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Sample records for albright hereditary osteodystrophy

  1. Albright hereditary osteodystrophy: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goswami M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO is a rare hereditary metabolic disorder that may be associated with or without resistant to parathyroid hormone (pseudohypoparathyroidism. It is commonly characterized by a constellation of physical features of short stature, round face, short neck, and small metacarpals and metatarsals, mild mental retardation, osteoporosis, subcutaneous calcification, and sometimes olfactory and hearing functional defect. Hypocalcaemia and hyperphosphatemia are the most important manifestations of the case. We report a clinical case of siblings with AHO with reduced Gs-alpha activity and we discuss their clinical features with oral manifestations, radiographic findings, laboratory tests along with treatment.

  2. Bilateral simultaneous disc edema and cataract associated with Albright hereditary osteodystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabyasachi Sengupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 16-year-old female presented with poor vision in both eyes. On clinical examination, she had bilateral cataracts and optic disc edema bilaterally on ultrasound examination. Extensive intracranial calcification was evident on computerized tomography. Physical examination revealed short stature, rounded chubby face, dental abnormalities, brachydactyly, and obesity. Laboratory evidence of hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, elevated parathyroid hormone level (indicative of pseudohypoparathyroidism along with the constellation of phenotypical characteristics lead to a diagnosis of Albright′s hereditary osteodystrophy. This case is being presented to increase awareness regarding presence of coexisting and previously undiagnosed hypocalcemic syndromes in pediatric cataracts. The role of an ophthalmologist may be pivotal in diagnosing such an entity as documented in the present case.

  3. Screening of PRKAR1A and PDE4D in a Large Italian Series of Patients Clinically Diagnosed With Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy and/or Pseudohypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Francesca Marta; Bordogna, Paolo; de Sanctis, Luisa; Giachero, Federica; Verrua, Elisa; Segni, Maria; Mazzanti, Laura; Boldrin, Valentina; Toromanovic, Alma; Spada, Anna; Mantovani, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) intracellular signaling pathway mediates the physiological effects of several hormones and neurotransmitters, acting by the activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and several downstream intracellular effectors, including the heterotrimeric stimulatory G-protein (Gs), the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), and cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Defective G-protein-mediated signaling has been associated with an increasing number of disorders, including Albright hereditary osteodistrophy (AHO) and pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP), a heterogeneous group of rare genetic metabolic disorders resulting from molecular defects at the GNAS locus. Moreover, mutations in PRKAR1A and PDE4D genes have been recently detected in patients with acrodysostosis (ACRDYS), showing a skeletal and endocrinological phenotype partially overlapping with AHO/PHP. Despite the high detection rate of molecular defects by currently available molecular approaches, about 30% of AHO/PHP patients still lack a molecular diagnosis, hence the need to screen patients negative for GNAS epi/genetic defects also for chromosomal regions and genes associated with diseases that undergo differential diagnosis with PHP. According to the growing knowledge on Gsα-cAMP signaling-linked disorders, we investigated our series of patients (n = 81) with a clinical diagnosis of PHP/AHO but negative for GNAS anomalies for the presence of novel genetic variants at PRKAR1A and PDE4D genes. Our work allowed the detection of 8 novel missense variants affecting genes so far associated with ACRDYS in 9 patients. Our data further confirm the molecular and clinical overlap among these disorders. We present the data collected from a large series of patients and a brief review of the literature in order to compare our findings with already published data; to look for PRKAR1A/PDE4D mutation spectrum, recurrent mutations, and mutation hot spots; and to identify specific

  4. Screening of PRKAR1A and PDE4D in a Large Italian Series of Patients Clinically Diagnosed With Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy and/or Pseudohypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Francesca Marta; Bordogna, Paolo; de Sanctis, Luisa; Giachero, Federica; Verrua, Elisa; Segni, Maria; Mazzanti, Laura; Boldrin, Valentina; Toromanovic, Alma; Spada, Anna; Mantovani, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) intracellular signaling pathway mediates the physiological effects of several hormones and neurotransmitters, acting by the activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and several downstream intracellular effectors, including the heterotrimeric stimulatory G-protein (Gs), the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), and cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Defective G-protein-mediated signaling has been associated with an increasing number of disorders, including Albright hereditary osteodistrophy (AHO) and pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP), a heterogeneous group of rare genetic metabolic disorders resulting from molecular defects at the GNAS locus. Moreover, mutations in PRKAR1A and PDE4D genes have been recently detected in patients with acrodysostosis (ACRDYS), showing a skeletal and endocrinological phenotype partially overlapping with AHO/PHP. Despite the high detection rate of molecular defects by currently available molecular approaches, about 30% of AHO/PHP patients still lack a molecular diagnosis, hence the need to screen patients negative for GNAS epi/genetic defects also for chromosomal regions and genes associated with diseases that undergo differential diagnosis with PHP. According to the growing knowledge on Gsα-cAMP signaling-linked disorders, we investigated our series of patients (n = 81) with a clinical diagnosis of PHP/AHO but negative for GNAS anomalies for the presence of novel genetic variants at PRKAR1A and PDE4D genes. Our work allowed the detection of 8 novel missense variants affecting genes so far associated with ACRDYS in 9 patients. Our data further confirm the molecular and clinical overlap among these disorders. We present the data collected from a large series of patients and a brief review of the literature in order to compare our findings with already published data; to look for PRKAR1A/PDE4D mutation spectrum, recurrent mutations, and mutation hot spots; and to identify specific

  5. Osteodystrophy in liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the osteodystrophy in liver cirrhosis, 21 liver cirrhotic patients having no malignancy and normal renal function were examined by 99m Tc Methylene Diphosphonate (MDP) bone scintigraphy. The cirrhotic subjects consisted of 14 males and 7 females. Their age was 31 - 80, average 55.7 years. The causes of their cirrhotic damage were 1 primary biliary cirrhosis, 9 alcoholic, 2 HB viral and 9 cryptogenic. The contents of their illness showed 9 cases in A, 4 in B and 8 in C of Child's classification. Abnormal hot spot(s) on bone in the cirrhotics could be observed very frequently in 99m Tc MDP bone scintigraphy (47.6 %; 10/21 cases). Those spots were seen more frequently in female and advanced stage of cirrhosis. The number of spot(s) increased also in advanced liver cirrhosis. Serum Ca, P and PTH were in normal range. All of three vitamin D3 fractions decreased and especially 1,25 (OH)2D3 was depressed more in scinti-positive cases. Metacarpal bone X-p with an alumimum step wedge as a reference was analyzed by a microdensitometry (MD) method (Inoue T et al) and the pattern of osteopathy (i.e. porosis, malacia and poromalacia) was examined according to Sumi Y et al. MD method was not known yet if there was any definite correlation with bone scintigraphy and the osteopathic pattern belonged to border categories. In conclusion, more attension on hepatic osteodystrophy will be significantly necessary due to the fact that it has been found very frequently in liver cirrhosis. 99m Tc MDP bone scintigraphy is a good means for detection of the hepatic osteodystrophy. (author)

  6. Imaging of renal osteodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jevtic, V. E-mail: vladimir.jevtic@mf.uni-lj.si

    2003-05-01

    Chronic renal insufficiency, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, renal transplantation and administration of different medications provoke complex biochemical disturbances of the calcium-phosphate metabolism with wide spectrum of bone and soft tissue abnormalities termed renal osteodystrophy. Clinically most important manifestation of renal bone disease includes secondary hyperparathyroidism, osteomalacia/rickets, osteoporosis, adynamic bone disease and soft tissue calcification. As a complication of long-term hemodialysis and renal transplantation amyloid deposition, destructive spondyloarthropathy, osteonecrosis, and musculoskeletal infections may occur. Due to more sophisticated diagnostic methods and more efficient treatment classical radiographic features of secondary hyperparathyroidism and osteomalacia/rickets are now less frequently seen. Radiological investigations play an important role in early diagnosis and follow-up of the renal bone disease. Although numerous new imaging modalities have been introduced in clinical practice (scintigraphy, CT, MRI, quantitative imaging), plain film radiography, especially fine quality hand radiograph, still represents most widely used examination.

  7. Hepatic osteodystrophy and liver cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vedat; Goral; Mehmet; Simsek; Nuriye; Mete

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the correlation between hepatic osteodystrophy and osteoporosis in patients with liver cirrhosis. METHODS: Bone mineral density of the patients (n = 55) and that of the control group (n = 30) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. All the women in the study were premenopausal. Deoxypyridinoline, pyridinoline and urinary Ca 2+ were measured as bone destruction markers, while alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were measured as bone ...

  8. McCune-Albright syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Collins Michael T; Dumitrescu Claudia E

    2008-01-01

    Abstract McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is classically defined by the clinical triad of fibrous dysplasia of bone (FD), café-au-lait skin spots, and precocious puberty (PP). It is a rare disease with estimated prevalence between 1/100,000 and 1/1,000,000. FD can involve a single or multiple skeletal sites and presents with a limp and/or pain, and, occasionally, a pathologic fracture. Scoliosis is common and may be progressive. In addition to PP (vaginal bleeding or spotting and development of...

  9. Nutritional fibrous osteodystrophy in goats

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    Paulo M Bandarra

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Seven out of 25 goats from a southern Brazilian flock developed nutritional fibrous osteodystrophy. Affected animals were younger than 1 year of age and were confined in stalls and fed a concentrate ration containing 1:6 calcium:phosphorus ratio. The remaining flock (35 goats was managed at pasture and showed no disease. Clinical signs were characterized by mandibular and maxillary enlargements, varying degrees of mouth opening and protruding tongue, dyspnea, apart of abnormalities of prehension and mastication. Affected animals had increased seric levels of phosphorus and parathormone, as well as higher alkaline phosphatase activity. Postmortem examination on three succumbed goats revealed bilateral enlargement of the maxilla and mandibula, and loose teeth, apart of multiple incomplete rib fractures in one of them. Severe diffuse proliferation of loose connective tissue surrounded the osteoid trabeculae, many of which were partially or completely non-mineralized. Mineralized osteoid trabeculae showed osteoclasts in the Howship's lacunae.

  10. McCune-Albright syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Michael T

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS is classically defined by the clinical triad of fibrous dysplasia of bone (FD, café-au-lait skin spots, and precocious puberty (PP. It is a rare disease with estimated prevalence between 1/100,000 and 1/1,000,000. FD can involve a single or multiple skeletal sites and presents with a limp and/or pain, and, occasionally, a pathologic fracture. Scoliosis is common and may be progressive. In addition to PP (vaginal bleeding or spotting and development of breast tissue in girls, testicular and penile enlargement and precocious sexual behavior in boys, other hyperfunctioning endocrinopathies may be involved including hyperthyroidism, growth hormone excess, Cushing syndrome, and renal phosphate wasting. Café-au-lait spots usually appear in the neonatal period, but it is most often PP or FD that brings the child to medical attention. Renal involvement is seen in approximately 50% of the patients with MAS. The disease results from somatic mutations of the GNAS gene, specifically mutations in the cAMP regulating protein, Gs alpha. The extent of the disease is determined by the proliferation, migration and survival of the cell in which the mutation spontaneously occurs during embryonic development. Diagnosis of MAS is usually established on clinical grounds. Plain radiographs are often sufficient to make the diagnosis of FD and biopsy of FD lesions can confirm the diagnosis. The evaluation of patients with MAS should be guided by knowledge of the spectrum of tissues that may be involved, with specific testing for each. Genetic testing is possible, but is not routinely available. Genetic counseling, however, should be offered. Differential diagnoses include neurofibromatosis, osteofibrous dysplasia, non-ossifying fibromas, idiopathic central precocious puberty, and ovarian neoplasm. Treatment is dictated by the tissues affected, and the extent to which they are affected. Generally, some form of surgical intervention

  11. Incomplete McCune-Albright Syndrome: A Case Report

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    Nagehan Aslan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fibrous dysplasia of bone is a genetic, non-inheritable disease that can cause bone pain, bone deformities and fracture. It has a large clinic spectrum from benign monostotic fibrous dysplasia to McCune-Albright syndrome. Rare McCune-Albright syndrome is characterized by precocious puberty, cafe au lait spots and fibrous dysplasia. Herein we presented a case who was preferred to hospital with pathological fractures and diagnosed with Incomplet McCune Albright syndrome because of the lack of endocrine hyperfunction and developed early puberty at clinical course.

  12. A rare cause of acromegaly: McCune-Albright syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Erdal Bodakçi; Mazhar Müslüm Tuna; Faruk Kılınç; Zafer Pekkolay; Hikmet Soylu; Şadiye Altun Tuzcu; Alpaslan Kemal Tuzcu

    2015-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome is characterized by polyostatic fibrous dysplasia, brown spots on the skin (café au lait pigmentation) and autonomous endocrine hyperfunction. Early puberty and other endocrinological manifestations, such as acromegaly, gigantism and hypercortisolism are widely observed in the syndrome. Acromegaly is seen in 20% of patients. We report a case of acromegaly accompanied with this syndrome.Key words: McCune-Albright syndrome; acromegaly; fibrous dysplasia

  13. Bone Canopies in Pediatric Renal Osteodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Renata C; Levin Andersen, Thomas; Friedman, Peter A;

    2016-01-01

    and their association with biochemical and bone histomorphometric parameters in 106 pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients (stage 2-5) across the spectrum of ROD. Canopies in CKD patients often appeared as thickened multilayered canopies, similar to previous reports in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism....... This finding contrasts with the thin appearance reported in healthy individuals with normal kidney function. Furthermore, canopies in pediatric CKD patients showed immunoreactivity to the PTH receptor (PTHR1) as well as to the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). The number of surfaces......Pediatric renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is characterized by changes in bone turnover, mineralization, and volume that are brought about by alterations in bone resorption and formation. The resorptive and formative surfaces on the cancellous bone are separated from the marrow cavity by canopies...

  14. Mandibular brown tumor in renal osteodystrophy

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    Park, Jin Woo; Choi, Bo Ram; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Choi, Soon Chul [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gang, In Tae [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Brown tumor is a histologically benign lesion that is a serious complication of renal osteodystrophy because it may result in severe deformity and discomfort. We report a case of brown tumor, which occurred in a 35-year-old woman with chronic renal failure, who had been treated with hemodialysis for 14 years. The lesion was found on the lingual side of the mandible. Standard panoramic radiograph showed generally decreased bone mineral density, loss of lamina dura, and thin cortical plates. Computed tomography (CT) revealed multilocular expansible lesions with heterogeneous attenuation in the anterior mandible, as well as generalized trabecular alteration with homogeneous sclerosis, and thinning or obliteration of cortical plates. Excision of the mandibular lesion and curettage of the affected bone were performed.

  15. Role of bone biopsy in renal osteodystrophy

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    Al Badr Wisam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal osteodystrophy (ROD, the abnormal bone histology that occurs in the context of kidney disease, is a disease spectrum and not a uniform progressive bone disease. It is an important component of the broad disturbances of bone and mineral metabolism associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD. There are multiple pathogenetic factors which contribute to the histological abnormalities seen on bone biopsy. The patients with ROD are rarely symp-tomatic in the early stages of CKD. It is also noteworthy that the clinical manifestations are usually preceded by biochemical changes that are insidious and subtle. This makes it difficult for the clinician to suspect the presence of bone and mineral metabolism abnormalities without direct testing. The serum calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase levels are usually normal until late in the course of CKD. The main screening test for abnormal bone and mineral metabolism is the measurement of parathyroid hormone which is also somewhat delayed. The clinical signs and symptoms are also challenging to interpret because of their slow and non-specific nature which may include vague, ill-defined, bone aches and pains, and muscle weakness. The gold standard for diagnosis of ROD is bone biopsy with mineralized bone histology after double tetracycline labeling, iron staining and aluminum staining. The currently used histomorphometric descriptions of bone histology are not well integrated clinically and a new nomenclature that is clinically more relevant and useful has been proposed. Additional studies are required to define the spectrum of ROD in the current therapeutic era, and to find clinically useful non-invasive biomarkers to improve the treatment and monitoring of the abnormal bone in the setting of CKD.

  16. A rare cause of acromegaly: McCune-Albright syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Bodakçi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available McCune-Albright syndrome is characterized by polyostatic fibrous dysplasia, brown spots on the skin (café au lait pigmentation and autonomous endocrine hyperfunction. Early puberty and other endocrinological manifestations, such as acromegaly, gigantism and hypercortisolism are widely observed in the syndrome. Acromegaly is seen in 20% of patients. We report a case of acromegaly accompanied with this syndrome.

  17. [Hereditary hemocromatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2004-10-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a disorder of iron metabolism characterized by a progressive tissue iron overload which leads to an irreversible organ damage if it is not treated timely. The recent developments in the field of molecular medicine have radically changed the physiopathology and the diagnosis of this disease. However, transferrin saturation and serum ferritin are still the most reliable tests for the detection of subjects with hereditary hemochromatosis. Therapeutic phlebotomy is the mainstay of the treatment of hereditary hemochromatosis. If phlebotomy is started before the onset of irreversible organ damages, the life expectancy of these patients is similar to that of normal population.

  18. Hereditary pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard M Charnley

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant condition,which results in recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis,progressing to chronic pancreatitis often at a young age.The majority of patients with hereditary pancreatitis expressone of two mutations (R122H or N29I) in the cationictrypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene). It has been hypothesisedthat one of these mutations, the R122H mutation causespancreatitis by altering a trypsin recognition site sopreventing deactivation of trypsin within the pancreas andprolonging its action, resulting in autodigestion. Families withthese two mutations have been identified in many countriesand there are also other rarer mutations, which have alsobeen linked to hereditary pancreatitis.Patients with hereditary pancreatitis present in the sameway as those with sporadic pancreatitis but at an earlierage. It is common for patients to remain undiagnosed formany years, particularly ifthey present with non-specificsymptoms. Hereditary pancreatitis should always beconsidered in patients who present with recurrent pancreatitiswith a family history of pancreatic disease. If patients withthe 2 common mutations are compared, those with theR122H mutation are more likely to present at a younger ageand are more likely to require surgical intervention than thosewith N29I. Hereditary pancreatitis carries a 40 % lifetimerisk of pancreatic cancer with those patients aged between50 to 70 being most at risk in whom screening tests maybecome important.

  19. Hansen's disease with McCune–Albright syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hari Kumar KVS; Dhull, P; Bisht, Y. S.

    2012-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) comprises a triad of fibrous dysplasia of bone, cafι-au-lait macule, and endocrinopathy. The disease is due to activating mutation of G protein-coupled receptor leading to hyperfunction of glands. Hansen′s disease is caused by infection with Mycobacterium leprae and is seen with underlying immunosuppressed conditions in genetically predisposed individuals. We recently encountered a patient with Hansen′s disease along with underlying MAS and report the same in th...

  20. Untersuchung der Knochen bei hepatischer Osteodystrophie am MDR2-/--Mausmodell

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is the most frequent bone disease in Germany with approximately six million people being affected by it. For this reason osteoporosis is a most relevant topic both for society in general and the health system in particular. In daily clinical practice, it could be observed that patients suffering from chronic liver disease in many cases also suffer from disturbances in bone metabolism. This observation is also referred to as hepatic osteodystrophy, with osteoporosis as its most...

  1. [Hereditary neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, Jean-Michel; Calvo, Judith; Ghorab, Karima; Tazir, Meriem

    2008-11-15

    Although there are many human hereditary neuropathies, most of them with the exception of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease or hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy, are rare. Irrespective of their type, the mode of transmission may be autosomal dominant or recessive, or X-linked. The most difficult to diagnose, however, are the sporadic forms. It is customary to distinguish the cases in which the neuropathy is the sole clinical expression from multisystemic diseases where neuropathy is one component of multi-organ involvement. The complexity and the multiplicity of genes involved and the lack of understanding of their exact functions hinder logical presentation of these hereditary neuropathies. For understandable technical reasons, the stage of specific treatment, namely the repair of the mutated gene, has yet to be attained.

  2. Síndrome de McCune Albright

    OpenAIRE

    Milvia Castillo Guerrero; Belkis Villegas Batista; Omar De La Paz Marín

    2014-01-01

    El síndrome de McCune-Albright es una enfermedad esporádica de causa genética, no hereditaria, clínicamente caracterizada por displasia fibrosa poliostótica, manchas de color café con leche y desórdenes endocrinos, tales como hipertiroidismo y pubertad precoz. Se reporta el caso de un paciente masculino de 10 años, que presentó múltiples fracturas óseas desde los seis meses de edad, hipertiroidismo y desnutrición severa, que causaron retardo en su crecimiento y desarrollo. El proceso de diagn...

  3. McCune-Albright syndrome: radiological and MR findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongjing, G; Huawei, L; Zilai, P; Bei, D; Hao, J; Kemin, C

    2001-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a non-inherited disorder due to the GNAS1 gene mutation. The syndrome is characterized with the triad of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, pigmented skin lesions, endocrinopathy, and precocious puberty. We report the case of a 14-year-old boy, presenting with sclerotic type of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. Radiological methods including plain X-ray film, MR and whole body bone scintigraphy suggested the diagnosis of MAS. MRI provided more directly perceived images and it was more sensitive in demonstrating the lesion: its shape, contents, especially the size of the affected region. Histopathological study and the identification of mutant gene finally confirmed the diagnostic result.

  4. Families of Pseudohypoparathyroidism presenting as Seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nand, N; Aggarwal, S; Yadav, M; Dsouza, S; Deshmukh, A R

    2015-10-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by variable insensitivity to parathyroid hormone. We describe two cases of 22 year male and 24 year female who have typical clinical features of Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO). Laboratory investigation revealed evidence of pseudohypoparathyroidism and skeletal survey showed shortening of the metacarpals and metatarsals. PMID:27608698

  5. Hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, M P; Bygum, A

    2016-01-01

    We report a 64-year-old man who suffered from recurrent visible swelling attacks since the age of 20 as well as episodes with severe upper airway edema, resulting in 4 emergency tracheotomies. Eventually after 44 years he was diagnosed with hereditary angioedema (HAE) type II. The aims of this re...... of this report is to emphasize the importance of awareness concerning HAE, which does not respond to traditional anti-allergic therapy, and remind physicians to test for functional C1-INH deficiency....

  6. [Hereditary pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare, heterogeneous familial disease and should be suspected in any patient who has suffered at least two attacks of acute pancreatitis for which there is no underlying cause and unexplained chronic pancreatitis with a family history in a first- or second degree relative. with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Genetic factors have been implied in cases of familial chronic pancreatitis. The most common are mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). The inflammation results in repeated DNA damage, error-prone repair mechanisms and the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations. Risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a major concern of many patients with hereditary chronic pancreatitis, but the individual risk is poorly defined. Better risk models of pancreatic cancer in individual patients based on etiology of pancreatitis, family history, genetics, smoking, alcohol, diabetes and the patient's age are needed. PMID:27000817

  7. Hereditary hemochromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the clinical and laboratory features of hereditary hemochromatosis associated liver disease in a tertiary care hospital. Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from January 2002 to October 2012. Methodology: Charts of patients with Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HHC) were reviewed. Data collected and analyzed consisting of clinical presentations, liver function tests, serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, hepatic imaging and histology in patients with HHC. Results: A total of 22 patients were identified as having hemochromatosis. All subjects were men with a mean age of 53 ± 9.2 years at the time of diagnosis. The most common presentation was skin pigmentation seen in 17 (77%), followed by loss of libido/ impotence in 11 (50%) and then arthralgias in 10 (45%) and weakness in 6 (27%). Eleven (50%) subjects had diabetes mellitus and one subject had concomitant cardiac involvement. Patients with diabetes were diagnosed earlier as compared to those without it. Eighteen (81%) subjects had cirrhosis at the time of diagnosis. Serum iron was 164 ± 53 ug/dl, ferritin 3391 ± 1960 ug/L, TIBC 202 ± 61 ug/dl and transferrin saturation 76.8 ± 14%. Liver biopsy was done in 10 (45%) and using Pearls stain histopathological features were consistent with hemochromatosis and none had carcinoma. Only 3 (14%) patients had regular phlebotomy. Conclusion: Hemochromatosis is not a rare disease in Pakistan and should be looked in those subjects whose liver function tests are deranged. (author)

  8. Pathophysiology and recent advances in the management of renal osteodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Grahame

    2002-12-01

    Bone disease is observed in 75-100% of patients with chronic renal failure as the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) falls below 60 ml/minute. Hyperparathyroid (high turnover) bone disease is found most frequently followed by mixed osteodystrophy, low-turnover bone disease, and osteomalacia. With advancing renal impairment, "skeletal resistance" to parathyroid hormone (PTH) occurs. To maintain bone turnover, intact PTH (iPTH) targets from two to four times the upper normal range have been suggested, but whole PTH(1-84) assays indicate that amino-terminally truncated fragments, which accumulate in end-stage renal disease (ESRD), account for up to one-half of the measured iPTH. PTH levels and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP) provide some information on bone involvement but bone biopsy and histomorphometry remains the gold standard. Calcitriol and calcium salts can be used to suppress PTH and improve osteomalacia but there is growing concern that these agents predispose to the development of vascular calcification, cardiovascular morbidity, low-turnover bone disease and fracture. Newer therapeutic options include less calcemic vitamin D analogues, calcimimetics and bisphosphonates for hyperparathyroidism, and sevelamer for phosphate control. Calcitriol and hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) have been shown to maintain bone mineral density (BMD) in certain patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). After renal transplantation, renal osteodystrophy generally improves but BMD often worsens. Bisphosphonate therapy may be appropriate for some patients at risk of fracture. When renal bone disease is assessed using a combination of biochemical markers, histology and bone densitometry, early intervention and the careful use of an increasing number of effective therapies can reduce the morbidity associated with this common problem. PMID:12469904

  9. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? Cancer of the pancreas is a genetic ... found in cigarette smoke. The genetics of hereditary pancreatic cancer is a focus of research at Johns Hopkins. ...

  10. McCune-Albright syndrome: growth hormone and prolactin hypersecretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforidis, Athanasios; Maniadaki, Ilianna; Stanhope, Richard

    2006-05-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) has a special interest for endocrinologists as its pathogenesis results in hypersecretion of hormones in peripheral endocrine tissues. This can be expressed as precocious puberty, mainly in girls, primary hyperthyroidism, growth hormone (GH) and/or prolactin excess, hyperparathyroidism and hypercortisolism. The incidence of GH excess among patients with MAS has been assessed as up to 21%. The pathogenesis of GH hypersecretion in MAS is not completely understood, whereas it seems to be different from the aetiology of acromegaly/gigantism in non-MAS patients. The clinical expression of GH excess can be masked because of precocious puberty or craniofacial fibrous dysplasia, indicating the necessity for screening. Medical treatment is usually the only option in MAS patients with GH excess, as transsphenoidal surgery is usually restricted due to massive thickening of the skull base, whereas radiotherapy is contraindicated due to probable higher predisposition to sarcomatous transformation. The use of bromocriptine, cabergoline and octreotide, or the combination of these, has shown variable results, whereas pegvisomant, a GH receptor antagonist, is a new promising option, although not yet used in patients with MAS. PMID:16789626

  11. Síndrome de McCune Albright

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milvia Castillo Guerrero

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de McCune-Albright es una enfermedad esporádica de causa genética, no hereditaria, clínicamente caracterizada por displasia fibrosa poliostótica, manchas de color café con leche y desórdenes endocrinos, tales como hipertiroidismo y pubertad precoz. Se reporta el caso de un paciente masculino de 10 años, que presentó múltiples fracturas óseas desde los seis meses de edad, hipertiroidismo y desnutrición severa, que causaron retardo en su crecimiento y desarrollo. El proceso de diagnóstico fue demorado por su inusual forma de presentación, pero su evolución después de iniciar el tratamiento fue favorable. Se presenta el caso por la baja frecuencia de este trastorno, asociado a complicaciones endocrino-metabólicas graves que causan la muerte, si no se diagnostica y se trata precozmente

  12. Cytokine accumulation in osteitis fibrosa of renal osteodystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte M.E.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow fibrosis occurs in association with a number of pathological states. Despite the extensive fibrosis that sometimes characterizes renal osteodystrophy, little is known about the factors that contribute to marrow accumulation of fibrous tissue. Because circulating cytokines are elevated in uremia, possibly in response to elevated parathyroid hormone levels, we have examined bone biopsies from 21 patients with end-stage renal disease and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Bone sections were stained with antibodies to human interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha, IL-6, IL-11, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha and transforming growth factor-ß (TGF-ß using an undecalcified plastic embedding method. Intense staining for IL-1alpha, IL-6, TNF-alpha and TGF-ß was evident within the fibrotic tissue of the bone marrow while minimal IL-11 was detected. The extent of cytokine deposition corresponded to the severity of fibrosis, suggesting their possible involvement in the local regulation of the fibrotic response. Because immunoreactive TGF-ß and IL-6 were also detected in osteoblasts and osteocytes, we conclude that selective cytokine accumulation may have a role in modulating bone and marrow cell function in parathyroid-mediated uremic bone disease.

  13. Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy in Two Red Wolf (Canis rufus Pups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenessa L. Gjeltema

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 6-month-old red wolf (Canis rufus pup presented for evaluation of progressive thoracic and pelvic limb lameness, joint swelling, and decreased body condition. Radiographic evaluation revealed medullary sclerosis centered at the metaphyses of multiple long bones, well-defined irregular periosteal proliferation, and ill-defined lucent zones paralleling the physes, consistent with hypertrophic osteodystrophy (HOD. Biopsies of affected bone revealed medullary fibrosis and new bone formation. The pup improved following treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, opioids, and supportive care over the course of 4 weeks. Metaphyseal periosteal bone proliferation persisted until the animal was humanely euthanized several years later for poor quality of life associated with bilateral cranial cruciate ligament rupture. A second red wolf pup of 4.5 months of age presented for evaluation of lethargy, kyphotic posture, and swollen carpal and tarsal joints. Radiographs revealed bilateral medullary sclerosis and smooth periosteal reaction affecting multiple long bones, suggestive of HOD. Further diagnostics were not pursued in this case to confirm the diagnosis, and the clinical signs persisted for 4 weeks. In light of these two case reports, HOD should be recognized as a developmental orthopedic disease in growing red wolves.

  14. Course and differential diagnosis of the McCune-Albright syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedel, B.; Weickert, H.

    1986-05-01

    The McCune-Albright syndrome consists of a combination of fibrous dysplasia of bone and endocrine lesions with abnormalities of pigmentation. The condition is rare and may be missed, as happened in our case. The case showed extreme skeletal deformities, menarche at one year and peculiar histological appearances.

  15. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia - HHT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... access catheters Vertebroplasty Women and vascular disease Women's health Social Media Facebook Twitter ... Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia - HHT Interventional Radiologists Offer Non-surgical Treatment for Underdiagnosed Genetic Disorder ...

  16. [Renal osteodystrophy (3); its treatment in dialysis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghitu, S; Oprisiu, R; Benamar, L; Said, S; Tataru Albu, A; Arsenescu, I; el Esper, N; Morinière, P; Fournier, A

    2000-01-01

    The prevalence and the clinical gravity of the various histopathological varieties of renal osteodystrophy in dialysis patients depends on the severity of both the aluminium intoxication and that of hyperparathyroidism. The prevalence of bone pains, fractures and hypercalcemias are the highest in adynamic bone diseases (ABD) with severe aluminium intoxication, then in osteitis fibrosa and mixed osteopathy, in the ABD with moderate aluminium intoxication and rare in the mild lesion in spite of similar moderate aluminium intoxication. In the absence of aluminium intoxication, hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia prevalence is higher only when intact PTH is more that 4 times the upper limit of normal. When PTH is between 1 and 2 folds the ULN this prevalence is null and bone mineral density is the highest. 2. The low turnover aluminic bone diseases (osteomalacic or adynamic) will be cured by long term deferoxamine treatment. The hazards of such treatment justify the performance of a bone biopsy to ensure the diagnosis. Their prevention relies on adequate treatment of tapwater and definitive exclusion of long term administration of aluminum phosphate binders. 3. Non aluminic osteomalacia will be treated according to the same guidelines given for the uremic patients before dialysis. 4. Non aluminic adynamic bone disease will be cured by means aiming at stimulating PTH secretion as discontinuing 1 alpha hydroxylated vitamin D derivatives, and, if there is no hyperphosphatemia by discontinuation of calcium supplement. In case of hyperphosphatemia in dialysis patients CaCO3 doses have to be nevertheless increased after the dialysate calcium concentration (DCa) has been decreased in order to induce a negative perdialytic calcium balance for PTH secretion stimulation. In the near future substitution of CaCO3 by non calcemic non aluminic phosphate binders will suffice. 5. Osteitis fibrosa due to hyperparathyroidism will be treated first by securing an optimal vitamin D

  17. McCune-Albright Syndrome: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moein Mobini

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS is a rare, heterogenous, clinical condition caused by a rare genetic mutation. The disorder is more common in females and is characterized by a triad of cutaneous, bone and endocrine abnormalities.  We describe a girl patient with MAS having precocious puberty and multiple cafe-au-lait macules and deforming polyostotic fibrous dysplasia of bone. Clinical presentation and X-ray finding were strongly diagnostic for MAS, Patients with McCune-Albright syndrome reach the adult age with a significant burden of the disease that continuously reduces their quality of life. Skeletal deformities, fractures, hyperthyroidism, and hyperestrogenism are just few of the many challenges in the management of these patients. These disorders with close observation and early detection can be controlled.

  18. [Developments in hereditary neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubourg, O

    2012-12-01

    Hereditary sensorimotor neuropathies, or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) comprise a group of diseases with heterogeneous clinical, electrophysiological and genetic expression. They are classified by the mode of inheritance (autosomal dominant, X-linked dominant, autosomal recessive) and their electrophysiological characteristics taking into account the speed of motor conduction of the median nerve (demyelinating, intermediary and axonal forms). Certain purely motor forms are called spinal CMT or hereditary distal motor neuropathy, or distal spinal amyotrophy. CMT involving an important sensorial component, trophic disorders, or signs of dysautonomia are included in the classification of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

  19. [Hereditary optic neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milea, D; Verny, C

    2012-10-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are a group of heterogeneous conditions affecting both optic nerves, with an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-related or mitochondrial transmission. The two most common non-syndromic hereditary optic neuropathies (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and autosomal dominant optic atrophy) are very different in their clinical presentation and their genetic transmission, leading however to a common, non-specific optic nerve atrophy. Beyond the optic atrophy-related visual loss, which is the clinical hallmark of this group of diseases, other associated neurological signs are increasingly recognized.

  20. Learning about Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Its Implications Meeting A 1997 ELSI Report Learning About Hereditary Hemochromatosis What do we know about ... and treatment information. Hosted by the Dolan DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Iron Overload ...

  1. Characteristic Height Growth Pattern in Patients with Pseudohypoparathyroidism: Comparison between Type 1a and Type 1b

    OpenAIRE

    Kinoshita, Kaori; Minagawa, Masanori; Anzai, Michiko; Sato, Yumiko; Kazukawa, Itsuro; Shimohashi, Kyoko; Ota, Setsuo; Kohno, Yoichi

    2007-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) is a metabolic disorder characterized by organ resistance to the action of parathyroid hormone. PHP type 1 is subclassified into two apparent disorders, type 1a (PHP1a) and type 1b (PHP1b). Patients with PHP1a show Albright hereditary osteodystrophy including short stature. Patients with PHP1b have no such skeletal defects, however, literature regarding the growth of PHP1b is not currently available. We evaluated growth charts of PHP patients, including four PHP...

  2. Hereditary Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf Haddad; Kowdley, Gopal C; Timothy M. Pawlik; Cunningham, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary etiologies of pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancers are increasingly recognized. An estimated >10% of pancreatic and increasing number of hepatobiliary cancers are hereditary. The cumulative risk of hereditary pancreatic cancer ranges from measurable but negligible in cystic fibrosis to a sobering 70% in cases of hereditary pancreatitis. Candidates for pancreatic cancer surveillance are those with a risk pancreatic cancer estimated to be >10-fold that of the normal population. Scree...

  3. Hypersecretion of growth hormone and prolactin in McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttler, L; Jackson, J A; Saeed uz-Zafar, M; Levitsky, L L; Mellinger, R C; Frohman, L A

    1989-06-01

    Acromegaly and hyperprolactinemia have been reported in association with the McCune-Albright syndrome, but the pathophysiology of the GH and PRL hypersecretion that occurs in patients with this disorder has not been defined. We studied GH and PRL secretory dynamics in three patients with McCune-Albright syndrome and hypersecretion of these hormones. Each patient had excessive linear growth, glucose-non-suppressible plasma GH concentration, and GH responsiveness to TRH and GHRH. In response to exogenous GHRH, plasma GH concentrations rose approximately 2-fold in all three patients. Plasma GHRH levels were 20-40 ng/L (normal, less than 30). Study of the spontaneous GH secretory pattern in two patients indicated nocturnal augmentation of GH release. Bromocriptine therapy failed to reduce plasma GH in all patients; in one patient treatment with octreotide, a long-acting somatostatin analog, partially suppressed plasma GH and insulin-like growth factor I levels. These results suggest that hypersecretion of GH in the McCune-Albright syndrome is not due to ectopic GHRH production or autonomous somatotroph function. The results are similar to those described in classic acromegaly due to GH-secreting pituitary tumors. However, the lack of radiographic pituitary enlargement, the variable pituitary pathology reported in similar patients, and frequent concordance of GH and PRL excess suggest that the pathogenesis of this disorder may differ fundamentally from other forms of acromegaly or gigantism. The pathophysiology may reflect abnormal hypothalamic regulation and/or an embryological defect in pituitary cellular differentiation and function. PMID:2498385

  4. Osteodystrophy in liver cirrhosis. Its demonstration by 99m Tc methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sezai, Shu-ichi; Ishizawa, Suguru; Yoshino, Katsumasa

    1987-10-01

    In order to investigate the osteodystrophy in liver cirrhosis, 21 liver cirrhotic patients having no malignancy and normal renal function were examined by 99m Tc Methylene Diphosphonate (MDP) bone scintigraphy. The cirrhotic subjects consisted of 14 males and 7 females. Their age was 31 - 80, average 55.7 years. The causes of their cirrhotic damage were 1 primary biliary cirrhosis, 9 alcoholic, 2 HB viral and 9 cryptogenic. The contents of their illness showed 9 cases in A, 4 in B and 8 in C of Child's classification. Abnormal hot spot(s) on bone in the cirrhotics could be observed very frequently in 99m Tc MDP bone scintigraphy (47.6 %; 10/21 cases). Those spots were seen more frequently in female and advanced stage of cirrhosis. The number of spot(s) increased also in advanced liver cirrhosis. Serum Ca, P and PTH were in normal range. All of three vitamin D/sub 3/ fractions decreased and especially 1,25 (OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ was depressed more in scinti-positive cases. Metacarpal bone X-p with an alumimum step wedge as a reference was analyzed by a microdensitometry (MD) method (Inoue T et al) and the pattern of osteopathy (i.e. porosis, malacia and poromalacia) was examined according to Sumi Y et al. MD method was not known yet if there was any definite correlation with bone scintigraphy and the osteopathic pattern belonged to border categories. In conclusion, more attension on hepatic osteodystrophy will be significantly necessary due to the fact that it has been found very frequently in liver cirrhosis. 99m Tc MDP bone scintigraphy is a good means for detection of the hepatic osteodystrophy.

  5. Hereditary Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, LenhAnh P.; Grundfast, Kenneth M.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses inheritance patterns in hearing loss, epidemiology, clues to genetic causes, locating genes that cause hereditary disorders, genes related to hearing loss disorders in individuals with Usher syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, Branchio-oto-renal and Pendred syndromes, and the significance of finding…

  6. Managing hereditary ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of recent developments in the management of hereditary ovarian cancer. Until recently, intensive screening of the ovaries was recommended to mutation carriers and their first-degree female relatives. However, since screening is not effective in detecting early-s

  7. Hereditary Angioedema in Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Line; Bygum, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare inherited disease that is often difficult to diagnose. We report a case of a 9-year-old boy with a spontaneous mutation causing HAE, diagnosed after a life-threatening episode of angioedema of the head and upper respiratory tract after a 5-year history of...

  8. Hereditary and metabolic myelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedera, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary and metabolic myelopathies are a heterogeneous group of neurologic disorders characterized by clinical signs suggesting spinal cord dysfunction. Spastic weakness, limb ataxia without additional cerebellar signs, impaired vibration, and positional sensation are hallmark phenotypic features of these disorders. Hereditary, and to some extent, metabolic myelopathies are now recognized as more widespread systemic processes with axonal loss and demyelination. However, the concept of predominantly spinal cord disorders remains clinically helpful to differentiate these disorders from other neurodegenerative conditions. Furthermore, metabolic myelopathies are potentially treatable and an earlier diagnosis increases the likelihood of a good clinical recovery. This chapter reviews major types of degenerative myelopathies, hereditary spastic paraplegia, motor neuron disorders, spastic ataxias, and metabolic disorders, including leukodystrophies and nutritionally induced myelopathies, such as vitamin B12, E, and copper deficiencies. Neuroimaging studies usually detect a nonspecific spinal cord atrophy or demyelination of the corticospinal tracts and dorsal columns. Brain imaging can be also helpful in myelopathies caused by generalized neurodegeneration. Given the nonspecific nature of neuroimaging findings, we also review metabolic or genetic assays needed for the specific diagnosis of hereditary and metabolic myelopathies. PMID:27430441

  9. Burnout control at the Albright coal-waste-bank fire. Rept. of investigations/1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnout Control is a process developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines for accelerating the burning of wasted coal fires in situ, while at the same time controlling the heat and fumes produced. The Albright fire project is a first field trial of Burnout Control as applied to a coal waste bank. An exhaust ventilation system was designed and constructed and then operated over a 1-year period at the site of an existing abandoned mine land fire near the town of Albright, W.V. While predicted exhaust gas temperatures of 900 C and thermal power levels of 5 MW were achieved at 20- to 30-in H2O vacuum levels, problems were encountered with engineering designs, equipment breakdown, and fuel-rich combustion that curtailed the time period of satisfactory operation. Effective afterburning of the exhaust gases (as they were drawn from the bank) corrected the problems associated with combustion stoichiometry and led to high thermal outputs. It is believed that with (1) improvements in engineering design and construction, (2) better control of the afterburning process, and (3) the use of conventional stack gas air-pollution controls, Burnout Control can be applied successfully to a coal waste bank fire

  10. [Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hund, E

    2014-10-01

    Hereditary amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant fatal multisystem disease caused by extracellular deposition of misfolded proteins and, therefore represents a hereditary protein folding or deposition disease that leads to progressive organ damage and eventually death. In most instances mutations within the transthyretin gene are the underlying cause. The main manifestation is a rapidly progressing axonal sensorimotor and autonomic polyneuropathy (familial amyloid polyneuropathy, FAP). Cardiac involvement is frequent in FAP and additional manifestations include the gastrointestinal tract and the eyes. A second manifestation type is cardiomyopathy with little or no polyneuropathy (familial amyloid cardiomyopathy, FAC). For therapy, orthotopic liver transplantation has been established for 25 years. Recently, the oral agent tafamidis, a transthyretin stabilizer, was licensed for treatment of stage 1 polyneuropathy. Additional treatment options are currently being studied. PMID:25123367

  11. [Hereditary peripheral neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, Jean-Michel; Tazir, Mériem; Calvo, Judith; Funalot, Benoît

    2009-09-01

    Currently more than 30 genes are known to be responsible for genetically determined neuropathies. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most frequent of these hereditary neuropathies, with a prevalence of 4.7 to 36 per 100 000. In its demyelinating forms (CMT1), approximately 70% of cases are associated with a duplication of the PMP22gene. In its axonal forms (CMT2), 10-20% of the cases may be associated with a mutation of the MFN2gene. For North African patients with recessive transmission, a mutation of the LMNA gene must be sought. It is essential to stress the great variability of the phenotype--clinical, electrophysiological, and histologic--between and within families. A detailed analysis of these criteria, together with consideration of ethnic origin, may guide the search for the causal mutation. Whether the case involves certainly hereditary transmission or a sporadic form, it is desirable to be able to examine the maximum number of the patient's kin, both clinically and electrophysiologically. The forms with recessive transmission usually have a very early onset and are more serious than the dominant forms. The early- and very early-onset forms of CMT are increasingly better distinguished: congenital hypomyelination neuropathy (mutations of PMP22, MPZ or EGR2), or more axonal forms, including SMARD1 (Spinal muscle atrophy with respiratory distress; mutations of IGHMBP2) and EOHMSN (Early-onset hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy; mutations of MFN2). The prevention of cutaneous (ulcerations), bone, and amputation complications is very important in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies, because of the severity of the sensory disorders.

  12. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie;

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight into the t......Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions hereditary fructose intolerance hereditary fructose intolerance Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Print All Open All Close All Description Hereditary fructose intolerance is a condition that affects a person's ...

  14. A Rare Cause of Acromegaly: Short Review of McCune Albright Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Aydın

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS is characterized by a triad of poly/monostotic fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait macules, and hyperfunctioning endocrinopathies, including growth hormone (GH excess. Acromegaly, as a manifestation of endocrine hyperfunction with MAS is uncommon. We report a 34-year-old man with MAS and acromegaly, in whom surgical removal of the pituitary tumour has been technically difficult because of bone deformities. A combination of a long-acting somatostatin analogue (Sandostatin LAR and external irradiation were therefore used as treatment. Acromegaly associated with MAS is very rarely seen, and has been the subject of approximately 70 published reports. We present a case of acromegaly associated with MAS and a brief survey of relevant literature. Turk Jem 2009; 13: 13-5

  15. A case of atypical McCune-Albright syndrome requiring optic nerve decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuzer, R; Khilnani, R; Jackson, I T; Audet, B

    1999-10-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a disease of noninheritable, genetic origin defined by the triad of café-au-lait pigmentation of the skin, precocious puberty, and polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. This syndrome, which affects young girls primarily, has also been reported with other endocrinopathies, and rarely with acromegaly and hyperprolactinemia. The fibrous dysplasia in MAS is of the polyostotic type and, apart from the characteristic sites such as the proximal aspects of the femur and the pelvis, the craniofacial region is frequently involved. A male patient with MAS presented with juvenile gigantism, precocious puberty, pituitary adenoma-secreting growth hormone and prolactin, hypothalamic pituitary gonadal and thyroid dysfunction, and polyostotic fibrous dysplasia causing optic nerve compression. Visual deterioration and its surgical management are presented. PMID:10517473

  16. Dental Perspectives in Fibrous Dysplasia and McCune-Albright Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintoye, Sunday O.; Boyce, Alison M.; Collins, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by the triad of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia (PFD), endocrine disorders and café-au-lait skin pigmentation. Ninety percent of MAS patients have FD lesions in the craniofacial area, resulting in significant orofacial deformity, dental disorders, bone pain and compromised oral health. Maxillo-mandibular FD is also associated with dental developmental disorders, malocclusion, and high caries index. There is limited data on the outcomes of dental treatments in maxillo-mandibular FD/MAS patients, because clinicians and researchers have limited access to patients, and there are concerns that dental surgery may activate quiescent jaw FD lesions to grow aggressively. This report highlights current perspectives on dental management issues associated with maxillo-mandibular FD within the context of MAS. PMID:23953425

  17. The Spectrum of Renal Osteodystrophy: A Clinical, Biochemical, Radiological and Histopathological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Gupta, Vijay Verma, Rajesh K. Gupta, Dheeraj K. Gandotra, Annil Mahajan, R.K. Saini, V.K. Gupta, V.K. Dubey

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The chief mineral source of Jammu province is bauxite, an aluminium ore, so a possibility of waterbeing heavily polluted with aluminium is prevalent. Hence, in an effort to relate this regional geographicalaspect with aluminium bone disease (ABD in chronic renal failure (CRF, 50 cases of CRF wereprospectively evaluated. Patients were subjected to a thorough history and clinical examination.Biochemical parameters along with raiological skeletal survey and iliac crest bone biopsies wereundertaken. Sixty-eight per cent of CRF patients were also consuming aluminium containing phosphatebinders (ACPB at that time. The study revealed an occurrence of ABD in 10% of CRF patients. Itwas found predominantly superimposed upon osteomalacia (8% and mixed osteodystrophy (2%.Superimposed ABD on osteomalacia was found more frequently in pre-dialysis (10.8% than afterhaemodialysis group (7.69%. Moreover, the incidence of ABD superimposed on osteomalacia andmixed osteodystrophy was higher in the ACPB group (14.7% than the post-haemodialysis group(7.69%. Correlating, the pre-dialysis, post-haemodialysis and ACPB ingestion status of CRF patientson one hand and histologically proven ABD on the other, it was deduced that the majority of cases ofCRF having ABD was seen in ACPB ingestion group (14.7% followed by pre-dialysis (10.8% andpost-haemodialysis (7.69% groups. Thus it was concluded that in the present work, ACPB ingestionwas the major source of aluminium deposition in bones of patients with CRF rather than the waterused in dialysis or possible pollution of drinking water with aluminium in our province.

  18. Hereditary angioedema in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouillet Laurence

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women with hereditary angioedema (HAE are more likely to be symptomatic that men. Hormonal factors (puberty, contraception, pregnancy,.... play a significant role in the precipitation or worsening of the condition in women. So, combined contraceptive pills are not indicated and progestogen pill must be preferred. During pregnancy, attack rate can increase (38-48% of women. C1Inhibitor concentrate and tranexamic acid can be used during pregnancy. Attenuated androgens for long term prophylaxis are effective but side effects appear more often in female patients. These side effects are dose dependant and can be attenuated by titrating the dose down the lowest effective level.

  19. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parambil, Joseph G

    2016-09-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an underrecognized and underdiagnosed autosomal-dominant angiodysplasia that has an estimated prevalence of 1 in 5000 individuals, with variable clinical presentations even within family members with identical mutations. The most common manifestations are telangiectasias of the skin and nasal mucosa. However, HHT can often be complicated by the presence of arteriovenous malformations and telangiectasias in the lungs, brain, gastrointestinal tract, and liver that are often silent and can lead to life-threatening complications of stroke and hemorrhage. This article reviews HHT for the pulmonologist, who is not uncommonly the first practitioner to encounter these patients. PMID:27514597

  20. HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkelkamp, EJ; Yapp, TR; Powell, LW

    2000-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of the iron metabolism Screening studies indicate that it has a prevalence of one in 200 to 400, depending on the population studied, and a carrier rate of about one in seven to one in 10. Feder et al identified the hereditary hemochromatosis

  1. Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia with gigantism and huge pelvic tumor: a rare case of McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakayama, Kenshi; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Kidani, Teruki; Fujibuchi, Taketsugu; Kito, Katsumi; Tanji, Nozomu; Nakamura, Atsushi

    2011-06-01

    We report a rare case of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia on endocrine hyperfunction with elevated human growth hormone and normal serum level of prolactin. There were some differential points of gender, gigantism, endocrine function, and GNAS gene from McCune-Albright syndrome. Malignant transformation was suspected in the pelvic tumor from imaging because rapid growth of the tumor by imaging was observed; however, no malignant change occurred in this case.

  2. Quantitative and Sensitive Detection of GNAS Mutations Causing McCune-Albright Syndrome with Next Generation Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Satoshi Narumi; Kumihiro Matsuo; Tomohiro Ishii; Yusuke Tanahashi; Tomonobu Hasegawa

    2013-01-01

    Somatic activating GNAS mutations cause McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS). Owing to low mutation abundance, mutant-specific enrichment procedures, such as the peptide nucleic acid (PNA) method, are required to detect mutations in peripheral blood. Next generation sequencing (NGS) can analyze millions of PCR amplicons independently, thus it is expected to detect low-abundance GNAS mutations quantitatively. In the present study, we aimed to develop an NGS-based method to detect low-abundance somat...

  3. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopishinskaya S.V.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Leber optic neuropathy is mitochondrial neurodegenerative disease manifested by progressive visual deterioration due to optic nerve atrophy. It is most frequently manifested in young people aged from 18 to 30, male patients prevailing. The disease is characterized by maternal inheritance, and the inheritance of a feature discontinues in men. In 95% cases Leber hereditary optic neuropathology is due to one of three known mitochondrial DNA mutations, its type being important in relation to the disease prognosis. The disease course has a number of succeeding stages: preclinical, acute and chronic (atrophic. The disease diagnosis is based on the characteristic clinical presentation of sequential impairment of both eyes forming central scotoma, the analysis of family history and detection of specific mutations. The present clinical observation illustrates the difficulties in Leber disease diagnosis.

  4. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge;

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  5. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  6. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo-Kottler, B; Wissinger, B

    2011-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a rare disease primarily affecting the retinal ganglion cells. In most cases patients with LHON develop permanent visual loss with a large central scotoma in the visual field of both eyes. The optic disc becomes partially or completely pale. At the onset of the disease many patients are considered to suffer from an optic neuritis and are treated under the diagnostic and therapeutic regimen of optic neuritis. LHON is mostly only considered when high dose cortisone therapy fails to be effective or the second eye is affected. Thereafter, molecular genetic analysis will prove LHON in these cases. Detailed anamnesis including pedigree analysis in combination with observance of the peripapillary microangiopathic alterations at the fundus will help to speed up the diagnosis of LHON, but even after exact clinical and molecular genetic diagnosis of LHON some aspects of the disease still remain a mystery today.

  7. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mössner Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary chronic pancreatitis (HCP is a very rare form of early onset chronic pancreatitis. With the exception of the young age at diagnosis and a slower progression, the clinical course, morphological features and laboratory findings of HCP do not differ from those of patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. As well, diagnostic criteria and treatment of HCP resemble that of chronic pancreatitis of other causes. The clinical presentation is highly variable and includes chronic abdominal pain, impairment of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function, nausea and vomiting, maldigestion, diabetes, pseudocysts, bile duct and duodenal obstruction, and rarely pancreatic cancer. Fortunately, most patients have a mild disease. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene, encoding cationic trypsinogen, play a causative role in chronic pancreatitis. It has been shown that the PRSS1 mutations increase autocatalytic conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin, and thus probably cause premature, intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation disturbing the intrapancreatic balance of proteases and their inhibitors. Other genes, such as the anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2, the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1 and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR have been found to be associated with chronic pancreatitis (idiopathic and hereditary as well. Genetic testing should only be performed in carefully selected patients by direct DNA sequencing and antenatal diagnosis should not be encouraged. Treatment focuses on enzyme and nutritional supplementation, pain management, pancreatic diabetes, and local organ complications, such as pseudocysts, bile duct or duodenal obstruction. The disease course and prognosis of patients with HCP is unpredictable. Pancreatic cancer risk is elevated. Therefore, HCP patients should strongly avoid environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer.

  8. Hereditary Elliptocytosis with Pyropoikilocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turan Bayhan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 17-day-old boy was admitted because of jaundice and anemia. He was born weighing 2900 g subsequent to a term gestation as the fourth child of first-degree cousin parents. The previous history revealed the administration of phototherapy for 4 days starting from the first day of life. Complete blood count revealed hemoglobin (Hb of 6.9 g/dL, hematocrit of 19.8%, mean corpuscular volume (MCV of 87.5 fL, red cell distribution width (RDW of 37%, white blood cell count of 11.4x109/L, and platelet count of 263x109/L. Corrected reticulocyte count was 5.3%. Peripheral blood smear revealed polychromasia and pyropoikilocytosis. Direct antibody test was negative. Erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, and pyrimidine 5’ nucleotidase levels were normal. An erythrocyte transfusion was administered with a diagnosis of non-immune hemolytic anemia and the patient was discharged at the 26th day of life with initiation of folic acid. During his outpatient followup, he required erythrocyte transfusions 2 more times and the last transfusion was performed when he was 3 months old. At a visit 3 months after the last transfusion, his blood count was as follows: Hb of 9.5 g/dL, hematocrit of 28.2%, MCV of 68.2 fL, and RDW of 30.5%. Erythrocyte osmotic fragility was found to be normal and Hb electrophoresis revealed Hb F of 6.6% and Hb A2 of 1.7%. Upon physical examination he had mild jaundice and no splenomegaly. The parents’ blood counts were within normal ranges. Peripheral blood smear revealed prominent elliptocytes and occasional microcytic and fragmented erythrocytes with poikilocytosis (Figure 1. The clinical findings and laboratory results were diagnostic for the hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP type of hereditary elliptocytosis (HE, but in vitro fragmentation testing was not performed

  9. Ampliación de la galería de arte Albright – Knox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skidmore - Owings - Merrill, Arquitectos

    1963-06-01

    Full Text Available Owings and Merrill, architects. This new extension houses an exhibition hall, an auditorium seating 350 people, lecture rooms, services, dining room, and a club room. The modifications to the old building have provided space for the Education Department and the Library. The auditorium is enclosed with large grey glass panels, and enables the beautiful park scenery to be viewed from within. From the outside, however, these glass surfaces act as mirrors, and reflect the surrounding views. To prevent the sun from penetrating, black curtains have been fitted. The seats of the auditorium are covered with vermillion nylon cloth, and the floor has a light yellow carpet. The ground floor is constructed round an open air garden-court, which contains a number of sculptures, especially one by Henry Moore, and the Manipulator, by Reg Butler. Large glazed areas are a feature of the building surface round the garden-court. The buildings are connected with each other at the level of the ground floor, and we feel that the outstanding success of the Albright Knox Gallery is due to the surprising harmony achieved between the old and the new buildings.La nueva ampliación alberga: una sala de exposiciones, un auditorio con capacidad para 350 personas sentadas, salas de conferencias, servicios, comedor y estar-club. La renovación realizada en el edificio antiguo ha proporcionado espacios para el Departamento de educación y la biblioteca. El auditorio, cerrado con amplios cristales grises, permite a los visitantes del interior contemplar el bello paisaje del parque, mientras que en el exterior actúa como un espejo, que refleja los alrededores. Para impedir el paso de los rayos solares dispone de cortinas negras; los asientos están tapizados en nylon bermellón y el piso va cubierto con moquetas beige. La planta baja rodea, mediante espacios también acristalados, el patio-jardín al aire libre, dedicado a escultura, en el que destacan una de Henry Moore, y el

  10. Hereditary iron and copper deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Flaten, Trond Peder; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary deposition of iron (primary haemochromatosis) or copper (Wilson's disease) are autosomal recessive metabolic disease characterized by progressive liver pathology and subsequent involvement of various other organs. The prevalence of primary haemochromatosis is approximately 0.5%, about...

  11. Gene Testing for Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAQ NATIONAL ATAXIA FOUNDATION FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT... Gene Testing for Hereditary Ataxia This fact sheet provides an overview of gene testing for ataxia. It also addresses commonly asked ...

  12. Impact of endocrine hyperfunction and phosphate wasting on bone in McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, R; Matarazzo, P; Andreo, M; Defilippi, C; de Sanctis, C

    2002-01-01

    Skin dysplasia, as café-au-lait spots, bone fibrous dysplasia and peripheral endocrinopathies are the main clinical features of McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS). This illness is due to activating mutations of the Gsalpha protein and is spread with a mosaic pattern in affected tissues that consist of intermixed areas of normal and mutated cells. Peripheral endocrine secretion, free of hypothalamic pituitary control, is the hallmark of the endocrine syndromes: precocious puberty, Cushing's syndrome, hyperthyroidism and gigantism/acromegaly. In addition, phosphate wasting as hyperphosphaturia is often present. The impact of hormonal hypersecretion and phosphate loss on the bones of patients with MAS is poorly understood both in normal and fibrous bone tissue. As hypercortisolism and hyperthyroidism increase bone resorption, hyperestrogenism and growth hormone hypersecretion stimulate bone growth and mineralization, and phosphate wasting reduces bone mineral content. All these actions can be exerted at varying times and degrees in a single patient on lesional and non-lesional bones. Sonographic evidence of multiple diffused hyperechogenic spots in the testes of patients with MAS do not seem to be related to alterations in calcium-phosphate metabolism but rather to zonal dysplasia/hyperplasia of testicular tissue. PMID:12199350

  13. A Case of Atypical McCune-Albright Syndrome with Vaginal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Hovsepian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS is a rare non-inherited disorder characterized by the clinical triad of precocious puberty, cafe-au-lait skin lesions, and fibrous dysplasia of bone. Case Presentation:We report a girl with MAS, presenting initially with vaginal bleeding at the age of 17 months. Ultrasonography revealed unilateral ovarian cysts and ureteral and ovarian enlargement. Considering the clinical and paraclinical findings, the patient diagnosed as a case of gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty was treated with medroxy-progestrone acetate (MPA for three months. During the follow up, recurrent episodes of bleeding, ovarian activation and cyst formation, as well as breast size development were reported. At the age of 5.5 years, fibrous dysplasia was detected, which in coexistence with precocious puberty confirmed the diagnosis of MAS. The patient had no cafe-au-lait skin macles during follow up. Conclusion:Considering that clinical manifestations of MAS appear later in the course of recurrent periods of ovarian activation and cyst formation, a careful clinical observation and follow up of patients is necessary and the diagnosis of MAS must be kept in mind in cases with gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty.

  14. [Pubertas praecox in McCune-Albright syndrome--case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stier, B; Ranke, M B

    1987-01-01

    A patient is presented with the syndrome of polyostatic fibrous dysplasia and precocious puberty (PP). The endocrinopathy in McCune-Albright-syndrome (MAS) has formerly been ascribed to a central (hypothalamic) origin. In this patient the PP was caused by a luteinized follicular cyst, suggesting autonomous hyperfunction of this gland. High serum estradiol levels returned to normal after cystectomie. The review of the literature suggests the peripheral origin of PP to be more frequent in younger age groups (under 6 years). It appears possible that peripheral hypersecretion of sexual steroids may cause a rise of gonadotropins secondarily followed by true PP in older children provided such longstanding hypersecretion leads to a generalized maturation of the body including skeletal maturation. Treatment in pseudoprecocious puberty seems to be not effective with LH-RH-analogues. Cyproteroneacetate alone or in combination with a LH-RH analogue gave the impression of being more successful. Cystectomy can lead to a cure but a recurrence of ovarian cysts is possible. A combination of surgical and drug therapy may be beneficial under these circumstances. Until now there is no sufficient treatment for polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. PMID:3316827

  15. Macroorchidism in an Indian boy with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Vaishakhi T; Khadilkar, Vaman V; Khadilkar, Anuradha V; Kinare, Arun S

    2011-09-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is defined by the clinical triad of fibrous dysplasia of bone (FD), café-au-lait spots and precocious puberty (PP). It is a rare disease with estimated prevalence between 1/100,000 and 1/1,000,000. The authors report a case of MAS in an Indian boy who had history of unilateral macroorchidism (but no other signs of MAS) since birth, then presented with PP, FD and café-au-lait spots at 6 years of age. On examination he had asymmetry of the face, café-au-lait spots and signs of sexual precocity with a right testicular volume of 25 ml (left 8 ml). Investigations revealed suppressed gonadotropins with elevated testosterone levels. Skeletal survey showed dysplastic changes involving multiple bones and advanced bone age. Reports of MAS in a boy with unilateral macroorchidism are scarce. Thus, unilateral macroorchidism at birth in a baby may be a feature of MAS and should be followed up with care.

  16. Applicability of Fractal Dimension Analysis in Dental Radiographs for the Evaluation of Renal Osteodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Maurício Anderson; Ribeiro Rosa, Edvaldo Antônio; Johann, Aline Cristina Batista Rodrigues; Grégio, Ana Maria Trindade; Trevilatto, Paula Cristina; Azevedo-Alanis, Luciana Reis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To test the capacity of the digital tool, fractal dimension (FD) analysis, in identifying subtle differences in bone pattern in patients with renal osteodystrophy (RO), correlated with the time of hemodialysis, in different regions of interest, delineated on panoramic and periapical radiographs. Study design: A total of 34 patients with chronic renal disease undergoing hemodialysis were submitted to panoramic and periapical radiographs. Different regions of interest were delineated on the mandibular body and ramus. FD was analyzed by means of the software program ImageJ and correlated with the time of hemodialysis. Results: The sample consisted of 34 subjects. The time of hemodialysis varied from 1 to 286 months. There was significant correlation between the time of hemodialysis and the FD values in the region delineated in the mandibular angle (r = 0.498; p = 0.003) and this was shown in the periapical radiographs as well (r = -0.349; p = 0.043). Conclusions: FD analysis was a useful tool in detecting alterations caused by RO in bone pattern, in panoramic and periapical radiographs.

  17. Differences in Bone Quality between High versus Low Turnover Renal Osteodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Daniel S. [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Pienkowski, David [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Faugere, Marie-Claude [Albert B. Chandler Medical Center; Malluche, Hartmut H. [Albert B. Chandler Medical Center

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal bone turnover is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but its effects on bone quality remain unclear. This study sought to quantify the relationship between abnormal bone turnover and bone quality. Iliac crest bone biopsies were obtained from CKD-5 patients on dialysis with low (n=18) or high (n=17) turnover, and from volunteers (n=12) with normal turnover and normal kidney function. Histomorphometric methods were used to quantify the microstructural parameters; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation were used to quantify the material and mechanical properties in bone. Reduced mineral-to-matrix ratio, mineral crystal size, stiffness and hardness were observed in bone with high turnover compared to bone with normal or low turnover. Decreased cancellous bone volume and trabecular thickness were seen in bone with low turnover compared to bone with normal or high turnover. Bone quality, as defined by its microstructural, material, and mechanical properties, is related to bone turnover. These data suggest that turnover related alterations in bone quality may contribute to the known diminished mechanical competence of bone in CKD patients, albeit from different mechanisms for bone with high (material abnormality) vs. low (microstructural alteration) turnover. The present findings suggest that improved treatments for renal osteodystrophy should seek to avoid low or high bone turnover and aim for turnover rates as close to normal as possible.

  18. Studies of the skeletal pathophysiology of renal osteodystrophy using nucleomedical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone scintigraphy with Tc-99m labeled phosphorous compounds has been performed in a series of 160 long-term hemodialysis patients with chronic renal failure. Renal osteodystrophy (ROD) was classified by five features of RI uptake in the entire skeleton: type A (low turn-over type) - a relatively decreased RI uptake in the bone tissue and an increased uptake in the soft tissue; type C (normal type) - normal findings; type D (osteomalacia type) - a strong RI uptake in the costochondral joints; type F (hyperparathyroid type) - strong RI uptake in the skull and submandible; and type G (calcification type) - an ectopic calcification. The group of type F had elevated levels of both alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and parathyroid hormones (PTH); on the contrary, both ALP and PTH were decreased in the group of type A. This suggested an increased and decreased bone metabolism in type F and A, respectively. The group of type D was characterized by having hypophosphatemia. Pathophysiologic types of ROD varied from day to day. Bone mineral density (BMD) tended to decrease in the radius. For the spine, however, BMD increased in some cases and decreased in the other cases with prolonging the duration of hemodialysis. Bone scintigraphy and BMD determination in both the cortical and cavernous bone tissue may provide integrated information about ROD presenting with heterogeneity of the entire skeleton. (Namekawa, K)

  19. Effect of rapamycin on hepatic osteodystrophy in rats with portasystemic shunting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Schalk W van der Merwe; Del Kahn; Enid G Shephard; Maritha J Kotze; Nico P de Villiers; Stephen Hough; Maria M Conradie; Robert Bond; Brenda J Olivier; Elongo Fritz; Martin Nieuwoudt; Rhena Delport; Tomas Slavik; Gert Engelbrecht

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study if T-cell activation related to portasystemic shunting causes osteodast-mediated bone loss through RANKL-dependent pathways. We also investigated if T-cell inhibition using rapamycin would protect against bone loss in rats.METHODS: Portasystemic shunting was performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats and rapamycin 0.1 mg/kg was administered for 15 wk by gavage. Rats received powderized chow and supplemental feeds to prevent the effects of malnutrition on bone composition. Weight gain and growth was restored after surgery in shunted animals. At termination, biochemical parameters of bone turnover and quantitative bone histology were assessed. Markers of T-cell activation, inflammatory cytokine production, and RANKL-dependent pathways were measured. In addition, the roles of IGF-1 and hypogonadism were investigated.RESULTS: Portasystemic shunting caused low turnover osteoporosis that was RANKL independent. Bone resorbing cytokine levels, including IL-1, IL-6 and TNFα,were not increased in serum and TNFα and RANKL expression were not upregulated in PBMC. Portasystemic shunting increased the circulating CD8+ T-cell population. Rapamycin decreased the circulating CD8+T-cell population, increased CD8+ CD25+ T-regulatory cell population and improved all parameters of bone turnover.CONCLUSION: Osteoporosis caused by portasystemic shunting may be partially ameliorated by rapamycin in the rat model of hepatic osteodystrophy.

  20. [Advances in hereditary hemochromatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Graciela; Cadiz, Claudia; Lachman, J; Cornelio, Cecilia

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary hemocromatosis (HH) is a genetic disease with a recessive autosomic pattern, in which inadequate iron (Fe) absorption is made by the intestinal cell. As consequence of that process, takes place a progressive accumulation of metal in different organs, predominantly in the liver. This leads to an alteration of liver structure and function: cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma (1). The gene implied in this pathology was identified (HFE) in 1996. This codes a similar molecule to the mayor histocompatibility complex type 1(MHC-T1 like) that can modulate the transport of PE binding the transferrin receptor. This progress allows a deep understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of the homeostasis of the Fe and its alterations in the NH. The diagnosis of disease by means of a genetic test let to carry out a familiar screening and to detect asymptomatic carriers. This makes possible to begin the appropriate treatment at early stages of the disease in order to avoid its consequences and offering a better quality of life to these patients.

  1. Adult hereditary fructose intolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Ismail Yasawy; Ulrich Richard Folsch; Wolfgang Eckhard Schmidt; Michael Schwend

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an underrecognized,preventable life-threatening condition. It is an autosomal recessive disorder with subnormal activity of aldolase B in the liver, kidney and small bowel. Symptoms are present only after the ingestion of fructose, which leads to brisk hypoglycemia, and an individual with continued ingestion will exhibit vomiting,abdominal pain, failure to thrive, and renal and liver failure. A diagnosis of HFI was made in a 50-year-old woman on the basis of medical history, response to Ⅳ fructose intolerance test, demonstration of aldolase B activity reduction in duodenal biopsy, and molecular analysis of leukocyte DNA by PCR showed homozygosity for two doses of mutant gene. HFI may remain undiagnosed until adult life and may lead to disastrous complications following inadvertent fructose or sorbitol infusion. Several lethal episodes of HFI following sorbitol and fructose infusion have been reported. The diagnosis can only be suspected by taking a careful dietary history, and this can present serious complications.

  2. Treatment of hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Nancy J

    2012-10-01

    The hereditary optic neuropathies are inherited disorders in which optic nerve dysfunction is a prominent feature in the phenotypic expression of disease. Optic neuropathy may be primarily an isolated finding, such as in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dominant optic atrophy, or part of a multisystem disorder. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the hereditary optic neuropathies involve mitochondrial dysfunction owing to mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA that encodes proteins essential to mitochondrial function. Effective treatments are limited, and current management includes therapies directed at enhancing mitochondrial function and preventing oxidative damage, as well as genetic counselling, and supportive and symptomatic measures. New therapies, including gene therapy, are emerging via animal models and human clinical trials. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, in particular, provides a unique model for testing promising treatments owing to its characteristic sequential bilateral involvement and the accessibility of target tissue within the eye. Lessons learned from treatment of the hereditary optic neuropathies may have therapeutic implications for other disorders of presumed mitochondrial dysfunction. In this Review, the natural history of the common inherited optic neuropathies, the presumed pathogenesis of several of these disorders, and the literature to date regarding potential therapies are summarized.

  3. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  4. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Changes Mutations in several genes, including the ACVRL1 , ENG , and SMAD4 genes, cause hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia . Hereditary ... type 1 is caused by mutations in the ENG gene. Type 2 is caused by mutations in ...

  5. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) Pulmonary & PH Hypertension Did you know that if you have HHT, you are at risk for pulmonary ... options for patients in the future. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia-Associated PH, or HHT-Associated PH My doctor ...

  6. The relevance of mineralization lag time in the evaluation of histologic changes in renal osteodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbey, N P; Chazan, J A; London, M R; Pono, L; Abuelo, J G

    1993-04-01

    We examined bone biopsies from 47 patients on chronic hemodialysis, and analyzed the histomorphometric and biochemical findings and histologic quantitation of bone aluminium, looking primarily at mineralization lag time (Mlt) to evaluate its usefulness in categorization of renal osteodystrophy (ROD). The patients were categorized as having either relatively normal Mlt ( 100 days, n = 13 patients). The group with relatively normal Mlt showed significantly higher C-terminal parathyroid hormone (PTHc) levels (26,141 +/- 19,270 vs 7,226 +/- 6,073 and 4,434 +/- 4,000 pg/ml) than the moderately or markedly prolonged Mlt groups (p < .01) and was associated with histologic characteristics of osteitis fibrosa or mild hyperparathyroidism (BFR/BS range 0.146-0.947 mcm3/mcm2/d). The group with markedly prolonged Mlt included one patient with classic and 11 with adynamic osteomalacia (BFR/BS range 0.009-0.099) and had greater bone aluminum (Al.S/OS 35.3 +/- 26.7% vs 7.2 +/- 9.0%) than the normal Mlt group (p < .01). The group with moderately prolonged Mlt included two patients with aplastic bone disease (Mlt 80.0 and 84.6 days, and Al.S/OS 100.0 and 72.3%) and 11 patients with features of hyperparathyroidism and osteomalacia (BFR/BS range 0.068-0.243) with variable but generally intermediate bone aluminum deposition (Al.S/OS 22.5 +/- 19.9%). Like BFR/BS and other dynamic parameters Mlt correlates with morphologic types of ROD which primarily reflect bone turnover, but it may also suggest varying degrees of mineralization impairment in a spectrum ranging from high to low turnover types of ROD. Its usefulness in this respect should not be overlooked.

  7. Nutritional education for management of osteodystrophy: Impact on serum phosphorus, quality of life, and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavetian, Mirey; Elzein, Hafez; Rizk, Rana; Jibai, Rime; de Vries, Nanne

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Osteodystrophy management includes dietary phosphorus restriction, which may limit protein intake, exacerbate malnutrition-inflammation syndrome and mortality among hemodialysis patients. Methods A multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted in Lebanon, to test the hypothesis that intensive nutrition education focused on phosphorus-to-protein balance will improve patient outcomes. Six hemodialysis units were randomly assigned to the trained hospital dietitian (THD) protocol (210 patients). Six others (184 patients) were divided equally according to the patients' dialysis shifts and assigned to Dedicated Dietitian (DD) and Control protocols. Patients in the THD group received nutrition education from hospital dietitians who were trained by the study team on renal dietetics, but had limited time for hemodialysis patients. Patients in the DD group received individualized nutritional education on dietary phosphorus and protein management for 6 months (2-hour/patient/month) from study renal dietitians. Patients in the control group continued receiving routine care from hospital dietitians who had limited time for these patients and were blinded to the study. Serum phosphorus (mmol/L), malnutrition-inflammation score (MIS), health-related quality of life (HRQOL) index and length of hospital stay (LOS) were assessed at T0 (baseline), T1 (postintervention) and T2 (post6 month follow up). Findings Only the DD protocol significantly improved serum phosphorus (T0:1.78 ± 0.5, T1:1.63 ± 0.46, T2:1.69 ± 0.53), 3 domains of the HRQOL and maintained MIS at T1, but this protective effect resolved at T2. The LOS significantly dropped for all groups. Discussion The presence of competent renal dietitians fully dedicated to hemodialysis units was superior over the other protocols in temporarily improving patient outcomes. PMID:26843138

  8. The relevance of mineralization lag time in the evaluation of histologic changes in renal osteodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbey, N P; Chazan, J A; London, M R; Pono, L; Abuelo, J G

    1993-04-01

    We examined bone biopsies from 47 patients on chronic hemodialysis, and analyzed the histomorphometric and biochemical findings and histologic quantitation of bone aluminium, looking primarily at mineralization lag time (Mlt) to evaluate its usefulness in categorization of renal osteodystrophy (ROD). The patients were categorized as having either relatively normal Mlt ( 100 days, n = 13 patients). The group with relatively normal Mlt showed significantly higher C-terminal parathyroid hormone (PTHc) levels (26,141 +/- 19,270 vs 7,226 +/- 6,073 and 4,434 +/- 4,000 pg/ml) than the moderately or markedly prolonged Mlt groups (p < .01) and was associated with histologic characteristics of osteitis fibrosa or mild hyperparathyroidism (BFR/BS range 0.146-0.947 mcm3/mcm2/d). The group with markedly prolonged Mlt included one patient with classic and 11 with adynamic osteomalacia (BFR/BS range 0.009-0.099) and had greater bone aluminum (Al.S/OS 35.3 +/- 26.7% vs 7.2 +/- 9.0%) than the normal Mlt group (p < .01). The group with moderately prolonged Mlt included two patients with aplastic bone disease (Mlt 80.0 and 84.6 days, and Al.S/OS 100.0 and 72.3%) and 11 patients with features of hyperparathyroidism and osteomalacia (BFR/BS range 0.068-0.243) with variable but generally intermediate bone aluminum deposition (Al.S/OS 22.5 +/- 19.9%). Like BFR/BS and other dynamic parameters Mlt correlates with morphologic types of ROD which primarily reflect bone turnover, but it may also suggest varying degrees of mineralization impairment in a spectrum ranging from high to low turnover types of ROD. Its usefulness in this respect should not be overlooked. PMID:8491052

  9. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; van Overeem Hansen, Thomas; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities in the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). However, only approximately 25% of cases of HBOC can be ascribed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Recently, exome sequencing has uncovered substantial locus heterogeneity among...

  10. New treatments of hereditary blindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Rosenberg, Thomas; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life and a structura......Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life and a...... structurally intact retinal tissue to adult life with a complete loss of photoreceptors. It must be assumed that some of the trials will succeed in producing new therapies and action must be taken to refine and accelerate diagnostics and to preserve therapeutic potential in blind people....

  11. Hereditary Methemoglobinemia: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    T Bostan; MT Haghi Ashtiani; A. Khodadad

    1995-01-01

    An 11-year old girl is presented by whom a generalized cyanosis since birth was noticed and hereditary Methemoglobinemia diagnosed when she was 3 years old. She is treated successfully with daily oral vitamin C administration. After 8 years of treatment she shows normal physical and mental development. It is recommended to use screening test for Methemoglobinemia by all cyanotic children, which is simple and specific.

  12. Hereditary progressive chorea without dementia.

    OpenAIRE

    Schady, W; Meara, R J

    1988-01-01

    A family with hereditary non-Huntington's chorea is presented. Transmission was autosomal dominant with variable penetrance. Chorea commenced in childhood and affected predominantly the head, face and upper limbs. Dysarthria appeared later, followed in two family members by elements of an axial dystonia. There was no intellectual impairment. Unlike previously described families, symptoms progressed steadily up to the eighth decade, causing considerable physical disability.

  13. An overview of hereditary pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebours, Vinciane; Lévy, Philippe; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatitis. The prevalence was evaluated to 0.3/100000 in Western Countries. Genetic disorders are due to mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). Since 1996, more than 30 mutations were found. The three more common mutations are R122H, N29I and A16V. First symptoms begin since childhood, mainly before 10 years old. Main symptoms are pancreatic pain and acute pancreatitis (>70%). CP morphological changes as pancreatic calcifications are diagnosed at a median age of 22-25 years. Exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency occurred in 34% and 26% at a median age of 29 and 38 years. No clinical differences exist according to the mutation type. No excess of mortality in hereditary pancreatitis population compared to general population was found, despite a real risk of cancer. The cumulative risks of pancreatic cancer at 50, 60 and, 75 years are 10%, 18.7% and, 53.5%, respectively. The relative risk of cancer increases in smokers and is evaluated to 8.55. Hereditary pancreatitis diagnosis permits to propose an adapted management in expert centres.

  14. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does...... of hereditary angioedema. The case illustrates how clinicians can have difficulties in handling patients with rare diseases, especially in the emergency care setting....

  15. Fibrous dysplasia and McCune–Albright syndrome: Imaging for positive and differential diagnoses, prognosis, and follow-up guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousson, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.bousson@lrb.aphp.fr [Radiologie Ostéo-Articulaire, AP-HP, Hôpital Lariboisière, 2 rue Ambroise Paré, 75010 Paris (France); Université Paris VII Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité (France); Rey-Jouvin, Caroline, E-mail: c.reyjouvin@gmail.com [Rhumatologie Viggo Petersen, AP-HP, Hôpital Lariboisière, 2 rue Ambroise Paré, 75010 Paris (France); Université Paris VII Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité (France); Laredo, Jean-Denis, E-mail: jean-denis.laredo@lrb.aphp.fr [Radiologie Ostéo-Articulaire, AP-HP, Hôpital Lariboisière, 2 rue Ambroise Paré, 75010 Paris (France); Université Paris VII Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité (France); Le Merrer, Martine, E-mail: martine.lemerrer@inserm.fr [Service de génétique médicale, AP-HP, Hôpital Necker – Enfants malades, 149 rue de Sèvres, 75743 Paris Cedex 15 (France); Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine, E-mail: nadine.martin-duverneuil@psl.aphp.fr [Service de Neuroradiologie, AP-HP, Hôpital Pitié Salpêtrière, 47 Boulevard de l’hôpital, 75013 Paris (France); and others

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The radiologist plays a critical role at all steps of the management of patients with fibrous dysplasia (FD) and McCune–Albright syndrome (MAS). • Specific recommendations are provided as key points for the diagnosis, prognosis, and follow-up of patients with FD/MAS. • We believe the dissemination of these recommendations within the radiology community may substantially improve the management of patients with these rare but potentially disabling conditions. - Abstract: Purpose: The radiologist plays a critical role at all steps of the management of patients with fibrous dysplasia (FD) and McCune–Albright syndrome (MAS). The development of a standardized approach to the management of FD/MAS is crucial given the low incidence and multiple clinical presentations of these conditions. Our aim was to develop recommendations for bone imaging in FD/MAS management. Materials and methods: The establishment of National Reference Centers in France as part of a Health Ministry program for orphan diseases has triggered the development of recommendations for the clinical management of FD/MAS. We used a well-established robust methodological approach involving an extensive literature review by a multidisciplinary working group (20 healthcare professionals) and scoring by a peer-review group (20 healthcare professionals different from the 20 previous ones). There were four phases: a systematic literature review, drafting of initial recommendations, peer-review of this initial draft, and drafting of the final recommendations. Results: Fifty-seven specific recommendations are provided as key points for the diagnosis, prognosis, and follow-up of patients with FD/MAS. Issues of special interest are highlighted in the discussion, and areas in which future research is needed are identified. Conclusion: We believe the dissemination of these recommendations within the radiology community may facilitate communication between radiologists and other healthcare

  16. Fibrous dysplasia and McCune–Albright syndrome: Imaging for positive and differential diagnoses, prognosis, and follow-up guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The radiologist plays a critical role at all steps of the management of patients with fibrous dysplasia (FD) and McCune–Albright syndrome (MAS). • Specific recommendations are provided as key points for the diagnosis, prognosis, and follow-up of patients with FD/MAS. • We believe the dissemination of these recommendations within the radiology community may substantially improve the management of patients with these rare but potentially disabling conditions. - Abstract: Purpose: The radiologist plays a critical role at all steps of the management of patients with fibrous dysplasia (FD) and McCune–Albright syndrome (MAS). The development of a standardized approach to the management of FD/MAS is crucial given the low incidence and multiple clinical presentations of these conditions. Our aim was to develop recommendations for bone imaging in FD/MAS management. Materials and methods: The establishment of National Reference Centers in France as part of a Health Ministry program for orphan diseases has triggered the development of recommendations for the clinical management of FD/MAS. We used a well-established robust methodological approach involving an extensive literature review by a multidisciplinary working group (20 healthcare professionals) and scoring by a peer-review group (20 healthcare professionals different from the 20 previous ones). There were four phases: a systematic literature review, drafting of initial recommendations, peer-review of this initial draft, and drafting of the final recommendations. Results: Fifty-seven specific recommendations are provided as key points for the diagnosis, prognosis, and follow-up of patients with FD/MAS. Issues of special interest are highlighted in the discussion, and areas in which future research is needed are identified. Conclusion: We believe the dissemination of these recommendations within the radiology community may facilitate communication between radiologists and other healthcare

  17. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet Educational Resources (6 links) Disease InfoSearch: Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy Dutch Neuromuscular Research Centre JAMA Patient Page: Peripheral Neuropathy ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA Enable Javascript to view the ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA is a condition characterized by ...

  19. The clinical spectrum of renal osteodystrophy in 57 chronic hemodialysis patients: a correlation between biochemical parameters and bone pathology findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazan, J A; Libbey, N P; London, M R; Pono, L; Abuelo, J G

    1991-02-01

    Fifty-nine chronic hemodialysis patients who had been on dialysis for an average of 77 months underwent bone biopsies and the pathologic findings were correlated with biochemical and demographic data. All but two had evidence of renal osteodystrophy, 23 with osteitis fibrosa (OF), 19 with osteomalacia and/or adynamic disease (OM/AD), and 15 with mixed osteodystrophy (MOD). Patients in each group were similar with regard to age, sex distribution, duration of dialysis, unstimulated serum aluminum, calcium and phosphorus. Patients with osteitis fibrosa (OF) had statistically higher DFO stimulated aluminum, alkaline phosphatase and PTHC levels than the other two groups although there was marked individual variation. The bone biopsies were also evaluated for the amount of aluminum deposited in the osteoid seam. All 23 of the patients with OF and 11 of the 15 patients with MOD had no, mild, or minimal aluminum deposition but 12 of the 19 patients with OM/AD had moderate to marked aluminum deposition. Patients with minimal to mild aluminum deposition were similar in age, duration of dialysis, sex distribution, unstimulated and DFO stimulated aluminum levels, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase to those with moderate to marked deposition but had significantly higher parathormone levels. All patients had been treated in a similar fashion regarding diet, oral phosphate binders and vitamin D; therefore, the observed differences in bone pathology were not readily explicable. However, patients who were found to have osteitis fibrosa and those with minimal to mild aluminum deposition had significantly higher parathormone levels when compared with patients in the other groups at the inception of dialysis.

  20. The clinical spectrum of renal osteodystrophy in 57 chronic hemodialysis patients: a correlation between biochemical parameters and bone pathology findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazan, J A; Libbey, N P; London, M R; Pono, L; Abuelo, J G

    1991-02-01

    Fifty-nine chronic hemodialysis patients who had been on dialysis for an average of 77 months underwent bone biopsies and the pathologic findings were correlated with biochemical and demographic data. All but two had evidence of renal osteodystrophy, 23 with osteitis fibrosa (OF), 19 with osteomalacia and/or adynamic disease (OM/AD), and 15 with mixed osteodystrophy (MOD). Patients in each group were similar with regard to age, sex distribution, duration of dialysis, unstimulated serum aluminum, calcium and phosphorus. Patients with osteitis fibrosa (OF) had statistically higher DFO stimulated aluminum, alkaline phosphatase and PTHC levels than the other two groups although there was marked individual variation. The bone biopsies were also evaluated for the amount of aluminum deposited in the osteoid seam. All 23 of the patients with OF and 11 of the 15 patients with MOD had no, mild, or minimal aluminum deposition but 12 of the 19 patients with OM/AD had moderate to marked aluminum deposition. Patients with minimal to mild aluminum deposition were similar in age, duration of dialysis, sex distribution, unstimulated and DFO stimulated aluminum levels, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase to those with moderate to marked deposition but had significantly higher parathormone levels. All patients had been treated in a similar fashion regarding diet, oral phosphate binders and vitamin D; therefore, the observed differences in bone pathology were not readily explicable. However, patients who were found to have osteitis fibrosa and those with minimal to mild aluminum deposition had significantly higher parathormone levels when compared with patients in the other groups at the inception of dialysis. PMID:2019018

  1. Relative functions of Gαs and its extra-large variant XLαs in the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastepe, M

    2012-09-01

    Gαs is a ubiquitous signaling protein necessary for the actions of many neurotransmitters, hormones, and autocrine/paracrine factors. Loss-of-function mutations within the gene encoding Gαs, GNAS, are responsible for multiple human diseases, including Albright's Hereditary Osteodystrophy, progressive osseous heteroplasia, and pseudohypoparathyroidism. Gain-of-function mutations in the same gene are found in various endocrine and nonendocrine tumors and in patients with McCune-Albright Syndrome and fibrous dysplasia of bone. In addition to Gαs, GNAS gives rise to multiple additional coding and noncoding transcripts. Among those, XLαs is a paternally expressed product that is partially identical to Gαs. This article reviews the cellular actions of Gαs and XLαs, focusing on the significance of XLαs relative to Gαs in mammalian physiology and human disease.

  2. Você conhece esta síndrome? Do you know this syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Helena Proença de Freitas

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A osteodistrofia hereditária de Albright é caracterizada por calcificações cutâneas, obesidade, baixa estatura, braquidactilia associada ao pseudo-hipoparatireoidismo do tipo IA entre outras alterações hormonais como hipotireoidismo e hipogonadismo. O diagnóstico é baseado no quadro clínico associado aos achados de hipocalcemia e níveis elevados de hormônio da paratireóide. Os autores relatam caso em que a avaliação dermatológica foi de grande contribuição para o diagnóstico.Albright hereditary osteodystrophy is characterized by subcutaneous calcification, obesity, short stature, brachydactyly and pseudohypoparathyroidism type IA. Hypothyroidism and hypogonadism may be present. The diagnosis is based on clinical characteristics associated with hypocalcemia and high levels of parathyroid hormone. The authors report a case in which the dermatological evaluation contributed to diagnosis.

  3. Molecular pathogenesis of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingqi; Pu, Chunwen; Lang, Lang; Qiao, Liang; Abdullahi, Mohanud Abukar Haji; Jiang, Chunmeng

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an inherited iron overload disorder characterized by normal iron-driven erythropoiesis and abnormal iron metabolism, leading to excess iron deposited in parenchymal cells of liver, heart, and endocrine glands. Iron hormone, hepcidin, plays a critical role in iron homeostasis through interaction with ferroportin (FPN), a major cellular iron exporter. Hepcidin is encoded by hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (HAMP). Mutations in hepcidin and any genes that regulate the biology of hepcidin, including hemochromatosis genes (HFE), Hemojuvelin (HJV), transferring receptor 2 (TFR2) and FPN, result in hemochromatosis. The identification of hepcidin and its role will provide a better understanding for pathogenesis of HH. PMID:27031690

  4. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P;

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria, unip...

  5. Two cases of hereditary fructose intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Ananth, N; Praveenkumar, G. S.; Rao, K Aravind; Vasanthi; Kakkilaya, Srinivas

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare cause of hepatic cirrhosis in the young. The disorder has a reported frequency of 1 in 20000 live births and no case has been reported from India so far. We report two cases of hereditary fructose intolerance, both with bilateral cataracts and one with cirrhosis of the liver.

  6. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSN/HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders of the peripheral nervous system that predominantly affect the sensory and autonomic neurons. Hallmark features comprise not only prominent sensory signs and symptoms and ulcerative mutilations but also variable autonomic and motor disturbances. Autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance has been reported. Molecular genetics studies have identified disease-causing mutations in 11 genes. Some of the affected proteins have nerve-specific roles but underlying mechanisms have also been shown to involve sphingolipid metabolism, vesicular transport, structural integrity, and transcription regulation. Genetic and functional studies have substantially improved the understanding of the pathogenesis of the HSN/HSAN and will help to find preventive and causative therapies in the future.

  7. The distal hereditary motor neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossor, Alexander M; Kalmar, Bernadett; Greensmith, Linda; Reilly, Mary M

    2012-01-01

    The distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN) comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that share the common feature of a length-dependent predominantly motor neuropathy. Many forms of dHMN have minor sensory abnormalities and/or a significant upper-motor-neuron component, and there is often an overlap with the axonal forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2) and with juvenile forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and hereditary spastic paraplegia. Eleven causative genes and four loci have been identified with autosomal dominant, recessive and X-linked patterns of inheritance. Despite advances in the identification of novel gene mutations, 80% of patients with dHMN have a mutation in an as-yet undiscovered gene. The causative genes have implicated proteins with diverse functions such as protein misfolding (HSPB1, HSPB8, BSCL2), RNA metabolism (IGHMBP2, SETX, GARS), axonal transport (HSPB1, DYNC1H1, DCTN1) and cation-channel dysfunction (ATP7A and TRPV4) in motor-nerve disease. This review will summarise the clinical features of the different subtypes of dHMN to help focus genetic testing for the practising clinician. It will also review the neuroscience that underpins our current understanding of how these mutations lead to a motor-specific neuropathy and highlight potential therapeutic strategies. An understanding of the functional consequences of gene mutations will become increasingly important with the advent of next-generation sequencing and the need to determine the pathogenicity of large amounts of individual genetic data.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency The prevalence of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy is unknown. The Dutch type is the most common, with over 200 ...

  9. Hereditary non-BRCA gynecological tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellone, Valerio G; Paudice, Michele; Varesco, Liliana

    2016-10-01

    Early diagnosis and proper management of gynecologic malignancies represent a challenge in modern oncology. A growing interest has arisen around the gynecological manifestations of hereditary cancer syndromes. In particular, the discovery of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in ovarian cancer and the mismatch repair genes (MMR) in endometrial carcinoma has revolutionized our approach to the diagnosis and screening of women for ovarian and uterine cancers. The clinical, genetic and pathological features of hereditary cancer syndromes with gynecological manifestations are reviewed focusing on Lynch Syndrome, also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC), Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome (PJS), Cowden Syndrome or multiple hamartoma syndrome, Gorlin Syndrome or nevoid basal-cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) and Reed's Syndrome or hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). PMID:26930387

  10. Genetics 101 --The Hereditary Material of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 Genetics 101 — The Hereditary Material of Life Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Genetics is the study of heredity, the process in ...

  11. A Review of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogoş Tiberius

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fructose intolerance is a metabolic disorder with hereditary determinism, clinically manifested on terms of fructose intake. Untreated, hereditary fructose intolerance may result in renal and hepatic failure. Unfortunately, there are no formal diagnostic and surveillance guidelines for this disease. If identified and treated before the occurrence of permanent organ damage, patients can improve their symptoms and self-rated health. Implementation and adherence to a strict fructose free diet is often difficult, but not impossible.

  12. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P;

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria, unip...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations....

  13. Hereditary Transthyretin Amyloidosis in Eight Chinese Families

    OpenAIRE

    Ling-Chao Meng; He Lyu; Wei Zhang; Jing Liu; Zhao-Xia Wang; Yun Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mutations of transthyretin (TTR) cause the most common type of autosomal-dominant hereditary systemic amyloidosis, which occurs worldwide. To date, more and more mutations in the TTR gene have been reported. Some variations in the clinical presentation are often observed in patients with the same mutation or the patients in the same family. The purpose of this study was to find out the clinicopathologic and genetic features of Chinese patients with hereditary TTR amyloidosis. ...

  14. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  15. Hereditary Predispositions to Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Bannon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS are heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, bone marrow dysplasia, and peripheral cytopenias. Familial forms of MDS have traditionally been considered rare, especially in adults; however, the increasing availability of somatic and germline genetic analyses has identified multiple susceptibility loci. Bone marrow failure syndromes have been well-described in the pediatric setting, e.g., Fanconi anemia (FA, dyskeratosis congenita (DC, Diamond–Blackfan anemia (DBA, and Shwachman–Diamond syndrome (SBS, hallmarked by clinically-recognizable phenotypes (e.g., radial ray anomalies in FA and significantly increased risks for MDS and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the setting of bone marrow failure. However, additional families with multiple cases of MDS or AML have long been reported in the medical literature with little known regarding potential hereditary etiologies. Over the last decade, genomic investigation of such families has revealed multiple genes conferring inherited risks for MDS and/or AML as the primary malignancy, including RUNX1, ANKRD26, DDX41, ETV6, GATA2, and SRP72. As these syndromes are increasingly appreciated in even apparently de novo presentations of MDS, it is important for hematologists/oncologists to become familiar with these newly-described syndromes. Herein, we provide a review of familial MDS syndromes and practical aspects of management in patients with predisposition syndromes.

  16. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies.

  17. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies. PMID:26951056

  18. Hereditary angioneurotic edema and HLA types in two Danish families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggert, J; Zachariae, H; Svejgaard, E; Svejgaard, A; Kissmeyer-Nielsen, F

    1982-01-01

    HLA types were determined in 19 patients and 9 healthy members of 2 Danish families with hereditary angioneurotic edema. The study revealed no connections between hereditary angioneurotic edema and the HLA system. PMID:7165360

  19. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neuropathy, type V distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V is a progressive disorder that affects nerve cells ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... list from the University of Kansas Medical Center: Muscular Dystrophy / Atrophy GeneReviews (1 link) Hereditary Myopathy with Early Respiratory Failure (HMERF) Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Hereditary myopathy with early ...

  1. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Sun Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes.

  2. Gigantism treated by pure endoscopic endonasal approach in a case of McCune-Albright syndrome with sphenoid fibrous dysplasia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Guive; Jalessi, Maryam; Sarvghadi, Farzaneh; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2013-12-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is an uncommon polyostotic manifestation of fibrous dysplasia in association with at least one endocrinopathy that is mostly associated with precocious puberty and hyperpigmented skin macules named café-au-lait spots. We present an atypical manifestation of McCune-Albright syndrome in a 19-year-old man with the uncommon association of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and gigantism in the absence of café-au-lait spots and precocious puberty. He presented with a height increase to 202 cm in the previous 3 years, which had become more progressive in the few months prior. Physical examination revealed only a mild facial asymmetry; however, a computed tomography (CT) scan discovered vast areas of voluminous bones with ground-glass density and thickening involving the craniofacial bones and skull base. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) found a right stalk shift of the pituitary with a 20 mm pituitary adenoma. We describe the diagnostic and endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for excision of the tumor.

  3. DESIGNING AND OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION AND COFIRING SAWDUST WITH COAL AT ALBRIGHT GENERATING STATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Payette; D. Tillman

    2004-06-01

    During the period July 1, 2000-March 31, 2004, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) conducted an extensive demonstration of woody biomass cofiring at its Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations. This demonstration, cofunded by USDOE and Allegheny, and supported by the Biomass Interest Group (BIG) of EPRI, evaluated the impacts of sawdust cofiring in both cyclone boilers and tangentially-fired pulverized coal boilers. The cofiring in the cyclone boiler--Willow Island Generating Station Unit No.2--evaluated the impacts of sawdust alone, and sawdust blended with tire-derived fuel. The biomass was blended with the coal on its way to the combustion system. The cofiring in the pulverized coal boiler--Albright Generating Station--evaluated the impact of cofiring on emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) when the sawdust was injected separately into the furnace. The demonstration of woody biomass cofiring involved design, construction, and testing at each site. The results addressed impacts associated with operational issues--capacity, efficiency, and operability--as well as formation and control of airborne emissions such as NO{sub x}, sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}2), opacity, and mercury. The results of this extensive program are detailed in this report.

  4. [Clinical practice of hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of neuropathies, the main category becomes Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT), also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN), distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN), and hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy (HSAN). At least 80 genes have been associated with CMT, HMN or HSAN, a precise molecular diagnosis is often needed to make a clinical diagnosis accurately, enable genetic counseling of the patient and understanding of their molecular mechanisms. To identify the mutation in each patient, using a high-throughput NGS, we established a diagnostic procedure involving screening of disease causing genes in CMT, HMN or HSAN.

  5. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan;

    2010-01-01

    Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian canc...

  6. [Hereditary optic neuropathies: clinical and molecular genetic characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanakova, N A; Sheremet, N L; Loginova, A N; Chukhrova, A L; Poliakov, A V

    2013-01-01

    The article presents a review of literature on hereditary optic neuropathies: Leber mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathy, autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive optic neuropathies, X-linked optic atrophy. Clinical and molecular genetic characteristics are covered. Isolated optic neuropathies, as well as hereditary optic disorders, being a part of a complex syndromic disease are described.

  7. HEREDITARY SPASTIC PARAPLEGIA: FROM GENE TO CLINIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Hasan TONEKABONI

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveHereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP is a degenerative disease of genetic origin affecting the corticospinal tracts in the spinal cord. There are three forms of inheritance: Autosomal dominant HSP, Autosomal rececive HSP and X-linked HSP.This disease is characterized by progressive spasticity of leg muscles with varying degrees of stiffness and weakness of other muscle groups. In this review, we will discuss the latest findings on  the pathophysiology of axonal degeneration and all the responsible genetic defects in HSP.Keyword: Hereditary spastic paraplegia, degenerative disease, inheritance

  8. Diagnosis and management of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgia, Reena J; Brown, Kimberly

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a rare genetic disorder that can have significant clinical consequences. Hemochromatosis is associated with iron overload, and can initially be recognized through laboratory testing for serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Genetic testing for the HFE mutation can be performed in patients with elevated iron indices and a suspicion for hemochromatosis or liver disease. The main pathway resulting in iron overload is through altered hepcidin levels. Treatment of patients with the clinical phenotype of hereditary hemochromatosis is commonly through phlebotomy for removal of excess iron stores. This article highlights the current information and data regarding the diagnosis and management of hemochromatosis.

  9. Autosomal recessive hereditary auditory neuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秋菊; 顾瑞; 曹菊阳

    2003-01-01

    evidence of peripheral neuropathy at the time of this writing. Conclusions: In this study, patients with feature of non- syndromic hereditary auditory neuropathy were identified in three Chinese families.Pedigree analysis indicates autosomal recessive inheritances in the pedigrees. The observed inheritance and clinical audiologic findings are different from those previously described for non-syndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. This information should facilitate future molecular candidate genes screening for understanding the mechanism of AN.

  10. [Hereditary sensory and motor neuropathy and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: recent advances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, T

    2011-12-01

    This review summarizes the recent genetic advances in hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy also called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. The different new genes discovered in 2010 and their underlying phenotypes will be presented.

  11. Hereditary spherocytosis presenting as indolent leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed K

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Indolent leg ulcertation, which is the rarest manifestation of hereditary spherocytosis, started at the age of 5 years affecting a 15-year-old boy and his mother is reported. Review of literature showed very few reports from India and abroad. The response to oral folic acid was excellent

  12. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jorn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n = 7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n = 7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C1 esterase inhibitor protein (functional C1 INH). The general population sample (44% response rate...

  13. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jørn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n¿=¿7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n¿=¿7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C1 esterase inhibitor protein (functional C1 INH). The general population sample (44% response rate...

  14. Demyelinating polyneuropathy in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilhuis, H.J.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    We report a patient with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (G11778A mtDNA) and a severe demyelinating neuropathy, for which no other cause except his mitochondrial disorder could be found. The involvement of the peripheral nervous system of patients with LHON, in particular with a 11778 mtDNA, is di

  15. [Sudden blindness: consider Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schieving, J.H.; Vries, L.B.A. de; Hol, F.A.; Stroink, H.

    2008-01-01

    In 3 young male patients, aged 10, 19 and 21 years respectively, sequential, severe, painless bilateral visual loss occurred. Ophthalmological examination revealed no other abnormalities and this delayed the diagnosis Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). LHON is a mitochondrial genetic diseas

  16. MRI in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Lucy; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and a multiple sclerosis (MS)-like illness appear to coexist 50 times more frequently than would be expected by chance. This association of LHON and MS (LMS) raises an important question about whether there could be a common pathophysiological...

  17. Uncommon Cone-Beam Computerized Tomography Findings in McCune-Albright Syndrome in an Implant Candidate Patient: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoshhal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction McCune-Albright syndrome is a rare disease, characterized by triad of cafe-au-lait spots, endocrinopathies and fibrous dysplasia. These bone lesions are usually revealed during the first decade of life, together with pain, pathological fractures and secondary deformities. Case Presentation A 40-year-old female patient presented an opaque lesion at the left mandibular side of face, in a cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT view, during the implant placement evaluations. The patient had experienced precocious puberty and had undergone hysterectomy. Unilateral cafe-au-lait spots were present on patient’s left side of the face. There was no expansion in intraoral examination. The oral mucosa was also normal. No asymmetry was detected. The analysis of sample histopathology confirmed fibrous dysplasia. Discussion In this patient we preferred following up. Afterwards, total surgical lesion resection can be performed. After a long-term follow-up, the area may receive an implant.

  18. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer--An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurzu, Simona; Jung, Ioan; Orlowska, Janina; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Kadar, Zoltan; Turdean, Sabin; Bara, Tivadar

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of gastric cancer varies by up to ten fold throughout the world, and the geographic distribution of hereditary cases is not well explored. Familial clustering is seen in 10% of cases, and approximately 3% of all gastric cancers develop due to hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). In this review, the characteristics of HDGC are presented according to molecular particularities, geographic distribution, and other parameters. Based on our experience and the data from the literature, we discuss the possibility of applying a mutation signature (spectrum) study and adductomic approaches to a comparative carcinogenesis of HDGC. We also provide a comprehensive, up-to-date review of genetic counseling and criteria for screening and surveillance of eligible families.

  19. Cate's Story: Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Megan

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a major cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide and is thought to be responsible for about 10% of cancer-related deaths across the globe. A small proportion of all gastric cancers arise because of a known hereditary syndrome, the most common of which is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). This is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an increased risk of developing diffuse gastric cancer at a young age. The gene responsible for HDGC is CDH1, also known as E-cadherin, a germline mutation conferring an 80% risk of developing gastric cancer during the lifetime of the carrier. Females with germline CDH1 mutations face an additional risk of developing lobular breast cancer, with a reported cumulative risk of 60% by the age of 80 years.
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  20. The biochemical basis of hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouteldja, Nadia; Timson, David J

    2010-04-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare, but potentially lethal, inherited disorder of fructose metabolism, caused by mutation of the aldolase B gene. Treatment currently relies solely on dietary restriction of problematic sugars. Biochemical study of defective aldolase B enzymes is key to revealing the molecular basis of the disease and providing a stronger basis for improved treatment and diagnosis. Such studies have revealed changes in enzyme activity, stability and oligomerisation. However, linking these changes to disease phenotypes has not always been straightforward. This review gives a general overview of the features of hereditary fructose intolerance, then concentrates on the biochemistry of the AP variant (Ala149Pro variant of aldolase B) and molecular pathological consequences of mutation of the aldolase B gene.

  1. Disease expression in women with hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouillet, Laurence; Longhurst, Hilary; Boccon-Gibod, Isabelle;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fluctuations in sex hormones can trigger angioedema attacks in women with hereditary angioedema. Combined oral contraceptive therapies, as well as pregnancy, can induce severe attacks. The course of angioedema may be very variable in different women. STUDY DESIGN: Within the PREHAEAT...... project launched by the European Union, data on 150 postpubertal women with hereditary angioedema were collected in 8 countries, using a patient-based questionnaire. RESULTS: Puberty worsened the disease for 62%. Combined oral contraceptives worsened the disease for 79%, whereas progestogen-only pills...... improved it for 64%. During pregnancies, 38% of women had more attacks, but 30% had fewer attacks. Vaginal delivery was usually uncomplicated. Attacks occurred within 48 hours in only 6% of cases. Those more severely affected during menses had more symptoms during pregnancies, suggesting a hormone...

  2. Hereditary History Preserving Bisimilarity Is Undecidable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurdzinski, Marcin; Nielsen, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    History preserving bisimilarity (hp-bisimilarity) and hereditary history preserving bisimilarity (hhp-bisimilarity) are behavioural equivalences taking into account causal relationships between events of concurrent systems. Their prominent feature is being preserved under action refinement, an op...... introduce an intermediate problem of checking domino bisimilarity for origin constrained tiling systems, whose undecidability is interesting in its own right. We also argue that the undecidability of hhp-bisimilarity holds for finite labelled 1-safe Petri nets....

  3. The Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Haemochromatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Paul; Britton, Laurence J; Powell, Lawrie W

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) is a common genetic disorder of iron metabolism in individuals of Northern European ancestry which leads to inappropriate iron absorption from the intestine and iron overload in susceptible individuals. Iron overload is suggested by elevations in serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. The majority of patients with clinically significant iron overload are homozygous for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene, however only a minority of C282Y homozygotes fully e...

  4. Coexistence of hereditary angioedema and Turner's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Fletcher, A; Weetman, A P

    1998-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman presented to the out-patient clinic with angioedema and type II hereditary angioedema was confirmed immunologically. She also volunteered she had never had a menstrual period and physical examination identified several features of Turner's syndrome. A mosaic karyotype with XY and XO was found on chromosomal analysis and gonadectomy was performed in view of the high risk of gonadoblastoma. After commencing oestrogen at physiological replacement doses, the patient experience...

  5. Hereditary Transthyretin Amyloidosis in Eight Chinese Families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-Chao Meng; He Lyu; Wei Zhang; Jing Liu; Zhao-Xia Wang; Yun Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background:Mutations of transthyretin (TTR) cause the most common type of autosomal-dominant hereditary systemic amyloidosis,which occurs worldwide.To date,more and more mutations in the TTR gene have been reported.Some variations in the clinical presentation are often observed in patients with the same mutation or the patients in the same family.The purpose of this study was to find out the clinicopathologic and genetic features of Chinese patients with hereditary TTR amyloidosis.Methods:Clinical and necessary examination materials were collected from nine patients of eight families with hereditary TTR amyloidosis at Peking University First Hospital from January 2007 to November 2014.Sural nerve biopsies were taken for eight patients and skin biopsies were taken in the calf/upper arm for two patients,for light and electron microscopy examination.The TTR genes from the nine patients were analyzed.Results:The onset age varied from 23 to 68 years.The main manifestations were paresthesia,proximal and/or distal weakness,autonomic dysfunction,cardiomyopathy,vitreous opacity,hearing loss,and glossohypertrophia.Nerve biopsy demonstrated severe loss ofmyelinated fibers in seven cases and amyloid deposits in three.One patient had skin amyloid deposits which were revealed from electron microscopic examination.Genetic analysis showed six kinds of mutations of TTR gene,including Val30Met,Phe33Leu,Ala36Pro,Val30Ala,Phe33Val,and Glu42Gly in exon 2.Conclusions:Since the pathological examinations of sural nerve were negative for amyloid deposition in most patients,the screening for TTR mutations should be performed in all the adult patients,who are clinically suspected with hereditary TTR amyloidosis.

  6. Hereditary fructose intolerance in Brazilian patients

    OpenAIRE

    Eugênia Ribeiro Valadares; Ana Facury da Cruz; Talita Emile Ribeiro Adelino; Viviane de Cássia Kanufre; Maria do Carmo Ribeiro; Maria Goretti Moreira Guimarães Penido; Luciano Amedee Peret Filho; Valadares, Laís Maria Santos Valadares e

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a rare inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism, autosomal recessive, caused by mutations in the gene ALDOB, leading to deficiency of aldolase B. Symptoms begin in the first months of life with the introduction of complementary foods containing fructose, sucrose or sorbitol, often with vomiting, feeding problems and failure to thrive. Prolonged exposure may cause liver and kidney failure, which can lead to death. Treatment consists in remo...

  7. Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia and severe respiratory distress

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Halawa; Abu-Hasan, Mutasim N; ElMallah, Mai K.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia (HMD) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mucoepithelial disruption of the skin, hair and mucous membranes. It results from defective gap junction formation and leads to non-scarring alopecia, mucosal erythema, perineal erythematous intertrigo, involvement of the conjunctival mucosa, and pulmonary disease. We present a case of severe respiratory distress in an initially healthy full term infant born to a mother with HMD. This infant later...

  8. REHABILITATION OF CHILDREN WITH HEREDITARY MYOPATHY

    OpenAIRE

    Vera Anatolevna Erokhina

    2015-01-01

    Now the problem of rehabilitation of children with various hereditary diseases gains special relevance because the number of children with genetic abnormalities is growing. These genetic abnormalities cause changes in the development and functioning of their psyche, for example, create special features of their cognitive processes.The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the psycho-correctional work on the state of psycho-cognitive functions of children with congenital myopathy. ...

  9. Hereditary Transthyretin Amyloidosis in Eight Chinese Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Chao Meng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mutations of transthyretin (TTR cause the most common type of autosomal-dominant hereditary systemic amyloidosis, which occurs worldwide. To date, more and more mutations in the TTR gene have been reported. Some variations in the clinical presentation are often observed in patients with the same mutation or the patients in the same family. The purpose of this study was to find out the clinicopathologic and genetic features of Chinese patients with hereditary TTR amyloidosis. Methods: Clinical and necessary examination materials were collected from nine patients of eight families with hereditary TTR amyloidosis at Peking University First Hospital from January 2007 to November 2014. Sural nerve biopsies were taken for eight patients and skin biopsies were taken in the calf/upper arm for two patients, for light and electron microscopy examination. The TTR genes from the nine patients were analyzed. Results: The onset age varied from 23 to 68 years. The main manifestations were paresthesia, proximal and/or distal weakness, autonomic dysfunction, cardiomyopathy, vitreous opacity, hearing loss, and glossohypertrophia. Nerve biopsy demonstrated severe loss of myelinated fibers in seven cases and amyloid deposits in three. One patient had skin amyloid deposits which were revealed from electron microscopic examination. Genetic analysis showed six kinds of mutations of TTR gene, including Val30Met, Phe33Leu, Ala36Pro, Val30Ala, Phe33Val, and Glu42Gly in exon 2. Conclusions: Since the pathological examinations of sural nerve were negative for amyloid deposition in most patients, the screening for TTR mutations should be performed in all the adult patients, who are clinically suspected with hereditary TTR amyloidosis.

  10. Molecular Diagnostic and Pathogenesis of Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Paulo C.J.L.; Krieger, Jose E.; Pereira, Alexandre C.

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by enhanced intestinal absorption of dietary iron. Without therapeutic intervention, iron overload leads to multiple organ damage such as liver cirrhosis, cardiomyopathy, diabetes, arthritis, hypogonadism and skin pigmentation. Most HH patients carry HFE mutant genotypes: homozygosity for p.Cys282Tyr or p.Cys282Tyr/p.His63Asp compound heterozygosity. In addition to HFE gene, mutations in the genes that encode hem...

  11. Cytotoxic and targeted therapy for hereditary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyevleva, Aglaya G; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2016-01-01

    There is a number of drugs demonstrating specific activity towards hereditary cancers. For example, tumors in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers usually arise via somatic inactivation of the remaining BRCA allele, which makes them particularly sensitive to platinum-based drugs, PARP inhibitors (PARPi), mitomycin C, liposomal doxorubicin, etc. There are several molecular assays for BRCA-ness, which permit to reveal BRCA-like phenocopies among sporadic tumors and thus extend clinical indications for the use of BRCA-specific therapies. Retrospective data on high-dose chemotherapy deserve consideration given some unexpected instances of cure from metastatic disease among BRCA1/2-mutated patients. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is characterized by high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H), increased antigenicity and elevated expression of immunosuppressive molecules. Recent clinical trial demonstrated tumor responses in HNPCC patients treated by the immune checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab. There are successful clinical trials on the use of novel targeted agents for the treatment or rare cancer syndromes, e.g. RET inhibitors for hereditary medullary thyroid cancer, mTOR inhibitors for tumors arising in patients with tuberous sclerosis (TSC), and SMO inhibitors for basal-cell nevus syndrome. Germ-line mutation tests will be increasingly used in the future for the choice of the optimal therapy, therefore turnaround time for these laboratory procedures needs to be significantly reduced to ensure proper treatment planning. PMID:27555886

  12. Medical management of hereditary optic neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eLa Morgia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases of the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e. the maternally inherited Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON and Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA. They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6 for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone. Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising venue that still needs to be validated.

  13. Medical management of hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Morgia, Chiara; Carbonelli, Michele; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Alfredo Arrigo; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases affecting the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e., the maternally inherited Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and dominant optic atrophy (DOA). They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is characterized by an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6) for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are still limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone). Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising avenue that still needs to be validated.

  14. [The role of the immune system in hereditary demyelinating neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäurer, M; Toyka, K V; Martini, R

    2005-06-01

    Hereditary neuropathies, e.g., Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, are inherited diseases of the peripheral nervous system causing chronic progressive motor and sensory dysfunction. Most neuropathies are due to mutations in myelin genes such as PMP22, P0, and the gap junction protein Cx32. Myelin mutant mice are regarded as suitable animal models for several forms of hereditary neuropathies and are important neurobiological tools for the evaluation of pathogenetic and therapeutic concepts in hereditary neuropathies. Using these animal models we could recently show that the immune system is involved in the pathogenesis of hereditary neuropathies. Due to the phenotypic similarities we also consider the immune system important for human inherited neuropathies, in particular since several case reports demonstrate a beneficial effect of immune therapies in patients with hereditary neuropathies. In this review we compare findings from animal models and human disease to elucidate the role of the immune system in hereditary neuropathies.

  15. Non responsive celiac disease due to coexisting hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadia, Lalit; Shivpuri, Deepak

    2012-04-01

    Celiac disease is associated with several genetic disorders, but its association with hereditary fructose intolerance is rare. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare autosomal recessive disease of fructose metabolism presenting as vomiting after intake of fructose. An association between these two distinct genetic gastrointestinal disorders is important as treatment failure of celiac disease calls for careful evaluation for hereditary fructose intolerance. We report a patient with an association of these two disorders.

  16. Hereditary pancreatitis and mutation of the trypsinogen gene

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, P; Keim, V; Zimmer, K.

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic recurrent pancreatitis. A family, in which 11 members had chronic pancreatitis, five had diabetes, and two had pancreatic cancer, was studied, and hereditary pancreatitis was diagnosed in all patients by demonstrating the mutation in exon 3 of the cationic trypsinogen gene (R117H). The clinical implications of genotypic analysis in hereditary pancreatitis are discussed.



  17. Pamidronic acid and cabergoline as effective long-term therapy in a 12-year-old girl with extended facial polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, prolactinoma and acromegaly in McCune-Albright syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Classen Carl; Mix Monika; Kyank Ulrike; Hauenstein Christina; Haffner Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction McCune-Albright syndrome is a complex inborn disorder due to early embryonal postzygotic somatic activating mutations in the GNAS1 gene. The phenotype is very heterogeneous and includes polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, typically involving the facial skull, numerous café-au-lait spots and autonomous hyperfunctions of several endocrine systems, leading to hyperthyroidism, hypercortisolism, precocious puberty and acromegaly. Case presentation Here, we describe a 12-year-old C...

  18. A Method for the Construction of Hereditary Constitutive Equations of Laminates Bases on a Hereditary Constitutive Equation for a Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumansky, Alexander M.; Tairova, Lyudmila P.

    2008-09-01

    A method for the construction of hereditary constitutive equation is proposed for the laminate on the basis of hereditary constitutive equations of a layer. The method is developed from the assumption that in the directions of axes of orthotropy the layer follows elastic behavior, and obeys hereditary constitutive equations under shear. The constitutive equations of the laminate are constructed on the basis of classical laminate theory and algebra of resolvent operators. Effective matrix algorithm and relationships of operator algebra are used to derive visco-elastic stiffness and compliance of the laminate. The example of construction of hereditary constitutive equations of cross-ply carbon fiber-reinforced plastic is presented.

  19. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer (CRC Program in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmejs Arvids

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence and phenotype - genotype characteristics of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Latvia in order to develop the basis of clinical management for patients and their relatives affected by these syndromes. Materials and methods From 02/1999-09/2002 in several hospitals in Latvia cancer family histories were collected from 865 patients with CRC. In families suspected of having a history consistent with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, DNA testing for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes was performed. In addition immunohistochemical (IH examination of the normal and cancer tissue from large bowel tumors for MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression was performed prior to DNA analysis. Results From the 865 CRC cases only 3 (0.35% pedigrees fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and 15 cases (1.73% were suspected of HNPCC. In 69 cases (8% with a cancer family aggregation (CFA were identified. Thus far 27 IH analyses have been performed and in 3 cancers homogenous lack of MSH2 or MSH6 protein expression was found. In one of these cases a mutation in MSH6 was identified. In 18 patients suspected of HNPCC or of matching the Amsterdam II criteria, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC followed by DNA sequencing of any heteroduplexes of the 35 exons comprising both MLH1 and MSH2 was performed revealing 3 mutations. For all of kindreds diagnosed definitively or with a high probability of being an HNPCC family appropriate recommendations concerning prophylactic measures, surveillance and treatment were provided in written form. Conclusions Existing pedigree/clinical data suggest that in Latvia the frequency of HNPCC is around 2% of consecutive colorectal cancer patients. It is crucial that genetic counseling is an integral part of cancer family syndrome management.

  20. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Carcinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benafif, Sarah; Eeles, Rosalind

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumours arise in cells of the diffuse neuroendocrine system and can develop in a number of anatomical sites including the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract. There has been a move away from the use of the term carcinoid tumour to the more appropriate use of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) to highlight the potential for invasion and metastasis associated with some NETs. Although most cases are sporadic, 15-20% of cases are related to a hereditary syndrome, the most common of these being multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN1). Other hereditary syndromes include the following: von Hippel-Lindau (VHL), neurofibromatosis 1 and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), which are all associated with a germline mutation of the associated tumour suppressor gene and an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Familial small intestinal NET (SI NET) is a recently described condition which is also inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. There appears to be more than one causative gene; thus far, only the IPMK gene has been identified as a causative germline mutation. This was identified by carrying out whole-exome sequencing of germline and tumour DNA in a family with multiple members diagnosed with SI NET. Identification of NET predisposition genes in other families via these methods will allow the development of dedicated NET gene panels which can be used to screen NET patients and at-risk relatives for hereditary mutations. Close surveillance of at-risk individuals is important to detect NETs early when curative surgery can be offered and the morbidity and mortality of metastatic NETs can be avoided. PMID:27075353

  1. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Associated with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telengiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarano Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old man was referred to our clinic for the rehabilitation of right hemiparesis caused by ischaemic stroke. Hypertension, postphlebitic syndrome of lower limbs, frequent nose bleeding, and anemia were present in his history; in his adolescence, he was treated for idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Further investigations have revealed also microsomia, suggesting a clinical diagnosis of Kallmann syndrome, that is, an association, possible in males and females, of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with olfactory deficits. A definite diagnosis of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia was made based on clinical criteria and confirmed by genetic analysis.

  2. Molecular basis of hereditary C3 deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Botto, M.; Fong, K. Y.; So, A K; Rudge, A; Walport, M.J. (Mark J.)

    1990-01-01

    Hereditary deficiency of complement component C3 in a 10-yr-old boy was studied. C3 could not be detected by RIA of serum from the patient. Segregation of C3 S and C3 F allotypes within the family confirmed the presence of a null gene for C3, for which the patient was homozygous. 30 exons have been characterized, spanning the entire beta chain of C3 and the alpha chain as far as the C3d region. Sequence analysis of the exons derived from the C3 null gene showed no abnormalities in the coding ...

  3. Skin deposits in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Gudmundsson, G

    1990-01-01

    Clinically normal skin from 47 individuals aged 9-70 years was investigated. Cystatin C amyloid deposits were found in various locations of the skin by light and/or electron microscopy, in all 12 patients with a clinical history of hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis (HCCA). Six asymptomatic...... individuals, who had the Alu 1 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker reported to cosegregate with the disease, also had cystatin C amyloid deposits in the skin. Three asymptomatic individuals (age 17-46) belonging to the HCCA families were without amyloid in the skin but had Alu 1 RFLP marker...

  4. Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia and severe respiratory distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Halawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia (HMD is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mucoepithelial disruption of the skin, hair and mucous membranes. It results from defective gap junction formation and leads to non-scarring alopecia, mucosal erythema, perineal erythematous intertrigo, involvement of the conjunctival mucosa, and pulmonary disease. We present a case of severe respiratory distress in an initially healthy full term infant born to a mother with HMD. This infant later developed signs and symptoms of HMD. A high index of suspicion for pulmonary infection with atypical organism is essential in infants with a family history of HMD who present with respiratory distress.

  5. Cerebral abscesses among Danish patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Tørring, P M; Nissen, H;

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), which due to paradoxical embolization may cause cerebral abscess.......Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), which due to paradoxical embolization may cause cerebral abscess....

  6. Analysis on the relationship between renal osteodystrophy and the biochemical marker of bone turnover and other related factors in patients with chronic kidney diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between renal osteodystrophy and the biochemical marker of bone turnover in patients with chronic kidney diseases. Methods: A total of 102 patients with chronic kidney diseases (CKD) and 52 healthy subjects (normal control) were included in this study. The level of total procollagen type Ⅰ amino-terminal propeptide of (TP Ⅰ NP), β-isomerized carboxyterminal propeptide (β-CTx), intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), serum calcium (Ca2+), serum phosphorus (P), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were detected. The correlations between renal osteodystrophy in the patients with chronic kidney diseases and other related factors were analyzed. Results: Compared with the normal control group, there were higher TP Ⅰ NP, β-CTx, iPTH, P, ALP, Cr, Bun and β2-MG, in the CKD group which were significantly different according to Mann-Whitney U test (P<0.05 or <0.01). The Ca2+ and 1, 25-OH Vitamin d3 [1, 25 (OH)2D3] in the CKD group were significantly decreased compared with the normal control group (P<0.05). Correlation analysis showed TP Ⅰ NP was positively correlated with β-CTx, iPTH, P, CaxP, ALP, Cr, Bun, β2-MG (r was 0.790, 0.681, 0.573, 0.541, 0.550, 0.598, 0.793 respectively, P<0.01), Correlation analysis showed β-CTx was positively correlated with iPTH, P, CaxP, ALP, Cr, Bun, β2-MG (r was 0.803, 0.527, 0.449, 0.659, 0.672, 0.565, 0.624 respectively, P<0.01). TP Ⅰ NP was negatively correlated with Ca2+ and 1, 25 (OH)2D3 (r was -0.302, -0.582 respectively, P<0.01). β-CTx was negatively correlated with Ca2+ and 1, 25 (OH)2D3 (r was -0.265, -0.595 respectively, P<0.01). The iPTH was positively correlated with age, TP Ⅰ NP, β-CTx, P, CaxP, ALP, Cr, Bun and β2-MG (r was 0.485, 0.681, 0.803, 0.630, 0.541, 0.486, 0.690, 0.648, 0.531 respectively, P<0.05 or <0.01), but was negatively correlated with Ca2+ and 1, 25 (OH)2D3 (r was -0.318, -0.621 respectively, P<0.05). Conclusion: The application of total procollagen type

  7. BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-song TENG; Yi ZHENG; Hao-hao WANG

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death in women today. Some of the patients are hereditary, with a large proportion characterized by mutation in BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 genes. In this review, we provide an overview of these two genes,focusing on their relationship with hereditary breast cancers. BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers have unique features that differ from the general breast cancers, including alterations in cellular molecules, pathological bases, biological behavior, and a different prevention strategy. But the outcome of BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers still remains controversial;further studies are needed to elucidate the nature of BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers.

  8. REHABILITATION OF CHILDREN WITH HEREDITARY MYOPATHY

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    Vera Anatolevna Erokhina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Now the problem of rehabilitation of children with various hereditary diseases gains special relevance because the number of children with genetic abnormalities is growing. These genetic abnormalities cause changes in the development and functioning of their psyche, for example, create special features of their cognitive processes.The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the psycho-correctional work on the state of psycho-cognitive functions of children with congenital myopathy. A complete cycle of psycho-pedagogical correction was conducted among 27 patients with hereditary myopathies (18 boys and 9 girls. A comprehensive neuropsychological study, which assessed the status and dynamics of the cognitive functions of patients was conducted before and after the rehabilitation. The main effect of the fulfilled directed rehabilitation program was the improvement of visual-spatial perception and energy functional structures implementing neurodynamic component activities.The results can be applied by psycho-pedagogical specialists and specialists of clinical profile in assisting patients with disorders of the musculoskeletal system.

  9. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyerson C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cherise Meyerson, Greg Van Stavern, Collin McClelland Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA Abstract: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. Keywords: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, mitochondria, neuro-ophthalmology, mitochondrial DNA

  10. Molecular genetics of distal hereditary motor neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irobi, Joy; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2004-10-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies comprise a wide variety of diseases primarily affecting the peripheral nervous system. The best-known peripheral neuropathy is Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) described in 1886 by J.-M. Charcot, P. Marie and H.H. Tooth. In 1980, A.E. Harding and P.K. Thomas showed that in a large group of individuals with CMT, several only had motor abnormalities on clinical and electrophysiological examination, whereas sensory abnormalities were absent. This exclusively motor variant of CMT was designated as spinal CMT or hereditary distal spinal muscular atrophy, and included in the distal hereditary motor neuropathies (distal HMN). The distal HMN are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and are subdivided according to the mode of inheritance, age at onset and clinical evolution. Since the introduction of positional cloning, 12 chromosomal loci and seven disease-causing genes have been identified for autosomal dominant and recessive distal HMN. Most of the genes involved have housekeeping functions, as in RNA processing, translation synthesis, glycosylation, stress response, apoptosis, but also axonal trafficking and editing. Functional characterization of the mutations will help to unravel the cellular processes that underlie the specificity of motor neuropathies leading to neurogenic muscular atrophy of distal limb muscles. Here we review the recent progress of the molecular genetics of distal HMN and discuss the genes implicated.

  11. Molecular genetics of hereditary sensory neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Mauko, Barbara; Auer-Grumbach, Piet; Pieber, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), also known as hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. They are caused by neuronal atrophy and degeneration, predominantly affecting peripheral sensory and autonomic neurons. Both congenital and juvenile to adulthood onset is possible. Currently, the classification of the HSN depends on the mode of inheritance, age at onset, and clinical presentation. Hallmark features are progressive sensory loss, chronic skin ulcers, and other skin abnormalities. Spontaneous fractures and neuropathic arthropathy are frequent complications and often necessitate amputations. Autonomic features vary between different subgroups. Distal muscle weakness and wasting may be present and is sometimes so prominent that it becomes difficult to distinguish HSN from Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome. Recent major advances in molecular genetics have led to the identification of seven gene loci and six-disease causing genes for autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive HSN. These genes have been shown to play roles in lipid metabolism and the regulation of intracellular vesicular transport, but also a presumptive transcriptional regulator, a nerve growth factor receptor, and a nerve growth factor have been described among the causative genes in HSN. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how mutations in the known genes lead to the phenotype of HSN. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of the molecular genetics of the HSN and the implicated genes.

  12. MOMO Syndrome with Holoprosencephaly and Cryptorchidism: Expanding the Spectrum of the New Obesity Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharda, Sheetal; Panigrahi, Inusha; Marwaha, Ram Kumar

    2011-01-01

    There are multiple genetic disorders with known or unknown etiology grouped under obesity syndromes. Inspite of having multisystem involvement and often having a characteristic presentation, the understanding of the genetic causes in the majority of these syndromes is still lacking. The common obesity syndromes are Bardet-Biedl, Prader-Willi, Alstrom, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy, Carpenter, Rubinstein-Taybi, Fragile X, and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome. The list is ever increasing as new syndromes are being added to it. One of the recent additions is MOMO syndrome, with about five such cases being reported in literature. Expanding the spectrum of clinical features, we report the first case of MOMO syndrome from India with lobar variant of holoprosencephaly and cryptorchidism, which have not been reported previously.

  13. MOMO Syndrome with Holoprosencephaly and Cryptorchidism: Expanding the Spectrum of the New Obesity Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Sharda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There are multiple genetic disorders with known or unknown etiology grouped under obesity syndromes. Inspite of having multisystem involvement and often having a characteristic presentation, the understanding of the genetic causes in the majority of these syndromes is still lacking. The common obesity syndromes are Bardet-Biedl, Prader-Willi, Alstrom, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy, Carpenter, Rubinstein-Taybi, Fragile X, and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome. The list is ever increasing as new syndromes are being added to it. One of the recent additions is MOMO syndrome, with about five such cases being reported in literature. Expanding the spectrum of clinical features, we report the first case of MOMO syndrome from India with lobar variant of holoprosencephaly and cryptorchidism, which have not been reported previously.

  14. Pseudohypoparathyroidism (a report of 6 patients in a family)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To improve the recognition and diagnosis of pseudohypoparathyroidism (PhP). Methods: Six subjects with PhP of 4 generations in one family were investigated and studied. There were 4 males (including 2 deaths) and 2 females. The age of 4 surviving patients was from 8 to 55 years. All cases were proved by clinical biochemistry tests. Plain film of hands and head CT scans were performed in 2 selected patients. Results: The somatotype of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) and short fingers and toes were found in all cases. Radiologic features were as follows: (1) short metacarpals and phalanges. (2) skull thickening and symmetrical calcification of basal ganglia. Conclusion: The diagnosis of PHP can be established by close combination of radiologic findings and clinical manifestations

  15. Abnormal Methylation Status of the GNAS Exon 1A Region in Pseudohypohyperparathyroidism Combined With Turner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Wang, Dong; Ren, An; Xing, Yan; Zhang, Dongliang; Wei, Jun; Yu, Ning; Xing, Xuenong; Ye, Shandong

    2015-12-01

    Pseudohypohyperparathyroidism (PHHP) is a rare type of pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP), which seems to have a normal skeletal response to parathyroid hormone but shows renal resistance. Almost all patients with PHHP have PHP Ib, a subtype of PHP that is usually caused by GNAS methylation defects, often in exon 1A. Some features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy can occasionally be found in patients with PHHP, but these features are also common in Turner syndrome. The authors report on an extremely rare case of a patient with PHHP and Turner syndrome, a 47-year-old woman who sought medical attention for hypocalcemia and elevated parathyroid hormone. She had no family history of hypocalcemia and no STX16 gene deletions. She had a mosaic karyotype of 46, X, del(X)(p11.4)/45, XO. Pyrosequencing was performed to determine the GNAS exon 1A methylation. The degree of methylation found in exon 1A of the patient was lower than her unaffected relatives.

  16. Paternal uniparental isodisomy of the entire chromosome 20 as a molecular cause of pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP-Ib).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastepe, Murat; Altug-Teber, Ozge; Agarwal, Chhavi; Oberfield, Sharon E; Bonin, Michael; Jüppner, Harald

    2011-03-01

    Pseudohypoparathyoridism type Ib (PHP-Ib) typically defines the presence of end-organ resistance to parathyroid hormone in the absence of Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy. Patients affected by this disorder present with imprinting defects in the complex GNAS locus. Microdeletions within STX16 or GNAS have been identified in familial cases with PHP-Ib, but the molecular cause of the GNAS imprinting defects in sporadic PHP-Ib cases remains poorly defined. We now report a case with sporadic PHP-Ib for whom a SNPlex analysis revealed loss of the maternal GNAS allele. Further analysis of the entire genome with a 100K SNP chip identified a paternal uniparental isodisomy affecting the entire chromosome 20 without evidence for another chromosomal abnormality. Our findings explain the observed GNAS methylation changes and the patient's hormone resistance, and furthermore suggest that chromosome 20 harbors, besides GNAS, no additional imprinted region that contributes to the clinical and laboratory phenotype.

  17. Identification of a Novel Mutation in a Pseudohypoparathyroidism Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Min Miao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHP Ia is defined as a series of disorders characterized by multihormone resistance in end-organs and Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO phenotype. PHP Ia is caused by heterozygous inactivating mutations in GNAS, which encodes the stimulatory G-protein alpha subunit (Gsa. A patient with typical clinical manifestations of pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP (round face, short stature, centripetal obesity, brachydactyly, and multi-hormone resistance: parathyroid hormone (PTH, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, and gonadotropins presented at our center. The sequence of the GNAS gene from the patient and her families revealed a novel missense mutation (Y318H in the proband and her mother. An in vitro Gsa functional study showed that Gsa function was significantly impaired. These results stress the importance of GNAS gene investigation.

  18. Three cases of osteoma cutis occurring in infancy. A brief overview of osteoma cutis and its association with pseudo-pseudohypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Susannah; Sugo, Ella; Verge, Charles F; Wargon, Orli

    2011-05-01

    We report three cases of primary osteoma cutis in children, two of whom (siblings) were associated with Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO), manifesting as short stature with autosomal dominant inheritance from the father, but no dysmorphic features and no parathyroid hormone (PTH) resistance. Osteoma cutis can manifest as an isolated skin disease, a secondary condition to other skin diseases (such as acne), or in association with several syndromes, including AHO, which in turn may be associated with PTH resistance. The management and prognosis of patients diagnosed with osteoma cutis is determined by whether the skin manifestation has occurred in isolation, in association with a syndrome, or as a secondary skin disease. These three paediatric cases highlight the importance of understanding the aetiology and associations of osteoma cutis in order to appropriately investigate and manage patients who present with this rare skin disease.

  19. Intracranial hemorrhage revealing pseudohypoparathyroidism as a cause of fahr syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Abhijit; Kar, Giridhari

    2011-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism is an infrequently encountered disease. It is one of the causes of Fahr syndrome which also is a rare clinical entity caused by multiple diseases. A 4-year-old man hospitalized for sudden onset left hemiparesis and hypertension was diagnosed to have right thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage on plain CT scan of the head which also revealed co-existent extensive intracranial calcifications involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum bilaterally. General physical examination revealed features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy, goitre, hypertension, left hemiparesis, and signs of cerebellar dysfunction. Laboratory findings suggested hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia along with high TSH, low FT(4), low FT(3), and high anti-TPO antibody. Though bilateral intracranial calcifications are usually encountered as an incidental radiological finding in the CT scan of brain, in this case, the patient admitted for thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage was on investigation for associated intracranial calcification, and goitre was also found to have coexisting pseudohypoparathyroidism and autoimmune hypothyroidism.

  20. Intracranial Hemorrhage Revealing Pseudohypoparathyroidism as a Cause of Fahr Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Swami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudohypoparathyroidism is an infrequently encountered disease. It is one of the causes of Fahr syndrome which also is a rare clinical entity caused by multiple diseases. A 4-year-old man hospitalized for sudden onset left hemiparesis and hypertension was diagnosed to have right thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage on plain CT scan of the head which also revealed co-existent extensive intracranial calcifications involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum bilaterally. General physical examination revealed features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy, goitre, hypertension, left hemiparesis, and signs of cerebellar dysfunction. Laboratory findings suggested hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia along with high TSH, low FT4, low FT3, and high anti-TPO antibody. Though bilateral intracranial calcifications are usually encountered as an incidental radiological finding in the CT scan of brain, in this case, the patient admitted for thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage was on investigation for associated intracranial calcification, and goitre was also found to have coexisting pseudohypoparathyroidism and autoimmune hypothyroidism.

  1. Difficulties in diagnosis and treatment of acromegaly in a patient with a McCune-Albright syndrome. A case report and a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baszko-Błaszyk, Daria; Slynko, Julia; Liebert, Włodzimierz; Sosnowski, Piotr; Sowiński, Jerzy; Waśko, Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    We describe a female patient aged 43, who at the age of five was diagnosed with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia (FD). The patient was intermittently treated in our department since the age 33, for approximately 10 years, with intravenous bisphosphonates. At the age of 42 acromegaly was diagnosed incidentally, since clinical manifestations were poor, and, if present earlier, they had been related to FD. Only retrospectively, having biochemical confirmation of GH excess, we could relate them to acromegaly. Because of the involvement of the base of the skull there was no possibility of transphenoidal surgery. Long-acting somatostatin analogues were started, but no response was observed, with IGF-1 and GH being even higher during than before treatment. After the 37-year-history of FD, the occurrence of additional endocrine disorder enabled to make diagnosis of McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) even in the absence of two out of three classical manifestations such as café-au-lait skin pigmentation and peripheral precocious puberty in the past medical history. PMID:21173751

  2. Brazilian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema

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    Pedro Giavina-Bianchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by edema attacks with multiple organ involvement. It is caused by a quantitative or functional deficiency of the C1 inhibitor, which is a member of the serine protease inhibitor family. Hereditary angioedema is unknown to many health professionals and is therefore an underdiagnosed disease. The causes of death from hereditary angioedema include laryngeal edema with asphyxia. The estimated mortality rate in patients in whom the disease goes undetected and who are therefore incorrectly treated is 25-40%. In addition to edema of the glottis, hereditary angioedema often results in edema of the gastrointestinal tract, which can be incapacitating. Patients with hereditary angioedema may undergo unnecessary surgical interventions because the digestive tract can be the primary or only organ system involved, thus mimicking acute surgical abdomen. It is estimated that patients with hereditary angioedema experience some degree of disability 20-100 days per year. The Experts in Clinical Immunology and Allergy of the "Associação Brasileira de Alergia e Imunopatologia -ASBAI" developed these guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and management of hereditary angioedema.

  3. {sup 99m}Tc(V)-DMSA scintigraphy in monitoring the response of bone disease to vitamin D{sub 3} therapy in renal osteodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarikaya, A.; Sen, S.; Hacimahmutoglu, S.; Pekindil, G. [Trakya Univ., Edirne (Turkey). Faculty of Medicine

    2002-02-01

    Renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is a common and serious complication for uremic patients and patients are treated with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}. The bone scanning agent {sup 99m}Tc-phosphate has also been used to evaluate in ROD but it is not clear that bone scintigraphy has a role in the follow-up of treatment. In this study {sup 99m}Tc(V)-DMSA scintigraphy was performed in eleven patients [age 40.7{+-}17.3 (mean {+-}SD) yr] with ROD before and after vitamin D{sub 3} therapy. Images were obtained after hemodialysis performed following tracer injection to maintain normal blood levels of the radiopharmaceutical and to reduce soft tissue activity. Lumbar vertebra-to-soft tissue uptake ratios (LUR) were quantified with the planar {sup 99m}Tc(V)-DMSA images. Alkaline phosphatase and parathyroid hormone levels after tretment had significantly decreased compared with pre-therapy. In all patients there was visually decreased uptake in bone structures after treatment. After treatment the mean LUR ratio was significantly lower than those of before treatment (3.59{+-}2.63 vs. 1.65{+-}0.62; p=0.01). LUR values were correlated with pre-therapy alkaline phosphatase and parathyroid hormone. These findings indicate that {sup 99m}Tc(V)-DMSA scintigraphy is sensitive in evaluating the response of ROD to vitamin D{sub 3} therapy. (author)

  4. Hereditary optic neuropathies share a common mitochondrial coupling defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrollier, Arnaud; Guillet, Virginie; Loiseau, Dominique; Gueguen, Naïg; de Crescenzo, Marie-Anne Pou; Verny, Christophe; Ferre, Marc; Dollfus, Hélène; Odent, Sylvie; Milea, Dan; Goizet, Cyril; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Procaccio, Vincent; Bonneau, Dominique; Reynier, Pascal

    2008-06-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are heterogeneous diseases characterized by the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells leading to optic nerve atrophy and impairment of central vision. We found a common coupling defect of oxidative phosphorylation in fibroblasts of patients affected by autosomal dominant optic atrophy (mutations of OPA1), autosomal dominant optic atrophy associated with cataract (mutations of OPA3), and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, a disorder associated with point mutations of mitochondrial DNA complex I genes. Interestingly, the energetic defect was significantly more pronounced in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and autosomal dominant optic atrophy patients with a more complex phenotype, the so-called plus phenotype.

  5. Hereditary palmoplantar keratodermas in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, S; Thappa, D M; Garg, B R

    1997-12-01

    Thirty-one patients with inherited palmoplantar keratodermas (PPKs) were screened from 59,490 cases who visiting the OPD of JIPMER, Pondicherry. The prevalence rate was 5.2 per 10,000 population (1:2000 approx.). PPKs were more common in males (25 patients) than females (6 patients); the overall male to female ratio was 4.2:1. The incidence was highest in the group from 0-10 years of life (67.7% of cases). Unna-Thost syndrome topped the list with 38.7% of cases and its prevalence 1:6000 (approx.), followed by Greither's disease (22.9%) and others-Vohwinkel (3 cases), idiopathic punctate (2 cases), ichthyosis vulgaris associated PPK (2 cases) etc. This study has for the first time reported the prevalence and patterns of hereditary PPKs in South India.

  6. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra B Nayak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints of excessive happiness, irritability, increased self-esteem and decreased sleep since 1 month. The patient also had complex partial seizure ever since he had features of HSP. The patient′s father and younger sister suffer from pure HSP. The patient was diagnosed to have first episode mania with complicated HSP. The details of treatment and possible neurobiology are discussed in this case report.

  7. Occurrence of hereditary bullous epidermolyses in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavicić, Z; Kmet-Vizintin, P; Kansky, A; Dobrić, I

    1990-06-01

    To determine the occurrence of hereditary bullous epidermolyses (EB) in Croatia, Yugoslavia, from 1960 to 1987, cases were gathered from the hospital files of dermatologic and pediatric clinics and departments throughout the area. The diagnosis of EB type was made on the basis of clinical features, patients' histories, and light microscopy and electron microscopy findings. Fifty families with 58 patients were registered; 44 patients were examined personally by one of the authors. The most frequent type of EB in Croatia was recessive dystrophic EB Hallopeau-Siemens, occurring in 35 of the 58 individuals. Regional accumulation of cases within the Varazdin area was noted (13 patients). Prevalence of EB in Croatia is 0.956 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. One case of recessive dystrophic EB Hallopeau-Siemens occurred in about every 52,000 live births.

  8. Idebenone for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueven, N

    2016-03-01

    Idebenone is a rapidly absorbed, safe and well-tolerated drug and is currently the only clinically proven treatment option for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients. Idebenone (Raxone®) is approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of LHON and has been available on the European market since 2015. Due to its molecular mode of action of bypassing the defective mitochondrial complex I, idebenone leads to improved energy supply and a functional recovery of retinal ganglion cells during the acute stage of the disease, thereby preventing further vision loss and promoting recovery of vision. Thus, commencing treatment shortly after the onset of symptoms is likely to have the best therapeutic effect, a hypothesis that is supported by the available clinical data. PMID:27186591

  9. Pulmonary hypertension in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Veronique; MM; Vorselaars; Sebastiaan; Velthuis; Repke; J; Snijder; Jan; Albert; Vos; Johannes; J; Mager; Martijn; C; Post

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia(HHT) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterised by vascular malformations in predominantly the brain,liverand lungs.Pulmonary hypertension(PH) is increasingly recognised as a severe complication of HHT.PH may be categorised into two distinct types in patients with HHT.Post-capillary PH most often results from a high pulmonary blood flow that accompanies the high cardiac output state associated with liver arteriovenous malformations.Less frequently,the HHT-related gene mutations in ENG or ACVRL1 appear to predispose patients with HHT to develop pre-capillary pulmonary arterial hypertension.Differentiation between both forms of PH by right heart catheterisation is essential,since both entities are associated with severe morbidity and mortality with different treatment options.Therefore all HHT patients should be referred to an HHT centre.

  10. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, D A; Buttery, R G

    1992-08-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) presents with sudden onset of visual loss mainly in young adult males. LHON is not uncommon in Australia, accounting for 2% of invalid blind pensions. We have identified 20 unrelated families carrying mitochondrial DNA mutations associated with LHON and 135 of 291 individuals with documented LHON are currently alive in Australia. The mean age of onset of visual loss for males was 26 years and for females 27 years, with a range from six to 65 years. The mean risk of visual loss was 20% for males and 4% for females. There are over 1750 male and female carriers living in Australia who have not yet lost vision; 600 carriers are under 24 years of age. The expected number of new cases of blindness from LHON is three to four per year. PMID:1449769

  11. Burden of Illness in Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, Anette; Aygören-Pürsün, Emel; Beusterien, Kathleen;

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the Hereditary Angioedema Burden of Illness Study in Europe was to assess the real-world experience of HAE from the patient perspective. Based on open-ended qualitative interviews with 30 patients from Spain, Germany and Denmark, 5 key themes emerged characterizing the impact...... of HAE on health-related quality of life (HRQoL): (i) unnecessary treatments and procedures, (ii) symptom triggers, (iii) attack impacts, (iv) caregiver impacts, and (v) long-term impacts. Patients for example experienced unnecessary medical procedures due to diagnostic delays, anxiety and fear about...... attacks, and passing HAE to children, reduced work/school productivity, and limited career/educational achievement. Patient caregivers also experienced worry and work/activity interruption during the attacks. In conclusion, a conceptual model was developed illustrating the hypothesized relationships among...

  12. Dementia in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blöndal, H; Guomundsson, G; Benedikz, Eirikur;

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen cases with verified Hereditary Cystatin C Amyloid Angiopathy are presented. All of the cases had one or more cerebrovascular insults starting at the age of 20-41 years and survived from 10 days to 23 years after the first insult. Progressive dementia was a prominent clinical feature...... in seventeen cases of whom two presented with dementia. At the last examination the majority had severe dementia and severely abnormal EEG. Anti-cystatin C positive amyloid vascular and perivascular infiltrates were found. The resulting damage to the microvasculature of the brain and secondary hemorrhages...... and infarctions were considered to be an adequate explanation for the dementia in these cases. Skin biopsies can now probably be used to demonstrate cystatin C positive amyloid deposits conclusively in the tissues of these patients....

  13. Idebenone for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueven, N

    2016-03-01

    Idebenone is a rapidly absorbed, safe and well-tolerated drug and is currently the only clinically proven treatment option for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients. Idebenone (Raxone®) is approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of LHON and has been available on the European market since 2015. Due to its molecular mode of action of bypassing the defective mitochondrial complex I, idebenone leads to improved energy supply and a functional recovery of retinal ganglion cells during the acute stage of the disease, thereby preventing further vision loss and promoting recovery of vision. Thus, commencing treatment shortly after the onset of symptoms is likely to have the best therapeutic effect, a hypothesis that is supported by the available clinical data.

  14. Mechanisms of postural instability in hereditary spastic paraplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nonnekes, J.; Niet, M. de; Nijhuis, L.B.; Bot, S.T. de; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Bloem, B.R.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Weerdesteyn, V.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is characterized by progressive lower extremity spasticity and weakness, due to retrograde axonal degeneration of the corticospinal tract and posterior spinal columns. HSP patients fall frequently. We hypothesized that delayed postural responses contribute to thei

  15. Genetics Home Reference: infantile-onset ascending hereditary spastic paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and paraplegia result from degeneration (atrophy) of motor neurons , which are specialized nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that control muscle movement. Hereditary spastic paraplegias are divided into two types: pure and complicated. The pure types involve only ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Central Sudarshan S, Pinto PA, Neckers L, Linehan WM. Mechanisms of disease: hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer-- ... with a qualified healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Contact Us Selection Criteria for Links ...

  17. Hereditary Gigantism-the biblical giant Goliath and his brothers

    OpenAIRE

    Donnelly, Deirdre E.; Morrison, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    The biblical giant Goliath has an identifiable family tree suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. We suggest that he had a hereditary pituitary disorder possibly due to the AIP gene, causing early onset and familial acromegaly or gigantism. We comment on the evidence within the scriptures for his other relatives including a relative with six digits and speculate on possible causes of the six digits. Recognition of a hereditary pituitary disorder in the biblical Goliath and his family s...

  18. Matroids, hereditary collections and simplicial complexes having boolean representations

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes, John; Silva, Pedro V.

    2012-01-01

    Inspired by the work of Izakhian and Rhodes, a theory of representation of hereditary collections by boolean matrices is developed. This corresponds to representation by finite $\\vee$-generated lattices. The lattice of flats, defined for hereditary collections, lattices and matrices, plays a central role in the theory. The representations constitute a lattice and the minimal and strictly join irreducible elements are studied, as well as various closure operators.

  19. Hereditary breast cancer. Psychosocial issues and family physicians' role.

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, J. C.; Heisey, R. E.; Warner, E.; V Goel; McCready, D R

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To outline the psychosocial issues in hereditary breast cancer (HBC) assessment and discuss the role of family physicians. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A literature search using MEDLINE, CINAHL, CancerLit, and HealthStar databases was conducted from January 1990 to April 1998, using the key words breast cancer or neoplasm and familial or hereditary, genetic testing or screening, primary care or family physician or counseling, genetic counseling, psychosocial or psychological. We found onl...

  20. Systemic treatment for hereditary cancers: a 2012 update

    OpenAIRE

    Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Byrski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    The history of specific therapy for hereditary tumors dates back to mid 1980s and involves a number of reports demonstrating regression of familial colon polyps upon administration of sulindac. Virtually no clinical studies on other hereditary cancer types were available until the year 2009, when Byrski et al. presented the data on unprecedented sensitivity of BRCA1-associated breast malignancies to cisplatin. This breakthrough has revived interest to the treatment of cancer in germ-line muta...

  1. Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy and anaesthesia - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini Dave

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies are a rare group of disorders characterized by progressive loss of function that predominantly affects the peripheral sensory nerves. Autonomic dysfunction is present to a variable degree and can have several implications for anaesthesia. We report the case of a patient with Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy who was posted for a below knee amputation and discuss the anaesthesia management.

  2. Hereditary angioedema: classification, pathogenesis, and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Aleena

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder associated with a deficiency in C1 inhibitor. More than 200 mutations in this gene, located on chromosome 11, have been identified. Although HAE is often inherited, 20-25% of cases are from new spontaneous mutations and they have no family history of swelling. Decreased C1 inhibitor activity leads to inappropriate activation of multiple pathways, including the complement and contact systems and the fibrinolysis and coagulation systems. Reduced C1 inhibitor activity results in increased activation of plasma kallikrein-kinin system proteases and increased bradykinin levels. Bradykinin is felt to be the main mediator of symptoms in HAE. Patients with HAE have recurrent episodes of swelling of the extremities, abdomen, face, and upper airway. Angioedema involving the gastrointestinal tract can lead to intestinal wall edema, which results in abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Laryngeal swelling is life-threatening and may lead to asphyxia. Common triggers of an attack include trauma, stress, infection, menstruation, oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Laboratory testing including C4, C1 inhibitor level, and function is needed to confirm or rule out the diagnosis of HAE. The treatment of HAE has improved significantly in recent years with the availability of several safe and effective therapies. Several consensus guidelines have been created to further assist in the management of HAE patients. This review will provide an update on the classification, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and diagnosis of HAE. PMID:22221432

  3. Multimodal Imaging in Hereditary Retinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pichi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In this retrospective study we evaluated the multimodal visualization of retinal genetic diseases to better understand their natural course. Material and Methods. We reviewed the charts of 70 consecutive patients with different genetic retinal pathologies who had previously undergone multimodal imaging analyses. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and genotyped at the known locus for the different diseases. Results. The medical records of 3 families of a 4-generation pedigree affected by North Carolina macular dystrophy were reviewed. A total of 8 patients with Stargardt disease were evaluated for their two main defining clinical characteristics, yellow subretinal flecks and central atrophy. Nine male patients with a previous diagnosis of choroideremia and eleven female carriers were evaluated. Fourteen patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy and 6 family members with autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy were included. Seven patients with enhanced s-cone syndrome were ascertained. Lastly, we included 3 unrelated patients with fundus albipunctatus. Conclusions. In hereditary retinal diseases, clinical examination is often not sufficient for evaluating the patient’s condition. Retinal imaging then becomes important in making the diagnosis, in monitoring the progression of disease, and as a surrogate outcome measure of the efficacy of an intervention.

  4. Hypercoagulability in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Finsterer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent data indicate that in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia (HHT, low iron levels due to inadequate replacement after hemorrhagic iron losses are associated with elevated factor-VIII plasma levels and consecutively increased risk of venous thrombo-embolism. Here, we report a patient with HHT, low iron levels, elevated factor-VIII, and recurrent venous thrombo-embolism. A 64-year-old multimorbid Serbian gipsy was diagnosed with HHT at age 62 years. He had a history of recurrent epistaxis, teleangiectasias on the lips, renal and pulmonary arterio-venous malformations, and a family history positive for HHT. He had experienced recurrent venous thrombosis (mesenteric vein thrombosis, portal venous thrombosis, deep venous thrombosis, insufficiently treated with phenprocoumon during 16 months and gastro-intestinal bleeding. Blood tests revealed sideropenia and elevated plasma levels of coagulation factor-VIII. His history was positive for diabetes, arterial hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, cerebral abscess, recurrent ischemic stroke, recurrent ileus, peripheral arterial occluding disease, polyneuropathy, mild renal insufficiency, and epilepsy. Following recent findings, hypercoagulability was attributed to the sideropenia-induced elevation of coagulation factor-VIII. In conclusion, HHT may be associated with hypercoagulability due to elevated factor-VIII associated with low serum iron levels from recurrent bleeding. Iron substitution may prevent HHT patients from hypercoagulability.

  5. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  6. [Designation criteria for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Makoto; Mimura, Osamu; Wakakura, Masato; Inatani, Masaru; Nakazawa, Toru; Shiraga, Fumio

    2015-05-01

    Designation criteria for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) have been established by a working group for retino-choroidal and optic atrophy funded by the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare (MHLW) of Japan in collaboration with the Japanese Neuro-ophthalmology Society. The criteria are composed of three major symptoms and three ancillary test findings. According to the number and the combination of these symptoms and findings, subjects are classified into definite, probable, and possible LHON cases and asymptomatic carriers. The major symptoms include bilateral involvement with a time-lag, a papillomacular bundle atrophy, both characteristic optic disc findings at the acute phase. In the ancillary testings, mitochondrial DNA mutations specific for LHON are detailed with a table listing the mutation loci being attached. To enhance readers' understanding of description of the major symptoms and ancillary test findings, explanatory remarks on 11 parameters are supplemented. The establishment of the criteria facilitates epidemiological survey of LHON by MHLW and contributes to improvement of welfare for patients with LHON in Japan.

  7. Neurological involvement in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labeyrie, Paul-Emile; Courthéoux, Patrick; Babin, Emmanuel; Bergot, Emmanuel; Touzé, Emmanuel; Pelage, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by epistaxis, telangiectases, and multi-organ vascular dysplasia. Head and neck localizations of HHT are recurrent, frequent associated with serious complications. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and imaging patterns of neurological involvement in HHT and to discuss the role of interventional radiology in the management of HHT patients. Based on a multidisciplinary experience of twenty years at our center, we report here the different aspects of neurological involvement of HHT. Depending on the genetic type of the disease, vascular abnormalities may affect different organs. The knowledge of neurological involvement according to specific localization of HHT makes detection easier. As cerebral or spinal arteriovenous fistula may be present in patients with epistaxis or pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), radiologists should be able to detect high-risk lesions and prevent related complications. Finally, we review indications and techniques of embolization for hemorrhagic lesions and emphasize that endovascular therapies are very effective and safe in experienced hands. Head and neck imaging is commonly used for the diagnosis of HHT. Imaging plays also a key role for patient evaluation before treatment as pluridisciplinary management is needed. PMID:27059009

  8. Molecular Diagnostic and Pathogenesis of Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo C. J. L. Santos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by enhanced intestinal absorption of dietary iron. Without therapeutic intervention, iron overload leads to multiple organ damage such as liver cirrhosis, cardiomyopathy, diabetes, arthritis, hypogonadism and skin pigmentation. Most HH patients carry HFE mutant genotypes: homozygosity for p.Cys282Tyr or p.Cys282Tyr/p.His63Asp compound heterozygosity. In addition to HFE gene, mutations in the genes that encode hemojuvelin (HJV, hepcidin (HAMP, transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2 and ferroportin (SLC40A1 have been associated with regulation of iron homeostasis and development of HH. The aim of this review was to identify the main gene mutations involved in the pathogenesis of type 1, 2, 3 and 4 HH and their genetic testing indication. HFE testing for the two main mutations (p.Cys282Tyr and p.His63Asp should be performed in all patients with primary iron overload and unexplained increased transferrin saturation and/or serum ferritin values. The evaluation of the HJV p.Gly320Val mutation must be the molecular test of choice in suspected patients with juvenile hemochromatosis with less than 30 years and cardiac or endocrine manifestations. In conclusion, HH is an example that genetic testing can, in addition to performing the differential diagnostic with secondary iron overload, lead to more adequate and faster treatment.

  9. 儿童遗传性肾脏疾病%Hereditary kidney diseases in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琰琴; 丁洁; 王芳; 张宏文

    2013-01-01

    About 10 to 15 percent of kidney diseases are inherited or related to genetic factors. While, hereditary kidney diseases have no specific clinical manifestations and react poorly to the therapy, as a result, about 30 percent of hospitalized children with chronic renal failure is due to hereditary kidney diseases in our country. Hereditary kidney diseases are related to many genes. Molecular genetic analysis plays an important role in the diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis of hereditary kidney diseases. Our group have made a series of research in hereditary kidney diseases for nearly 30 years. Here we review the research work and the main results in hereditary kidney diseases of our group.

  10. Hereditary pancreatitis and secondary screening for early pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitone, L J; Greenhalf, W; Howes, N R; Neoptolemos, J P

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant disease with incomplete penetrance (80%), accounting for approximately 1% of all cases of pancreatitis. It is characterized by the onset of recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis in childhood and frequent progression to chronic pancreatitis. Whitcomb et al. identified the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1) on chromosome 7q35 as the site of the mutation that causes hereditary pancreatitis. The European registry of hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer (EUROPAC) aims to identify and make provisions for those affected by hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer. The most common mutations in hereditary pancreatitis are R122H, N29I and A16V but many families have been described with clinically defined hereditary pancreatitis where there is no PRSS1 mutation. It is known that the cumulative lifetime risk (to age 70 years) of pancreatic cancer is 40% in individuals with hereditary pancreatitis. This subset of individuals form an ideal group for the development of a screening programme aimed at detecting pancreatic cancer at an early stage in an attempt to improve the presently poor long-term survival. Current screening strategies involve multimodality imaging (computed tomography, endoluminal ultrasound) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for pancreatic juice collection followed by molecular analysis of the DNA extracted from the juice. The potential benefit of screening (curative resection) must be balanced against the associated morbidity and mortality of surgery. Philosophically, the individual's best interest must be sought in light of the latest advances in medicine and science following discussions with a multidisciplinary team in specialist pancreatic centres.

  11. Hereditary Spherocytosis and Hereditary Elliptocytosis: Aberrant Protein Sorting during Erythroblast Enucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomao, Marcela; Chen, Ke; Villalobos, Jonathan; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2010-02-08

    During erythroblast enucleation, membrane proteins distribute between extruded nuclei and reticulocytes. In hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), deficiencies of membrane proteins, in addition to those encoded by the mutant gene, occur. Elliptocytes, resulting from protein 4.1R gene mutations, lack not only 4.1R but also glycophorin C, which links the cytoskeleton and bilayer. In HS resulting from ankyrin-1 mutations, band 3, Rh-associated antigen, and glycophorin A are deficient. The current study was undertaken to explore whether aberrant protein sorting, during enucleation, creates these membrane-spanning protein deficiencies. We found that although glycophorin C sorts to reticulocytes normally, it distributes to nuclei in 4.1R-deficient HE cells. Further, glycophorin A and Rh-associated antigen, which normally partition predominantly to reticulocytes, distribute to both nuclei and reticulocytes in an ankyrin-1-deficient murine model of HS. We conclude that aberrant protein sorting is one mechanistic basis for protein deficiencies in HE and HS.

  12. Pamidronic acid and cabergoline as effective long-term therapy in a 12-year-old girl with extended facial polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, prolactinoma and acromegaly in McCune-Albright syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Classen Carl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction McCune-Albright syndrome is a complex inborn disorder due to early embryonal postzygotic somatic activating mutations in the GNAS1 gene. The phenotype is very heterogeneous and includes polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, typically involving the facial skull, numerous café-au-lait spots and autonomous hyperfunctions of several endocrine systems, leading to hyperthyroidism, hypercortisolism, precocious puberty and acromegaly. Case presentation Here, we describe a 12-year-old Caucasian girl with severe facial involvement of fibrous dysplasia, along with massive acromegaly due to growth hormone excess and precocious puberty, with a prolactinoma. Our patient was treated with a bisphosphonate and the prolactin antagonist, cabergoline, resulting in the inhibition of fibrous dysplasia and involution of both the prolactinoma and growth hormone excess. During a follow-up of more than two years, no severe side effects were noted. Conclusion Treatment with bisphosphonates in combination with cabergoline is a suitable option in patients with McCune-Albright syndrome, especially in order to circumvent surgical interventions in patients suffering from polyostotic fibrous dysplasia involving the skull base.

  13. Hereditary benign telangiectasia: first case in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidi, Zari; Maleki, M; Mashayekhi, V; Nahidi, Y; Omidvar Borna, A

    2006-07-01

    A 14-year-old boy was referred to the Dermatology Clinic of the Medical University of Mashhad, Iran, with numerous cutaneous telangiectasias on the face, ears, lips, and back of the hands, with lesions in the temporal region being the first to appear (Figs 1-3). His mother stated that the lesions had been present for 10 years with an increase in the past 6 months. He had no history of bleeding from the nose, mouth, gastrointestinal tract, and other mucosal surfaces, and there was no sign of organ involvement. On inspection, no lesions were detected on the nasal mucosa, external ear, over the tympanic membrane, or mouth. The patient is one member of a family of six. His mother is healthy, but similar lesions were seen in his father, sister and one of his brothers with similar distributions. Lesions were also seen in his aunt and paternal grandmother, showing disease distribution in six members of this family from three generations. The oldest brother is 20 years of age and mentioned the onset of disease from the age of 10 years. The sister is 18 years of age and lesions started to appear 7 years ago; she claims that the lesions regress during her menstrual period. The youngest brother is 4 years of age and shows no sign of cutaneous lesions as yet. The parents are not consanguineous. Generalized telangiectasia with a predominant distribution on light-exposed skin, an autosomal dominant inheritance, and no sign of systemic or mucosal involvement and bleeding disorders indicates a diagnosis of hereditary benign telangiectasia. Our patient did not consent to biopsy. PMID:16863520

  14. Hereditary progressive dystonia with marked diurnal fluctuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Masaya

    2011-03-01

    Hereditary progressive dystonia with marked diurnal fluctuation (HPD) is a dopa-responsive dystonia, now called autosomal dominant GTP cyclohydrolase 1 deficiency or Segawa disease, caused by mutation of the GCH-1 gene located on 14q22.1 to q22.2. Because of heterozygous mutation, partial deficiency of tetrahydrobiopterin affects tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) rather selectively and causes decrease of TH in the terminals of the nigrostriatal dopamine (NS DA) neurons, projecting to the D1 receptors on the striosome, the striatal direct pathways and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the D4 receptors of the tuberoinfundibular tract. The activities of TH in the terminal are high in early childhood decrease exponentially to the stational level around early twenties, and show circadian oscillatron. TH in HPD follows these variations with around 20% of normal levels and with development of the downstream structures show appears characteristic clinical symptoms age dependently. In late fetus period to early infancy, through the striosome-substantia nigra pars compacta pathway failure in morphogenesis of the DA neurons in substantia nigra, in childhood around 6 years postural dystonia through the D1 direct pathways and the descending output of the basal ganglia. Diurnal fluctuation is apparent in childhood but decrease its grade with age. TH deficiency at the terminal on the STN causes action dystonia from around 8 years and postural tremor from around 10 years, focal dystonia in adulthood. Adult onset cases in the family with action dystonia start with writer's cramp, torticollis or generalized rigid hypertonus with tremor but do not show postural dystonia. TH deficiency on the D4 receptors causes stagnation of the body length in childhood. With or without action dystonia depends on the locus of mutation. Postural dystonia is inhibitory disorder, while action dystonia is excitatory disorder. The TH deficiency at the terminal does not cause morphological changes or degenerative

  15. Outcomes of Lensectomy in Hereditary Lens Subluxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Hossein Dehghan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the results of pars plana lensectomy in patients with hereditary lens subluxation. METHOD: Hospital records of patients with hereditary lens subluxation who had undergone pars plana lensectomy at Labbafinejad Medical Center, Tehran-Iran from 1996 to 2003 were reviewed. Patients with more than 6 months of follow up were included. Underlying disorders, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA before and after surgery, intraocular pressure (IOP, postoperative refraction and complications were evaluated. RESULTS: Overall, records of 87 eyes of 49 patients including 27 male and 22 female subjects were reviewed. Mean follow up duration was 20±18 months. Underlying disorders leading to lens subluxation included Marfan syndrome (79.5%, Weill-Marchesani syndrome (8.2%, simple ectopia lentis (8.2%, and homocystinuria (4.1%. The most common indication for surgery was non-correctable refractive error (92.1%. Mean BCVA was 1.13 LogMAR (20/250 preoperatively, which improved to 0.26 LogMAR (20/30-20/40 postoperatively (P < 0.001. BCVA better than 20/40 was achieved in 82.8% of cases after surgery. Angle-supported anterior chamber intraocular lens (ACIOL was implanted in

  16. Characteristic modules and tensor products over quasi-hereditary algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Let A be a monomial quasi-hereditary algebra with a pure strong exact Borel subalgebra B.It is proved that the category of induced good modules over B is contained in the category of good modules over A;that the characteristic module of A is an induced module of that of B via the exact functor-(?)_B A if and only if the induced A-module of an injective B-module remains injective as a B-module.Moreover,it is shown that an exact Borel subalgebra of a basic quasi-hereditary serial algebra is right serial and that the characteristic module of a basic quasi-hereditary serial algebra is exactly the induced module of that of its exact Borel subalgebra.

  17. Characteristic modules and tensor products over quasi-hereditary algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-hui ZHANG; Shi-ying SHEN; Ping-kai YE

    2007-01-01

    Let A be a monomial quasi-hereditary algebra with a pure strong exact Borel subalgebra B. It is proved that the category of induced good modules over B is contained in the category of good modules over A; that the characteristic module of A is an induced module of that of B via the exact functor - (×)B A if and only if the induced A-module of an injective B-module remains injective as a B-module. Moreover, it is shown that an exact Borel subalgebra of a basic quasi-hereditary serial algebra is right serial and that the characteristic module of a basic quasi-hereditary serial algebra is exactly the induced module of that of its exact Borel subalgebra.

  18. Neuromyelitis optica antibody in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Mesquita Simão

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica antibody (or aquaporin-4 antibody is a well stablished serum marker associated to high-risk neuromyelitis optica syndrome that presents as an inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by the occurrence of bilateral and simultaneous optic neuritis without complete visual recovery or it occurs as an isolated episode of transverse myelitis accompanied by longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. On the other hand, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a primarily hereditary disorder that affects all tissues of the body and its clinical presentation is tissue-specific for the optic nerve and, eventually, it might reach the spinal cord. Overlapping clinical features of neuromyelitis optica and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy may suggest common target organ diseases. The case report described herein emphasizes the coexistence of serum markers of both diseases, and suggests that further investigation of this challenging clinical presentation is warranted to confirm or rule out this association.

  19. Anaesthetic management of a patient with hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nergis Ataol

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by reduced activity of the C1 esterase inhibitor. Patients with hereditary angioedema are clinically characterized by recurrent episodes of swelling of the extremities, face, trunk, airways and abdominal organs. Attacks may occur either spontaneously or following trauma, stress, surgery, infections and hormonal fluctuations. The most common cause of death is asphyxia related to laryngeal edema. Giving C1 esterase inhibitor is the most effective method of treatment. Also fresh frozen plasma, androgen steroids, quinine pathway inhibitors, antifibrinolytics and bradykinin receptor antagonists can be used as treatment. In this paper, the anesthetic management of a patient with hereditary angioedema undergoing inguinal hernia repair surgery is reported.

  20. Principally Left Hereditary and Principally Left Strong Radicals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Tumurbat; R. Wiegandt

    2001-01-01

    A radical γ is normal if and only if γ is principally left hereditary and principally left strong (i.e., γ(L) = L e A and Lz ∈γ for all z ∈ L imply L γ(A)). Let a radical γ satisfy that A°∈γ and S° A° imply S°∈γ.Then γ is a hereditary normal radical if and only if γ is principally left strong and γ {A | (A, +,◇a) ∈γ a ∈ A}, where the multiplication ◇a is defined by x ◇a y = xay. The Behrens radical class B is the largest principally left hereditary subclass of the Brown-McCoy radical class G. Neither3 nor G is principally left strong.

  1. Intragenic Duplication A Novel Mutational Mechanism in Hereditary Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, M. T.; Geisz, A.; Brusgaard, K.;

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In a hereditary pancreatitis family from Denmark, we identified a novel intragenic duplication of 9 nucleotides in exon-2 of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene (c.63_71dup) which at the amino-acid level resulted in the insertion of 3 amino acids within the activation peptide...... pancreatitis. The accelerated activation of p.K23_I24insIDK by cathepsin B is a unique biochemical property not found in any other pancreatitis-associated trypsinogen mutant. In contrast, the robust autoactivation of the novel mutant confirms the notion that increased autoactivation is a disease......-relevant mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis....

  2. Hereditary Gigantism-the biblical giant Goliath and his brothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Deirdre E; Morrison, Patrick J

    2014-05-01

    The biblical giant Goliath has an identifiable family tree suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. We suggest that he had a hereditary pituitary disorder possibly due to the AIP gene, causing early onset and familial acromegaly or gigantism. We comment on the evidence within the scriptures for his other relatives including a relative with six digits and speculate on possible causes of the six digits. Recognition of a hereditary pituitary disorder in the biblical Goliath and his family sheds additional information on his and other family members' battles with David and his relatives.

  3. Hereditary Gigantism-the biblical giant Goliath and his brothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Deirdre E; Morrison, Patrick J

    2014-05-01

    The biblical giant Goliath has an identifiable family tree suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. We suggest that he had a hereditary pituitary disorder possibly due to the AIP gene, causing early onset and familial acromegaly or gigantism. We comment on the evidence within the scriptures for his other relatives including a relative with six digits and speculate on possible causes of the six digits. Recognition of a hereditary pituitary disorder in the biblical Goliath and his family sheds additional information on his and other family members' battles with David and his relatives. PMID:25075136

  4. Diagnostic evaluation of hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE and non-HFE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardou-Jacquet, Edouard; Brissot, Pierre

    2014-08-01

    The management and understanding of hereditary hemochromatosis have evolved with recent advances in iron biology and the associated discovery of numerous genes involved in iron metabolism. HFE-related (type 1) hemochromatosis remains the most frequent form, characterized by C282Y mutation homozygosity. Rare forms of hereditary hemochromatosis include type 2 (A and B, juvenile hemochromatosis caused by HJV and HAMP mutation), type 3 (related to TFR2 mutation), and type 4 (A and B, ferroportin disease). The diagnostic evaluation relies on comprehension of the involved pathophysiologic defect, and careful characterization of the phenotype, which gives clues to guide appropriate genetic testing.

  5. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  6. Fetal MRI of hereditary multiple intestinal atresia with postnatal correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Githu, Tangayi [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Radiology of Huntsville, P.C., Huntsville, AL (United States); Merrow, Arnold C.; Lee, Jason K. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Garrison, Aaron P. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Surgical Services, Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Akron Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Surgery, Akron, OH (United States); Brown, Rebeccah L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Surgical Services, Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Hereditary multiple intestinal atresia (HMIA) is an extremely uncommon cause of congenital bowel obstruction. The morbidity and mortality of this disease differ significantly from those of isolated intestinal atresias and non-hereditary forms of multiple intestinal atresia. Most notably, despite successful operative repairs of the atresias found in this disease, HMIA maintains a 100% lethality rate from continued post-operative intestinal failure and an associated severe immunodeficiency. We present a case of HMIA evaluated with fetal MRI and subsequently diagnosed by a combination of corroborative postnatal imaging with surgical exploration and pathological examination. (orig.)

  7. Hereditary benign telangiectasia without family history in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Lin; SUN Qing-miao; ZANG Dong-jie; ZHANG Jian-zhong

    2011-01-01

    A case of hereditary benign telangiectasia without family history was reported. A 39-year-old woman presented with small and tiny telangiectases on the face, neck, upper trunk and forearms at birth. The numbers and sizes of the lesions increased gradually and she had no hemorrhagic diathesis and systemic diseases. No similar patients were found in her family. Upon physical examination, telangiectases were found on the face, neck, upper trunk and forearms; and a telangiectatic erythema was found on the right forearm 25 mm ×40 mm in size. Histopathology examination showed a normal epidermis and dilation of the capillaries at upper dermis. Hereditary benign telangiectasia without family history was diagnosed.

  8. The optic nerve head in hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Evelyn C; Mackey, David A; Connell, Paul P; Hewitt, Alex W; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V; Crowston, Jonathan G

    2009-05-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are a prominent cause of blindness in both children and adults. The disorders in this group share many overlapping clinical characteristics, including morphological changes that occur at the optic nerve head. Accurate and prompt clinical diagnosis, supplemented with imaging when indicated, is essential for optimum management of the relevant optic neuropathy and appropriate counseling of the patient on its natural history. Patient history, visual field assessment, optic disc findings and imaging are the cornerstones of a correct diagnosis. This Review highlights the characteristic optic nerve head features that are common to the various hereditary optic neuropathies, and describes the features that enable the conditions to be differentiated.

  9. The diagnosis of hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, B; Gitzelmann, R

    1981-09-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a potentially life-threatening disorder and can be suspected from a detailed nutritional history. The usefulness of 2 diagnostic procedures, fructose tolerance test (FTT) and aldolase assay on biopsied liver, was studied. A standardized intravenous FTT with 200 mg/kg b.w. was done on 11 children with HFI, 17 age-matched contrast children, 6 adults with HFI and 6 adult controls. Blood glucose, phosphorus, urate, magnesium and fructose were followed for 2 hours. By the FTT, each HFI individual was reliably distinguished from controls and contrasts and even from those with acute liver disease other than HFI. Both children with non-HFI hepatopathy examined by both procedures had a normal FTT in spite of reduced liver fructaldolase activity. HFI children responded to the FTT by earlier and more pronounced hypoglycemia than adults, and one girl converted to an adult type response between the ages 12 and 181/2 years. Responses of two HFI sibling pairs and of one set of monozygotic twins were typical for age, but resemblance was no greater than within the unrelated HFI probands. The intravenous FTT is judged a reliable diagnostic tool, simple and harmless if done in hospital. Essential fructosuria is readily diagnosed by the FTT, but fructose-1,6-diphosphatase deficiency and HFI are not differentiated with certainty. Liver biopsies were obtained from 35 children with HFI, 14 contrast persons and 10 controls (of which 9 organ donors) and examined enzymatically. Deficiency of fructaldolase was observed in all HFI children but also in some contrast children suffering from acute liver disease other than HFI. In these, HFI could only be excluded when the reduced activity of reference enzymes such as fructose-1,6-diphosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase and liver histology were included in the evaluation. In one deceased HFI infant, fructaldolase was deficient in both, liver and kidney cortex. Extent of antibody activation and of heat

  10. Targeted therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    Cancer genetics has rapidly evolved in the last two decades. Understanding and exploring the several genetic pathways in the cancer cell is the foundation of targeted therapy. Several genomic aberrations have been identified and their role in carcinogenesis is being explored. In contrast to most cancers where these mutations are acquired, patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have inherited genomic aberrations. The understanding of the molecular pathobiology in hereditary cancer syndromes has advanced dramatically. In addition, many molecularly targeted therapies have been developed that could have potential roles in the treatment of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes. In this review, we outline the presentation, molecular biology, and possible targeted therapies for two of the most widely recognized hereditary cancer syndromes -- hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (Lynch syndrome). We will also discuss other syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (TP53). PMID:25549704

  11. Intragenic duplication: a novel mutational mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Maiken T; Geisz, Andrea; Brusgaard, Klaus;

    2011-01-01

    In a hereditary pancreatitis family from Denmark, we identified a novel intragenic duplication of 9 nucleotides in exon-2 of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene (c.63_71dup) which at the amino-acid level resulted in the insertion of 3 amino acids within the activation peptide of cationic...

  12. Non-recurrent SEPT9 duplications cause hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collie, A.M.; Landsverk, M.L.; Ruzzo, E.; Mefford, H.C.; Buysse, K.; Adkins, J.R.; Knutzen, D.M.; Barnett, K.; Brown Jr., R.H.; Parry, G.J.; Yum, S.W.; Simpson, D.A.; Olney, R.K.; Chinnery, P.F.; Eichler, E.E.; Chance, P.F.; Hannibal, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genomic copy number variants have been shown to be responsible for multiple genetic diseases. Recently, a duplication in septin 9 (SEPT9) was shown to be causal for hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA), an episodic peripheral neuropathy with autosomal dominant inheritance. This duplicat

  13. RB1 mutations and second primary malignancies after hereditary retinoblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, Charlotte J.; Marees, Tamara; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Imhof, Saskia M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Ringens, Peter J.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Moll, Annette C.

    2012-01-01

    Survivors of hereditary retinoblastoma have a high risk of second primary malignancies, but it has not been investigated whether specific RB1 germline mutations are associated with greater risk of second primary malignancies in a large cohort. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 199 survivo

  14. Hereditary Angioedema - Consequences of a New Treatment Paradigm in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    stopped long-term prophylaxis with danazol or tranexamic acid and changed treatment regimen to on-demand treatment with C1 inhibitor concentrate or icatibant. At least 10% of the attacks remained un-treated. More than half of the patients felt that hereditary angioedema had a significant psychological...

  15. Hereditary orotic aciduria with epilepsy and without megaloblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohmann, Karina; Lauffer, Heinz; Lauenstein, Peter; Hoffmann, Georg F; Seidlitz, Günter

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary orotic aciduria is a rare metabolic disease that results from a defect of uridine-5-monophosphate synthase (UMPS). In affected patients, main clinical symptoms are a markedly increased urinary excretion of orotic acid combined with megaloblastic anemia. This report describes a new case of UMPS deficiency without megaloblastic anemia but with epilepsy. PMID:25757096

  16. On the many faces of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostra, RJ; Tijmes, NT; Cobben, JM; Bolhuis, PA; vanNesselrooij, BPM; Houtman, WA; deKokNazaruk, MM; BleekerWagemakers, EM

    1997-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited disorder, associated with mutations in the mitochondrial DNA, which is notorious for its aspecific presentations. Two pedigrees are described with cases that are atypical for LHON with respect to sex, age of onset, interval between t

  17. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pott, Jan Willem R.; Wong, Kwok H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited optic neuropathy caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). It is also believed that several epigenetic factors have an influence on the development of LHON. Methods: A case series was observed. Results: Three pa

  18. Gene-environment interactions in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Kirkman; P. Yu-Wai-Man (Patrick); A. Korsten (Alex); M. Leonhardt (Miriam); K. Dimitriadis (Konstantin); I.F.M. de Coo (René); T. Klopstock (Thomas); P.F. Chinnery

    2009-01-01

    textabstractLeber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a genetic disorder primarily due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Environmental factors are thought to precipitate the visual failure and explain the marked incomplete penetrance of LHON, but previous small studies have failed to conf

  19. Visual Rehabilitation of Persons with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudanko, S.-L.

    1995-01-01

    This article presents results of a noncontrolled clinical study of 20 persons with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy who were treated from 1976 to 1990 at the Low Vision Centre of the Finnish Federation of the Visually Handicapped. The importance of early functional visual rehabilitation is emphasized, as is the use of low vision aids to help…

  20. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Kjeldsen, J

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding occurs in a number of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and may lead to a high transfusion need. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and severity of gastrointestinal bleeding in a geographically well defined HHT population....

  1. Efficiency of laser treatment in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Gita; Lange, Bibi; Wanscher, Jens Højberg;

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown the effect of laser treatment on epistaxis in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). At the present time, only very few prospective trials have been performed, and many studies are based on patients' subjective assessment of the severity of epistaxis...

  2. National mutation study among Danish patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, P M; Brusgaard, K; Ousager, L B;

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominantly inherited vascular disease characterized by the presence of mucocutaneous telangiectasia and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVM). The clinical diagnosis of HHT is based on the Curaçao criteria. About 85% of HHT patients...

  3. Study of glycolytic intermediates in hereditary elliptocytosis with thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavri Roshan

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycolytic intermediates like ATP, DPG and GSH have been studied in a family with. hereditary elliptocytosis and thalassemia. Results indicate a fall in ATP with a concomitant rise in DPG in the Patient. Findings are discussed in relation to other data.

  4. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  5. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... article on PubMed Central Huang CL, Kuo E. Mechanisms of disease: WNK-ing at the mechanism of salt-sensitive hypertension. Nat Clin Pract Nephrol. ... Verpoorten N, De Jonghe P, Timmerman V. Disease mechanisms in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies. Neurobiol Dis. ...

  6. Oestrogens ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Carla; Montopoli, Monica; Perli, Elena; Orlandi, Maurizia; Fantin, Marianna; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Caparrotta, Laura; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Ghelli, Anna; Sadun, Alfredo A; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, the most frequent mitochondrial disease due to mitochondrial DNA point mutations in complex I, is characterized by the selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells, leading to optic atrophy and loss of central vision prevalently in young males. The current study investigated the reasons for the higher prevalence of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in males, exploring the potential compensatory effects of oestrogens on mutant cell metabolism. Control and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy osteosarcoma-derived cybrids (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6) were grown in glucose or glucose-free, galactose-supplemented medium. After having shown the nuclear and mitochondrial localization of oestrogen receptors in cybrids, experiments were carried out by adding 100 nM of 17β-oestradiol. In a set of experiments, cells were pre-incubated with the oestrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy cybrids in galactose medium presented overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which led to decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increased apoptotic rate, loss of cell viability and hyper-fragmented mitochondrial morphology compared with control cybrids. Treatment with 17β-oestradiol significantly rescued these pathological features and led to the activation of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 2. In addition, 17β-oestradiol induced a general activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and a small although significant improvement in energetic competence. All these effects were oestrogen receptor mediated. Finally, we showed that the oestrogen receptor β localizes to the mitochondrial network of human retinal ganglion cells. Our results strongly support a metabolic basis for the unexplained male prevalence in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and hold promises for a therapeutic use for oestrogen-like molecules.

  7. Inherited focal, episodic neuropathies: hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies and hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Phillip F

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP; also called tomaculous neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder that produces a painless episodic, recurrent, focal demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP generally develops during adolescence, and may cause attacks of numbness, muscular weakness, and atrophy. Peroneal palsies, carpal tunnel syndrome, and other entrapment neuropathies may be frequent manifestations of HNPP. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities may be reduced in clinically affected patients, as well as in asymptomatic gene carriers. The histopathological changes observed in peripheral nerves of HNPP patients include segmental demyelination and tomaculous or "sausage-like" formations. Mild overlap of clinical features with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 1 (CMT1) may lead patients with HNPP to be misdiagnosed as having CMT1. HNPP and CMT1 are both demyelinating neuropathies, however, their clinical, pathological, and electrophysiological features are quite distinct. HNPP is most frequently associated with a 1.4-Mb pair deletion on chromosome 17p12. A duplication of the identical region leads to CMT1A. Both HNPP and CMT1A result from a dosage effect of the PMP22 gene, which is contained within the deleted/duplicated region. This is reflected in reduced mRNA and protein levels in sural nerve biopsy samples from HNPP patients. Treatment for HNPP consists of preventative and symptom-easing measures. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA; also called familial brachial plexus neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder causing episodes of paralysis and muscle weakness initiated by severe pain. Individuals with HNA may suffer repeated episodes of intense pain, paralysis, and sensory disturbances in an affected limb. The onset of HNA is at birth or later in childhood with prognosis for recovery usually favorable; however, persons with HNA may have permanent residual neurological dysfunction following attack(s). Episodes are often

  8. McCune-Albright syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fractures Deformities of the bones in the face Gigantism Irregular, large patchy cafe-au-lait spots , especially ... skull Abnormal heart rhythms ( arrhythmias ) Acromegaly Adrenal ... Hyperthyroidism Hypophosphatemia Large cafe-au-lait spots ...

  9. Genetic and biochemical impairment of mitochondrial complex I activity in a family with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and hereditary spastic dystonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeVries, DD; Went, LN; Bruyn, GW; Scholte, HR; Hofstra, RMW; Bolhuis, PA; vanOost, BA

    1996-01-01

    A rare form of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) that is associated with hereditary spastic dystonia has been studied in a large Dutch family. Neuropathy and ophthalmological lesions were present together in some family members, whereas only one type of abnormality was found in others. mtDNA

  10. Síndrome de McCune-Albrigth: Evaluación del Compromiso Craneofacial y de Columna por Imágenes de Resonancia Magnética McCune-Albright syndrome: Evaluation of craniofacial and spinal alterations on MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Garcés

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta a un paciente de sexo femenino de 27 años de edad con el cuadro clásico de Síndrome de Mc Cune- Albright, caracterizado por: pubertad precoz, manchas color café con leche, displasia fibrosa poliostótica y gigantismo. Se describen los hallazgos en Resonancia Magnética de la región craneofacial y del raquis.We report on a 27-year-old female with the classical McCune-Albright syndrome. This condition is characterized by precocious puberty, café-au-lait spots, polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and gigantism. MR findings are described in skull, face and spine.

  11. The potential of disease management for neuromuscular hereditary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Gagnon, Cynthia; Laberge, Luc; Tremblay, Carmen; Côté, Charlotte; Leclerc, Nadine; Mathieu, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular hereditary disorders require long-term multidisciplinary rehabilitation management. Although the need for coordinated healthcare management has long been recognized, most neuromuscular disorders are still lacking clinical guidelines about their long-term management and structured evaluation plan with associated services. One of the most prevalent adult-onset neuromuscular disorders, myotonic dystrophy type 1, generally presents several comorbidities and a variable clinical picture, making management a constant challenge. This article presents a healthcare follow-up plan and proposes a nursing case management within a disease management program as an innovative and promising approach. This disease management program and model consists of eight components including population identification processes, evidence-based practice guidelines, collaborative practice, patient self-management education, and process outcomes evaluation (Disease Management Association of America, 2004). It is believed to have the potential to significantly improve healthcare management for neuromuscular hereditary disorders and will prove useful to nurses delivering and organizing services for this population.

  12. Hereditary hemochromatosis and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Grande, Peer;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We tested the hypothesis that the hereditary hemochromatosis genotypes C282Y/C282Y, C282Y/H63D, or C282Y/wild-type are risk factors for ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a prospective study of 9178 individuals from the Danish...... or MI in case-control studies, overall or stratified by gender. We had 90% power to detect an odds ratio for IHD of 3.6 for C282Y/C282Y, 1.8 for C282Y/H63D, and 1.3 for C282Y/wild-type versus wild-type/wild-type. CONCLUSIONS: In these studies, hereditary hemochromatosis C282Y/C282Y, C282Y/H63D, and C282...

  13. Spinal Exostosis in a Boy with Multiple Hereditary Exostoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al Kaissi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a 13-year-old boy who presented with multiple hereditary exostosis and had development of back pain, associated with neurological deficits, and was found to have exostoses in the spinal canal. Spine radiograph showed a cauliflower-like abnormality of multiple exostoses of the posterior arch (pedicle of the thoracic vertebrae (T3–5. Reformatted CT scanning revealed the simultaneous development of intra- and extraspinal osteochondromatosis of T3–5. The spinal cord was compressed by the intraspinal exostosis. Our patient was surgically treated for intraspinal exostoses and showed cessation of neurological deficits. We report what might be a rare association of spinal cord compression in a patient with multiple hereditary exostoses.

  14. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy associated with multiple sclerosis: Harding's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry-Jones, A R; Mitchell, J D; Gunarwardena, W J; Shaunak, S

    2008-04-01

    We describe a 32-year-old woman with sequential, severe, painless visual loss in one eye and then the other, and three temporally distinct episodes of neurological disturbance suggestive of demyelination in the spinal cord. She was positive for the T14484C mutation in the mitochondrial genome, one of three common mutations causing Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. In addition, MRI identified areas of demyelination within the periventricular white matter of the brain and within the spinal cord. The coexistence of multiple sclerosis and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (Harding's syndrome) is known to occur more often than would be expected by chance; therefore, screening for the Leber's mutations in multiple sclerosis patients with severe visual loss should be considered because this has important prognostic and genetic implications.

  15. Glaucoma progression associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucci, Carlo; Martucci, Alessio; Mancino, Raffaele; Cerulli, Luciano

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a case of open-angle glaucoma progression associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. Single case analysis method is used. A 53-year-old woman with a previous diagnosis of glaucoma presented with progressive visual field loss. Complete ophthalmological examination and blood tests were negative for other concomitant diseases. Genetic counseling revealed mitochondrial DNA mutation compatible with the diagnosis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. In conclusion, the case describes the concomitant occurrence of open-angle glaucoma and Leber's optic neuropathy. We hypothesize that the two diseases may have a cumulative effect on oxidative stress and retinal ganglion cell death with the consequent rapid progression of visual impairment. Screening for mitochondrial DNA mutations may be requested in patients with glaucoma who, despite pharmacologically controlled intraocular pressure, show rapid progression of the disease.

  16. [Clinical and molecular genetic analysis of hereditary optic neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetisov, S É; Sheremet, N L; Vorob'eva, O K; Eliseeva, É G; Chukhrova, A L; Loginova, A N; Khanakova, N A; Poliakov, A V

    2013-01-01

    DNA samples of 50 patients with optic neuropathy (ON) associated with congenital cataract were studied to find 3 major mt-DNA mutations (m.11778G>A, m.3460G>A, m.14484T>C), mutations in "hot" regions of OPA 1 gene (exons 8, 14, 15, 16, 18, 27, 28) and in the entire coding sequence of OPA3 gene for molecular genetic confirmation of diagnosis of hereditary Leber and autosomal dominant ON. Primary mutations of mtDNA responsible for hereditary Leber ON were found in 16 patients (32%). Pathogenic mutations of OPAl gene (c.869G>A and c. 2850delT) were identified in 2 patients (4%), these mutations were not found in the literature. OPA3 gene mutations were not revealed.

  17. Disease mechanisms in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpoorten, Nathalie; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2006-02-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies are common monogenically inherited diseases of the peripheral nervous system. In the most common variant, i.e., the hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies, both motor and sensory nerves are affected. In contrast, sensory abnormalities predominate or are exclusively present in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN). HSAN are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and are subdivided according to mode of inheritance, age of onset and clinical evolution. In recent years, 6 disease-causing genes have been identified for autosomal dominant and recessive HSAN. However, vesicular transport and axonal trafficking seem important common pathways leading to degeneration of sensory and autonomic neurons. This review discusses the HSAN-related genes and their biological role in the disease mechanisms leading to HSAN.

  18. [Hereditary ataxias, spastic parapareses and neuropathies in Eastern Canada].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, N; Chrestian, N; Thiffault, I; Brais, B; Rouleau, G A; Bouchard, J-P

    2008-01-01

    It has been demonstrated, for many inherited diseases, that historical events have shaped the various regional gene pools of Eastern Canada. In so doing, it has given rise to the increased prevalence of some rare diseases due, to founder effects. The following neurogenetic disorders were first identified in patients from Eastern Canada: AOA-2, Arsacs, HSN-2, Arca-1, HMSN/ACC and Arsal. The population of Eastern Canada, we are convinced, will still allow the identification of new rare forms of hereditary ataxias, spastic parapareses and neuropathies as well as contribute to the uncovering of their mutated genes. We have summarized our current knowledge of the various hereditary ataxias, spastic parapareses and neuropathies in Eastern Canada. The study of the more common and homogenous features of these diseases has been largely completed.

  19. Hereditary peripheral neuropathies of childhood: an overview for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmshurst, Jo M; Ouvrier, Robert

    2011-11-01

    This review focuses on the "pure" hereditary peripheral neuropathies where peripheral nerve disease is the main manifestation and does not address neurodegenerative disorders associated with but not dominated by peripheral neuropathy. Aetiologies of childhood-onset peripheral neuropathies differ from those of adult-onset, with more inherited conditions, especially autosomal recessive. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is the commonest neuromuscular disorder. The genetic labels of CMT (Charcot-Marie-Tooth) disease types 1-4 are the preferred sub-type terms. Clinical presentations and molecular genetic heterogeneity of hereditary peripheral neuropathies are diverse. For most patients worldwide, diagnostic studies are limited to clinical assessment. Such markers which could be used to identify specific sub-types include presentation in early childhood, scoliosis, marked sensory involvement, respiratory compromise, upper limb involvement, visual or hearing impairment, pyramidal signs and mental retardation. These key markers may assist targeted genetic testing and aid in diagnosing children where DNA testing is not possible.

  20. Hereditary anaemias: genetic basis, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment*

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    The hereditary anaemias present a major genetic health problem that contributes considerably to childhood mortality and morbidity in many developing countries. This article summarizes recent scientific and technical advances in knowledge concerning the genes involved and their interaction to produce major haemoglobinopathies, the clinical pictures of these conditions, and their diagnostic criteria. Though there is no definitive cure, supportive treatment for the haemoglobinopathies has improv...

  1. Usefulness of erythrocyte ferritin analysis in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cruickshank, M K; Ninness, J; A. Curtis; Barr, R M; Flanagan, P R; Ghent, C N; Valberg, L. S.

    1987-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the usefulness of erythrocyte ferritin analysis in identifying homozygotes and heterozygotes in families affected with hereditary hemochromatosis, an autosomal recessive disorder. To select the subjects the genotypes of 60 people from 26 affected families were determined by HLA-A and HLA-B haplotyping. In addition, data for 12 homozygotes for whom erythrocyte ferritin values were available from the literature were included. Likelihood analysis was used to ...

  2. Hereditary cancer risk assessment: essential tools for a better approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gomy, Israel; Estevez Diz, Maria Del Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary cancer risk assessment (HCRA) is a multidisciplinary process of estimating probabilities of germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes and assessing empiric risks of cancer, based on personal and family history. It includes genetic counseling, testing and management of at-risk individuals so that they can make well-informed choices about cancer surveillance, surgical treatment and chemopreventive measures, including biomolecular cancer therapies. Providing patients and famil...

  3. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with a thin corpus callosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somasundaram, Sivaraman; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Trivandrum (India); Raghavendra, Seetharam; Singh, Atampreet; Nair, Muraleedharan [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Neurology, Trivandrum (India)

    2007-05-15

    We report a 15-year-old boy with autosomal recessive complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia with a thin corpus callosum (HSP-TCC). The involvement of the corpus callosum was characteristic with the genu and body predominantly affected with relative sparing of the splenium. HSP-TCC is being increasingly recognized over a wider geographical area than earlier believed. We now report a case of HSP-TCC from the Indian subcontinent. (orig.)

  4. The molecular basis of hereditary enamel defects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J T; Carrion, I A; Morris, C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel.

  5. HEREDITARY INTRAVENTRICULAR CONDUCTION DISORDERS IN THE FAMILY FROM KRASNOYARSK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Chernova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pedigree of the family from Krasnoyarsk city with hereditary disorders of intracardiac conduction was studied. The diagnosis of each family member was verified by electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography , bicycle ergometry , ECG Holter monitoring. The family 10-year follow-up showed familial aggregation of intracardiac conduction disorders in grandson, niece, son of the proband niece, ie, in the III-degree relatives. Family history of III-degree relatives with intracardiac conduction disorders and discordant pathology is identified.

  6. Strumpellin and Spartin, Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Proteins, are Binding Partners

    OpenAIRE

    Jiali Zhao; Peter Hedera

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is one of the most heterogeneous neurodegenerative diseases with more than 50 identified genes causing a relatively stereotypical phenotypic presentation. Recent studies of HSP pathogenesis have suggested the existence of shared biochemical pathways that are crucial for axonal maintenance and degeneration. We explored possible interactions of several proteins associated with this condition. Here we report interactions of endogenous and overexpressed strumpe...

  7. Hereditary vitamin D rickets: a case series in a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surender, Kumar; Kochar, I P S; Ahmad, Ayesha; Kapoor, Meenal

    2014-11-01

    Hereditary vitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by end-organ resistance to 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3). Clinically, the syndrome is recognized by severe early onset rickets with bowing of the lower extremities, short stature, and often alopecia. Here, we report a case series on three siblings who had HVDRR with varied clinical findings.

  8. One novel transcript of human hereditary multipleexostoses 2 (EXT2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The encoding sequence of human hereditary multiple exostoses gene EXT2.1 is 30 bp longer than EXT2, and they differ in a sequence of 90 base pairs. In order to clarify EXT2.1 structure, this 90 bp sequence was analyzed with the Human Sequence Draft, a database provided by Celera Genomics. The result shows that EXT2.1 is a novel transcript of EXT2 gene, suggesting a rare event of alternative splicing.

  9. Study on diagnosis and treatment of hereditary ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANG Bei-sha

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary ataxia (HA is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders with high mortality and morbidity. It is characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia of gait and limbs variably associated with ophthalmoplegia, pigmentary retinopathy, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, dementia and peripheral neuropathy. The molecular diagnosis process is proposed based on molecular classification. So far, symptomatic treatment is the mainly approach, with the lack of effective therapeutic method.

  10. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and juvenile polyposis: an overlap of syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletto, Erica D.; Levin, Terry L. [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States); Trinh, Angela M. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Loizides, Anthony M. [Children' s Hospital at Montefiore, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) (Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome) is a syndrome characterized by multiorgan telangiectases and arteriovenous malformations. A subset of patients with a mutation in the MADH4 gene on chromosome 18 exhibits an overlapping syndrome of HHT and juvenile polyposis (JPS). We present one such family. Genetic testing is warranted when either HHT or JPS is diagnosed, as early recognition of this syndrome overlap allows appropriate management of these patients. (orig.)

  11. Hereditary hemochromatosis in an Indian origin: A rare case report

    OpenAIRE

    R L Geetha; Vani, B. R.; V Srinivasa Murthy; Deepak Kumar; Geethamala, K.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is manifested as an iron overload in different organs due to homozygosity of a single autosomal mutation. If untreated it leads to conditions such as liver cirrhosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, cardiomyopathy, arthritis, and bronze coloring of the skin. Hemochromatosis affects as many as 1 in every 200 people in the United States, but in India the reports of genetic study are rare and virtually unexplored. It is also possible that ...

  12. Hereditary hemochromatosis:with a special emphasis on HFE genotyping

    OpenAIRE

    Hannuksela, J. (Jokke)

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a common autosomal recessive disorder estimated to affect one out of every 250–400 Caucasian individuals. It is a disorder of iron metabolism, in which excessive iron accumulation in the body may induce serious clinical manifestations (e.g. liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, diabetes, and cardiomyopathy). HH is caused by mutations in the HFE gene, and HFE genotyping thus enables early diagnosis of the disease and detection of the individu...

  13. Hereditary Amyloid Cardiomyopathy Caused by a Variant Apolipoprotein A1

    OpenAIRE

    Hamidi Asl, Ladan; Liepnieks, Juris J.; Hamidi Asl, Kamran; Uemichi, Tomoyuki; Moulin, Georges; Desjoyaux, Emmanuel; Loire, Robert; Delpech, Marc; Grateau, Gilles; Benson, Merrill D.

    1999-01-01

    Autosomal dominant hereditary amyloidosis with a unique cutaneous and cardiac presentation and death from heart failure by the sixth or seventh decade was found to be associated with a previously unreported point mutation (thymine to cytosine, nt 1389) in exon 4 of the apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) gene. The predicted substitution of proline for leucine at amino acid position 90 was confirmed by structural analysis of amyloid protein isolated from cardiac deposits of amyloid. The subunit protein ...

  14. Cardiac function in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis : an echocardiographic study

    OpenAIRE

    Arvidsson, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) is a lethal disease in which misfolded transthyretin (TTR) proteins accumulate as insoluble aggregates in tissues throughout the body. A common mutation is the exchange of valine to methionine at place 30 (TTR V30M), a form endemically found in the northern parts of Sweden. The main treatment option for ATTR amyloidosis is liver transplantation as the procedure halts production of mutated transthyretin. The disease is associated with mar...

  15. Hereditary nonsyndromic gingival fibromatosis: report of family case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeran, Syed Wali; Ramalingam, Karthikeyan; Peeran, Syed Ali; Mugrabi, Marei Hamed; Abdulla, Khaled Awidat

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare, benign disorder with slowly progressive enlargement of maxillary and mandibular gingiva. Herewith, we report the first case series of HGF presenting among mother and all of her 3 children. Their complaints included unaesthetic appearance due to gingival growth, malocclusion, and difficulty in mastication. Conventional gingivectomy with oral hygiene measures and regular followup is the treatment of choice for such presentation. PMID:24191204

  16. Hereditary Nonsyndromic Gingival Fibromatosis: Report of Family Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Wali Peeran; Karthikeyan Ramalingam; Syed Ali Peeran; Marei Hamed Mugrabi; Khaled Awidat Abdulla

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare, benign disorder with slowly progressive enlargement of maxillary and mandibular gingiva. Herewith, we report the first case series of HGF presenting among mother and all of her 3 children. Their complaints included unaesthetic appearance due to gingival growth, malocclusion, and difficulty in mastication. Conventional gingivectomy with oral hygiene measures and regular followup is the treatment of choice for such presentation.

  17. [Familial brain abscess as a complication of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szöts, M; Szapáry, L; Nagy, F; Vetö, F

    2001-10-21

    The hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber disease) is an inherited autosomal dominant disease with angiodysplasia of the skin, mucosa, parenchymal organs, and it can affect the central nervous system. In 40% of the cases neurological complications, most frequently intracerebral abscesses occur. In this study, the case history of a patient with central nervous system manifestation of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia showing familiar aggregation of brain abscess will be presented. A young male patient was admitted to Neurological Department because of his first epileptic seizure and progressive right hemispheric symptoms. His examinations showed frontal abscess, which was surgically removed. The frequent nose-bleeding of the patient and recurrent brain abscess in his brother's history provided the possibility of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. The background of brain abscess were multiple pulmonary arteriovenous malformation, which were embolized by repeated angiography. Familiar brain abscess is very rare. However, in the case of brain abscess especially with familiarity diagnosis of the Rendu-Osler-Weber disease should be considered. PMID:11760648

  18. Management of hereditary angioedema in pregnant women: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caballero T

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Teresa Caballero,1,2 Julio Canabal,1 Daniela Rivero-Paparoni,1 Rosario Cabañas1 1Hospital La Paz Institute for Health Research, (IdiPaz 2Biomedical Research Network on Rare Diseases-U754 (CIBERER, Madrid, Spain Abstract: Three types of hereditary angioedema (HAE have been described: two are due to C1 inhibitor (C1-INH deficiency (C1-INH-HAE types I and II and one is characterized by normal C1-INH (nC1-INH-HAE. The management of pregnancy in patients with HAE is often a clinical challenge owing to potential worsening of the disease in relation to the physiological increase in estrogens and the limited treatment options. This review addresses the potential influence of pregnancy on the clinical severity of hereditary angioedema and the management of this disease during pregnancy with currently available treatments. Keywords: hereditary angioedema, pregnancy, female, treatment, C1 inhibitor concentrate, tranexamic acid

  19. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijmons, Rolf H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2016-02-01

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome. Both conditions are important to recognize clinically as their identification has direct consequences for clinical management and allows targeted preventive actions in mutation carriers. Lynch syndrome is one of the more common adult-onset hereditary tumor syndromes, with thousands of patients reported to date. Its tumor spectrum is well established and includes colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and a range of other cancer types. However, surveillance for cancers other than colorectal cancer is still of uncertain value. Prophylactic surgery, especially for the uterus and its adnexa is an option in female mutation carriers. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer with aspirin is actively being investigated in this syndrome and shows promising results. In contrast, the Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome is rare, features a wide spectrum of childhood onset cancers, many of which are brain tumors with high mortality rates. Future studies are very much needed to improve the care for patients with this severe disorder. PMID:26746812

  20. Small Heat Shock Proteins and Distal Hereditary Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedova, V V; Muranova, L K; Sudnitsyna, M V; Ryzhavskaya, A S; Gusev, N B

    2015-12-01

    Classification of small heat shock proteins (sHsp) is presented and processes regulated by sHsp are described. Symptoms of hereditary distal neuropathy are described and the genes whose mutations are associated with development of this congenital disease are listed. The literature data and our own results concerning physicochemical properties of HspB1 mutants associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease are analyzed. Mutations of HspB1, associated with hereditary motor neuron disease, can be accompanied by change of the size of HspB1 oligomers, by decreased stability under unfavorable conditions, by changes in the interaction with protein partners, and as a rule by decrease of chaperone-like activity. The largest part of these mutations is accompanied by change of oligomer stability (that can be either increased or decreased) or by change of intermonomer interaction inside an oligomer. Data on point mutation of HspB3 associated with axonal neuropathy are presented. Data concerning point mutations of Lys141 of HspB8 and those associated with hereditary neuropathy and different forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease are analyzed. It is supposed that point mutations of sHsp associated with distal neuropathies lead either to loss of function (for instance, decrease of chaperone-like activity) or to gain of harmful functions (for instance, increase of interaction with certain protein partners).

  1. [Diagnosis of the peripheral hereditary neuropathies and its molecular genetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Zamora, Edgar; Arenas-Sordo, María de la Luz

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies include a wide range of pathological disorders characterized by damage of peripheral nerves. Among them, peripheral hereditary neuropathies are a group of frequent illnesses and early evolution. They have been named hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) or peripheral hereditary neuropathies type Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT). The most frequent types are CMT1, CMT2 and CMTX. Approximately 70% of the cases correspond to subtype CMT1A, associated with tandem duplication of a 1.5 Mb DNA fragment on chromosome 17p11.2-p12 that codifies the peripheral myelin protein PMP22. So far, there five different types of CMT (1,2,3,4,X) with approximately 32 subtypes, associated with more than 30 genes. Have been reported genetic heterogeneity and expression variability of the illness makes it necessary to carry on diagnostic strategies that integrate clinical study for determining genetic clinical history, family history, complete physical exploration, muscular strength, physical deformities, reflexes and sensitivity, and molecular studies allow detection of different types of mutations and help establish a correct diagnosis and an adequate genetic counseling.

  2. Colorectal Cancer Survivors' Interest in Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer: Implications for Universal Tumor Screening

    OpenAIRE

    Cragun, Deborah; Malo, Teri L.; Pal, Tuya; Shibata, David; Vadaparampil, Susan T

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Benefits of universal tumor screening for Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC), will be realized only if patients are interested in genetic counseling and testing. This study explores interest in genetic testing for hereditary CRC among CRC patients who have never received genetic counseling or testing. Methods Using results from a cross-sectional survey of CRC patients (n=91) at varying categories of risk for hereditary CRC, bivariate and mult...

  3. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies Multiple, Complex Etiologies in an Idiopathic Hereditary Pancreatitis Kindred

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica LaRusch; Sheila Solomon; M Michael Barmada; Whitcomb, David C

    2012-01-01

    Context Hereditary pancreatitis is the early onset form of chronic pancreatitis that is carried in an autosomal dominant pattern with variable penetrance. While 80% of hereditary pancreatitis has been shown to be due to a single mutation in the trypsinogen gene PRSS1, a number of hereditary pancreatitis families have no identified genetic cause for illness; thus no reliable screening options or clear therapy. Objective To explore the use of massive parallel DNA sequencing technology to discov...

  4. [Correlations between the patient's genotype and the course of the disease in hereditary cancer diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisgaard, Marie Luise

    2006-06-12

    The majority of hereditary cancers demonstrate extended variation of phenotype, not only between families, but also within a particular family, who supposedly have inherited the same pathogenic mutation. The present paper reviews genotype-phenotype correlations with examples mainly from the two largest hereditary cancer groups, namely hereditary colorectal cancer and hereditary breast (and ovarian) cancer. It is concluded that knowledge about genotype-phenotype correlations is essential in the cancer genetic clinic; otherwise, the patient tends to base decisions on personal experience, not realising that the course of disease might be different in other family members. PMID:16822416

  5. Dispersion of compound muscle action potential in hereditary neuropathies and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Michael; Pannoni, Valerie; Lewis, Richard A; Logigian, Eric L; Naguib, Demian; Shy, Michael E; Cleland, James; Herrmann, David N

    2006-10-01

    Distal compound muscle action potential (DCMAP) dispersion, defined as a DCMAP duration > or = 9 ms, and proximal-distal (P-D) CMAP dispersion are considered useful in the electrodiagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Distal and P-D CMAP dispersion have not been fully studied in hereditary neuropathies, and it is not known whether these measures distinguish hereditary from acquired demyelination. We compared DCMAP duration and P-D CMAP dispersion in 91 genetically characterized hereditary neuropathies and 33 subjects with CIDP. DCMAP dispersion was more frequent in nerves affected by CIDP (41.5%) than in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT)1A (24.4%), CMT1B (7.4%), hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) (10.5%), or CMTX (9.8%). P-D CMAP dispersion was more frequent in CIDP (27.7% of nerves) than in hereditary neuropathies (16.3%) when applying American Academy of Neurology (AAN) criteria; however, its frequency was similar in CIDP and the hereditary neuropathies using the more restrictive criteria of the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM). Although dispersion is more common in CIDP than in the hereditary neuropathies, DCMAP and P-D dispersion occur in at least one motor nerve in a significant proportion of hereditary neuropathies, and cannot be used in isolation to distinguish acquired from hereditary demyelination.

  6. Sporadic diffuse segmental interstitial cell of Cajal hyperplasia harbouring two gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST mimicking hereditary GIST syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafalda Costa Neves

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: We describe a diffuse form of sporadic ICC hyperplasia harbouring multifocal GISTs, mimicking diffuse ICC hyperplasia in hereditary GIST syndromes. Detection of somatic c-KIT exon 11 mutation ruled out a hereditary disorder.

  7. Congenital optic nerve anomalies and hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidary, Gena

    2014-12-01

    Congenital and hereditary optic nerve anomalies represent a significant cause of visual dysfunction. While some optic nerve abnormalities affect the visual system alone, others may be associated with neurologic and systemic findings. Correct identification of the optic nerve disease therefore is crucial both for developing a treatment plan with respect to visual rehabilitation, but also for initiating the appropriate multidisciplinary evaluation. The purpose of this review is to highlight common examples of congenital and inherited optic nerve abnormalities in an effort to familiarize the clinician with salient clinical features of these diseases and to review important systemic testing when relevant. PMID:27625883

  8. Hereditary hemochromatosis should be considered a conformational disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Matthew W; Mankan, Arun K; Norris, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disease associated with iron overload, in which individuals homozygous for the mutant C282Y HFE associated allele are at risk of developing liver disease, diabetes and arthritis. Conformational diseases are a class of disorders associated with the expression of misfolded protein and examples include conditions such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Z alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency and Huntington's diseases. HFE C282Y is a mutant protein that does not fold correctly forming aggregates and is retained in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER). Consequently, we propose that HH associated with the C282Y HFE mutation should be considered a conformational disorder. PMID:17904763

  9. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarano, Valentina; Valentina, Scarano; De Santis, Daniele; Daniele, De Santis; Suppressa, Patrizia; Patrizia, Suppressa; Lastella, Patrizia; Patrizia, Lastella; Lenato, Gennaro Mariano; Mariano, Lenato Gennaro; Triggiani, Vincenzo; Vincenzo, Triggiani; Sabbà, Carlo; Carlo, Sabbà

    2013-01-01

    A 65-year-old man was referred to our clinic for the rehabilitation of right hemiparesis caused by ischaemic stroke. Hypertension, postphlebitic syndrome of lower limbs, frequent nose bleeding, and anemia were present in his history; in his adolescence, he was treated for idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Further investigations have revealed also microsomia, suggesting a clinical diagnosis of Kallmann syndrome, that is, an association, possible in males and females, of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with olfactory deficits. A definite diagnosis of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia was made based on clinical criteria and confirmed by genetic analysis. PMID:23710379

  10. CDH1 germline mutations and hereditary lobular breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Giovanni; Intra, Mattia; Trentin, Chiara; Veronesi, Paolo; Galimberti, Viviana

    2016-04-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is an autosomal dominant inherited disease associated of CDH1 germline mutations (that encodes for the E-cadherin protein), and lobular breast cancer is the second most frequent type of neoplasia. Recently, novel E-cadherin constitutional alterations have been identified in pedigree clustering only for lobular breast carcinoma without evidence of diffuse gastric tumors and in absence of BRCA1/2 mutations. This first evidence opens novel questions about the inherited correlation between diffuse gastric and lobular breast cancers. In this brief review we revise the literature data about the CDH1 mutation frequency affecting exclusively lobular breast cancer, providing clinical recommendation for asymptomatic mutation carriers.

  11. Hereditary dentine disorders: dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentine dysplasia

    OpenAIRE

    MacKie Iain; McDonnell Sinead T; Barron Martin J; Dixon Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The hereditary dentine disorders, dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and dentine dysplasia (DD), comprise a group of autosomal dominant genetic conditions characterised by abnormal dentine structure affecting either the primary or both the primary and secondary dentitions. DGI is reported to have an incidence of 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 8,000, whereas that of DD type 1 is 1 in 100,000. Clinically, the teeth are discoloured and show structural defects such as bulbous crowns and small pulp cham...

  12. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: Bringing the Lab to the Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Nailyn; Lessell, Simmons; Cestari, Dean M

    2016-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was the first clinically characterized mitochondrial disorder. Since its first description in 1871, much has been discovered regarding the genetics and pathophysiology of the disease. This has enabled the development of in vitro cell and animal models that can be used to try to determine not only the effects of the genetic mutation upon the clinical phenotype but to also test potential novel therapies. Treatments for LHON have ranged from vitamins and minerals to immunosuppressants and, more recently, targeted gene therapy. This article reviews the pathophysiology and clinical features of LHON with a focus on translational research. PMID:26959136

  13. Hereditary vitamin D-resistant rickets presenting as alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Genevieve; McPherson, Tess; Kini, Usha; Ryan, Fiona; Taibjee, Saleem M; Moss, Celia; Burge, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary vitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene. We report the case of an infant presenting with alopecia, growth failure, and gross motor developmental delay. Serum biochemistry and skeletal survey were consistent with rickets. After a poor response to standard treatment, genetic testing confirmed a c.147-2A>T novel mutation in the VDR gene consistent with HVDRR. It is important for dermatologists and pediatricians to recognize alopecia as a presenting sign of HVDRR because appropriate treatment leads to better growth and development of the child.

  14. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Associated with Bilateral Macular Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yoshiaki; Horiguchi, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) causes visual loss, predominantly in healthy young men. We recently examined a patient who previously had bilateral macular holes and subsequently developed LHON at 74 years of age. Although his central scotomas were initially attributed to the macular holes, his visual acuity declined following an initial improvement after operative closure of the macular holes; thus, other diagnoses, including LHON, were considered. Furthermore, macular optical coherence tomography (OCT) images remained unchanged in this time. A mitochondrial genetic analysis identified a 11778G→A mutation. From this case, we propose that LHON remains in the differential diagnosis even in older patients, as has previously been reported. PMID:27335507

  15. A case of hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G P Prashanth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV (HSAN -IV, also known as congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis, is a very rare condition that presents in infancy with anhidrosis, absence of pain sensation and self -mutilation. Developmental delay and mental retardation are usually present. Ultrastructural study of the peripheral nerves demonstrates loss of the unmyelinated and small myelinated fibers. We here report a 8 year -old boy with HSAN IV with typical clinical features where the diagnosis was supported by nerve biopsy findings. However, our case was unusual since mental development was normal.

  16. Synthetic dural graft septoplasty in epistaxis from hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Patricia Guerra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available It   is an autosomal dominant vascular disorder, which has a variety of clinical manifestations, with epistaxis being one of the most common. Many treatment options exist for epistaxis, but with no consensus on which is the method of choice. We describe the case of a patient with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT secondary epistaxis with septoplasty managed with synthetic hard graft, which improved intensity and frequency of bleeding episodes. This technique is a variant of the septodermoplasty described by several authors, but the use of synthetic dura can help in obtaining better results and avoid taking skin grafts from other sites different from the surgical site.

  17. Congenital optic nerve anomalies and hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidary, Gena

    2014-12-01

    Congenital and hereditary optic nerve anomalies represent a significant cause of visual dysfunction. While some optic nerve abnormalities affect the visual system alone, others may be associated with neurologic and systemic findings. Correct identification of the optic nerve disease therefore is crucial both for developing a treatment plan with respect to visual rehabilitation, but also for initiating the appropriate multidisciplinary evaluation. The purpose of this review is to highlight common examples of congenital and inherited optic nerve abnormalities in an effort to familiarize the clinician with salient clinical features of these diseases and to review important systemic testing when relevant.

  18. Comprehensive mutational screening in a cohort of Danish families with hereditary congenital cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Mikkelsen, Annemette; Nürnberg, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Identification of the causal mutations in 28 unrelated families and individuals with hereditary congenital cataract identified from a national Danish register of hereditary eye diseases. Seven families have been published previously, and the data of the remaining 21 families are presente...... populations, the applied sequencing strategy seems to be suitable for the exploration of the large group of isolated cataracts with unknown etiology....

  19. Descriptive Epidemiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics of Hereditary Prostate Cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon, Diem Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    A search for markers that can differentiate indolent prostate cancers from more aggressive forms. Assessment of clinical differences between hereditary and sporadicc prostate cancer.......A search for markers that can differentiate indolent prostate cancers from more aggressive forms. Assessment of clinical differences between hereditary and sporadicc prostate cancer....

  20. Novel germline c-MET mutation in a family with hereditary papillary renal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadt, Karin; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas V O;

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary papillary renal carcinoma (HPRC) is a highly penetrant hereditary renal cancer syndrome caused by germline missense mutations in the c-MET proto-oncogene. HPRC is clinically characterized by multiple bilateral papillary renal-cell carcinomas. Here we report a family with a novel missense...

  1. Estimation of EuroQol 5-Dimensions health status utility values in hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aygören-Pürsün, Emel; Bygum, Anette; Beusterien, Kathleen;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate health status utility (preference) weights for hereditary angioedema (HAE) during an attack and between attacks using data from the Hereditary Angioedema Burden of Illness Study in Europe (HAE-BOIS-Europe) survey. Utility measures quantitatively describe the net impact of a...

  2. A MELAS-associated ND1 mutation causing leber hereditary optic neuropathy and spastic dystonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, L.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Hendrickx, A.; Bettink-Remeijer, M.W.; Maat-Kievit, A.; Schoonderwoerd, K.C.; Sluiter, W.; Coo, I.F.M. de; Hintzen, R.Q.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report a novel mutation that is associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) within the same family affected by spastic dystonia. DESIGN: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by isolated central visual loss. Of patients with LHON, 95%

  3. McCune-Albright syndrome with hypophosphatemic rickets in four Chinese patients and literature review%McCune-Albright综合征合并低血磷性佝偻病4例并文献复习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许莉军; 姜艳; 邢小平; 李梅; 王鸥; 袁涛; 孟迅吾; 夏维波

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical characteristics of McCune-Albright syndrome with hypophos-phatemic rickets and improve the awareness of the disease .Methods Clinical data of four patients with McCune-Al-bright syndrome and hypophosphatemic rickets were retrospectively analyzed , including clinical manifestations , biochemi-cal parameters , radiographic characteristics , treatment and prognosis .Literature review was also conducted to survey the prevalence and clinical features of the disease .Results The four cases analyzed were all females and presented with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia .The onset of McCune-Albright syndrome with hypophosphatemic rickets was before 10 years old.The common manifestations were bone pain , bone deformities and fragility fractures .Hyperthyroidism appeared in two patients , and peripheral precocious puberty existed in the other two patients .Laboratory assessment showed hypophos-phatemia and increased serum alkaline phosphatase levels in all four patients .Serumβ-CTX and intact FGF23 levels were increased in three and two patients , respectively .Radiographic analysis indicated fibrous dysplasia in all patients , while typical rickets were only seen in three patients .Bone scan showed diffuse increased uptake in affected areas in three pa-tients.Bisphosphonate and supplementation of active vitamin D and phosphorus were proven to be efficacious .Systematic review of literatures revealed that patients with earlier onset of McCune-Albright syndrome and hypophosphatemic rickets suffer from more severe manifestations , lower serum phosphate levels , higher bone turnover markers and FGF 23 levels. Conclusion McCune-Albright syndrome accompanied by hypophosphatemic rickets are relatively rare in clinical prac -tice, in which patients should take examinations in order to screen for hypophosphatemic rickets , therefore avoid the mis-diagnosis and improve patients'prognosis .%目的:总结4例McCune-Albright综合征合并低血磷

  4. Pediatric hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkas Henriette

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary angioedema (HAE resulting from the deficiency of the C1 inhibitor (C1-INH is a rare, life-threatening disorder. It is characterized by attacks of angioedema involving the skin and/or the mucosa of the upper airways, as well as the intestinal mucosa. In approximately 50 per cent of cases, clinical manifestations may appear during childhood. The complex management of HAE in pediatric patients is in many respects different from the management of adults. Establishing the diagnosis early, preferably before the onset of clinical symptoms, is essential in cases with a positive family history. Complement studies usually afford accurate diagnosis, whereas molecular genetics tests may prove helpful in uncertain cases. Appropriate therapy, supported by counselling, suitable modification of lifestyle, and avoidance of triggering factors (which primarily include mechanical trauma, mental stress and airway infections in children may spare the patient unnecessary surgery and may prevent mortality. Prompt control of edematous attacks, short-term prophylaxis and intermittent therapy are recommended as the primary means for the management of pediatric cases. Medicinal products currently used for the treatment of children with hereditary angioedema include antifibrinolytics, attenuated androgens, and C1-INH replacement therapy. Current guidelines favour antifibrinolytics for long-term prophylaxis because of their favorable safety profile but efficacy may be lacking. Attenuated androgens administered in the lowest effective dose are another option. C1-INH replacement therapy is also an effective and safe agent for children. Regular monitoring and follow-up of patients are necessary.

  5. Generation of plasmin during acute attacks of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugno, M; Hack, C E; de Boer, J P; Eerenberg, A J; Agostoni, A; Cicardi, M

    1993-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is caused by a genetic deficiency of C1-inhibitor, a serine protease inhibitor that regulates activation of complement, contact, and fibrinolytic systems. Symptoms (bouts of subcutaneous and mucous swelling) depend on the release of a vasoactive mediator, probably through activation of these three systems. We studied the interrelationship among complement, contact, and fibrinolytic activation in 23 patients with hereditary angiodema, 18 during remission and five during an attack, by measuring plasma levels of C1-C1 inhibitor, factor XIIa-C1 inhibitor, kallikrein-C1 inhibitor, and plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complexes, tissue plasminogen activator, and urokinase plasminogen activator. In addition, cleavage of high-molecular weight kininogen was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and quantified by densitometry. During remission, plasma levels of C1-C1 inhibitor complexes were elevated (p = 0.0002), whereas the other parameters were within the normal range. During acute attacks, not only plasma levels of C1-C1 inhibitor complexes but also those of plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complexes (P = 0.0009) and cleaved high-molecular weight kininogen were elevated. A positive correlation between plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complexes and cleaved high-molecular weight kininogen was observed (r = 0.75, p attacks is associated with the activation of the fibrinolytic system.

  6. Fractional hereditariness of lipid membranes: Instabilities and linearized evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deseri, L; Pollaci, P; Zingales, M; Dayal, K

    2016-05-01

    In this work lipid ordering phase changes arising in planar membrane bilayers is investigated both accounting for elasticity alone and for effective viscoelastic response of such assemblies. The mechanical response of such membranes is studied by minimizing the Gibbs free energy which penalizes perturbations of the changes of areal stretch and their gradients only (Deseri and Zurlo, 2013). As material instabilities arise whenever areal stretches characterizing homogeneous configurations lie inside the spinoidal zone of the free energy density, bifurcations from such configurations are shown to occur as oscillatory perturbations of the in-plane displacement. Experimental observations (Espinosa et al., 2011) show a power-law in-plane viscous behavior of lipid structures allowing for an effective viscoelastic behavior of lipid membranes, which falls in the framework of Fractional Hereditariness. A suitable generalization of the variational principle invoked for the elasticity is applied in this case, and the corresponding Euler-Lagrange equation is found together with a set of boundary and initial conditions. Separation of variables allows for showing how Fractional Hereditariness owes bifurcated modes with a larger number of spatial oscillations than the corresponding elastic analog. Indeed, the available range of areal stresses for material instabilities is found to increase with respect to the purely elastic case. Nevertheless, the time evolution of the perturbations solving the Euler-Lagrange equation above exhibits time-decay and the large number of spatial oscillation slowly relaxes, thereby keeping the features of a long-tail type time-response. PMID:26897568

  7. 血液透析与肾移植患者肾性骨病的转归%Comparative study of renal osteodystrophy between maintenance hemodialysis and kidney transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢飞; 王汉民; 李振江

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tile prevention and treatment of renal osteodystrophy directly affect tile long term survivals of chronic renal failure patients,thereby, there is important significances to comparative study the difference of renal osteodystrophy between maintenance hemodialysis and kidney transplantation.OBJECTIVE: To observe the variances of serous phosphorus (P) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations in the patients before and after either maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) or kidney transplantation for discussions of the treatment and prognosis of renal osteodystrophy.SETTING, PARTICIPANTS and METHODS: Forty chronic renal failure patients who accorded with the clinical diagnostic criteria and suffered from hyperphosphatemia and high serous PTH level as well were selected fiom the hemodialysis center of Xijing Hospital Affiliated to Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA, in which 20 cases were allocated into MHD group and 20 cases were allocated into kidney transplantation group (transplantation group) . Another 20 healthy subjects were selected into control group. Patients in MHD group were treated with MHD, and patients il transplantation group were treated with kidney allograft transplantation with preferably postoperative recovery.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The comparisons of serous P and PTH before and after treatnents in both case groups.RESULTS: The serous P and PTH after hemodialysis or kidney transplantation were significantly decreased compared with those before hemodialysis or kidney transplantation ( t = 3.15, P < 0.001) . However, the serous PTH levels [(278.20+95.84) ng/L] in patients of MHD group were higher than that of control group [ (21.60 + 16.60) ng/L], moreover, the serous levels of P and PTH returned to higher levels before next MHD.CONCLUSION: Serous levels of P and PTH in patients of MHD group are still higher than that of healthy subjects, while there is no signifieant dffference of serous levels of P and PTH between the

  8. Osteodistrofia Hipertrófica en Weimaraner. Un nuevo concepto a tener en cuenta para su prevención (Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy in the Weimaraner. A new concept to consider for its prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo D. Mauro

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Sumario. El Weimaraner es una raza que ha tenido gran difusión en nuestro país durante los últimos años. Algunos de sus ejemplares, pueden presentar particularidades en la respuesta inmunologica, que el veterinario especializado en pequeñas especies no debiera ignorar. Existe cierta predisposición en estos animales, a presentar una forma mas grave de Osteodistrofia Hipertrófica, asociada a síntomas orgánicos generalizados. En esta presentación se postulan algunas hipótesis sobre la etiología de esta enfermedad, y se intenta concientizar al profesional sobre la necesidad de aplicar planes de vacunación diferenciados, en animales potencialmente predispuestos a sufrir algún tipo de reacción indeseada, a consecuencia de la aplicación de una vacuna. Summary. The Weimaraner breed has had great diffusion in our country in these last years. Some specimens of this breed may present certain inmunologic response particularities, which the small animal practitioner should keep in mind. These animals have a certain predisposition to suffer a severe form of Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy, associated with generalized organic simptomatology. In this presentation some hypothesis about the disease aethiology are postulated, and the necessity of making practitioners aware of imposing differential vaccination plans for potentially predisposed animals, based on the probability of suffering adverse reactions to the vaccine applied, is stated.

  9. Renal AA amyloidosis in a patient with hereditary complete complement C4 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imed Helal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary complete C4 deficiency has until now been reported in 30 cases only. A disturbed clearance of immune- complexes probably predisposes these individuals to systemic lupus erythematosus, other immune- complex diseases and recurrent microbial infections. We present here a 20- year- old female with hereditary complete C4 deficiency. Renal biopsy demonstrated renal AA amyloidosis. This unique case further substantiates that deficiency of classical pathway components predisposes to the development of recurrent microbial infections and that the patients may develop AA amyloidosis. Furthermore, in clinical practice, the nephrotic syndrome occurring in a patient with hereditary complete complement C4 deficiency should lead to the suspicion of renal AA amyloidosis.

  10. Hamilton cycles in almost distance-hereditary graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Bing; Ning Bo

    2013-01-01

    Let G be a graph on n ≥ 3 vertices. A graph G is almost distance-hereditary if each connected induced subgraph H of G has the property dH(x, y) ≤ dG(x, y) + 1 for any pair of vertices x, y ∈ V(H). Adopting the terminology introduced by Broersma et al. and Čada, a graph G is called 1-heavy if at least one of the end vertices of each induced subgraph of G isomorphic to K1,3 (a claw) has degree at least n/2, and is called claw-heavy if each claw of G has a pair of end vertices with degree sum at...

  11. Power-law hereditariness of hierarchical fractal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deseri, Luca; Di Paola, Mario; Zingales, Massimiliano; Pollaci, Pietro

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the authors introduce a hierarchic fractal model to describe bone hereditariness. Indeed, experimental data of stress relaxation or creep functions obtained by compressive/tensile tests have been proved to be fit by power law with real exponent 0 ⩽ β ⩽1. The rheological behavior of the material has therefore been obtained, using the Boltzmann-Volterra superposition principle, in terms of real order integrals and derivatives (fractional-order calculus). It is shown that the power laws describing creep/relaxation of bone tissue may be obtained by introducing a fractal description of bone cross-section, and the Hausdorff dimension of the fractal geometry is then related to the exponent of the power law. PMID:23836622

  12. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: a cause of preventable morbidity and mortality.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brady, A P

    2012-01-31

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant condition whose effects are mediated through deficient blood vessel formation and regeneration, with multisystem involvement. Patients are usually aware of resulting skin telangiectasia and epistaxis, but are also exposed to dangers posed by occult vascular malformations in other organs. About 15-35% of HHT patients have pulmonary AVMs (PAVMs), 10% have cerebral AVMs (CAVMs), 25-33% suffer significant GI blood loss from GI tract telangiectasia, and an unknown but high percentage have liver involvement. In total, 10% of affected individuals die prematurely or suffer major disability from HHT, largely because of bleeding from CAVMs and PAVMs, or paradoxical embolization through PAVMs. Screening for and early intervention to treat occult PAVMs and CAVMs can largely eliminate these risks, and should be undertaken in a specialist centre. The National HHT Center in The Mercy University Hospital in Cork is the referral centre for HHT screening in Ireland.

  13. Prophylactic total gastrectomy in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Linda; Hansen, Thomas V O; Gerdes, Anne-Marie;

    2014-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in the CDH1 (E-cadherin) gene are the predisposing cause of gastric cancer in most families with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). The lifetime risk of cancer in mutation positive members is more than 80 % and prophylactic total gastrectomy is recommended. Not all...... mutations in the CDH1 gene are however pathogenic and it is important to classify mutations before this major operation is performed. Probands from two Danish families with gastric cancer and a history suggesting HDGC were screened for CDH1 gene mutations. Two novel CDH1 gene mutations were identified....... Hospital stay was 6-8 days and there were no complications. Small foci of diffuse gastric cancer were found in all patients-intramucosal in six and advanced in one. Preoperative endoscopic biopsies had revealed a microscopic cancer focus in two of the patients. Our data confirmed the pathogenic nature...

  14. Hereditary hemochromatosis in an Indian origin: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R L Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is manifested as an iron overload in different organs due to homozygosity of a single autosomal mutation. If untreated it leads to conditions such as liver cirrhosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, cardiomyopathy, arthritis, and bronze coloring of the skin. Hemochromatosis affects as many as 1 in every 200 people in the United States, but in India the reports of genetic study are rare and virtually unexplored. It is also possible that in India clinical hemochromatosis could be masked by iron deficiency. Patients with HH may be either asymptomatic or symptomatic. When symptomatic, there is a wide range of symptoms and a high index of suspicion based on the symptoms is necessary to diagnose the entity. We report an interesting and rare case of HH in a 35-year-old male of Indian origin, who presented with icterus and fever of acute onset with negative HFE genetic mutations.

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of hereditary tyrosinemia in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Matsumoto, Shirou; Mitsubuchi, Hiroshi; Endo, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia is an autosomal recessive inherited disease that manifests as three types (types I-III). We conducted a nationwide survey of this disease in Japan, and here review the results in relation to prevalence, clinical characteristics, and treatment and diagnosis. A definitive diagnosis of tyrosinemia type I is difficult to obtain based only on blood tyrosine level. Detection of succinylacetone using dried blood spots or urinary organic acid analysis, however, is useful for diagnosis. In tyrosinemia type I, dietary therapy and nitisinone (Orfandin®) are effective. Prognosis is greatly affected by the complications of liver cancer and hypophosphatemic rickets; even patients that are treated early with nitisinone may develop liver cancer. Long-term survival can be expected in type I if nitisinone therapy is effective. Prognosis in types II and III is relatively good. PMID:25443793

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of hereditary tyrosinemia in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Matsumoto, Shirou; Mitsubuchi, Hiroshi; Endo, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia is an autosomal recessive inherited disease that manifests as three types (types I-III). We conducted a nationwide survey of this disease in Japan, and here review the results in relation to prevalence, clinical characteristics, and treatment and diagnosis. A definitive diagnosis of tyrosinemia type I is difficult to obtain based only on blood tyrosine level. Detection of succinylacetone using dried blood spots or urinary organic acid analysis, however, is useful for diagnosis. In tyrosinemia type I, dietary therapy and nitisinone (Orfandin®) are effective. Prognosis is greatly affected by the complications of liver cancer and hypophosphatemic rickets; even patients that are treated early with nitisinone may develop liver cancer. Long-term survival can be expected in type I if nitisinone therapy is effective. Prognosis in types II and III is relatively good.

  17. Depressive symptoms associated with hereditary Alzheimer's disease: a case description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Mónica Yicette Sánchez; Vargas, Paula Alejandra Osorio; Ramos, Lucero Rengifo; Velandia, Rafael Alarcón

    The authors describe a family group studied by the Centro de Biología Molecular y Biotecnología, and the Clínica de la Memoria, las Demencias y el Envejecimiento (Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira, Colombia), and evaluate the association of depressive symptoms with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This family presented a hereditary pattern for AD characterized by an early onset of dementia symptoms, a long preclinical depressive course, and, once the first symptoms of dementia appeared, a rapid progression to severe cognitive function impairment. The authors found a high prevalence of depressive symptoms in this family and propose that the symptoms could be an important risk factor for developing AD in the presence of other risk factors such as the APOE E4 allele.

  18. [Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. Report of four siblings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate, Alejandro; Alvarez, Karin; Wielandt, Ana María; Hevia, Montserrat; De la Fuente, Marjorie; Carvallo, Pilar; López-Köstner, Francisco

    2008-06-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch Syndrome is an autosomic dominant syndrome involving 596-1096 of colorectal cancer patients. Mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 genes account for most cases. These two genes participate in the DNA mismatch repair pathway. Therefore mutation carriers show microsatellite instability (MSI) in tumors. This syndrome is characterized by the early development of colorectal cancer (before 50 years) and an increased incidence of cancer in other organs. We report four siblings from a family diagnosed with HNPCC. All of them were subjected to colonic surgery for colorectal cancer Moreover, one patient developed an ampulloma after her colon surgery. The molecular-genetic analysis revealed three brothers with microsatellite instability in the tumor tissue, the absence of the MLH1 protein, and the presence of a germ line mutation localized in introm 15 of the MLH1 gene. PMID:18769833

  19. Fruit-induced FPIES masquerading as hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocchi, Alessandro; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Cotugno, Giovanna; Koch, Pierluigi; Dahdah, Lamia

    2014-08-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) symptoms develop at first introduction of fruit during weaning. We report on an infant with suspected HFI who presented with repeated episodes of vomiting and hypotension after ingestion of fruit-containing meals. The first episode occurred at age 4 months. Despite negative genetic testing for HFI, strict avoidance of fruit ingestion resulted in lack of recurrence of symptoms. Oral-fructose-tolerance testing conducted with an apple mousse did not determine hypoglycemia or fructosuria but caused severe hypotension. Allergy evaluations were negative, and the history was diagnostic for fruit-induced food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome. Because this non-immunoglobulin E-mediated gastrointestinal food hypersensitivity manifests as profuse, repetitive vomiting, often with diarrhea, leading to acute dehydration and lethargy, it may be misinterpreted as HFI. We advise pediatricians to consider food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome in the differential diagnosis when there is a suspicion of HFI.

  20. Motor activation in SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, KH; Nielsen, JE; Krabbe, Katja;

    2006-01-01

    ) and between-group comparisons of movement vs. rest (group x behavioural state interaction) were performed using a random effects approach and statistical parametric mapping (SPM99). RESULTS: Patterns of motor activation were generally comparable between groups during both tasks, although patients had......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of motor cortical functional reorganisation in patients with SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia by exploring cortical motor activation related to movements of clinically affected (lower) and unaffected (upper) limbs. METHODS...... a tendency towards more widespread activation in sensorimotor cortical and cerebellar regions. Statistically significant differences were restricted to the ankle movement response, however, where patients showed significantly increased regional cerebral blood flow in the right and left primary motor cortices...

  1. Dementia with non-hereditary cystatin C angiopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Jóhannesson, G;

    1989-01-01

    Brain biopsies from two patients with non-hereditary cerebral hemorrhages and eighty autopsied cases with the clinical diagnosis of dementia are presented. The biopsied cases, both males aged 64 and 59, had a sudden onset of cerebral hemorrhage, mild progressive dementia and cystatin C cerebral...... amyloid angiopathy. Of the autopsied cases 59 had senile plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy was also found in 36 of them. Both senile plaques and the blood vessel amyloid stained positively with beta-protein antibodies, and five of them also showed a positive reaction to cystatin C antibodies....... These cystatin C positive cases were three males aged 76, 80 and 83, and one female 93 years old and the fifth case was a female aged 47 with Down's syndrome....

  2. Cerebral metabolism of glucose in benign hereditary chorea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benign hereditary chorea (BHC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by chorea of early onset with little or no progression. There is marked clinical variability in this disease with some subjects having onset in infancy and others with onset in early adulthood. In contrast to Huntington's disease (HD), there is no dementia. Computed tomography is normal in all subjects with no evidence of caudate nucleus atrophy. We present the results of positron emission tomography using 18F-2-fluorodeoxyglucose on three patients with this disorder from two families. Cerebral glucose metabolism in one patient was decreased in the caudate nucleus, as previously reported in HD. The other two persons from a second family showed a relative decrease in metabolic rates of glucose in the caudate when compared with the thalamus. It appears that caudate hypometabolism is not specific for HD. These findings suggest that the caudate nucleus may play a significant role in the pathophysiology of some persons with BHC

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of a hereditary gingival fibromatosis case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min; Xu, Li; Meng, Huan Xin

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare condition characterised by severe gingival hyperplasia, which could result in serious aesthetic and emotional problems and functional impairment. Here the present authors report a case of a 28-year-old female patient with generalised severe gingival enlargement covering almost all of the teeth and diagnosed as HGF. Her family history was of significance, since her father and 3-year-old daughter suffered from the same symptoms. Many studies have agreed that surgical removal should be used in the treatment of HGF, and gingivectomy is the most common method. This study tried both external and internal bevel incisions. The results suggest that the former is better for shaping gingival contour, if the attached gingiva is adequate. Correct physiological contour of the marginal gingiva, good oral hygiene and periodic recall can decrease recurrence risk. Post-surgical follow-up after 26 months demonstrated no recurrence and the patient was satisfied with her appearance.

  4. Hereditary gingival hyperplasia associated with amelogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibali, Luigi; Brett, Peter M; Donos, Nikos; Griffiths, Gareth S

    2012-06-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) and amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) are two rare oral conditions with genetic etiologies. The case of a 17-year-old boy affected by HGF, AI, anterior open bite, and pyramidal impaction of the maxillary molars is reported. Internal bevel gingivectomies were carried out to reduce gingival overgrowth. Clinical examination of the family revealed the presence of HGF and AI in his 12-year-old sister (both in milder forms) and of HGF in his older half brother. Genetic sequencing analyses were performed to detect any of the known mutations leading to HGF and AI. Histologic analysis revealed the presence of fibroepithelial hyperplasia, consistent with a diagnosis of GF. Sequencing genetic analysis failed to identify any of the common mutations leading to HGF (SOS-1) or AI (enamelin and amelogenin genes). This phenotype, similar to what has been described in other families, may represent a new syndrome caused by an as-yet unknown genotype.

  5. Multiple sclerosis associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palace, Jacqueline

    2009-11-15

    The cause of multiple sclerosis is unknown although it is recognised to involve an inflammatory process associated with demyelinating plaques and more widespread neurodegeneration. It appears to have become progressively more common in females which is further discussed in this issue, and genetic factors, as identified to date, appear to play only a moderate role. One curious observation is that Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON), a rare genetic syndrome, presents clinically overwhelmingly in males, but can be associated with an MS-like illness and when it does it occurs mainly in females. It is interesting to examine this further to assess if this could give us any clues as to the pathogenesis of MS.

  6. Therapeutic strategies for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: A current update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueven, Nuri; Faldu, Dharmesh

    2013-11-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a rare mitochondrial retinopathy, caused by mutations in subunits of complex I of the respiratory chain, which leads to elevated levels of oxidative stress and an insufficient energy supply. This molecular pathology is thought to be responsible for the dysfunction and eventual apoptotic loss of retinal ganglion cells in the eye, which ultimately results in blindness. Many strategies, ranging from neuroprotectants, antioxidants, anti-apoptotic- and anti-inflammatory compounds have been tested with mixed results. Currently, the most promising compounds are short-chain quinones that have been shown to protect the vision of LHON patients during the early stages of the disease. This commentary gives a brief overview on the current status of tested therapeutics and also addresses future developments such as the use of gene therapy that hopefully will provide safe and efficient therapy options for all LHON patients.

  7. CDH1 germline mutations and hereditary lobular breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Giovanni; Intra, Mattia; Trentin, Chiara; Veronesi, Paolo; Galimberti, Viviana

    2016-04-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is an autosomal dominant inherited disease associated of CDH1 germline mutations (that encodes for the E-cadherin protein), and lobular breast cancer is the second most frequent type of neoplasia. Recently, novel E-cadherin constitutional alterations have been identified in pedigree clustering only for lobular breast carcinoma without evidence of diffuse gastric tumors and in absence of BRCA1/2 mutations. This first evidence opens novel questions about the inherited correlation between diffuse gastric and lobular breast cancers. In this brief review we revise the literature data about the CDH1 mutation frequency affecting exclusively lobular breast cancer, providing clinical recommendation for asymptomatic mutation carriers. PMID:26759166

  8. Hereditary motor-sensory, motor, and sensory neuropathies in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrieu, Pierre; Baets, Jonathan; De Jonghe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathies (HN) are categorized according to clinical presentation, pathogenic mechanism based on electrophysiology, genetic transmission, age of occurrence, and, in selected cases, pathological findings. The combination of these parameters frequently orients towards specific genetic disorders. Ruling out a neuropathy secondary to a generalized metabolic disorder remains the first pediatric concern. Primary, motor-sensory are the most frequent HN and are dominated by demyelinating AD forms (CMT1). Others are demyelinating AR forms, axonal AD/AR forms, and forms with "intermediate" electrophysiological phenotype. Pure motor HN represent40 genes with various biological functions have been found responsible for HN. Many are responsible for various phenotypes, including some without the polyneuropathic trait: for the pediatric neurologist, phenotype/genotype correlations constitute a permanent bidirectional exercise.

  9. Antiretroviral therapy-induced Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Moodley

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Optic neuropathy in HIV-infected patients results from the HIV infection itself, post-infectious auto-immune disease, opportunistic infections and drugs. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs such as zidovudine and stavudine have known mitochondrial toxicity and can cause mitochondrial myopathies, neuropathies, hyperlactataemia, and can induce mitochondrial genetic disorders. Individuals with the mutation for Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON, a mitochondrial disorder, are usually asymptomatic but develop visual loss when exposed to external triggers such as smoking. We report on two HIV-infected patients with LHON mutations (m.14484T>C and m.11778G>A who developed profound visual loss with antiretroviral therapy. We postulate that the phenotypic expression of LHON in these genetically predisposed individuals was triggered by NRTI drugs lamivudine and tenofovir when used in combination, despite their relatively weak mitochondrial toxic effects. 

  10. Pediatric Hereditary Angioedema: Onset, Diagnostic Delay, and Disease Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Sandra C; Davis, Donna K; Castaldo, Anthony J; Zuraw, Bruce L

    2016-09-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) typically presents in childhood. Large gaps remain in our understanding of the natural history of HAE during childhood. We examined age of onset, delay in diagnosis, androgen exposure, and their influence on ultimate disease severity in a large cohort of patients with HAE. Median age of first swelling was 11 years with a median age at diagnosis of 19 years. Earlier onset of symptoms correlated with longer delays in diagnosis (P < .001) and predicted a more severe disease course, including increased number of attacks per year (P = .0009) and hospital admissions (P = .009). Earlier age of onset also significantly correlated with increased perceived HAE severity (P = .0002), negative overall life impact (P < .0001), and use of anabolic androgen. Our observations highlight the importance of early HAE diagnosis and suggest the necessity of a disease management plan once the diagnosis has been made. PMID:26581355

  11. Hereditary angioedema: what the gastroenterologist needs to know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali MA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available M Aamir Ali, Marie L Borum Division of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Up to 93% of patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE experience recurrent abdominal pain. Many of these patients, who often present to emergency departments, primary care physicians, general surgeons, or gastroenterologists, are misdiagnosed for years and undergo unnecessary testing and surgical procedures. Making the diagnosis of HAE can be challenging because symptoms and attack locations are often inconsistent from one episode to the next. Abdominal attacks are common and can occur without other attack locations. An early, accurate diagnosis is central to managing HAE. Unexplained abdominal pain, particularly when accompanied by swelling of the face and extremities, suggests the diagnosis of HAE. A family history and radiologic imaging demonstrating edematous bowel also support an HAE diagnosis. Once HAE is suspected, C4 and C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH laboratory studies are usually diagnostic. Patients with HAE may benefit from recently approved specific treatments, including plasma-derived C1-INH or recombinant C1-INH, a bradykinin B2-receptor antagonist, or a kallikrein inhibitor as first-line therapy and solvent/detergent-treated or fresh frozen plasma as second-line therapy for acute episodes. Short-term or long-term prophylaxis with nanofiltered C1-INH or attenuated androgens will prevent or reduce the frequency and severity of episodes. Gastroenterologists can play a critical role in identifying and treating patients with HAE, and should have a high index of suspicion when encountering patients with recurrent, unexplained bouts of abdominal pain. Given the high rate of abdominal attacks in HAE, it is important for gastroenterologists to appropriately diagnose and promptly recognize and treat HAE, or refer patients with HAE to an allergist. Keywords: hereditary angioedema, abdominal pain, diagnosis

  12. [Review of the recent literature on hereditary neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birouk, N

    2014-12-01

    The recent literature included interesting reports on the pathogenic mechanisms of hereditary neuropathies. The axonal traffic and its abnormalities in some forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease were particularly reviewed by Bucci et al. Many genes related to CMT disease code for proteins that are involved directly or not in intracellular traffic. KIF1B controls vesicle motility on microtubules. MTMR2, MTMR13 and FIG4 regulate the metabolism of phosphoinositide at the level of endosomes. The HSPs are involved in the proteasomal degradation. GDAP1 and MFN2 regulate the mitochondrial fission and fusion respectively and the mitochondial transport within the axon. Pareyson et al. reported a review on peripheral neuropathies in mitochondrial disorders. They used the term of "mitochondrial CMT" for the forms of CMT with abnormal mitochondrial dynamic or structure. Among the new entities, we can draw the attention to a proximal form of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with autosomal dominant inheritance, which is characterized by motor deficit with cramps and fasciculations predominating in proximal muscles. Distal sensory deficit can be present. The gene TFG on chromosome 3 has been recently identified to be responsible for this form. Another rare form of axonal autosomal recessive neuropathy due to HNT1 gene mutation is characterized by the presence of hands myotonia that appears later than neuropathy but constitute an interesting clinical hallmark to orientate the diagnosis of this form. In terms of differential diagnosis, CMT4J due to FIG4 mutation can present with a rapidly progressive and asymmetric weakness that resembles CIDP. Bouhy et al. made an interesting review on the therapeutic trials, animal models and the future therapeutic strategies to be developed in CMT disease.

  13. Therapeutic effect of a case classics McCune-Albright syndrome an Heredity d related document analysis%经典McCune-Albright综合征1例疗效及文献分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王会贞; 卫海燕(通讯作者); 陈永兴

    2013-01-01

    objective:To promote the awareness of McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS), and explore its treatment. Methods:Based on a MAS patient’s clinical data and treatment effect and by reviewing relative literatures, a detailed analysis was carried out to explore the etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of MAS. Results:The MAS child showed significant increased skeletal maturity, obvious bone fibrosis progress and change of uterine volume and ovarian cystic dark space before treatment. After tamoxifen therapy, the child’s uterine volume and ovarian cystic dark space narrowed, while between the period of drug withdrawal and next colporrhagia, the uterine volume and ovarian cystic dark areas increased again. After two months’ letrozole treatment, the child’s breast showed B1stage, breast nuclear disappeared, the volume of uterine reduced significantly, and there was no colporrhagia again. Conclusions: There was no radical cure for MAS, the main treatment was symptomatic treatment.Tamoxifen and letrozole were both effective to MAS children with peripheral precocious puberty.%目的:提高对McCune-Albright综合征(McCune-Albright syndrome,MAS)的认识,探讨治疗方案。方法:通过1例MAS患者的临床资料、治疗效果和文献复习,详细分析MAS的病因、临床表现、诊断及治疗。结果:给予他莫西芬治疗前患儿骨骼成熟度明显增加,骨纤维化进展明显,子宫体积、卵巢囊性暗区变化明显;给予他莫西芬治疗2月后患儿子宫体积、卵巢囊性暗区缩小,停药后至此次阴道出血前子宫体积、卵巢囊性暗区明显增大。来曲唑治疗2月后乳房B1期,乳核消失,未出现阴道出血,查腹部彩超示子宫体积明显缩小。结论:MAS的治疗主要是对症治疗,尚无有效根治方法。他莫西芬、来曲唑对伴有外周性性早熟的MAS患儿具有一定疗效,可抑制性早熟进一步发展。

  14. Case study of a 15-year-old boy with McCune-Albright syndrome combined with pituitary gigantism: effect of octreotide-long acting release (LAR) and cabergoline therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Toshihiro; Tsubaki, Junko; Ishizu, Katsura; Jo, Wakako; Ishi, Nobuaki; Fujieda, Kenji

    2008-07-01

    The use of octreotide-LAR and cabergoline therapy has shown great promise in adults with acromegaly; however, the experience in pediatric patients has rarely been reported. We described a clinical course of a 15-year-old boy of McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) with pituitary gigantism. At the age of 8 years, a growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) producing pituitary adenoma was diagnosed at our hospital. He also had multiple fibrous dysplasia, so that he was diagnosed as having MAS. The tumor was partially resected, and GNAS1 gene mutation (R201C) was identified in affected tissues. We introduced octreotide to suppress GH secretion (100 mug 2/day s.c). During therapy with octreotide, IGF-1 and GH levels could not be suppressed and the patient frequently complained of nausea from octreotide treatment. Therefore, the therapy was changed to monthly injections of octreotide-LAR at the age of 12.3 years and was partially effective. However, as defect of left visual field worsened due to progressive left optic canal stenosis, he underwent second neurological decompression of the left optic nerve at 13.4 years of age. After surgery, in addition to octreotide-LAR, cabergoline (0.25 mg twice a month) was started. This regimen normalized serum levels of GH and IGF-1; however, he showed impaired glucose tolerance and gallstones at 15.7 years of age. Therefore, the dose of octreotide-LAR was reduced to 10 mg and the dose of cabergoline increased. This case demonstrated the difficulty of treating pituitary gigantism due to MAS. The use of octreotide-LAR and cabergoline should be considered even in pediatric patients; however, adverse events due to octreotide-LAR must be carefully examined. PMID:18445999

  15. Increased expression of collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylases in Chinese patients with hereditary gingival fibromatosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, L.; Huang, M.; Ye, X.; Fan, M.; Bian, Z.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is characterized by excess accumulation of interstitial collagen. However, until now, there has been controversy about the mechanism of collagen accumulation in HGF gingivae. The present study aimed to clarify the pathogenic mechanisms potentially i

  16. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer : Identification of mutation carriers and assessing pathogenicity of mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, RC; Sijmons, RH; Berends, MJW; Ou, J; Hofstra, RNW; Kleibeuker, JH

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also referred to as Lynch syndrome, is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by susceptibility to colorectal cancer and extracolonic malignancies, in particular endometrial cancer. HNPCC is caused by pathogenic mutations

  17. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: a population-based study of prevalence and mortality in Danish patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Vase, P; Green, A

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by telangiectatic lesions. The disease manifestations are variable and include epistaxis, gastrointestinal bleeding, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and cerebral arteriovenous malformations. Early...

  18. Clinical symptoms according to genotype amongst patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Møller, T R; Brusgaard, K;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease, characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including epistaxis, gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and neurological symptoms. HHT is a genetically...

  19. Genes for hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies : a genotype-phenotype correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Jacobs, An; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Levy, Nicolas; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Weis, Joachim; Nascimento, Andres; Swinkels, Marielle; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Jordanova, Albena; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by axonal atrophy and degeneration, exclusively or predominantly affecting the sensory and autonomic neurons. So far, disease-associated mutations have been identified in seven g

  20. Hereditary Cancer: Example of a Public Health Approach to Ensure Population Health Benefits of Genetic Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragun, Deborah; Lewis, Courtney; Camperlengo, Lucia; Pal, Tuya

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces the identification, prevention, and treatment of hereditary cancer as an important public health concern. Hereditary cancer research and educational outreach activities are used to illustrate how public health functions can help to achieve health benefits of genetic and genomic medicine. First, we evaluate genetic service delivery through triangulating patient and provider survey results which reveal variability among providers in hereditary cancer knowledge and genetic service provision. Second, we describe efforts we have made to assure competency among healthcare providers and to inform, educate and empower patients with regard to the rapidly evolving field of genomics and hereditary cancer. Lastly, key policy-issues raised by our experiences are discussed in the context of how they may help us to more effectively translate future genomic technologies into practice in order to attain population health benefits from genetic and genomic medicine.

  1. UOK 268 Cell Line for Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Carcinoma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Urologic Oncology Branch seeks parties to co-develop the UOK 262 immortalized cell line as research tool to study aggressive hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC)-associated recurring kidney cancer.

  2. Hereditary Oil Monarchies: Why Arab Spring Fails in GCC Arabian States?

    OpenAIRE

    AYDIN, Aydın

    2013-01-01

    This study tries to reveal the reasons of why Arab Spring could not change the hereditary oil monarchies regimes in Persian Gulf, when compare with other countries in region. The strong cooperation between Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, and Oman, hereditary monarchies for long years, high oil and natural gas income and sharing with lower social class that did not cause to improve strong demand among public to change regime of countries, also the external powers su...

  3. MSI-Testing in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Carcinoma (HNPCC)

    OpenAIRE

    Annegret Müller; Tina Bocker Edmonston; Wolfgang Dietmaier; Reinhard Büttner; Richard Fishel; Josef Rüschoff

    2004-01-01

    Genomic instability at simple repeated sequences, termed microsatellite instability (MSI), plays an important role in the analysis of sporadic and hereditary colon cancers. In hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (HNPCC) more than 90% of cases show MSI, whereas only 10–15% of sporadic colorectal cancers do so. Thus, microsatellite analysis is commonly used as the first diagnostic screening test for HNPCC. In 1997, an international collaborative workshop sponsored by the Nationa...

  4. Combined pulmonary involvement in hereditary lysozyme amyloidosis with associated pulmonary sarcoidosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Cormac; Deegan, Alexander P; Garvey, John F; McDonnell, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disorder of unknown cause which can affect any organ system. Autosomal dominant lysozyme amyloidosis is a very rare form of hereditary amyloidosis. The Arg64 variant is extraordinarily rare with each family showing a particular pattern of organ involvement, however while Sicca syndrome, gastrointestinal involvement and renal failure are common, lymph node involvement is very rare. In this case report we describe the first reported case of sarcoidosis in association with hereditary lysozyme amyloidosis. PMID:24351625

  5. A new family with hereditary lysozyme amyloidosis with gastritis and inflammatory bowel disease as prevailing symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Jean, Estelle; Ebbo, Mikael; Valleix, Sophie; Benarous, Lucas; Heyries, Laurent; Grados, Aurélie; Bernit, Emmanuelle; Grateau, Gilles; Papo, Thomas; Granel, Brigitte; Daniel, Laurent; Harlé, Jean-Robert; Schleinitz, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Background Systemic amyloidoses is a heterogeneous group of diseases either acquired or hereditary. Amyloidoses can involve the gastrointestinal tract and the nature of the precursor protein that forms the fibrils deposits should be identified to adjust the treatment and evaluate the prognosis. Lysozyme amyloidosis (ALys) is a rare, systemic non neuropathic hereditary amyloidosis with a heterogenous phenotype including gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic symptoms. Case presentation We report ...

  6. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations: screening procedures and pulmonary angiography in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Oxhøj, H; Andersen, P E;

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease with a high prevalence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs). The first symptom of HHT may be stroke or fatal hemoptysis associated with the presence of PAVM.......Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease with a high prevalence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs). The first symptom of HHT may be stroke or fatal hemoptysis associated with the presence of PAVM....

  7. Nasal Sinus Leiomyosarcoma in a Patient with History of Non-Hereditary Unilateral Treated Retinoblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzpatrick, Sarah G.; Woodworth, Bradford A.; Monteiro, Carmela; Makary, Raafat

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary patients with a history of treated retinoblastoma (RB) have a greatly increased risk of a broad spectrum of secondary malignancies appearing many years later, with a high incidence in the head and neck region. Leiomyosarcomas (LMS) account for up to 58% of these tumors. LMS in the sinonasal region generally are uncommon and are associated with a locally aggressive course and have a poor prognosis. RB may occur in two forms. The hereditary form is generally bilateral but can present...

  8. Hereditary nephritis (with unusual renal histology): report of a first case from the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, J S; Jankey, N

    1976-11-01

    A 21-year-old Grenadian girl undergoing investigation in Trinidad for anaemia was diagnosed as a case of hereditary nephritis. She had the clinical features of a nephropathy, nerve deafness and an ocular defect. Renal histology was exceptional in that in addition to the typical findings of a hereditary nephritis, cystic areas generally associated with medullary cystic disease were noted. Several members of the patient's maternal family were afflicted with either deafness visual distrubances or renal disease.

  9. 2010 International consensus algorithm for the diagnosis, therapy and management of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We published the Canadian 2003 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE; C1 inhibitor [C1-INH] deficiency and updated this as Hereditary angioedema: a current state-of-the-art review: Canadian Hungarian 2007 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema. Objective To update the International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (circa 2010. Methods The Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN/Réseau Canadien d'angioédème héréditaire (RCAH http://www.haecanada.com and cosponsors University of Calgary and the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (with an unrestricted educational grant from CSL Behring held our third Conference May 15th to 16th, 2010 in Toronto Canada to update our consensus approach. The Consensus document was reviewed at the meeting and then circulated for review. Results This manuscript is the 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema that resulted from that conference. Conclusions Consensus approach is only an interim guide to a complex disorder such as HAE and should be replaced as soon as possible with large phase III and IV clinical trials, meta analyses, and using data base registry validation of approaches including quality of life and cost benefit analyses, followed by large head-to-head clinical trials and then evidence-based guidelines and standards for HAE disease management.

  10. Hereditary angioedema: epidemiology, management, and role of icatibant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazi A

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aasia Ghazi, J Andrew GrantUniversity of Texas Medical Branch, Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Galveston, TX, USAAbstract: Hereditary angioedema (HAE is an autosomal dominant, potentially life-threatening condition, manifesting as recurrent and self-limiting episodes of facial, laryngeal, genital, or peripheral swelling with abdominal pain secondary to intra-abdominal edema. The estimated prevalence of HAE in the general population is one individual per 50,000, with reported ranges from 1:10,000 to 1:150,000, without major sex or ethnic differences. Various treatment options for acute attacks and prophylaxis of HAE are authorized and available in the market, including plasma-derived (Berinert®, Cinryze®, and Cetor® and recombinant (Rhucin® and Ruconest™ C1 inhibitors, kallikrein inhibitor-ecallantide (Kalbitor®, and bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist-icatibant (Firazyr®. Some of these drugs are used only to treat HAE attacks, whereas others are only approved for prophylactic therapies and all of them have improved disease outcomes due to their different mechanisms of action. Bradykinin and its binding to B2 receptor have been demonstrated to be responsible for most of the symptoms of HAE. Thus icatibant (Firazyr®, a bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist, has proven to be an effective and more targeted treatment option and has been approved for the treatment of acute attacks of HAE. Rapid and stable relief from symptoms of cutaneous, abdominal, or laryngeal HAE attacks has been demonstrated by 30 mg of icatibant in Phase III clinical trials. Self-resolving mild to moderate local site reactions after subcutaneous injection of icatibant were observed. Icatibant is a new, safe, and effective treatment for acute attacks of HAE. HAE has been reported to result in enormous humanistic burden to patients, affecting both physical and mental health, with a negative impact on education, career, and work productivity, and with substantial

  11. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of complex hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Eleanna; Tucci, Arianna; Manzoni, Claudia; Lynch, David S; Elpidorou, Marilena; Bettencourt, Conceicao; Chelban, Viorica; Manole, Andreea; Hamed, Sherifa A; Haridy, Nourelhoda A; Federoff, Monica; Preza, Elisavet; Hughes, Deborah; Pittman, Alan; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Brandner, Sebastian; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Wiethoff, Sarah; Schottlaender, Lucia; Proukakis, Christos; Morris, Huw; Warner, Tom; Bhatia, Kailash P; Korlipara, L V Prasad; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W; Lewis, Patrick A; Houlden, Henry

    2016-07-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias are a heterogeneous group of degenerative disorders that are clinically classified as either pure with predominant lower limb spasticity, or complex where spastic paraplegia is complicated with additional neurological features, and are inherited in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked patterns. Genetic defects have been identified in over 40 different genes, with more than 70 loci in total. Complex recessive spastic paraplegias have in the past been frequently associated with mutations in SPG11 (spatacsin), ZFYVE26/SPG15, SPG7 (paraplegin) and a handful of other rare genes, but many cases remain genetically undefined. The overlap with other neurodegenerative disorders has been implied in a small number of reports, but not in larger disease series. This deficiency has been largely due to the lack of suitable high throughput techniques to investigate the genetic basis of disease, but the recent availability of next generation sequencing can facilitate the identification of disease-causing mutations even in extremely heterogeneous disorders. We investigated a series of 97 index cases with complex spastic paraplegia referred to a tertiary referral neurology centre in London for diagnosis or management. The mean age of onset was 16 years (range 3 to 39). The SPG11 gene was first analysed, revealing homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in 30/97 (30.9%) of probands, the largest SPG11 series reported to date, and by far the most common cause of complex spastic paraplegia in the UK, with severe and progressive clinical features and other neurological manifestations, linked with magnetic resonance imaging defects. Given the high frequency of SPG11 mutations, we studied the autophagic response to starvation in eight affected SPG11 cases and control fibroblast cell lines, but in our restricted study we did not observe correlations between disease status and autophagic or lysosomal markers. In the remaining cases, next

  12. Genome-wide sequencing to identify the cause of hereditary cancer syndromes: with examples from familial pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Nicholas J.; Klein, Alison P.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the human genome and next-generation technologies have facilitated the use of genome-wide sequencing to decipher the genetic basis of Mendelian disease and hereditary cancer syndromes. The application of genome-wide sequencing in hereditary cancer syndromes has had mixed success, in part, due to complex nature of the underlying genetic architecture. In this review we discuss the use of genome-wide sequencing in both Mendelian diseases and hereditary cancer syn...

  13. Mutations in exons 2 and 3 of the cationic trypsinogen gene in Japanese families with hereditary pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimori, I; Kamakura, M; Fujikawa-Adachi, K; Morita, M.; Onishi, S; Yokoyama, K.; Makino, I; H. Ishida; Yamamoto, M.; Watanabe, S; Ogawa, M

    1999-01-01

    Background/Aims—Single-point mutations in the cationic trypsinogen gene have been reported in hereditary pancreatitis kindreds in the white population. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether similar gene mutations are present in Japanese hereditary pancreatitis kindreds. 
Methods—All five exons of the cationic trypsinogen gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced in six Japanese families with hereditary pancreatitis. 
Results—Two types o...

  14. Impairment of autophagy: from hereditary disorder to drug intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aki, Toshihiko; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Unuma, Kana; Uemura, Koichi

    2013-09-15

    At first, the molecular mechanism of autophagy was unveiled in a unicellular organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast), followed by the discovery that the basic mechanism of autophagy is conserved in multicellular organisms including mammals. Although autophagy was considered to be a non-selective bulk protein degradation system to recycle amino acids during periods of nutrient starvation, it is also believed to be an essential mechanism for the selective elimination of proteins/organelles that are damaged under pathological conditions. Research advances made using autophagy-deficient animals have revealed that impairments of autophagy often underlie the pathogenesis of hereditary disorders such as Danon, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. On the other hand, there are many reports that drugs and toxicants, including arsenic, cadmium, paraquat, methamphetamine, and ethanol, induce autophagy during the development of their toxicity on many organs including heart, brain, lung, kidney, and liver. Although the question as to whether autophagic machinery is involved in the execution of cell death or not remains controversial, the current view of the role of autophagy during cell/tissue injury is that it is an important, often essential, cytoprotective reaction; disturbances in cytoprotective autophagy aggravate cell/tissue injuries. The purpose of this review is to provide (1) a gross summarization of autophagy processes, which are becoming more important in the field of toxicology, and (2) examples of important studies reporting the involvement of perturbations in autophagy in cell/tissue injuries caused by acute as well as chronic intoxication. PMID:23851159

  15. Hereditary hemochromatosis: HFE mutation analysis in Greeks reveals genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, G; Politou, M; Terpos, E; Fourlemadis, S; Sakellaropoulos, N; Loukopoulos, D

    2000-04-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is common among Caucasians; reported disease frequencies vary from 0.3 to 0.8%. Identification of a candidate HFE gene in 1996 was soon followed by the description of two ancestral mutations, i.e., c.845G-->A (C282Y) and c.187C-->G (H63D). To these was recently added the mutation S65C, which may represent a simple polymorphism. The incidence of HH in Greece is unknown but clinical cases are rare. Also unknown is the carrier frequency of the two mutant alleles. A first estimate of the latter is given in the present report. It is based on data from the genetic analysis of 10 unrelated patients of Greek origin who were referred to our center for genotyping and 158 unselected male blood donors. The allele frequencies for the C282Y and H63D mutations were 0.003 and 0.145, respectively. The C282Y allele was detected in 50% of HH patients. This is considerably lower than the frequencies reported for HH patients in the U.S.A. (82%) and France (91 %) and closer to that reported in Italy (64%). Five patients did not carry any known HFE mutation; three may represent cases of juvenile hemochromatosis, given their early onset with iron overload, hypogonadism, and heart disease. We suggest that genetic heterogeneity is more prominent in Southern Europe. It is also possible that the penetrance of the responsible genes is different across the Mediterranean.

  16. Research on Potential Biomarkers in Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Maria Botella

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, involving mutations in two predominant genes known as Endoglin (ENG; HHT1 and Activin receptor like kinase 1 (ACVRL1/ALK1; HHT2, as well as in some less frequent genes, such as MADH4/SMAD4 (JP-HHT or BMP9/GDF2 (HHT5. The diagnosis of HHT patients currently remains at the clinical level, according to the Curaçao criteria, whereas the molecular diagnosis is used to confirm or rule out suspected HHT cases, especially when a well characterized index case is present in the family or in an isolated population. Unfortunately, many suspected patients do not present a clear HHT diagnosis or do not show pathogenic mutations in HHT genes, prompting the need to investigate additional biomarkers of the disease. Here, several HHT biomarkers and novel methodological approaches developed during the last years will be reviewed. On one hand, products detected in plasma or serum samples: soluble proteins (VEGF, TGF-β1, soluble endoglin, angiopoietin-2 and microRNA variants (miR-27a, miR-205, miR-210. On the other hand, differential HHT gene expression fingerprinting, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS of a panel of genes involved in HHT, and infrared spectroscopy combined with Artificial Neural Network (ANN patterns will also be reviewed. All these biomarkers might help to improve and refine HHT diagnosis by distinguishing from the non-HHT population.

  17. Hereditary deafness with hydrops and anomalous calcium phosphate deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsson, L.G.; Rouse, R.C.; Hawkins, J.E. Jr.; Kingsley, T.C.; Wright, C.G.

    1981-11-01

    The temporal bones from a 58-year-old white woman who had had hereditary congenital deafness were examined with the techniques of microdissection and surface preparations followed by sectioning of the modiolus. There was bilateral, almost total sensorineural degeneration, which also involved the saccule. The degeneration of the distal processes of the cochlear neurons in the osseous spiral lamina was almost complete, whereas numerous ganglion cells and proximal processes remained in the modiolus and the internal auditory canal. Severe cochleo-saccular hydrops was present in the left ear with Reissner's membrane bulging into the horizontal canal. X-ray diffraction and electron probe analysis were used to study the abnormal crystalline deposits in both ears. On the left side the saccular otoconia were composed of calcite, but the utricular macula was covered by a crust of apatite spherulites. More apatite occurred around the maculae and in the scala media. The cupulae were composed of apatite and octacalcium phosphate. On the right side the utricular otoconia were of normal calcite, but there was a deposit of apatite on the macula sacculi. The upper part of the scala media was completely filled by a deposit of apatite and octacalcium phosphate.

  18. New therapies for hereditary angioedema: disease outlook changes dramatically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Michael M; Jiang, Haixiang

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease associated with episodic attacks of nonpitting edema that may affect any external or mucosal body surface. Attacks most often affect the extremities, causing local swelling, the GI tract, leading to severe abdominal pain, and the mouth and throat, at times causing asphyxiation. Most patients with HAE have low levels of the plasma serine protease inhibitor C1 inhibitor. The edema in these patients is caused by unregulated generation of bradykinin. Effective chronic therapy of patients with impeded androgens or plasmin inhibitors has been available for decades, but in the United States, we do not have therapy for acute attacks. Five companies have completed or are in the process of conducting phase 3 clinical trials, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of products designed to terminate acute attacks or to be used in prophylaxis. Two companies, Lev Pharmaceuticals and CSL Behring, have preparations of C1 inhibitor purified from plasma that have been used in Europe for decades (trade names Cinryze and Berinert P, respectively). One company, Pharming, has developed a recombinant C1 inhibitor preparation. One company, Dyax, is testing a kallikrein inhibitor (ecallantide), and one company, Jerini, is completing testing of a bradykinin type 2 receptor antagonist (Icatibant). Although little has been published thus far, all of these products may prove effective. It is likely that HAE treatment will change dramatically within the next few years. PMID:18206518

  19. CDH1 germline mutation in hereditary gastric carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Dan Wang; Jun Ren; Lian Zhang

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a bird's-eye view both in preclinical and clinical aspects of E-cadherin germline gene (CDH1)in gastric cancer patients and their families. E-cadherin,a product of CDH1 gene, belonging to the functionally related trans-membrane glycoprotein family, is responsible for the Ca2+-dependent cell-cell adhesion mechanism and contributes to dissociation followed by acquisition of cell motility, which usually occurs in the first step of cancer invasion and metastasis. CDH1 gene germline mutation is common in many types of carcinoma,and occurs very frequent in hereditary gastric carcinoma (HGC) patients and their families. Recently, more and more researches support that E-cadherin plays an important role in the differentiation, growth and invasion of HGC. So it is of great value to clarify its mechanisms both for understanding HGC pathogenesis and for clinical therapy, especially in China, where there are a high risk population of gastric cancer and a high HGC incidence rate. In this paper, recent researches on CDH1 gene mutation, especially its role in tumor genesis and progress of HGC, are reviewed, and advances in evaluation of its mutation status for HGC diagnosis, therapy and prognosis,are also discussed briefly.

  20. [Hereditary angioedema. Treatment of acute attacks in Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malbrán, Alejandro; Malbrán, Eloisa; Menéndez, Alejandra; Fernández Romero, Diego S

    2014-01-01

    In the world, hereditary angioedema (HAE) affects 1 every 50000 persons. It is characterized by highly disabling and recurrent episodes of cutaneous, abdominal and laryngeal episodes of angioedema. Asphyxia related mortality ranges from 15 to 50%. In Argentina a plasma derived C1 inhibitor concentrate (pdC1INH) has been available for the treatment of acute attacks for many decades, however, only15 (26%) out of 58 patients had received pdC1INH at least once until 2008, and only2 (3.4%) had used it regularly. After worldwide approval of the new drugs for the treatment of acute HAE attacks, adding icatibant to pdC1INH in Argentina, and after publication of the therapeutic guide for the country, 42 (82%) out of 51 patients from the original group has pdC1INH available to treat their next attack. However, 16 (18%) patients continue without access to medication and other 15 (35.7%) obtain their therapy spuriously through some other affected relative in their environment. Only 12 (28.6%) patients of the group self-treated at home. Access to treatment has greatly improved, but needs to be extended to all patients and self-treatment at home should be encouraged.

  1. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer: What the clinician should know

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryan; Ying; Cong; Tan; Joanne; Ngeow

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer(HDGC) is an inherited autosomal dominant syndrome with a penetrance of up to 80% affecting diverse geographic populations. While it has been shown to be caused mainly by germline alterations in the E-cadherin gene(CDH1), problematically, the genetic diagnosis remains unknown in up to 60% of patients. Given the important knowledge gaps regarding the syndrome, asymptomatic carriers of CDH1 mutations are advised for a prophylactic total gastrectomy. Intensive annual endoscopic surveillance is the alternative for carriers who decline gastrectomy. As HDGCs have a prolonged indolent phase, this provides a window of opportunity for surveillance and treatment. Recent findings of other gene defects in CTNNA1 and MAP3K6, as well as further characterization of CDH1 mutations and their pathogenicity will change the way HDGC patients are counselled for screening, surveillance and treatment. This review will bring the reader up to date with these changes and discuss future directions for research; namely more accurate risk stratification and surveillance methods to improve clinical care of HDGC patients.

  2. New therapies for hereditary angioedema: disease outlook changes dramatically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Michael M; Jiang, Haixiang

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease associated with episodic attacks of nonpitting edema that may affect any external or mucosal body surface. Attacks most often affect the extremities, causing local swelling, the GI tract, leading to severe abdominal pain, and the mouth and throat, at times causing asphyxiation. Most patients with HAE have low levels of the plasma serine protease inhibitor C1 inhibitor. The edema in these patients is caused by unregulated generation of bradykinin. Effective chronic therapy of patients with impeded androgens or plasmin inhibitors has been available for decades, but in the United States, we do not have therapy for acute attacks. Five companies have completed or are in the process of conducting phase 3 clinical trials, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of products designed to terminate acute attacks or to be used in prophylaxis. Two companies, Lev Pharmaceuticals and CSL Behring, have preparations of C1 inhibitor purified from plasma that have been used in Europe for decades (trade names Cinryze and Berinert P, respectively). One company, Pharming, has developed a recombinant C1 inhibitor preparation. One company, Dyax, is testing a kallikrein inhibitor (ecallantide), and one company, Jerini, is completing testing of a bradykinin type 2 receptor antagonist (Icatibant). Although little has been published thus far, all of these products may prove effective. It is likely that HAE treatment will change dramatically within the next few years.

  3. Identification of novel hereditary cancer genes by whole exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolenko, Anna P; Suspitsin, Evgeny N; Kuligina, Ekatherina Sh; Bizin, Ilya V; Frishman, Dmitrij; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2015-12-28

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) provides a powerful tool for medical genetic research. Several dozens of WES studies involving patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have already been reported. WES led to breakthrough in understanding of the genetic basis of some exceptionally rare syndromes; for example, identification of germ-line SMARCA4 mutations in patients with ovarian hypercalcemic small cell carcinomas indeed explains a noticeable share of familial aggregation of this disease. However, studies on common cancer types turned out to be more difficult. In particular, there is almost a dozen of reports describing WES analysis of breast cancer patients, but none of them yet succeeded to reveal a gene responsible for the significant share of missing heritability. Virtually all components of WES studies require substantial improvement, e.g. technical performance of WES, interpretation of WES results, mode of patient selection, etc. Most of contemporary investigations focus on genes with autosomal dominant mechanism of inheritance; however, recessive and oligogenic models of transmission of cancer susceptibility also need to be considered. It is expected that the list of medically relevant tumor-predisposing genes will be rapidly expanding in the next few years. PMID:26427841

  4. Strumpellin and Spartin, Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Proteins, are Binding Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiali; Hedera, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is one of the most heterogeneous neurodegenerative diseases with more than 50 identified genes causing a relatively stereotypical phenotypic presentation. Recent studies of HSP pathogenesis have suggested the existence of shared biochemical pathways that are crucial for axonal maintenance and degeneration. We explored possible interactions of several proteins associated with this condition. Here we report interactions of endogenous and overexpressed strumpellin with another HSP-associated protein, spartin. This biochemical interaction does not appear to be a part of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein and Scar homologue (WASH) complex because spartin is not co-immunoprecipitated with WASH1 protein. The spartin-strumpellin association does not require the presence of the microtubule interacting and trafficking domain of spartin. Over-expression of mutant forms of strumpellin with the introduced HSP-causing mutations does not alter the colocalization of these two proteins. Knockdown of strumpellin in cultured cortical rat neurons interferes with development of neuronal branching and results in reduced expression of endogenous spartin. Proteosomal inhibition stabilized the levels of spartin and WASH1 proteins, supporting increased spartin degradation in the absence of strumpellin. PMID:25987849

  5. Management of upper airway edema caused by hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkas Henriette

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary angioedema is a rare disorder with a genetic background involving mutations in the genes encoding C1-INH and of factor XII. Its etiology is unknown in a proportion of cases. Recurrent edema formation may involve the subcutis and the submucosa - the latter can produce obstruction in the upper airways and thereby lead to life-threatening asphyxia. This is the reason for the high, 30-to 50-per-cent mortality of undiagnosed or improperly managed cases. Airway obstruction can be prevented through early diagnosis, meaningful patient information, timely recognition of initial symptoms, state-of-the-art emergency therapy, and close monitoring of the patient. Prophylaxis can substantially mitigate the risk of upper airway edema and also improve the patients' quality of life. Notwithstanding the foregoing, any form of upper airway edema should be regarded as a potentially life-threatening condition. None of the currently available prophylactic modalities is capable of preventing UAE with absolute certainty.

  6. Hereditary breast and gynecological tumors: Italian legal issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DI Vella, Giancarlo

    2016-10-01

    The availability of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that lower the risk for developing hereditary family-related tumors is weighed against Italian ethical and legal provisions. The healthcare environment in which a professional works should require that he possess specific technical, relational and medical competencies based upon legal orientation in addition to scientific evidence. Particular emphasis is attributed to the doctor-patient relationship, with explicit reference to the following: 1) all of the information at hand that is required to achieve a "therapeutic alliance" that combines the best interests of the patient with treatment options; 2) the completeness and intelligibility of health records, as they are likely to explain the background logic and the following of scientific clinical procedure; 3) the observance of guidelines and protocols, and their relevance to the legal responsibility of the individual and health care companies; 4) the need of a multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of these patients and the obligation of the team to have malpractice insurance. Advances on "provisions concerning liability of health personnel", which is currently awaiting approval, allows the professional to protect the patient's health without the fear of being unnecessarily censured, and unjustified from a penal or civil point of view which can deteriorate the relationship of trust and cooperation established. PMID:26924172

  7. Defective fluid shear stress mechanotransduction mediates hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Larrivée, Bruno; Ola, Roxana; Hayward-Piatkowskyi, Brielle; Dubrac, Alexandre; Huang, Billy; Ross, Tyler D; Coon, Brian G; Min, Elizabeth; Tsarfati, Maya; Tong, Haibin; Eichmann, Anne; Schwartz, Martin A

    2016-09-26

    Morphogenesis of the vascular system is strongly modulated by mechanical forces from blood flow. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an inherited autosomal-dominant disease in which arteriovenous malformations and telangiectasias accumulate with age. Most cases are linked to heterozygous mutations in Alk1 or Endoglin, receptors for bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) 9 and 10. Evidence suggests that a second hit results in clonal expansion of endothelial cells to form lesions with poor mural cell coverage that spontaneously rupture and bleed. We now report that fluid shear stress potentiates BMPs to activate Alk1 signaling, which correlates with enhanced association of Alk1 and endoglin. Alk1 is required for BMP9 and flow responses, whereas endoglin is only required for enhancement by flow. This pathway mediates both inhibition of endothelial proliferation and recruitment of mural cells; thus, its loss blocks flow-induced vascular stabilization. Identification of Alk1 signaling as a convergence point for flow and soluble ligands provides a molecular mechanism for development of HHT lesions. PMID:27646277

  8. Hereditary Angioedema Attacks: Local Swelling at Multiple Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Zonne L M; Relan, Anurag; Hack, C Erik

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients experience recurrent local swelling in various parts of the body including painful swelling of the intestine and life-threatening laryngeal oedema. Most HAE literature is about attacks located in one anatomical site, though it is mentioned that HAE attacks may also involve multiple anatomical sites simultaneously. A detailed description of such multi-location attacks is currently lacking. This study investigated the occurrence, severity and clinical course of HAE attacks with multiple anatomical locations. HAE patients included in a clinical database of recombinant human C1-inhibitor (rhC1INH) studies were evaluated. Visual analog scale scores filled out by the patients for various symptoms at various locations and investigator symptoms scores during the attack were analysed. Data of 219 eligible attacks in 119 patients was analysed. Thirty-three patients (28%) had symptoms at multiple locations in anatomically unrelated regions at the same time during their first attack. Up to five simultaneously affected locations were reported. The observation that severe HAE attacks often affect multiple sites in the body suggests that HAE symptoms result from a systemic rather than from a local process as is currently believed.

  9. The proteomic profile of hereditary inclusion body myopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilan Sela

    Full Text Available Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM is an adult onset, slowly progressive distal and proximal myopathy. Although the causing gene, GNE, encodes for a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of sialic acid, its primary function in HIBM remains unknown. The goal of this study was to unravel new clues on the biological pathways leading to HIBM by proteomic comparison. Muscle cultures and biopsies were analyzed by two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and the same biopsy extracts by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ. Proteins that were differentially expressed in all HIBM specimens versus all controls in each analysis were identified by mass spectrometry. The muscle cultures 2-DE analysis yielded 41 such proteins, while the biopsies 2-DE analysis showed 26 differentially expressed proteins. Out of the 400 proteins identified in biopsies by iTRAQ, 41 showed altered expression. In spite of the different nature of specimens (muscle primary cultures versus muscle biopsies and of the different methods applied (2D gels versus iTRAQ the differentially expressed proteins identified in each of the three analyses where related mainly to the same pathways, ubiquitination, stress response and mitochondrial processes, but the most robust cluster (30% was assigned to cytoskeleton and sarcomere organization. Taken together, these findings indicate a possible novel function of GNE in the muscle filamentous apparatus that could be involved in the pathogenesis of HIBM.

  10. CT findings of hereditary dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hereditary dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) has recently been recognized as a clinicopathological entity. It may be defined as a multisystem degenerative disease of dominant inheritance, and characterized clinically by a combination of epilepsy, myoclonus, ataxia, dementia, and choreo-athetosis. This paper reports on the CT findings of ten patients (in four families) with DRPLA. In two families, the diagnosis was established on the basis of the clinicopathological findings, while in the other two, the diagnosis was made clinically. Although the CT findings were not identical in all patients, some degree of atrophic change was always observed in the cerebellum, brainstem, and cerebral cortex. Cerebellar atrophy was always accompanied by a dilatation of the fourth ventricle. Midbrain atrophy was characterized by a prominent tegmental atrophy and aqueductal dilatation, such as is seen in progressive supranuclear palsy. Of the four patients over 40 years of age, three had a diffuse hypodensity of the cerebral white matter on CT. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports on this hypodensity in patients with spino-cerebellar degeneration or Huntington's chorea. CT may be helpful in the differential diagnosis of progressive neuro-degenerative disorders. (author)

  11. Leber′s hereditary optic neuropathy: The mitochondrial connection revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled K Abu-Amero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of Leber′s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON-mitochondrial connection falls short of comprehensive. Twenty years of intensive investigation have yielded a wealth of information about mitochondria, the mitochondrial genome, the metabolism of the optic nerve and other structures, and the phenotypic variability of classic LHON. However, we still cannot completely explain how primary LHON mutations injure the optic nerve or why the optic nerve is particularly at risk. We cannot explain the incomplete penetrance or the male predominance of LHON, the typical onset in young adult life without warning, or the synchronicity of visual loss. Moreover, primary LHON mutations clearly are not present in every family with the LHON phenotype (including multigenerational maternal inheritance, and they are present in only a minority of individuals who have the LHON optic neuropathy phenotype without a family history. All lines of evidence point to abnormalities of the mitochondria as the direct or indirect cause of LHON. Therefore, the mitochondria-LHON connection needs to be revisited and examined closely. This review will attempt to do that and provide an update on various aspects of LHON.

  12. Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: The Mitochondrial Connection Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Amero, Khaled K

    2011-01-01

    Our current understanding of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON)-mitochondrial connection falls short of comprehensive. Twenty years of intensive investigation have yielded a wealth of information about mitochondria, the mitochondrial genome, the metabolism of the optic nerve and other structures, and the phenotypic variability of classic LHON. However, we still cannot completely explain how primary LHON mutations injure the optic nerve or why the optic nerve is particularly at risk. We cannot explain the incomplete penetrance or the male predominance of LHON, the typical onset in young adult life without warning, or the synchronicity of visual loss. Moreover, primary LHON mutations clearly are not present in every family with the LHON phenotype (including multigenerational maternal inheritance), and they are present in only a minority of individuals who have the LHON optic neuropathy phenotype without a family history. All lines of evidence point to abnormalities of the mitochondria as the direct or indirect cause of LHON. Therefore, the mitochondria-LHON connection needs to be revisited and examined closely. This review will attempt to do that and provide an update on various aspects of LHON.

  13. Idebenone: A Review in Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A

    2016-05-01

    Idebenone (Raxone(®)), a short-chain benzoquinone, is the only disease-specific drug approved to treat visual impairment in adolescents and adults with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a rare genetic mitochondrial disease that causes rapid and progressive bilateral vision loss. The mechanism of action of idebenone involves its antioxidant properties and ability to act as a mitochondrial electron carrier. Idebenone overcomes mitochondrial complex I respiratory chain deficiency in patients with LHON by transferring electrons directly to mitochondrial complex III (by-passing complex I), thereby restoring cellular energy (ATP) production and re-activating inactive-but-viable retinal ganglion cells, which ultimately prevents further vision loss and promotes vision recovery. The approval of idebenone in the treatment of LHON was based on the overall data from a randomized clinical trial, a follow-up study and real-world data. Taken together, these studies provide convincing evidence that oral idebenone 900 mg/day for 24 weeks has persistent beneficial effects in preventing further vision impairment and promoting vision recovery in patients with LHON relative to the natural course of the disease. Therefore, idebenone is a valuable agent to treat visual impairment in adolescents and adults with LHON.

  14. Secondary post-geniculate involvement in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Giovanni; Tozer, Kevin R; Tonon, Caterina; Manners, David; Testa, Claudia; Malucelli, Emil; Valentino, Maria Lucia; La Morgia, Chiara; Barboni, Piero; Randhawa, Ruvdeep S; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Sadun, Alfredo A; Carelli, Valerio; Lodi, Raffaele

    2012-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration with the preferential involvement of those forming the papillomacular bundle. The optic nerve is considered the main pathological target for LHON. Our aim was to investigate the possible involvement of the post-geniculate visual pathway in LHON patients. We used diffusion-weighted imaging for in vivo evaluation. Mean diffusivity maps from 22 LHON visually impaired, 11 unaffected LHON mutation carriers and 22 healthy subjects were generated and compared at level of optic radiation (OR). Prefrontal and cerebellar white matter were also analyzed as internal controls. Furthermore, we studied the optic nerve and the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) in post-mortem specimens obtained from a severe case of LHON compared to an age-matched control. Mean diffusivity values of affected patients were higher than unaffected mutation carriers (Poptic nerve. The post-geniculate involvement in LHON patients is a downstream post-synaptic secondary phenomenon, reflecting de-afferentation rather than a primary neurodegeneration due to mitochondrial dysfunction of LGN neurons.

  15. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy - phenotype, genetics, therapeutic options].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallenmüller, C; Klopstock, T

    2014-03-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a rare genetic disorder affecting the retinal ganglion cells leading to a persistent severe bilateral loss of visual acuity within weeks or months. Males are much more likely to be affected than females, disease onset in most cases takes place between age 15 and 35 years. The disease is caused by point mutations in the mitochondrial DNA. The penetrance of the disease is incomplete, i.e., not all mutation carriers develop clinical symptoms. The phenotype is relatively uniform, but age at onset, severity and prognosis may vary even within the same family. Environmental and endocrine factors, optic disc anatomy as well as mitochondrial and nuclear genetic factors are discussed to influence penetrance as well as interindividual and intrafamilial variability. However, only cigarette smoking and excessive alcohol consumption have been shown to trigger disease onset. The disease is characterised by a central visual field defect, impaired colour vision and fundoscopically a peripapillary microangiopathy in the acute phase. Most patients end up after some months with a severe visual loss below 0.1 and in most cases there is no significant improvement of visual acuity in the course. In rare cases patients experience a mostly partial visual recovery which depends on the type of mutation. For confirmation of the diagnosis a detailed ophthalmological examination with fundoscopy, family history and genetic analysis of the mitochondrial DNA is needed. To date, there is no proven causal therapy, but at early disease stages treatment with idebenone can be tried.

  16. Auditory function in individuals within Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy pedigrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rance, Gary; Kearns, Lisa S; Tan, Johanna; Gravina, Anthony; Rosenfeld, Lisa; Henley, Lauren; Carew, Peter; Graydon, Kelley; O'Hare, Fleur; Mackey, David A

    2012-03-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate whether auditory dysfunction is part of the spectrum of neurological abnormalities associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and to determine the perceptual consequences of auditory neuropathy (AN) in affected listeners. Forty-eight subjects confirmed by genetic testing as having one of four mitochondrial mutations associated with LHON (mt11778, mtDNA14484, mtDNA14482 and mtDNA3460) participated. Thirty-two of these had lost vision, and 16 were asymptomatic at the point of data collection. While the majority of individuals showed normal sound detection, >25% (of both symptomatic and asymptomatic participants) showed electrophysiological evidence of AN with either absent or severely delayed auditory brainstem potentials. Abnormalities were observed for each of the mutations, but subjects with the mtDNA11778 type were the most affected. Auditory perception was also abnormal in both symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects, with >20% of cases showing impaired detection of auditory temporal (timing) cues and >30% showing abnormal speech perception both in quiet and in the presence of background noise. The findings of this study indicate that a relatively high proportion of individuals with the LHON genetic profile may suffer functional hearing difficulties due to neural abnormality in the central auditory pathways.

  17. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy after head trauma: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shintaro; Okamoto, Koichi

    2011-10-01

    A previously healthy 34-year-old man sustained multiple skull fractures in a traffic accident. Radiological findings and visual field examination did not detect any abnormality. Shortly after the accident, he noticed blurred vision in both eyes. Six months after the accident, he gradually developed disturbance of visual acuity in the right eye. His best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.8 OD and 1.2 OS and brain MRI did not show any abnormality, while Humphrey visual field analysis demonstrated right homonymous hemianopsia. Two months after the initial presentation, his BCVA showed 0.1 OD and 0.08 OS. Visual field examination suggested that both right homonymous hemianopsia and left blind spot had become enlarged. Mitochondrial DNA analysis demonstrated G11,778A mutation and a diagnosis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was made. A few reports have documented mild acute insult to the head or blunt optic trauma as triggers of optic neuropathy in subjects with LHON. Although, the precise mechanism of LHON following trauma remains unknown, it appears that an acute insult may be sufficient to precipitate neuropathy in the optic nerve already compromised by mitochondrial dysfunction. Asymptomatic carriers should be advised to avoid possible precipitating factors such as head trauma.

  18. Novel therapeutic approaches for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Shilpa

    2013-03-01

    Many human childhood mitochondrial disorders result from abnormal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and altered bioenergetics. These abnormalities span most of the mtDNA, demonstrating that there are no "unique" positions on the mitochondrial genome that when deleted or mutated produce a disease phenotype. This diversity implies that the relationship between mitochondrial genotype and clinical phenotype is very complex. The origins of clinical phenotypes are thus unclear, fundamentally difficult-to-treat, and are usually clinically devastating. Current treatment is largely supportive and the disorders progress relentlessly causing significant morbidity and mortality. Vitamin supplements and pharmacological agents have been used in isolated cases and clinical trials, but the efficacy of these interventions is unclear. In spite of recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of mitochondrial diseases, a cure remains elusive. An optimal cure would be gene therapy, which involves introducing the missing gene(s) into the mitochondria to complement the defect. Our recent research results indicate the feasibility of an innovative protein-transduction ("protofection") technology, consisting of a recombinant mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) that avidly binds mtDNA and permits efficient targeting into mitochondria in situ and in vivo. Thus, the development of gene therapy for treating mitochondrial disease offers promise, because it may circumvent the clinical abnormalities and the current inability to treat individual disorders in affected individuals. This review aims to focus on current treatment options and future therapeutics in mitochondrial disease treatment with a special emphasis on Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

  19. Evidence for retrochiasmatic tissue loss in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcella, Valeria; Rocca, Maria A; Bianchi-Marzoli, Stefania; Milesi, Jacopo; Melzi, Lisa; Falini, Andrea; Pierro, Luisa; Filippi, Massimo

    2010-12-01

    Patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) have loss of central vision with severe damage of small-caliber fibers of the papillomacular bundle and optic nerve atrophy. The aim of this study was to define the presence and topographical distribution of brain grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) injury in LHON patients using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). The correlation of such changes with neuro-ophthalmologic findings and measurements of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness by optical coherence tomography (OCT) was also assessed. Dual-echo and fast-field echo scans were acquired from 12 LHON patients and 12 matched controls. VBM analysis was performed using SPM5 and an ANCOVA model. A complete neuro-ophthalmologic examination, including standardized automated Humphrey perimetry as well as average and temporal peripapillary RNFL thickness measurements were obtained in all the patients. Compared with controls, average peripapillary RNFL thickness was significantly decreased in LHON patients. LHON patients also had significant reduced GM volume in the bilateral primary visual cortex, and reduced WM volume in the optic chiasm, optic tract, and several areas located in the optic radiations (OR), bilaterally. Visual cortex and OR atrophy were significantly correlated with average and temporal peripapillary RNFL thickness (P optic nerve or to local mitochondrial dysfunction.

  20. Hereditary deafness with hydrops and anomalous calcium phosphate deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temporal bones from a 58-year-old white woman who had had hereditary congenital deafness were examined with the techniques of microdissection and surface preparations followed by sectioning of the modiolus. There was bilateral, almost total sensorineural degeneration, which also involved the saccule. The degeneration of the distal processes of the cochlear neurons in the osseous spiral lamina was almost complete, whereas numerous ganglion cells and proximal processes remained in the modiolus and the internal auditory canal. Severe cochleo-saccular hydrops was present in the left ear with Reissner's membrane bulging into the horizontal canal. X-ray diffraction and electron probe analysis were used to study the abnormal crystalline deposits in both ears. On the left side the saccular otoconia were composed of calcite, but the utricular macula was covered by a crust of apatite spherulites. More apatite occurred around the maculae and in the scala media. The cupulae were composed of apatite and octacalcium phosphate. On the right side the utricular otoconia were of normal calcite, but there was a deposit of apatite on the macula sacculi. The upper part of the scala media was completely filled by a deposit of apatite and octacalcium phosphate

  1. Impairment of autophagy: From hereditary disorder to drug intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At first, the molecular mechanism of autophagy was unveiled in a unicellular organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast), followed by the discovery that the basic mechanism of autophagy is conserved in multicellular organisms including mammals. Although autophagy was considered to be a non-selective bulk protein degradation system to recycle amino acids during periods of nutrient starvation, it is also believed to be an essential mechanism for the selective elimination of proteins/organelles that are damaged under pathological conditions. Research advances made using autophagy-deficient animals have revealed that impairments of autophagy often underlie the pathogenesis of hereditary disorders such as Danon, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. On the other hand, there are many reports that drugs and toxicants, including arsenic, cadmium, paraquat, methamphetamine, and ethanol, induce autophagy during the development of their toxicity on many organs including heart, brain, lung, kidney, and liver. Although the question as to whether autophagic machinery is involved in the execution of cell death or not remains controversial, the current view of the role of autophagy during cell/tissue injury is that it is an important, often essential, cytoprotective reaction; disturbances in cytoprotective autophagy aggravate cell/tissue injuries. The purpose of this review is to provide (1) a gross summarization of autophagy processes, which are becoming more important in the field of toxicology, and (2) examples of important studies reporting the involvement of perturbations in autophagy in cell/tissue injuries caused by acute as well as chronic intoxication

  2. Unusual presentation of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andary Michael T

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP is an autosomal-dominant painless peripheral neuropathy characterized by episodes of repeated focal pressure neuropathies at sites of entrapment/compression, with a considerable variability in the clinical course. Electrodiagnostic and genetic testing are important in the diagnostic evaluation of these patients. Case presentation We report an unusual HNPP phenotype, five compression neuropathies in four nerves in a patient with bilateral hand numbness. A 42-year-old female, presented with acute bilateral paresthesias and weakness in her hands after starting yoga exercises requiring hyperextension of her hands at the wrists. Her presentation was complicated by: a a remote history of acute onset foot drop and subsequent improvement, b previous diagnoses of demyelinating peripheral neuropathy, possibly Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and c exposure to leprosy. Electrodiagnostic testing showed 5 separate compression neuropathies in 4 nerves including: severe left and right ulnar neuropathies at the wrist, left and right median neuropathies at the wrist and left ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. There was a mild generalized, primarily demyelinating, peripheral polyneuropathy. Based on the clinical suspicion and electrodiagnostic findings, consistent with profound demyelination in areas of compression, genetic analysis was done which identified a deletion of the PMP-22 gene consistent with HNPP. Conclusion HNPP can present with unusual phenotypes, such as 5 separate mononeuropathies, bilateral ulnar and median neuropathies at the wrists and ulnar neuropathy at the elbow with mild peripheral demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with the PMP-22 gene deletion.

  3. Mechanisms of disease in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; Timmerman, Vincent; Janssens, Katrien

    2012-01-24

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSANs) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders of the PNS. Progressive degeneration, predominantly of sensory and autonomic neurons, is the main pathological feature in patients with HSAN, and causes prominent sensory loss and ulcerative mutilations in combination with variable autonomic and motor disturbances. Advances in molecular genetics have enabled identification of disease-causing mutations in 12 genes, and studies on the functional effects of these mutations are underway. Although some of the affected proteins--such as nerve growth factor and its receptor--have obvious nerve-specific roles, others are ubiquitously expressed proteins that are involved in sphingolipid metabolism, vesicular transport, transcription regulation and structural integrity. An important challenge in the future will be to understand the common molecular pathways that result in HSANs. Unraveling the mechanisms that underlie sensory and autonomic neurodegeneration could assist in identifying targets for future therapeutic strategies in patients with HSAN. This Review highlights key advances in the understanding of HSANs, including insights into the molecular mechanisms of disease, derived from genetic studies of patients with these disorders.

  4. Deception in simplicity: hereditary phospholamban mutations in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Howard S; Ceholski, Delaine K; Trieber, Catharine A

    2015-02-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium pump (SERCA) and its regulator phospholamban are required for cardiovascular function. Phospholamban alters the apparent calcium affinity of SERCA in a process that is modulated by phosphorylation via the β-adrenergic pathway. This regulatory axis allows for the dynamic control of SR calcium stores and cardiac contractility. Herein we focus on hereditary mutants of phospholamban that are associated with heart failure, such as Arg(9)-Cys, Arg(9)-Leu, Arg(9)-His, and Arg(14)-deletion. Each mutant has a distinct effect on PLN function and SR calcium homeostasis. Arg(9)-Cys and Arg(9)-Leu do not inhibit SERCA, Arg(14)-deletion is a partial inhibitor, and Arg(9)-His is comparable to wild-type. While the mutants have distinct functional effects on SERCA, they have in common that they cannot be phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA). Arg(9) and Arg(14) are required for PKA recognition and phosphorylation of PLN. Thus, mutations at these positions eliminate β-adrenergic control and dynamic cardiac contractility. Hydrophobic mutations of Arg(9) cause more complex changes in function, including loss of PLN function and dominant negative interaction with SERCA in heterozygous individuals. In addition, aberrant interaction with PKA may prevent phosphorylation of wild-type PLN and sequester PKA from other local subcellular targets. Herein we consider what is known about each mutant and how the synergistic changes in SR calcium homeostasis lead to impaired cardiac contractility and dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:25563649

  5. Hereditary breast and gynecological tumors: Italian legal issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DI Vella, Giancarlo

    2016-10-01

    The availability of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that lower the risk for developing hereditary family-related tumors is weighed against Italian ethical and legal provisions. The healthcare environment in which a professional works should require that he possess specific technical, relational and medical competencies based upon legal orientation in addition to scientific evidence. Particular emphasis is attributed to the doctor-patient relationship, with explicit reference to the following: 1) all of the information at hand that is required to achieve a "therapeutic alliance" that combines the best interests of the patient with treatment options; 2) the completeness and intelligibility of health records, as they are likely to explain the background logic and the following of scientific clinical procedure; 3) the observance of guidelines and protocols, and their relevance to the legal responsibility of the individual and health care companies; 4) the need of a multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of these patients and the obligation of the team to have malpractice insurance. Advances on "provisions concerning liability of health personnel", which is currently awaiting approval, allows the professional to protect the patient's health without the fear of being unnecessarily censured, and unjustified from a penal or civil point of view which can deteriorate the relationship of trust and cooperation established.

  6. Two novel mutations involved in hereditary tyrosinemia type I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St-Louis, M.; Poudrier, J.; Phaneuf, D. [Univ. of Laval, Ste-Foy, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase, the last enzyme in the tyrosine catabolic pathway is the cause of hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HT1), an autosomal recessive disease. The disease has been reported worldwide. The incidence is much higher in two clusters: the Saguenay- Lac St-Jean region (Quebec, Canada) and in Scandinavia. Seven mutations have been reported in the last two years. Here we describe two new missense mutations identified by direct sequencing of PCR products in two HT1 patients, a Norwegian (patient No. 1) and a French-Canadian (patient No. 2). The first mutation consists of a G to A transition at position 337 of the FAH gene which predicts a change from glycine to serine (G337S). The second mutation is an A to G transition at position 381 which predicts a change from arginine to glycine (R381G). Patient No. 1 seems heterozygous for the G337S mutation and for a splice mutation (IVS12+5G{r_arrow}A) which was previously described. Patient No. 2 was also found heterozygous for the R381G mutation and for a rare nonsense mutation (E357X) already reported. In vitro transcription and translation were performed on mutant cDNA to demonstrate the responsibility of these two mutations in causing the decreased amount of FAH detected by Western blot analysis.

  7. [Diagnostic image (153). A boy with chronic hereditary pancreatitis and nocturnal abdominal pain. Multiple, large pseudo-cysts of the pancreas, caused by chronic hereditary pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaars, R.; Wildenberg, F.J. van den

    2003-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy with chronic hereditary pancreatitis developed nocturnal episodes of pain in the back and abdomen. CT revealed two large pseudocysts of the pancreas and one smaller pseudocyst near the hilus of the spleen. The two largest pseudocysts were surgically drained into the stomach and the

  8. Germ line mutations of mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer patients with small bowel cancer: International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours Collaborative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Jae-Gahb; Kim, Duck-Woo; Hong, Chang Won;

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of study was to determine the clinical characteristics and mutational profiles of the mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients with small bowel cancer (SBC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A questionnaire was mailed to 55 members of the Internatio...

  9. Pes cavus and hereditary neuropathies: when a relationship should be suspected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, S; Ricci, G; Caldarazzo Ienco, E; Carlesi, C; Volpi, L; Siciliano, G; Mancuso, M

    2010-12-01

    The hereditary peripheral neuropathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases of the peripheral nervous system. Foot deformities, including the common pes cavus, but also hammer toes and twisting of the ankle, are frequently present in patients with hereditary peripheral neuropathy, and often represent one of the first signs of the disease. Pes cavus in hereditary peripheral neuropathies is caused by imbalance between the intrinsic muscles of the foot and the muscles of the leg. Accurate clinical evaluation in patients with pes cavus is necessary to exclude or confirm the presence of peripheral neuropathy. Hereditary peripheral neuropathies should be suspected in those cases with bilateral foot deformities, in the presence of family history for pes cavus and/or gait impairment, and in the presence of neurological symptoms or signs, such as distal muscle hypotrophy of limbs. Herein, we review the hereditary peripheral neuropathies in which pes cavus plays a key role as a "spy sign," discussing the clinical and molecular features of these disorders to highlight the importance of pes cavus as a helpful clinical sign in these rare diseases. PMID:20963465

  10. Forced gradings in integral quasi-hereditary algebras with applications to quantum groups

    CERN Document Server

    Parshall, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Let $\\sO$ be a discrete valuation ring with fraction field $K$ and residue field $k$. A quasi-hereditary algebra $\\wA$ over $\\sO$ provides a bridge between the representation theory of the quasi-hereditary algebra $\\wA_K:=K\\otimes \\wA$ over the field $K$ and the quasi-hereditary algebra $A_k:=k\\otimes_\\sO\\wA$ over $k$. In one important example, $\\wA_K$--mod is a full subcategory of the category of modules for a quantum enveloping algebra while $\\wA_k$--mod is a full subcategory of the category of modules for a reductive group in positive characteristic. This paper considers first the question of when the positively graded algebra $\\gr \\wA:= \\bigoplus_{n\\geq 0}(\\wA\\cap\\rad^n\\wA_K)/(\\wA\\cap\\rad^{n+1}\\wA_K)$ is quasi-hereditary. A main result gives sufficient conditions that $\\gr\\wA$ be quasi-hereditary. The main requirement is that each graded module $\\gr\\wDelta(\\lambda)$ arising from a $\\wA$-standard (Weyl) module $\\wDelta(\\lambda)$ have an irreducible head. An additional hypothesis requires that the graded al...

  11. A novel locus for a hereditary recurrent neuropathy on chromosome 21q21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calpena, E; Martínez-Rubio, D; Arpa, J; García-Peñas, J J; Montaner, D; Dopazo, J; Palau, F; Espinós, C

    2014-08-01

    Hereditary recurrent neuropathies are uncommon. Disorders with a known molecular basis falling within this group include hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) due to the deletion of the PMP22 gene or to mutations in this same gene, and hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA) caused by mutations in the SEPT9 gene. We report a three-generation family presenting a hereditary recurrent neuropathy without pathological changes in either PMP22 or SEPT9 genes. We performed a genome-wide mapping, which yielded a locus of 12.4 Mb on chromosome 21q21. The constructed haplotype fully segregated with the disease and we found significant evidence of linkage. After mutational screening of genes located within this locus, encoding for proteins and microRNAs, as well as analysis of large deletions/insertions, we identified 71 benign polymorphisms. Our findings suggest a novel genetic locus for a recurrent hereditary neuropathy of which the molecular defect remains elusive. Our results further underscore the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of this group of neuropathies.

  12. Pes cavus and hereditary neuropathies: when a relationship should be suspected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, S; Ricci, G; Caldarazzo Ienco, E; Carlesi, C; Volpi, L; Siciliano, G; Mancuso, M

    2010-12-01

    The hereditary peripheral neuropathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases of the peripheral nervous system. Foot deformities, including the common pes cavus, but also hammer toes and twisting of the ankle, are frequently present in patients with hereditary peripheral neuropathy, and often represent one of the first signs of the disease. Pes cavus in hereditary peripheral neuropathies is caused by imbalance between the intrinsic muscles of the foot and the muscles of the leg. Accurate clinical evaluation in patients with pes cavus is necessary to exclude or confirm the presence of peripheral neuropathy. Hereditary peripheral neuropathies should be suspected in those cases with bilateral foot deformities, in the presence of family history for pes cavus and/or gait impairment, and in the presence of neurological symptoms or signs, such as distal muscle hypotrophy of limbs. Herein, we review the hereditary peripheral neuropathies in which pes cavus plays a key role as a "spy sign," discussing the clinical and molecular features of these disorders to highlight the importance of pes cavus as a helpful clinical sign in these rare diseases.

  13. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies Multiple, Complex Etiologies in an Idiopathic Hereditary Pancreatitis Kindred

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica LaRusch

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Hereditary pancreatitis is the early onset form of chronic pancreatitis that is carried in an autosomal dominant pattern with variable penetrance. While 80% of hereditary pancreatitis has been shown to be due to a single mutation in the trypsinogen gene PRSS1, a number of hereditary pancreatitis families have no identified genetic cause for illness; thus no reliable screening options or clear therapy. Objective To explore the use of massive parallel DNA sequencing technology to discover the etiology of pancreatitis in a family with idiopathic hereditary pancreatitis. Design Candidate gene screening and verification within a kindred. Setting Prospective cohort study, university based. Patients or participants Kindred with idiopathic hereditary pancreatitis. Interventions None. Main outcome measures Identification of DNA variants predicted to increase susceptibility to pancreatitis. Methods Whole exome sequencing of two distantly related subjects with variant-specific confirmation in the subjects and other family members. Results We identified three deleterious genetic changes in the three major pancreatitis associated genes (PRSS1 CNV, SPINK1 c.27delC and CFTR R117H, two of which were carried by each patient. Individual targeted assays confirmed these variations in the two whole exome sequencing patients as well as affected and non-affected pedigree members. Conclusion Whole exome sequencing was useful for rapid screening of candidate genes linked to pancreatitis. This method opens the door for time- and cost-effective screening of multiple disease-associated genes and modifying factors that associate in different ways to generate a complex geneticdisorder.

  14. Hereditary multiple exostoses: from genetics to clinical syndrome and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhoenacker, Filip M.; Hul, Wim van; Wuyts, Wim; Willems, P.J.; Schepper, Arthur M. de

    2001-12-01

    Objective: To give an overview of genetic, clinical and radiological aspects in two families over four generations with known hereditary multiple exostoses (HME). Methods and material: After linkage analysis in both families to localize the defective gene, mutation analysis was performed in these genes to identify the underlying mutation. In the 31 affected individuals, location, number and morphology and evolution of exostosis, evolution of remodeling defects at the metaphysis, and the extent of possible complications were evaluated on clinical and imaging (plain radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) data over a lifetime period. Results and conclusions: Both families demonstrate the gene defect in the same EXT-2 gene locus on chromosome 11p. Exostoses are preferentially located in the lower extremity (hip, knee and lower leg), humerus, and forearm. Any other bone may be involved, except for the calvaria of the skull and the mandible. Exostoses are rather sessile than pedunculated. Exostosis is rarely present at birth but develops gradually and may persist to grow slowly after closure of the growth plates. Preferential expression of the remodeling defect was seen in the hip, distal femur (trumpet-shaped metaphysis) and forearm (shortening of the ulna with secondary bowing of the radius and development of a pseudo-Madelung deformity). These radiological manifestations start at the age of 4-5 years and become more obvious as the enchondral bone formation progresses with age. Reported complications in these families consist of local entrapment phenomenons (vessel, tendon, nerve), frictional bursitis, and sarcomatous transformation. MRI was able to suggest these complications and is the imaging technique of choice in the evaluation of symptomatic exostoses.

  15. Prognostic Factors for Distress After Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorwinden, Jan S; Jaspers, Jan P C

    2016-06-01

    The psychological impact of an unfavorable genetic test result for counselees at risk for hereditary cancer seems to be limited: only 10-20 % of counselees have psychological problems after testing positive for a known familial mutation. The objective of this study was to find prognostic factors that can predict which counselees are most likely to develop psychological problems after presymptomatic genetic testing. Counselees with a 50 % risk of BRCA1/2 or Lynch syndrome completed questionnaires at three time-points: after receiving a written invitation for a genetic counseling intake (T1), 2-3 days after receiving their DNA test result (T2), and 4-6 weeks later (T3). The psychological impact of the genetic test result was examined shortly and 4-6 weeks after learning their test result. Subsequently, the influence of various potentially prognostic factors on psychological impact were examined in the whole group. Data from 165 counselees were analyzed. Counselees with an unfavorable outcome did not have more emotional distress, but showed significantly more cancer worries 4-6 weeks after learning their test result. Prognostic factors for cancer worries after genetic testing were pre-existing cancer worries, being single, a high risk perception of getting cancer, and an unfavorable test result. Emotional distress was best predicted by pre-existing cancer worries and pre-existing emotional distress. The psychological impact of an unfavorable genetic test result appears considerable if it is measured as "worries about cancer." Genetic counselors should provide additional guidance to counselees with many cancer worries, emotional distress, a high risk perception or a weak social network. PMID:26475052

  16. Advocate's Viewpoint on Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolling-Dandrieu Francisca

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper discusses the presentation I held at the symposium on genetics during the 4th European Breast Cancer Conference held in Hamburg in March 2004. Primarily, the goals and working methods of the advocacy group specialised in Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer of the Dutch Breast Cancer Patient Organisation known as BorstkankerVereniging Nederland (BVN are explained. Furthermore, some specific individual problems that mutation carriers might encounter before and after BRCA1/2 susceptibility testing are discussed. These include: dilemmas in choosing preventive interventions, dealing with the psychological impact of knowing you are a mutation carrier, dealing with the social implications of being genetically at risk, an example of insurance discrimination. In addition, some controversial social and ethical issues that are currently under debate are highlighted, such as the issue of the European patenting of the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. Since this topic could also become relevant for other gene-related diseases, society as a whole has to consider the ethical and social implications related to the patenting of human genes in general. Another ethical area of debate is the controversial issue of prenatal BRCA testing and the choice of pregnancy termination. Finally, the Working Party pleads for the international co-operation and exchange of data and experience among professionals as well as patients. It appears that professionals in different European countries tend to advise on different risk management strategies and treatments and as such, the Working Party strongly advocates the international standardisation of risk management and treatment of mutation carriers. In this respect, specific attention should be given to a group that has had a non-informative or negative BRCA test result, because this group is still considered to be at high risk to develop the disease.

  17. Gastric angiodysplasia in a hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia type 2 patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minsu Ha; Yoon Jae Kim; Kwang An Kwon; Ki Baik Hahm; Mi-Jung Kim; Dong Kyu Kim; Young Jae Lee; S Paul Oh

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a rare autosomal-dominantly inherited disease that occurs in approximately one in 5000 to 8000 people.Clinical diagnosis of HHT is made when a person presents three of the following four criteria:family history,recurrent nosebleeds,mucocutaneous telangiectasis,and arteriovenous malformations (AVM) in the brain,lung,liver and gastrointestinal (GI) tract.Although epistaxis is the most common presenting symptom,AVMs affecting the lungs,brain and GI tract provoke a more serious outcome.Heterozygous mutations in endoglin,activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ACVRL1; ALK1),and SMAD4,the genes involved in the transforming growth factor-β family signaling cascade,cause HHT.We report here the case of a 63 year-old male patient who presented melena and GI bleeding episodes,proven to be caused by bleeding from multiple gastric angiodysplasia.Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed multiple angiodysplasia throughout the stomach.Endoscopic argon plasma coagulation was performed to control bleeding from a gastric angiodysplasia.The patient has been admitted several times with episodes of hemoptysis and hematochezia.One year ago,the patient was hospitalized due to right-sided weakness,which was caused by left basal ganglia hemorrhage as the part of HHT presentation.In family history,the patient's mother and elder sister had died,due to intracranial hemorrhage,and his eldest son has been suffered from recurrent epistaxis for 20 years.A genetic study revealed a mutation in exon 3 of ALK1 (c.199C > T; p.Arg67Trp) in the proband and his eldest son presenting epistaxis.

  18. HEREDITARY CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISORDERS: NOMENCLATURE AND DIAGNOSTIC ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Klemenov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary connective tissue disorders (HCTDs are a genetically and clinically diverse group of diseases, which encompasses common congenital disorders of fibrous connective tissue structures. Out of the whole variety of the clinical manifestations of NCTDs, only differentiated monogenic syndromes with the agreed guidelines for their diagnosis have been long the focus of the medical community’s attention. Many unclassified forms of the pathology (dysplasia phenotypes have been disregarded while assessing a person’s prognosis and defining treatment policy. With no clear definition of NCTDs or their approved diagnostic algorithm, it is difficult to study their real prevalence in the population, to compare literature data, and to constructively discuss various scientific and practical aspects of this disease. Efforts to systematize individual clinical types of NCTD and to formulate their diagnostic criteria are set forth in the All-Russian Research Society Expert Committee national guidelines approved in 2009 and revised in 2012. The paper gives current views on the nomenclature of NCTDs, considers diagnostic criteria for both classified monogenic syndromes (Marfan's syndrome, Ehlers–Danlos' syndrome, MASS phenotype, primary mitral valve prolapse, joint hypermobility syndrome and unclassified dysplasia phenotypes (MASS-like phenotype, marfanoid appearance, Ehlers–Danlos-like phenotype, benign joint hypermobility syndrome, unclassified phenotype. The above abnormalities are presented as a continuous list drawn up in the decreasing order of the degree of their clinical manifestations and prognostic value (the phenotypic continuum described by M.J. Glesby and R.E. Pyentz: from monogenic syndromes through dysplasia phenotypes to an unclassified phenotype. Emphasis is laid on the clinical NCTD identification difficulties associated with the lack of specificity of external and visceral markers of connective tissue asthenia and with the certain

  19. C-reactive protein levels in hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Z L M; Relan, A; Hack, C E

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients experience recurrent episodes of angioedema attacks that can be painful, disfiguring and even life-threatening. The disorder results from a mutation in the gene that controls the synthesis of C1-inhibitor (C1INH). C1INH is a major regulator of activation of the contact system. It is often assumed that attacks results from uncontrolled local activation of the contact system with subsequent formation of bradykinin. To evaluate the involvement of inflammatory reactions in HAE, we analysed C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. HAE patients included in a clinical database of recombinant human C1-inhibitor (rhC1INH) studies were evaluated. For the current study we analysed CRP levels when patients were asymptomatic, during a clinical attack and in a follow-up period, and correlated these with the clinical manifestations of the attack. Data from 68 HAE patients were analysed and included CRP levels on 273 occasions. While asymptomatic, 20% of the patients analysed had increased CRP. At the onset of the attack (P = 0·049) and during the next 24 h CRP rose significantly (P = 0·002) in patients with an abdominal location, and post-attack levels were significantly higher in these patients than in patients with attacks at other locations (P = 0·034). In conclusion, CRP levels are elevated in a substantial proportion of asymptomatic HAE patients. Levels of CRP increase significantly during an abdominal attack. These data suggest low-grade systemic inflammatory reactions in HAE patients as well as a triggering event for attacks that starts prior to symptom onset.

  20. Secondary post-geniculate involvement in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Rizzo

    Full Text Available Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC degeneration with the preferential involvement of those forming the papillomacular bundle. The optic nerve is considered the main pathological target for LHON. Our aim was to investigate the possible involvement of the post-geniculate visual pathway in LHON patients. We used diffusion-weighted imaging for in vivo evaluation. Mean diffusivity maps from 22 LHON visually impaired, 11 unaffected LHON mutation carriers and 22 healthy subjects were generated and compared at level of optic radiation (OR. Prefrontal and cerebellar white matter were also analyzed as internal controls. Furthermore, we studied the optic nerve and the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN in post-mortem specimens obtained from a severe case of LHON compared to an age-matched control. Mean diffusivity values of affected patients were higher than unaffected mutation carriers (P<0.05 and healthy subjects (P<0.01 in OR and not in the other brain regions. Increased OR diffusivity was associated with both disease duration (B = 0.002; P<0.05 and lack of recovery of visual acuity (B = 0.060; P<0.01. Post-mortem investigation detected atrophy (41.9% decrease of neuron soma size in the magnocellular layers and 44.7% decrease in the parvocellular layers and, to a lesser extent, degeneration (28.5% decrease of neuron density in the magnocellular layers and 28.7% decrease in the parvocellular layers in the LHON LGN associated with extremely severe axonal loss (99% in the optic nerve. The post-geniculate involvement in LHON patients is a downstream post-synaptic secondary phenomenon, reflecting de-afferentation rather than a primary neurodegeneration due to mitochondrial dysfunction of LGN neurons.

  1. Circulating angiogenic cell dysfunction in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Zucco

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is an autosomal dominant vascular disorder. Circulating angiogenic cells (CACs play an important role in vascular repair and regeneration. This study was designed to examine the function of CACs derived from patients with HHT. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs isolated from patients with HHT and age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers were assessed for expression of CD34, CD133 and VEGF receptor 2 by flow cytometry. PBMNCs were cultured to procure early outgrowth CACs. Development of endothelial cell (EC phenotype in CACs was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. CAC apoptosis was assayed with Annexin V staining, and CAC migration assessed by a modified Boyden chamber assay. mRNA expression of endoglin (ENG, activin receptor-like kinase-1 (ACVLR1 or ALK1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS in CACs was measured by real time RT-PCR. The percentage of CD34+ cells in PBMNCs from HHT patients was significantly higher than in PBMNCs of healthy controls. CACs derived from patients with HHT not only showed a significant reduction in EC-selective surface markers following 7-day culture, but also a significant increase in the rate of basal apoptosis and blunted migration in response to vascular endothelial growth factor and stromal cell-derived factor-1. CACs from HHT patients expressed significantly lower levels of ENG, ALK1 and eNOS mRNAs. In conclusion, CACs from patients with HHT exhibited various functional impairments, suggesting a reduced regenerative capacity of CACs to repair the vascular lesions seen in HHT patients.

  2. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: types II, III, and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Felicia B; Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle

    2007-10-03

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) encompass a number of inherited disorders that are associated with sensory dysfunction (depressed reflexes, altered pain and temperature perception) and varying degrees of autonomic dysfunction (gastroesophageal reflux, postural hypotention, excessive sweating). Subsequent to the numerical classification of four distinct forms of HSAN that was proposed by Dyck and Ohta, additional entities continue to be described, so that identification and classification are ongoing. As a group, the HSAN are rare diseases that affect both sexes. HSAN III is almost exclusive to individuals of Eastern European Jewish extraction, with incidence of 1 per 3600 live births. Several hundred cases with HSAN IV have been reported. The worldwide prevalence of HSAN type II is very low. This review focuses on the description of three of the disorders, HSAN II through IV, that are characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance and onset at birth. These three forms of HSAN have been the most intensively studied, especially familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome or HSAN III), which is often used as a prototype for comparison to the other HSAN. Each HSAN disorder is likely caused by different genetic errors that affect specific aspects of small fiber neurodevelopment, which result in variable phenotypic expression. As genetic tests are routinely used for diagnostic confirmation of HSAN III only, other means of differentiating between the disorders is necessary. Diagnosis is based on the clinical features, the degree of both sensory and autonomic dysfunction, and biochemical evaluations, with pathologic examinations serving to further confirm differences. Treatments for all these disorders are supportive.

  3. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: types II, III, and IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axelrod Felicia B

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN encompass a number of inherited disorders that are associated with sensory dysfunction (depressed reflexes, altered pain and temperature perception and varying degrees of autonomic dysfunction (gastroesophageal reflux, postural hypotention, excessive sweating. Subsequent to the numerical classification of four distinct forms of HSAN that was proposed by Dyck and Ohta, additional entities continue to be described, so that identification and classification are ongoing. As a group, the HSAN are rare diseases that affect both sexes. HSAN III is almost exclusive to individuals of Eastern European Jewish extraction, with incidence of 1 per 3600 live births. Several hundred cases with HSAN IV have been reported. The worldwide prevalence of HSAN type II is very low. This review focuses on the description of three of the disorders, HSAN II through IV, that are characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance and onset at birth. These three forms of HSAN have been the most intensively studied, especially familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome or HSAN III, which is often used as a prototype for comparison to the other HSAN. Each HSAN disorder is likely caused by different genetic errors that affect specific aspects of small fiber neurodevelopment, which result in variable phenotypic expression. As genetic tests are routinely used for diagnostic confirmation of HSAN III only, other means of differentiating between the disorders is necessary. Diagnosis is based on the clinical features, the degree of both sensory and autonomic dysfunction, and biochemical evaluations, with pathologic examinations serving to further confirm differences. Treatments for all these disorders are supportive.

  4. Prognostic Factors for Distress After Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorwinden, Jan S; Jaspers, Jan P C

    2016-06-01

    The psychological impact of an unfavorable genetic test result for counselees at risk for hereditary cancer seems to be limited: only 10-20 % of counselees have psychological problems after testing positive for a known familial mutation. The objective of this study was to find prognostic factors that can predict which counselees are most likely to develop psychological problems after presymptomatic genetic testing. Counselees with a 50 % risk of BRCA1/2 or Lynch syndrome completed questionnaires at three time-points: after receiving a written invitation for a genetic counseling intake (T1), 2-3 days after receiving their DNA test result (T2), and 4-6 weeks later (T3). The psychological impact of the genetic test result was examined shortly and 4-6 weeks after learning their test result. Subsequently, the influence of various potentially prognostic factors on psychological impact were examined in the whole group. Data from 165 counselees were analyzed. Counselees with an unfavorable outcome did not have more emotional distress, but showed significantly more cancer worries 4-6 weeks after learning their test result. Prognostic factors for cancer worries after genetic testing were pre-existing cancer worries, being single, a high risk perception of getting cancer, and an unfavorable test result. Emotional distress was best predicted by pre-existing cancer worries and pre-existing emotional distress. The psychological impact of an unfavorable genetic test result appears considerable if it is measured as "worries about cancer." Genetic counselors should provide additional guidance to counselees with many cancer worries, emotional distress, a high risk perception or a weak social network.

  5. The Association of Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ia with Chiari Malformation Type I: A Coincidence or a Common Link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A 19-month-old boy was referred for progressive weight gain. His past medical history included congenital hypothyroidism and developmental delay. Physical examination revealed characteristics of Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy, macrocephaly, and calcinosis cutis. He had hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and elevated Parathyroid Hormone levels. Genetic testing revealed a known mutation of GNAS gene, confirming the diagnosis of Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ia (PHP-Ia) (c.34C>T (p.G1n12X)). He had a normal brain MRI at three months, but developmental delay prompted a repeat MRI that revealed Chiari Malformation Type I (CM-I) with hydrocephalus requiring neurosurgical intervention. This was followed by improvement in attaining developmental milestones. Recently, he was diagnosed with growth hormone deficiency. This case suggests the potential association of CM-I with PHP-Ia. Larger studies are needed to assess whether CM-I with hydrocephalus are common associations with PHP-Ia and to define potential genetic links between these conditions. We propose a low threshold in performing brain MRI on PHP-1a patients, especially those with persistent developmental delay to rule out CM-I. Early intervention may improve neurodevelopmental outcomes and prevent neurosurgical emergencies. PMID:27703483

  6. Recent advances in GNAS epigenetic research of pseudohypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzi, B; Van Geet, C; Freson, K

    2012-06-01

    Endocrinopathies in patients with hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia that share resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH) are grouped under the term pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP). Patients with PHP type Ia (PHP-Ia) often present with additional hormonal resistance and show characteristic physical features that are jointly termed as having an Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) phenotype. Alternatively, PHPIb patients predominantly have PTH and sometimes TSH resistance but do not present with AHO features. Most of these PHP forms are caused by defects in GNAS, an imprinted gene locus consisting of maternal, paternal and biallelic transcripts. PHP-Ia is caused by heterozygous inactivating mutations in those exons of GNAS encoding the alpha subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein (Gsalpha) while PHPIb results from epigenetic GNAS defects. Familial and sporadic forms of PHP-Ib have distinct GNAS imprinting patterns: familial PHP-Ib patients have an exon A/B-only imprinting defect whereas sporadic PHP-Ib cases have abnormal imprinting of the three differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in GNAS. This classification of PHP was made years ago but was recently questioned since different studies showed GNAS epigenetic defects in PHP-Ia patients. In this review, we focus on the epigenetic description and screening methods of GNAS, the associated pathology and the recent need for a PHP reclassification.

  7. Abnormal Methylation Status of the GNAS Exon 1A Region in Pseudohypohyperparathyroidism Combined With Turner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Wang, Dong; Ren, An; Xing, Yan; Zhang, Dongliang; Wei, Jun; Yu, Ning; Xing, Xuenong; Ye, Shandong

    2015-12-01

    Pseudohypohyperparathyroidism (PHHP) is a rare type of pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP), which seems to have a normal skeletal response to parathyroid hormone but shows renal resistance. Almost all patients with PHHP have PHP Ib, a subtype of PHP that is usually caused by GNAS methylation defects, often in exon 1A. Some features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy can occasionally be found in patients with PHHP, but these features are also common in Turner syndrome. The authors report on an extremely rare case of a patient with PHHP and Turner syndrome, a 47-year-old woman who sought medical attention for hypocalcemia and elevated parathyroid hormone. She had no family history of hypocalcemia and no STX16 gene deletions. She had a mosaic karyotype of 46, X, del(X)(p11.4)/45, XO. Pyrosequencing was performed to determine the GNAS exon 1A methylation. The degree of methylation found in exon 1A of the patient was lower than her unaffected relatives. PMID:26488942

  8. The Role of GNAS and Other Imprinted Genes in the Development of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Lee S.; Xie, Tao; Qasem, Ahmed; Wang, Jie; Chen, Min

    2010-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon affecting a small number of genes which leads to differential expression from the two parental alleles. Imprinted genes are known to regulate fetal growth and a ‘kinship’ or ‘parental conflict’ model predicts that paternally- and maternally-expressed imprinted genes promote and inhibit fetal growth, respectively. In this review we examine the role of imprinted genes in postnatal growth and metabolism, with an emphasis on the GNAS/Gnas locus. GNAS is a complex imprinted locus with multiple oppositely imprinted gene products, including the G protein α-subunit Gsα which is expressed primarily from the maternal allele in some tissues and the Gsα isoform XLαs which is expressed only from the paternal allele. Maternal, but not paternal, Gsα mutations lead to obesity in Albright hereditary osteodystrophy. Mouse studies show that this phenomenon is due to Gsα imprinting in the central nervous system leading to a specific defect in the ability of central melanocortins to stimulate sympathetic nervous system activity and energy expenditure. In contrast mutation of paternally-expressed XLαs leads to opposite metabolic effects in mice. While these findings conform to the ‘kinship’ model, the effects of other imprinted genes on body weight regulation do not conform to this model. PMID:19844212

  9. The Association of Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ia with Chiari Malformation Type I: A Coincidence or a Common Link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paria Kashani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 19-month-old boy was referred for progressive weight gain. His past medical history included congenital hypothyroidism and developmental delay. Physical examination revealed characteristics of Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy, macrocephaly, and calcinosis cutis. He had hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and elevated Parathyroid Hormone levels. Genetic testing revealed a known mutation of GNAS gene, confirming the diagnosis of Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ia (PHP-Ia (c.34C>T (p.G1n12X. He had a normal brain MRI at three months, but developmental delay prompted a repeat MRI that revealed Chiari Malformation Type I (CM-I with hydrocephalus requiring neurosurgical intervention. This was followed by improvement in attaining developmental milestones. Recently, he was diagnosed with growth hormone deficiency. This case suggests the potential association of CM-I with PHP-Ia. Larger studies are needed to assess whether CM-I with hydrocephalus are common associations with PHP-Ia and to define potential genetic links between these conditions. We propose a low threshold in performing brain MRI on PHP-1a patients, especially those with persistent developmental delay to rule out CM-I. Early intervention may improve neurodevelopmental outcomes and prevent neurosurgical emergencies.

  10. Macrosomia, obesity, and macrocephaly as first clinical presentation of PHP1b caused by STX16 deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Iris M; Verrijn Stuart, Annemarie A; van der Luijt, Rob B; Ploos van Amstel, Hans Kristian; van Haelst, Mieke M

    2016-09-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) is a genetic disorder with resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH) as most important feature. Main subtypes of the disease are pseudohypoparathyroidism 1b (PHP1b) and pseudohypoparathyroidism 1a (PHP1a). PHP1b is characterized by PTH resistance of the renal cortex due to reduced activity of the stimulatory G protein α subunit (Gsα) of the PTH receptor. In addition to resistance to PTH, PHP1a patients also lack sensitivity for other hormones that signal their actions through G protein-coupled receptors and display physical features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO), which is not classically seen in PHP1b patients. PHP1a is caused by heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in maternally inherited GNAS exons 1-13, which encode Gsα. PHP1b is often caused by deletion of the STX16 gene, which is thought to have an important role in controlling the methylation and thus imprinting at part of the GNAS locus. Here we present a patient with PHP1b caused by the previously described recurrent 3-kb STX16 deletion. The patient's first symptoms were macrosomia, early onset obesity, and macrocephaly. Since this is an atypical but previously described rare presentation of PHP1b, we reemphasize STX16 deletions and PHP1b as a rare cause for early onset obesity and macrosomia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27338644

  11. Hereditary rickets. How genetic alterations explain the biochemical and clinical phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Anna; Gole, Evaggelia; Nicolaidou, Polyxeni

    2013-12-01

    The reemergence of vitamin D deficiency in the industrialized countries resurrects the "threat" of nutritional rickets, especially among pediatric populations, a fact that may lead to underdiagnosis of hereditary rickets. Today, hereditary rickets may be subdivided into two main groups according to their biochemical profile: the one associated with defects in vitamin D synthesis and action and the second associated with abnormal phosphorus metabolism. The classification of the patients in a particular group of hereditary rickets is determinative of the treatment to follow. This review, through the recent advances on vitamin D and P metabolism, discusses the molecular and biochemical defects associated to each group of inherited rickets, as well as the clinical phenotypes and the recommended therapeutic approaches.

  12. Hereditary Effects in Eccentric Compact Binary Inspirals to Third Post-Newtonian Order

    CERN Document Server

    Loutrel, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    While there has been much success in understanding the orbital dynamics and gravitational wave emission of eccentric compact binaries in the post-Newtonian formalism, some problems still remain. The largest of these concerns hereditary effects: non-linear phenomena related to the scattering off of the background curved spacetime (tails) and to the generation of gravitational waves by gravitational waves (memory). Currently, these hereditary effects are only known numerically for arbitrary eccentricity through infinite sums of Bessel functions, with closed-form, analytic results only available in the small eccentricity limit. We here calculate, for the first time, closed-form, analytic expressions for all hereditary effects to third post-Newtonian order in binaries with arbitrary eccentricity. For the tails, we first asymptotically expand all Bessel functions in high eccentricity and find a superasymptotic series for each enhancement factor, accurate to better than $10^{-3}$ relative to post-Newtonian numerica...

  13. Urinary excretion of biomarkers of oxidatively damaged DNA and RNA in hereditary hemochromatosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broedbaek, Kasper; Poulsen, Henrik E; Weimann, Allan;

    2009-01-01

    Oxidatively generated damage to nucleic acids is considered to play a significant role in carcinogenesis, and it has been shown that people with hereditary hemochromatosis are at increased risk of cancer. In this study we used a new refined liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method...... to measure the urinary excretion of oxidatively generated 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine and related 2'-deoxyribonucleoside and ribonucleoside derivatives in hereditary hemochromatosis patients, and we investigated the effect of treatment on the levels of these modifications. The study was carried out...... as a classical case-control study of 21 newly diagnosed, never treated hereditary hemochromatosis patients and 21 matched controls. We found that at baseline the urinary excretion of the RNA oxidation product 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo) was 2.5-fold increased in patients compared with controls...

  14. Hereditary Portfolio Optimization with Taxes and Fixed Plus Proportional Transaction Costs—Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mou-Hsiung Chang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the continuation of the paper entitled “Hereditary portfolio optimization with taxes and fixed plus proportional transaction costs I” that treats an infinite-time horizon hereditary portfolio optimization problem in a market that consists of one savings account and one stock account. Within the solvency region, the investor is allowed to consume from the savings account and can make transactions between the two assets subject to paying capital-gain taxes as well as a fixed plus proportional transaction cost. The investor is to seek an optimal consumption-trading strategy in order to maximize the expected utility from the total discounted consumption. The portfolio optimization problem is formulated as an infinite dimensional stochastic classical impulse control problem due to the hereditary nature of the stock price dynamics and inventories. This paper contains the verification theorem for the optimal strategy. It also proves that the value function is a viscosity solution of the QVHJBI.

  15. Hip dysplasia associated with a hereditary sensorimotor polyneuropathy mimics a myopathic process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Hadianfard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Some orthopedic complications have been reported in the hereditary neuropathies. However, the association of the hip dysplasia with this category of neuropathy is rarely recognized. We present a 13-year-old boy with the progressive weakness of the lower extremities, difficulty in walking, climbing stairs, and rising from floor; a wide-based, hyper-extended and waddling gait similar to a myopathic process. Hip radiography showed dysplastic acetabulae with hip subluxation, broken Shenton′s lines, and valgus femoral necks. In electrodiagnosis, there was a significant neuropathic process (absent all evoked sensory potentials, abnormal evoked motor responses, and neurogenic electeromyography which eventually was found to be a hereditary mixed axonal and demyelinating sensorimotor polyneuropathy with concomitant hip dysplasia confirmed with thorough physical examination and the electrodiagnostic study. In patients with gait difficulties such as waddling gait mimicking a myopathic process, hereditary polyneuropathy complicated with hip dysplasia should be considered as well.

  16. 儿童遗传性周围神经病%Hereditary Peripheral Neuropathy in Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕俊兰

    2006-01-01

    早在1886年Chareot、Marie和Tooth就报道了腓骨肌萎缩症(peroneal muscular atrophy),但直到1956年,由于神经电生理和腓肠神经活检的广泛开展和应用,才使周围神经病的分类成为可能。1984年Dyck将遗传性周围神经病分为遗传性运动神经病(hereditary motor neuropathy,HMN),遗传性感觉自主神经病(hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy,HSAN)以及遗传性运动和感觉神经病(hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy,HMSN)。

  17. Human parvovirus B19-induced aplastic crisis in an adult patient with hereditary spherocytosis: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Yujin; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Ishiwatari, Yusaku; Kanno, Hitoshi; Takei, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Background Although there are several case reports of human parvovirus B19 infection in patients with hereditary spherocytosis, no systematic reviews of adult patients with hereditary spherocytosis with human parvovirus B19 infection have been published as clinical case reports. In this study, we report a case of aplastic crisis due to human parvovirus B19 infection in an adult patient with hereditary spherocytosis. Case presentation A 33-year-old woman with hereditary spherocytosis and galls...

  18. Prevalence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and occurrence of neurological symptoms in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Oxhøj, H; Andersen, P E;

    2000-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease. HHT is characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and neurological symptoms.......Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease. HHT is characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and neurological symptoms....

  19. 双生成元An型拟遗传代数的拟遗传序%Quasi-Hereditary Orderings of An-Type Algebras with

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张跃辉; 吴六三; 高春燕

    2008-01-01

    This short note is devoted to an approach of the quasi-hereditary orderings of An-type algebras with exactly two generators.A necessary and sufficient condition for a quasi-hereditary ordering is obtained.Moreover,the numbers of quasi-hereditary orderings of such algebras are explicitly given.

  20. Hereditary cancer risk assessment: insights and perspectives for the Next-Generation Sequencing era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomy, Israel; Diz, Maria Del Pilar Estevez

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hereditary cancer risk assessment is a multidisciplinary and dynamic process, with the purpose of estimating probabilities of germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes and assessing empiric risks of cancer based on personal and family histories, in order to offer clinical and molecular diagnoses and clinical management based on these risks. Genetic tests are available and most of them are reimbursed by insurance companies, although they are generally not covered by the public health systems of developing countries. More recently, molecular diagnosis of hereditary cancer is feasible through next-generation sequencing (NGS) panels. Here we review the benefits and limitations of NGS technologies in the clinical practice. PMID:27192130

  1. Hereditary cancer risk assessment: insights and perspectives for the Next-Generation Sequencing era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Gomy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary cancer risk assessment is a multidisciplinary and dynamic process, with the purpose of estimating probabilities of germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes and assessing empiric risks of cancer based on personal and family histories, in order to offer clinical and molecular diagnoses and clinical management based on these risks. Genetic tests are available and most of them are reimbursed by insurance companies, although they are generally not covered by the public health systems of developing countries. More recently, molecular diagnosis of hereditary cancer is feasible through next-generation sequencing (NGS panels. Here we review the benefits and limitations of NGS technologies in the clinical practice.

  2. Knowledge about hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer; mutation carriers and physicians at equal levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Carlsson, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification and adequate management of individuals at risk for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is crucial since surveillance programmes reduce morbidity and mortality. We investigated knowledge about key features of HNPCC in at risk individuals and physicians in...... suggested a later starting age for surveillance than recommended. CONCLUSION: The finding of similar levels of knowledge about key features of HNPCC in at risk individuals and physicians reflect the challenge physicians face in keeping up to date on hereditary cancer and may have implications for the...... clinical management and professional relations with HNPCC family members....

  3. Hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE) genotypes in heart failure: relation to etiology and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Daniel Vega; Pecini, Redi; Gustafsson, Finn;

    2010-01-01

    It is believed that hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) might play a role in cardiac disease (heart failure (HF) and ischemia). Mutations within several genes are HH-associated, the most common being the HFE gene. In a large cohort of HF patients, we sought to determine the etiological role and the p......It is believed that hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) might play a role in cardiac disease (heart failure (HF) and ischemia). Mutations within several genes are HH-associated, the most common being the HFE gene. In a large cohort of HF patients, we sought to determine the etiological role...

  4. High liver FDG uptake on PET/CT in patient with lymphoma diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Jose R; Moreno, Manuel; Rayo, Juan I; Serrano, Justo; Dominguez, Maria L; Garcia, Lucia

    2015-06-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is an autosomal recessive disorder of iron metabolism resulting in toxic accumulation of iron in vital organs. We present a 64-year-old white man with non-Hodgkin lymphoma treated with high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplant that was subsequently diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis. F-FDG PET/CT was performed as routine follow-up and showed a pathological finding of homogeneous increased liver glucose metabolism. Increased FDG avidity in the liver suggested the presence of damage caused by hemochromatosis.

  5. Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Generalized Gingival Overgrowth Resembling Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis in Siblings: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Yaprak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI is a group of hereditary disorders primarily characterized by developmental abnormalities in the quantity and/or quality of enamel. There are some reports suggesting an association between AI and generalized gingival enlargement. This paper describes the clinical findings and oral management of two siblings presenting both AI and hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF like generalized gingival enlargements. The treatment of gingival enlargements by periodontal flap surgery was successful in the management of the physiologic gingival form for both patients in the 3-year follow-up period. Prosthetic treatment was also satisfactory for the older patient both aesthetically and functionally.

  6. Hereditary cancer risk assessment: insights and perspectives for the Next-Generation Sequencing era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomy, Israel; Diz, Maria Del Pilar Estevez

    2016-05-13

    Hereditary cancer risk assessment is a multidisciplinary and dynamic process, with the purpose of estimating probabilities of germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes and assessing empiric risks of cancer based on personal and family histories, in order to offer clinical and molecular diagnoses and clinical management based on these risks. Genetic tests are available and most of them are reimbursed by insurance companies, although they are generally not covered by the public health systems of developing countries. More recently, molecular diagnosis of hereditary cancer is feasible through next-generation sequencing (NGS) panels. Here we review the benefits and limitations of NGS technologies in the clinical practice. PMID:27192130

  7. An effect from anticipation also in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families without identified mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timshel, Susanne; Therkildsen, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola;

    2009-01-01

    Optimal prevention of hereditary cancer is central and requires initiation of surveillance programmes and/or prophylactic measures at a safe age. Anticipation, expressed as an earlier age at onset in successive generations, has been demonstrated in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC...... the Amsterdam criteria for HNPCC and showed normal MMR function and/or lack of disease-predisposing MMR gene mutation. In total, 319 cancers from 212 parent-child pairs in 99 families were identified. A paired t-test and a bivariate statistical model were used to assess anticipation. Both methods demonstrated...

  8. Vision improvement in a Taiwanese (Han Chinese) family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong-Zin; Pang, Cheng-Yoong; Chen, Shee-Ping; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2012-12-01

    In this report, we describe a Taiwanese (Han Chinese) family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. The family carried a mitochondrial DNA mutation (mtDNA m.14484T>C) associated with spontaneous visual improvement. A 15-year-old boy from this family was diagnosed with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy 6 months after losing his vision. His vision recovered after 8 months of supportive treatment. His mother, older brother, and two sisters also had the same mutation and had previously experienced vision loss. In this family, there was no male predominance.

  9. Novel use of idebenone in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, S W; Ko, C H; Yau, S K; Mak, Chloe; Yuen, Y F; Lee, C Y

    2014-10-01

    We report a case of a young Chinese male presenting with sequential, painless, bilateral visual loss in Hong Kong. He was diagnosed to have Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy with genetic workup showing G11778A mutation with over 80% heteroplasmy. He was started on idebenone treatment 11 months after onset of the binocular disease. To our best knowledge, this is the first case of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy treated with idebenone in Hong Kong. The recent evidence of the diagnosis and treatment of this devastating disease is reviewed.

  10. Cardiac arrest after anesthetic management in a patient with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergül Yakup

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV is a rare disorder with an autosomal recessive transmission and characterized by self-mutilation due to a lack in pain and heat sensation. Recurrent hyperpyrexia and anhydrosis are seen in patients as a result of a lack of sweat gland innervation. Self-mutilation and insensitivity to pain result in orthopedic complications and patients undergone recurrent surgical interventions with anesthesia. However, these patients are prone to perioperative complications such as hyperthermia, hypothermia, and cardiac complications like bradycardia and hypotension. We report a 5-year-old boy with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV, developing hyperpyrexia and cardiac arrest after anesthesia.

  11. Prevalence and Genetics of Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy in the Danish Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Thomas; Nørby, Søren; Schwartz, Marianne;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: In Denmark, the occurrence of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) has continuously been monitored since 1944. We provide here a summary of 70 years of data collection including registered lines and subjects by the end of 2012. METHODS: Affected individuals were identified from...... a national register of hereditary eye diseases at the National Eye Clinic (NEC), a tertiary low vision rehabilitation center for the entire Danish population. The assembling of LHON pedigrees was based on the reconstruction of published families and newly diagnosed cases from 1980 to 2012 identified...

  12. Early onset hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type I and not leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pande Sushil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathies (HSAN are rare forms of chronic neuropathies in children, which lead to severe complications like foot ulcers, mutilations, fractures and deformities. We report an eight years old female who presented with nonhealing perforating ulcer over anterior sole, resorption of terminal portion of right middle finger and hyperhidrosis over back since two years of age. Deep tendon reflexes were absent in lower legs but were preserved in upper limbs. Nerve conduction studies and nerve biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of HSAN, Type I. Early diagnosis of hereditary sensory neuropathy led to significant reduction in morbidity and hence improvement in the quality of life in our patient.

  13. Congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy with progressive sensorineural deafness (Harboyan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramowicz Marc

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Harboyan syndrome is a degenerative corneal disorder defined as congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy (CHED accompanied by progressive, postlingual sensorineural hearing loss. To date, 24 cases from 11 families of various origin (Asian Indian, South American Indian, Sephardi Jewish, Brazilian Portuguese, Dutch, Gypsy, Moroccan, Dominican have been reported. More than 50% of the reported cases have been associated with parental consanguinity. The ocular manifestations in Harboyan syndrome include diffuse bilateral corneal edema occurring with severe corneal clouding, blurred vision, visual loss and nystagmus. They are apparent at birth or within the neonatal period and are indistinguishable from those characteristic of the autosomal recessive CHED (CHED2. Hearing deficit in Harboyan is slowly progressive and typically found in patients 10–25 years old. There are no reported cases with prelinglual deafness, however, a significant hearing loss in children as young as 4 years old has been detected by audiometry, suggesting that hearing may be affected earlier, even at birth. Harboyan syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC4A11 gene located at the CHED2 locus on chromosome 20p13-p12, indicating that CHED2 and Harboyan syndrome are allelic disorders. A total of 62 different SLC4A11 mutations have been reported in 98 families (92 CHED2 and 6 Harboyan. All reported cases have been consistent with autosomal recessive transmission. Diagnosis is based on clinical criteria, detailed ophthalmological assessment and audiometry. A molecular confirmation of the clinical diagnosis is feasible. A variety of genetic, metabolic, developmental and acquired diseases presenting with clouding of the cornea should be considered in the differential diagnosis (Peters anomaly, sclerocornea, limbal dermoids, congenital glaucoma. Audiometry must be performed to differentiate Harboyan syndrome from CHED2. Autosomal recessive types of CHED (CHED2 and

  14. Hereditary multiple exostosis with secondary malignization: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho, A.M.N.; Pitella, F.A.; Coura Filho, G.B.; Costa, P.L.A.; Ono, C.R.; Watanabe, T.; Sapienza, M.T.; Hironaka, F.; Cerri, G.G.; Buchpiguel, C.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Radiologia. Centro de Medicna Nuclear

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Hereditary Multiple Exostosis (HME) or multiple osteochondromatosis is a skeletal development anomaly which is characterized by generalized exostoses in the bones, mainly in long bone metaphyses, appearing during childhood and adolescence. The transmission is autosomal dominant, its prevalence varies from 1/50,000 to 9/1,000,000 in Europe, and around 10% of cases show no family history. Case Report: Description of an HME case with two secondary malignization episodes. The data was taken from the patient's chart and from imaging exams from the hospital files. WASB, a 19-year-old male, hospitalized after being pre-diagnosed with HME and complaints of bone-consistent mass in the right gluteal region and a lump in the posterior region of the right leg, associated to multiple bone lumps all over the body. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed along with a bone scintillography with {sup 99m}Tc-MDP which showed multiple osteogenic lesions in the thorax, pelvic bones and long bones with periarticular prevalence in the lower limbs. The suspicion of malignancy in the right iliac area was raised due to the MRI result and to the higher intensity captured in the scintillography, confirming chondrosarcoma grade I of malignancy in the biopsy. The patient suffered interileo abdominalis amputation of the right lower limb with good evolution and control scintillography performed after 1 and 1,5 years. In the second controlling procedure, the patient complained about pain in the left knee, and a MRI suggested a new secondary malignization. The hypothesis of a head of left fibula osteochondroma with signs of aggressiveness was confirmed following surgery. Discussion: In HME, the exostoses grow along with the individual, ceasing with the epiphyseal fusion. The growth of these formations after skeletal maturation suggests activity of exostoses and, in most times, it is a sign of malignant transformation, which turns almost every time into

  15. Hereditary dentine disorders: dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentine dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacKie Iain

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hereditary dentine disorders, dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI and dentine dysplasia (DD, comprise a group of autosomal dominant genetic conditions characterised by abnormal dentine structure affecting either the primary or both the primary and secondary dentitions. DGI is reported to have an incidence of 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 8,000, whereas that of DD type 1 is 1 in 100,000. Clinically, the teeth are discoloured and show structural defects such as bulbous crowns and small pulp chambers radiographically. The underlying defect of mineralisation often results in shearing of the overlying enamel leaving exposed weakened dentine which is prone to wear. Currently, three sub-types of DGI and two sub-types of DD are recognised but this categorisation may change when other causative mutations are found. DGI type I is inherited with osteogenesis imperfecta and recent genetic studies have shown that mutations in the genes encoding collagen type 1, COL1A1 and COL1A2, underlie this condition. All other forms of DGI and DD, except DD-1, appear to result from mutations in the gene encoding dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP, suggesting that these conditions are allelic. Diagnosis is based on family history, pedigree construction and detailed clinical examination, while genetic diagnosis may become useful in the future once sufficient disease-causing mutations have been discovered. Differential diagnoses include hypocalcified forms of amelogenesis imperfecta, congenital erythropoietic porphyria, conditions leading to early tooth loss (Kostmann's disease, cyclic neutropenia, Chediak-Hegashi syndrome, histiocytosis X, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome, permanent teeth discolouration due to tetracyclines, Vitamin D-dependent and vitamin D-resistant rickets. Treatment involves removal of sources of infection or pain, improvement of aesthetics and protection of the posterior teeth from wear. Beginning in infancy, treatment usually continues into adulthood with a

  16. Hereditary dentine disorders: dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentine dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Martin J; McDonnell, Sinead T; Mackie, Iain; Dixon, Michael J

    2008-11-20

    The hereditary dentine disorders, dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and dentine dysplasia (DD), comprise a group of autosomal dominant genetic conditions characterised by abnormal dentine structure affecting either the primary or both the primary and secondary dentitions. DGI is reported to have an incidence of 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 8,000, whereas that of DD type 1 is 1 in 100,000. Clinically, the teeth are discoloured and show structural defects such as bulbous crowns and small pulp chambers radiographically. The underlying defect of mineralisation often results in shearing of the overlying enamel leaving exposed weakened dentine which is prone to wear. Currently, three sub-types of DGI and two sub-types of DD are recognised but this categorisation may change when other causative mutations are found. DGI type I is inherited with osteogenesis imperfecta and recent genetic studies have shown that mutations in the genes encoding collagen type 1, COL1A1 and COL1A2, underlie this condition. All other forms of DGI and DD, except DD-1, appear to result from mutations in the gene encoding dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), suggesting that these conditions are allelic. Diagnosis is based on family history, pedigree construction and detailed clinical examination, while genetic diagnosis may become useful in the future once sufficient disease-causing mutations have been discovered. Differential diagnoses include hypocalcified forms of amelogenesis imperfecta, congenital erythropoietic porphyria, conditions leading to early tooth loss (Kostmann's disease, cyclic neutropenia, Chediak-Hegashi syndrome, histiocytosis X, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome), permanent teeth discolouration due to tetracyclines, Vitamin D-dependent and vitamin D-resistant rickets. Treatment involves removal of sources of infection or pain, improvement of aesthetics and protection of the posterior teeth from wear. Beginning in infancy, treatment usually continues into adulthood with a number of options including

  17. Surgical management of hand deformities in hereditary dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panajotović Ljubomir

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In the period 1996-2001 in the Clinic for Plastic Surgery and Burns of the Military Medical Academy, 18 patients. 12 male and 6 female, with hereditary dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (HDEB and hand deformities were surgically treated, to achieve the complete separation of fingers, correction of the thumb adduction contracture and flexion or extension contracture of finger joints. The period of wound healing on flat surfaces after surgery, and the period between two operations was estimated. The most common deformity was the flexion contractures of metacarpophalangeal (MP joints (45% and one or both interphalangeal (IP joints (types A1, A2. In 20% of the hands MP joint was streched with the flexion contracture in distal interphalangeal (DIP or both IP joints (types B1, B2. In 35% of hands MP joint was in hyperextension with folded proximal interphalangeal (PIP or both IP joints (C1 i C2. The adduction deformity of the thumb type 1, without the possibility of abduction, was present in 15%, type 2, when the thumb was placed above the palm in 60% and type 3, when the thumb was fused in the palm in 25%. Pseudosyndactyly of the first degree (till PIP joint was found in 30% of hands, the second degree (till DIP joint in 25%, and the third degree (the whole finger length in 45% of hands. Fingers were completely separated and stretched surgically. The period of spontaneous healing was 15 days on the average. EBDC represents great medical and social problem that requires multidisciplinary approach of physicians of various specialties (surgeons, dermatologists, pediatrists, geneticists, nutritionists physiatrists, ophtalmologists, dentists, ENT, as well as specially trained persons and families. The efficient specific systemic therapy aiming to increase the skin resistence to mechanical trauma does not exist yet, and should be developed in the field of gene therapy. The surgical correction of hand deformities, acrylate glove use in the longer post

  18. Tumores colorretais hereditários Hereditary colorectal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedito Mauro Rossi

    1998-08-01

    áveis pela respectiva doença ou pela proteína produto dos mesmos. É de suma importância uma abordagem multidisciplinar de pacientes portadores de FAP ou HNPCC, pois existe uma preocupação ética muito grande na realização dos testes genéticos de predisposição, considerando suas conseqüências psicológicas e sociais.About 15% of the colorectal tumors are hereditary. There are two main groups: the familiar adenomatous polyposis (FAP and the non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC, both autosomal dominant diseases. Patients with FAP present hundreds to thousands of adenomas in colorectum. usually after puberty. The cause of FAP is mutation of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene, located on long arm of chromosome 5 (5q. Patients who have not undergone to colectomy, the only treatment avaiable, will develop colorectal cancer and die at the age of 45 years. Extracolonic manifestations can occur: gastric and small bowel adenomas, soft tissue tumors, retinal pigmentation. osteomas. Patients with HNPCC do not present hundreds of benign polyps, but already a solitary colorectal cancer: This disease is caused by mutations in one of the several mismatch repair genes (hMSH2, hMLHI, hPMSI, hPMS2, hPMS6/GTBP. The average age of the diagnosis is 45 years and usually the disease produces cancer in the right colon. Other carcinomas can occur: endometrial, stomach, pancreas and others. Prophylactic surgery in asymptomatic gene carriers are controversial. Nowadays it is possible to identify asymptomatic genes carriers of FAP and HNPCC by genetic testing. The analysis can be done by direct gene sequencing or by in vitro synthesized protein assay (IVSP, which finds defective truncate proteins. Genetic testing for hereditary forms of colorectal cancer requires not only an appropriate laboratory, but genetic counseling with an ethical multidisciplinary approach considering the psychological and social consequences.

  19. Hereditary Deafness in a Former Fishing Village on the Dutch Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyst, Victoria A. S.

    2016-01-01

    In communities with an increased prevalence of hereditary deafness, social, and linguistic adaptations are found in response. Aulbers (1959) describes a high prevalence of deafness in a fishing village on the Dutch coast: Katwijk aan Zee. This article aims to assess the current prevalence of deafness in Katwijk, as well as the current sign…

  20. The hereditary progressive muscular dystrophy type 2A (calpainopathy: a clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Grishina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Presents clinical case the hereditary progressive muscular dystrophy type 2A (calpainopathy. Shows diagnostic difficulties and feature of presents clinical observations. This case is significance, as in the domestic scientific literature presents few articles on clinical examples of this muscle pathology.

  1. [Screening for hereditary neuromuscular disorders with molecular genetic methods in the Roma population of Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herczegfalvi, Agnes; Pikó, Henriett; Karcagi, Veronika

    2008-11-30

    Recent medical genetic research has identified a number of novel, or previously known, but rare conditions, caused by private founder mutations. The Finnish and Ashkenazi Jew populations provide the best examples for identifying genes in unique genetic disorders. In these populations, research efforts and high-level medical services resulted in intense improvements of medical care and in organization of population-based screening programs. Hereditary disorders of the Roma populations are known for a long time. The genetic background of these diseases has been established by extensive molecular genetic studies. The Romas represent 6% of the Hungarian population and live under extremely bad health conditions. Therefore, our aim was to map the incidence of the hereditary neuromuscular disorders among the Hungarian Roma population. Moreover, we intended to provide proper information, genetic counseling and possible prevention strategies for the families at risk, which should represent a primer task in public health. Because of our experience in neuromuscular disorders, we choose six, frequent, autosomal recessive disorders for these clinical and genetic studies: hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Lom (HMSNL), hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Russe (HMSNR), congenital cataracts facial dysmorphism syndrome (CCFDN), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2C (LGMD2C), congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Following identification of the founder mutations, the possibility of prenatal diagnosis and carrier screening for family members will contribute to the decrease of the recurrence risk for these severe, mostly untreatable disorders. PMID:19070320

  2. Rhucin, a recombinant C1 inhibitor for the treatment of hereditary angioedema and cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Hilary

    2008-03-01

    Pharming NV and Esteve are developing Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor. Rhucin is currently undergoing phase III clinical trials in North America and is awaiting regulatory approval in Western Europe for the treatment of prophylactic and acute hereditary angioedema. Pharming is also investigating Rhucin for the potential treatment of cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:18311668

  3. [From gene to disease; E-cadherin and hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, J.H.F.M. de; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Nagengast, F.M.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome associated with an early-onset, histologically diffuse, signet ring cell type gastric cancer and the occurrence of cancer at other anatomical sites, i.e. breast, colon, prostate and ovary. Inactivating germline mutations

  4. Ocular findings in quarter horses with hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to compare ocular structures of Quarter Horses homozygous for hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA) with those of Quarter Horses not affected by HERDA (control horses) and to determine the frequency of new corneal ulcers for horses with and without HERDA ...

  5. Hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis in North American farmed silver fox (Vulpes vulpes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jo-Anna B J; Hudson, Robert C; Marshall, H Dawn

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis is a progressive growth of gingival tissues in foxes resulting in dental encapsulation. It is an autosomal recessive condition displaying a gender-biased penetrance, with an association with superior fur quality. This disease has been primarily described in European farmed foxes. Here we document its emergence in Canada.

  6. Hereditary persistence of alpha-fetoprotein (HPAFP) : review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwert, A. C.; Giltay, J. C.; Lentjes, E. G. W. M.; Lock, M. T. W. T.

    2010-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) serum levels are raised in several clinical conditions, ranging from non-pathological conditions to malignancies. Hereditary persistence of alpha-fetoprotein (HPAFP) is a rare benign disorder with elevated AFP levels. HPAFP is described as a benign autosomal dominantly inheri

  7. Abnormal red cell features associated with hereditary neurodegenerative disorders: the neuroacanthocytosis syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franceschi, L. De; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Mohandas, N.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review discusses the mechanisms involved in the generation of thorny red blood cells (RBCs), known as acanthocytes, in patients with neuroacanthocytosis, a heterogenous group of neurodegenerative hereditary disorders that include chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc) and McLeod syndro

  8. Rapidly deteriorating course in Dutch hereditary spastic paraplegia type 11 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bot, Susanne T.; Burggraaff, Rogier C.; Herkert, Johanna C.; Schelhaas, Helenius J.; Post, Bart; Diekstra, Adinda; van Vliet, Reinout O.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Scheffer, Hans; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, Corien C.; Kremer, Hubertus P. H.

    2013-01-01

    Although SPG11 is the most common complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia, our knowledge of the long-term prognosis and life expectancy is limited. We therefore studied the disease course of all patients with a proven SPG11 mutation as tested in our laboratory, the single Dutch laboratory providin

  9. Rhucin, a recombinant C1 inhibitor for the treatment of hereditary angioedema and cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Hilary

    2008-03-01

    Pharming NV and Esteve are developing Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 esterase inhibitor. Rhucin is currently undergoing phase III clinical trials in North America and is awaiting regulatory approval in Western Europe for the treatment of prophylactic and acute hereditary angioedema. Pharming is also investigating Rhucin for the potential treatment of cerebral ischemic injury.

  10. A frameshift mutation in LRSAM1 is responsible for a dominant hereditary polyneuropathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weterman, M.A.J.; Sorrentino, V.; Kasher, P.R.; Jakobs, M.E.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Fluiter, K.; Wissel, M.B. de; Sizarov, A.; Nurnberg, G.; Nurnberg, P.; Zelcer, N.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Baas, F.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the high number of genes identified in hereditary polyneuropathies/Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, the genetic defect in many families is still unknown. Here we report the identification of a new gene for autosomal dominant axonal neuropathy in a large three-generation family. Linkage ana

  11. Pancreatic pseudoaneurysm in a child with hereditary pancreatitis: diagnosis with multidetector CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pseudoaneurysm formation is a serious vascular complication of pancreatitis. It most commonly affects splenic and gastroduodenal arteries. We report a rare case of superior mesenteric artery pseudoaneurysm in a child with hereditary pancreatitis. Multidetector CT angiography allowed the comprehensive assessment of the aneurysm and allowed accurate surgical planning obviating the need for catheter angiography. (orig.)

  12. Management of acute attacks of hereditary angioedema: potential role of icatibant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary J Longhurst

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Hilary J LonghurstDepartment of Immunology, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London, UKAbstract: Icatibant (Firazyr® is a novel subcutaneous treatment recently licensed in the European Union for acute hereditary angioedema. Hereditary angioedema, resulting from inherited partial C1 inhibitor deficiency, is a disabling condition characterized by intermittent episodes of bradykinin-mediated angioedema. Icatibant blocks bradykinin B2 receptors, attenutating the episode. Randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of icatibant, showed significant superiority over oral tranexamic acid in 74 European patients and a trend to improvement in a similar US trial comparing icatibant with placebo in 55 patients. Outcomes for several endpoints did not reach significance in the US trial, perhaps because of low participant numbers and confounding factors: a further trial is planned. Open label studies have shown benefit in multiple treatments for attacks at all sites. Approximately 10% of patients require a second dose for re-emergent symptoms, usually 10 to 27 hours after the initial treatment. Its subcutaneous route of administration, good tolerability and novel mode of action make icatibant a promising addition to the limited repertoire of treatments for hereditary angioedema.Keywords: hereditary angioedema, bradykinin, icatibant, C1 inhibitor deficiency

  13. Hereditary angioderma: an uncommon cause of acute abdomen. Abdominal computed tomography and ultrasound findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an uncommon case of acute abdomen in a patient with hereditary angioderma. The ultrasound and CT findings described may suggest this diagnosis, thus avoiding useless surgical interventions in patients in whom the disease has not been previously diagnosed. (Author) 19 refs

  14. Hereditary thrombophilia and recurrent pregnancy loss: a retrospective cohort study of pregnancy outcome and obstetric complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, M; Nielsen, H S; Hviid, T V;

    2010-01-01

    The association among hereditary thrombophilia, recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) and obstetric complications is yet uncertain. The objective of the study was to assess the prognostic value of the factor V Leiden (FVL) and prothrombin (PT) mutations for the subsequent chance of live birth for women ...

  15. Antibody-based screening for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma compared with microsatellite analysis and sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mariann; Katballe, Niels; Wikman, Friedrik;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes, MSH2, MLH1, and others are associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Due to the high costs of sequencing, cheaper screening methods are needed to identify HNPCC cases. Ideally, these methods should have a hi...

  16. Hereditary thrombophilia and recurrent pregnancy loss: a retrospective cohort study of pregnancy outcome and obstetric complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Marie; Nielsen, H S; Hviid, T V;

    2010-01-01

    The association among hereditary thrombophilia, recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) and obstetric complications is yet uncertain. The objective of the study was to assess the prognostic value of the factor V Leiden (FVL) and prothrombin (PT) mutations for the subsequent chance of live birth for women...

  17. Discrepancies between estimated and perceived risk of cancer among individuals with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, K; Nilbert, Mef; Soller, M;

    2007-01-01

    Communicating cancer risk and recommending adequate control programs is central for genetic counseling. Individuals affected by hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) are at about 80% life-time risk of colorectal cancer and for female carriers 40-60% risk of endometrial cancer and 10-1...

  18. Behavioral and endocrine responses of rats with hereditary hypothalamic diabetes insipidus (Brattleboro strain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohus, B.; Wimersma Greidanus, T.B. van; Wied, D. de

    1975-01-01

    Behavioral and endocrine profiles were established of homozygous (HO-DI) and heterozygous (HE-DI) rats with hereditary hypothalamic diabetes insipidus in comparison to Wistar strain rats. HO-DI rats were inferior in acquiring and maintaining active and passive avoidance behavior. Behavioral deficits

  19. Transferrin hypoglycosylation in hereditary fructose intolerance: using the clues and avoiding the pitfalls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adamowicz, M.; Ploski, R.; Rokicki, D.; Morava, E.; Gizewska, M.; Mierzewska, H.; Pollak, A.; Lefeber, D.J.; Wevers, R.A.; Pronicka, E.

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is caused by a deficiency of aldolase B due to mutations of the ALDOB gene. The disease poses diagnostic problems because of unspecific clinical manifestations. We report three cases of HFI all of whom had a chronic disease with neurological, nephrological or ga

  20. Exome sequencing is a useful diagnostic tool for complicated forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bettencourt, C.; Lopez-Sendon, J. L.; Garcia-Caldentey, J.; Rizzu, P.; Bakker, I. M. C.; Shomroni, O.; Quintans, B.; Davila, J. R.; Bevova, M. R.; Sobrido, M-J; Heutink, P.; de Yebenes, J. G.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias constitute a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases encompassing pure and complicated forms, for which at least 52 loci and 31 causative genes have been identified. Although mutations in the SPAST gene explain approximately 40% of the pure autosomal dominant

  1. Unravelling the genetic basis of hereditary disorders by high-throughput exome sequencing strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jazayeri, Omid

    2016-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis focuses on using Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) to unravel the genetic basis of human hereditary disorders with different inheritance patterns. We set out to apply WES as a diagnostic approach for establishing a molecular diagnosis in a highly heterogeneous group

  2. Allelic Dropout in the ENG Gene, Affecting the Results of Genetic Testing in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Pernille M; Kjeldsen, A.D.; Ousager, L.B.;

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal-dominant vascular disorder with three disease-causing genes identified to date: ENG, ACVRL1, and SMAD4. We report an HHT patient with allelic dropout that on routine sequence analysis for a known mutation in the family (c.817...

  3. Hereditary haemochromatosis: a case of iron accumulation in the basal ganglia associated with a parkinsonian syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.E.; Jensen, L.N.; Krabbe, K

    1995-01-01

    . A patient is reported with hereditary haemochromatosis and a syndrome of dementia, dysarthria, a slowly progressive gait disturbance, imbalance, muscle weakness, rigidity, bradykinesia, tremor, ataxia, and dyssynergia. The findings on MRI of a large signal decrease in the basal ganglia, consistent...

  4. Global Gene Expression Profiling of Telangiectasial Tissue from Patients with Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Pernille M; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Kjeldsen, Anette D;

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), the most common inherited vascular disorder, is predominantly caused by mutations in ENG and ACVRL1, which are part of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signalling pathway. HHT is characterized by the presence of mucocutaneous telangiectases...

  5. Urticaria and Prodromal Symptoms Including Erythema Marginatum in Danish Patients with Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Eva R; Valente de Freitas, Priscila; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Erythema marginatum is a characteristic skin rash seen in patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE); however, it can be confused with urticaria, leading to delay in correct diagnosis. The aim of this study was to clarify how often erythema marginatum is misinterpreted as urticaria, potentially...

  6. Radiological features of bilateral hereditary micro-epiphyseal dysplasia - a distinct entity in the skeletal dysplasias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morstert, AK; Dijkstra, PF; van Horn, [No Value; Jansen, BRH; Heutink, P; Lindhout, D

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To prove that bilateral hereditary micro-epiphyseal dysplasia (BHMED), first described by Elsbach in 1959 [1], is a distinct disorder radiologically as well as clinically, compared with multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED). Material and Methods: We used the data of the revised pedigree with 84 f

  7. Fresh Frozen Plasma for the Treatment of a Chinese Patient with Hereditary Angioedema

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Tang; Hong-yu Zhang; Jia Gan

    2009-01-01

    HEREDITARY angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant inherited condition which was initially described by Osier in 1888.~1 Patients with HAE can develop rapid subcutaneous or submucosal edema involving the hands, feet, limbs, face, intestinal tract, even larynx and trachea.

  8. Risk of gynecologic cancers in Danish hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boilesen, Astrid Elisabeth Bruun; Bisgaard, Marie Luise; Bernstein, Inge

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Women in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families have an elevated risk of endometrial and ovarian cancer. The risk in Lynch syndrome families with known mutations in mismatch repair genes (MMR genes) seems to be higher than in familial colorectal cancer (CRC) famili...

  9. Influence of mutation type on clinical expression of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, L.; Kolbach, D.; Coo, R.F. de; Plomp, A.S.; Bauer, N.J.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Die-Smulders, C.E.M. de

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this research was to determine the molecular factors of influence on the clinical expression of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), which might aid in counseling LHON patients and families. The prevalence of LHON in the Dutch population was determined. DESIGN: Observational

  10. LEBERS HEREDITARY OPTIC NEUROPATHY - CORRELATIONS BETWEEN MITOCHONDRIAL GENOTYPE AND VISUAL OUTCOME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OOSTRA, RJ; BOLHUIS, PA; WIJBURG, FA; ZORNENDE, G; BLEEKERWAGEMAKERS, EM

    1994-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited disease associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. We describe the distribution of seven different mtDNA mutations and the clinical findings in 334 LHON patients belonging to 29 families. Mutations described only in LHON

  11. Is there alteration in aortic stiffness in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemes, A.; Coo, I.F.M. de; Spruijt, L.; Smeets, H.J.; Chinnery, P.F.; Soliman, O.I.; Geleijnse, M.L.; Cate, FJ Ten

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is recognized as the most common cause of isolated blindness in young men. The current study was designed to test whether LHON as a mitochondrial disease is associated with vascular functional alterations characterized by aortic elastic properties du

  12. Patients with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy fail to compensate impaired oxidative phosphorylation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korsten, A.; Coo, I.F.M. de; Spruijt, L.; Wit, L.E. de; Smeets, H.J.M.; Sluiter, W.

    2010-01-01

    Ninety-five percent of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients carry a mutation in one out of three mtDNA-encoded ND subunits of complex I. Penetrance is reduced and more male than female carriers are affected. To assess if a consistent biochemical phenotype is associated with LHON express

  13. Clinical expression of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is affected by the mitochondrial DNA-haplogroup background.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hudson, G.; Carelli, V.; Spruijt, L.; Gerards, M.; Mowbray, C.; Achilli, A.; Pyle, A.; Elson, J.; Howell, N.; Morgia, C. La; Valentino, M.L.; Huoponen, K.; Savontaus, M.L.; Nikoskelainen, E.; Sadun, A.A.; Salomao, S.R.; Belfort Jr, R.; Griffiths, P.; Man, P.Y.; Coo, R.F. de; Horvath, R.; Zeviani, M.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Torroni, A.; Chinnery, P.F.

    2007-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is due primarily to one of three common point mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but the incomplete penetrance implicates additional genetic or environmental factors in the pathophysiology of the disorder. Both the 11778G-->A and 14484T-->C LHON mutation

  14. Orofacial hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: high power diode laser in early and advanced lesion treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempesta, Angela; Franco, Simonetta; Miccoli, Simona; Suppressa, Patrizia; De Falco, Vincenzo; Crincoli, Vito; Lacaita, Mariagrazia; Giuliani, Michele; Favia, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a muco-cutaneous inherited disease. Symptoms are epistaxis, visceral arterio-venous malformations, multiple muco-cutaneous telangiectasia with the risk of number increasing enlargement, bleeding, and super-infection. The aim of this work is to show the dual Diode Laser efficacy in preventive treatment of Early Lesions (EL telangiectasia.

  15. Splenic arteriovenous malformation manifested by thrombocytopenia in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hee Jin; Choi, Jong Cheol; Oh, Jong Yeong; Cho, Jin Han; Kang, Myong Jin; Lee, Jin Hwa; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Nam, Kyeong Jin [College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant inherited disease characterized by epistaxis, telangiectases and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The involvement of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, lung and cerebrum for HHT has been described, whereas little is known about AVMs of the spleen. We report here the radiological findings of a case of a splenic AVM manifested by thrombocytopenia in HHT.

  16. Epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: an evidence based review of surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Christopher J; Rotenberg, Brian W; Witterick, Ian J

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) frequently present with epistaxis. Up to 98% of these patients will have epistaxis at some point in their life. There are multiple ways to deal with this problem, including conservative, medical and surgical options. We present a case and an update on the treatment options for HHT, with a focus on the newer and experimental techniques. PMID:26754744

  17. Treatment of Laryngeal Telangiectatic Lesions in a Patient Diagnosed with Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse; Printz, Trine; Slot Mehlum, Camilla;

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We here present a case concerning a 69 year old female patient with Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT). She was suffering from hoarseness due to a telangiectatic lesion on the right vocal cord. The lesion was treated with laser and the voice improved markedly, which is document...

  18. miRNA expression profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE hereditary breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljana Tanić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer constitutes only 5–10% of all breast cancer cases and is characterized by strong family history of breast and/or other associated cancer types. Only ~25% of hereditary breast cancer cases carry a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene, while mutations in other rare high and moderate-risk genes and common low penetrance variants may account for additional 20% of the cases. Thus the majority of cases are still unaccounted for and designated as BRCAX tumors. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that play important roles as regulators of gene expression and are deregulated in cancer. To characterize hereditary breast tumors based on their miRNA expression profiles we performed global microarray miRNA expression profiling on a retrospective cohort of 80 FFPE breast tissues, including 66 hereditary breast tumors (13 BRCA1, 10 BRCA2 and 43 BRCAX, 10 sporadic breast carcinomas and 4 normal breast tissues, using Exiqon miRCURY LNA™ microRNA Array v.11.0. Here we describe in detail the miRNA microarray expression data and tumor samples used for the study of BRCAX tumor heterogeneity (Tanic et al., 2013 and biomarkers associated with positive BRCA1/2 mutation status (Tanic et al., 2014. Additionally, we provide the R code for data preprocessing and quality control.

  19. Genes for Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Jacobs, An; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Levy, Nicolas; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Weis, Joachim; Nascimento, Andres; Swinkels, Marielle; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Jordanova, Albena; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by axonal atrophy and degeneration, exclusively or predominantly affecting the sensory and autonomic neurons. So far, disease-associated mutations have been identified in seven genes: two genes for autosomal dominant ("SPTLC1"…

  20. Painless ulcers and fissures of toes: Hereditary sensory neuropathy, not leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angoori Gnaneshwar Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN are rare genetically determined neuropathies. They often manifest as painless injuries in children. We present HSN in a 5-year-old boy who presented with recurrent fissuring and ulceration involving both great toes.

  1. Experimental therapeutics in hereditary neuropathies: the past, the present, and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, David N

    2008-10-01

    Hereditary neuropathies represent approximately 40% of undiagnosed neuropathies in a tertiary clinic setting. The Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies (CMT) are the most common. Mutations in more than 40 genes have been identified to date in CMT. Approximately 50% of CMT cases are accounted for by CMT type 1A, due to a duplication within the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22). Mutations in the gap junction beta 1 gene (GJB1), the myelin protein zero gene (MPZ), and the mitofusin 2 gene (MFN2) account for a substantial proportion of other genetically definable CMT. Some 15% of demyelinating CMT and 70% of axonal CMT await genetic clarification. Other hereditary neuropathies include the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies, the familial amyloid polyneuropathies, and multisystem disorders (e.g., lipid storage diseases and inherited ataxias) that have peripheral neuropathy as a major or minor component. This review surveys the challenges of developing effective therapies for hereditary neuropathies in terms of past, present, and future experimental therapeutics in CMT.

  2. Hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE) genotypes in heart failure: relation to etiology and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Daniel Vega; Pecini, Redi; Gustafsson, Finn;

    2010-01-01

    It is believed that hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) might play a role in cardiac disease (heart failure (HF) and ischemia). Mutations within several genes are HH-associated, the most common being the HFE gene. In a large cohort of HF patients, we sought to determine the etiological role and the...

  3. Studies on bone scintigraphy in renal osteodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchimochi, Makoto (Nippon Dental Univ., Niigata)

    1983-12-01

    Bone scintigraphy was superior over roentgenography for detection of abnormal bone findings in chronic dialysis patients. According to the type of scintigraphic findings, an increase in the hot area in the cranium or the mandibule seemed to express fibrous osteitis due to secondary hyperparathyroidism. Multiple coin-shaped hot areas in ribs were thought to indicate advanced osteomalacia or osteomalacia in patients with aluminum poisoning. The 4 hr-B/St ratio of the cranium was thought to serve as a quantitative indicator of the status of fibrous osteitis due to secondary hyperparathyroidism to show the progress and therapeutic course of the disease.

  4. Hereditary Connective Tissue Disorders: a Modern Approach to Classification and Diagnosis (Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemenov А.V.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary connective tissue disorders — a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases united by common congenital mesenchymal abnormalities — is one of the most debatable problems of clinical medicine. A great while, from the whole variety of hereditary connective tissue disorders, only “differentiated” (with concerted diagnostic recommendations, monogenic syndromes registered in OMIM, have been the focus of attention of medical community. However, numerous unclassifiable forms with multi-factorial development mechanisms or so called dysplastic phenotypes have not been taken into account when estimating the disease prognosis and determining treatment policy. The review represents the current concepts of the nomenclature of hereditary connective tissue disorders, and considers the diagnostic criteria of the classified monogenic syndromes (Marfan syndrome and Ehlers–Danlos syndrome, MASS-phenotype, primary mitral valve prolapse, joint hypermobility syndrome and unclassifiable dysplastic phenotypes (МASS-like phenotypes, marfanoid appearance, Ehlers-like phenotype, benign joint hypermobility, unclassifiable phenotype in the view of recent international and domestic recommendations. Congenital mesenchymal disorders have been represented in the form of a continuous list in order of decreasing clinical intensity of their manifestations and prognostic value reduction (“phenotypic continuum”: from monogenic syndromes through dysplastic phenotypes to unclassifiable phenotypes. The authors have laid emphasis on the difficulties of clinical identification of hereditary connective tissue disorders related to non-specificity of external and visceral markers of connective tissue weakness and certain conventionality of diagnostic criteria. The review has shown the debating aspects of diagnosis and interpretation of clinical significance of some hereditary connective tissue disorders.

  5. Genome-wide sequencing to identify the cause of hereditary cancer syndromes: with examples from familial pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Nicholas J; Klein, Alison P

    2013-11-01

    Advances in our understanding of the human genome and next-generation technologies have facilitated the use of genome-wide sequencing to decipher the genetic basis of Mendelian disease and hereditary cancer syndromes. However, the application of genome-wide sequencing in hereditary cancer syndromes has had mixed success, in part, due to complex nature of the underlying genetic architecture. In this review we discuss the use of genome-wide sequencing in both Mendelian diseases and hereditary cancer syndromes, highlighting the potential and challenges of this approach using familial pancreatic cancer as an example. PMID:23196058

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of a 16-year-old Chinese patient with concurrent hereditary hemochromatosis and Gilbert's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianbo; Liu, Yanmin; Chang, Yujuan; Liu, Huimin; Wang, Peng

    2014-09-28

    Gilbert's syndrome and hereditary hemochromatosis predominantly affect Caucasians with a low incidence in Asians. Here we report the case of a 16-year-old Chinese boy, who was admitted with hepatalgia, jaundice, hyperpigmentation, and splenomegaly to our hospital. After excluding chronic hepatitis, autoimmune disorders, and alcohol or drug injury, genetic analyses of the patient and his parents revealed simultaneous manifestations of Gilbert's syndrome and hereditary hemochromatosis, though his parents did not develop related symptoms. The presented case indicates that diagnoses of Gilbert's syndrome and hereditary hemochromatosis should be taken into consideration when chronic hepatitis is suspected without a clear etiology.

  7. Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma of Vörner: is it the most frequent type of hereditary palmoplantar keratoderma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, H; Happle, R; Butterfass, T; Traupe, H

    1988-01-01

    In a retrospective study, we reevaluated the biopsies that had been obtained, during the past 11 years, from 26 patients presenting with hereditary palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK). Twelve out of 26 biopsies disclosed the histological features of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, consistent with the diagnosis of epidermolytic PPK of Vörner. A review of the histologically examined cases of the literature revealed a comparable predominance of this hereditary PPK. We conclude that, in contrast to the current opinion, epidermolytic PPK of Vörner represents the most frequent type of hereditary PPK.

  8. [Medico-genetic study of isolates in Uzbekistan. IV. Clinico-biochemical diagnosis of hereditary diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlova, S I; Diachenko, S S; Khannanova, F K; Kuleshov, N P; Khodzhaeva, G K

    1976-01-01

    An exhaustive clinico-biochemical examination of the population of two kishlaks of the Samarkand Region, viz. Karakent (210 persons) and Ishan (248 persons) was carried out. The program of this examination permitted to exclude over 160 forms of hereditary pathology. A total of 45 persons affected with diseases belonging to 12 nosological forms were revealed in the course of the examination. Among the diseases observed only 5 are hereditary sensu stricto, viz. myoclonus-epilepsy, Bonevi-Ulrich's syndrome, imperfect osteogenesis, pigment choreoretinite and Down's syndrome, others belong to diseases with a pronounced hereditary predisposition. The main part of this group comprises neuro-psychic diseases, such as non-differentiated olygophreny (5.0%), epilepsy (1.3%), schizophreny; many of these cases have a familial character, particularly in Karakent. Besides the persons suffering from diseases, 20 heterozygous carriers of beta-thalassemia and 17 heterozygous carriers of G6PD-deficiency were discovered in the kishlaks examined. On the whole the frequency of the diseases revealed did not exceed the level in the general population. Despite the different degree of isolation of the kishlaks examined (Karakent is isolated on a religious basis, F = 0.0064; while Ishan is a desintagrated isolate, F = = 0.0014), no substantial differences between them in the distribution of pathological phenomena were observed. On the basis of the experience of this expedition recomendations are proposed concerning the origination and accomplishment of medico-genetic expeditions. A scheme is proposed for the performance of medico-genetic examination through several stages. The first stage in the composition of tentative maps of the distribution of hereditary diseases within a region on the basis of the information obtained from the medical personnel and from the examination of the documents of district and regional hospitals. Subsequently the primary information is specified, the regions to

  9. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: a rare cause of long-lasting abdominal distension in an 8-year-old boy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈雷铃; 郎诗明; 胡廷泽; 钟麟; 李俊杰

    2002-01-01

    @@ Abdominal distension is a common complaint encountered in pediatric surgery. In most cases, Hirschsprung's disease is the most common cause associated with abdominal distension in older children. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is a rare disease which commonly presents with hemorrhage and anemia. We treated an 8-year-old boy with long lasting intractable abdominal distension associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Clinicopathologic features of this rare entity are discussed with emphasis on its pathogenesis and diagnosis.

  10. Comparative analysis of human tissue interactomes reveals factors leading to tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth Barshir; Omer Shwartz; Smoly, Ilan Y.; Esti Yeger-Lotem

    2014-01-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-...

  11. Comparative Analysis of Human Tissue Interactomes Reveals Factors Leading to Tissue-Specific Manifestation of Hereditary Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Barshir, Ruth; Shwartz, Omer; Smoly, Ilan Y.; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2014-01-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-...

  12. Absence of close linkage between benign hereditary chorea and the locus D4S10 (probe G8).

    OpenAIRE

    Quarrell, O W; Youngman, S; Sarfarazi, M; P.S. Harper

    1988-01-01

    A genetic linkage study between benign hereditary chorea and the locus D4S10 using the DNA probe G8 has shown two recombinations in five small families. There were negative lod scores at recombination fractions that show conclusive evidence of linkage in 16 larger British Huntington's disease families. We suggest that although benign hereditary chorea and Huntington's disease may have some clinical similarities they are probably at two different loci.

  13. Natural History and Outcome of Hepatic Vascular Malformations in a Large Cohort of Patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Teleangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Buscarini, Elisabetta; Leandro, Gioacchino; Conte, Dario; DANESINO, CESARE; Daina, Erica; Manfredi, Guido; Lupinacci, Guido; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Menozzi, Fernanda; De Grazia, Federico; Gazzaniga, Pietro; INAMA, GIUSEPPE; Bonardi, Roberto; Blotta, Pasquale; Forner, PierAngelo

    2011-01-01

    Background Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is a genetic disease characterized by teleangiectasias involving virtually every organ. There are limited data in the literature regarding the natural history of liver vascular malformations in hemorrhagic telangiectasia and their associated morbidity and mortality. Aim This prospective cohort study sought to assess the outcome of liver involvement in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia patients. Methods We analyzed 16 years of surveillance d...

  14. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia: a complex phenotype associated with a new SPG4 gene mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Johnson, B; Koefoed, Pernille;

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria, unip...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations...

  15. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis and its management: 2-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitandra Kumar Tripathi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF is a rare hereditary condition characterised by slow, progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of gingiva caused by increase in sub-mucosal connective tissue component. This paper presents a case report of a 14-year-old male suffering from HGF with positive family history. After through clinical examination, routine blood investigation was advised. All the parameters were within normal physiological limits. Surgical excision of enlarged gingival mass was planned after meticulous scaling and root planning. Patient was recalled 1-week after surgery. Postoperative healing was good and desired crown lengthening was achieved with significant improvement in speech and masticatory problems. There was no recurrence of the disease even after 2 years follow-up.

  16. Management of hereditary gingival fibromatosis: A 2 years follow-up case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitandra Kumar Tripathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF is a rare hereditary condition characterized by slow, progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of gingiva due to increase in sub-mucosal connective tissue component. This paper presents a case report of an 18-year-old female suffering from HGF with positive family history. Her 42-year-old mother also have enlargement of the gums. After through clinical examination of both the patients, routine blood investigation was advised. All the investigations were within normal physiological limits of both the patients. Surgical excision of enlarged gingival tissue was planned after meticulous scaling and root planing. Patients were recalled 1 week after surgery. Postoperative healing were good and desired crown lengthening was achieved with significant improvement in speech and masticatory problems in both the patients. There was no recurrence of the disease even after 2 years follow-up.

  17. Management of hereditary gingival fibromatosis: A 2 years follow-up case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Amitandra Kumar; Dete, Gopal; Saimbi, Charanjeet Singh; Kumar, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare hereditary condition characterized by slow, progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of gingiva due to increase in sub-mucosal connective tissue component. This paper presents a case report of an 18-year-old female suffering from HGF with positive family history. Her 42-year-old mother also have enlargement of the gums. After through clinical examination of both the patients, routine blood investigation was advised. All the investigations were within normal physiological limits of both the patients. Surgical excision of enlarged gingival tissue was planned after meticulous scaling and root planing. Patients were recalled 1 week after surgery. Postoperative healing were good and desired crown lengthening was achieved with significant improvement in speech and masticatory problems in both the patients. There was no recurrence of the disease even after 2 years follow-up. PMID:26229281

  18. Treatment of type I and II hereditary angioedema with Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Lilian; Farkas, Henriette

    2008-11-01

    Hereditary and acquired angioedema are of outstanding clinical importance, as edematous attacks associated with these conditions can thrust afflicted patients into mortal danger. Currently, C1 inhibitor concentrate - a human blood product - is available as a replacement therapy. In view of the limited number of donors, as well as the risk of transmission of blood-borne infections, it is a reasonable expectation to develop a therapeutic alternative based on recombinant technology, which would eliminate all these shortcomings. Pharming (Leiden, The Netherlands) has developed Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor, as a proprietary product, which is currently being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials. Ongoing studies conducted within the framework of the development program are almost complete and their interim findings are reassuring. This should facilitate successful regulatory approval in the near future, which is indispensable in order to make Rhucin available for patients with hereditary angioedema or other disorders amenable to C1 inhibitor replacement. PMID:20477114

  19. Recombinant replacement therapy for hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Dumitru; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Cicardi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare genetic condition transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait and characterized most commonly by the production of either inadequate or nonfunctioning C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), a blood protein that regulates proteases in the complement, fibrinolytic and contact systems. Patients with hereditary angioedema suffer from episodic, unpredictable manifestations of edema affecting multiple anatomical locations, including the GI tract, facial tissue, the upper airway, oropharynx, urogenital region and/or the arms and legs. A rational approach to treatment is replacement of C1-INH protein, to normalize the levels of C1-INH activity and halt the progression of the biochemical activation processes underlying the edema formation. Ruconest is a highly purified recombinant human C1-INH. This article will focus on the results of ten clinical studies demonstrating the efficacy and safety of Ruconest(®) (Pharming Group NV, Leiden, the Netherlands), which is now approved for use in Europe, Israel and the USA. PMID:26250409

  20. Hepatocellular carcinoma associated with hereditary hemochromatosis occurring in non-cirrhotic liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Delius, S; Lersch, C; Schulte-Frohlinde, E; Fend, F; Dobritz, M; Schmid, R M; Eckel, F

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is well known. Thereby, the development of liver cirrhosis seems to be a prerequisite. Whether or not a hepatic iron overload in the context of hereditary hemochromatosis is an independent risk factor for HCC remains unclear. To date there are only a few reports about HCC arising in non-cirrhotic livers in the presence of HH. We report the case of a 64-year-old man who presented to our outpatient clinic with HCC. Liver cirrhosis could be excluded. Detailed exploration of the patient's history revealed that he had been treated by venesection for about 10 years up to 15 years ago. Subsequent investigations showed an elevated serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. The diagnosis of HH was confirmed by genetic testing, with homozygosity for the Cys282Tyr mutation. The patient received palliative chemotherapy and finally died 15 months after initial diagnosis of HCC. PMID:16397838