AChE in both clams and

  3. Plant Cell Cultures as Source of Cosmetic Active Ingredients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Barbulova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The last decades witnessed a great demand of natural remedies. As a result, medicinal plants have been increasingly cultivated on a commercial scale, but the yield, the productive quality and the safety have not always been satisfactory. Plant cell cultures provide useful alternatives for the production of active ingredients for biomedical and cosmetic uses, since they represent standardized, contaminant-free and biosustainable systems, which allow the production of desired compounds on an industrial scale. Moreover, thanks to their totipotency, plant cells grown as liquid suspension cultures can be used as “biofactories” for the production of commercially interesting secondary metabolites, which are in many cases synthesized in low amounts in plant tissues and differentially distributed in the plant organs, such as roots, leaves, flowers or fruits. Although it is very widespread in the pharmaceutical industry, plant cell culture technology is not yet very common in the cosmetic field. The aim of the present review is to focus on the successful research accomplishments in the development of plant cell cultures for the production of active ingredients for cosmetic applications.

  4. The use of NPAR results in plant inspection activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.; Taylor, J.

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program is a hardware oriented research program which has produced a large data base of equipment and system operating, maintenance, and testing information. Equipment and systems which have a propensity for age related degradation are identified, and methods for detecting and mitigating aging effects have been evaluated. As plants age, it becomes increasingly important that NRC inspectors be cognizant of plant aging phenomena. This paper describes the NPAR information which can enhance inspection activities, and provides a mechanism for making pertinent research available to the inspectors

  5. Anti-Helicobactor pylori activity of some Jordanian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masadeh, Majed M; Alkofahi, Ahmad S; Alzoubi, Karem H; Tumah, Haitham N; Bani-Hani, Kamal

    2014-05-01

    Natural flora are considered a major source of new agents for the treatment of Helicobactor pylori. The plants used in this study were selected based on previous traditional use. In this study, we evaluated the effect of extracts of 16 medicinal plants grown in Jordan against clinical isolates of H. pylori. Tested plant extracts included Aloysia triphylla (L'Her.) Britton (Verbenaceae), Anethum graveolens L. (Apiaceae), Artemisia inculata Delile (Asteraceae), Capparis spinosa L. (Capparaceae), Crataegus aronia (L.) Bosc ex. DC. (Rosaceae), Inula viscose (L.) Ait (Asteraceae), Lavandula officinalis Chaix. (Lamiaceae), Lepidium sativum L. (Cruciferae), Origanum syriaca L. (Lamiaceae), Paronychia argentea Lam. (Caryophyllaceae), Passiflora incarnate L. (Passifloraceae), Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae), Sarcopoterium spinosum (L.) Spach (Rosaceae), Sesamum indicum L. (Pedaliaceae), Urtica urens L. (Urticaceae) and Varthemia iphionoids Boiss (Asteraceae). Clinical isolates of H. pylori were tested in vitro for susceptibility to each of the above plant crude extracts using disk diffusion method, and the MIC value was determined for each plant extract using the serial dilution method. Results showed that ethanol extracts of most medicinal plants exerted cytotoxiciy against H. pylori isolates. Among the tested plant extracts, A. triphylla (MIC: 90 µg/mL, MBC: 125 µg/mL) and I. viscosa (MIC: 83 µg/mL, MBC: 104 µg/mL) showed the strongest activity against both isolates of H. pylori. Jordanian medicinal plants might be valuable sources of starting materials for the synthesis of new antibacterial agents against H. pylori.

  6. The use of NPAR [Nuclear Plant Aging Research] results in plant inspection activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.; Taylor, J.

    1989-01-01

    The US NRC's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program is a hardware oriented research program which has produced a large data base of equipment and system operating, maintenance, and testing information. Equipment and systems which have a propensity for age related degradation are identified, and methods for detecting and mitigating aging effects have been evaluated. As plants age, it becomes increasingly important that NRC inspectors be cognizant of plant aging phenomena. This paper describes the NPAR information which can enhance inspection activities, and provides a mechanism for making pertinent research available to the inspectors. 7 refs., 2 figs

  7. The Red Algae Compound 3-Bromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde Protects Human Keratinocytes on Oxidative Stress-Related Molecules and Pathways Activated by UVB Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Piao, Mei Jing; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Ryu, Yea Seong; Shilnikova, Kristina; Park, Jeong Eon; Hyun, Yu Jae; Zhen, Ao Xuan; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Koh, Young Sang; Ahn, Mee Jung; Hyun, Jin Won

    2017-01-01

    Skin exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excessive ROS cause aging of the skin via basement membrane/extracellular matrix degradation by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We recently demonstrated that 3-bromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (BDB), a natural compound of red algae, had a photo-protective effect against UVB-induced oxidative stress in human keratinocytes. The present study focused on the effect of BDB on UVB-irradiated ...

  8. Screening of some Nigerian plants for molluscicidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kela, S L; Ogunsusi, R A; Ogbogu, V C; Nwude, N

    1989-01-01

    Methanolic (MEOH), evaporated crude water (ECW) and unevaporated crude water (UECW) extracts of 25 Nigerian plants, used for different medicinal and domestic purposes were screened for molluscacidal activity on laboratory-reared Lymnaea natalensis Krauss. Seven of the plants were not active; extracts from 18 (72 per cent) of the plants, some of which are renowned fish poisons, had molluscicidal activity. These were Acacia nilotica, Aristolochia albida, Balanites aegyptiaca, Blighia sapida, Boswellia dalzielii, Detarium microcarpum, Gnidia kraussiana, Kigelia africana, Nauclea latifolia, Opilia celtidefolia, Parkia clappertoniana, Polygonum limbatum, Pseudocedrela kotschyi, Sclerocarya birrea, Securidaca longipedunculata, Ximenia americana, Vetiveria nigritana and Ziziphus abyssinica. The LC50 of these extracts were determined. It is strongly recommended that the toxic effects of these extracts against fish, cercariae, snail eggs and mammals be further investigated so as to determine the right concentration, especially for use in fish ponds.

  9. Control of cytokinin and auxin homeostasis in cyanobacteria and algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žižková, Eva; Kubeš, Martin; Dobrev, Petre I; Přibyl, Pavel; Šimura, Jan; Zahajská, Lenka; Záveská Drábková, Lenka; Novák, Ondřej; Motyka, Václav

    2017-01-01

    phytohormones in algal growth and cell division. Our data suggest the existence and functioning of a complex network of metabolic pathways and activity control of CKs and auxins in cyanobacteria and algae that apparently differ from those in vascular plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  10. Fatty acid composition from the marine red algae Pterocladiella capillacea (S. G. Gmelin Santelices & Hommersand 1997 and Osmundaria obtusiloba (C. Agardh R. E. Norris 1991 and its antioxidant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIEL B. DE ALENCAR

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study evaluated the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of fatty acids from the marine red algae Pterocladiella capillacea (S. G. Gmelin Santelices & Hommersand 1997 and Osmundaria obtusiloba (C. Agardh R. E. Norris 1991. The gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS identified nine fatty acids in the two species. The major fatty acids of P. capillacea and O. obtusiloba were palmitic acid, oleic acid, arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid. The DPPH radical scavenging capacity of fatty acids was moderate ranging from 25.90% to 29.97%. Fatty acids from P. capillacea (31.18% had a moderate ferrous ions chelating activity (FIC, while in O. obtusiloba (17.17%, was weak. The ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP of fatty acids from P. capillacea and O. obtusiloba was low. As for β-carotene bleaching (BCB, P. capillacea and O. obtusiloba showed a good activity. This is the first report of the antioxidant activities of fatty acids from the marine red algae P. capillacea and O. obtusiloba.

  11. Fossil non-calcareous Algae from insoluble residues of algal limestones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, de J.J.

    1969-01-01

    Dissolution of algal limestones in a 1-10% HCL solution delivers flocks of well preserved non-calcareous algae and sometimes some other plant remains as well. Non-calcareous algae of Cambrian, Carboniferous, Jurassic and Paleogene age were obtained in this manner. Slides of these fossils together

  12. How Embryophytic is the Biosynthesis of Phenylpropanoids and their Derivatives in Streptophyte Algae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jan; de Vries, Sophie; Slamovits, Claudio H; Rose, Laura E; Archibald, John M

    2017-05-01

    The origin of land plants from algae is a long-standing question in evolutionary biology. It is becoming increasingly clear that many characters that were once assumed to be 'embryophyte specific' can in fact be found in their closest algal relatives, the streptophyte algae. One such case is the phenylpropanoid pathway. While biochemical data indicate that streptophyte algae harbor lignin-like components, the phenylpropanoid core pathway, which serves as the backbone of lignin biosynthesis, has been proposed to have arisen at the base of the land plants. Here we revisit this hypothesis using a wealth of new sequence data from streptophyte algae. Tracing the biochemical pathway towards lignin biogenesis, we show that most of the genes required for phenylpropanoid synthesis and the precursors for lignin production were already present in streptophyte algae. Nevertheless, phylogenetic analyses and protein structure predictions of one of the key enzyme classes in lignin production, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), suggest that CADs of streptophyte algae are more similar to sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenases (SADs). This suggests that the end-products of the pathway leading to lignin biosynthesis in streptophyte algae may facilitate the production of lignin-like compounds and defense molecules. We hypothesize that streptophyte algae already possessed the genetic toolkit from which the capacity to produce lignin later evolved in vascular plants. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Food Preference of Fresh-Water Invertebrates - Comparing Fresh and Decomposed Angiosperm and a Filamentous Alga

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornijow, R.; Gulati, R.D.; Ozimek, T.

    1995-01-01

    1. Fresh and decomposed Mougeotia sp. (a filamentous green alga) and Elodea nuttallii (a vascular plant) were offered as food to three species of aquatic macroinvertebrates (Lymnnea peregra, Asellus meridianus and Endochironomus albipennis) to test: (i) if filamentous algae are preferred to aquatic

  14. Antifungal Activities of Extracts from Selected Lebanese Wild Plants against Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Abou-Jawdah

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracts of nine plant species growing wild in Lebanon were tested for their efficacy against seven plant pathogenic fungi: Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria solani, Penicillium sp., Cladosporium sp., Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis, Rhizoctonia solani and Sphaerotheca cucurbitae. Extracts of three of the plants, Origanum syriacum, Micromeria nervosa and Plumbago maritima, showed the highest levels of in vitro activity against spore germination and mycelial growth of the fungi tested. Inula viscosa showed high activity against spore germination but only moderate activity against mycelial growth. The other five plant species tested Calamintha origanifolia, Micromeria juliana, Ruta sp., Sideritis pullulans and Urginea maritima showed only moderate to low activity against these fungi. Preventive sprays with extracts of O. syriacum, M. nervosa, P. maritima and I. viscosa, applied at concentrations ranging between 4 and 8% to squash and cucumber seedlings, gave efficient protection against gray mold caused by B. cinerea and powdery mildew caused by S. cucurbitae. However, these extracts did not control green mold of citrus fruits caused by Penicillium sp. Thin layer chromatography revealed three inhibitory bands in extracts of O. syriacum, two in I. viscosa and only one in each of the other plants tested: M. nervosa, P. maritima, C. origanifolia and Ruta sp.

  15. Antibacterial activity of plant extracts from Brazilian southeast region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Denilson F; Pereira, Aline C; Figueiredo, Henrique C P; Carvalho, Douglas A; Silva, Greiciele; Nunes, Alexandro S; Alves, Dejane S; Carvalho, Hudson W P

    2007-02-01

    A screening was conducted with 26 plants collected in the Brazilian southeast region, to identify plant extracts with antibacterial properties against Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Initially, the agar diffusion method was employed. Then, those extracts presenting activity were submitted to a broth microdilution assay to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC). It was observed that 13 of the tested extracts showed antibacterial activity. The best results were obtained with those from Lantana lilacina and Phyllanthus tenellus.

  16. Savannah River Plant history plantwide activities, July 1954--December 1972

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1972-12-31

    This report recounts the yearly activities of the Savannah River Plant nonproduction agencies and is concerned mainly with Plant personnel and items of general interest. The ``History of Plantwide Activities`` is published as an accumulative document; at the end of each year a new writeup is added to the volume to bring it up to date. Writeups for 1955 and 1956 are based on the governmental fiscal year; those for 1957 and subsequent years are on a calendar year basis. The history of the period from prestartup through June 30, 1953, is presented in DPSP 53-368; the history from July 1953 through June 1954 is presented in DPSP 54-448.

  17. Regulatory control of maintenance activities in Argentine nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, J.C.; Caruso, G.

    2000-01-01

    The main maintenance objective is to assure that the safety features of structures, components and systems of nuclear power plants are kept as designed. Therefore, there is a direct relationship between safety and maintenance. Owing to the above mentioned, maintenance activities are considered a relevant regulatory issue for the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN). This paper describes the regulatory control to maintenance activities of Argentine nuclear power plants. It also addresses essential elements for maintenance control, routine inspections, special inspections during planned outages, audits and license conditions and requirements. (author)

  18. Screening of some Cuban medicinal plants for antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, M J; Betancourt, J; Alonso-González, N; Jauregui, A

    1996-07-05

    The antimicrobial activities of 23 extracts of 12 Cuban plant species reported in traditional medicine were tested. The agar diffusion method was used to assess the activity against four bacteria and one yeast: Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. The results, evaluated as the diameter of the inhibition zone of microbial growth, showed that nine extracts were active against Gram-positive bacteria but only two of these proved to be also active against Gram-negative bacteria. None of the extracts inhibited the growth of the yeast. The most susceptible bacterium was Staphylococcus aureus and the best antibacterial activity was shown by Schinus terebenthifolius.

  19. Evolutionary origins, molecular cloning and expression of carotenoid hydroxylases in eukaryotic photosynthetic algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Xanthophylls, oxygenated derivatives of carotenes, play critical roles in photosynthetic apparatus of cyanobacteria, algae, and higher plants. Although the xanthophylls biosynthetic pathway of algae is largely unknown, it is of particular interest because they have a very complicated evolutionary history. Carotenoid hydroxylase (CHY) is an important protein that plays essential roles in xanthophylls biosynthesis. With the availability of 18 sequenced algal genomes, we performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of chy genes and explored their distribution, structure, evolution, origins, and expression. Results Overall 60 putative chy genes were identified and classified into two major subfamilies (bch and cyp97) according to their domain structures. Genes in the bch subfamily were found in 10 green algae and 1 red alga, but absent in other algae. In the phylogenetic tree, bch genes of green algae and higher plants share a common ancestor and are of non-cyanobacterial origin, whereas that of red algae is of cyanobacteria. The homologs of cyp97a/c genes were widespread only in green algae, while cyp97b paralogs were seen in most of algae. Phylogenetic analysis on cyp97 genes supported the hypothesis that cyp97b is an ancient gene originated before the formation of extant algal groups. The cyp97a gene is more closely related to cyp97c in evolution than to cyp97b. The two cyp97 genes were isolated from the green alga Haematococcus pluvialis, and transcriptional expression profiles of chy genes were observed under high light stress of different wavelength. Conclusions Green algae received a β-xanthophylls biosynthetic pathway from host organisms. Although red algae inherited the pathway from cyanobacteria during primary endosymbiosis, it remains unclear in Chromalveolates. The α-xanthophylls biosynthetic pathway is a common feature in green algae and higher plants. The origination of cyp97a/c is most likely due to gene duplication before divergence of

  20. Modelization of tritium transfer into the organic compartments of algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, S.; Gerber, G.B.; Arapis, G.; Kirchmann, R.

    1982-01-01

    Uptake of tritium oxide and its conversion into organic tritium was studied in four different types of algae with widely varying size and growth characteristics (Acetabularia acetabulum, Boergesenia forbesii, two strains of Chlamydomonas and Dunaliella bioculata). Water in the cell and the vacuales equilibrates rapidly with external tritium water. Tritium is actively incorporated into organically bound form as the organisms grow. During the stationary phase, incorporation of tritium is slow. There exists a discrimination against the incorporation of tritium into organically bound form. A model has been elaborated taking in account these different factors. It appears that transfer of organic tritium by algae growing near the sites of release would be significant only for actively growing algae. Algae growing slowly may, however, be useful as cumulative indicators of discontinuous tritium release. (author)

  1. Phytochemical and biological activities of four wild medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shad, Anwar Ali; Ahmad, Shabir; Ullah, Riaz; AbdEl-Salam, Naser M; Fouad, H; Ur Rehman, Najeeb; Hussain, Hidayat; Saeed, Wajid

    2014-01-01

    The fruits of four wild plants, namely, Capparis decidua, Ficus carica, Syzygium cumini, and Ziziphus jujuba, are separately used as traditional dietary and remedial agents in remote areas of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The results of our study on these four plants revealed that the examined fruits were a valuable source of nutraceuticals and exhibited good level of antimicrobial activity. The fruits of these four investigated plants are promising source of polyphenols, flavonoids, alkaloids, terpenoids, and saponins. These four plants' fruits are good sources of iron, zinc, copper, manganese, selenium, and chromium. It was also observed that these fruits are potential source of antioxidant agent and the possible reason could be that these samples had good amount of phytochemicals. Hence, the proper propagation, conservation, and chemical investigation are recommended so that these fruits should be incorporated for the eradication of food and health related problems.

  2. Antibacterial, Antifungal and antioxidant activities of some medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazir, Asma; Mehjabeen, -; Jahan, Noor; Sherwani, Sikander Khan; Ahmad, Mansoor

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activities of medicinal plants. The antibacterial activity of methanolic extracts of three medicinal plants (Swertia chirata, Terminalia bellerica and Zanthoxylum armatum) were tested against Gentamicin (standard drug) on eleven gram positive and seventeen gram negative bacteria by agar well method. It was revealed that seven-gram negative and six gram positive bacterial species were inhibited by these plant extracts. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the extracts were determined by broth micro-dilution method. The significant MIC value of Swertia chirata was 20mg/ml against Serratia marcesens, Zanthoxylum armatum was 10 mg/ml against Aeromonas hydrophila and Terminali bellerica was 20mg/ml against Acinetobacter baumanii as well as Serratia marcesens. Antifungal screening was done for methanolic extracts of these plants by agar well method with the 6 saprophytic, 5 dermatophytic and 6 yeasts. In this case Griseofulvin was used as a standard. All saprophytes and dermatophytes were showed resistance by these plants extracts except Microsporum canis, which was inhibited by Z. armatum and S. chirata extracts. The significant MIC value of Zanthoxylum armatum was 10mg/ml against Microsporum canis and Swertia chirata was 10mg/ml against Candida tropicalis. The anti-oxidant study was performed by DPPH free radical scavenging assay using ascorbic acid as a reference standard. Significant antioxidant activities were observed by Swertia chirata and Zanthoxylum armatum at concentration 200μg/ml was 70% DPPH scavenging activity (EC50=937.5μg/ml) while Terminalia bellerica showed 55.6% DPPH scavenging activity (EC50=100μg/ml). This study has shown that these plants could provide potent antibacterial compounds and may possible preventive agents in ROS related ailments.

  3. Biodiesel Production From Algae to Overcome the Energy Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suliman Khan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of energy sources has reached at the level that whole world is relying on it. Being the major source of energy, fuels are considered the most important. The fear of diminishing the available sources thirst towards biofuel production has increased during last decades. Considering the food problems, algae gain the most attention to be used as biofuel producers. The use of crop and food-producing plants will never be a best fit into the priorities for biofuel production as they will disturb the food needs. Different types of algae having the different production abilities. Normally algae have 20%–80% oil contents that could be converted into different types of fuels such as kerosene oil and biodiesel. The diesel production from algae is economical and easy. Different species such as tribonema, ulothrix and euglena have good potential for biodiesel production. Gene technology can be used to enhance the production of oil and biodiesel contents and stability of algae. By increasing the genetic expressions, we can find the ways to achieve the required biofuel amounts easily and continuously to overcome the fuels deficiency. The present review article focusses on the role of algae as a possible substitute for fossil fuel as an ideal biofuel reactant.

  4. Pathogen-secreted proteases activate a novel plant immune pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhenyu; Li, Jian-Feng; Niu, Yajie; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Woody, Owen Z; Xiong, Yan; Djonović, Slavica; Millet, Yves; Bush, Jenifer; McConkey, Brendan J; Sheen, Jen; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2015-05-14

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play central roles in innate immune signalling networks in plants and animals. In plants, however, the molecular mechanisms of how signal perception is transduced to MAPK activation remain elusive. Here we report that pathogen-secreted proteases activate a previously unknown signalling pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana involving the Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits of heterotrimeric G-protein complexes, which function upstream of an MAPK cascade. In this pathway, receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) functions as a novel scaffold that binds to the Gβ subunit as well as to all three tiers of the MAPK cascade, thereby linking upstream G-protein signalling to downstream activation of an MAPK cascade. The protease-G-protein-RACK1-MAPK cascade modules identified in these studies are distinct from previously described plant immune signalling pathways such as that elicited by bacterial flagellin, in which G proteins function downstream of or in parallel to an MAPK cascade without the involvement of the RACK1 scaffolding protein. The discovery of the new protease-mediated immune signalling pathway described here was facilitated by the use of the broad host range, opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The ability of P. aeruginosa to infect both plants and animals makes it an excellent model to identify novel immunoregulatory strategies that account for its niche adaptation to diverse host tissues and immune systems.

  5. Plant compounds insecticide activity against Coleoptera pests of stored products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Marcio Dionizio; Picanco, Marcelo Coutinho; Guedes, Raul Narciso Carvalho; Campos, Mateus Ribeiro de; Silva, Gerson Adriano; Martins, Julio Claudio [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Animal]. E-mail: marcio.dionizio@gmail.com; picanco@ufv.br; guedes@ufv.br; mateusc3@yahoo.com.br; agronomiasilva@yahoo.com.br

    2007-07-15

    The objective of this work was to screen plants with insecticide activity, in order to isolate, identify and assess the bioactivity of insecticide compounds present in these plants, against Coleoptera pests of stored products: Oryzaephilus surinamensis L. (Silvanidae), Rhyzopertha dominica F. (Bostrichidae) and Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (Curculionidae). The plant species used were: basil (Ocimum selloi Benth.), rue (Ruta graveolens L.), lion's ear (Leonotis nepetifolia (L.) R.Br.), jimson weed (Datura stramonium L.), baleeira herb (Cordia verbenacea L.), mint (Mentha piperita L.), wild balsam apple (Mormodica charantia L.), and billy goat weed or mentrasto (Ageratum conyzoides L.). The insecticide activity of hexane and ethanol extracts from those plants on R. dominica was evaluated. Among them, only hexane extract of A. conyzoides showed insecticide activity; the hexane extract of this species was successively fractionated by silica gel column chromatography, for isolation and purification of the active compounds. Compounds 5,6,7,8,3',4',5'-heptamethoxyflavone; 5,6,7,8,3'-pentamethoxy-4',5'-methilenedioxyflavone and coumarin were identified. However, only coumarin showed insecticide activity against three insect pests (LD{sub 50} from 2.72 to 39.71 mg g{sup -1} a.i.). The increasing order of insects susceptibility to coumarin was R. dominica, S. zeamais and O. surinamensis. (author)

  6. Photosynthesis in extreme environments: responses to different light regimes in the Antarctic alga Koliella antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rocca, Nicoletta; Sciuto, Katia; Meneghesso, Andrea; Moro, Isabella; Rascio, Nicoletta; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2015-04-01

    Antarctic algae play a fundamental role in polar ecosystem thanks to their ability to grow in an extreme environment characterized by low temperatures and variable illumination. Here, for prolonged periods, irradiation is extremely low and algae must be able to harvest light as efficiently as possible. On the other side, at low temperatures even dim irradiances can saturate photosynthesis and drive to the formation of reactive oxygen species. Colonization of this extreme environment necessarily required the optimization of photosynthesis regulation mechanisms by algal organisms. In order to investigate these adaptations we analyzed the time course of physiological and morphological responses to different irradiances in Koliella antarctica, a green microalga isolated from Ross Sea (Antarctica). Koliella antarctica not only modulates cell morphology and composition of its photosynthetic apparatus on a long-term acclimation, but also shows the ability of a very fast response to light fluctuations. Koliella antarctica controls the activity of two xanthophyll cycles. The first, involving lutein epoxide and lutein, may be important for the growth under very low irradiances. The second, involving conversion of violaxanthin to antheraxanthin and zeaxanthin, is relevant to induce a fast and particularly strong non-photochemical quenching, when the alga is exposed to higher light intensities. Globally K. antarctica thus shows the ability to activate a palette of responses of the photosynthetic apparatus optimized for survival in its natural extreme environment. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  7. Cell death upon H(2)O(2) induction in the unicellular green alga Micrasterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darehshouri, A; Affenzeller, M; Lütz-Meindl, U

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether the unicellular green alga Micrasterias denticulata is capable of executing programmed cell death (PCD) upon experimental induction, and which morphological, molecular and physiological hallmarks characterise this. This is particularly interesting as unicellular freshwater green algae growing in shallow bog ponds are exposed to extreme environmental conditions, and the capacity to perform PCD may be an important strategy to guarantee survival of the population. The theoretically 'immortal' alga Micrasterias is an ideal object for such investigations as it has served as a cell biological model system for many years and details on its growth properties, physiology and ultrastructure throughout the cell cycle are well known. Treatments with low concentrations of H(2)O(2) are known to induce PCD in other organisms, resulting in severe ultrastructural changes to organelles, as observed in TEM. These include deformation and part disintegration of mitochondria, abnormal dilatation of cisternal rims of dictyosomes, occurrence of multivesicular bodies, an increase in the number of ER compartments, and slight condensation of chromatin. Additionally, a statistically significant increase in caspase-3-like activity was detected, which was abrogated by a caspase-3 inhibitor. Photosynthetic activity measured by fast chlorophyll fluorescence decreased as a consequence of H(2)O(2) exposure, whereas pigment composition, except for a reduction in carotenoids, was the same as in untreated controls. TUNEL positive staining and ladder-like degradation of DNA, both frequently regarded as a hallmark of PCD in higher plants, could only be detected in dead Micrasterias cells.

  8. Functional properties of carotenoids originating from algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christaki, Efterpi; Bonos, Eleftherios; Giannenas, Ilias; Florou-Paneri, Panagiota

    2013-01-15

    Carotenoids are isoprenoid molecules which are synthesised de novo by photosynthetic plants, fungi and algae and are responsible for the orange, yellow and some red colours of various fruits and vegetables. Carotenoids are lipophilic compounds, some of which act as provitamins A. These compounds can be divided into xanthophylls and carotenes. Many macroalgae and microalgae are rich in carotenoids, where these compounds aid in the absorption of sunlight. Industrially, these carotenoids are used as food pigments (in dairy products, beverages, etc.), as feed additives, in cosmetics and in pharmaceuticals, especially nowadays when there is an increasing demand by consumers for natural products. Production of carotenoids from algae has many advantages compared to other sources; for example, their production is cheap, easy and environmentally friendly; their extraction is easier, with higher yields, and there is no lack of raw materials or limited seasonal variation. Recently, there has been considerable interest in dietary carotenoids with respect to their antioxidant properties and their ability to reduce the incidence of some chronic diseases where free radicals are involved. Possibly, carotenoids protect cells from oxidative stress by quenching singlet oxygen damage with various mechanisms. Therefore, carotenoids derived from algae could be a leading natural resource in the research for potential functional ingredients. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Priming plant resistance by activation of redox-sensitive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Bosch, Carmen

    2017-12-24

    Priming by natural compounds is an interesting alternative for sustainable agriculture, which also contributes to explore the molecular mechanisms associated with stress tolerance. Although hosts and stress types eventually determine the mode of action of plant-priming agents, it highlights that many of them act on redox signalling. These include vitamins thiamine, riboflavin and quercetin; organic acids like pipecolic, azelaic and hexanoic; volatile organic compounds such as methyl jasmonate; cell wall components like chitosans and oligogalacturonides; H 2 O 2 , etc. This review provides data on how priming inducers promote stronger and faster responses to stress by modulating the oxidative environment, and interacting with signalling pathways mediated by salycilic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene. The histone modifications involved in priming that affect the transcription of defence-related genes are also discussed. Despite the evolutionary distance between plants and animals, and the fact that the plant innate immunity takes place in each plant cell, they show many similarities in the molecular mechanisms that underlie pathogen perception and further signalling to activate defence responses. This review highlights the similarities between priming through redox signalling in plants and in mammalian cells. The strategies used by pathogens to manipulate the host´s recognition and the further activation of defences also show similarities in both kingdoms. Moreover, phytochemicals like sulforaphane and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid prime both plant and mammalian responses by activating redox-sensitive genes. Hence research data into the priming of plant defences can provide additional information and a new viewpoint for priming mammalian defence, and vice versa. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Photophysiology and cellular composition of sea ice algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizotte, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The productivity of sea ice algae depends on their physiological capabilities and the environmental conditions within various microhabitats. Pack ice is the dominant form of sea ice, but the photosynthetic activity of associated algae has rarely been studied. Biomass and photosynthetic rates of ice algae of the Weddell-Scotia Sea were investigated during autumn and winter, the period when ice cover grows from its minimum to maximum. Biomass-specific photosynthetic rates typically ranged from 0.3 to 3.0 μg C · μg chl -1 · h -1 higher than land-fast ice algae but similar to Antarctic phytoplankton. Primary production in the pack ice during winter may be minor compared to annual phytoplankton production, but could represent a vital seasonal contribution to the Antarctic ecosystem. Nutrient supply may limit the productivity of ice algae. In McMurdo Sound, congelation ice algae appeared to be more nutrient deficient than underlying platelet ice algae based on: lower nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, and protein:carbohydrate; and 14 C-photosynthate distribution to proteins and phospholipids was lower, while distribution to polysaccharides and neutral lipids was higher. Depletion of nitrate led to decreased nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, protein:carbohydrate, and 14 C-photosynthate to proteins. Studied were conducted during the spring bloom; therefore, nutrient limitation may only apply to dense ice algal communities. Growth limiting conditions may be alleviated when algae are released into seawater during the seasonal recession of the ice cover. To continue growth, algae must adapt to the variable light field encountered in a mixed water column. Photoadaptation was studied in surface ice communities and in bottom ice communities

  11. Analysis of medicinal plant extracts by neutron activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, Sandra Muntz

    1995-01-01

    This dissertation has presented the results from analysis of medicinal plant extracts using neutron activation method. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to the determination of the elements Al, Br, Ca, Ce, Cl, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc and Zn in medicinal extracts obtained from Achyrolcline satureoides DC, Casearia sylvestris, Centella asiatica, Citrus aurantium L., Solano lycocarpum, Solidago microglossa, Stryphnondedron barbatiman and Zingiber officinale R. plants. The elements Hg and Se were determined using radiochemical separation by means of retention of Se in HMD inorganic exchanger and solvent extraction of Hg by bismuth diethyl-dithiocarbamate solution. Precision and accuracy of the results have been evaluated by analysing reference materials. The therapeutic action of some elements found in plant extracts analyzed was briefly discussed

  12. Lead stress effects on physiobiochemical activities of higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengar, Rakesh Singh; Gautam, Madhu; Sengar, Rajesh Singh; Garg, Sanjay Kumar; Sengar, Kalpana; Chaudhary, Reshu

    2008-01-01

    Lead is a metallic pollutant emanating from various environmental sources including industrial wastes, combustion of fossil fuels, and use of agrochemicals. Lead may exist in the atmosphere as dusts, fumes, mists, and vapors, and in soil as a mineral. Soils along roadsides are rich in lead because vehicles burn leaded gasoline, which contributes to environmental lead pollution. Other important sources of lead pollution are geological weathering, industrial processing of ores and minerals, leaching of lead from solid wastes, and animal and human excreta. Lead is nondegradable, readily enters the food chain, and can subsequently endanger human and animal health. Lead is one of the most important environment pollutants and deserves the increasing attention it has received in recent decades. The present effort was undertaken to review lead stress effects on the physiobiochemical activity of higher plants. Lead has gained considerable attention as a potent heavy metal pollutant because of growing anthropogenic pressure on the environment. Lead-contaminated soils show a sharp decline in crop productivity. Lead is absorbed by plants mainly through the root system and in minor amounts through the leaves. Within the plants, lead accumulates primarily in roots, but some is translocated to aerial plant parts. Soil pH, soil particle size, cation-exchange capacity, as well as root surface area, root exudation, and mycorrhizal transpiration rate affect the availability and uptake of lead by plants. Only a limited amount of lead is translocated from roots to other organs because there are natural plant barriers in the root endodermis. At lethal concentrations, this barrier is broken and lead may enter vascular tissues. Lead in plants may form deposits of various sizes, present mainly in intercellular spaces, cell walls, and vacuoles. Small deposits of this metal are also seen in the endoplasmic reticulum, dictyosome, and dictyosome-derived vesicles. After entering the cells, lead

  13. Antibiotic activity of Plectranthus ornatus Codd., a Traditional Medicinal Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Fernanda R; Albuquerque, Kamylla R S; Oliveira, Marcos R; Pizziolo, Virginia R; Brasileiro, Beatriz G; Diaz, Gaspar; Diaz, Marisa A N

    2017-01-01

    The dichloromethane extract of Plectranthus ornatus Codd., a tradicional medicinal plant, showed antibiotic activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 0.4 mg.mL-1 and 100 percent of biofilm inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from animals with mastitis infections. Based on these antibacterial activities, in addition to ethnopharmacological reports from healing men and farmers in Brazil, an herbal soap was produced from this active extract and was tested both in vitro and in vivo. In vivo assays conducted on these herbal soaps led to results similar to those previously conducted with the active extract. These results indicated the great potential of this plant for use as an excipient by preparing herbal antibacterial soaps as an alternative veterinary medicine aimed at controlling bovine mastitis infections on small Brazilian farms.

  14. Antibiotic activity of Plectranthus ornatus Codd., a Traditional Medicinal Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FERNANDA R. NASCIMENTO

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The dichloromethane extract of Plectranthus ornatus Codd., a tradicional medicinal plant, showed antibiotic activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of 0.4 mg.mL-1 and 100 percent of biofilm inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from animals with mastitis infections. Based on these antibacterial activities, in addition to ethnopharmacological reports from healing men and farmers in Brazil, an herbal soap was produced from this active extract and was tested both in vitro and in vivo. In vivo assays conducted on these herbal soaps led to results similar to those previously conducted with the active extract. These results indicated the great potential of this plant for use as an excipient by preparing herbal antibacterial soaps as an alternative veterinary medicine aimed at controlling bovine mastitis infections on small Brazilian farms.

  15. In vitro antiplasmodial activity of Central American medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenett-Siems, K; Mockenhaupt, F P; Bienzle, U; Gupta, M P; Eich, E

    1999-09-01

    The in vitro antiplasmodial activities of 14 plant species traditionally used in Central America for the treatment of malaria or fever were evaluated. Lipophilic extracts of Piper hispidum, Siparuna andina, S. pauciflora, S. tonduziana, and Xylopia cf. frutescens, proved to be active against both a chloroquine-sensitive and a resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum. IC50 values ranged between 3.0 microg/ml and 21.9 microg/ml; however, moderate cytotoxicity of active extracts was observed. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of Piper hispidum yielded 2',4, 6'-trihydroxy-4'-methoxydihydrochalcone (asebogenin) as an active compound.

  16. Extraction and antioxidant activities of two species Origanum plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antioxidant of ethanolic extract of two species of Origanum and essential oil of plant Origanum vulgare were investigated and also the total phenolic and flavonoid content measured. The radical scavenging activity was measured using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. Total phenolic and flavonoid ...

  17. Antidiarrhoeal activity of different plants used in traditional medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antidiarrhoeal activity of different plants used in traditional medicine. SP Gutiérrez, MAZ Sánchez, CP González, LA García. Abstract. Diarrhoea is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in children under age of 5 years. In view of this problem, the World Health Organization has a Diarrhoea Disease Control ...

  18. Screening of some Siberian medicinal plants for antimicrobial activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kokoška, L.; Polesný, Z.; Rada, V.; Nepovím, Aleš; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 82, - (2002), s. 51-53 ISSN 0378-8741 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/02/0257 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : antimicrobial activity * medicinal plants Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.188, year: 2002

  19. Anticonvulsant activity of extracts from six Cameroonian plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epilepsy remains one of the leading public health problems that affects about 50 million people worldwide, thus stressing the need for new anticonvulsant drug. This study was designed to evaluate the anticonvulsant activity against Penty lenetetrazole induced–convulsion in mice. Plants were extracted by maceration with ...

  20. In vitro investigation on antifungal activity of some plant extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    In vitro investigation on antifungal activity of some plant extracts against Pyricularia oryzae. Olufolaji, D. B.1, Adeosun, B.O.1 and Onasanya, R. O.2. 1. Department of Crop, Soil and Pest Management, The Federal University of Technology, PMB 704. Akure, Ondo state, Nigeria. 2. Department of Agriculture, Federal College ...

  1. Catalase activity of cassava ( Manihot esculenta ) plant under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African cassava mosaic virus has caused an immersed low yield of the cassava crop. The virus impacts stress on the cellular metabolism of the plant producing a lot of reactive oxygen species and increases the expression of the antioxidant enzymes. The activity of catalase as a response to oxidative stress was investigated ...

  2. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of two endemic plants from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition to the antioxidant activity of these plants, the total phenolic compounds and flavonoids were also measured in the extracts. ... that the extracts of A. scabriflorum and A. tchihatschewii possess antimicrobial and antioxidant properties, and therefore, they can be used as a natural preservative ingredient in food

  3. Antibacterial activity of honey and medicinal plant extracts against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using a broth dilution method, the antibacterial activity extracts of six South African honeys and medicinal plants against six enteric microorganisms viz- Enterobacter cloacae, Escheriachia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter freundii isolated from geophagia samples and Aeromonas hydrophila and plesiomonas ...

  4. Anticariogenic activity of some tropical medicinal plants against Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae-Kwan; Shim, Jae-Seok; Chung, Jae-Youn

    2004-09-01

    The methanol extracts of five tropical plants, Baeckea frutescens, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Kaempferia pandurata, Physalis angulata and Quercus infectoria, exhibited potent antibacterial activity against the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans. In particular, G. glabra, K. pandurata and P. angulata conferred fast killing bactericidal effect against S. mutans in 2 min at 50 microg/ml of extract concentration.

  5. Evaluation of in vitro antimycobacterial activity of Nigerian plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-03

    Jun 3, 2008 ... extracts obtained from each plant were air-dried then packed in glass bottles with proper labelling for future reference. The extracts were kept refrigerated and away from ..... The in vitro antimycobacterial activity tests (BCG) were then conducted on each of the fractions. The bioactive fraction(s) is/are then.

  6. Antimycobacterial activity of selected medicinal plants extracts from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New drugs are highly needed to control mycobacterial infections. This study aimed at screening ethnobotanically selected plants extracted using organic solvents for their antimycobacterial activity. In vitro assays were performed on Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette ...

  7. Evaluation of anti-adenovirus activity of some plants from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-30

    Nov 30, 2011 ... Evaluation of anti-adenovirus activity of some plants from Lamiaceae family grown in Iran in cell culture. Horieh Saderi1 and Maryam Abbasi2*. 1Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran. 2Student Research Center, School of Medicine, Shahed University, Tehran, Iran.

  8. Antioxidant activities and flavonoid contents of selected plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-09-27

    Sep 27, 2012 ... The methanolic extract of three parasitic plants belonging to family Loranthaceae (Plicosepalus acacia,. Plicosepalus curviflorus and Phragmanthera austro arabica) were investigated for their antioxidant activity. The free radical and nitrogen oxide scavenging abilities were evaluated using diphenyl-1-.

  9. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Compounds Isolated from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Perez G.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This review shows over 300 compounds isolated and identified from plants that previously demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity. They have been classified in appropriate chemical groups and data are reported on their pharmacological effects, mechanisms of action, and other properties.

  10. Analysis of promoter activity in transgenic plants by normalizing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Analysis of promoter activity in transgenic plants by normalizing expression with a reference gene: anomalies due to the influence of the test promoter on the reference promoter. Simran Bhullar Suma Chakravarthy Deepak Pental Pradeep Kumar Burma. Articles Volume 34 Issue 6 December 2009 pp 953-962 ...

  11. Anti-Streptococcus pyogenes Activity of Selected Medicinal Plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Original Research Article. Anti-Streptococcus pyogenes Activity of Selected. Medicinal Plant Extracts Used in Thai Traditional Medicine. Surasak Limsuwan1 and Supayang P Voravuthikunchai2*. 1Faculty of Traditional Thai Medicine and Natural Products Research Center of Excellence, 2Department of Microbiology and.

  12. Activities of selected medicinal plants against multi-drug resistant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present work was designed to assess the in vitro antibacterial activities of some Cameroonian medicinal plants including Entada abyssinica, Entada africana, Pentaclethra macrophylla, Allexis cauliflora, Anthocleista leibrechtsiana, Carapa procera, Carica papaya and Persea americana against Gram-negative bacteria ...

  13. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils and other plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, K A; Carson, C F; Riley, T V

    1999-06-01

    The antimicrobial activity of plant oils and extracts has been recognized for many years. However, few investigations have compared large numbers of oils and extracts using methods that are directly comparable. In the present study, 52 plant oils and extracts were investigated for activity against Acinetobacter baumanii, Aeromonas veronii biogroup sobria, Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia col, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype typhimurium, Serratia marcescens and Staphylococcus aureus, using an agar dilution method. Lemongrass, oregano and bay inhibited all organisms at concentrations of oils did not inhibit any organisms at the highest concentration, which was 2.0% (v/v) oil for apricot kernel, evening primrose, macadamia, pumpkin, sage and sweet almond. Variable activity was recorded for the remaining oils. Twenty of the plant oils and extracts were investigated, using a broth microdilution method, for activity against C. albicans, Staph. aureus and E. coli. The lowest minimum inhibitory concentrations were 0.03% (v/v) thyme oil against C. albicans and E. coli and 0.008% (v/v) vetiver oil against Staph. aureus. These results support the notion that plant essential oils and extracts may have a role as pharmaceuticals and preservatives.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of Northwestern Mexican plants against Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Zepeda, Ramón E; Velázquez-Contreras, Carlos A; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Gálvez-Ruiz, Juan C; Ruiz-Bustos, Eduardo

    2011-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the major etiologic agent of such gastric disorders as chronic active gastritis and gastric carcinoma. Over the past few years, the appearance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has led to the development of better treatments, such as the use of natural products. This study evaluated the anti-H. pylori activity of 17 Mexican plants used mainly in the northwestern part of Mexico (Sonora) for the empirical treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The anti-H. pylori activity of methanolic extracts of the plants was determined by using the broth microdilution method. The 50% minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged from less than 200 to 400 μg/mL for Castella tortuosa, Amphipterygium adstringens, Ibervillea sonorae, Pscalium decompositum, Krameria erecta, Selaginella lepidophylla, Pimpinella anisum, Marrubium vulgare, Ambrosia confertiflora, and Couterea latiflora and were greater than 800 μg/mL for Byophyllum pinnatum, Tecoma stans linnaeus, Kohleria deppena, Jatropha cuneata, Chenopodium ambrosoides, and Taxodium macronatum. Only Equisetum gigantum showed no activity against H. pylori. This study suggests the important role that these plants may have in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders caused by H. pylori. The findings set the groundwork for further characterization and elucidation of the active compounds responsible for such activity.

  15. HPTLC Analysis, Antioxidant and Antigout Activity of Indian Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nile, Shivraj Hariram; Park, Se Won

    2014-01-01

    The HPTLC analysis, antioxidant, and antigout activity of Asparagus racemosus, Withania somnifera, Vitex negundo, Plumbago zeylanica, Butea monosperma and Tephrosia purpurea extracts were investigated. The chemical fingerprinting were carried out by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC), antioxidant activity by ABTS, DPPH, FRAP radical scavenging assays, and antiogout activity by cow milk xanthine oxidase. The HPTLC fingerprint qualitatively revealed predominant amount of flavonoids. The TEAC values ranged from 45.80 to 140 µM trolox/100 g dry weight for ABTS, from 85 to 430 µM trolox/ 100 g dw DPPH, and 185 to 560 µM trolox/100 g dw for FRAP respectively. Plants used in this study was found to inhibit the toxicity, as seen from the decreased LPO and increased GSH, SOD and CAT levels. The total phenolic and flavonoid content ranged from 10.21 to 28.17 and 5.80 to 10.1 mg of gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/100 gdw respectively. The plant extracts demonstrated significant xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity at 100 g/mL and revealed an inhibition greater than 50 % and IC50 values below the standard. This effect was almost similar to the activity of allopurinol (Standard drug) against xanthine oxidase (90.2 ± 0.4 %). These plant root extract will be subjected for further extensive studies to isolate and identify their active constituents which are useful for against inflammation and gout.

  16. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of selected medicinal plants from Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krimat Soumia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of methanolic extract extracts of selected Algerian medicinal plants. Methods: Antioxidant activity of extracts was evaluated in terms of radical scavenging potential (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and β-carotene bleaching assay. Total phenolic contents and flavonoid contents were also measured. Antimicrobial activity of these plants was examined against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. Results: The values of IC50 ranged from 4.30 μg/mL to 486.6 μg/mL for the DPPH method, while total antioxidant activity using β-carotene/linoleic acid bleaching assay ranged from 17.03% to 86.13%. It was found that Pistacia lentiscus showed the highest antioxidant capacities using DPPH assay (IC50=4.30 μg/mL, while Populus trimula, Origanum glandulosum, Centaurea calcitrapa, Sysimbrium officinalis and Rhamnus alaternus showed the highest percent of total antioxidant activity in β-carotene/linoleic acid bleaching assay. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents ranged from 3.96 to 259.65 mg GAE/g extract and from 1.13 to 26.84 mg QE/g extract, respectively. The most interesting antimicrobial activity was obtained from Sysimbrium officinalis, Rhamnus alaternus, Origanum glandulosum, Cupressus sempervirens, Pinus halipensis and Centaurea calcitrapa. Conclusions: The results indicated that the plants tested may be potential sources for isolation of natural antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds.

  17. Screening of Brazilian medicinal plants for antiviral activity against rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecílio, Alzira Batista; de Faria, Déborah Behr; Oliveira, Pollyana de Carvalho; Caldas, Sérgio; de Oliveira, Dario Alves; Sobral, Marcos Eduardo Guerra; Duarte, Maria Gorette Resende; Moreira, Carolina Paula de Souza; Silva, Cláudia Gontijo; de Almeida, Vera Lúcia

    2012-06-14

    Brazilian medicinal plants traditionally used for the treatment of diarrhoea were investigated for their in vitro antiviral activity against the simian rotavirus SA11. The ethanolic crude extracts of plants collected in the cerrado of Minas Gerais, Brazil were submitted to phytochemical screening. The cytotoxicity of the extracts was inferred by cellular morphologic alterations. Antiviral activity was assessed by the ability of the extracts to inhibit the cytopathic effect (CPE) of rotavirus on the treated cells. RT-PCR was performed to confirm and/or confront antiviral assay data. The maximum non-toxic concentration ranged from 50 to 500 μg/mL. All extracts were toxic at a concentration of 5000 μg/mL but no extract showed cytotoxicity at 50 μg/mL. The species Byrsonima verbascifolia, Myracrodruon urundeuva, Eugenia dysenterica and Hymenaea courbaril exhibited the strongest in vitro activity against rotavirus. Their extracts prevented the formation of CPE, and RT-PCR analysis detected no amplification of genetic material from rotavirus. Tannins, flavonoids, saponins, coumarins and terpenes were the major classes of natural products found in the leaf extracts that showed antiviral activity. Among the species studied, Byrsonima verbascifolia, Eugenia dysenterica, Hymenaea courbaril and Myracrodruon urundeuva showed potential activity against rotavirus and are worthy of further study. The present study corroborates ethnopharmacological data as a valuable source in the selection of plants with antiviral activity and to some extent validates their traditional uses. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. In vitro antimicrobial activity of plants in Acute Otitis Externa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Janaina Cândida Rodrigues; Diniz, Margareth de Fátima Melo; Lima, Edeltrudes O

    2008-01-01

    Acute Otitis Externa is an inflammation of the outer auditory meatus, and according to popular saying, medicinal plant extracts can be used in its treatment. to assess the in vitro antimicrobial activity of the following plants: Aleolanthus suaveolens; Caryophyllus aromaticus; Cymbopogon citratus; Matricaria chamomila; Pithecellobium avaremotemo; Plectranthus amboinicus and Ruta graveolens on the germs that cause otitis externa. the minimum inhibitory concentration of extracts and oils from these plants was obtained from otitis externa samples. Staphylococcus aureus in 10 cultures, Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 8, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus together in 5 cultures and Candida albicans and Candida krusei in 4 cultures. P. aeruginosa was resistant to all oils and extracts tested; extracts from A. suaveolens, P. avaremotemo and R. graveolens were inactive; the essential oil from C. aromaticus and M. chamomila were active against 3 strains of S. aureus and the Candida strains; seven of the S. aureus strains were sensitive to the P. amboinicus extract; however, the oil was inactive against 4 S. aureus strains and the Candida strains were sensitive to the R. graveolens essential oil. depending on the etiological agent, some plants presented satisfactory results, however we still need more detailed studies in order to better use these plants.

  19. New α-Pyridones with Quorum-Sensing Inhibitory Activity from Diversity-Enhanced Extracts of a Streptomyces sp. Derived from Marine Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuqi; Sun, Jian; Gong, Qianhong; Wang, Yi; Fu, Peng; Zhu, Weiming

    2018-02-28

    Four new α-pyrones (1-4) and eight known analogues (5-12) were identified from the secondary metabolites of Streptomyces sp. OUCMDZ-3436 derived from the marine green algae Enteromorpha prolifera. Seven new α-pyridones (14-20) were constructed by diversity-oriented synthesis, which has been an effective approach to expanding the chemical space of natural-product-like compounds. Compounds 16, 17, 19, and 20 were found to have inhibitory effect on the gene expression controlled by quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa QSIS-lasI.

  20. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Specht

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for molecular pharming in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae are poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, and they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally-delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered – from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and system immune reactivity.

  1. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Elizabeth A.; Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for “molecular pharming” in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae could be poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, as they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered – from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and systemic immune reactivity. PMID:24596570

  2. Subcellular Sequestration and Impact of Heavy Metals on the Ultrastructure and Physiology of the Multicellular Freshwater Alga Desmidium swartzii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancuela Andosch

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to modern life with increasing traffic, industrial production and agricultural practices, high amounts of heavy metals enter ecosystems and pollute soil and water. As a result, metals can be accumulated in plants and particularly in algae inhabiting peat bogs of low pH and high air humidity. In the present study, we investigated the impact and intracellular targets of aluminum, copper, cadmium, chromium VI and zinc on the filamentous green alga Desmidium swartzii, which is an important biomass producer in acid peat bogs. By means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS it is shown that all metals examined are taken up into Desmidium readily, where they are sequestered in cell walls and/or intracellular compartments. They cause effects on cell ultrastructure to different degrees and additionally disturb photosynthetic activity and biomass production. Our study shows a clear correlation between toxicity of a metal and the ability of the algae to compartmentalize it intracellularly. Cadmium and chromium, which are not compartmentalized, exert the most toxic effects. In addition, this study shows that the filamentous alga Desmidium reacts more sensitively to aluminum and zinc when compared to its unicellular relative Micrasterias, indicating a severe threat to the ecosystem.

  3. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activities of six Iranian plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariman, Farahnaz; Eftekhar, Fereshteh; Habibi, Zohreh; Falsafi, Tahereh

    2004-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the major worldwide cause of bacterial gastrointestinal infections in adults and children. Antibiotic therapy and a combination of two or three drugs have been widely used to eradicate these infections. However, development of drug resistance in bacteria calls for new sources of drugs, and plants seem to be a logical source of new antibacterial compounds. The anti-H. pylori activities of six native Iranian plants (Glycyrrhiza aspera, Juglans regia, Ligustrum vulgare, Thymus kotschyanus, Trachyspermum copticum and Xanthium brasilicum) and seven antibiotics were determined against 70 clinical isolates from children using the disk susceptibility assay. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were also measured for the biologically active extracts. One extract with the best anti-H. pylori activity was fractionated by silica gel and thin layer chromatography and the active compounds were identified by hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)HNMR) spectroscopy. All plant extracts showed anti-H. pylori activity by the disk sensitivity method, but the most active extracts were those from X. brasilicum and T. copticum. In fact, the anti-H. pylori activities of the two extracts were superior to the disk antibiotic susceptibility profile. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were within the range of 31.25-250 micro g/ml. Fractionation and chemical identification of the extract from X. brasilicum showed the presence of two substances, a flavonoid and a xanthanolide. Due to the rise in antibiotic resistance, new sources of anti-H. pylori drugs are needed. The use of medicinal plants and/or their chemical components may have potential benefit in eradicating such problems.

  4. Mannitol metabolism in brown algae involves a new phosphatase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groisillier, Agnès; Shao, Zhanru; Michel, Gurvan; Goulitquer, Sophie; Bonin, Patricia; Krahulec, Stefan; Nidetzky, Bernd; Duan, Delin; Boyen, Catherine; Tonon, Thierry

    2014-02-01

    Brown algae belong to a phylogenetic lineage distantly related to green plants and animals, and are found predominantly in the intertidal zone, a harsh and frequently changing environment. Because of their unique evolutionary history and of their habitat, brown algae feature several peculiarities in their metabolism. One of these is the mannitol cycle, which plays a central role in their physiology, as mannitol acts as carbon storage, osmoprotectant, and antioxidant. This polyol is derived directly from the photoassimilate fructose-6-phosphate via the action of a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase and a mannitol-1-phosphatase (M1Pase). Genome analysis of the brown algal model Ectocarpus siliculosus allowed identification of genes potentially involved in the mannitol cycle. Among these, two genes coding for haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like enzymes were suggested to correspond to M1Pase activity, and thus were named EsM1Pase1 and EsM1Pase2, respectively. To test this hypothesis, both genes were expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant EsM1Pase2 was shown to hydrolyse the phosphate group from mannitol-1-phosphate to produce mannitol but was not active on the hexose monophosphates tested. Gene expression analysis showed that transcription of both E. siliculosus genes was under the influence of the diurnal cycle. Sequence analysis and three-dimensional homology modelling indicated that EsM1Pases, and their orthologues in Prasinophytes, should be seen as founding members of a new family of phosphatase with original substrate specificity within the HAD superfamily of proteins. This is the first report describing the characterization of a gene encoding M1Pase activity in photosynthetic organisms.

  5. Further studies on South African plants: Acaricidal activity of organic plant extracts against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wellington, Kevin W

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available -1 Veterinary Parasitology, vol. 234: 10-12 Further studies on South African plants: Acaricidal activity of organic plant extracts against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) Wellington, KW Leboho, T Sakong, BM Adenubi, OT Eloff, JN...

  6. Exploring the potential of using algae in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Min David; Chen, Ching-Chun; Huynh, Pauline; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-05-01

    The applications of microalgae in cosmetic products have recently received more attention in the treatment of skin problems, such as aging, tanning and pigment disorders. There are also potential uses in the areas of anti-aging, skin-whitening, and pigmentation reduction products. While algae species have already been used in some cosmetic formulations, such as moisturizing and thickening agents, algae remain largely untapped as an asset in this industry due to an apparent lack of utility as a primary active ingredient. This review article focuses on integrating studies on algae pertinent to skin health and beauty, with the purpose of identifying serviceable algae functions in practical cosmetic uses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Lab on a chip technologies for algae detection: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Allison; Rohrlack, Thomas; Bellouard, Yves

    2012-08-01

    Over the last few decades, lab on a chip technologies have emerged as powerful tools for high-accuracy diagnosis with minute quantities of liquid and as tools for exploring cell properties in general. In this paper, we present a review of the current status of this technology in the context of algae detection and monitoring. We start with an overview of the detection methods currently used for algae monitoring, followed by a review of lab on a chip devices for algae detection and classification, and then discuss a case study based on our own research activities. We conclude with a discussion on future challenges and motivations for algae-oriented lab on a chip technologies. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Shewanella algae in acute gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella algae is an emerging bacteria rarely implicated as a human pathogen. Previously reported cases of S. algae have mainly been associated with direct contact with seawater. Here we report the isolation of S. algae as the sole etiological agent from a patient suffering from acute gastroenteritis with bloody diarrhoea. The bacterium was identified by automated identification system and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Our report highlights the importance of looking for the relatively rare aetiological agents in clinical samples that does not yield common pathogens. It also underscores the usefulness of automated systems in identification of rare pathogens.

  9. Highly active vitrification plant remote handling operational experience and improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgate, I.

    1996-01-01

    Operational experience and technological innovation in the area of remote handling is described for the Sellafield Waste Vitrification Plant (WVP). This plant turns Highly Active Liquid Wastes (HALW) into radioactively immobile, solid forms. The technology needed for remote handling of HALWs, such as ejectors and power fluidics is described as is the mechanical handling needed after the vitrification process. Key features of WVP are described, such as the in-cell cranes, master-slave manipulators and swabbing robots. The severity of the in-cell environment has highlighted the need for innovation in the remote handling equipment and these changes are also described. (UK)

  10. Biological Activity of Vegetal Extracts Containing Phenols on Plant Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ertani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of vegetal extracts derived from red grape, blueberry fruits and hawthorn leaves on Zea mays L. plant growth and the activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, a key enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway, was investigated in laboratory experiments. The extracts were characterized using FT-IR and Raman spectroscopies in order to obtain a pattern of the main functional groups. In addition, phenols content was determined by HPLC, whereas the content of indoleacetic acid and isopentenyladenosine hormones was determined by ELISA test and the auxin and gibberellin-like activities by plant-bioassays. The treated maize revealed increased root and leaf biomass, chlorophyll and sugars content with respect to untreated plants. Hawthorn, red grape skin and blueberry at 1.0 mL/L induced high p-coumaric content values, whilst hawthorn also showed high amounts of gallic and p-hydroxybenzoic acids. PAL activity induced by hawthorn at 1.0 mL/L had the highest values (11.1-fold UNT and was strongly and linearly related with the sum of leaf phenols. Our results suggest that these vegetal extracts contain more than one group of plant-promoting substances.

  11. Influence of aerogenic contamination on phytoncide activity of woody plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O. Volodarez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to determine variations of antimicrobial activity of the volatile organic compounds from leaves of woody plants, which are growing on the areas with the different air pollution degree in the south-east of Ukraine. The research objects were Aesculus hippocastanum L., Betula pendula Roth, Salix alba L., Picea pungens Engelm. in Donetsk, Ukraine, and 6 species (Betula pendula Roth, Fraxinus excelsior L., Robinia pseudoacacia L., Populus nigra L., Tilia cordata Mill., Picea pungens Engelm. in Kramatorsk, Ukraine. Samples were collected in Donetsk every month during 2012 and 2013 years on four sample areas. Three research areas border with Donetsk Metallurgical Plant PSC, heavy traffic road and Kalinin coal mine, that feature such pollutants as CO2, SO2, NO2, and marsh gas. The fourth research area is the recreation zone (Donetsk Culture and Leisure Park near Donbass Arena stadium. The control area is located in the Donetsk Botanical Garden. The leaves from trees in Kramatorsk were collected in July and August 2013 on the sample area. The research area borders with Novokramatorsk Machine-building Plant JSC, which also features CO2, SO2, NO2 and other pollutants. The control area is located in the Jubilejnyi park. The research proves that antimicrobial activity of the volatile organic compounds from leaves of species under studyis sensitive to the impact of pollutants. Moreover, the antimicrobial activity of leaves B. pendula, S. alba, F. excelsior, R. pseudoacacia, P. nigra increases under the influence of pollutants from metallurgical plants and traffic exhausts. The antimicrobial ability of A. hippocastanum, T. cordata and P. pungens enhances in the areas with the cleaner air. These species are not gas-resistant species. Consequently, gas-resistant species feature the higher antimicrobial activity in the conditions of contamination. The other benefit of this study consists in monitoring of the seasonal

  12. The P450-type carotene hydroxylase PuCHY1 from Porphyra suggests the evolution of carotenoid metabolism in red algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-En; Huang, Xing-Qi; Hang, Yu; Deng, Yin-Yin; Lu, Qin-Qin; Lu, Shan

    2014-09-01

    Carotene hydroxylases catalyze the hydroxylation of α- and β-carotene hydrocarbons into xanthophylls. In red algae, β-carotene is a ubiquitously distributed carotenoid, and hydroxylated carotenoids such as zeaxanthin and lutein are also found. However, no enzyme with carotene hydroxylase activity had been previously identified in red algae. Here, we report the isolation of a gene encoding a cytochrome P450-type carotene hydroxylase (PuCHY1) from Porphyra umbilicalis, a red alga with an ancient origin. Sequence comparisons found PuCHY1 belongs to the CYP97B subfamily, which has members from different photosynthetic organisms ranging from red algae to land plants. Functional complementation in Escherichia coli suggested that PuCHY1 catalyzed the conversion from β-carotene to zeaxanthin. When we overexpressed PuCHY1 in the Arabidopsis thaliana chy2 mutant, pigment analysis showed a significant accumulation of hydroxylated carotenoids, including neoxanthin, violaxanthin, and lutein in the leaves of transgenic plants. These results confirmed a β-hydroxylation activity of PuCHY1, and also suggested a possible ϵ-hydroxylation function. The pigment profile and gene expression analyses of the algal thallus under high-light stress suggested that P. umbilicalis is unlikely to operate a partial xanthophyll cycle for photoprotection. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  13. The alga Trachydiscus minutus (Pseudostaurastrum minutum): growth and composition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Iliev, I.; Petkov, G.; Lukavský, Jaromír; Furnadzhieva, S.; Andreeva, R.; Bankova, V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 36, 3-4 (2011), 222-231 ISSN 1312-8183 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0571 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : algae, * fatty acids * pilot plant cultivation Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  14. The Belmont Valley integrated algae pond system in retrospect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Integrated Algae Pond Systems (IAPS) are a derivation of the Oswald-designed Algal Integrated Wastewater Pond Systems (AIWPS®) and combine the use of anaerobic and aerobic bioprocesses to effect sewage treatment. IAPS technology was introduced to South Africa in 1996 and a pilot plant designed and ...

  15. Transgenic algae engineered for higher performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkefer, Pat J; Anderson, Penelope S; Knight, Thomas J

    2014-10-21

    The present disclosure relates to transgenic algae having increased growth characteristics, and methods of increasing growth characteristics of algae. In particular, the disclosure relates to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and a glutamine synthetase.

  16. Anthelmintic activities of three medicinal plants from Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbolade, A A; Adeyemi, A A

    2008-04-01

    Aqueous extracts of the leaf, stem bark and root bark from Canna bidentata, Spondias mombin and Commiphora africana were examined for anthelmintic activity against earthworm. All the extracts demonstrated a concentration-dependent activity at tested concentrations of 10-80 mg/ml. Higher activities were observed at the higher concentrations, 40-80 mg/ml for all the plant extracts. C. bidentata with a paralysis time of 3-5 min and death time of 5-18 min at these concentrations for the stem bark, and S. mombin which exhibited comparatively higher efficacy (34-44 min paralysis time and 105 min death time for the leaf) at lower concentrations of 10-20 mg/ml were adjudged the outstanding anthelmintics of plant origin accordingly.

  17. Antibacterial activity of some selected medicinal plants of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Yamin; Nisa, Sobia; Chaudhary, Fayyaz M; Zia, Muhammad

    2011-06-30

    Screening of the ethnobotenical plants is a pre-requisite to evaluate their therapeutic potential and it can lead to the isolation of new bioactive compounds. The crude extracts and fractions of six medicinal important plants (Arisaema flavum, Debregeasia salicifolia, Carissa opaca, Pistacia integerrima, Aesculus indica, and Toona ciliata) were tested against three Gram positive and two Gram negative ATCC bacterial species using the agar well diffusion method. The crude extract of P. integerrima and A. indica were active against all tested bacterial strains (12-23 mm zone of inhibition). Other four plant's crude extracts (Arisaema flavum, Debregeasia salicifolia, Carissa opaca, and Toona ciliata) were active against different bacterial strains. The crude extracts showed varying level of bactericidal activity. The aqueous fractions of A. indica and P. integerrima crude extract showed maximum activity (19.66 and 16 mm, respectively) against B. subtilis, while the chloroform fractions of T. ciliata and D. salicifolia presented good antibacterial activities (13-17 mm zone of inhibition) against all the bacterial cultures tested. The methanol fraction of Pistacia integerrima, chloroform fractions of Debregeasia salicifolia &Toona ciliata and aqueous fraction of Aesculus indica are suitable candidates for the development of novel antibacterial compounds.

  18. Antibacterial activity of some selected medicinal plants of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary Fayyaz M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening of the ethnobotenical plants is a pre-requisite to evaluate their therapeutic potential and it can lead to the isolation of new bioactive compounds. Methods The crude extracts and fractions of six medicinal important plants (Arisaema flavum, Debregeasia salicifolia, Carissa opaca, Pistacia integerrima, Aesculus indica, and Toona ciliata were tested against three Gram positive and two Gram negative ATCC bacterial species using the agar well diffusion method. Results The crude extract of P. integerrima and A. indica were active against all tested bacterial strains (12-23 mm zone of inhibition. Other four plant's crude extracts (Arisaema flavum, Debregeasia salicifolia, Carissa opaca, and Toona ciliata were active against different bacterial strains. The crude extracts showed varying level of bactericidal activity. The aqueous fractions of A. indica and P. integerrima crude extract showed maximum activity (19.66 and 16 mm, respectively against B. subtilis, while the chloroform fractions of T. ciliata and D. salicifolia presented good antibacterial activities (13-17 mm zone of inhibition against all the bacterial cultures tested. Conclusion The methanol fraction of Pistacia integerrima, chloroform fractions of Debregeasia salicifolia &Toona ciliata and aqueous fraction of Aesculus indica are suitable candidates for the development of novel antibacterial compounds.

  19. The role of activated charcoal in plant tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, T Dennis

    2008-01-01

    Activated charcoal has a very fine network of pores with large inner surface area on which many substances can be adsorbed. Activated charcoal is often used in tissue culture to improve cell growth and development. It plays a critical role in micropropagation, orchid seed germination, somatic embryogenesis, anther culture, synthetic seed production, protoplast culture, rooting, stem elongation, bulb formation etc. The promotary effects of AC on morphogenesis may be mainly due to its irreversible adsorption of inhibitory compounds in the culture medium and substancially decreasing the toxic metabolites, phenolic exudation and brown exudate accumulation. In addition to this activated charcoal is involved in a number of stimulatory and inhibitory activities including the release of substances naturally present in AC which promote growth, alteration and darkening of culture media, and adsorption of vitamins, metal ions and plant growth regulators, including abscisic acid and gaseous ethylene. The effect of AC on growth regulator uptake is still unclear but some workers believe that AC may gradually release certain adsorbed products, such as nutrients and growth regulators which become available to plants. This review focuses on the various roles of activated charcoal in plant tissue culture and the recent developments in this area.

  20. Antiviral and antimicrobial activities of Colombian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, A; Hudson, J B; Towers, G H

    2001-10-01

    Strong antiviral and antimicrobial activities were detected in methanolic extracts of 24 plants used medicinally in the treatment of skin infections in four different regions of Colombia. Thirteen extracts displayed activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV) whereas none was active against poliovirus. The antiviral activity was indicated by a total inhibition of viral cytopathic effects (CPE) at a non-cytotoxic concentration of the extract. The most potent extract was obtained from Byrsonima verbascifolia (L.) HBK. which showed anti-HSV activity at a concentration as low as 2.5 microg/ml. Antimicrobial screening was conducted using the disc diffusion assay against Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus faecalis, Mycobacterium phlei, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium and the human pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans. Anti-Candida activity was observed for Piper lanceaefolium HBK. and Juglans neotropica Diels. Twenty-two extracts displayed activity against Gram-positive bacteria whereas none was active against the Gram-negative species. We concluded that these Colombian medicinal plants represent an untapped source of potentially useful antivirals and are worthy of further study.

  1. Radical scavenging, antioxidant and cytotoxic activity of Brazilian Caatinga plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Juceni P; Meira, Marilena; David, Jorge M; Brandão, Hugo N; Branco, Alexsandro; de Fátima Agra, M; Barbosa, M Regina V; de Queiroz, Luciano P; Giulietti, Ana M

    2007-04-01

    Extracts of 32 plants from the Brazilian northeastern semi-arid region called Caatinga were evaluated through DPPH radical scavenging assay, beta-carotene bleaching, and brine shrimp lethality tests (BST). Among the extracts studied Byrsonima cf. gardneriana, Mascagnia coriacea, Cordia globosa, Diodia apiculata and Hypenia salzmannii showed the highest activities in DPPH radical scavenging test. In the beta-carotene bleaching test the highest activities were observed for Passiflora cincinnata, Chamaecrista repens, B. cf. gardneriana, Rollinia leptopetala, Serjania glabrata, Diospyros gaultheriifolia, C. globosa, Mimosa ophtalmocentra, M. coriacea and Lippia cf. microphylla. In contrast, R. leptopetala, Zornia cf. brasiliensis and Leonotis nepetifolia were the most active species in the BST.

  2. ETOILE regulates developmental patterning in the filamentous brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bail, Aude; Billoud, Bernard; Le Panse, Sophie; Chenivesse, Sabine; Charrier, Bénédicte

    2011-04-01

    Brown algae are multicellular marine organisms evolutionarily distant from both metazoans and land plants. The molecular or cellular mechanisms that govern the developmental patterning in brown algae are poorly characterized. Here, we report the first morphogenetic mutant, étoile (etl), produced in the brown algal model Ectocarpus siliculosus. Genetic, cellular, and morphometric analyses showed that a single recessive locus, ETL, regulates cell differentiation: etl cells display thickening of the extracellular matrix (ECM), and the elongated, apical, and actively dividing E cells are underrepresented. As a result of this defect, the overrepresentation of round, branch-initiating R cells in the etl mutant leads to the rapid induction of the branching process at the expense of the uniaxial growth in the primary filament. Computational modeling allowed the simulation of the etl mutant phenotype by including a modified response to the neighborhood information in the division rules used to specify wild-type development. Microarray experiments supported the hypothesis of a defect in cell-cell communication, as primarily Lin-Notch-domain transmembrane proteins, which share similarities with metazoan Notch proteins involved in binary cell differentiation were repressed in etl. Thus, our study highlights the role of the ECM and of novel transmembrane proteins in cell-cell communication during the establishment of the developmental pattern in this brown alga.

  3. Epoxyalcohol synthase of Ectocarpus siliculosus. First CYP74-related enzyme of oxylipin biosynthesis in brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporkova, Yana Y; Fatykhova, Valeria S; Gogolev, Yuri V; Khairutdinov, Bulat I; Mukhtarova, Lucia S; Grechkin, Alexander N

    2017-02-01

    Enzymes of CYP74 family play the central role in the biosynthesis of physiologically important oxylipins in land plants. Although a broad diversity of oxylipins is known in the algae, no CYP74s or related enzymes have been detected in brown algae yet. Cloning of the first CYP74-related gene CYP5164B1 of brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus is reported in present work. The recombinant protein was incubated with several fatty acid hydroperoxides. Linoleic acid 9-hydroperoxide (9-HPOD) was the preferred substrate, while linoleate 13-hydroperoxide (13-HPOD) was less efficient. α-Linolenic acid 9- and 13-hydroperoxides, as well as eicosapentaenoic acid 15-hydroperoxide were inefficient substrates. Both 9-HPOD and 13-HPOD were converted into epoxyalcohols. For instance, 9-HPOD was turned primarily into (9S,10S,11S,12Z)-9,10-epoxy-11-hydroxy-12-octadecenoic acid. Both epoxide and hydroxyl oxygen atoms of the epoxyalcohol were incorporated mostly from [ 18 O 2 ]9-HPOD. Thus, the enzyme exhibits the activity of epoxyalcohol synthase (EsEAS). The results show that the EsEAS isomerizes the hydroperoxides into epoxyalcohols via epoxyallylic radical, a common intermediate of different CYP74s and related enzymes. EsEAS can be considered as an archaic prototype of CYP74 family enzymes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Algae biotechnology: products and processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bux, F; Chisti, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    This book examines the utilization of algae for the development of useful products and processes with the emphasis towards green technologies and processes, and the requirements to make these viable...

  5. Algae: America's Pathway to Independence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Custer, James

    2007-01-01

    .... Oil dependency is an unacceptable risk to U.S. national strategy. This paper advocates independence from foreign oil by converting the national transportation fleet to biodiesel derived from algae...

  6. Database on pharmacophore analysis of active principles, from medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchai, Daisy; Manikkam, Rajalakshmi; Rajendran, Sasikala R; Pitchai, Gnanamani

    2010-07-06

    Plants continue to be a major source of medicines, as they have been throughout human history. In the present days, drug discovery from plants involves a multidisciplinary approach combining ethnobotanical, phytochemical and biological techniques to provide us new chemical compounds (lead molecules) for the development of drugs against various pharmacological targets, including cancer, diabetes and its secondary complications. In view of this need in current drug discovery from medicinal plants, here we describe another web database containing the information of pharmacophore analysis of active principles possessing antidiabetic, antimicrobial, anticancerous and antioxidant properties from medicinal plants. The database provides the botanical, taxonomic classification, biochemical as well as pharmacological properties of medicinal plants. Data on antidiabetic, antimicrobial, anti oxidative, anti tumor and anti inflammatory compounds, and their physicochemical properties, SMILES Notation, Lipinski's properties are included in our database. One of the proposed features in the database is the predicted ADMET values and the interaction of bioactive compounds to the target protein. The database alphabetically lists the compound name and also provides tabs separating for anti microbial, antitumor, antidiabetic, and antioxidative compounds. http://www.hccbif.info /

  7. MECON's activities in chemical plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pramanik, S.R.; Wazir, S.N.

    1976-12-01

    Mecon's activities in chemical plant design are surveyed, including the company's, i.e., Metallurgical and Engineering Consultants (India) Ltd., countercurrent extraction process with caustic soda solution for recovering phenols (up to 90%) as sodium phenolate from by-product oil fractions produced at coke plants and coal gasification plants, which was first installed at the Durgapur Steel Plant for treating light oil and drained naphthalene-oil fractions; a design for producer-gas generators with approximately 4 to 4.5 million kcal/h thermal output, which can be operated on sized coal or sized coke and which can be used to make raw, hot or clean, cold producer gas, e.g., as a petroleum oil substitute; a countercurrent wash-oil scrubbing process and detailed design for the recovery, refining, and rectification of benzene, toluene, and xylene from petroleum- or coal-based streams; and the engineering and design of a new 13,700 ton/y oil-furnace carbon black plant at Kerala. Flow diagrams, diagrams, and tables.

  8. Antibacterial Activity of Medicinal Aqueous Plant Extracts against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Mohammed Buzayan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a serious health problem in many regions of the world, and the development of resistance to antibiotics by this microbe created the need for new drugs to replace those which have lost effectiveness. This study assesses the medicinal anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis properties of natural products obtained from plants collected from Eastern Libya. In this study aqueous extracts of nine different plants were assayed for their Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibitory activity using the BACTEC MGIT960 susceptibility test method. The aqueous extracts of Ceratonia siliqua L, Helichrysum stoechas (L. Moench and Thymus algeriensis did not show any activity against M. tuberculosis in different concentrations. The aqueous extract of Marrubium vulgare L. from Syria showed high activity against M. tuberculosis. Marrubium alysson L., Marrubium vulgare L., Pistacia lentiscus L, Quercus coccifera L, Thymus capitatus (L. Hoffm. & Link, showed varying degrees of activity against M. tuberculosis. The results of this study show that aqueous extracts from six different medicinal plants have different effects against M. tuberculosis in vitro.

  9. Biological activity of selected plants with adaptogenic effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ivanišová

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine biological activity of plants with adaptogenic effect: Panax ginseng Mayer., Withania somnifera L., Eleuterococcus senticosus Rupr. et Maxim., Astragallus membranaceus Fisch. and Codonopsis pilosulae Franch. The antioxidant activity was detected by DPPH and phosphomolybdenum method, total polyphenol content with Folin – Ciocalteu reagent, flavonoids content by aluminium chloride method. The detection of antimicrobial activity was carried out by disc diffusion method against three species of Gram-negative bacteria: Escherichia coli CCM 3988, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica CCM 3807, Yersinia enterocolitica CCM 5671 and two Gram-positive bacteria: Bacillus thuringiensis CCM 19, Stapylococcus aureus subsp. aureus CCM 2461. Results showed that plants with adaptogenic effect are rich for biologically active substances. The highest antioxidant activity by DPPH method was determined in the sample of Eleuterococcus senticosus (3.15 mg TEAC – Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity per g of sample and by phosphomolybdenum method in the sample of Codonopsis pilosulae (188.79 mg TEAC per g of sample. In the sample of Panax ginseng was measured the highest content of total polyphenols (8.10 mg GAE – galic acid equivalent per g of sample and flavonoids (3.41 μg QE – quercetin equivalent per g of sample. All samples also showed strong antimicrobial activity with the best results in Panax ginseng and Withania somnifera in particular for species Yersinia enterocolitica CCM 5671 and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica CCM 3807. The analyzed species of plant with high value of biological activity can be used more in the future, not only in food, but also in cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries.

  10. Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities of Plants from Northeast of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Salazar-Aranda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional medicine has a key role in health care worldwide. Obtaining scientific information about the efficacy and safety of the plants from our region is one of the goals of our research group. In this report, 17 plants were selected and collected in different localities from northeast Mexico. The dried plants were separated into leaves, flowers, fruit, stems, roots and bark. Each part was extracted with methanol, and 39 crude extracts were prepared. The extracts were tested for their antimicrobial activity using three Gram-negative bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii, three Gram-positive bacterial strains (Enterococcus faecalis and two Staphylococcus aureus strains, and seven clinically isolated yeasts (Candida albicans, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata; their antioxidant activity was tested using a DPPH free radical assay. No activity against Gram-negative bacteria was observed with any extract up to the maximum concentration tested, 1000 μg ml−1. We report here for the first time activity of Ceanothus coeruleus against S. aureus (flowers, minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC 125 μg ml−1, C. glabrata (MICs 31.25 μg ml−1 and C. parapsilosis (MICs between 31.25 and 125 μg ml−1; Chrysanctinia mexicana against C. glabrata (MICs 31.25 μg ml−1; Colubrina greggii against E. faecalis (MICs 250 μg ml−1 and Cordia boissieri against C. glabrata (MIC 125 μg ml−1. Furthermore, this is the first report about antioxidant activity of extracts from Ceanothus coeruleus, Chrysanctinia mexicana, Colubrina greggii and Cyperus alternifolius. Some correlation could exist between antioxidant activity and antiyeast activity against yeasts in the species Ceanothus coeruleus, Schinus molle, Colubrina greggii and Cordia boissieri.

  11. Modeling and Control of Algae Harvesting, Dewatering and Drying (HDD) Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    produce bio-diesel, and the residue can be used as additives in animal feed or used as feedstock in fast- pyrolysis process to produce bio-oil. Besides...algae are capable of making CO2 as a carbon source just like other plants . Figure 1.2 shows the process of closed carbon cycle of algae. Besides...they are one of the most photosynthetically efficient plants on the earth, and they use photosynthesis to convert solar energy to chemical energy

  12. Bio sorption of copper ions with biomass of algae and dehydrated waste of olives; Biosorcion de iones cobre con biomasa de algas y orujos deshidratados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapia, P.; Santander, M.; Pavez, O.; Valderrama, L.; Guzman, D.; Romero, L.

    2011-07-01

    They were carried out experiments of biosorption batch and in continuous to remove copper from aqueous solutions using as adsorbents green algae and olive residues under virgins conditions and chemically activated. The results of batch bio sorption indicate that the algae present mayor elimination capacities than the waste of olives, with uptakes of copper of the order of 96 % using activated algae with dissolution of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} under the optimum conditions. The results of the columns tests show that the virgin algae permits the removal of more copper ions than the activate algae, with removal efficiency of 98 % during the firth 20 min, a breakthrough time of 240 min and a saturation at time of 600 min. In the second cycle the regenerated biomass showed a best performance indicating that they can be used for another bio sorption cycle. (Author) 42 refs.

  13. Larvicidal activity of some Cerrado plant extracts against Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, A M S; De Paula, J E; Degallier, N; Molez, J E; Espindola, L S

    2006-06-01

    One hundred ninety hexanic and ethanolic extract from 27 plant species from the Cerrado biome of Brazil were tested for larvicidal activity against 3rd-stage Aedes aegypti larvae at 500 microg/ml. Fourteen extracts from 7 species showed activity (>65% mortality) against the larvae. Of these Dugeutia furfuracea, Piptocarpha rotundifolia, Casearia sylvestris var. lingua, Serjania lethalis, and Xylopia aromatica were active at 56.6, 162.31, 232.4, 285.76, and 384.37 microg/ml, respectively. Annona crassiflora and Cybistax antisyphilitica showed activity at 23.06 and 27.61 microg/ml. The larvicidal properties of these species are described for the first time, and may prove to be promising in active chemical compound isolation.

  14. Antimalarial activity of selected Ethiopian medicinal plants in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshetu M. Bobasa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: Parasites are the leading killers in subtropical areas of which malaria took the lion share from protozoan diseases. Measuring the impact of antimalarial drug resistance is difficult, and the impact may not be recognized until it is severe, especially in high transmission areas. Aims: To evaluate the in vivo antimalarial activities of hydroalcoholic extracts of the roots of Piper capense and Adhatoda schimperiana, against Plasmodium berghei in mice. Methods: Four-day suppressive and curative test animal models were used to explore the antimalarial activities of the plants. 200, 400, and 600 mg/kg of each plant extract was administered to check the activities versus vehicle administered mice. Mean survival time and level of parasitemia were the major variables employed to compare the efficacy vs. negative control. Results: In both models the 400 and 600 mg/kg doses of Adhatoda schimperiana and the 600 mg/kg dose Piper capense. showed significant parasitemia suppression and increased in mean survival time at p≤0.05. The middle dose of Piper capense had a border line inhibition where the extracts were considered active when parasitemia was reduced by ≥ 30%. Conclusions: The hydroalcoholic extracts of the roots of Adhatoda schimperiana and Piper capense possess moderate antimalarial activities, which prove its traditional claims. Thus, further studies should be done to isolate the active constituents for future use in the modern drug discovery.

  15. Antileishmanial and trypanocidal activity of Brazilian Cerrado plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Laundry de Mesquita

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The side effects and the emerging resistance to the available drugs against leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis led to the urgent need for new therapeutic agents against these diseases. Thirty one extracts of thirteen medicinal plants from the Brazilian Cerrado were therefore evaluated in vitro for their antiprotozoal activity against promastigotes of Leishmania donovani, and amastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi. Among the selected plants, Casearia sylvestris var. lingua was the most active against both L. donovani and T. cruzi. Fifteen extracts were active against promastigotes of L. donovani with concentrations inhibiting 50% of parasite growth (IC50 between 0.1-10 µg/ml, particularly those of Annona crassiflora (Annonaceae, Himatanthus obovatus (Apocynaceae, Guarea kunthiana (Meliaceae, Cupania vernalis (Sapindaceae, and Serjania lethalis (Sapindaceae. With regard to amastigotes of T. cruzi, extracts of A. crassiflora, Duguetia furfuracea (Annonaceae, and C. sylvestris var. lingua were active with IC50 values between 0.3-10 µg/ml. Bioassay fractionations of the more active extracts are under progress to identify the active antiparasite compounds.

  16. Antileishmanial and trypanocidal activity of Brazilian Cerrado plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Mariana Laundry de; Desrivot, Julie; Bories, Christian; Fournet, Alain; Paula, José Elias de; Grellier, Philippe; Espindola, Laila Salmen

    2005-11-01

    The side effects and the emerging resistance to the available drugs against leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis led to the urgent need for new therapeutic agents against these diseases. Thirty one extracts of thirteen medicinal plants from the Brazilian Cerrado were therefore evaluated in vitro for their antiprotozoal activity against promastigotes of Leishmania donovani, and amastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi. Among the selected plants, Casearia sylvestris var. lingua was the most active against both L. donovani and T. cruzi. Fifteen extracts were active against promastigotes of L. donovani with concentrations inhibiting 50% of parasite growth (IC50) between 0.1-10 microg/ml, particularly those of Annona crassiflora (Annonaceae), Himatanthus obovatus (Apocynaceae), Guarea kunthiana (Meliaceae), Cupania vernalis (Sapindaceae), and Serjania lethalis (Sapindaceae). With regard to amastigotes of T. cruzi, extracts of A. crassiflora, Duguetia furfuracea (Annonaceae), and C. sylvestris var. lingua were active with IC50 values between 0.3-10 microg/ml. Bioassay fractionations of the more active extracts are under progress to identify the active antiparasite compounds.

  17. LIPIDS OF BLACK SEA ALGAE: UNVEILING THEIR POTENTIAL FOR PHARMACEUTICAL AND COSMETIC APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Veselina Panayotova; Albena Merzdhanova; Diana A. Dobreva; Magdalen Zlatanov; Lubomir Makedonski

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bulgarian Black Sea coast is rich in algae, regarding biomass and algal biodiversity. The red algae Gelidium crinale (Rhodophyta) and brown algae Cystoseira barbata (Phaeophytes) are among the most abundant species along the Bulgarian Black Sea shore. Yet information about their lipid composition is limited. Purpose: Present study was conducted to investigate biologically active substances in two underexplored seaweed lipids. Total lipids, total phospholipids, fat soluble vita...

  18. Antifungal activity of aloe vera gel against plant pathogenic fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitara, U.; Hassan, N.; Naseem, J.

    2011-01-01

    Aloe vera gel extracted from the Aloe vera leaves was evaluated for their antifungal activity at the rate of 0.15%, 0.25% and 0.35% concentration against five plants pathogenic fungi viz., Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Alternaria alternata, Drechslera hawaiensis and Penicillum digitatum 0.35% concentration Aloe vera gel completely inhibited the growth of Drechslera hawaiensis and Alternaria alternata. (author)

  19. Influence of aerogenic contamination on phytoncide activity of woody plants

    OpenAIRE

    S. O. Volodarez

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to determine variations of antimicrobial activity of the volatile organic compounds from leaves of woody plants, which are growing on the areas with the different air pollution degree in the south-east of Ukraine. The research objects were Aesculus hippocastanum L., Betula pendula Roth, Salix alba L., Picea pungens Engelm. in Donetsk, Ukraine, and 6 species ( Betula pendula Roth, Fraxinus excelsior L., Robinia pseudoacacia L., Populus nigra L., Tilia cordat...

  20. Anti-implantation activity of some indigenous plants in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, A O; Saxena, V; Shukla, S; Tewari, R K; Mathur, S; Gupta, A; Sharma, S; Mathur, R

    1985-01-01

    Various extracts of one hundred and eight medicinal plants were screened for their anti-implantation activity in female albino rats. Out of these, 50% ethanolic extract of Codonospis ovata Benth (PL); 50% ethanolic, acetone and benzene extracts of Puararia tuberosa DC (TUB); aqueous and methanolic extracts of Punica granatum Linn. (PX) and ethanolic and acetone extracts of Rubus ellipiticus Smith (PX) inhibited pregnancy in 70-90% of rats. Similarly ethanolic extract of Adhatoda vasica Nees (LF) and Kigelia pinnata DC (PL); ethanolic and acetone extracts of Acrostichum aureum Linn. (PL), Juniperus communis Linn. (SD), Lepidium capitatum H.f. & T. (PL); ethanolic and benzene extracts of Citrulus colocynthus Schrad (LF) and acetone extract of Codonopsis ovata Benth (PL) showed 60-70% anti-implantation activity. Extracts of a few plants VIZ. Dolichos biflorus Linn. (SD), Ferule orientalis Linn. (PL), Nerium odoratum Lamk (RT), Randia dumetorum Lamk (SD) and Ruta graveolens Linn. (PL) could inhibit pregnancy in 50-60% of rats. The rest of the plants were either inactive or showed insignificant antifertility activity.

  1. SCREENING OF PLANT EXTRACTS FOR ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AGAINST BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vatľák

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was antimicrobial action of the methanolic extracts of Equisetum arvense L. and Urtica dioica L. against gramnegative and grampositive bacteria. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts against gramnegative bacteria: Escherichia coli CCM 3988, Listeria ivanovii CCM 5884, Listeria innocua CCM 4030, Pseudomonas aeruginosa CCM 1960, Serratia rubidaea CCM 4684 and grampositive bacteria: Brochothrix thermosphacta CCM 4769, Enterococcus raffinosus CCM 4216, Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCM 1828, Paenobacillus larvae CCM 4483 and Staphylococcus epidermis CCM 4418 were determined by the disc diffusion method and the microbroth dilution method according to CLSI. Probit analysis was used in this experiment. Of the 2 plant extracts tested, all extracts showed antimicrobial activity against one or more species of microorganisms. The most antimicrobial activity showed methanolic plant extract of E. arvense against S. epidermis with disc diffusion method and with microbroth dilution method against S. rubidaea and plant extract Urtica dioica with disc diffusion method against P. aeruginosa and with microbroth dilution method against S. rubidaea and E. coli.

  2. Algae from the arid southwestern United States: an annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, W.H.; Gaines, S.R.

    1983-06-01

    Desert algae are attractive biomass producers for capturing solar energy through photosynthesis of organic matter. They are probably capable of higher yields and efficiencies of light utilization than higher plants, and are already adapted to extremes of sunlight intensity, salinity and temperature such as are found in the desert. This report consists of an annotated bibliography of the literature on algae from the arid southwestern United States. It was prepared in anticipation of efforts to isolate desert algae and study their yields in the laboratory. These steps are necessary prior to setting up outdoor algal culture ponds. Desert areas are attractive for such applications because land, sunlight, and, to some extent, water resources are abundant there. References are sorted by state.

  3. Ten years of investigation on radioactive contamination of the marine environment. Incorporation, by marine algae and animals, of hydrogen-3 and other radionuclides present in effluents of nuclear or industrial origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, S.; Colard, J.; Koch, G.; Kirchmann, R.; Strack, S.; Luettke, A.; Carraro, G.

    1981-01-01

    Several marine plants and animals were investigated for their capability of incorporating the main radionuclides present in selected effluents. Accumulation factors are reported for 3 H, 134 Cs, 136 Cs, 137 Cs, 58 Co, 60 Co, 54 Mn, 131 I 226 Ra and 124 Sb. Marine algae, which are involved in food chains leading to man, show the highest accumulation factors. The stable element composition of the alga Acetabularia was determined by gamma-activation analysis. The preferential accumulation of particular radionuclides by marine organisms suggests that they may have a significant role in the turnover rate of elements in the marine environment. (author)

  4. Calcium Modulation of Plant Plasma Membrane-Bound Atpase Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, C.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic properties of barley enzyme are discussed and compared with those of other plants. Possibilities for calcium transport in the plasma membrane by proton pump and ATPase-dependent calcium pumps are explored. Topics covered include the ph phase of the enzyme; high affinity of barley for calcium; temperature dependence, activation enthalpy, and the types of ATPase catalytic sites. Attention is given to lipids which are both screened and bound by calcium. Studies show that barley has a calmodulin activated ATPase that is found in the presence of magnesium and calcium.

  5. Antioxidant and antibacterial activity of Thai medicinal plant (Capparis micracantha)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laoprom, Nonglak; Sangprom, Araya; Chaisri, Patcharaporn

    2018-04-01

    This work aims to study the antioxidants capacity, Total phenolic content and antibacterial activity of Thai medicinal plant for the treatment of dermatitis-related inflammations, Capparis micracantha. Crude extract from stem of Thai medicinal plant was extracted with hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water. The antioxidant activities (IC50) was evaluated with 1,1-diphenyl-1-princylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay. Total phenolic content (TPC) was determined by using Folin-Ciocalteu method. Bacterial activities was tested with four human pathogenic bacteria; Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and Stapylococcus epidermidis by using agar diffusion assay. Minimum Inhibition Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) were also determined by broth dilution method. For antioxidant activity, the methanol fraction from stem extract showed the highest activity with an IC50 of 2.4 mg/ml. Water extraction was the high TPC with 10,136.9 mg GAE/g dry weight. Methanol and water extraction showed the remarkable inhibition of bacterial growth was shown against L. monocytogenes and S. aureus. In addition, ethyl acetate, methanol and water fraction from stem extract against S. epidermidis. The present finding suggests that the extract of C. micracantha could be used to discover bioactive natural products that may serve as pharmaceutical products.

  6. Acute toxicity and associated mechanisms of four strobilurins in algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxu; Wang, Yu; Chen, Hao; Zhang, Junli; Wang, Chengju; Li, Xuefeng; Pang, Sen

    2018-04-03

    Strobilurins have been reported highly toxic to non-target aquatic organisms but few illustrated how they cause toxic effects on algae. This study investigated the acute toxicity of Kresoxim-methy (KRE), Pyraclostrobin (PYR), Trifloxystrobin (TRI) and Picoxystrobin (PIC) on two algae and their toxicity mechanisms. Four strobilurins showed lower toxic effects on Chlorella pyrenoidsa but higher on Chlorella vulgaris. bc1 complex activities in C. vulgaris were significantly inhibited by all strobilurins, suggesting bc 1 complex might be the target of strobilurin toxicity in algae. Moreover, SOD, CAT and POD activities were significantly up-regulated by all doses of KRE, PYR and PIC. In contrast, low concentrations of TRI stimulated SOD and POD activities but highest concentration significantly inhibited those activities. Comet assays showed damaged DNA in C. vulgaris by four strobulirins, suggesting their potential genotoxic threats to algae. The results illustrated acute toxicity by strobulirins on algae and their possible toxicity mechanisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Boron uptake, localization, and speciation in marine brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eric P; Wu, Youxian; Carrano, Carl J

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to the generally boron-poor terrestrial environment, the concentration of boron in the marine environment is relatively high (0.4 mM) and while there has been extensive interest in its use as a surrogate of pH in paleoclimate studies in the context of climate change-related questions, the relatively depth independent, and the generally non-nutrient-like concentration profile of this element have led to boron being neglected as a potentially biologically relevant element in the ocean. Among the marine plant-like organisms the brown algae (Phaeophyta) are one of only five lineages of photosynthetic eukaryotes to have evolved complex multicellularity. Many of unusual and often unique features of brown algae are attributable to this singular evolutionary history. These adaptations are a reflection of the marine coastal environment which brown algae dominate in terms of biomass. Consequently, brown algae are of fundamental importance to oceanic ecology, geochemistry, and coastal industry. Our results indicate that boron is taken up by a facilitated diffusion mechanism against a considerable concentration gradient. Furthermore, in both Ectocarpus and Macrocystis some boron is most likely bound to cell wall constituent alginate and the photoassimilate mannitol located in sieve cells. Herein, we describe boron uptake, speciation, localization and possible biological function in two species of brown algae, Macrocystis pyrifera and Ectocarpus siliculosus.

  8. Sustainability of algae derived biodiesel: a mass balance approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfromm, Peter H; Amanor-Boadu, Vincent; Nelson, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A rigorous chemical engineering mass balance/unit operations approach is applied here to bio-diesel from algae mass culture. An equivalent of 50,000,000 gallons per year (0.006002 m3/s) of petroleum-based Number 2 fuel oil (US, diesel for compression-ignition engines, about 0.1% of annual US consumption) from oleaginous algae is the target. Methyl algaeate and ethyl algaeate diesel can according to this analysis conceptually be produced largely in a technologically sustainable way albeit at a lower available diesel yield. About 11 square miles of algae ponds would be needed with optimistic assumptions of 50 g biomass yield per day and m2 pond area. CO2 to foster algae growth should be supplied from a sustainable source such as a biomass-based ethanol production. Reliance on fossil-based CO2 from power plants or fertilizer production renders algae diesel non-sustainable in the long term. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. In vitro antifungal activities of 26 plant extracts on mycelial growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antifungal activities of 26 plant extracts were tested against Phytophthora infestans using radial growth technique. While all tested plant extracts produced some antifungal activities Xanthium strumarium, Lauris nobilis, Salvia officinalis and Styrax officinalis were the most active plants that showed potent antifungal activity.

  10. Antiviral Activity of Some Plants Used in Nepalese Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rajbhandari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanolic extracts of 41 plant species belonging to 27 families used in the traditional medicine in Nepal have been investigated for in vitro antiviral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 and influenza virus A by dye uptake assay in the systems HSV-1/Vero cells and influenza virus A/MDCK cells. The extracts of Astilbe rivularis, Bergenia ciliata, Cassiope fastigiata and Thymus linearis showed potent anti-herpes viral activity. The extracts of Allium oreoprasum, Androsace strigilosa, Asparagus filicinus, Astilbe rivularis, Bergenia ciliata and Verbascum thapsus exhibited strong anti-influenza viral activity. Only the extracts of A. rivularis and B. ciliata demonstrated remarkable activity against both viruses.

  11. Anti-bacterial activity of some Brazilian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Maria Raquel Ferreira; de Souza Luna, Josiane; dos Santos, Aldenir Feitosa; de Andrade, Maria Cristina Caño; Sant'Ana, Antônio Euzébio Goulart; Genet, Jean-Pierre; Marquez, Béatrice; Neuville, Luc; Moreau, Nicole

    2006-04-21

    Extracts from various organs of 25 plants of Brazilian traditional medicine were assayed with respect to their anti-bacterial activities against Escherichia coli, a susceptible strain of Staphylococcus aureus and two resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus harbouring the efflux pumps NorA and MsrA. Amongst the 49 extracts studied, 14 presented anti-bacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, including the ethanolic extracts from the rhizome of Jatropha elliptica, from the stem barks of Schinus terebinthifolius and Erythrina mulungu, from the stems and leaves of Caesalpinia pyramidalis and Serjania lethalis, and from the stem bark and leaves of Lafoensia pacari. The classes of compounds present in the active extracts were determined as a preliminary step towards their bioactivity-guided separation. No extracts were active against Escherichia coli.

  12. Nuclear power plant control and instrumentation activities in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapanen, P.; Wahlstroem, B.

    1992-01-01

    Finland has remarkable achievements in nuclear power. The existing four plants have some of the best operating records in the world - high capacity factors, low occupational doses and short refuelling outages. Public opinion was strongly turned against nuclear power after Chernobyl accident, and the previous government decided not to allow for the construction of a fifth nuclear unit during its period of reign. The opposition has however slowly been diminishing. According to the latest polls the opinion is almost balanced. Finnish power companies are going to file an application for a decision-in-principle to build a new plant to the new government appointed in April 1991. A readiness to start new construction project immediately after a positive political decision is made has been maintained during the intermediate period. Continuous research, development, modification and upgrading work provide important components of the good operational history of the Finnish nuclear power plants. Efforts have also been devoted to identifying possible new problems arising from the use of distributed digital C and I technology. The following a short description is summarizing recent activities related to the C and I-systems of the nuclear power plants. (author). 3 tab

  13. Hydrogen as an activating fuel for a tidal power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlov, A. M.

    Tidal projects, offering a clean, inexhaustible, and fairly predictable energy source, require a system for accumulating energy for off-peak periods. Hydrogen produced by electrolysis during off-peak power plant operation can be used as an activating fuel to furnish the plant during peak load demands. Tidal energy is converted into compressed air energy by special chambers on the ocean bed. This compressed air can be heated by combustion of the stored hydrogen and expanded through high speed gas turbine generators. For off-peak periods, the energy of non-heated compressed air is used for the production of hydrogen fuel. The amount of fuel produced at this time is enough for power plant operation during two peak hours, with three times greater plant capacity. The hydrogen fuel storage method does have energy losses and requires extra capital investment for electrolysis and hydrogen storage equipment. It does not, however, require a gas turbine oil fuel, as does the air compressed storage method, nor a low-speed heavy hydro-turbine, as does the hydro-pumped method. Moreover, the gas turbine can be used for both production and consumption of hydrogen fuel.

  14. Antitrypanosomal activity of some medicinal plants from Nigerian ethnomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiodun, Oyindamola O; Gbotosho, Grace O; Ajaiyeoba, Edith O; Brun, Reto; Oduola, Ayoade M

    2012-02-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease with complex clinical presentation, diagnosis, and difficult treatment. The available drugs for the treatment of trypanosomiasis are old, expensive, and less effective, associated with severe adverse reactions and face the problem of drug resistance. This situation underlines the urgent need for the development of new, effective, cheap, and safe drugs for the treatment of trypanosomiasis. The search for new antitrypanosomal agents in this study is based on ethnomedicine. In vitro antitrypanosomal activity of 36 plant extracts from 10 plant species from Nigerian ethnomedicine was evaluated against bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense STIB 900. Cytotoxic activity was determined against mammalian L6 cells. Alamar blue assay was used to measure the endpoint of both antitrypanosomal and toxicity assays. The ethyl acetate extract of leaves of Ocimum gratissimum Linn. (Labiatae) showed the highest antitrypanosomal activity (IC(50) of 2.08 ± 0.01 μg/ml) and a high selective index of 29. Furthermore, the hexane, ethyl acetate, or methanol extracts of Trema orientalis (L.) Blume (Ulmaceae), Pericopsis laxiflora (Benth. ex Baker) Meeuwen, Jatropha curcas Linn. (Euphorbiaceae), Terminalia catappa Linn. (Combretaceae), and Vitex doniana Sweet (Verbenaceae) displayed remarkable antitrypanosomal activity (IC(50) 2.1-17.2 μg/ml) with high selectivity indices (20-80) for trypanosomes. The antitrypanosomal activity of T. catappa and T. orientalis against T. brucei rhodesiense (STIB 900) is being reported for the first time in Nigerian ethnomedicine, and these plants could be a potential source of antitrypanosomal agents.

  15. Plant viral intergenic DNA sequence repeats with transcription enhancing activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cazzonelli Christopher I

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The geminivirus and nanovirus families of DNA plant viruses have proved to be a fertile source of viral genomic sequences, clearly demonstrated by the large number of sequence entries within public DNA sequence databases. Due to considerable conservation in genome organization, these viruses contain easily identifiable intergenic regions that have been found to contain multiple DNA sequence elements important to viral replication and gene regulation. As a first step in a broad screen of geminivirus and nanovirus intergenic sequences for DNA segments important in controlling viral gene expression, we have 'mined' a large set of viral intergenic regions for transcriptional enhancers. Viral sequences that are found to act as enhancers of transcription in plants are likely to contribute to viral gene activity during infection. Results DNA sequences from the intergenic regions of 29 geminiviruses or nanoviruses were scanned for repeated sequence elements to be tested for transcription enhancing activity. 105 elements were identified and placed immediately upstream from a minimal plant-functional promoter fused to an intron-containing luciferase reporter gene. Transient luciferase activity was measured within Agrobacteria-infused Nicotiana tobacum leaf tissue. Of the 105 elements tested, 14 were found to reproducibly elevate reporter gene activity (>25% increase over that from the minimal promoter-reporter construct, p Conclusion Biological significance for the active DNA elements identified is supported by repeated isolation of a previously defined viral element (CLE, and the finding that two of three viral enhancer elements examined were markedly enriched within both geminivirus sequences and within Arabidopsis promoter regions. These data provide a useful starting point for virologists interested in undertaking more detailed analysis of geminiviral promoter function.

  16. ANTI-QUORUM SENSING ACTIVITY OF SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haidari, Rwaida A; Shaaban, Mona I; Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is the key regulator of virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa such as biofilm formation, motility, productions of proteases, hemolysin, pyocyanin, and toxins. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of the extracts from some medicinal plants on quorum sensing and related virulence factors of P. aeruginosa . Quorum sensing inhibitory (OSI) effect of the alcohol extracts of 20 medicinal plants was evaluated by Chromobacterium violaceum reporter using agar cup diffusion method. The efficient QSI extracts were tested for their activity against biofilm synthesis, motility, and synthesis of pyocyanin from P. aeruginosa PA14. The extracts of Citrus sinensis, Laurus nobilis, Elettaria cardamomum, Allium cepa , and Coriandrum sativum exhibited potent quorum quenching effect. On the other hand, Psidium guajava and Mentha longifolia extracts showed lower QSI activity. These extracts exhibited significant elimination of pyocyanin formation and biofilm development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14. In addition, they significantly inhibited twitching and swimming motilities of P. aeruginosa PA14. This study illustrated, for the first time, the importance of C. sinensis, L. nobilis, E. cardamomum, A. cepa , and C. sativum as quorum sensing inhibitors and virulence suppressors of P. aeruginosa . Thus, these plants could provide a natural source for the elimination of Pseudomonas pathogenesis.

  17. Complex effects of fertilization on plant and herbivore performance in the presence of a plant competitor and activated carbon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh Mahdavi-Arab

    Full Text Available Plant-herbivore interactions are influenced by host plant quality which in turn is affected by plant growth conditions. Competition is the major biotic and nutrient availability a major abiotic component of a plant's growth environment. Yet, surprisingly few studies have investigated impacts of competition and nutrient availability on herbivore performance and reciprocal herbivore effects on plants. We studied growth of the specialist aphid, Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria, and its host plant tansy, Tanacetum vulgare, under experimental addition of inorganic and organic fertilizer crossed with competition by goldenrod, Solidago canadensis. Because of evidence that competition by goldenrod is mediated by allelopathic compounds, we also added a treatment with activated carbon. Results showed that fertilization increased, and competition with goldenrod decreased, plant biomass, but this was likely mediated by resource competition. There was no evidence from the activated carbon treatment that allelopathy played a role which instead had a fertilizing effect. Aphid performance increased with higher plant biomass and depended on plant growth conditions, with fertilization and AC increasing, and plant competition decreasing aphid numbers. Feedbacks of aphids on plant performance interacted with plant growth conditions in complex ways depending on the relative magnitude of the effects on plant biomass and aphid numbers. In the basic fertilization treatment, tansy plants profited from increased nutrient availability by accumulating more biomass than they lost due to an increased number of aphids under fertilization. When adding additional fertilizer, aphid numbers increased so high that tansy plants suffered and showed reduced biomass compared with controls without aphids. Thus, the ecological cost of an infestation with aphids depends on the balance of effects of growth conditions on plant and herbivore performance. These results emphasize the importance

  18. Complex effects of fertilization on plant and herbivore performance in the presence of a plant competitor and activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi-Arab, Nafiseh; Meyer, Sebastian T; Mehrparvar, Mohsen; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2014-01-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions are influenced by host plant quality which in turn is affected by plant growth conditions. Competition is the major biotic and nutrient availability a major abiotic component of a plant's growth environment. Yet, surprisingly few studies have investigated impacts of competition and nutrient availability on herbivore performance and reciprocal herbivore effects on plants. We studied growth of the specialist aphid, Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria, and its host plant tansy, Tanacetum vulgare, under experimental addition of inorganic and organic fertilizer crossed with competition by goldenrod, Solidago canadensis. Because of evidence that competition by goldenrod is mediated by allelopathic compounds, we also added a treatment with activated carbon. Results showed that fertilization increased, and competition with goldenrod decreased, plant biomass, but this was likely mediated by resource competition. There was no evidence from the activated carbon treatment that allelopathy played a role which instead had a fertilizing effect. Aphid performance increased with higher plant biomass and depended on plant growth conditions, with fertilization and AC increasing, and plant competition decreasing aphid numbers. Feedbacks of aphids on plant performance interacted with plant growth conditions in complex ways depending on the relative magnitude of the effects on plant biomass and aphid numbers. In the basic fertilization treatment, tansy plants profited from increased nutrient availability by accumulating more biomass than they lost due to an increased number of aphids under fertilization. When adding additional fertilizer, aphid numbers increased so high that tansy plants suffered and showed reduced biomass compared with controls without aphids. Thus, the ecological cost of an infestation with aphids depends on the balance of effects of growth conditions on plant and herbivore performance. These results emphasize the importance to investigate both

  19. Role of algae in water quality regulation in NPP water reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klenus, V.G.; Kuz'menko, M.I.; Nasvit, O.I.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations, carried out in Chernobyl NPP water reservoir, show that sewage water inflow, being not sufficiently purified, enriched by mineral and organic substances, is accompanied by a considerable increase of algae productivity. The algae play a determining role in accumulation of radionuclides and their transformation into bottom depositions. Comparative investigation of accumulation intensity in alga cells 12 C and 14 C gives evidence that the rate of radioactive nuclide inclusions is practically adequate to the rate of inclusions of their stable analogues. Bacterial destruction of organic contaminations occurs more intensively under aerobic conditions, which are mainly provided due to photosynthetizing activity of algae

  20. Total phenolics and antioxidant activity of five medicinal plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Cleyton Marcos de M.; Silva, Hilris Rocha e; Vieira-Junior, Gerardo Magela; Ayres, Mariane Cruz C.; Costa, Charllyton Luis S. da; Araajo, Delton Servulo; Cavalcante, Luis Carlos D.; Barros, Elcio Daniel S.; Araujo, Paulo Breitner de M.; Brandao, Marcela S.; Chaves, Mariana H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes total phenolics content and antioxidant activity in the ethanolic extract of leaves, bark and roots of five medicinal plants: Terminalia brasiliensis Camb., Terminalia fagifolia Mart. and Zucc., Copernicia cerifera (Miller) H.E. Moore, Cenostigma macrophyllum Tul. var. acuminata Teles Freire and Qualea grandiflora Mart. The total phenolics content of the plant extracts, determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method, varied from 250.0 ±8,2 to 763,63 ±13.03 mg of gallic acid equivalent/g dry EtOH extract. The antioxidant activity of extracts was evaluated using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay system. Extract of bark from T. brasiliensis, the most active, with an EC 50 value of 27.59 ± 0.82 μg/mL, was comparable to rutin (EC 50 = 27.80 ± 1.38) and gallic acid (EC 50 = 24.27 ± 0.31), used as positive controls. The relationship between total phenolic content and antioxidant activity was positive and significant for T. brasiliensis, C. macrophyllum and C. cerifera. (author)