WorldWideScience

Sample records for albright hereditary osteodystrophy

  1. Albright hereditary osteodystrophy: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goswami M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO is a rare hereditary metabolic disorder that may be associated with or without resistant to parathyroid hormone (pseudohypoparathyroidism. It is commonly characterized by a constellation of physical features of short stature, round face, short neck, and small metacarpals and metatarsals, mild mental retardation, osteoporosis, subcutaneous calcification, and sometimes olfactory and hearing functional defect. Hypocalcaemia and hyperphosphatemia are the most important manifestations of the case. We report a clinical case of siblings with AHO with reduced Gs-alpha activity and we discuss their clinical features with oral manifestations, radiographic findings, laboratory tests along with treatment.

  2. Raised intracranial pressure as a result of pansynostosis in a child with Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mamoei, Sepehr; Cortnum, Søren

    2017-01-01

    CASE: The authors describe the case of an 8-year-old boy with pansynostosis in the context of Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO). This condition had lead to raised intracranial pressure (ICP). The elevated ICP was a consequence of the rigid skull impeding brain growth. Therefore, a decomp......CASE: The authors describe the case of an 8-year-old boy with pansynostosis in the context of Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO). This condition had lead to raised intracranial pressure (ICP). The elevated ICP was a consequence of the rigid skull impeding brain growth. Therefore......, a decompressive cranioplasty was performed successfully, leaving further space for the growing brain. Affection of the central nervous system has been documented in AHO. However, affection of the skull bones has rarely been described in literature. CONCLUSION: We suggest that craniosynostosis may develop...

  3. Resistance to growth hormone releasing hormone and gonadotropins in Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Giovanna; Spada, Anna

    2006-05-01

    Heterozygous inactivating mutations in the Gs alpha gene cause Albright's hereditary osteo-dystrophy (AHO). Consistent with the observation that only maternally inherited mutations lead to resistance to hormone action (pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia [PHP-Ia), recent studies have provided evidence for a predominant maternal origin of Gs alpha transcripts in endocrine organs, such as thyroid, gonad and pituitary. Accordingly, patients with PHP-Ia display variable degrees of resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), gonadotropins and growth hormone (GH) releasing hormone (GHRH). Although the incidence and the clinical and biochemical characteristics of PTH and TSH resistance have been widely investigated and described, the cause and significance of the reproductive dysfunction in AHO is still poorly understood. The clinical finding of alterations of GH secretion in these patients was described for the first time only 2 years ago. The present report briefly reviews the literature focusing on the actual knowledge about these last two subjects.

  4. Identification of two novel deletion mutations within the Gs alpha gene (GNAS1) in Albright hereditary osteodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Yu, S; Schuster, V; Kruse, K; Clericuzio, C L; Weinstein, L S

    1999-09-01

    Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is a genetic disorder characterized by short stature, skeletal defects, and obesity. Within AHO kindreds, some affected family members have only the somatic features of AHO [pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP)], whereas others have these features in association with resistance to multiple hormones that stimulate adenylyl cyclase within their target tissues [pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHP Ia)]. Affected members of most AHO kindreds (both those with PPHP and those with PHP Ia) have a partial deficiency of Gs alpha, the alpha-subunit of the G protein that couples receptors to adenylyl cyclase stimulation, and in a number of cases heterozygous loss of function mutations within the Gs alpha gene (GNAS1) have been identified. Using PCR with the attachment of a high melting domain (GC-clamp) and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis, two novel heterozygous frameshift mutations within GNAS1 were found in two AHO kindreds. In one kindred all affected members (both PHP Ia and PPHP) had a heterozygous 2-bp deletion in exon 8, whereas in the second kindred a heterozygous 2-bp deletion in exon 4 was identified in all affected members examined. In both cases the frameshift encoded a premature termination codon several codons downstream of the deletion. In the latter kindred affected members were previously shown to have decreased levels of GNAS1 messenger ribonucleic acid expression. These results further underscore the genetic heterogeneity of AHO and provides further evidence that PHP Ia and PPHP are two clinical presentations of a common genetic defect. Serial measurements of thyroid function in members of kindred 1 indicate that TSH resistance progresses with age and becomes more evident after the first year of life.

  5. Duplication of 17q11.2 and Features of Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy Secondary to Methylation Defects within the GNAS Cluster: Coincidence or Causal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. White

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO in a three-year-old girl with a microduplication at 17q11.2. The child developed obesity within the first 6 months of life. A diagnosis of Albright was made at age 2 years when biochemical evidence of parathyroid resistance was found. No mutations were identified in guanine nucleotide-binding protein G (s subunit alpha (GNAS1. Subsequent investigations revealed methylation disturbance at GNAS1A, neuroendocrine secretory protein antisense (NESPAS and neuroendocrine secretory protein 55 (NESP55 confirming a diagnosis of pseudohypothyroidism type 1B. A deletion of NESP55 and uniparental disomy chromosome 20 were excluded which suggested that the features of AHO arose through a purely epigenetic mechanism. Further investigation revealed a de novo microduplication at 17q11.2 encompassing the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 gene. The combination of two rare de novo events in the same child raises the possibility that duplication of a gene within the 17q11.2 region may have triggered abnormal methylation in the GNAS cluster region on chromosome 20.

  6. Screening of PRKAR1A and PDE4D in a Large Italian Series of Patients Clinically Diagnosed With Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy and/or Pseudohypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Francesca Marta; Bordogna, Paolo; de Sanctis, Luisa; Giachero, Federica; Verrua, Elisa; Segni, Maria; Mazzanti, Laura; Boldrin, Valentina; Toromanovic, Alma; Spada, Anna; Mantovani, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) intracellular signaling pathway mediates the physiological effects of several hormones and neurotransmitters, acting by the activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and several downstream intracellular effectors, including the heterotrimeric stimulatory G-protein (Gs), the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), and cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Defective G-protein-mediated signaling has been associated with an increasing number of disorders, including Albright hereditary osteodistrophy (AHO) and pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP), a heterogeneous group of rare genetic metabolic disorders resulting from molecular defects at the GNAS locus. Moreover, mutations in PRKAR1A and PDE4D genes have been recently detected in patients with acrodysostosis (ACRDYS), showing a skeletal and endocrinological phenotype partially overlapping with AHO/PHP. Despite the high detection rate of molecular defects by currently available molecular approaches, about 30% of AHO/PHP patients still lack a molecular diagnosis, hence the need to screen patients negative for GNAS epi/genetic defects also for chromosomal regions and genes associated with diseases that undergo differential diagnosis with PHP. According to the growing knowledge on Gsα-cAMP signaling-linked disorders, we investigated our series of patients (n = 81) with a clinical diagnosis of PHP/AHO but negative for GNAS anomalies for the presence of novel genetic variants at PRKAR1A and PDE4D genes. Our work allowed the detection of 8 novel missense variants affecting genes so far associated with ACRDYS in 9 patients. Our data further confirm the molecular and clinical overlap among these disorders. We present the data collected from a large series of patients and a brief review of the literature in order to compare our findings with already published data; to look for PRKAR1A/PDE4D mutation spectrum, recurrent mutations, and mutation hot spots; and to identify specific

  7. Partial Hypopituitarism, Hypoglycemia, and Hyperlipemia in Albright's Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareen, C. K.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The cases of two mentally retarded adult siblings with the classical features of Albright's osteodystrophy (a disease with characteristics such as short stature and abnormal sexual development) were reported. (Author/DB)

  8. [Osteodystrophy in thalassemia major].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisbocci, D; Livorno, P; Modina, P; Gambino, M; Damiano, P; Cantoni, R; Villata, E; Chiandussi, L

    1993-01-01

    Subjects with thalassemia major frequently have bone disorders of debatable pathogenesis. We attempt here to analyze the relationships between siderosis and thalassemic osteodystrophy by assessing calcium-phosphorus balance, hormone-vitamin homeostasis, osteoblastic-osteoclastic activity parameters, and bone mineral density (BMD) in 30 patients with thalassemia major (16 males, 14 females, age range 17-30 years). We found a significant increase in ferritin (p < 0.001) and significant decreases in serum i-PTH, 25OHD3, 1.25(OH)2D3, osteocalcin, estradiol, testosterone and FT4 (p < 0.001) in both sexes. In all patients a net decrease of bone mineral density was documented (p < 0.001). These results were then submitted to linear regression analysis: positive correlations between BMD and FT3, testosterone, estradiol (p < 0.01), were documented, and an inverse correlation between osteocalcin and ferritin was confirmed. Our findings suggest that thalassemic osteodystrophy is the result of several inhibitory influences on osteoblastic activity and bone apposition (related to hormone deficits and siderosis) which are aggravated further by anemia, chronic hypoxia and red marrow expansion.

  9. Imaging of renal osteodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jevtic, V. E-mail: vladimir.jevtic@mf.uni-lj.si

    2003-05-01

    Chronic renal insufficiency, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, renal transplantation and administration of different medications provoke complex biochemical disturbances of the calcium-phosphate metabolism with wide spectrum of bone and soft tissue abnormalities termed renal osteodystrophy. Clinically most important manifestation of renal bone disease includes secondary hyperparathyroidism, osteomalacia/rickets, osteoporosis, adynamic bone disease and soft tissue calcification. As a complication of long-term hemodialysis and renal transplantation amyloid deposition, destructive spondyloarthropathy, osteonecrosis, and musculoskeletal infections may occur. Due to more sophisticated diagnostic methods and more efficient treatment classical radiographic features of secondary hyperparathyroidism and osteomalacia/rickets are now less frequently seen. Radiological investigations play an important role in early diagnosis and follow-up of the renal bone disease. Although numerous new imaging modalities have been introduced in clinical practice (scintigraphy, CT, MRI, quantitative imaging), plain film radiography, especially fine quality hand radiograph, still represents most widely used examination.

  10. McCune-Albright syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001217.htm McCune-Albright syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. McCune-Albright syndrome is a genetic disease that affects the bones ...

  11. Hepatic osteodystrophy and liver cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vedat; Goral; Mehmet; Simsek; Nuriye; Mete

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the correlation between hepatic osteodystrophy and osteoporosis in patients with liver cirrhosis. METHODS: Bone mineral density of the patients (n = 55) and that of the control group (n = 30) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. All the women in the study were premenopausal. Deoxypyridinoline, pyridinoline and urinary Ca 2+ were measured as bone destruction markers, while alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were measured as bone ...

  12. Nutritional fibrous osteodystrophy in goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo M Bandarra

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Seven out of 25 goats from a southern Brazilian flock developed nutritional fibrous osteodystrophy. Affected animals were younger than 1 year of age and were confined in stalls and fed a concentrate ration containing 1:6 calcium:phosphorus ratio. The remaining flock (35 goats was managed at pasture and showed no disease. Clinical signs were characterized by mandibular and maxillary enlargements, varying degrees of mouth opening and protruding tongue, dyspnea, apart of abnormalities of prehension and mastication. Affected animals had increased seric levels of phosphorus and parathormone, as well as higher alkaline phosphatase activity. Postmortem examination on three succumbed goats revealed bilateral enlargement of the maxilla and mandibula, and loose teeth, apart of multiple incomplete rib fractures in one of them. Severe diffuse proliferation of loose connective tissue surrounded the osteoid trabeculae, many of which were partially or completely non-mineralized. Mineralized osteoid trabeculae showed osteoclasts in the Howship's lacunae.

  13. Mandibular brown tumor in renal osteodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Woo; Choi, Bo Ram; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Choi, Soon Chul [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gang, In Tae [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Brown tumor is a histologically benign lesion that is a serious complication of renal osteodystrophy because it may result in severe deformity and discomfort. We report a case of brown tumor, which occurred in a 35-year-old woman with chronic renal failure, who had been treated with hemodialysis for 14 years. The lesion was found on the lingual side of the mandible. Standard panoramic radiograph showed generally decreased bone mineral density, loss of lamina dura, and thin cortical plates. Computed tomography (CT) revealed multilocular expansible lesions with heterogeneous attenuation in the anterior mandible, as well as generalized trabecular alteration with homogeneous sclerosis, and thinning or obliteration of cortical plates. Excision of the mandibular lesion and curettage of the affected bone were performed.

  14. Bone Canopies in Pediatric Renal Osteodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Renata C; Levin Andersen, Thomas; Friedman, Peter A;

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is characterized by changes in bone turnover, mineralization, and volume that are brought about by alterations in bone resorption and formation. The resorptive and formative surfaces on the cancellous bone are separated from the marrow cavity by canopies...... and their association with biochemical and bone histomorphometric parameters in 106 pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients (stage 2-5) across the spectrum of ROD. Canopies in CKD patients often appeared as thickened multilayered canopies, similar to previous reports in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism....... This finding contrasts with the thin appearance reported in healthy individuals with normal kidney function. Furthermore, canopies in pediatric CKD patients showed immunoreactivity to the PTH receptor (PTHR1) as well as to the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). The number of surfaces...

  15. Role of bone biopsy in renal osteodystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Badr Wisam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal osteodystrophy (ROD, the abnormal bone histology that occurs in the context of kidney disease, is a disease spectrum and not a uniform progressive bone disease. It is an important component of the broad disturbances of bone and mineral metabolism associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD. There are multiple pathogenetic factors which contribute to the histological abnormalities seen on bone biopsy. The patients with ROD are rarely symp-tomatic in the early stages of CKD. It is also noteworthy that the clinical manifestations are usually preceded by biochemical changes that are insidious and subtle. This makes it difficult for the clinician to suspect the presence of bone and mineral metabolism abnormalities without direct testing. The serum calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase levels are usually normal until late in the course of CKD. The main screening test for abnormal bone and mineral metabolism is the measurement of parathyroid hormone which is also somewhat delayed. The clinical signs and symptoms are also challenging to interpret because of their slow and non-specific nature which may include vague, ill-defined, bone aches and pains, and muscle weakness. The gold standard for diagnosis of ROD is bone biopsy with mineralized bone histology after double tetracycline labeling, iron staining and aluminum staining. The currently used histomorphometric descriptions of bone histology are not well integrated clinically and a new nomenclature that is clinically more relevant and useful has been proposed. Additional studies are required to define the spectrum of ROD in the current therapeutic era, and to find clinically useful non-invasive biomarkers to improve the treatment and monitoring of the abnormal bone in the setting of CKD.

  16. Incomplete McCune-Albright Syndrome: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Nagehan Aslan

    2014-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia of bone is a genetic, non-inheritable disease that can cause bone pain, bone deformities and fracture. It has a large clinic spectrum from benign monostotic fibrous dysplasia to McCune-Albright syndrome. Rare McCune-Albright syndrome is characterized by precocious puberty, cafe au lait spots and fibrous dysplasia. Herein we presented a case who was preferred to hospital with pathological fractures and diagnosed with Incomplet McCune Albright syndrome because of the lack of e...

  17. McCune-Albright syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Michael T

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS is classically defined by the clinical triad of fibrous dysplasia of bone (FD, café-au-lait skin spots, and precocious puberty (PP. It is a rare disease with estimated prevalence between 1/100,000 and 1/1,000,000. FD can involve a single or multiple skeletal sites and presents with a limp and/or pain, and, occasionally, a pathologic fracture. Scoliosis is common and may be progressive. In addition to PP (vaginal bleeding or spotting and development of breast tissue in girls, testicular and penile enlargement and precocious sexual behavior in boys, other hyperfunctioning endocrinopathies may be involved including hyperthyroidism, growth hormone excess, Cushing syndrome, and renal phosphate wasting. Café-au-lait spots usually appear in the neonatal period, but it is most often PP or FD that brings the child to medical attention. Renal involvement is seen in approximately 50% of the patients with MAS. The disease results from somatic mutations of the GNAS gene, specifically mutations in the cAMP regulating protein, Gs alpha. The extent of the disease is determined by the proliferation, migration and survival of the cell in which the mutation spontaneously occurs during embryonic development. Diagnosis of MAS is usually established on clinical grounds. Plain radiographs are often sufficient to make the diagnosis of FD and biopsy of FD lesions can confirm the diagnosis. The evaluation of patients with MAS should be guided by knowledge of the spectrum of tissues that may be involved, with specific testing for each. Genetic testing is possible, but is not routinely available. Genetic counseling, however, should be offered. Differential diagnoses include neurofibromatosis, osteofibrous dysplasia, non-ossifying fibromas, idiopathic central precocious puberty, and ovarian neoplasm. Treatment is dictated by the tissues affected, and the extent to which they are affected. Generally, some form of surgical intervention

  18. Hereditary spherocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weed, R.I.

    1975-10-01

    Studies of the clinical features of hereditary spherocytosis since 1871 and laboratory investigation of the cellular abnormalities since 1940 have led to the characterization of hereditary spherocytosis as a prime example of a Mendelian dominant, genetically determined disorder of the erythrocyte membrane. This review of hereditary spherocytosis emphasizes the contributions of Dr. Lawrence Young and many others to our present understanding of the disease and discusses current studies of the protein abnormality in the membrane of hereditary spherocytes.

  19. Incomplete McCune-Albright Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagehan Aslan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fibrous dysplasia of bone is a genetic, non-inheritable disease that can cause bone pain, bone deformities and fracture. It has a large clinic spectrum from benign monostotic fibrous dysplasia to McCune-Albright syndrome. Rare McCune-Albright syndrome is characterized by precocious puberty, cafe au lait spots and fibrous dysplasia. Herein we presented a case who was preferred to hospital with pathological fractures and diagnosed with Incomplet McCune Albright syndrome because of the lack of endocrine hyperfunction and developed early puberty at clinical course.

  20. [Recovery of Cushing syndrome revealing McCune-Albright syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halioui-Louhaichi, S; Dridi, Y; Azzabi, O; Selmi, I; Fetni, I; Siala, N; Maherzi, A

    2016-01-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS) is a rare feature of McCune-Albright syndrome. Treatments consist of bilateral adrenalectomy followed by lifelong glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid treatment. However, cases of spontaneous remission of CS have been reported in the literature. We report a case of McCune-Albright syndrome with CS treated with metyrapone for 30 months with prolonged remission after a 12-year follow-up. Adrenalectomy may be avoided in some cases of CS caused by McCune-Albright syndrome. Metyrapone could be a good alternative to surgical treatment.

  1. [Hereditary hemocromatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2004-10-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a disorder of iron metabolism characterized by a progressive tissue iron overload which leads to an irreversible organ damage if it is not treated timely. The recent developments in the field of molecular medicine have radically changed the physiopathology and the diagnosis of this disease. However, transferrin saturation and serum ferritin are still the most reliable tests for the detection of subjects with hereditary hemochromatosis. Therapeutic phlebotomy is the mainstay of the treatment of hereditary hemochromatosis. If phlebotomy is started before the onset of irreversible organ damages, the life expectancy of these patients is similar to that of normal population.

  2. Hereditary pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard M Charnley

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant condition,which results in recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis,progressing to chronic pancreatitis often at a young age.The majority of patients with hereditary pancreatitis expressone of two mutations (R122H or N29I) in the cationictrypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene). It has been hypothesisedthat one of these mutations, the R122H mutation causespancreatitis by altering a trypsin recognition site sopreventing deactivation of trypsin within the pancreas andprolonging its action, resulting in autodigestion. Families withthese two mutations have been identified in many countriesand there are also other rarer mutations, which have alsobeen linked to hereditary pancreatitis.Patients with hereditary pancreatitis present in the sameway as those with sporadic pancreatitis but at an earlierage. It is common for patients to remain undiagnosed formany years, particularly ifthey present with non-specificsymptoms. Hereditary pancreatitis should always beconsidered in patients who present with recurrent pancreatitiswith a family history of pancreatic disease. If patients withthe 2 common mutations are compared, those with theR122H mutation are more likely to present at a younger ageand are more likely to require surgical intervention than thosewith N29I. Hereditary pancreatitis carries a 40 % lifetimerisk of pancreatic cancer with those patients aged between50 to 70 being most at risk in whom screening tests maybecome important.

  3. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/2015 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited ...

  4. [McCune-Albright syndrome associated with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihaoui, M; Hamza, N; Lamine, F; Jabeur, S; Yazidi, M; Ftouhi, B; Slimane, H

    2012-03-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) consists of the triad of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, cutaneous pigmentation, and multiple endocrine abnormalities. Type 1 diabetes mellitus is not included in MAS. We report the case of an 18-year-old girl who presented with McCune-Albright syndrome. The diagnosis was made by the presence of precocious puberty at the age of 6 years, cutaneous pigmentation, polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, and phosphate diabetes. Type 1 diabetes mellitus developed at the age of 16 years. We discuss this case, the relationship between type 1 diabetes mellitus and MAS, with a literature review.

  5. Hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, A; Avvisati, R A; Piscopo, C

    2010-09-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis is a common hemolytic disorder characterized by a defect or deficiency in one or more of the proteins composing red blood cell membrane. As a result, red blood cells have an abnormal shape, higher metabolic requirements, and are prematurely trapped and destroyed in the spleen. Hereditary spherocytosis, including the very mild or subclinical forms, is the most common cause of non-immune hemolytic anemia among people of Northern European ancestry, with a prevalence of approximately 1 in 2000. However very mild forms of the disease may be much more common. Hereditary spherocytosis is inherited in a dominant fashion in 75% of cases, whereas the remaining are truly recessive cases and de novo mutations. This review reports current concepts on red cell membrane structure and it will attempt to clarify molecular defects leading to spherocyte and their consequences.

  6. [Hereditary neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, Jean-Michel; Calvo, Judith; Ghorab, Karima; Tazir, Meriem

    2008-11-15

    Although there are many human hereditary neuropathies, most of them with the exception of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease or hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy, are rare. Irrespective of their type, the mode of transmission may be autosomal dominant or recessive, or X-linked. The most difficult to diagnose, however, are the sporadic forms. It is customary to distinguish the cases in which the neuropathy is the sole clinical expression from multisystemic diseases where neuropathy is one component of multi-organ involvement. The complexity and the multiplicity of genes involved and the lack of understanding of their exact functions hinder logical presentation of these hereditary neuropathies. For understandable technical reasons, the stage of specific treatment, namely the repair of the mutated gene, has yet to be attained.

  7. Hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, M P; Bygum, A

    2016-01-01

    We report a 64-year-old man who suffered from recurrent visible swelling attacks since the age of 20 as well as episodes with severe upper airway edema, resulting in 4 emergency tracheotomies. Eventually after 44 years he was diagnosed with hereditary angioedema (HAE) type II. The aims...

  8. Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdel-Karim, Omar; Dizdarevic, Adis; Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an inherited disease that causes periodic swelling attacks, which can be life threatening and have a major effect on a patient's life. Studies have shown that home therapy for angioedema reduces disease severity, leads to faster relief of symptoms, and improves quality...

  9. A rare cause of acromegaly: McCune-Albright syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Bodakçi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available McCune-Albright syndrome is characterized by polyostatic fibrous dysplasia, brown spots on the skin (café au lait pigmentation and autonomous endocrine hyperfunction. Early puberty and other endocrinological manifestations, such as acromegaly, gigantism and hypercortisolism are widely observed in the syndrome. Acromegaly is seen in 20% of patients. We report a case of acromegaly accompanied with this syndrome.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: McCune-Albright syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Albright syndrome . The thyroid gland , a butterfly-shaped organ at the base of the neck, may become enlarged (a condition called a goiter) or develop masses called nodules. About 50 percent of affected individuals produce excessive amounts of thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism), ...

  11. McCune-Albright syndrome: role of radiology; Syndrome de McCune-Albright, place de la radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iffenecker, C.; Coevoet, V.; Higa, E.R.; Petit, M.C.; Fuerxer, F.; Doyon, D. [Hopital de Bicetre, 94 - le Kremlin-Bicetre (France)

    1997-09-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome is a genetical disease with a mosaic distribution. It is characterized by skin pigmentations, fibrous dysplasia and sexual precocity but can also include others endocrinopathies. Two cases are reported illustrating the interest of radiological investigations in diagnosis, follow up and complications of this affection. (authors). 21 refs.

  12. Cytokine accumulation in osteitis fibrosa of renal osteodystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte M.E.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow fibrosis occurs in association with a number of pathological states. Despite the extensive fibrosis that sometimes characterizes renal osteodystrophy, little is known about the factors that contribute to marrow accumulation of fibrous tissue. Because circulating cytokines are elevated in uremia, possibly in response to elevated parathyroid hormone levels, we have examined bone biopsies from 21 patients with end-stage renal disease and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Bone sections were stained with antibodies to human interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha, IL-6, IL-11, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha and transforming growth factor-ß (TGF-ß using an undecalcified plastic embedding method. Intense staining for IL-1alpha, IL-6, TNF-alpha and TGF-ß was evident within the fibrotic tissue of the bone marrow while minimal IL-11 was detected. The extent of cytokine deposition corresponded to the severity of fibrosis, suggesting their possible involvement in the local regulation of the fibrotic response. Because immunoreactive TGF-ß and IL-6 were also detected in osteoblasts and osteocytes, we conclude that selective cytokine accumulation may have a role in modulating bone and marrow cell function in parathyroid-mediated uremic bone disease.

  13. Hereditary hyperbilirubinemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherited disorders of bilirubin metabolism involve four autosomal recessive syndromes: Gilbert, Crigler- Najjar, Dubin-Johnson and Rotor, among which the first two are characterized by unconjugated and the second two by conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Gilbert syndrome occurs in 2%-10% of general population, while others are rare. Except for Crigler-Najjar syndrome, hereditary hyperbilirubinemias belong to benign disorders and thus no treatment is required.

  14. Cystic fibrous osteodystrophy of the jaw in two pet kinkajous (Potos flavus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garma-Aviña, A; Torres-Montoya, J

    1998-11-07

    Two kinkajous (Potos flavus), which were separately owned as pets and fed an inappropriate diet consisting almost exclusively of succulent fruits developed cystic fibrous osteodystrophy of the jaw. In both cases there was a prominent enlargement of the chin and lower jaw, decalcification of facial bones, softening of the gingiva, and severe malocclusion, but no other relevant changes. Clinical, radiographic and histological findings were consistent with cystic fibrous osteodystrophy. The findings suggest that kinkajous with this condition are particularly prone to developing a bulbous enlargement of the chin as the main clinical sign, and that this change is histologically similar to the cystic form of the disease observed in man and monkeys.

  15. Oral manifestations of McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravinda, Konidena; Ratnakar, Pamula; Srinivas, Kandakurti

    2013-01-01

    McCune- Albright Syndrome (MAS) is a rare fibrosseous lesion, characterized by a classic triad of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia (PFD), café -au-lait macules (CALM) and underlying endocrinopathies. We present the oral findings of an interesting case of MAS with relevant review of literature. A 30-year-old male presented to us with swelling of both jaws over a period of two years. Cutaneous examination revealed café - au - lait macule over the back, crossing the midline. Skeletal survey showed expansile, osteolytic, mixed radiolucent- radiopaque lesions in skull and jaw bones. Serum alkaline phosphatase was elevated (388 IU/L), with normal calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone and 25 hydroxy vitamin D levels. Diagnosis of McCune- Albright syndrome was made and he was treated with parenteral bisphosphonates (intravenous Zoledronate 4 mg) and is under follow up for surgical recontouring of the jaws. Early recognition facilitates better treatment and improves prognosis by reducing the morbidity.

  16. Hansen's disease with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kvs Hari; Dhull, P; Bisht, Ys

    2012-10-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) comprises a triad of fibrous dysplasia of bone, café-au-lait macule, and endocrinopathy. The disease is due to activating mutation of G protein-coupled receptor leading to hyperfunction of glands. Hansen's disease is caused by infection with Mycobacterium leprae and is seen with underlying immunosuppressed conditions in genetically predisposed individuals. We recently encountered a patient with Hansen's disease along with underlying MAS and report the same in this report.

  17. Hereditary spherocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Kalyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a familial hemolytic disorder with marked heterogeneity of clinical features, ranging from an asymptomatic condition to a fulminant hemolytic anemia. In severe cases, the disorder may present in early childhood, but in some cases it may go unnoticed until later in adult life. We present a 32-year-old male who presented with anemia, jaundice, splenomegaly, and gallstones. Seven of his family members had similar illness in the past. The Mother died of similar illness at the age of 40. The Blood film showed spherocytosis and reticulocytosis. There was increased osmotic fragility and a negative direct coomb′s test. He was given folic acid supplements and was advised for splenectomy and cholecystectomy. This case is reported due to its rarity in Indian population.

  18. Radioiodine treatment in McCune-Albright syndrome with hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Dhritiman; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Kashyap, Raghava; Manohar, Kuruva; Bhattacharya, Anish; Bhansali, Anil

    2012-07-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a sporadic disease characterized by polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, "café-au-lait" spots and hyperfunctional endocrinopathies. Pathophysiological basis is activating mutation of the gene that encodes the alpha subunit of Gs membrane protein that stimulates the intracellular production of cAMP, conferring autonomous secretion of the gland in particular. One of the uncommon endocrine manifestations is hyperthyroidism. We present a patient who had café-au-lait spots, polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and hyperthyroidism. She was treated with radioactive iodine for the symptoms of hyperthyroidism and subsequently relieved from hyperthyroid features.

  19. McCune-Albright Syndrome五例报道

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈瑞敏; 林祥泉; 陈文茹

    2005-01-01

    McCune-Albright Syndrome(MAS)又称为多发性骨纤维发育不良伴性早熟综合征,以皮肤咖啡斑、性早熟、多发性骨纤维发育不良为特点.临床上较为少见,女孩多于男孩,现将我科2002年5月~2004年12月诊治的5例报道如下.

  20. Hansen′s disease with McCune-Albright syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KVS Hari Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS comprises a triad of fibrous dysplasia of bone, cafι-au-lait macule, and endocrinopathy. The disease is due to activating mutation of G protein-coupled receptor leading to hyperfunction of glands. Hansen′s disease is caused by infection with Mycobacterium leprae and is seen with underlying immunosuppressed conditions in genetically predisposed individuals. We recently encountered a patient with Hansen′s disease along with underlying MAS and report the same in this report.

  1. Radioiodine treatment in McCune-Albright syndrome with hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhritiman Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS is a sporadic disease characterized by polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, "café-au-lait" spots and hyperfunctional endocrinopathies. Pathophysiological basis is activating mutation of the gene that encodes the alpha subunit of Gs membrane protein that stimulates the intracellular production of cAMP, conferring autonomous secretion of the gland in particular. One of the uncommon endocrine manifestations is hyperthyroidism. We present a patient who had café-au-lait spots, polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and hyperthyroidism. She was treated with radioactive iodine for the symptoms of hyperthyroidism and subsequently relieved from hyperthyroid features.

  2. McCune-Albright syndrome: radiological and MR findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongjing, G; Huawei, L; Zilai, P; Bei, D; Hao, J; Kemin, C

    2001-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a non-inherited disorder due to the GNAS1 gene mutation. The syndrome is characterized with the triad of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, pigmented skin lesions, endocrinopathy, and precocious puberty. We report the case of a 14-year-old boy, presenting with sclerotic type of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. Radiological methods including plain X-ray film, MR and whole body bone scintigraphy suggested the diagnosis of MAS. MRI provided more directly perceived images and it was more sensitive in demonstrating the lesion: its shape, contents, especially the size of the affected region. Histopathological study and the identification of mutant gene finally confirmed the diagnostic result.

  3. The reliability and representativity of non-dynamic bone histomorphometry in uremic osteodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, J G; Pødenphant, J; Gammelgaard, Bente

    1993-01-01

    In order to evaluate the reliability and representativity of iliac crest bone biopsy in uremic osteodystrophy, non-dynamic bone histomorphometry was performed post-mortem on the right and left iliac crests and the 3rd lumbar vertebra in 20 patients with chronic uremia. High (> 0.8) right-left cor......In order to evaluate the reliability and representativity of iliac crest bone biopsy in uremic osteodystrophy, non-dynamic bone histomorphometry was performed post-mortem on the right and left iliac crests and the 3rd lumbar vertebra in 20 patients with chronic uremia. High (> 0.8) right...... trabecular bone indices are reliable variables and, with the possible exception of bone mass determination, indicative of systemic bone disease. Bone aluminium concentration and cortical bone indices are unreliable measures of uremic bone disease. These reservations apply to the diagnostic use of biopsy...

  4. Oral manifestations of McCune-Albright syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konidena Aravinda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available McCune- Albright Syndrome (MAS is a rare fibrosseous lesion, characterized by a classic triad of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia (PFD, cafι -au-lait macules (CALM and underlying endocrinopathies. We present the oral findings of an interesting case of MAS with relevant review of literature. A 30-year-old male presented to us with swelling of both jaws over a period of two years. Cutaneous examination revealed cafι - au - lait macule over the back, crossing the midline. Skeletal survey showed expansile, osteolytic, mixed radiolucent- radiopaque lesions in skull and jaw bones. Serum alkaline phosphatase was elevated (388 IU/L, with normal calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone and 25 hydroxy vitamin D levels. Diagnosis of McCune- Albright syndrome was made and he was treated with parenteral bisphosphonates (intravenous Zoledronate 4 mg and is under follow up for surgical recontouring of the jaws. Early recognition facilitates better treatment and improves prognosis by reducing the morbidity.

  5. Management of infertility in a patient presenting with ovarian dysfunction and McCune-Albright syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S.E. Laven (Joop); S. Lumbroso; C. Sultan; B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractPersistent autonomous ovarian dysfunction in McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) patients is associated with the development of multiple dominant follicles, premature luteinization, cyst formation, and anovulatory infertility. Due to the mosaic distribution of the mutation,

  6. McCune-Albright syndrome presenting with unilateral macroorchidism and bilateral testicular masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Geetika; Kantawala, Kartikeya; Shinawi, Marwan; Sarwate, Sandhya; Dehner, Louis P

    2010-12-01

    Bilateral synchronous intratesticular masses are rare but can be caused by metastatic disease to the testicle, primary testicular masses or benign etiologies such as congenital adrenal hyperplasia and granulomatous orchitis. We present an unusual case of McCune-Albright syndrome presenting with unilateral testicular enlargement and bilateral testicular masses secondary to Sertoli cell hyperplasia. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of testicular masses secondary to McCune-Albright syndrome.

  7. [Diagnosis of hereditary angioedema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillet, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare disease, potentially life-threatening. It requires a specific treatment. Angioedema without wheals associated with abdominal attacks are very specific of this disease. Antigenemy and functional C1Inhibitor assays are necessary for the diagnosis. The hereditary angioedema with normal C1Inh (type III) is a diagnostic challenge. Bradykinin, secondary to kallikrein-kinin system activation is the key mediator of hereditary angioedema. Female are more symptomatic. Attacks can be induced by menstruations, pregnancies or contraceptive pills.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary spherocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions hereditary spherocytosis hereditary spherocytosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary spherocytosis is a condition that affects red blood cells. ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions hereditary angioedema hereditary angioedema Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary angioedema is a disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of ...

  10. Osteodystrophy in liver cirrhosis. Its demonstration by 99m Tc methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sezai, Shu-ichi; Ishizawa, Suguru; Yoshino, Katsumasa

    1987-10-01

    In order to investigate the osteodystrophy in liver cirrhosis, 21 liver cirrhotic patients having no malignancy and normal renal function were examined by 99m Tc Methylene Diphosphonate (MDP) bone scintigraphy. The cirrhotic subjects consisted of 14 males and 7 females. Their age was 31 - 80, average 55.7 years. The causes of their cirrhotic damage were 1 primary biliary cirrhosis, 9 alcoholic, 2 HB viral and 9 cryptogenic. The contents of their illness showed 9 cases in A, 4 in B and 8 in C of Child's classification. Abnormal hot spot(s) on bone in the cirrhotics could be observed very frequently in 99m Tc MDP bone scintigraphy (47.6 %; 10/21 cases). Those spots were seen more frequently in female and advanced stage of cirrhosis. The number of spot(s) increased also in advanced liver cirrhosis. Serum Ca, P and PTH were in normal range. All of three vitamin D/sub 3/ fractions decreased and especially 1,25 (OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ was depressed more in scinti-positive cases. Metacarpal bone X-p with an alumimum step wedge as a reference was analyzed by a microdensitometry (MD) method (Inoue T et al) and the pattern of osteopathy (i.e. porosis, malacia and poromalacia) was examined according to Sumi Y et al. MD method was not known yet if there was any definite correlation with bone scintigraphy and the osteopathic pattern belonged to border categories. In conclusion, more attension on hepatic osteodystrophy will be significantly necessary due to the fact that it has been found very frequently in liver cirrhosis. 99m Tc MDP bone scintigraphy is a good means for detection of the hepatic osteodystrophy.

  11. Technological testing of calcium carbonate tablets for use in the treatment of renal osteodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Zotto, M; Ragazzi, E; Realdon, N; Dalla Fini, G

    1993-07-01

    Samples of calcium carbonate tablets produced by different manufacturers were subjected to various tests in order to evaluate tablet quality parameters, mostly indicative for calcium availability. Indications about tablet suitability for treatment of renal osteodystrophy in uremic patients were also tested. The disintegration test turned out to be the most useful in evaluating calcium carbonate availability from tablets. Samples from several manufacturers varied in their behaviour to disaggregation. The availability of calcium dissolved in gastric fluid and the extent of phosphorus binding appeared to depend on disintegration behaviour.

  12. Hereditary urea cycle abnormality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitro so the specific genetic cause is known. Teamwork between parents, the affected child, and doctors can help prevent severe illness. Alternative Names Abnormality of the urea cycle - hereditary; Urea cycle - hereditary abnormality Images Male urinary system Urea cycle References Lichter-Konecki ...

  13. The Role of Serum Cytokines in the Pathogenesis of Hepatic Osteodystrophy in Male Cirrhotic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Riza Soylu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In this study, we aimed to investigate the possible role of serum cytokines in the development of hepatic osteodystrophy. Matherial and Methods. 44 consecutive male cirrhotic patients (17 alcoholic, 20 hepatitis B, 7 hepatitis C, 15 age- and sex-matched chronic alcoholics without liver disease, and 17 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included in the study during one year period. Bone mineral density was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry in the lumbar vertebrate and femoral neck. Serum interleukin levels were measured by ELISA method. Results. Although osteopenia frequency between our cirrhotic patients was 20%, there was no difference in T-scores among the controls and other groups. Serum interleukin-1, interleukin-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels were not different between all groups. Serum interleukin-2 and interleukin-6 levels were higher in the cirrhotics than controls (P<0.001. However, there were no significant difference between osteopenic and nonosteopenic cirrhotics. Conclusion. According to the results of the study in this small population of 44 male cirrhotic patients, frequency of hepatic osteopenia is small and serum interleukins 1, 2, 6, 8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha may not play a role in the pathogenesis of hepatic osteodystrophy. Further studies in which large number of patients involved are necessary in this field.

  14. Osteosarcoma in a pregnant patient with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Ippei; Yamauchi, Mika; Yano, Shozo; Imanishi, Yasuo; Kitazawa, Riko; Nariai, Yoshiki; Araki, Asuka; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Inaba, Masaaki; Maruyama, Riruke; Yamaguchi, Toru; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2009-09-01

    Malignant transformation of fibrous dysplasia is very rare and has not been previously described in patients with McCune-Albright syndrome in the absence of radiation treatment during gestation. Here, we report a 38-year-old pregnant woman with McCune-Albright syndrome and acromegaly accompanied by osteosarcoma. The patient was in the 6th week of pregnancy, when she visited our hospital. She had multiple fibrous dysplasia, skin pigmentation, and acromegaly. The markedly high bone turnover rate during pregnancy tended to decrease after a normal delivery. Fibrous dysplasia of the lower jaw rapidly increased in the 37th week of pregnancy, and the tumor was surgically resected after delivery. Pathological examination of the resected tumor revealed fibrous dysplasia admixed with osteosarcoma containing chondroblastic and osteoblastic tissue. We firstly reported a case of osteosarcoma in a patient with McCune-Albright syndrome, which rapidly progressed during pregnancy.

  15. Síndrome de McCune Albright

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milvia Castillo Guerrero

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de McCune-Albright es una enfermedad esporádica de causa genética, no hereditaria, clínicamente caracterizada por displasia fibrosa poliostótica, manchas de color café con leche y desórdenes endocrinos, tales como hipertiroidismo y pubertad precoz. Se reporta el caso de un paciente masculino de 10 años, que presentó múltiples fracturas óseas desde los seis meses de edad, hipertiroidismo y desnutrición severa, que causaron retardo en su crecimiento y desarrollo. El proceso de diagnóstico fue demorado por su inusual forma de presentación, pero su evolución después de iniciar el tratamiento fue favorable. Se presenta el caso por la baja frecuencia de este trastorno, asociado a complicaciones endocrino-metabólicas graves que causan la muerte, si no se diagnostica y se trata precozmente

  16. Allergic manifestations and cutaneous histamine responses in patients with McCune Albright syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, Jill D.; Turpin, Angela L.; Sands, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Background McCune Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare disorder characterized by precocious puberty, café-au-lait spots, and fibrous dysplasia. Its cause is an activating mutation in the GNAS gene, encoding a subunit of the stimulatory G protein, Gsalpha (Gsα). The action of any mediator that signals via Gsα and cyclic AMP can be up regulated in MAS. We had observed gastritis, gastroesophageal reflux, and anaphylaxis in McCune Albright patients. Objective As histamine is known to signal via hist...

  17. [Developments in hereditary neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubourg, O

    2012-12-01

    Hereditary sensorimotor neuropathies, or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) comprise a group of diseases with heterogeneous clinical, electrophysiological and genetic expression. They are classified by the mode of inheritance (autosomal dominant, X-linked dominant, autosomal recessive) and their electrophysiological characteristics taking into account the speed of motor conduction of the median nerve (demyelinating, intermediary and axonal forms). Certain purely motor forms are called spinal CMT or hereditary distal motor neuropathy, or distal spinal amyotrophy. CMT involving an important sensorial component, trophic disorders, or signs of dysautonomia are included in the classification of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

  18. [Hereditary optic neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milea, D; Verny, C

    2012-10-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are a group of heterogeneous conditions affecting both optic nerves, with an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-related or mitochondrial transmission. The two most common non-syndromic hereditary optic neuropathies (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and autosomal dominant optic atrophy) are very different in their clinical presentation and their genetic transmission, leading however to a common, non-specific optic nerve atrophy. Beyond the optic atrophy-related visual loss, which is the clinical hallmark of this group of diseases, other associated neurological signs are increasingly recognized.

  19. McCune-Albright Syndrome:2 Cases and Literature Review%McCune-Albright 综合征2例并文献复习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫淯淳; 袁新宇

    2010-01-01

    @@ McCune-Albright综合征(McCune-Albright Syndrome, MAS)是一种散发疾病,以多发骨纤维异常增殖症、皮肤牛奶咖啡斑和高功能性内分泌疾病为特点.本病较为罕见,国内至今仅见33例报告.近日本院收治2例,报告如下.

  20. Renal Osteodystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Metin Terzibaşoğlu

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic renal insufficiency is a functional definition which is characterized by irreversible and progressive decreasing in renal functions. This impairment is in collaboration with glomeruler filtration rate and serum creatinine levels. Besides this, different grades of bone metabolism disorders develop in chronic renal insufficiency. Pathologic changes in bone tissue due to loss of renal paranchyme is interrelated with calcium, phosphorus vitamine-D and parathyroid hormone. Clinically we can see high turnover bone disease, low turnover bone disease, osteomalacia, osteosclerosis and osteoporosis in renal osteodystropy. In this article we aimed to review pathology of bone metabolism disorders due to chronic renal insufficiency, clinic aspects and treatment approaches briefly.

  1. Maxillary fibrous dysplasia associated with McCune-Albright syndrome. A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wójcik Sylwia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available McCune Albright syndrome (MCA is a rare complication of genetic origin. The authors present a case study of a patient with MCA diagnosed with multifocal fibrous dysplasia in his limb and craniofacial bones. The symptoms of the disease in the patient’s facial and oral tissue and the treatment administered have been described.

  2. Course and differential diagnosis of the McCune-Albright syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedel, B.; Weickert, H.

    1986-05-01

    The McCune-Albright syndrome consists of a combination of fibrous dysplasia of bone and endocrine lesions with abnormalities of pigmentation. The condition is rare and may be missed, as happened in our case. The case showed extreme skeletal deformities, menarche at one year and peculiar histological appearances.

  3. Maxillary fibrous dysplasia associated with McCune-Albright syndrome. A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Sylwia; Koszowski, Rafał; Drozdowska, Bogna; Śmieszek-Wilczewska, Joanna; Raczkowska-Siostrzonek, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    McCune Albright syndrome (MCA) is a rare complication of genetic origin. The authors present a case study of a patient with MCA diagnosed with multifocal fibrous dysplasia in his limb and craniofacial bones. The symptoms of the disease in the patient's facial and oral tissue and the treatment administered have been described.

  4. Maxillary fibrous dysplasia associated with McCune-Albright syndrome. A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Wójcik Sylwia; Koszowski Rafał; Drozdowska Bogna; Śmieszek-Wilczewska Joanna; Raczkowska-Siostrzonek Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    McCune Albright syndrome (MCA) is a rare complication of genetic origin. The authors present a case study of a patient with MCA diagnosed with multifocal fibrous dysplasia in his limb and craniofacial bones. The symptoms of the disease in the patient’s facial and oral tissue and the treatment administered have been described.

  5. Value of bone scan in the McCune-Albright syndrome. Report of a case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edeburn, G.F.; Mortensson, W.

    Bone scintigraphy proved valuable in diagnosing McCune-Albright's syndrome in a 6-year-old girl by detecting multiple, non-symptomatic foci in the skull, axial skeleton and in the extremities. Subsequent roentgen examination showed abnormal bone structure in the affected areas, consistent with fibrous dysplasia.

  6. Hereditary Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, LenhAnh P.; Grundfast, Kenneth M.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses inheritance patterns in hearing loss, epidemiology, clues to genetic causes, locating genes that cause hereditary disorders, genes related to hearing loss disorders in individuals with Usher syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, Branchio-oto-renal and Pendred syndromes, and the significance of finding…

  7. Hereditary Angioedema in Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Line; Bygum, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare inherited disease that is often difficult to diagnose. We report a case of a 9-year-old boy with a spontaneous mutation causing HAE, diagnosed after a life-threatening episode of angioedema of the head and upper respiratory tract after a 5-year history...

  8. Managing hereditary ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of recent developments in the management of hereditary ovarian cancer. Until recently, intensive screening of the ovaries was recommended to mutation carriers and their first-degree female relatives. However, since screening is not effective in detecting early-s

  9. McCune-Albright Syndrome: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moein Mobini

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS is a rare, heterogenous, clinical condition caused by a rare genetic mutation. The disorder is more common in females and is characterized by a triad of cutaneous, bone and endocrine abnormalities.  We describe a girl patient with MAS having precocious puberty and multiple cafe-au-lait macules and deforming polyostotic fibrous dysplasia of bone. Clinical presentation and X-ray finding were strongly diagnostic for MAS, Patients with McCune-Albright syndrome reach the adult age with a significant burden of the disease that continuously reduces their quality of life. Skeletal deformities, fractures, hyperthyroidism, and hyperestrogenism are just few of the many challenges in the management of these patients. These disorders with close observation and early detection can be controlled.

  10. Primary bimorphic adrenocortical disease: cause of hypercortisolism in McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, J Aidan; Young, William F; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2011-09-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait skin spots, and precocious puberty) is a genetically mosaic disorder with populations of mutant and normal cells in affected organs. Cushing syndrome, a rare feature of the condition, usually affects infants and is the result of corticotropin-independent primary bilateral adrenal disease, usually interpreted as nodular adrenocortical hyperplasia. In this study of 9 patients with Cushing syndrome and McCune-Albright syndrome, light microscopy revealed a characteristic bimorphic pattern of diffuse and nodular hyperplasia and a distinctive form of cortical atrophy with apparent zona glomerulosa hyperplasia in 8 patients, all very young. The pattern could be explained by the presence of a mosaic distribution of mutant and normal cells in the adrenal glands. The findings are different from those in inherited or other forms of genetically caused Cushing syndrome. The ninth patient, aged 17 years, had an adrenal adenoma and diffuse cortical hyperplasia in each adrenal gland.

  11. Effect of rapamycin on hepatic osteodystrophy in rats with portasystemic shunting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Schalk W van der Merwe; Del Kahn; Enid G Shephard; Maritha J Kotze; Nico P de Villiers; Stephen Hough; Maria M Conradie; Robert Bond; Brenda J Olivier; Elongo Fritz; Martin Nieuwoudt; Rhena Delport; Tomas Slavik; Gert Engelbrecht

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study if T-cell activation related to portasystemic shunting causes osteodast-mediated bone loss through RANKL-dependent pathways. We also investigated if T-cell inhibition using rapamycin would protect against bone loss in rats.METHODS: Portasystemic shunting was performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats and rapamycin 0.1 mg/kg was administered for 15 wk by gavage. Rats received powderized chow and supplemental feeds to prevent the effects of malnutrition on bone composition. Weight gain and growth was restored after surgery in shunted animals. At termination, biochemical parameters of bone turnover and quantitative bone histology were assessed. Markers of T-cell activation, inflammatory cytokine production, and RANKL-dependent pathways were measured. In addition, the roles of IGF-1 and hypogonadism were investigated.RESULTS: Portasystemic shunting caused low turnover osteoporosis that was RANKL independent. Bone resorbing cytokine levels, including IL-1, IL-6 and TNFα,were not increased in serum and TNFα and RANKL expression were not upregulated in PBMC. Portasystemic shunting increased the circulating CD8+ T-cell population. Rapamycin decreased the circulating CD8+T-cell population, increased CD8+ CD25+ T-regulatory cell population and improved all parameters of bone turnover.CONCLUSION: Osteoporosis caused by portasystemic shunting may be partially ameliorated by rapamycin in the rat model of hepatic osteodystrophy.

  12. Differences in Bone Quality between High versus Low Turnover Renal Osteodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Daniel S. [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Pienkowski, David [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Faugere, Marie-Claude [Albert B. Chandler Medical Center; Malluche, Hartmut H. [Albert B. Chandler Medical Center

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal bone turnover is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but its effects on bone quality remain unclear. This study sought to quantify the relationship between abnormal bone turnover and bone quality. Iliac crest bone biopsies were obtained from CKD-5 patients on dialysis with low (n=18) or high (n=17) turnover, and from volunteers (n=12) with normal turnover and normal kidney function. Histomorphometric methods were used to quantify the microstructural parameters; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation were used to quantify the material and mechanical properties in bone. Reduced mineral-to-matrix ratio, mineral crystal size, stiffness and hardness were observed in bone with high turnover compared to bone with normal or low turnover. Decreased cancellous bone volume and trabecular thickness were seen in bone with low turnover compared to bone with normal or high turnover. Bone quality, as defined by its microstructural, material, and mechanical properties, is related to bone turnover. These data suggest that turnover related alterations in bone quality may contribute to the known diminished mechanical competence of bone in CKD patients, albeit from different mechanisms for bone with high (material abnormality) vs. low (microstructural alteration) turnover. The present findings suggest that improved treatments for renal osteodystrophy should seek to avoid low or high bone turnover and aim for turnover rates as close to normal as possible.

  13. Applicability of Fractal Dimension Analysis in Dental Radiographs for the Evaluation of Renal Osteodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Maurício Anderson; Ribeiro Rosa, Edvaldo Antônio; Johann, Aline Cristina Batista Rodrigues; Grégio, Ana Maria Trindade; Trevilatto, Paula Cristina; Azevedo-Alanis, Luciana Reis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To test the capacity of the digital tool, fractal dimension (FD) analysis, in identifying subtle differences in bone pattern in patients with renal osteodystrophy (RO), correlated with the time of hemodialysis, in different regions of interest, delineated on panoramic and periapical radiographs. Study design: A total of 34 patients with chronic renal disease undergoing hemodialysis were submitted to panoramic and periapical radiographs. Different regions of interest were delineated on the mandibular body and ramus. FD was analyzed by means of the software program ImageJ and correlated with the time of hemodialysis. Results: The sample consisted of 34 subjects. The time of hemodialysis varied from 1 to 286 months. There was significant correlation between the time of hemodialysis and the FD values in the region delineated in the mandibular angle (r = 0.498; p = 0.003) and this was shown in the periapical radiographs as well (r = -0.349; p = 0.043). Conclusions: FD analysis was a useful tool in detecting alterations caused by RO in bone pattern, in panoramic and periapical radiographs.

  14. Awake Tracheal Intubation in an 8-Year-Old Girl with McCune-Albright Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohman, J Kyle; Segura, Leal

    2013-10-01

    An 8-year-old girl with McCune-Albright syndrome presented for resection of a very large fibrous dysplasia mass of the face with significant distortion of the airway anatomy. She had significant obstructive sleep apnea with daytime somnolence and hemoglobin oxygen desaturations while breathing room air preoperatively. We were able to successfully manage her airway by providing IV sedation, topical anesthesia of the airway, and oral fiberoptic intubation in close collaboration with our otorhinolaryngology colleagues.

  15. Severe arterial hypertension: a possible complication of McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, Yasuhisa; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Mori, Ikuko; Kikuchi, Toru; Michigami, Toshimi; Imanishi, Yasuo; Satomura, Kenichi; Ida, Shinobu; Ozono, Keiichi

    2009-07-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome is characterized by café-au-lait spot, multiple endocrine hyperfunction, and polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. A somatic point mutation of Gsalpha protein leads to an increase in the Gsalpha-associated hormone activity in McCune-Albright syndrome. Because cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate stimulates the dopamine beta hydroxylase gene, an activating mutation of the Gsalpha protein may cause the hyperproduction of norepinephrine via dopamine. We report on a 9-year-old girl with McCune-Albright syndrome complicated by severe arterial hypertension. The urinary excretion of norepinephrine was 5- to 10-fold higher than in age-matched controls. Meta-iodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) revealed no hot spots. These findings suggest that severe hypertension might be due to an activating mutation of Gsalpha protein in sympathetic ganglia. Because of the reported association of GNAS1 gene polymorphism with hypertension, our patient provides further evidence for a role of Gsalpha protein in hypertension.

  16. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  17. Human hereditary hepatic porphyrias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmann, Yves; Puy, Hervé

    2002-11-01

    The human hereditary hepatic porphyrias are diseases due to marked deficiencies of enzymes in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Porphyrias can be classified as either hepatic or erythroid, depending on the major production site of porphyrins or their precursors. The pathogenesis of inherited hepatic porphyrias has now been defined at the molecular level. Some gene carriers are vulnerable to a range of exogenous and endogenous factors, which may trigger neuropsychiatric and/or cutaneous symptoms. Early diagnosis is of prime importance since it makes way for counselling. In this article we present an overview of recent advances on hepatic porphyrias: 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria, acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), hereditary coproporphyria (HC), and variegate porphyria (VP).

  18. [Hereditary peripheral neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, Jean-Michel; Tazir, Mériem; Calvo, Judith; Funalot, Benoît

    2009-09-01

    Currently more than 30 genes are known to be responsible for genetically determined neuropathies. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most frequent of these hereditary neuropathies, with a prevalence of 4.7 to 36 per 100 000. In its demyelinating forms (CMT1), approximately 70% of cases are associated with a duplication of the PMP22gene. In its axonal forms (CMT2), 10-20% of the cases may be associated with a mutation of the MFN2gene. For North African patients with recessive transmission, a mutation of the LMNA gene must be sought. It is essential to stress the great variability of the phenotype--clinical, electrophysiological, and histologic--between and within families. A detailed analysis of these criteria, together with consideration of ethnic origin, may guide the search for the causal mutation. Whether the case involves certainly hereditary transmission or a sporadic form, it is desirable to be able to examine the maximum number of the patient's kin, both clinically and electrophysiologically. The forms with recessive transmission usually have a very early onset and are more serious than the dominant forms. The early- and very early-onset forms of CMT are increasingly better distinguished: congenital hypomyelination neuropathy (mutations of PMP22, MPZ or EGR2), or more axonal forms, including SMARD1 (Spinal muscle atrophy with respiratory distress; mutations of IGHMBP2) and EOHMSN (Early-onset hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy; mutations of MFN2). The prevention of cutaneous (ulcerations), bone, and amputation complications is very important in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies, because of the severity of the sensory disorders.

  19. Lessons from McCune-Albright syndrome-associated intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms: : GNAS-activating mutations in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvanescu, Alina; Cros, Jérôme; Ronot, Maxime; Hentic, Olivia; Grybek, Virginie; Couvelard, Anne; Levy, Philippe; Chanson, Philippe; Ruszniewski, Philippe; Sauvanet, Alain; Gaujoux, Sebastien

    2014-08-01

    GNAS-activating mutations are reported in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) and in McCune-Albright syndrome, characterized by fibrous dysplasia, precocious puberty, and café au lait spots. Recently, IPMNs have been described as a McCune-Albright syndrome-associated tumor, present in about 15% of patients. The aim of the present work was to assess the prevalence of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and McCune-Albright syndrome among patients operated on for presumptive sporadic IPMNs. All patients operated on for IPMNs between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2012, with available imaging were retrospectively screened for polyostotic fibrous dysplasia based on their preoperative abdominal or thoracoabdominal spiral computed tomography images. Systematic screening of 272 patients operated on for IPMNs revealed 1 patient with axial and peripheral polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and café au lait spots on clinical examination suggestive of McCune-Albright syndrome. This patient had been operated on for an unusually large invasive colloid adenocarcinoma (pT3N0M0 R0) derived from an intestinal subtype GNAS-mutated IPMN. The patient underwent adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine for 6 months and was alive without recurrence 6 years later. Besides providing additional evidence of a syndromic IPMN as a feature of McCune-Albright syndrome, this observation is further evidence of the functional oncogenic consequences of GNAS mutations in the pancreas.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions hereditary diffuse gastric cancer hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited disorder that greatly increases ...

  1. Neue radiologische und serologische Methoden zur Diagnose der renalen Osteodystrophie bei Dialysepatienten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cejka D

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mit Abnahme der Nierenfunktion steigt die Prävalenz der renalen Osteodystrophie (ROD, im Dialysestadium ist fast jeder Patient von ROD betroffen. Dialysepatienten haben verglichen mit der Normalbevölkerung ein 4-fach erhöhtes Risiko, eine Oberschenkelhalsfraktur zu erleiden. Die ROD ist eine Urämie-bedingte Erkrankung des Knochens, die zu Veränderungen des Knochenstoffwechsels („turnover“ [T], der Mineralisierung („mineralization“ [M] und des Knochenvolumens („volume“ [V] führen kann. Bislang ist die Untersuchung all dieser Veränderungen nur mittels invasiver Knochenbiopsie mit anschließender Histomorphometrie und TMV-Klassifizierung möglich. Klinisch verfügbare Methoden wie Knochendichtemessung („dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry“ [DXA] oder Bestimmung von Parathormon beziehungsweise von Knochenstoffwechselparametern zeigen niedrige Sensitivitäten/Spezifitäten bezüglich der korrekten Klassifizierung der ROD. Unter den neuen radiologischen Methoden erscheint die „high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography“ (HR-pQCT eine vielversprechende Methode. In einer Studie war die HR-pQCT der konventionellen DXA bezüglich der Unterscheidung zwischen Dialysepatienten mit und ohne Vorgeschichte einer Low-trauma-Fraktur deutlich überlegen. Unter den neu entdeckten Knochenstoffwechselmarkern hat die Messung von Sclerostin einen hohen Vorhersagewert für das Vorliegen einer „highturnover bone disease“ gezeigt. Diesen interessanten Ansätzen zum Trotz bedarf es weiterer Forschung auf dem Gebiet. Insbesondere gibt es bislang keine Methode, die mit hoher Sicherheit Low-impact-Frakturen bei Dialysepatienten vorhersagen kann.

  2. The relevance of mineralization lag time in the evaluation of histologic changes in renal osteodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbey, N P; Chazan, J A; London, M R; Pono, L; Abuelo, J G

    1993-04-01

    We examined bone biopsies from 47 patients on chronic hemodialysis, and analyzed the histomorphometric and biochemical findings and histologic quantitation of bone aluminium, looking primarily at mineralization lag time (Mlt) to evaluate its usefulness in categorization of renal osteodystrophy (ROD). The patients were categorized as having either relatively normal Mlt ( 100 days, n = 13 patients). The group with relatively normal Mlt showed significantly higher C-terminal parathyroid hormone (PTHc) levels (26,141 +/- 19,270 vs 7,226 +/- 6,073 and 4,434 +/- 4,000 pg/ml) than the moderately or markedly prolonged Mlt groups (p < .01) and was associated with histologic characteristics of osteitis fibrosa or mild hyperparathyroidism (BFR/BS range 0.146-0.947 mcm3/mcm2/d). The group with markedly prolonged Mlt included one patient with classic and 11 with adynamic osteomalacia (BFR/BS range 0.009-0.099) and had greater bone aluminum (Al.S/OS 35.3 +/- 26.7% vs 7.2 +/- 9.0%) than the normal Mlt group (p < .01). The group with moderately prolonged Mlt included two patients with aplastic bone disease (Mlt 80.0 and 84.6 days, and Al.S/OS 100.0 and 72.3%) and 11 patients with features of hyperparathyroidism and osteomalacia (BFR/BS range 0.068-0.243) with variable but generally intermediate bone aluminum deposition (Al.S/OS 22.5 +/- 19.9%). Like BFR/BS and other dynamic parameters Mlt correlates with morphologic types of ROD which primarily reflect bone turnover, but it may also suggest varying degrees of mineralization impairment in a spectrum ranging from high to low turnover types of ROD. Its usefulness in this respect should not be overlooked.

  3. Nutritional education for management of osteodystrophy (NEMO) trial: Design and patient characteristics, Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavetian, Mirey; Abboud, Saade; Elzein, Hafez; Haydar, Sarah; de Vries, Nanne

    2014-02-01

    THIS STUDY AIMS TO DETERMINE THE EFFECT OF A TRAINED DEDICATED DIETITIAN ON CLINICAL OUTCOMES AMONG LEBANESE HEMODIALYSIS (HD) PATIENTS: and thus demonstrate a viable developing country model. This paper describes the study protocol and baseline data. The study was a multicenter randomized controlled trial with parallel-group design involving 12 HD units: assigned to cluster A (n = 6) or B (n = 6). A total of 570 patients met the inclusion criteria. Patients in cluster A were randomly assigned as per dialysis shift to the following: Dedicated Dietitian (DD) (n = 133) and Existing Practice (EP) (n = 138) protocols. Cluster B patients (n = 299) received Trained Hospital Dietitian (THD) protocol. Dietitians of the DD and THD groups were trained by the research team on Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative nutrition guidelines. DD protocol included: individualized nutrition education for 2 hours/month/HD patient for 6 months focusing on renal osteodystrophy and using the Trans-theoretical theory for behavioral change. EP protocol included nutrition education given to patients by hospital dietitians who were blinded to the study. The THD protocol included nutrition education to patients given by hospital dietitian as per the training received but within hospital responsibilities, with no set educational protocol or tools. Baseline data revealed that 40% of patients were hyperphosphatemics (> 5.5 mg/dl) with low dietary adherence and knowledge of dietary P restriction in addition to inadequate daily protein intake (58.86%± 33.87% of needs) yet adequate dietary P intake (795.52 ± 366.94 mg/day). Quality of life (QOL) ranged from 48-75% of full health. Baseline differences between the 3 groups revealed significant differences in serum P, malnutrition status, adherence to diet and P chelators and in 2 factors of the QOL: physical and social functioning. The data show room for improvement in the nutritional status of the patients. The NEMO trial may be able to

  4. HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkelkamp, EJ; Yapp, TR; Powell, LW

    2000-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of the iron metabolism Screening studies indicate that it has a prevalence of one in 200 to 400, depending on the population studied, and a carrier rate of about one in seven to one in 10. Feder et al identified the hereditary hemochromatosis

  5. Hereditary angioedema in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouillet Laurence

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women with hereditary angioedema (HAE are more likely to be symptomatic that men. Hormonal factors (puberty, contraception, pregnancy,.... play a significant role in the precipitation or worsening of the condition in women. So, combined contraceptive pills are not indicated and progestogen pill must be preferred. During pregnancy, attack rate can increase (38-48% of women. C1Inhibitor concentrate and tranexamic acid can be used during pregnancy. Attenuated androgens for long term prophylaxis are effective but side effects appear more often in female patients. These side effects are dose dependant and can be attenuated by titrating the dose down the lowest effective level.

  6. Sudden onset vision loss in an 8-year-old female with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, David; Wysong, Ashley; Lai, Jennifer; Alcorn, Deborah M; Benjamin, Latanya T

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of an 8-year-old girl with large irregular café au lait macules on the right cheek and right lower extremity presenting with sudden onset vision loss and found to have polyostotic fibrous dysplasia on imaging. The classic triad of McCune-Albright syndrome is discussed along with the importance of recognition in patients with partial presentation. This case also highlights a rare and potentially devastating neurologic complication of McCune-Albright syndrome, as well as the need for early diagnosis and continual surveillance in these patients.

  7. Cadmium toxicity to ringed seals (Phoca hispida): an epidemiological study of possible cadmium-induced nephropathy and osteodystrophy in ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from Qaanaaq in Northwest Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne-Hansen, C; Dietz, R; Leifsson, P S

    2002-01-01

    or osteodystrophy. This might be explained by the composition of the ringed seals diet, which contains high levels of vitamin D, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, selenium and protein. These elements are all likely to counteract cadmium-induced damage. It is speculated that ringed seal are not particularly vulnerable...

  8. McCune-Albright syndrome: A case report in a male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Krina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS is a rare, heterogenous, clinical condition caused by a rare genetic mutation. The disorder is more common in females and is characterized by a triad of cutaneous, bone and endocrine abnormalities. We describe a male patient with MAS having multiple cafι-au-lait macules and deforming polyostotic fibrous dysplasia involving long bones of the limbs, skull and spine without any endocrine abnormality. Severe bone deformities involving almost all bones have not been described previously and this prompted us to present the current case.

  9. McCune-Albright Syndrome临床研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾玉林; 董俊华

    2007-01-01

    @@ 1937年美国医生McCune和Albright分别报告了一种具多发性骨纤维发育不良、非隆起性皮肤褐色素沉着和性早熟三大特点的疾病,后来被命名为McCune-Albright Syndrome,为一种罕见的临床疾病.主要表现为内分泌功能障碍、骨纤维发育不良和皮肤牛奶咖啡样色素斑三类症状.

  10. Endoscopic Decompression for Optic Neuropathy in McCune-Albright Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Jung-Hoon; Kong, Doo-Sik; Seol, Ho Jun; Shin, Hyung Jin

    2014-09-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is characterized by a triad of poly/monostotic fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait macules and hyperfunctioning endocrinopathies including human growth hormone excess. Acromegaly as a manifestation of endocrine hyperfunction with MAS is uncommon. Surgical excision may be challenging due to the associated severe fibrous dysplasia of the skull base. Through the endoscopic procedures, we treated a case of MAS presenting with compressive optic neuropathy due to fibrous dysplasia and acromegaly caused by growth hormone secreting pituitary adenoma. We reviewed the literature on GH excess in MAS to highlight its surgical and medical challenges.

  11. Effects of unfractionated heparin on renal osteodystrophy and vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yan; Zhang, Hao; Li, Yingbin; Li, Qingnan; Zuo, Li

    2014-01-01

    Unfractionated heparin (UFH) is the most widely used anticoagulant in hemodialysis for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Many studies have verified that UFH can induce bone loss in subjects with normal bone, but few have focused on its effect on renal osteodystrophy. We therefore investigated this issue in adenine-induced CKD rats. As CKD also impairs mineral metabolism systemically, we also studied the impacts of UFH on serum markers of CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) and vascular calcification. We administered low and high doses of UFH (1U/g and 2U/g body weight, respectively) to CKD rats and compared them with CKD controls. At sacrifice, the serum markers of CKD-MBD did not significantly differ among the two UFH CKD groups and the CKD control group. The mean bone mineral densities (BMDs) of the total femur and a region of interest (ROI) constituted of trabecular and cortical bone were lower in the high-dose UFH (H-UFH) CKD group than in the CKD control group (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). The BMD of the femoral ROI constituted of cortical bone did not differ between the H-UFH CKD group and the CKD control group. Histomorphometrical changes in the CKD rats indicated secondary hyperparathyroidism, and the femoral trabecular bone volume, but not cortical bone volume, significantly decreased with increasing UFH dose. The same decreasing trend was found in osteoblast parameters, and an increasing trend was found in osteoclast parameters; however, most differences were not significant. Moreover, no distinct statistical differences were found in the comparison of vascular calcium or phosphorus content among the CKD control group and the two UFH CKD groups. Therefore, we concluded that UFH could induce bone loss in CKD rats with secondary hyperparathyroidism, mainly by reducing the trabecular volume and had little effect on cortical bone volume. The underlying mechanism might involve inhibition of osteoblast activity and promotion of osteoclast activity

  12. RELATIONS BETWEEN OBESITY AND RENAL OSTEODYSTROPHY: REGULATION OF BONE METABOLISM BY LEPTIN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina S. Martins

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the bone tissue is now recognized as the protagonist in the complex control mechanism energy because their hormone interactions with the adipose tissue. Leptin is an adipokine and its production is proportional to the amount of adipose tissue. Although leptin is associated with obesity, and this is recognized as the protector of bone tissue, little can be said about the inter-relationship in chronic kidney disease. In cross-sectional study, 32 hemodialysis patients at Botucatu Medical School - State University of Sao Paulo - Brazil, were evaluated anthropometrically regarding the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (based on the harmonization of criteria IDF, AHA/NHLBI, ATP III, biochemically and bone biopsy. Due to variability of serum leptin was applied also values of the natural logarithm (Ln of leptin corrected by BMI. In comparisons was used Kruskal-Wallis, Pearson correlations were performed using regression analysis and considered the Ln leptin / BMI as the dependent variable was considered significant with p value less than 5%. Positive correlations of leptin have been shown in females (p=0.006, body fat percentage (p<0.001, serum albumin (p=0.035, and markers of metabolic syndrome, such as total cholesterol (p=0.01 , triglycerides (p=0.02 basal insulin (p=0.05 and BMI (p<0.001. About renal osteodystrophy, the sample has higher prevalence (69% of high turnover diseases - osteitis fibrosa cystica and mixed bone disease. BMI, percent body fat, leptin and Ln leptin/BMI showed no influence on the bone turnover and osteoporosis. In regression analysis Ln leptin/BMI was independently associated with age (p=0.006 and individuals diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (p=0.002, histological classifications of bone tissue showed no associations. In conclusion, this was a preliminary result which reinforced the strong and independent relationship between leptin and metabolic syndrome in chronic renal failure, however, has not found evidence of

  13. The Evaluation of Renal Osteodystrophy in Patients on Hemodialysis by Biochemical and Radiological Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Mandıroğlu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We planned this study in order to evaluate the radiological and biochemical parameters that may be useful in the early diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy in the patients with chronic renal failure, prospectively. Meterial and Methods: In this study, 50 cases on hemodialysis due to chronic renal failure were included and 50 cases without renal and bone pathology were included as control group. Serum levels of calcium, phosphate, alkalen phosphatase, βm, osteocalcin (BGP and intact parathormon (iPTH were measured. Right hand graphies of both case and control groups were taken by magnifying techniques. Bone mineral densities (BMD of lumbar vertebra and femur neck were calculated by DEXA method. Results: The average disease duration and the average of duration of hemodialysis of cases were 8.38±5.61years and 6.9±4.01years, respectively. There were signi cant differences between case and control groups in all biochemical parameters, except calcium levels (p<0.05. There were a negative correlation between iPTH and BMD (r=-0.4, p<0.05, and pozitif correlations between iPTH and BGP (r=0.6, p<0.05, and between PTH and β-m (r=0.5, p<0.05. A low level negative but statistically signi cant correlation between dialysis duration and femur neck bone mineral density was determined (r=0.2, p<0.05. There were positive correlations between dialysis duration and PTH levels (r:0.3, p<0.05, and between dialysis duration and β2 m (r=0.4, p<0.05. In the hand graphies, osteopenia, subperiostal resorption, radial artery calci cation and endoosteal resorption were seen. Ostepenia was determined in 80% of our cases, however, subperiostal resorption was found in 58% of patients. The cases that had iPTH levels over than 200 pg/ml and cases that have osteopenia have sensitivity of 93% and spesi ty of 92% for RO diagnosis. Sensitivity and spesi ty for high iPTH-BGP levels were 90.3% and 87%, respectively. Sensitivity and spesi ty in the evaluation of

  14. Envolvimento orbitário difuso por displasia fibrosa na síndrome de McCune Albright: relato de caso McCune Albright syndrome - diffuse orbital involvement due to fibrous dysplasia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Alberto Costanzi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A displasia fibrosa é considerada uma desordem óssea benigna, de progressão lenta na qual há substituição de osso normal por tecido fibroso Quando associada a hiperpigmentação de pele e distúrbios endocrinológicos denomina-se síndrome de McCune Albright. Relatamos um caso raro de síndrome de McCune Albright em uma criança do sexo masculino que apesar de apresentar mínimas distorções crânio-facial externas, mostrou um envolvimento difuso e bilateral das órbitas.Fibrous dysplasia is a benign, slowly progressive bone disorder, in which normal bone is replaced by fibrous tissue. It is called McCune Albright syndrome when associated with skin hyperpigmentation and endocrinological disorders. We report a rare case of McCune Albright syndrome in a boy, who presented bilateral and diffuse involvement of orbits but few external craniofacial distortions.

  15. DESIGNING AN OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION AND COFIRING SAWDUST WITH COAL AT ALBRIGHT GENERATING STATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Payette; D. Tillman

    2003-07-01

    During the period April 1, 2003--June 30, 2003, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) proceeded with demonstration operations at the Willow Island Generating Station and improvements to the Albright Generating Station cofiring systems. The demonstration operations at Willow Island were designed to document integration of biomass cofiring into commercial operations. The Albright improvements were designed to increase the resource base for the projects, and to address issues that came up during the first year of operations. This report summarizes the activities associated with the Designer Opportunity Fuel program, and demonstrations at Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations.

  16. Hereditary angioedema: Not an allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Bhivgade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is a genetic disorder due to a deficiency or malfunction of C1 esterase inhibitor. We herein describe a case of 25-year-old male who presented with swelling over face since one day. There was history of similar episodes since two years with gradual subsidence of swelling without any treatment. Investigations revealed grossly reduced complement C4 and C1 esterase inhibitor level. Patient was diagnosed to have hereditary angioedema type 1 and started on stanozolol 2 mg three times a day with no recurrence in one year of follow-up. Hereditary angioedema resembles angioedema of an allergic reaction. However, the cause is different.

  17. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  18. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo-Kottler, B; Wissinger, B

    2011-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a rare disease primarily affecting the retinal ganglion cells. In most cases patients with LHON develop permanent visual loss with a large central scotoma in the visual field of both eyes. The optic disc becomes partially or completely pale. At the onset of the disease many patients are considered to suffer from an optic neuritis and are treated under the diagnostic and therapeutic regimen of optic neuritis. LHON is mostly only considered when high dose cortisone therapy fails to be effective or the second eye is affected. Thereafter, molecular genetic analysis will prove LHON in these cases. Detailed anamnesis including pedigree analysis in combination with observance of the peripapillary microangiopathic alterations at the fundus will help to speed up the diagnosis of LHON, but even after exact clinical and molecular genetic diagnosis of LHON some aspects of the disease still remain a mystery today.

  19. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  20. [Mazabraud and McCune-Albright syndromes in association : A case of two very rare orthopaedic tumour entities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, M; Weber, M-A; Mechtersheimer, G; Lehner, B; Renker, E K

    2017-02-21

    We report on a 47-year-old woman with unilateral fibrous dysplasia and three intramuscular masses. Medical imaging revealed possible intramuscular myxomas, so that the suspected diagnosis was Mazabraud syndrome. After biopsy, the suspected diagnosis was verified by histology and molecular pathology. Due to endocrine abnormalities in the patient's medical history, McCune-Albright syndrome has was also verified.

  1. Endoscopic transsphenoidal excision of a GH-PRL-secreting pituitary macroadenoma in a patient with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Manikandan S; Prabhu, Krishna; Chacko, Geeta; Rajaratnam, Simon; Chacko, Ari G

    2012-02-01

    We describe an endoscopic transsphenoidal excision of a GH-PRL-secreting pituitary adenoma and remodeling of frontotemporal fibrous dysplasia in a patient with McCune-Albright syndrome. Sphenoid dysplasia rendered transsphenoidal surgery challenging, but a study of the radiological anatomy and good surgical planning made this feasible. Medical therapy and radiation was required for persistent acromegaly after surgery.

  2. Hereditary Elliptocytosis with Pyropoikilocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turan Bayhan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 17-day-old boy was admitted because of jaundice and anemia. He was born weighing 2900 g subsequent to a term gestation as the fourth child of first-degree cousin parents. The previous history revealed the administration of phototherapy for 4 days starting from the first day of life. Complete blood count revealed hemoglobin (Hb of 6.9 g/dL, hematocrit of 19.8%, mean corpuscular volume (MCV of 87.5 fL, red cell distribution width (RDW of 37%, white blood cell count of 11.4x109/L, and platelet count of 263x109/L. Corrected reticulocyte count was 5.3%. Peripheral blood smear revealed polychromasia and pyropoikilocytosis. Direct antibody test was negative. Erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, and pyrimidine 5’ nucleotidase levels were normal. An erythrocyte transfusion was administered with a diagnosis of non-immune hemolytic anemia and the patient was discharged at the 26th day of life with initiation of folic acid. During his outpatient followup, he required erythrocyte transfusions 2 more times and the last transfusion was performed when he was 3 months old. At a visit 3 months after the last transfusion, his blood count was as follows: Hb of 9.5 g/dL, hematocrit of 28.2%, MCV of 68.2 fL, and RDW of 30.5%. Erythrocyte osmotic fragility was found to be normal and Hb electrophoresis revealed Hb F of 6.6% and Hb A2 of 1.7%. Upon physical examination he had mild jaundice and no splenomegaly. The parents’ blood counts were within normal ranges. Peripheral blood smear revealed prominent elliptocytes and occasional microcytic and fragmented erythrocytes with poikilocytosis (Figure 1. The clinical findings and laboratory results were diagnostic for the hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP type of hereditary elliptocytosis (HE, but in vitro fragmentation testing was not performed

  3. Fuller Albright. His concept of postmenopausal osteoporosis and what came of it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, A P

    1991-08-01

    Fifty years ago Albright contributed the following to understanding osteoporosis: (1) He recognized it as a deficiency of formation, not of mineralization of bone matrix; (2) he observed that 40 of 42 patients with osteoporosis before age 65 were women past menopause or young women postoophorectomy; (3) he concluded that estrogen stimulates osteoblasts (a conclusion later challenged); (4) he demonstrated by metabolic balance studies that estrogen causes a positive calcium balance in postmenopausal osteoporosis; (5) he introduced periodic progesterone to prevent or treat endometrial hyperplasia from prolonged estrogen therapy; and (6) he showed that long-term therapy arrested vertebral damage and height loss in postmenopausal osteoporosis and prevented them if started early. Since Albright's time, more sensitive methods of assessing bone density have replaced conventional roentgenograms. Some large scale trials of estrogen have indicated increased bone density and fewer fractures. Unopposed estrogen increases risk of endometrial cancer and decreases mortality from other cancers, myocardial infarction, stroke, and osteoporosis. Trials of calcitonin, diphosphonates, fluoride, vitamin D, and high calcium intake have not proved more effective than estrogen.

  4. Treatment of Pathological Bone Fractures in a Patient with McCune-Albright Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Kollerova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available McCune-Albright syndrome is a rare genetic disorder with typical skeletal and endocrine manifestations. The disease course is complicated by recurrent fractures resulting from polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and the treatment is thus primarily directed at the reduction of the risk of fractures. However, due to the complex mechanism of the skeletal damage the standard antiporotic therapeutics are ineffective. We report here a case of a 31-year-old female, diagnosed with the McCune-Albright syndrome in early childhood. She was suffering from extensive bone involvement, complicated by recurrent fractures despite the treatment with bisphosphonates. In addition, the disease course was complicated by the impairment of several endocrine functions—precocious puberty, hyperestrogenism, and hyperthyroidism for which a total thyroidectomy was performed. During the operation, two enlarged parathyroid glands were removed. This resulted in severe hypocalcaemia in the postoperative period with a need for supplementation with very high calcium and vitamin D doses. After this episode, the patient has remained free of fractures. We discuss here the corrected thyroid function, the supplementation with unconventionally high doses of vitamin D and calcium, and the termination of bisphosphonates treatment as presumable factors contributing to the reduced fracture risk in this patient.

  5. McCune Albright syndrome in association with excessive GH secretion: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özsu, Elif; Mutlu, Gül Yeşiltepe; Çizmecioğlu, Filiz Mine; Hatun, Şükrü

    2015-06-01

    McCune-Albright Syndrome is a rare syndrome characterized with excessive function of peripheral endocrine organs and activating mutations of the stimulatory G protein alpha subunit are involved in the pathogenesis. The three main findings of the disease include hyperpigmented café au lait spots, fibrous dysplasia and increased endocrine functions and excessive secretion of growth hormone is observed in 21% of the patients. Clinical signs may be missed in these patients because of precocious puberty and craniofacial fibrous dysplasia. Since radiotherapy causes to sarcomatous changes and transsphenoidal surgery may cause to severe thickening in the cranial bones, they are not appropriate treatment options and medical treatment is recommended. Bromocriptine, cabergoline and octreotide or different combinations of these drugs are used in treatment and pegvisomant has also been used in recent years. Here, we present a male patient aged 12 years and 7 months to show gigantism as a rare clinical reflection of McCune-Albright Syndrome with an excessive height (197 cm), café au lait spots, growht hormone levels which could not be supressed with oral glucose tolerance test and increased prolactin levels.

  6. Treatment of Pathological Bone Fractures in a Patient with McCune-Albright Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollerova, Jana; Koller, Tomas; Zelinkova, Zuzana; Kostalova, Ludmila; Payer, Juraj

    2013-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome is a rare genetic disorder with typical skeletal and endocrine manifestations. The disease course is complicated by recurrent fractures resulting from polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and the treatment is thus primarily directed at the reduction of the risk of fractures. However, due to the complex mechanism of the skeletal damage the standard antiporotic therapeutics are ineffective. We report here a case of a 31-year-old female, diagnosed with the McCune-Albright syndrome in early childhood. She was suffering from extensive bone involvement, complicated by recurrent fractures despite the treatment with bisphosphonates. In addition, the disease course was complicated by the impairment of several endocrine functions-precocious puberty, hyperestrogenism, and hyperthyroidism for which a total thyroidectomy was performed. During the operation, two enlarged parathyroid glands were removed. This resulted in severe hypocalcaemia in the postoperative period with a need for supplementation with very high calcium and vitamin D doses. After this episode, the patient has remained free of fractures. We discuss here the corrected thyroid function, the supplementation with unconventionally high doses of vitamin D and calcium, and the termination of bisphosphonates treatment as presumable factors contributing to the reduced fracture risk in this patient.

  7. The clinical spectrum of renal osteodystrophy in 57 chronic hemodialysis patients: a correlation between biochemical parameters and bone pathology findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazan, J A; Libbey, N P; London, M R; Pono, L; Abuelo, J G

    1991-02-01

    Fifty-nine chronic hemodialysis patients who had been on dialysis for an average of 77 months underwent bone biopsies and the pathologic findings were correlated with biochemical and demographic data. All but two had evidence of renal osteodystrophy, 23 with osteitis fibrosa (OF), 19 with osteomalacia and/or adynamic disease (OM/AD), and 15 with mixed osteodystrophy (MOD). Patients in each group were similar with regard to age, sex distribution, duration of dialysis, unstimulated serum aluminum, calcium and phosphorus. Patients with osteitis fibrosa (OF) had statistically higher DFO stimulated aluminum, alkaline phosphatase and PTHC levels than the other two groups although there was marked individual variation. The bone biopsies were also evaluated for the amount of aluminum deposited in the osteoid seam. All 23 of the patients with OF and 11 of the 15 patients with MOD had no, mild, or minimal aluminum deposition but 12 of the 19 patients with OM/AD had moderate to marked aluminum deposition. Patients with minimal to mild aluminum deposition were similar in age, duration of dialysis, sex distribution, unstimulated and DFO stimulated aluminum levels, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase to those with moderate to marked deposition but had significantly higher parathormone levels. All patients had been treated in a similar fashion regarding diet, oral phosphate binders and vitamin D; therefore, the observed differences in bone pathology were not readily explicable. However, patients who were found to have osteitis fibrosa and those with minimal to mild aluminum deposition had significantly higher parathormone levels when compared with patients in the other groups at the inception of dialysis.

  8. [Advances in hereditary hemochromatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Graciela; Cadiz, Claudia; Lachman, J; Cornelio, Cecilia

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary hemocromatosis (HH) is a genetic disease with a recessive autosomic pattern, in which inadequate iron (Fe) absorption is made by the intestinal cell. As consequence of that process, takes place a progressive accumulation of metal in different organs, predominantly in the liver. This leads to an alteration of liver structure and function: cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma (1). The gene implied in this pathology was identified (HFE) in 1996. This codes a similar molecule to the mayor histocompatibility complex type 1(MHC-T1 like) that can modulate the transport of PE binding the transferrin receptor. This progress allows a deep understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of the homeostasis of the Fe and its alterations in the NH. The diagnosis of disease by means of a genetic test let to carry out a familiar screening and to detect asymptomatic carriers. This makes possible to begin the appropriate treatment at early stages of the disease in order to avoid its consequences and offering a better quality of life to these patients.

  9. [Hereditary phaeochromocytoma in twins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Géza; Patócs, Attila; Tóth, Miklós

    2016-08-01

    Phaeochromocytoma is a tumor of the catecholamine-producing cells of the adrenal gland. Extraadrenal phaeochromocytomas are frequently called paragangliomas. The majority of phaeochromocytomas are sporadic, however, about 25-30% are caused by genetic mutation. These tumor are frequently referred as hereditary phaeochromocytomas/paragangliomas. Their incidence increases continuously which can be attributed to availability of genetic examination and to the discovery of novel genes. The 47-year-old female patient underwent abdominal computed tomography which revealed bilateral adrenal gland enlargement. Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, the 131-I- metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy, urinary catecholamines and serum chomogranin A measurements confirmed the diagnosis of bilateral phaeochromocytomas. The genetically identical twin sister of the patient was also diagnosed with hormonally active bilateral phaechromocytoma, suggesting the genetic origin of phaeochromocytoma. Mutation screening confirmed a germline mutation of the transmembrane protein 127 tumorsupressor gene in both patients. Both patients underwent cortical-sparing adrenalectomy. The adrenal gland with the larger tumor was totally resected, while in the opposite side only the tumor was resected and a small part of the cortex was saved. After the operation urinary catecholamines and serum chromogranin A returned to normal in both patients. Adrenocortical deficiency was absent in the first patient, but her sister developed adrenal insufficiency requiring glucocorticoid replacement. To the best of the authors' knowledge phaeochromocytoma affecting twins has never been described earlier. Genetic examination performed in siblings confirmed the presence of the mutant gene through four generations. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(33), 1326-1330.

  10. Adult hereditary fructose intolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Ismail Yasawy; Ulrich Richard Folsch; Wolfgang Eckhard Schmidt; Michael Schwend

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an underrecognized,preventable life-threatening condition. It is an autosomal recessive disorder with subnormal activity of aldolase B in the liver, kidney and small bowel. Symptoms are present only after the ingestion of fructose, which leads to brisk hypoglycemia, and an individual with continued ingestion will exhibit vomiting,abdominal pain, failure to thrive, and renal and liver failure. A diagnosis of HFI was made in a 50-year-old woman on the basis of medical history, response to Ⅳ fructose intolerance test, demonstration of aldolase B activity reduction in duodenal biopsy, and molecular analysis of leukocyte DNA by PCR showed homozygosity for two doses of mutant gene. HFI may remain undiagnosed until adult life and may lead to disastrous complications following inadvertent fructose or sorbitol infusion. Several lethal episodes of HFI following sorbitol and fructose infusion have been reported. The diagnosis can only be suspected by taking a careful dietary history, and this can present serious complications.

  11. Adult hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasawy, Mohamed Ismail; Folsch, Ulrich Richard; Schmidt, Wolfgang Eckhard; Schwend, Michael

    2009-05-21

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an under-recognized, preventable life-threatening condition. It is an autosomal recessive disorder with subnormal activity of aldolase B in the liver, kidney and small bowel. Symptoms are present only after the ingestion of fructose, which leads to brisk hypoglycemia, and an individual with continued ingestion will exhibit vomiting, abdominal pain, failure to thrive, and renal and liver failure. A diagnosis of HFI was made in a 50-year-old woman on the basis of medical history, response to IV fructose intolerance test, demonstration of aldolase B activity reduction in duodenal biopsy, and molecular analysis of leukocyte DNA by PCR showed homozygosity for two doses of mutant gene. HFI may remain undiagnosed until adult life and may lead to disastrous complications following inadvertent fructose or sorbitol infusion. Several lethal episodes of HFI following sorbitol and fructose infusion have been reported. The diagnosis can only be suspected by taking a careful dietary history, and this can present serious complications.

  12. Treatment of hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Nancy J

    2012-10-01

    The hereditary optic neuropathies are inherited disorders in which optic nerve dysfunction is a prominent feature in the phenotypic expression of disease. Optic neuropathy may be primarily an isolated finding, such as in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dominant optic atrophy, or part of a multisystem disorder. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the hereditary optic neuropathies involve mitochondrial dysfunction owing to mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA that encodes proteins essential to mitochondrial function. Effective treatments are limited, and current management includes therapies directed at enhancing mitochondrial function and preventing oxidative damage, as well as genetic counselling, and supportive and symptomatic measures. New therapies, including gene therapy, are emerging via animal models and human clinical trials. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, in particular, provides a unique model for testing promising treatments owing to its characteristic sequential bilateral involvement and the accessibility of target tissue within the eye. Lessons learned from treatment of the hereditary optic neuropathies may have therapeutic implications for other disorders of presumed mitochondrial dysfunction. In this Review, the natural history of the common inherited optic neuropathies, the presumed pathogenesis of several of these disorders, and the literature to date regarding potential therapies are summarized.

  13. A Rare Cause of Acromegaly: Short Review of McCune Albright Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Aydın

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS is characterized by a triad of poly/monostotic fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait macules, and hyperfunctioning endocrinopathies, including growth hormone (GH excess. Acromegaly, as a manifestation of endocrine hyperfunction with MAS is uncommon. We report a 34-year-old man with MAS and acromegaly, in whom surgical removal of the pituitary tumour has been technically difficult because of bone deformities. A combination of a long-acting somatostatin analogue (Sandostatin LAR and external irradiation were therefore used as treatment. Acromegaly associated with MAS is very rarely seen, and has been the subject of approximately 70 published reports. We present a case of acromegaly associated with MAS and a brief survey of relevant literature. Turk Jem 2009; 13: 13-5

  14. Fibrous Dysplasia/McCune-Albright Syndrome: Clinical and Translational Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Cemre; Collins, Michael T; Boyce, Alison M

    2016-10-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is an uncommon and debilitating skeletal disorder resulting in fractures, deformity, functional impairment, and pain. It arises from post-zygotic somatic activating mutations in GNAS, in the cAMP-regulating transcript α-subunit, Gsα. Constitutive Gs signaling results in activation of adenylyl cyclase and dysregulated cAMP production. In the skeleton, this leads to the development of FD lesions with abnormal bone matrix, trabeculae, and collagen, produced by undifferentiated mesenchymal cells. FD may occur in isolation or in combination with extraskeletal manifestations, including hyperfunctioning endocrinopathies and café-au-lait macules, termed McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS). This review summarizes current clinical and translational perspectives in FD/MAS, with an emphasis on FD pathogenesis, natural history, pre-clinical and clinical investigation, and future directions.

  15. McCune-Albright syndrome mimicking malignancy: an endocrine disease from oncologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genç, D Bahar; Özkan, M Alp; Büyükgebiz, Atilla

    2012-09-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is categorized as either monostotic or polyostotic and may occur as a component of McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS). Imaging findings can mimic neoplastic diseases. We present a case of MAS initially suspected to have neoplastic disease. A 9-year-old girl was admitted to pediatric emergency with ataxia. Upon hospitalization, an extradural mass was seen on cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the bone survey showed lytic lesions in the long bones. The patient was referred to the pediatric oncology department with a presumptive diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis or metastatic tumor. Further investigations demonstrated that the patient had MAS and coexisting postinfectious cerebellitis. The findings in this patient demonstrate that the radiographic findings and the clinical presentation of FD and MAS may be similar to those of malignant diseases.

  16. Dental perspectives in fibrous dysplasia and McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintoye, Sunday O; Boyce, Alison M; Collins, Michael T

    2013-09-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by the triad of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia (FD), endocrine disorders, and café-au-lait skin pigmentation. Ninety percent of MAS patients have FD lesions in the craniofacial area, resulting in significant orofacial deformity, dental disorders, bone pain, and compromised oral health. Maxillomandibular FD is also associated with dental developmental disorders, malocclusion, and high caries index. There are limited data on the outcomes of dental treatments in maxillomandibular FD/MAS patients, because clinicians and researchers have limited access to patients, and there are concerns that dental surgery may activate quiescent jaw FD lesions to grow aggressively. This report highlights current perspectives on dental management issues associated with maxillomandibular FD within the context of MAS.

  17. Eight-year follow-up of a girl with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aycan, Zehra; Önder, Aşan; Çetinkaya, Semra

    2011-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is characterized by the triad of fibrous dysplasia (FD), cafe-au-lait spots and precocious puberty (PP). We report a 14-year-old girl with MAS who has been followed-up for 8 years. She was referred for multiple fractures and vaginal bleeding at age 5.9 years. She had peripheral PP, FD, and osteoporosis and was diagnosed as MAS. The patient was treated with aromatase inhibitors and bisphosphonates. She had no menses during aromatase inhibitor treatment. Her growth rate and bone maturation were in normal ranges while on treatment. She had one new fracture on the seventh year of follow- up in spite of bisphosphonate treatment.

  18. Transsphenoidal approach for pituitary adenomas in patients with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Wanchen; Di, Xiao; Wang, Renzhi; Zhu, Huijuan; Yao, Yong; Deng, Kan; Feng, Ming; Li, Guilin; Wei, Junji

    2013-06-01

    The feasibility of transsphenoidal approach under a guidance of neuronavigation was explored to remove pituitary adenomas for patients with McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS). From August, 2008 to July, 2010, there were 5 patients diagnosed with MAS associated with a pituitary adenoma in our department of Peking Union Medical College Hospital. All the patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery for the removal of pituitary adenomas with the assistant of neuronavigation and all the procedures went uneventfully. Four of the five patients have got cured radiologically by imaging and 3 of them have got cured based on endocrinological criteria. Transsphenoidal approach under the neuronavigational guidance is a safe and effective management for the MAS patients with pituitary adenomas.

  19. Neonatal McCune-Albright syndrome with survival beyond two years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Melinda; Scottoline, Brian

    2016-11-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare disease resulting from a somatic, mosaic mutation of GNAS1 encoding the Gs α subunit of the G-protein coupled membrane receptor responsible for multiple hormonal signaling cascades. We present a patient with neonatal MAS who initially presented with neonatal diabetes and concern for congenital cardiac disease, and subsequently was found to have significant ACTH-independent neonatal Cushing syndrome. Her course included multi-system organ involvement, although she initially did not have obvious findings consistent with the MAS classic triad of café-au-lait macules, fibrous dysplasia, or peripheral precocious puberty. After medical and surgical treatment, she remains the only reported survivor of neonatal MAS. This clinical report alerts clinicians to the possibility of this disease in neonates with non-classical endocrine and non-endocrine manifestations of MAS, and demonstrates that this very early presentation is potentially survivable. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Low serum free thyroxine level in a girl with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosimaa, Mart; Pajuväli, Anett; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo

    2015-01-05

    A 17-year-old girl with McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) was suspected of having central hypothyroidism based on an inappropriately normal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and low free thyroxine (fT4). She was clinically euthyroid and her pituitary appeared normal on MRI. Treatment of hypothyroidism with levothyroxine resulted in suppression of TSH with a low fT4 and high free triiodothyronine (fT3) concentration and hence iatrogenic hyperthyroidism was diagnosed. After discontinuation of levothyroxine, the TSH and fT3 normalised while fT4 remained low. Increased conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3) can be part of MAS. Therefore, fT3 and fT4 should both be measured when evaluating thyroid function in patients with MAS.

  1. Dental Perspectives in Fibrous Dysplasia and McCune-Albright Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintoye, Sunday O.; Boyce, Alison M.; Collins, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by the triad of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia (PFD), endocrine disorders and café-au-lait skin pigmentation. Ninety percent of MAS patients have FD lesions in the craniofacial area, resulting in significant orofacial deformity, dental disorders, bone pain and compromised oral health. Maxillo-mandibular FD is also associated with dental developmental disorders, malocclusion, and high caries index. There is limited data on the outcomes of dental treatments in maxillo-mandibular FD/MAS patients, because clinicians and researchers have limited access to patients, and there are concerns that dental surgery may activate quiescent jaw FD lesions to grow aggressively. This report highlights current perspectives on dental management issues associated with maxillo-mandibular FD within the context of MAS. PMID:23953425

  2. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  3. Envolvimento orbitário difuso por displasia fibrosa na síndrome de McCune Albright: relato de caso McCune Albright syndrome - diffuse orbital involvement due to fibrous dysplasia: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Márcio Alberto Costanzi; CRUZ, Antonio Augusto Velasco e

    2007-01-01

    A displasia fibrosa é considerada uma desordem óssea benigna, de progressão lenta na qual há substituição de osso normal por tecido fibroso Quando associada a hiperpigmentação de pele e distúrbios endocrinológicos denomina-se síndrome de McCune Albright. Relatamos um caso raro de síndrome de McCune Albright em uma criança do sexo masculino que apesar de apresentar mínimas distorções crânio-facial externas, mostrou um envolvimento difuso e bilateral das órbitas.Fibrous dysplasia is a benign, s...

  4. McCune–Albright syndrome with craniofacial dysplasia: Clinical review and surgical management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsuzarri, Telmo Augusto Barba; Araujo, João Flavio Mattos; Melro, Carlos Alberto Morassi; Neves, Maick Willen Fernandes; Navarro, Juliano Nery; Brito, Leandro Gomes; Pontelli, Luis Otavio Carneiro; de Abreu Mattos, Luis Gustavo; Gonçales, Tiago Fernandes; Zeviani, Wolnei Marques

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a benign fibro-osseous lesion related to an abnormal bone development and replacement by fibrous tissue. FD has three clinical patterns namely monostotic, polyostotic, and the McCune–Albright syndrome (MAS). MAS is a rare genetic disorder (about 3% of all FD's) that comprises a triad of polyostotic FD, café-au-lait skin macules, and precocious puberty. MAS can involve the orbit region and cause stenosis in the optic canal, leading the patient to a progressive visual loss. Methods: We reported a case of craniofacial FD in MAS in a 9-year-old male with progressive visual loss, submitted to optic nerve decompression by fronto-orbito-zygomatic approach, with total recovery. A research was made at Bireme, PubMed, Cochrane, LILACS, and MEDLINE with the keywords: FD/craniofacial/McCune–Albright/Optic compression for the clinical review. Results: A clinical review of the disease was made, the multiple, clinical, and surgical management options were presented, and the case report was reported. Conclusion: MAS is a rare disease with a progressive polyostotic FD. Whenever it affects the orbit region, the optic canal, and it is associated with a progressive visual loss, the urgent optic nerve decompression is mandatory, either manually or with a rapid drill. It is known that aggressive approach is associated with less recurrence; it is also associated with worsening of the visual loss in optic nerve decompression. In MAS cases, multiple and less aggressive surgeries seem to be more suitable. PMID:27057395

  5. Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia with gigantism and huge pelvic tumor: a rare case of McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakayama, Kenshi; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Kidani, Teruki; Fujibuchi, Taketsugu; Kito, Katsumi; Tanji, Nozomu; Nakamura, Atsushi

    2011-06-01

    We report a rare case of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia on endocrine hyperfunction with elevated human growth hormone and normal serum level of prolactin. There were some differential points of gender, gigantism, endocrine function, and GNAS gene from McCune-Albright syndrome. Malignant transformation was suspected in the pelvic tumor from imaging because rapid growth of the tumor by imaging was observed; however, no malignant change occurred in this case.

  6. Hereditary skin diseases of hemidesmosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkman, MF

    1999-01-01

    Studies of hereditary blistering skin diseases (epidermolysis bullosa) and targeted gene mutation experiments in knockout mice have greatly improved our understanding of hemidesmosomes and their associated structures in the cytoskeleton and basement membrane of the skin and mucous membranes. At leas

  7. Histology of hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alfen, N. van; Gabreëls-Festen, A.A.W.M.; Laak, H.J. ter; Arts, W.F.M.; Gabreëls, F.J.M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2005-01-01

    We report the findings in five muscle and three sural nerve biopsies, and in one postmortem plexus specimen, from six patients with hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA). We found that the sensory nerves are definitely involved in HNA despite the mainly motor symptoms, and that lesions in nerves and

  8. [Hereditary fructose intolerance (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanner, F

    1977-07-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is the most important disturbance in human fructose metabolism. This paper deals with the present knowledge of biochemistry and pathophysiology of this inborn error of metabolism, which is often wrongly diagnosed and gives a detailed description of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

  9. Drug therapy for hereditary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyanitov Evgeny N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumors arising in patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may have distinct drug sensitivity as compared to their sporadic counterparts. Breast and ovarian neoplasms from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by deficient homologous recombination (HR of DNA, that makes them particularly sensitive to platinum compounds or inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Outstandingly durable complete responses to high dose chemotherapy have been observed in several cases of BRCA-related metastatic breast cancer (BC. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that women with BRCA1-related BC may derive less benefit from taxane-based treatment than other categories of BC patients. There is virtually no reports directly assessing drug response in hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC patients; studies involving non-selected (i.e., both sporadic and hereditary CRC with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H suggest therapeutic advantage of irinotecan. Celecoxib has been approved for the treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Hereditary medullary thyroid cancers (MTC have been shown to be highly responsive to a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, which exerts specific activity towards mutated RET receptor. Given the rapidly improving accessibility of DNA analysis, it is foreseen that the potential predictive value of cancer-associated germ-line mutations will be increasingly considered in the future studies.

  10. Genetics of Hereditary Angioedema Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germenis, Anastasios E; Speletas, Matthaios

    2016-10-01

    Contemporary genetic research has provided evidences that angioedema represents a diverse family of disorders related to kinin metabolism, with a much greater genetic complexity than was initially considered. Convincing data have also recently been published indicating that the clinical heterogeneity of hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (classified as C1-INH-HAE) could be attributed at least in part, either to the type of SERPING1 mutations or to mutations in genes encoding for enzymes involved in the metabolism and function of bradykinin. Alterations detected in at least one more gene (F12) are nowadays considered responsible for 25 % of cases of hereditary angioedema with normal C1-INH (type III hereditary angioedema (HAE), nlC1-INH-HAE). Interesting data derived from genetic approaches of non-hereditary angioedemas indicate that other immune pathways might be implicated in the pathogenesis of HAE. More than 125 years after the recognition of the hereditary nature of HAE by Osler, the heterogeneity of clinical expressions, the genetics of this disorder, and the genotype-phenotype relationships, still presents a challenge that will be discussed in this review. Large scale, in-depth genetic studies are expected not only to answer these emerging questions but also to further elucidate many of the unmet aspects of angioedema pathogenesis. Uncovering genetic biomarkers affecting the severity of the disease and/or the effectiveness of the various treatment modalities might lead to the prevention of attacks and the optimization of C1-INH-HAE management that is expected to provide a valuable benefit to the sufferers of angioedema.

  11. Fulvestrant treatment of precocious puberty in girls with McCune-Albright syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sims Emily K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background McCune-Albright Syndrome (MAS is usually characterized by the triad of precocious puberty (PP, fibrous dysplasia, and café au lait spots. Previous treatments investigated for PP have included aromatase inhibitors and the estrogen receptor modulator, tamoxifen. Although some agents have been partially effective, the optimal pharmacologic treatment of PP in girls with MAS has not been identified. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of fulvestrant (FaslodexTM, a pure estrogen receptor antagonist, in girls with progressive precocious puberty (PP associated with McCune-Albright Syndrome (MAS. Methods In this prospective international multicenter trial, thirty girls ≤ 10 years old with MAS and progressive PP received fulvestrant 4 mg/kg via monthly intramuscular injections for 12 months. Changes in vaginal bleeding, rates of bone age advancement, growth velocity, Tanner staging, predicted adult heights, and uterine and ovarian volumes were measured. Results Median vaginal bleeding days decreased from 12.0 days per year to 1.0 day per year, with a median change in frequency of -3.6 days, (95% confidence interval (CI -10.10, 0.00; p = 0.0146. Of patients with baseline bleeding, 74% experienced a ≥50% reduction in bleeding, and 35% experienced complete cessation during the study period (95% CI 51.6%, 89.8%; 16.4%, 57.3%, respectively. Average rates of bone age advancement (ΔBA/ΔCA decreased from 1.99 pre-treatment to 1.06 on treatment (mean change -0.93, 95% CI -1.43, -0.43; p = 0.0007. No significant changes in uterine volumes or other endpoints or serious adverse events occurred. Conclusions Fulvestrant was well tolerated and moderately effective in decreasing vaginal bleeding and rates of skeletal maturation in girls with MAS. Longer-term studies aimed at further defining potential benefits and risks of this novel therapeutic approach in girls with MAS are needed. Trial

  12. Você conhece esta síndrome? Do you know this syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Helena Proença de Freitas

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A osteodistrofia hereditária de Albright é caracterizada por calcificações cutâneas, obesidade, baixa estatura, braquidactilia associada ao pseudo-hipoparatireoidismo do tipo IA entre outras alterações hormonais como hipotireoidismo e hipogonadismo. O diagnóstico é baseado no quadro clínico associado aos achados de hipocalcemia e níveis elevados de hormônio da paratireóide. Os autores relatam caso em que a avaliação dermatológica foi de grande contribuição para o diagnóstico.Albright hereditary osteodystrophy is characterized by subcutaneous calcification, obesity, short stature, brachydactyly and pseudohypoparathyroidism type IA. Hypothyroidism and hypogonadism may be present. The diagnosis is based on clinical characteristics associated with hypocalcemia and high levels of parathyroid hormone. The authors report a case in which the dermatological evaluation contributed to diagnosis.

  13. Relative functions of Gαs and its extra-large variant XLαs in the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastepe, M

    2012-09-01

    Gαs is a ubiquitous signaling protein necessary for the actions of many neurotransmitters, hormones, and autocrine/paracrine factors. Loss-of-function mutations within the gene encoding Gαs, GNAS, are responsible for multiple human diseases, including Albright's Hereditary Osteodystrophy, progressive osseous heteroplasia, and pseudohypoparathyroidism. Gain-of-function mutations in the same gene are found in various endocrine and nonendocrine tumors and in patients with McCune-Albright Syndrome and fibrous dysplasia of bone. In addition to Gαs, GNAS gives rise to multiple additional coding and noncoding transcripts. Among those, XLαs is a paternally expressed product that is partially identical to Gαs. This article reviews the cellular actions of Gαs and XLαs, focusing on the significance of XLαs relative to Gαs in mammalian physiology and human disease.

  14. Craniospinal Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia, Aneurysmal Bone Cysts, and Chiari Type 1 Malformation Coexistence in a Patient with McCune-Albright Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgun, Kamran; Yılmaz, Baran; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Akakın, Akın; Konya, Deniz; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Kılıç, Türker

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are defined as benign cystic lesions of bone composed of blood-filled spaces. ABCs may be a secondary pathology superimposed on fibrous dysplasia (FD). Concomitant FD and ABC in relation with McCune-Albright syndrome is an extremely rare condition. Here, we report concomitant, double ABCs in bilateral occipital regions and FD from the skull base to the C2 vertebra with Chiari type 1 malformation. A 14-year-old female with a diagnosis of McCune-Albright syndrome presented with swellings at the back of her head. The lesions were consistent with ABCs and were totally resected with reconstruction of the calvarial defects. The coexistence of FD, bilateral occipital ABCs, and Chiari malformation type 1 in a McCune-Albright patient is an extremely rare condition and, to our knowledge, has not been reported to date. Exact diagnosis and appropriate surgical treatment usually lead to a good outcome.

  15. DESIGNING AN OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION AND COFIRING SAWDUST WITH COAL AT ALBRIGHT GENERATING STATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Payette; D. Tillman

    2003-10-01

    During the period July 1, 2003-September 30, 2003, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) proceeded with demonstration operations at the Willow Island Generating Station and improvements to the Albright Generating Station cofiring systems. The demonstration operations at Willow Island were designed to document integration of bio mass cofiring into commercial operations, including evaluating new sources of biomass supply. The Albright improvements were designed to increase the resource base for the projects, and to address issues that came up during the first year of operations. During this period, a major presentation summarizing the program was presented at the Pittsburgh Coal Conference. This report summarizes the activities associated with the Designer Opportunity Fuel program, and demonstrations at Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations.

  16. New treatments of hereditary blindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Rosenberg, Thomas; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life and a structura......Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life...... and a structurally intact retinal tissue to adult life with a complete loss of photoreceptors. It must be assumed that some of the trials will succeed in producing new therapies and action must be taken to refine and accelerate diagnostics and to preserve therapeutic potential in blind people....

  17. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; van Overeem Hansen, Thomas; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities in the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). However, only approximately 25% of cases of HBOC can be ascribed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Recently, exome sequencing has uncovered substantial locus heterogeneity among...... of putative causal variants and the clinical application of new HBOC genes in cancer risk management and treatment decision-making....

  18. Hereditary iron and copper deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Flaten, Trond Peder; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary deposition of iron (primary haemochromatosis) or copper (Wilson's disease) are autosomal recessive metabolic disease characterized by progressive liver pathology and subsequent involvement of various other organs. The prevalence of primary haemochromatosis is approximately 0.5%, about...... can be successfully treated, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis. Serum ferritin values, transferrin saturation and genetic analysis are used when diagnosing haemochromatosis. The diagnostics of Wilson's disease depends on the use of urinary copper values, serum ceruloplasmin and liver...

  19. An overview of hereditary pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebours, Vinciane; Lévy, Philippe; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatitis. The prevalence was evaluated to 0.3/100000 in Western Countries. Genetic disorders are due to mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). Since 1996, more than 30 mutations were found. The three more common mutations are R122H, N29I and A16V. First symptoms begin since childhood, mainly before 10 years old. Main symptoms are pancreatic pain and acute pancreatitis (>70%). CP morphological changes as pancreatic calcifications are diagnosed at a median age of 22-25 years. Exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency occurred in 34% and 26% at a median age of 29 and 38 years. No clinical differences exist according to the mutation type. No excess of mortality in hereditary pancreatitis population compared to general population was found, despite a real risk of cancer. The cumulative risks of pancreatic cancer at 50, 60 and, 75 years are 10%, 18.7% and, 53.5%, respectively. The relative risk of cancer increases in smokers and is evaluated to 8.55. Hereditary pancreatitis diagnosis permits to propose an adapted management in expert centres.

  20. Hereditary angioedema may not be the only cause of abdominal pain in patients with hereditary angioedema!

    OpenAIRE

    Ozgur Kartal; Sevket Arslan; Mustafa Gulec; Ahmet Zafer Caliskaner; Abdullah Baysan; Nail Ersoz; Ugur Musabak; Osman Sener

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the basic clinical presentations of the hereditary angioedema and danazol is a common medicine which has been used for long years in patients with hereditary angioedema. We present two hereditary angioedema patients with abdominal pain albeit under danazol treatment, whose final diagnoses was colon carcinoma. There are two consequences in this article which shall be insisted on: First; in patients with hereditary angioedema, the differential diagnosis of and ldquo;ab...

  1. McCune-Albright syndrome and the extraskeletal manifestations of fibrous dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Michael T

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fibrous dysplasia (FD is sometimes accompanied by extraskeletal manifestations that can include any combination of café-au-lait macules, hyperfunctioning endocrinopathies, such as gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty, hyperthyroidism, growth hormone excess, FGF23-mediated renal phosphate wasting, and/or Cushing syndrome, as well as other less common features. The combination of any of these findings, with or without FD, is known as McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS. The broad spectrum of involved tissues and the unpredictable combination of findings owe to the fact that molecular defect is due to dominant activating mutations in the widely expressed signaling protein, Gsα, and the fact these mutations arises sporadically, often times early in development, prior to gastrulation, and can distribute across many or few tissues. The complexity can be mastered by a systematic screening of potentially involved tissues and cognizance that the pattern of involved tissues is established, to some degree, in utero. Thorough testing allows the clinician to establish, often times at presentation, the full extent of the disease, and importantly as well what tissues are unaffected. Treatment and follow-up can then be focused on affected systems and a meaningful prognosis can be offered to the patient and family. The authors outline screening and treatment strategies that allow for effective management of the extraskeletal manifestations of FD.

  2. McCune-Albright syndrome and the extraskeletal manifestations of fibrous dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael T; Singer, Frederick R; Eugster, Erica

    2012-05-24

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is sometimes accompanied by extraskeletal manifestations that can include any combination of café-au-lait macules, hyperfunctioning endocrinopathies, such as gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty, hyperthyroidism, growth hormone excess, FGF23-mediated renal phosphate wasting, and/or Cushing syndrome, as well as other less common features. The combination of any of these findings, with or without FD, is known as McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS). The broad spectrum of involved tissues and the unpredictable combination of findings owe to the fact that molecular defect is due to dominant activating mutations in the widely expressed signaling protein, Gsα, and the fact these mutations arises sporadically, often times early in development, prior to gastrulation, and can distribute across many or few tissues.The complexity can be mastered by a systematic screening of potentially involved tissues and cognizance that the pattern of involved tissues is established, to some degree, in utero. Thorough testing allows the clinician to establish, often times at presentation, the full extent of the disease, and importantly as well what tissues are unaffected. Treatment and follow-up can then be focused on affected systems and a meaningful prognosis can be offered to the patient and family. The authors outline screening and treatment strategies that allow for effective management of the extraskeletal manifestations of FD.

  3. McCune-Albright syndrome revealed by hyperthyroidism at advanced age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhaï, Muriel; Meunier, Marine; Kahan, André; Cormier, Catherine

    2011-12-01

    We report a case of a 38-year-old woman admitted to our service for diagnosis of osteolytic lesions. She suffered from back, lumbar and costal pain at the time a hyperthyroidism, related to multinodular goiter, was diagnosed. The pain remained despite the cure of hyperthyroidism. Cutaneous examination revealed café au lait skin spots. Analysis of the phosphocalcic metabolism allowed the diagnosis of phosphate diabetes. X-ray showed lytic lesions involving the ribs with thinning of the cortex and vertebral fractures of the dorsal spine. The computed tomography revealed lytic lesions with a typical "ground glass" appearance involving the spine, ribs, sternum, iliac bones and sacrum. The presence of this clinical triad allowed the diagnosis of McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS). The treatment consisted in vitamin D supplementation, and high doses of both oral phosphate and calcitriol to treat the phosphate diabetes as well as cycles of intravenous pamidronate administration to relieve bone pain. We report an uncommon case of the diagnosis of MAS at an advanced age following hyperthyroidism. We believe that the disease was revealed by an increase in bone turnover due to hyperthyroidism.

  4. Macroorchidism in an Indian boy with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Vaishakhi T; Khadilkar, Vaman V; Khadilkar, Anuradha V; Kinare, Arun S

    2011-09-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is defined by the clinical triad of fibrous dysplasia of bone (FD), café-au-lait spots and precocious puberty (PP). It is a rare disease with estimated prevalence between 1/100,000 and 1/1,000,000. The authors report a case of MAS in an Indian boy who had history of unilateral macroorchidism (but no other signs of MAS) since birth, then presented with PP, FD and café-au-lait spots at 6 years of age. On examination he had asymmetry of the face, café-au-lait spots and signs of sexual precocity with a right testicular volume of 25 ml (left 8 ml). Investigations revealed suppressed gonadotropins with elevated testosterone levels. Skeletal survey showed dysplastic changes involving multiple bones and advanced bone age. Reports of MAS in a boy with unilateral macroorchidism are scarce. Thus, unilateral macroorchidism at birth in a baby may be a feature of MAS and should be followed up with care.

  5. A Case of Atypical McCune-Albright Syndrome with Vaginal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostampour, Noushin; Hashemipour, Mahin; Kelishadi, Roya; Hovsepian, Silva; Hekmatnia, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Background McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare non-inherited disorder characterized by the clinical triad of precocious puberty, cafe-au-lait skin lesions, and fibrous dysplasia of bone. Case Presentation We report a girl with MAS, presenting initially with vaginal bleeding at the age of 17 months. Ultrasonography revealed unilateral ovarian cysts and ureteral and ovarian enlargement. Considering the clinical and paraclinical findings, the patient diagnosed as a case of gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty was treated with medroxy-progestrone acetate (MPA) for three months. During the follow up, recurrent episodes of bleeding, ovarian activation and cyst formation, as well as breast size development were reported. At the age of 5.5 years, fibrous dysplasia was detected, which in coexistence with precocious puberty confirmed the diagnosis of MAS. The patient had no cafe-au-lait skin macles during follow up. Conclusion Considering that clinical manifestations of MAS appear later in the course of recurrent periods of ovarian activation and cyst formation, a careful clinical observation and follow up of patients is necessary and the diagnosis of MAS must be kept in mind in cases with gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty. PMID:23056821

  6. A Case of Atypical McCune-Albright Syndrome with Vaginal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Hovsepian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS is a rare non-inherited disorder characterized by the clinical triad of precocious puberty, cafe-au-lait skin lesions, and fibrous dysplasia of bone. Case Presentation:We report a girl with MAS, presenting initially with vaginal bleeding at the age of 17 months. Ultrasonography revealed unilateral ovarian cysts and ureteral and ovarian enlargement. Considering the clinical and paraclinical findings, the patient diagnosed as a case of gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty was treated with medroxy-progestrone acetate (MPA for three months. During the follow up, recurrent episodes of bleeding, ovarian activation and cyst formation, as well as breast size development were reported. At the age of 5.5 years, fibrous dysplasia was detected, which in coexistence with precocious puberty confirmed the diagnosis of MAS. The patient had no cafe-au-lait skin macles during follow up. Conclusion:Considering that clinical manifestations of MAS appear later in the course of recurrent periods of ovarian activation and cyst formation, a careful clinical observation and follow up of patients is necessary and the diagnosis of MAS must be kept in mind in cases with gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty.

  7. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does...... however not always have to be caused by angioedema but can relate to other concomitant disorders. In this report we are focusing on misdiagnosis in a patient with known hereditary angioedema, whose bleeding episode caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was mistaken for an acute attack...... of hereditary angioedema. The case illustrates how clinicians can have difficulties in handling patients with rare diseases, especially in the emergency care setting....

  8. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary antithrombin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Merck Manual Home Edition for Patients and Caregivers: Thrombophilia National Blood Clot Alliance: Antithrombin Deficiency Orphanet: Hereditary thrombophilia due to congenital antithrombin deficiency Patient Support and ...

  9. A case of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia associated with McCune-Albright syndrome lost to follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert Gareth Michael

    2015-02-26

    McCune-Albright syndrome is a rare fibro-osseous syndrome characterised by a classic triad of fibrous dysplasia (FD), café-au-lait macules and various underlying endocrinopathies. This case report describes how a patient was rediagnosed by a general dental practitioner following attendance for a routine dental examination. The patient had been previously diagnosed with the condition 28 years earlier but no follow-up or monitoring of her condition had taken place. As a result, she was found to have several undiagnosed and untreated complications of the disease including FD of the mandible, optic neuropathy and potential thyroid involvement.

  10. Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia in McCune-Albright Syndrome Demonstrated on 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Grace; Shetty, Deepa; Loh, Han; Bui, Chuong; Le, Ken; Mansberg, Robert

    2016-12-01

    A 33-year-old woman with McCune-Albright syndrome was referred for a Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT study for evaluation and staging of a biopsy-proven pancreatic tail neuroendocrine tumor. The scan demonstrated intense focal octreopeptide uptake corresponding to the known neuroendocrine tumor at the pancreatic tail/splenic hilum. There was no evidence of octreopeptide-avid metastases. Diffuse octreopeptide uptake was demonstrated in multiple bones involving the right side of the skeleton. The concurrent CT demonstrated corresponding expansile lucent changes consistent with the known fibrous dysplasia.

  11. Two cases of hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananth, N; Praveenkumar, G S; Rao, K Aravind; Vasanthi; Kakkilaya, Srinivas

    2003-07-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare cause of hepatic cirrhosis in the young. The disorder has a reported frequency of 1 in 20000 live births and no case has been reported from India so far. We report two cases of hereditary fructose intolerance, both with bilateral cataracts and one with cirrhosis of the liver.

  12. Lower limbs deformities in patients with McCune-Albright syndrome: Tomography and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al Kaissi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The skeletal changes in McCune-Albright disease are usually severe because of the polyostotic form of the disease. Trendelenberg gait and limited mobility are the most common presenting features. The constellation of Café-au lait spots and polyostotic bone involvement is commonly referred to as McCune-Albright′s syndrome (MAS. Materials and Methods: One boy and 4 girls (7-16 years were sought in our departments from 1998 to 2012. Limb length discrepancy was the main clinical presentation. Repetitive micro-fractures caused the development of ′Shepherd crook′ deformity with pain were the main burden. Results: Because of the repetitive micro-fractures and the significant deformity that distorted the integrity of the long bones which were associated with pain. We referred to re-alignment valgus osteotomy with internal fixation to preserve proper alignment. Moreover, guided growth technique with 8-plates was performed in 1 case. Conclusion: Tendency to progressive unilateral lower limb deformity in patients with MAS is usually associated with thinning and expansion of the cortex and distortion of the normal lower limb integrity secondary to repetitive micro-fractures. The latter is a situation which warrants surgical treatment to re-align the deformity and to preserve function. Prophylactic intramedullary nailing via the application of locking nails to ensure stabilisation of the femoral neck was found to be effective. However, nevertheless, the mosaic nature of MAS means any cell, tissue and organ in any site of the body could be affected to varying degrees. The clinical manifestations are a diversity of the disorder ranging from mild clinical signs to severe life-threatening disease.

  13. Quantitative and sensitive detection of GNAS mutations causing mccune-albright syndrome with next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narumi, Satoshi; Matsuo, Kumihiro; Ishii, Tomohiro; Tanahashi, Yusuke; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2013-01-01

    Somatic activating GNAS mutations cause McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS). Owing to low mutation abundance, mutant-specific enrichment procedures, such as the peptide nucleic acid (PNA) method, are required to detect mutations in peripheral blood. Next generation sequencing (NGS) can analyze millions of PCR amplicons independently, thus it is expected to detect low-abundance GNAS mutations quantitatively. In the present study, we aimed to develop an NGS-based method to detect low-abundance somatic GNAS mutations. PCR amplicons encompassing exons 8 and 9 of GNAS, in which most activating mutations occur, were sequenced on the MiSeq instrument. As expected, our NGS-based method could sequence the GNAS locus with very high read depth (approximately 100,000) and low error rate. A serial dilution study with use of cloned mutant and wildtype DNA samples showed a linear correlation between dilution and measured mutation abundance, indicating the reliability of quantification of the mutation. Using the serially diluted samples, the detection limits of three mutation detection methods (the PNA method, NGS, and combinatory use of PNA and NGS [PNA-NGS]) were determined. The lowest detectable mutation abundance was 1% for the PNA method, 0.03% for NGS and 0.01% for PNA-NGS. Finally, we analyzed 16 MAS patient-derived leukocytic DNA samples with the three methods, and compared the mutation detection rate of them. Mutation detection rate of the PNA method, NGS and PNA-NGS in 16 patient-derived peripheral blood samples were 56%, 63% and 75%, respectively. In conclusion, NGS can detect somatic activating GNAS mutations quantitatively and sensitively from peripheral blood samples. At present, the PNA-NGS method is likely the most sensitive method to detect low-abundance GNAS mutation.

  14. Quantitative and sensitive detection of GNAS mutations causing mccune-albright syndrome with next generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Narumi

    Full Text Available Somatic activating GNAS mutations cause McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS. Owing to low mutation abundance, mutant-specific enrichment procedures, such as the peptide nucleic acid (PNA method, are required to detect mutations in peripheral blood. Next generation sequencing (NGS can analyze millions of PCR amplicons independently, thus it is expected to detect low-abundance GNAS mutations quantitatively. In the present study, we aimed to develop an NGS-based method to detect low-abundance somatic GNAS mutations. PCR amplicons encompassing exons 8 and 9 of GNAS, in which most activating mutations occur, were sequenced on the MiSeq instrument. As expected, our NGS-based method could sequence the GNAS locus with very high read depth (approximately 100,000 and low error rate. A serial dilution study with use of cloned mutant and wildtype DNA samples showed a linear correlation between dilution and measured mutation abundance, indicating the reliability of quantification of the mutation. Using the serially diluted samples, the detection limits of three mutation detection methods (the PNA method, NGS, and combinatory use of PNA and NGS [PNA-NGS] were determined. The lowest detectable mutation abundance was 1% for the PNA method, 0.03% for NGS and 0.01% for PNA-NGS. Finally, we analyzed 16 MAS patient-derived leukocytic DNA samples with the three methods, and compared the mutation detection rate of them. Mutation detection rate of the PNA method, NGS and PNA-NGS in 16 patient-derived peripheral blood samples were 56%, 63% and 75%, respectively. In conclusion, NGS can detect somatic activating GNAS mutations quantitatively and sensitively from peripheral blood samples. At present, the PNA-NGS method is likely the most sensitive method to detect low-abundance GNAS mutation.

  15. McCune Albright syndrome - association of fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait skin spots and hyperthyroidism - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raus, Iulian; Coroiu, Roxana Elena

    2016-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome is a rare sporadic disease characterized by bone fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait skin spots and a variable association of hyperfunctional endocrine disorders. Fibrous dysplasia (FD), which can involve the craniofacial, axial, and appendicular skeleton, may range from an isolated, asymptomatic monostotic lesion to a severe disabling polyostotic disease involving the entire skeleton. A twenty-five-year old male patient presented to our clinic with recently developed heart palpitations. He had also been feeling pain in the right femur since he was younger, without any trauma history, leading to difficulties of ambulation and limping occasionally. His physical examination revealed café-au-lait spots with irregular borders and right testicular agenesis. Laboratory findings identified hyperthyroidism with hyperparathyroidism. Radiographs of the pelvis revealed multiple lytic lesions of the right femur and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characterized these lesions as specific to fibrous dysplasia of the bone, without any insufficiency fracture at this level. The association of café-au-lait skin spots with bone fibrous dysplasia, and hyperthyroidism in this patient suggested the diagnosis of McCune - Albright syndrome.

  16. Three intragenic suppressors of a GTPase-deficient allele of GNAS associated with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcic, Kyle; Tobar-Rubin, Raquel; Janevska, Daniela; Carroll, Julie; Din, Eraj; Alvarez, Rebecca; Haick, Jennifer; Pals-Rylaarsdam, Robin

    2014-06-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in heterotrimeric G-protein α subunits are associated with a variety of human diseases. McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is caused by mutations in GNAS, the gene encoding Gs. Alterations at Arg201 significantly reduce the GTPase activity of the protein, rendering it constitutively active. In this study, we have constructed a library of random mutations in a constitutively active yeast GPA1 gene carrying a mutation homologous to the McCune-Albright allele (Arg297His). Intragenic suppressors found at sites with homology to the human Gs protein were tested for their ability to suppress the constitutive activity of an Arg201His mutation in Gs. Three intragenic suppressors, at Phe142, Arg231, and Leu266, were able to suppress elevated basal cAMP responses caused by Arg201His when expressed in HEK293 cells. A range of amino acid substitutions was introduced at each of these sites to investigate the chemical requirements for intragenic suppression. The ability of Gs proteins carrying the suppressor mutations alone to mediate receptor-induced cAMP production was measured. These results offer potential sites on Gs that could serve as drug targets for MAS therapies.

  17. Carney complex and McCune Albright syndrome: an overview of clinical manifestations and human molecular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salpea, Paraskevi; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2014-04-05

    Endocrine neoplasia syndromes feature a wide spectrum of benign and malignant tumors of endocrine and non-endocrine organs associated with other clinical manifestations. This study outlines the main clinical features, genetic basis, and molecular mechanisms behind two multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes that share quite a bit of similarities, but one can be inherited whereas the other is always sporadic, Carney complex (CNC) and McCune-Albright (MAS), respectively. Spotty skin pigmentation, cardiac and other myxomas, and different types of endocrine tumors and other characterize Carney complex, which is caused largely by inactivating Protein kinase A, regulatory subunit, type I, Alpha (PRKAR1A) gene mutations. The main features of McCune-Albright are fibrous dysplasia of bone (FD), café-au-lait macules and precocious puberty; the disease is caused by activating mutations in the Guanine Nucleotide-binding protein, Alpha-stimulating activity polypeptide (GNAS) gene which are always somatic. We review the clinical manifestations of the two syndromes and provide an update on their molecular genetics.

  18. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSN/HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders of the peripheral nervous system that predominantly affect the sensory and autonomic neurons. Hallmark features comprise not only prominent sensory signs and symptoms and ulcerative mutilations but also variable autonomic and motor disturbances. Autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance has been reported. Molecular genetics studies have identified disease-causing mutations in 11 genes. Some of the affected proteins have nerve-specific roles but underlying mechanisms have also been shown to involve sphingolipid metabolism, vesicular transport, structural integrity, and transcription regulation. Genetic and functional studies have substantially improved the understanding of the pathogenesis of the HSN/HSAN and will help to find preventive and causative therapies in the future.

  19. The distal hereditary motor neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossor, Alexander M; Kalmar, Bernadett; Greensmith, Linda; Reilly, Mary M

    2012-01-01

    The distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN) comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that share the common feature of a length-dependent predominantly motor neuropathy. Many forms of dHMN have minor sensory abnormalities and/or a significant upper-motor-neuron component, and there is often an overlap with the axonal forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2) and with juvenile forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and hereditary spastic paraplegia. Eleven causative genes and four loci have been identified with autosomal dominant, recessive and X-linked patterns of inheritance. Despite advances in the identification of novel gene mutations, 80% of patients with dHMN have a mutation in an as-yet undiscovered gene. The causative genes have implicated proteins with diverse functions such as protein misfolding (HSPB1, HSPB8, BSCL2), RNA metabolism (IGHMBP2, SETX, GARS), axonal transport (HSPB1, DYNC1H1, DCTN1) and cation-channel dysfunction (ATP7A and TRPV4) in motor-nerve disease. This review will summarise the clinical features of the different subtypes of dHMN to help focus genetic testing for the practising clinician. It will also review the neuroscience that underpins our current understanding of how these mutations lead to a motor-specific neuropathy and highlight potential therapeutic strategies. An understanding of the functional consequences of gene mutations will become increasingly important with the advent of next-generation sequencing and the need to determine the pathogenicity of large amounts of individual genetic data.

  20. Splenic Involvement in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Takamatsu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old man who presented with prolonged epigastric pain was referred to our hospital. He had experienced recurrent epistaxis and had a family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed splenomegaly and a 9 cm hypervascular mass in his spleen. Computed tomography also showed a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation and heterogeneous enhancement of the liver parenchyma, suggesting the presence of arteriosystemic shunts and telangiectases. Based on these findings, the patient was definitely diagnosed with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia according to Curaçao criteria. He underwent splenectomy, and his symptoms disappeared after surgery. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed that the hypervascular lesion of the spleen was not a tumor but was composed of abnormal vessels associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Symptomatic splenic involvement may be a rare manifestation of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia but can be revealed by imaging modalities.

  1. Hereditary angioedema: imaging manifestations and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakhal, Mandip S; Marcotte, Gregory V

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a genetic disorder typically related to insufficient or dysfunctional C1-esterase inhibitor. Patients present with episodic swelling of various body parts, such as the face, neck, bowel, genitals, and extremities. Acute or severe symptoms can lead to patients presenting to the emergency room, particularly when the neck and abdominopelvic regions are affected, which is often accompanied by radiologic imaging evaluation. Patients with hereditary angioedema can pose a diagnostic challenge for emergency department physicians and radiologists at initial presentation, and the correct diagnosis may be missed or delayed, due to lack of clinical awareness of the disease or lack of its consideration in the radiologic differential diagnosis. Timely diagnosis of hereditary angioedema and rapid initiation of appropriate therapy can avoid potentially life-threatening complications. This article focuses on the spectrum of common and characteristic acute imaging manifestations of hereditary angioedema and provides an update on important recent developments in its clinical management and treatment.

  2. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Fog Andersen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does however not always have to be caused by angioedema but can relate to other concomitant disorders. In this report we are focusing on misdiagnosis in a patient with known hereditary angioedema, whose bleeding episode caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was mistaken for an acute attack of hereditary angioedema. The case illustrates how clinicians can have difficulties in handling patients with rare diseases, especially in the emergency care setting.

  3. Genetics 101 --The Hereditary Material of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 Genetics 101 — The Hereditary Material of Life Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Genetics is the study of heredity, the process in ...

  4. Hereditary History Preserving Bisimilarity Is Undecidable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurdzinski, Marcin; Nielsen, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    History preserving bisimilarity (hp-bisimilarity) and hereditary history preserving bisimilarity (hhp-bisimilarity) are behavioural equivalences taking into account causal relationships between events of concurrent systems. Their prominent feature is being preserved under action refinement...

  5. A Review of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogoş Tiberius

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fructose intolerance is a metabolic disorder with hereditary determinism, clinically manifested on terms of fructose intake. Untreated, hereditary fructose intolerance may result in renal and hepatic failure. Unfortunately, there are no formal diagnostic and surveillance guidelines for this disease. If identified and treated before the occurrence of permanent organ damage, patients can improve their symptoms and self-rated health. Implementation and adherence to a strict fructose free diet is often difficult, but not impossible.

  6. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations....

  7. Findings on magnetic resonance imaging of the spine and femur in a case of McCune-Albright syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inamo, Y. (Department of Pediatrics, Nihon Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)); Hanawa, Y. (Department of Pediatrics, Nihon Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)); Kin, H. (Department of Pediatrics, Nihon Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)); Okuni, M. (Department of Pediatrics, Nihon Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-03-01

    Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, a major osseous change in McCune-Albright syndrome, is seen in the cranium, facial bones, of the extremeties, and ribs, but rarely in the spine. Spinal X-rays revealed no abnormalities in an 8-year-old girl with this syndrome, but [sup 99m]Tc-methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy disclosed high-density areas in the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae. Multiple well-circumscribed areas of low signal intensity were seen on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine. Although MRI spine scans in this disease have never been reported, our findings in this case proved for evaluating osseous lesions. MRI made it possible to differentiate between fibrous lesions (low signal intensity on T1- und T2- weighted MRI) and cartilaginous lesions (low signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI and high signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI). (orig.)

  8. Pituitary and ovarian abnormalities demonstrated by CT and ultrasound in children with features of the McCune-Albright syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieth, K.G.; Comite, F.; Shawker, T.H.; Cutler, G.B. Jr.

    1984-11-01

    In a random series of 97 children referred to the National Institutes of Health with a presumptive diagnosis of precocious puberty, eight girls were found to have features of the McCune-Albright syndrome, including fibrous dysplasia of bone and/or skin lesions resembling cafe au lait spots. Radiographic evaluation of these patients included computed tomography of the head and pelvic ultrasound. The pituitary glands were suspicious for abnormality in five of the eight girls. Seven girls underwent pelvic ultrasound, and in all of them the ovaries were considered to be abnormal for their chronological age; in addition, two had functional ovarian cysts. The role of diagnostic radiological studies in the diagnosis of this syndrome is discussed.

  9. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  10. Fibrous dysplasia and McCune–Albright syndrome: Imaging for positive and differential diagnoses, prognosis, and follow-up guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousson, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.bousson@lrb.aphp.fr [Radiologie Ostéo-Articulaire, AP-HP, Hôpital Lariboisière, 2 rue Ambroise Paré, 75010 Paris (France); Université Paris VII Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité (France); Rey-Jouvin, Caroline, E-mail: c.reyjouvin@gmail.com [Rhumatologie Viggo Petersen, AP-HP, Hôpital Lariboisière, 2 rue Ambroise Paré, 75010 Paris (France); Université Paris VII Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité (France); Laredo, Jean-Denis, E-mail: jean-denis.laredo@lrb.aphp.fr [Radiologie Ostéo-Articulaire, AP-HP, Hôpital Lariboisière, 2 rue Ambroise Paré, 75010 Paris (France); Université Paris VII Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité (France); Le Merrer, Martine, E-mail: martine.lemerrer@inserm.fr [Service de génétique médicale, AP-HP, Hôpital Necker – Enfants malades, 149 rue de Sèvres, 75743 Paris Cedex 15 (France); Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine, E-mail: nadine.martin-duverneuil@psl.aphp.fr [Service de Neuroradiologie, AP-HP, Hôpital Pitié Salpêtrière, 47 Boulevard de l’hôpital, 75013 Paris (France); and others

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The radiologist plays a critical role at all steps of the management of patients with fibrous dysplasia (FD) and McCune–Albright syndrome (MAS). • Specific recommendations are provided as key points for the diagnosis, prognosis, and follow-up of patients with FD/MAS. • We believe the dissemination of these recommendations within the radiology community may substantially improve the management of patients with these rare but potentially disabling conditions. - Abstract: Purpose: The radiologist plays a critical role at all steps of the management of patients with fibrous dysplasia (FD) and McCune–Albright syndrome (MAS). The development of a standardized approach to the management of FD/MAS is crucial given the low incidence and multiple clinical presentations of these conditions. Our aim was to develop recommendations for bone imaging in FD/MAS management. Materials and methods: The establishment of National Reference Centers in France as part of a Health Ministry program for orphan diseases has triggered the development of recommendations for the clinical management of FD/MAS. We used a well-established robust methodological approach involving an extensive literature review by a multidisciplinary working group (20 healthcare professionals) and scoring by a peer-review group (20 healthcare professionals different from the 20 previous ones). There were four phases: a systematic literature review, drafting of initial recommendations, peer-review of this initial draft, and drafting of the final recommendations. Results: Fifty-seven specific recommendations are provided as key points for the diagnosis, prognosis, and follow-up of patients with FD/MAS. Issues of special interest are highlighted in the discussion, and areas in which future research is needed are identified. Conclusion: We believe the dissemination of these recommendations within the radiology community may facilitate communication between radiologists and other healthcare

  11. Prevalence of autoantibodies in a group of hereditary angioedema patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dortas Junior, Sergio Duarte; Valle, Solange Oliveira Rodrigues; Levy, Soloni Afra Pires; Tortora, Rosangela P; Abe, Augusto Tiaqui; Pires, Gisele Viana; Papi, José Angelo de Souza; França, Alfeu Tavares

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary Angioedema is a dominantly inherited disease. Routine screening of autoantibodies (AAB) is not recommended for individuals with Hereditary Angioedema; however, prevalence of these antibodies in Hereditary Angioedema patients is not well documented. We aim to determine the prevalence of AAB so that individuals at risk of developing autoimmune diseases can be identified. Fifteen patients with Hereditary Angioedema attended at Clementino Fraga Filho University Hospital accepted to participate in this study. Prevalence of AAB was 40%. Our data indicate high prevalence of AAB in patients with Hereditary Angioedema. Large-scale studies should be considered to determine the significance of these AAB in the follow-up care of patients with Hereditary Angioedema.

  12. Hereditary angioedema may not be the only cause of abdominal pain in patients with hereditary angioedema!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Kartal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal pain is one of the basic clinical presentations of the hereditary angioedema and danazol is a common medicine which has been used for long years in patients with hereditary angioedema. We present two hereditary angioedema patients with abdominal pain albeit under danazol treatment, whose final diagnoses was colon carcinoma. There are two consequences in this article which shall be insisted on: First; in patients with hereditary angioedema, the differential diagnosis of and ldquo;abdominal pain and rdquo; is always important even though hereditary angioedema diagnosis exists. And the second; It can be hardy speculated that long term danazol treatment may cause different malignancies. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(3.000: 567-569

  13. [Genetics of hereditary iron overload].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, Jean-Yves; Jouanolle, Anne-Marie; Fergelot, Patricia; Mosser, Jean; David, Véronique

    2004-01-01

    The classification of hereditary abnormalities of iron metabolism was recently expanded and diversified. Genetic hemochromatosis now corresponds to six diseases, namely classical hemochromatosis HFE 1; juvenile hemochromatosis HFE 2 due to mutations in an unidentified gene on chromosome 1; hemochromatosis HFE 3 due to mutations in the transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2); hemochromatosis HFE 4 caused by a mutation in the H subunit of ferritin; and hemochromatosis HFE 6 whose gene is hepcidine (HAMP). Systemic iron overload is also associated with aceruloplasminemia, atransferrinemia and the "Gracile" syndrome caused by mutations in BCS1L. The genes responsible for neonatal and African forms of iron overload are unknown. Other genetic diseases are due to localized iron overload: Friedreich's ataxia results from the expansion of triple nucleotide repeats within the frataxin (FRDA) gene; two forms of X-linked sideroblastic anemia are due to mutations within the delta aminolevulinate synthetase (ALAS 2) or ABC-7 genes; Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome is caused by a pantothenate kinase 2 gene (PANK-2) defect; neuroferritinopathies; and hyperferritinemia--cataract syndrome due to a mutation within the L-ferritin gene. In addition to this wide range of genetic abnormalities, two other features characterize these iron disorders: 1) most are transmitted by an autosomal recessive mechanism, but some, including hemochromatosis type 4, have dominant transmission; and 2) most correspond to cytosolic iron accumulation while some, like Friedreich's ataxia, are disorders of mitochondrial metabolism.

  14. Oral Alendronate Treatment for Severe Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia due to McCune-Albright Syndrome in a Child: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva IvaniNovato

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia (FD associated to McCune-Albright Syndrome (MAS often leads to fractures, deformities, and bone pain resulting in bad quality of life. Parenteral bisphosphonates have been used in children and adolescents to improve these symptoms with few adverse effects. We evaluated the response to oral Alendronate in a girl with severe MAS FD and observed improved quality of life with reduction of bone pain.

  15. Hepato-pancreato-biliary lesions are present in both Carney complex and McCune Albright syndrome: comments on P. Salpea and C. Stratakis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaujoux, Sébastien; Chanson, Philippe; Bertherat, Jérôme; Sauvanet, Alain; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2014-01-25

    One of the key messages of recent Salpea and Stratakis work is to underline the clinical similarities shared by these syndromes that could be explained by a defect in the same signaling pathway, i.e. activation of the cAMP pathway. That being said, we would like to emphasize that hepatopancreato-biliary lesions are one additional feature shared both by Carney complex and McCune Albright syndrome.

  16. Tamoxifen-associated hirsutism: an unusual side effect in a 5-year-old girl with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kırmızıbekmez, Heves; Yesiltepe Mutlu, Rahime Gül; Dursun, Fatma; İşgüven, Şükriye Pınar

    2015-09-01

    Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, has been used in the treatment of peripheral precocious puberty. A 5-year and 3-month-old girl, diagnosed with McCune-Albright syndrome, came in with abnormal hair growth approximately 2 months after the initiation of tamoxifen. The pattern of terminal hair on the skin following the administration of the drug and the exclusion of other causes suggested tamoxifen-induced hirsutism.

  17. McCune Albright syndrome - association of fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait skin spots and hyperthyroidism – case report

    OpenAIRE

    RAUS, IULIAN; COROIU, ROXANA ELENA

    2016-01-01

    McCune–Albright syndrome is a rare sporadic disease characterized by bone fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait skin spots and a variable association of hyperfunctional endocrine disorders. Fibrous dysplasia (FD), which can involve the craniofacial, axial, and appendicular skeleton, may range from an isolated, asymptomatic monostotic lesion to a severe disabling polyostotic disease involving the entire skeleton. A twenty-five-year old male patient presented to our clinic with recently developed hea...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions HSAN5 hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Description Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V ( HSAN5 ) is a condition that primarily affects the ...

  19. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies.

  20. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Sun Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes.

  1. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ulrich Weiss

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Hereditary pancreatitis often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of hereditary pancreatitis patients to develop pancreatic cancer.

  2. High liver glycogen in hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, A R; Ryman, B E

    1971-11-01

    A case of hereditary fructose intolerance is reported in a girl aged 2 years at the time of her death. She had apparently progressed normally until the age of 14 months. At 19 months she was admitted to hospital with failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, and superficial infections. Investigations revealed hypoglycaemia, persistent acidosis, aminoaciduria, and a high liver glycogen level which suggested that she had glycogen storage disease. There was also some evidence of malabsorption. At necropsy the liver enzyme estimations showed that fructose 1-phosphate aldolase activity was absent and that fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase activity was reduced. Hereditary fructose intolerance and glycogen storage disease have been confused in the past on clinical grounds, but a high liver glycogen level has not previously been reported in hereditary fructose intolerance.

  3. [Hereditary optic neuropathies: clinical and molecular genetic characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanakova, N A; Sheremet, N L; Loginova, A N; Chukhrova, A L; Poliakov, A V

    2013-01-01

    The article presents a review of literature on hereditary optic neuropathies: Leber mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathy, autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive optic neuropathies, X-linked optic atrophy. Clinical and molecular genetic characteristics are covered. Isolated optic neuropathies, as well as hereditary optic disorders, being a part of a complex syndromic disease are described.

  4. [Clinical practice of hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of neuropathies, the main category becomes Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT), also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN), distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN), and hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy (HSAN). At least 80 genes have been associated with CMT, HMN or HSAN, a precise molecular diagnosis is often needed to make a clinical diagnosis accurately, enable genetic counseling of the patient and understanding of their molecular mechanisms. To identify the mutation in each patient, using a high-throughput NGS, we established a diagnostic procedure involving screening of disease causing genes in CMT, HMN or HSAN.

  5. Diagnosis and management of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgia, Reena J; Brown, Kimberly

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a rare genetic disorder that can have significant clinical consequences. Hemochromatosis is associated with iron overload, and can initially be recognized through laboratory testing for serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Genetic testing for the HFE mutation can be performed in patients with elevated iron indices and a suspicion for hemochromatosis or liver disease. The main pathway resulting in iron overload is through altered hepcidin levels. Treatment of patients with the clinical phenotype of hereditary hemochromatosis is commonly through phlebotomy for removal of excess iron stores. This article highlights the current information and data regarding the diagnosis and management of hemochromatosis.

  6. Extramedullary paraspinal hematopoiesis in hereditary spherocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogia P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a common inherited hemolytic anemia due to red cell membrane defects. Extramedullary hematopoiesis is a compensatory response to insufficient bone marrow blood cell production. The preferred sites of extramedullary hematopoietic involvement are the spleen, liver and lymph nodes; but in HS, the posterior paravertebral mediastinum is also commonly involved. We report a case of a 50-year-old male who presented to us in respiratory distress and with bilateral paravertebral posterior mediastinal masses, which on trucut biopsy were found to be extra-hematopoietic masses; and the patient was found to have hereditary spherocytosis.

  7. Disease expression in women with hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouillet, Laurence; Longhurst, Hilary; Boccon-Gibod, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    project launched by the European Union, data on 150 postpubertal women with hereditary angioedema were collected in 8 countries, using a patient-based questionnaire. RESULTS: Puberty worsened the disease for 62%. Combined oral contraceptives worsened the disease for 79%, whereas progestogen-only pills......OBJECTIVE: Fluctuations in sex hormones can trigger angioedema attacks in women with hereditary angioedema. Combined oral contraceptive therapies, as well as pregnancy, can induce severe attacks. The course of angioedema may be very variable in different women. STUDY DESIGN: Within the PREHAEAT...

  8. Hereditary angioedema with normal C1 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, Konrad

    2013-11-01

    Until recently it was assumed that hereditary angioedema was a disease that results exclusively from a genetic deficiency of the C1 inhibitor. In 2000, families with hereditary angioedema, normal C1 inhibitor activity, and protein in plasma were described. Since then, numerous patients and families with that condition have been reported. Most of the patients were women. In many of the affected women, oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy containing estrogens, and pregnancies triggered the clinical symptoms. In some families mutations in the coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor) gene were detected.

  9. Autosomal recessive hereditary auditory neuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秋菊; 顾瑞; 曹菊阳

    2003-01-01

    evidence of peripheral neuropathy at the time of this writing. Conclusions: In this study, patients with feature of non- syndromic hereditary auditory neuropathy were identified in three Chinese families.Pedigree analysis indicates autosomal recessive inheritances in the pedigrees. The observed inheritance and clinical audiologic findings are different from those previously described for non-syndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. This information should facilitate future molecular candidate genes screening for understanding the mechanism of AN.

  10. [Hereditary sensory and motor neuropathy and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: recent advances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, T

    2011-12-01

    This review summarizes the recent genetic advances in hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy also called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. The different new genes discovered in 2010 and their underlying phenotypes will be presented.

  11. Burden of Illness in Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, Anette; Aygören-Pürsün, Emel; Beusterien, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the Hereditary Angioedema Burden of Illness Study in Europe was to assess the real-world experience of HAE from the patient perspective. Based on open-ended qualitative interviews with 30 patients from Spain, Germany and Denmark, 5 key themes emerged characterizing the impact...

  12. Hereditary spherocytosis presenting as indolent leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed K

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Indolent leg ulcertation, which is the rarest manifestation of hereditary spherocytosis, started at the age of 5 years affecting a 15-year-old boy and his mother is reported. Review of literature showed very few reports from India and abroad. The response to oral folic acid was excellent

  13. Clinical management of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Tomlinson, Ian; Castells, Antoni

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary factors are involved in the development of a substantial proportion of all cases of colorectal cancer. Inherited forms of colorectal cancer are usually subdivided into polyposis syndromes characterized by the development of multiple colorectal polyps and nonpolyposis syndromes characterized by the development of few or no polyps. Timely identification of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes is vital because patient participation in early detection programmes prevents premature death due to cancer. Polyposis syndromes are fairly easy to recognize, but some patients might have characteristics that overlap with other clinically defined syndromes. Comprehensive analysis of the genes known to be associated with polyposis syndromes helps to establish the final diagnosis in these patients. Recognizing Lynch syndrome is more difficult than other polyposis syndromes owing to the absence of pathognomonic features. Most investigators therefore recommend performing systematic molecular analysis of all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer using immunohistochemical methods. The implementation in clinical practice of new high-throughput methods for molecular analysis might further increase the identification of individuals at risk of hereditary colorectal cancer. This Review describes the clinical management of the various hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes and demonstrates the advantage of using a classification based on the underlying gene defects.

  14. Reprogramming development of experimental hereditary hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeners, M.P.M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the development of experimental hereditary hypertension and to persistently ameliorate the development of hypertension due brief interventions during early development (perinatal treatment). We used two different models of experiment

  15. [Sudden blindness: consider Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schieving, J.H.; Vries, L.B.A. de; Hol, F.A.; Stroink, H.

    2008-01-01

    In 3 young male patients, aged 10, 19 and 21 years respectively, sequential, severe, painless bilateral visual loss occurred. Ophthalmological examination revealed no other abnormalities and this delayed the diagnosis Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). LHON is a mitochondrial genetic diseas

  16. Demyelinating polyneuropathy in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilhuis, H.J.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    We report a patient with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (G11778A mtDNA) and a severe demyelinating neuropathy, for which no other cause except his mitochondrial disorder could be found. The involvement of the peripheral nervous system of patients with LHON, in particular with a 11778 mtDNA, is di

  17. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary paraganglioma-pheochromocytoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chain with loss of enzymatic activity and abnormal mitochondrial morphology. J Pathol. 2003 Nov;201(3):480-6. Citation on PubMed GeneReview: Hereditary ... complex II in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and activates the hypoxia pathway. Am ...

  18. Hereditary spherocytosis: Consequences of delayed diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C Steward

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine whether patients with undiagnosed hereditary spherocytosis hospitalized for transfusions might have avoided hospitalization via earlier diagnosis. Study design: Charts of all (N = 30 patients with hereditary spherocytosis seen in pediatric hematology at West Virginia University-Charleston were reviewed. Family and transfusion history and presence of neonatal jaundice were recorded. Complete blood count and reticulocyte values during infancy were available for 20 of 30 patients, while baseline steady-state values were available for all 30. Results: Transfusions were given to 22 patients; 12 of 14 with an aplastic crisis were undiagnosed. In 10 of 12, the severity of anemia led to hospitalization (3 to intensive care. All 10 had prior mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and/or red cell distribution width elevations and a history of neonatal jaundice; 7 of 10 had a positive family history. Conclusions: Undiagnosed hereditary spherocytosis may lead to inpatient transfusions for severe anemia. Earlier detection of hereditary spherocytosis is easily achievable and may reduce hospitalizations via closer monitoring.

  19. Gynecologic screening in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, FEM; Mourits, MJE; Kleibeuker, JH; Hollema, H; van der Zee, AGJ

    2003-01-01

    Objective. In hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), women with a mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation have a cumulative lifetime risk of 25-50% for endometrial cancer and 8-12% for ovarian cancer. Therefore, female members of HNPCC families are offered an annual gynecologic and transvagi

  20. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jorn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    % in the abdominal area, 17% had diarrhoea, 11% had vomiting and 6% fainted during attacks. Non-hereditary angioedema has high lifetime prevalence and becomes chronic in approximately 50% of affected patients. Symptoms in the larynx and throat, as well as non-specific symptoms, such as dizziness and abdominal pain...

  1. {sup 99m}Tc(V)-DMSA scintigraphy in monitoring the response of bone disease to vitamin D{sub 3} therapy in renal osteodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarikaya, A.; Sen, S.; Hacimahmutoglu, S.; Pekindil, G. [Trakya Univ., Edirne (Turkey). Faculty of Medicine

    2002-02-01

    Renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is a common and serious complication for uremic patients and patients are treated with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}. The bone scanning agent {sup 99m}Tc-phosphate has also been used to evaluate in ROD but it is not clear that bone scintigraphy has a role in the follow-up of treatment. In this study {sup 99m}Tc(V)-DMSA scintigraphy was performed in eleven patients [age 40.7{+-}17.3 (mean {+-}SD) yr] with ROD before and after vitamin D{sub 3} therapy. Images were obtained after hemodialysis performed following tracer injection to maintain normal blood levels of the radiopharmaceutical and to reduce soft tissue activity. Lumbar vertebra-to-soft tissue uptake ratios (LUR) were quantified with the planar {sup 99m}Tc(V)-DMSA images. Alkaline phosphatase and parathyroid hormone levels after tretment had significantly decreased compared with pre-therapy. In all patients there was visually decreased uptake in bone structures after treatment. After treatment the mean LUR ratio was significantly lower than those of before treatment (3.59{+-}2.63 vs. 1.65{+-}0.62; p=0.01). LUR values were correlated with pre-therapy alkaline phosphatase and parathyroid hormone. These findings indicate that {sup 99m}Tc(V)-DMSA scintigraphy is sensitive in evaluating the response of ROD to vitamin D{sub 3} therapy. (author)

  2. Partial benefit of anastrozole in the long-term treatment of precocious puberty in McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Cresio; Silva, Sheila Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    We report a long-term follow-up on the use of anastrozole in the treatment of peripheral precocious puberty (PP) in McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS). A girl, age 3 years and 9 months, was diagnosed with MAS due to PP, café-au-lait spots, and polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. Serum estradiol was elevated, and gonadotropins were suppressed. Pelvic ultrasound showed an enlarged uterus and a follicle cyst (13 mm) in the left ovary. Bone scintigraphy showed osteogenic lesions on the skull, humerus, tibia, and acetabulum. Bone age was 3 years and 5 months at the chronological age of 3 years. After 36 months of treatment with anastrozole (1 mg/day), there was suppression of breast growth, normalization of growth velocity and serum estradiol, and disappearance of ovarian cysts. However, there was increase in uterine volume, advancement of bone age, and two episodes of vaginal bleeding (18th and 24th months). This report shows the partial benefit of anastrozole in the treatment of peripheral PP of girls with MAS.

  3. Patients with McCune-Albright syndrome have a broad spectrum of abnormalities in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Laura D; Noë, Michaël; Hackeng, Wenzel; Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Bhaijee, Feriyl; Debeljak, Marija; Yu, Jun; Suenaga, Masaya; Singhi, Aatur D; Zaheer, Atif; Boyce, Alison; Robinson, Cemre; Eshleman, James R; Goggins, Michael G; Hruban, Ralph H; Collins, Michael T; Lennon, Anne Marie; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2017-02-10

    McCune-Albright Syndrome (MAS) is a rare sporadic syndrome caused by post-zygotic mutations in the GNAS oncogene, leading to constitutional mosaicism for these alterations. Somatic activating GNAS mutations also commonly occur in several gastrointestinal and pancreatic neoplasms, but the spectrum of abnormalities in these organs in patients with MAS has yet to be systematically described. We report comprehensive characterization of the upper gastrointestinal tract in seven patients with MAS and identify several different types of polyps, including gastric heterotopia/metaplasia (7/7), gastric hyperplastic polyps (5/7), fundic gland polyps (2/7), and a hamartomatous polyp (1/7). In addition, one patient had an unusual adenomatous lesion at the gastroesophageal junction with high-grade dysplasia. In the pancreas, all patients had endoscopic ultrasound findings suggestive of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), but only two patients met the criteria for surgical intervention. Both of these patients had IPMNs at resection, one with low-grade dysplasia and one with high-grade dysplasia. GNAS mutations were identified in the majority of lesions analyzed, including both IPMNs and the adenomatous lesion from the gastroesophageal junction. These studies suggest that there is a broad spectrum of abnormalities in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas in patients with MAS and that patients with MAS should be evaluated for gastrointestinal pathology, some of which may warrant clinical intervention due to advanced dysplasia.

  4. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations....

  5. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer--An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurzu, Simona; Jung, Ioan; Orlowska, Janina; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Kadar, Zoltan; Turdean, Sabin; Bara, Tivadar

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of gastric cancer varies by up to ten fold throughout the world, and the geographic distribution of hereditary cases is not well explored. Familial clustering is seen in 10% of cases, and approximately 3% of all gastric cancers develop due to hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). In this review, the characteristics of HDGC are presented according to molecular particularities, geographic distribution, and other parameters. Based on our experience and the data from the literature, we discuss the possibility of applying a mutation signature (spectrum) study and adductomic approaches to a comparative carcinogenesis of HDGC. We also provide a comprehensive, up-to-date review of genetic counseling and criteria for screening and surveillance of eligible families.

  6. Hereditary angioedema type I: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Peralta, Francisca; Buller Vigueira, Eva; Cabello Pulido, Juana

    2016-01-28

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare disease with great heterogeneity of symptoms such as edema of the skin, gastro-intestinal mucosa and larynx or pharynx. Even though there are three types, the most frequent is type I, which is a result from a deficiency of the complement C1 inhibitor. The severity of its symptoms along with the low prevalence of the disease and the need for appropriate specific treatment make the diagnosis and treatment of the pathology an outstanding subject for the family physician. The present is the case of a male teenager with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency since he was six months old, angioedema on arms and legs since 11 years old and diagnosed with hereditary angioedema type I one year after. The definitive diagnosis of the disease enabled an appropriate treatment which consists in preventing outbreaks that may compromise the patient's life and, if they occur, administration of complement C1 inhibitor.

  7. Cate's Story: Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Megan

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a major cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide and is thought to be responsible for about 10% of cancer-related deaths across the globe. A small proportion of all gastric cancers arise because of a known hereditary syndrome, the most common of which is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). This is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an increased risk of developing diffuse gastric cancer at a young age. The gene responsible for HDGC is CDH1, also known as E-cadherin, a germline mutation conferring an 80% risk of developing gastric cancer during the lifetime of the carrier. Females with germline CDH1 mutations face an additional risk of developing lobular breast cancer, with a reported cumulative risk of 60% by the age of 80 years.
.

  8. The biochemical basis of hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouteldja, Nadia; Timson, David J

    2010-04-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare, but potentially lethal, inherited disorder of fructose metabolism, caused by mutation of the aldolase B gene. Treatment currently relies solely on dietary restriction of problematic sugars. Biochemical study of defective aldolase B enzymes is key to revealing the molecular basis of the disease and providing a stronger basis for improved treatment and diagnosis. Such studies have revealed changes in enzyme activity, stability and oligomerisation. However, linking these changes to disease phenotypes has not always been straightforward. This review gives a general overview of the features of hereditary fructose intolerance, then concentrates on the biochemistry of the AP variant (Ala149Pro variant of aldolase B) and molecular pathological consequences of mutation of the aldolase B gene.

  9. Distal renal tubular acidosis with hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rajiv; Agarwal, Indira; Bawazir, Waleed M; Bruce, Lesley J

    2013-07-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA), although distinct entities, share the same protein i.e. the anion exchanger1 (AE1) protein. Despite this, their coexistence has been rarely reported. We hereby describe the largest family to date with co-existence of dRTA and HS and discuss the molecular basis for the co-inheritance of these conditions.

  10. Hereditary Transthyretin Amyloidosis in Eight Chinese Families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-Chao Meng; He Lyu; Wei Zhang; Jing Liu; Zhao-Xia Wang; Yun Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background:Mutations of transthyretin (TTR) cause the most common type of autosomal-dominant hereditary systemic amyloidosis,which occurs worldwide.To date,more and more mutations in the TTR gene have been reported.Some variations in the clinical presentation are often observed in patients with the same mutation or the patients in the same family.The purpose of this study was to find out the clinicopathologic and genetic features of Chinese patients with hereditary TTR amyloidosis.Methods:Clinical and necessary examination materials were collected from nine patients of eight families with hereditary TTR amyloidosis at Peking University First Hospital from January 2007 to November 2014.Sural nerve biopsies were taken for eight patients and skin biopsies were taken in the calf/upper arm for two patients,for light and electron microscopy examination.The TTR genes from the nine patients were analyzed.Results:The onset age varied from 23 to 68 years.The main manifestations were paresthesia,proximal and/or distal weakness,autonomic dysfunction,cardiomyopathy,vitreous opacity,hearing loss,and glossohypertrophia.Nerve biopsy demonstrated severe loss ofmyelinated fibers in seven cases and amyloid deposits in three.One patient had skin amyloid deposits which were revealed from electron microscopic examination.Genetic analysis showed six kinds of mutations of TTR gene,including Val30Met,Phe33Leu,Ala36Pro,Val30Ala,Phe33Val,and Glu42Gly in exon 2.Conclusions:Since the pathological examinations of sural nerve were negative for amyloid deposition in most patients,the screening for TTR mutations should be performed in all the adult patients,who are clinically suspected with hereditary TTR amyloidosis.

  11. Hereditary angioedema:44 years of diagnostic delay

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, M.P.; Bygum, A

    2016-01-01

    We report a 64-year-old man who suffered from recurrent visible swelling attacks since the age of 20 as well as episodes with severe upper airway edema, resulting in 4 emergency tracheotomies. Eventually after 44 years he was diagnosed with hereditary angioedema (HAE) type II. The aims of this report is to emphasize the importance of awareness concerning HAE, which does not respond to traditional anti-allergic therapy, and remind physicians to test for functional C1-INH deficiency.

  12. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy mimicking neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Collin M; Van Stavern, Gregory P; Tselis, Alex C

    2011-09-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is rarely associated with multiple sclerosis-like features. We present a case of a 65-year-old African American woman with LHON masquerading as neuromyelitis optica (NMO). We highlight the features of the clinical examination and MRI that were suggestive of an alternative diagnosis and review the literature regarding LHON and multiple sclerosis. The diagnosis of LHON should be considered in all cases of acute or subacute bilateral optic neuropathy, including presumed seronegative NMO.

  13. [The role of the immune system in hereditary demyelinating neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäurer, M; Toyka, K V; Martini, R

    2005-06-01

    Hereditary neuropathies, e.g., Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, are inherited diseases of the peripheral nervous system causing chronic progressive motor and sensory dysfunction. Most neuropathies are due to mutations in myelin genes such as PMP22, P0, and the gap junction protein Cx32. Myelin mutant mice are regarded as suitable animal models for several forms of hereditary neuropathies and are important neurobiological tools for the evaluation of pathogenetic and therapeutic concepts in hereditary neuropathies. Using these animal models we could recently show that the immune system is involved in the pathogenesis of hereditary neuropathies. Due to the phenotypic similarities we also consider the immune system important for human inherited neuropathies, in particular since several case reports demonstrate a beneficial effect of immune therapies in patients with hereditary neuropathies. In this review we compare findings from animal models and human disease to elucidate the role of the immune system in hereditary neuropathies.

  14. Medical management of hereditary optic neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eLa Morgia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases of the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e. the maternally inherited Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON and Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA. They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6 for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone. Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising venue that still needs to be validated.

  15. Medical management of hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Morgia, Chiara; Carbonelli, Michele; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Alfredo Arrigo; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases affecting the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e., the maternally inherited Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and dominant optic atrophy (DOA). They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is characterized by an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6) for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are still limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone). Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising avenue that still needs to be validated.

  16. Brazilian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Giavina-Bianchi; Alfeu T. França; GRUMACH, Anete S.; Abílio A Motta; Fátima R Fernandes; Regis A. Campos; Solange O Valle; Rosário, Nelson A.; Dirceu Sole

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by edema attacks with multiple organ involvement. It is caused by a quantitative or functional deficiency of the C1 inhibitor, which is a member of the serine protease inhibitor family. Hereditary angioedema is unknown to many health professionals and is therefore an underdiagnosed disease. The causes of death from hereditary angioedema include laryngeal edema with asphyxia. The estimated mortality rate in patients in whom t...

  17. Non responsive celiac disease due to coexisting hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadia, Lalit; Shivpuri, Deepak

    2012-04-01

    Celiac disease is associated with several genetic disorders, but its association with hereditary fructose intolerance is rare. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare autosomal recessive disease of fructose metabolism presenting as vomiting after intake of fructose. An association between these two distinct genetic gastrointestinal disorders is important as treatment failure of celiac disease calls for careful evaluation for hereditary fructose intolerance. We report a patient with an association of these two disorders.

  18. Inhibiting Plasma Kallikrein for Hereditary Angioedema Prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Aleena; Busse, Paula; Shennak, Mustafa; Lumry, William; Davis-Lorton, Mark; Wedner, Henry J; Jacobs, Joshua; Baker, James; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Lockey, Richard; Li, H Henry; Craig, Timothy; Cicardi, Marco; Riedl, Marc; Al-Ghazawi, Ahmad; Soo, Carolyn; Iarrobino, Ryan; Sexton, Daniel J; TenHoor, Christopher; Kenniston, Jon A; Faucette, Ryan; Still, J Gordon; Kushner, Harvey; Mensah, Robert; Stevens, Chris; Biedenkapp, Joseph C; Chyung, Yung; Adelman, Burt

    2017-02-23

    Background Hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency is characterized by recurrent, unpredictable swelling episodes caused by uncontrolled plasma kallikrein generation and excessive bradykinin release resulting from cleavage of high-molecular-weight kininogen. Lanadelumab (DX-2930) is a new kallikrein inhibitor with the potential for prophylactic treatment of hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency. Methods We conducted a phase 1b, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-ascending-dose trial. Patients with hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive either lanadelumab (24 patients) or placebo (13 patients), in two administrations 14 days apart. Patients assigned to lanadelumab were enrolled in sequential dose groups: total dose of 30 mg (4 patients), 100 mg (4 patients), 300 mg (5 patients), or 400 mg (11 patients). The pharmacodynamic profile of lanadelumab was assessed by measurement of plasma levels of cleaved high-molecular-weight kininogen, and efficacy was assessed by the rate of attacks of angioedema during a prespecified period (day 8 to day 50) in the 300-mg and 400-mg groups as compared with the placebo group. Results No discontinuations occurred because of adverse events, serious adverse events, or deaths in patients who received lanadelumab. The most common adverse events that emerged during treatment were attacks of angioedema, injection-site pain, and headache. Dose-proportional increases in serum concentrations of lanadelumab were observed; the mean elimination half-life was approximately 2 weeks. Lanadelumab at a dose of 300 mg or 400 mg reduced cleavage of high-molecular-weight kininogen in plasma from patients with hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency to levels approaching that from patients without the disorder. From day 8 to day 50, the 300-mg and 400-mg groups had 100% and 88% fewer attacks, respectively, than the placebo group. All

  19. Gigantism treated by pure endoscopic endonasal approach in a case of McCune-Albright syndrome with sphenoid fibrous dysplasia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Guive; Jalessi, Maryam; Sarvghadi, Farzaneh; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2013-12-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is an uncommon polyostotic manifestation of fibrous dysplasia in association with at least one endocrinopathy that is mostly associated with precocious puberty and hyperpigmented skin macules named café-au-lait spots. We present an atypical manifestation of McCune-Albright syndrome in a 19-year-old man with the uncommon association of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and gigantism in the absence of café-au-lait spots and precocious puberty. He presented with a height increase to 202 cm in the previous 3 years, which had become more progressive in the few months prior. Physical examination revealed only a mild facial asymmetry; however, a computed tomography (CT) scan discovered vast areas of voluminous bones with ground-glass density and thickening involving the craniofacial bones and skull base. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) found a right stalk shift of the pituitary with a 20 mm pituitary adenoma. We describe the diagnostic and endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for excision of the tumor.

  20. McCune Albright syndrome - association of fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait skin spots and hyperthyroidism – case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    RAUS, IULIAN; COROIU, ROXANA ELENA

    2016-01-01

    McCune–Albright syndrome is a rare sporadic disease characterized by bone fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait skin spots and a variable association of hyperfunctional endocrine disorders. Fibrous dysplasia (FD), which can involve the craniofacial, axial, and appendicular skeleton, may range from an isolated, asymptomatic monostotic lesion to a severe disabling polyostotic disease involving the entire skeleton. A twenty-five-year old male patient presented to our clinic with recently developed heart palpitations. He had also been feeling pain in the right femur since he was younger, without any trauma history, leading to difficulties of ambulation and limping occasionally. His physical examination revealed café-au-lait spots with irregular borders and right testicular agenesis. Laboratory findings identified hyperthyroidism with hyperparathyroidism. Radiographs of the pelvis revealed multiple lytic lesions of the right femur and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characterized these lesions as specific to fibrous dysplasia of the bone, without any insufficiency fracture at this level. The association of café-au-lait skin spots with bone fibrous dysplasia, and hyperthyroidism in this patient suggested the diagnosis of McCune – Albright syndrome. PMID:27857528

  1. Three cases of osteoma cutis occurring in infancy. A brief overview of osteoma cutis and its association with pseudo-pseudohypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Susannah; Sugo, Ella; Verge, Charles F; Wargon, Orli

    2011-05-01

    We report three cases of primary osteoma cutis in children, two of whom (siblings) were associated with Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO), manifesting as short stature with autosomal dominant inheritance from the father, but no dysmorphic features and no parathyroid hormone (PTH) resistance. Osteoma cutis can manifest as an isolated skin disease, a secondary condition to other skin diseases (such as acne), or in association with several syndromes, including AHO, which in turn may be associated with PTH resistance. The management and prognosis of patients diagnosed with osteoma cutis is determined by whether the skin manifestation has occurred in isolation, in association with a syndrome, or as a secondary skin disease. These three paediatric cases highlight the importance of understanding the aetiology and associations of osteoma cutis in order to appropriately investigate and manage patients who present with this rare skin disease.

  2. MOMO Syndrome with Holoprosencephaly and Cryptorchidism: Expanding the Spectrum of the New Obesity Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharda, Sheetal; Panigrahi, Inusha; Marwaha, Ram Kumar

    2011-01-01

    There are multiple genetic disorders with known or unknown etiology grouped under obesity syndromes. Inspite of having multisystem involvement and often having a characteristic presentation, the understanding of the genetic causes in the majority of these syndromes is still lacking. The common obesity syndromes are Bardet-Biedl, Prader-Willi, Alstrom, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy, Carpenter, Rubinstein-Taybi, Fragile X, and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome. The list is ever increasing as new syndromes are being added to it. One of the recent additions is MOMO syndrome, with about five such cases being reported in literature. Expanding the spectrum of clinical features, we report the first case of MOMO syndrome from India with lobar variant of holoprosencephaly and cryptorchidism, which have not been reported previously.

  3. MOMO Syndrome with Holoprosencephaly and Cryptorchidism: Expanding the Spectrum of the New Obesity Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Sharda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There are multiple genetic disorders with known or unknown etiology grouped under obesity syndromes. Inspite of having multisystem involvement and often having a characteristic presentation, the understanding of the genetic causes in the majority of these syndromes is still lacking. The common obesity syndromes are Bardet-Biedl, Prader-Willi, Alstrom, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy, Carpenter, Rubinstein-Taybi, Fragile X, and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome. The list is ever increasing as new syndromes are being added to it. One of the recent additions is MOMO syndrome, with about five such cases being reported in literature. Expanding the spectrum of clinical features, we report the first case of MOMO syndrome from India with lobar variant of holoprosencephaly and cryptorchidism, which have not been reported previously.

  4. Intracranial Hemorrhage Revealing Pseudohypoparathyroidism as a Cause of Fahr Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Swami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudohypoparathyroidism is an infrequently encountered disease. It is one of the causes of Fahr syndrome which also is a rare clinical entity caused by multiple diseases. A 4-year-old man hospitalized for sudden onset left hemiparesis and hypertension was diagnosed to have right thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage on plain CT scan of the head which also revealed co-existent extensive intracranial calcifications involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum bilaterally. General physical examination revealed features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy, goitre, hypertension, left hemiparesis, and signs of cerebellar dysfunction. Laboratory findings suggested hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia along with high TSH, low FT4, low FT3, and high anti-TPO antibody. Though bilateral intracranial calcifications are usually encountered as an incidental radiological finding in the CT scan of brain, in this case, the patient admitted for thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage was on investigation for associated intracranial calcification, and goitre was also found to have coexisting pseudohypoparathyroidism and autoimmune hypothyroidism.

  5. Identification of a Novel Mutation in a Pseudohypoparathyroidism Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Min Miao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHP Ia is defined as a series of disorders characterized by multihormone resistance in end-organs and Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO phenotype. PHP Ia is caused by heterozygous inactivating mutations in GNAS, which encodes the stimulatory G-protein alpha subunit (Gsa. A patient with typical clinical manifestations of pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP (round face, short stature, centripetal obesity, brachydactyly, and multi-hormone resistance: parathyroid hormone (PTH, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, and gonadotropins presented at our center. The sequence of the GNAS gene from the patient and her families revealed a novel missense mutation (Y318H in the proband and her mother. An in vitro Gsa functional study showed that Gsa function was significantly impaired. These results stress the importance of GNAS gene investigation.

  6. Genetic obesity syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Anthony P; Beales, Philip L

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous reports of multi-system genetic disorders with obesity. Many have a characteristic presentation and several, an overlapping phenotype indicating the likelihood of a shared common underlying mechanism or pathway. By understanding the genetic causes and functional perturbations of such syndromes we stand to gain tremendous insight into obesogenic pathways. In this review we focus particularly on Bardet-Biedl syndrome, whose molecular genetics and cell biology has been elucidated recently, and Prader-Willi syndrome, the commonest obesity syndrome due to loss of imprinted genes on 15q11-13. We also discuss highlights of other genetic obesity syndromes including Alstrom syndrome, Cohen syndrome, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (pseudohypoparathyroidism), Carpenter syndrome, MOMO syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, cases with deletions of 6q16, 1p36, 2q37 and 9q34, maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14, fragile X syndrome and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome.

  7. Abnormal Methylation Status of the GNAS Exon 1A Region in Pseudohypohyperparathyroidism Combined With Turner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Wang, Dong; Ren, An; Xing, Yan; Zhang, Dongliang; Wei, Jun; Yu, Ning; Xing, Xuenong; Ye, Shandong

    2015-12-01

    Pseudohypohyperparathyroidism (PHHP) is a rare type of pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP), which seems to have a normal skeletal response to parathyroid hormone but shows renal resistance. Almost all patients with PHHP have PHP Ib, a subtype of PHP that is usually caused by GNAS methylation defects, often in exon 1A. Some features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy can occasionally be found in patients with PHHP, but these features are also common in Turner syndrome. The authors report on an extremely rare case of a patient with PHHP and Turner syndrome, a 47-year-old woman who sought medical attention for hypocalcemia and elevated parathyroid hormone. She had no family history of hypocalcemia and no STX16 gene deletions. She had a mosaic karyotype of 46, X, del(X)(p11.4)/45, XO. Pyrosequencing was performed to determine the GNAS exon 1A methylation. The degree of methylation found in exon 1A of the patient was lower than her unaffected relatives.

  8. Intracranial hemorrhage revealing pseudohypoparathyroidism as a cause of fahr syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Abhijit; Kar, Giridhari

    2011-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism is an infrequently encountered disease. It is one of the causes of Fahr syndrome which also is a rare clinical entity caused by multiple diseases. A 4-year-old man hospitalized for sudden onset left hemiparesis and hypertension was diagnosed to have right thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage on plain CT scan of the head which also revealed co-existent extensive intracranial calcifications involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum bilaterally. General physical examination revealed features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy, goitre, hypertension, left hemiparesis, and signs of cerebellar dysfunction. Laboratory findings suggested hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia along with high TSH, low FT(4), low FT(3), and high anti-TPO antibody. Though bilateral intracranial calcifications are usually encountered as an incidental radiological finding in the CT scan of brain, in this case, the patient admitted for thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage was on investigation for associated intracranial calcification, and goitre was also found to have coexisting pseudohypoparathyroidism and autoimmune hypothyroidism.

  9. Paternal uniparental isodisomy of the entire chromosome 20 as a molecular cause of pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP-Ib).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastepe, Murat; Altug-Teber, Ozge; Agarwal, Chhavi; Oberfield, Sharon E; Bonin, Michael; Jüppner, Harald

    2011-03-01

    Pseudohypoparathyoridism type Ib (PHP-Ib) typically defines the presence of end-organ resistance to parathyroid hormone in the absence of Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy. Patients affected by this disorder present with imprinting defects in the complex GNAS locus. Microdeletions within STX16 or GNAS have been identified in familial cases with PHP-Ib, but the molecular cause of the GNAS imprinting defects in sporadic PHP-Ib cases remains poorly defined. We now report a case with sporadic PHP-Ib for whom a SNPlex analysis revealed loss of the maternal GNAS allele. Further analysis of the entire genome with a 100K SNP chip identified a paternal uniparental isodisomy affecting the entire chromosome 20 without evidence for another chromosomal abnormality. Our findings explain the observed GNAS methylation changes and the patient's hormone resistance, and furthermore suggest that chromosome 20 harbors, besides GNAS, no additional imprinted region that contributes to the clinical and laboratory phenotype.

  10. Moyamoya Syndrome Associated With Hereditary Spherocytosis: An Emerging Clinical Entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gait-Carr, Eleanor; Connolly, Daniel J A; King, David

    2017-04-01

    Moyamoya syndrome is an unusual cerebrovascular disorder, which has rarely been reported in association with hereditary spherocytosis. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy with hereditary spherocytosis who was diagnosed with Moyamoya syndrome following a stroke. We discuss why these conditions may coexist and briefly outline the management of such children.

  11. [DNA-based diagnosis of hereditary tumour predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menko, F.H.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Brouwer, T.; Hahn, D.E.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2007-01-01

    Of all forms of cancer, approximately 5% are caused by factors leading to a strong genetic predisposition. DNA diagnosis is currently used in families with hereditary tumour syndromes, such as familial adenomatous polyposis, hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma (Lynch syndrome), and heredit

  12. Cerebral abscesses among Danish patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Tørring, P M; Nissen, H;

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), which due to paradoxical embolization may cause cerebral abscess.......Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), which due to paradoxical embolization may cause cerebral abscess....

  13. The humanistic burden of hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caballero, Teresa; Aygören-Pürsün, Emel; Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    and impact of HAE types I and II from the patient perspective. The HAE Burden of Illness Study in Europe was conducted in Spain, Germany, and Denmark to assess the real-world experience of HAE from the patient perspective via a one-time survey, which included items on clinical characteristics and physical......Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare but potentially life-threatening disease marked by spontaneous, recurrent attacks of swelling. The broad range of consequences of HAE on patients? lives is not well understood. The study objective was to comprehensively characterize the burden of illness...

  14. Multiple mechanisms for hereditary sideroblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuyama, Kazumichi; Sassa, Shigeru

    2002-02-01

    Hereditary sideroblastic anemia (HSA) is a heterogeneous group of inherited anemic disorders which is characterized by the presence of ringed sideroblasts in the bone marrow, microcytic hypochromic anemia and typically its X-linked inheritance in patients. It has been shown that a deficiency of the erythroid-specific delta-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS-E) activity is responsible for pyridoxine-responsive HSA in many patients, however, the pathogenesis of other types of HSA remains still unknown. In this article, recent evidence suggesting multiple causes for HSA is summarized and discussed.

  15. Platelet Function in Basset Hound Hereditary Thrombopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Hematol, 17(4),242-258, 1980. 5. CHARO, I.F., FEINMAN , R.D., DETWILER, T.C. Interrelation of platelet aggregation and secretion. J. Clin. Invest...of dogs affected with Basset Hound Hereditary Thrombopathy. Thromb Au, 3, 61-71, 1985. 4. DETWILER, T.C., CHARO, I.F., AND FEINMAN , R.D. Evidence...glycoproteins. Surv Synth Path Res 1:274, 1983. Charo IF, Feinman RD, and Detwiler TC. Interrelation of platelet aggregation and secretion. J Clin Invest 60

  16. Management of hereditary angioedema: 2010 Canadian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract C1-inhibitor (C1-INH deficiency is a rare blood disorder resulting in angioedema attacks that are debilitating and may be life-threatening. Prophylaxis and therapy of events has changed since our first Canadian Consensus Conference on the diagnosis, therapy and management of HAE. We have formed the Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN/Réseau Canadien d'Angioédème Héréditaire (RCAH - http://www.haecanada.com to advance care of patients with this disorder in Canada. We here present a review of management of HAE in Canada.

  17. BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-song TENG; Yi ZHENG; Hao-hao WANG

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death in women today. Some of the patients are hereditary, with a large proportion characterized by mutation in BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 genes. In this review, we provide an overview of these two genes,focusing on their relationship with hereditary breast cancers. BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers have unique features that differ from the general breast cancers, including alterations in cellular molecules, pathological bases, biological behavior, and a different prevention strategy. But the outcome of BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers still remains controversial;further studies are needed to elucidate the nature of BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers.

  18. Epidemiology of non-hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jørn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-09-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n = 7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n = 7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C(1) esterase inhibitor protein (functional C(1) INH). The general population sample (44% response rate) reported a lifetime prevalence of 7.4% for angioedema. In both groups symptoms were most frequent in the lips, head, neck, eyes and tongue. In the C(1) INH test normal group angioedema was still active at the time of the study in 53% of the patients, and 36% reported symptoms in the throat, 23% in the abdominal area, 17% had diarrhoea, 11% had vomiting and 6% fainted during attacks. Non-hereditary angioedema has high lifetime prevalence and becomes chronic in approximately 50% of affected patients. Symptoms in the larynx and throat, as well as non-specific symptoms, such as dizziness and abdominal pain, were more frequent than previously reported.

  19. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jørn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n¿=¿7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n¿=¿7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C1 esterase inhibitor protein (functional C1 INH). The general population sample (44% response rate......% in the abdominal area, 17% had diarrhoea, 11% had vomiting and 6% fainted during attacks. Non-hereditary angioedema has high lifetime prevalence and becomes chronic in approximately 50% of affected patients. Symptoms in the larynx and throat, as well as non-specific symptoms, such as dizziness and abdominal pain......) reported a lifetime prevalence of 7.4% for angioedema. In both groups symptoms were most frequent in the lips, head, neck, eyes and tongue. In the C1 INH test normal group angioedema was still active at the time of the study in 53% of the patients, and 36% reported symptoms in the throat, 23...

  20. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyerson C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cherise Meyerson, Greg Van Stavern, Collin McClelland Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA Abstract: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. Keywords: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, mitochondria, neuro-ophthalmology, mitochondrial DNA

  1. Molecular genetics of distal hereditary motor neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irobi, Joy; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2004-10-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies comprise a wide variety of diseases primarily affecting the peripheral nervous system. The best-known peripheral neuropathy is Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) described in 1886 by J.-M. Charcot, P. Marie and H.H. Tooth. In 1980, A.E. Harding and P.K. Thomas showed that in a large group of individuals with CMT, several only had motor abnormalities on clinical and electrophysiological examination, whereas sensory abnormalities were absent. This exclusively motor variant of CMT was designated as spinal CMT or hereditary distal spinal muscular atrophy, and included in the distal hereditary motor neuropathies (distal HMN). The distal HMN are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and are subdivided according to the mode of inheritance, age at onset and clinical evolution. Since the introduction of positional cloning, 12 chromosomal loci and seven disease-causing genes have been identified for autosomal dominant and recessive distal HMN. Most of the genes involved have housekeeping functions, as in RNA processing, translation synthesis, glycosylation, stress response, apoptosis, but also axonal trafficking and editing. Functional characterization of the mutations will help to unravel the cellular processes that underlie the specificity of motor neuropathies leading to neurogenic muscular atrophy of distal limb muscles. Here we review the recent progress of the molecular genetics of distal HMN and discuss the genes implicated.

  2. Molecular genetics of hereditary sensory neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Mauko, Barbara; Auer-Grumbach, Piet; Pieber, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), also known as hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. They are caused by neuronal atrophy and degeneration, predominantly affecting peripheral sensory and autonomic neurons. Both congenital and juvenile to adulthood onset is possible. Currently, the classification of the HSN depends on the mode of inheritance, age at onset, and clinical presentation. Hallmark features are progressive sensory loss, chronic skin ulcers, and other skin abnormalities. Spontaneous fractures and neuropathic arthropathy are frequent complications and often necessitate amputations. Autonomic features vary between different subgroups. Distal muscle weakness and wasting may be present and is sometimes so prominent that it becomes difficult to distinguish HSN from Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome. Recent major advances in molecular genetics have led to the identification of seven gene loci and six-disease causing genes for autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive HSN. These genes have been shown to play roles in lipid metabolism and the regulation of intracellular vesicular transport, but also a presumptive transcriptional regulator, a nerve growth factor receptor, and a nerve growth factor have been described among the causative genes in HSN. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how mutations in the known genes lead to the phenotype of HSN. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of the molecular genetics of the HSN and the implicated genes.

  3. Intragenic suppression of a constitutively active allele of Gsα associated with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobar-Rubin, Raquel; Sultan, Dahlia; Janevska, Daniela; Turcic, Kyle; Carroll, Julie; Ooms, Laura; Pals-Rylaarsdam, Robin

    2013-04-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a human genetic disorder caused by a mutation that constitutively activates the G(s)α subunit by abolishing GTP hydrolysis. MAS patients suffer from a range of endocrinopathies as well as polyostotic fibrous dysplasia of bone. We previously identified an intragenic suppressor of the MAS mutation in a yeast system, which substituted two residues in the GTP-binding site of Gpa1: L318P and D319V to suppress the constitutive activity of an R297H mutation, corresponding to the human F222P, D223V, and R201H mutations respectively. To extend these studies, the human GNAS gene was subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. Constructs expressing the MAS mutation (R201H), the MAS mutation plus the mutations homologous to the yeast suppressors (R201H, F222P/D223V), or the yeast suppressor mutation alone (F222P/D223V) were transfected into HEK293 cells, and basal and receptor-stimulated cAMP levels were measured. Expression of R201H increased the basal cAMP levels and decreased the EC(50) for hormone-stimulated cAMP production. These effects were dependent on the amount of R201H protein expressed. R201H, F222P/D223V abolished the constitutive activity of the MAS mutation and caused responses to hormone that were not different from those measured in cells expressing WT G(s)α. Interestingly, F222P/D223V behaved similar to R201H in causing increases in basal cAMP production, thus demonstrating constitutive activity. Substitution of another acidic (E) or polar (N, T, and G) amino acid at position 223 caused no suppression of R201H activity, while substitution of a second nonpolar amino acid (A) at this position partially suppressed, and the larger polar I residue completely suppressed the effects of R201H.

  4. Outcome of Long-Term Bisphosphonate Therapy in McCune-Albright Syndrome and Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majoor, Bas Cj; Appelman-Dijkstra, Natasha M; Fiocco, Martha; van de Sande, Michiel Aj; Dijkstra, Pd Sander; Hamdy, Neveen At

    2017-02-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare bone disorder characterized by fibrous dysplasia (FD), endocrinopathies, and café-au-lait patches. FD patients have been shown to respond favorably to treatment with bisphosphonates, but data are scarce in the more severe polyostotic form (PFD), including MAS, and factors determining treatment outcome are not known, particularly in the long-term. We evaluated the biochemical (bone turnover markers [BTMs]) and clinical (pain reduction) outcome of bisphosphonate therapy in 11 patients with MAS and 30 patients with PFD: median duration of treatment 6 years (range, 2 to 25 years). Prognostic factors for treatment outcome were identified in both groups. Patients with MAS were younger at diagnosis (p = 0.001), all had precocious puberty, and four (36%) had additional growth hormone (GH) excess associated with severe craniofacial FD. Extent of skeletal disease was more severe in MAS compared to PFD. MAS patients had higher serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) concentrations (p = 0.005), higher skeletal burden scores (p < 0.001), and more fractures (p = 0.021). MAS patients had also higher levels of FGF-23 (p = 0.008) and higher prevalence of hypophosphatemia (p = 0.013). Twenty-four of 30 PFD patients (80%) demonstrated a complete clinical and biochemical response within a year of starting treatment (p = 0.015), compared to only four of 11 MAS patients (36%). There were no nonresponders. In the whole group, FGF-23, total ALP, P1NP, and CTX positively correlated with skeletal burden scores (all p ≤ 0.001), which was the only significant risk factor for an incomplete response to bisphosphonate therapy (p < 0.01). Our data suggest a beneficial and safe outcome of long-term bisphosphonate therapy in the majority of patients with PFD, although response to therapy was limited by the higher skeletal disease burden in MAS patients. In the PFD/MAS population studied, the only identified prognostic factor

  5. Brazilian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Giavina-Bianchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by edema attacks with multiple organ involvement. It is caused by a quantitative or functional deficiency of the C1 inhibitor, which is a member of the serine protease inhibitor family. Hereditary angioedema is unknown to many health professionals and is therefore an underdiagnosed disease. The causes of death from hereditary angioedema include laryngeal edema with asphyxia. The estimated mortality rate in patients in whom the disease goes undetected and who are therefore incorrectly treated is 25-40%. In addition to edema of the glottis, hereditary angioedema often results in edema of the gastrointestinal tract, which can be incapacitating. Patients with hereditary angioedema may undergo unnecessary surgical interventions because the digestive tract can be the primary or only organ system involved, thus mimicking acute surgical abdomen. It is estimated that patients with hereditary angioedema experience some degree of disability 20-100 days per year. The Experts in Clinical Immunology and Allergy of the "Associação Brasileira de Alergia e Imunopatologia -ASBAI" developed these guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and management of hereditary angioedema.

  6. Brazilian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; França, Alfeu T; Grumach, Anete S; Motta, Abílio A; Fernandes, Fátima R; Campos, Regis A; Valle, Solange O; Rosário, Nelson A; Sole, Dirceu

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by edema attacks with multiple organ involvement. It is caused by a quantitative or functional deficiency of the C1 inhibitor, which is a member of the serine protease inhibitor family. Hereditary angioedema is unknown to many health professionals and is therefore an underdiagnosed disease. The causes of death from hereditary angioedema include laryngeal edema with asphyxia. The estimated mortality rate in patients in whom the disease goes undetected and who are therefore incorrectly treated is 25-40%. In addition to edema of the glottis, hereditary angioedema often results in edema of the gastrointestinal tract, which can be incapacitating. Patients with hereditary angioedema may undergo unnecessary surgical interventions because the digestive tract can be the primary or only organ system involved, thus mimicking acute surgical abdomen. It is estimated that patients with hereditary angioedema experience some degree of disability 20-100 days per year. The Experts in Clinical Immunology and Allergy of the "Associação Brasileira de Alergia e Imunopatologia -ASBAI" developed these guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and management of hereditary angioedema.

  7. Hereditary red cell membrane disorders and laboratory diagnostic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M-J; Zanella, A

    2013-06-01

    This overview describes two groups of nonimmune hereditary hemolytic anemias caused by defects in membrane proteins located in distinct layers of the red cell membrane. Hereditary spherocytosis (HS), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), and hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP) represent disorders of the red cell cytoskeleton. Hereditary stomatocytoses represents disorders of cation permeability in the red cell membrane. The current laboratory screening tests for HS are the osmotic fragility test, acid glycerol lysis time test (AGLT), cryohemolysis test, and eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA)-binding test. For atypical HS, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of erythrocyte membrane proteins is carried out to confirm the diagnosis. The diagnosis of HE/HPP is based on abnormal red cell morphology and the detection of protein 4.1R deficiency or spectrin variants using gel electrophoresis. None of screening tests can detect all HS cases. Some testing centers (a survey of 25 laboratories) use a combination of tests (e.g., AGLT and EMA). No specific screening test for hereditary stomatocytoses is available. The preliminary diagnosis is based on presenting a compensated hemolytic anemia, macrocytosis, and a temperature or time dependent pseudohyperkalemia in some patients. Both the EMA-binding test and the osmotic fragility test may help in differential diagnosis of HS and hereditary stomatocytosis.

  8. Monoclonal gammopathy in hereditary spherocytosis: Possible pathogenetic relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, A.I. (Univ. of Chicago); Miller, J.B.; Lester, E.P.; Bowers, T.K.; Jacob, H.S.

    1978-01-01

    Two cases of monoclonal gammopathy in patients with hereditary spherocytosis led us to consider the possible pathogenetic relation between these two disorders. Twelve adult patients with hereditary spherocytosis had significant hypergammaglobulinemia in comparison to normal subjects. Retrospective analysis of previous illness in 140 patients with multiple myeloma showed a significant association between IgA myeloma and previous gallbladder disease. We propose that the chronic reticuloendothelial stimulation due to extravascular hemolysis, possibly potentiated by the inflammation associated with cholelithiasis and cholecystitis, may foster neoplastic transformation of immunocytes in patients with hereditary spherocytosis, ultimately leading to the development of monoclonal gammopathy.

  9. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Renal Cell Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menko, Fred H; Maher, Eamonn R

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) is the common denominator for a heterogeneous group of diseases. The subclassification of these tumours is based on histological type and molecular pathogenesis. Insight into molecular pathogenesis has led to the development of targeted systemic therapies. Genetic susceptibility is the principal cause of RCC in about 2-4% of cases. Hereditary RCC is the umbrella term for about a dozen different conditions, the most frequent of which is von Hippel-Lindau disease . Here, we describe the main hereditary RCC syndromes, consider criteria for referral of RCC patients for clinical genetic assessment and discuss management options for patients with hereditary RCC and their at-risk relatives.

  10. Hereditary optic neuropathies share a common mitochondrial coupling defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrollier, Arnaud; Guillet, Virginie; Loiseau, Dominique; Gueguen, Naïg; de Crescenzo, Marie-Anne Pou; Verny, Christophe; Ferre, Marc; Dollfus, Hélène; Odent, Sylvie; Milea, Dan; Goizet, Cyril; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Procaccio, Vincent; Bonneau, Dominique; Reynier, Pascal

    2008-06-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are heterogeneous diseases characterized by the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells leading to optic nerve atrophy and impairment of central vision. We found a common coupling defect of oxidative phosphorylation in fibroblasts of patients affected by autosomal dominant optic atrophy (mutations of OPA1), autosomal dominant optic atrophy associated with cataract (mutations of OPA3), and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, a disorder associated with point mutations of mitochondrial DNA complex I genes. Interestingly, the energetic defect was significantly more pronounced in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and autosomal dominant optic atrophy patients with a more complex phenotype, the so-called plus phenotype.

  11. Onyx embolization of an intraosseous pseudoaneurysm of the middle meningeal artery in a patient with meningiomatosis, McCune-Albright syndrome, and gray platelet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settecase, Fabio; Nicholson, Andrew D; Amans, Matthew R; Higashida, Randall T; Halbach, Van V; Cooke, Daniel L; Dowd, Christopher F; Hetts, Steven W

    2016-03-01

    A 13-year-old boy with meningiomatosis, McCune-Albright syndrome, and gray platelet syndrome presented with an enlarging "lump" on his right forehead. A head CT scan revealed a polyostotic fibrous dysplasia involving the entire skull. A 3.4-cm right frontal osseous cavity and an overlying right forehead subcutaneous soft-tissue mass were seen, measuring 5.2 cm in diameter and 1.6 cm thick. Ultrasound of the cavity and overlying mass showed swirling of blood and an arterialized waveform. MRI revealed an en plaque meningioma underlying the cavity. An intraosseous pseudoaneurysm fed by 3 distal anterior division branches of the right middle meningeal artery (MMA) with contrast extravasation was found on angiography. Two MMA feeders were embolized with Onyx, with anterograde filling of the intraosseous cavity with Onyx. A small pocket of residual intracavity contrast filling postembolization from a smaller third MMA feeder eventually thrombosed and the forehead lump regressed.

  12. Uncommon Cone-Beam Computerized Tomography Findings in McCune-Albright Syndrome in an Implant Candidate Patient: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoshhal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction McCune-Albright syndrome is a rare disease, characterized by triad of cafe-au-lait spots, endocrinopathies and fibrous dysplasia. These bone lesions are usually revealed during the first decade of life, together with pain, pathological fractures and secondary deformities. Case Presentation A 40-year-old female patient presented an opaque lesion at the left mandibular side of face, in a cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT view, during the implant placement evaluations. The patient had experienced precocious puberty and had undergone hysterectomy. Unilateral cafe-au-lait spots were present on patient’s left side of the face. There was no expansion in intraoral examination. The oral mucosa was also normal. No asymmetry was detected. The analysis of sample histopathology confirmed fibrous dysplasia. Discussion In this patient we preferred following up. Afterwards, total surgical lesion resection can be performed. After a long-term follow-up, the area may receive an implant.

  13. Dementia in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blöndal, H; Guomundsson, G; Benedikz, Eirikur

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen cases with verified Hereditary Cystatin C Amyloid Angiopathy are presented. All of the cases had one or more cerebrovascular insults starting at the age of 20-41 years and survived from 10 days to 23 years after the first insult. Progressive dementia was a prominent clinical feature...... in seventeen cases of whom two presented with dementia. At the last examination the majority had severe dementia and severely abnormal EEG. Anti-cystatin C positive amyloid vascular and perivascular infiltrates were found. The resulting damage to the microvasculature of the brain and secondary hemorrhages...... and infarctions were considered to be an adequate explanation for the dementia in these cases. Skin biopsies can now probably be used to demonstrate cystatin C positive amyloid deposits conclusively in the tissues of these patients....

  14. Prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Shelley E; Ramaciotti, Claudio; Buchanan, George R

    2011-12-01

    Vascular complications, including pulmonary hypertension (PH), have been reported to occur following splenectomy for various disorders,including hereditary spherocytosis (HS). We performed a prospective cross-sectional study of 36 adults with HS (78% with prior splenectomy)utilizing echocardiography to estimate tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) as well as measurement of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) to screen for PH. No participant with HS hada significantly elevated TRV or NT-proBNP level, despite a median 25-year interval since splenectomy (95% confidence interval for point prevalence 0, 0.097). Although our study was limited by a small sample size, it appears that persons with HS, following splenectomy, appear unlikely to be at significantly increased risk of developing PH to the degree reported for thalassemia and sickle cell disease

  15. Pulmonary hypertension in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Veronique; MM; Vorselaars; Sebastiaan; Velthuis; Repke; J; Snijder; Jan; Albert; Vos; Johannes; J; Mager; Martijn; C; Post

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia(HHT) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterised by vascular malformations in predominantly the brain,liverand lungs.Pulmonary hypertension(PH) is increasingly recognised as a severe complication of HHT.PH may be categorised into two distinct types in patients with HHT.Post-capillary PH most often results from a high pulmonary blood flow that accompanies the high cardiac output state associated with liver arteriovenous malformations.Less frequently,the HHT-related gene mutations in ENG or ACVRL1 appear to predispose patients with HHT to develop pre-capillary pulmonary arterial hypertension.Differentiation between both forms of PH by right heart catheterisation is essential,since both entities are associated with severe morbidity and mortality with different treatment options.Therefore all HHT patients should be referred to an HHT centre.

  16. [Progress with management of hereditary angioedema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, D T; Lode, H

    2013-03-21

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare type of angioedema caused by a quantitative or functional deficit of C1 inhibitor (C1 INH) that leads to excess production of bradykinin, which can result in acute localized swelling attacks in the skin or mucous membranes of the mouth, head and neck, extremities, gastrointestinal (GI) tract, genitals, trunk, and larynx. Angioedema in the respiratorytract maycause airway obstruction; severe abdominal pain, vomiting, or diarrhea may occur in the GI tract. Patients with HAE may be diagnosed and managed by HAE specialists or by primary care physicians depending on individual circumstances. Proper treatment requires differentiation from other forms of angioedema. Patients with HAE who are managed appropriately with medications that treat and prevent atttacks may have a lower risk of death from laryngeal edema and a better quality of life. Less frequent attacks may allow them to attend work, school, and leisure activities more regularlyand be free of the pain and disfigurement of HAE attacks moreoften.

  17. [Hereditary spastic paraplegia: up to date].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders that are clinically characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. HSP genetic loci are designated SPG1-72 in order of their discovery. In 206 Japanese families with autosomal dominant HSP, SPG4 was the most common form, accounting for 38%, followed by SPG3A (5%), SPG31 (5%), SPG10 (2%), and SPG8 (1%). We have identified novel mutations in the C12orf65 gene and the LYST gene in several Japanese families with autosomal recessive HSP. JASPAC will facilitate gene discovery and mechanistic understanding of HSP. The future challenge will be the establishment of treatment of HSP.

  18. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis with distinctive facies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sunkara Shree Ramalinga; Radharani, Chitturi; Sinha, Soumya; Kumar, Sv Kiran

    2012-11-01

    Hereditary gingival enlargement also known as gingivitis or familial elephantiasis is a rare type of gingival enlargement. It appears as an isolated autosomal dominant disorder or maybe associated with other conditions. Oral manifestations may vary from minimal involvement of only tuberosity area and the buccal gingiva around the lower molars to a generalized enlargement inhibiting eruption of the teeth. This paper discusses the case of a 13-year-old female patient with distinctive facial characteristics who presented to the department with a chief complaint of swollen gums since 1 year. She had severe diffuse gingival enlargement of the maxilla and mandible. Diagnosis was made based upon clinical examination and family history. Quadrant wise internal bevel gingivectomy procedure was done for the patient to restore her functional and esthetic needs.

  19. Hereditary palmoplantar keratodermas in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, S; Thappa, D M; Garg, B R

    1997-12-01

    Thirty-one patients with inherited palmoplantar keratodermas (PPKs) were screened from 59,490 cases who visiting the OPD of JIPMER, Pondicherry. The prevalence rate was 5.2 per 10,000 population (1:2000 approx.). PPKs were more common in males (25 patients) than females (6 patients); the overall male to female ratio was 4.2:1. The incidence was highest in the group from 0-10 years of life (67.7% of cases). Unna-Thost syndrome topped the list with 38.7% of cases and its prevalence 1:6000 (approx.), followed by Greither's disease (22.9%) and others-Vohwinkel (3 cases), idiopathic punctate (2 cases), ichthyosis vulgaris associated PPK (2 cases) etc. This study has for the first time reported the prevalence and patterns of hereditary PPKs in South India.

  20. Occurrence of hereditary bullous epidermolyses in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavicić, Z; Kmet-Vizintin, P; Kansky, A; Dobrić, I

    1990-06-01

    To determine the occurrence of hereditary bullous epidermolyses (EB) in Croatia, Yugoslavia, from 1960 to 1987, cases were gathered from the hospital files of dermatologic and pediatric clinics and departments throughout the area. The diagnosis of EB type was made on the basis of clinical features, patients' histories, and light microscopy and electron microscopy findings. Fifty families with 58 patients were registered; 44 patients were examined personally by one of the authors. The most frequent type of EB in Croatia was recessive dystrophic EB Hallopeau-Siemens, occurring in 35 of the 58 individuals. Regional accumulation of cases within the Varazdin area was noted (13 patients). Prevalence of EB in Croatia is 0.956 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. One case of recessive dystrophic EB Hallopeau-Siemens occurred in about every 52,000 live births.

  1. Idebenone for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueven, N

    2016-03-01

    Idebenone is a rapidly absorbed, safe and well-tolerated drug and is currently the only clinically proven treatment option for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients. Idebenone (Raxone®) is approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of LHON and has been available on the European market since 2015. Due to its molecular mode of action of bypassing the defective mitochondrial complex I, idebenone leads to improved energy supply and a functional recovery of retinal ganglion cells during the acute stage of the disease, thereby preventing further vision loss and promoting recovery of vision. Thus, commencing treatment shortly after the onset of symptoms is likely to have the best therapeutic effect, a hypothesis that is supported by the available clinical data.

  2. Skin deposits in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Gudmundsson, G

    1990-01-01

    Clinically normal skin from 47 individuals aged 9-70 years was investigated. Cystatin C amyloid deposits were found in various locations of the skin by light and/or electron microscopy, in all 12 patients with a clinical history of hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis (HCCA). Six asymptomatic...... individuals, who had the Alu 1 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker reported to cosegregate with the disease, also had cystatin C amyloid deposits in the skin. Three asymptomatic individuals (age 17-46) belonging to the HCCA families were without amyloid in the skin but had Alu 1 RFLP marker....... Skin from 12 individuals who served as controls and skin from 14 close relatives of the patients was negative for amyloid. Punch biopsy of the skin is a simple procedure which is of value for the diagnosis of HCCA, even before the appearance of clinical symptoms. This method might also be of use...

  3. [Research progress of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A-Mei; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2013-02-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON; MIM 535000) is one of the most common mitochondrial diseases, with a clinical manifestation of painless, acute or sub-acute bilateral visual loss in young adults leading to blindness and central scotoma. Over 95% of LHON patients were caused by one of three primary mtDNA mutations (m.11778G>A, m.3460G>A and m.14484T>C). Incomplete penetrance and gender bias are two riddles of this disease. Here we summarized recent research progress of LHON, with a focus on the molecular pathogenic mechanisms, clinical features, in vitro experiments and animal models, and prevention and treatment of LHON. In particular, we presented the main findings and challenges in our recent efforts to decipher genetic susceptibility and mechanism of LHON in Chinese patients.

  4. Chaperonopathies: spotlight on hereditary motor neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Lupo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN comprise a group of rare hereditary neuromuscular disorders characterized by a peroneal muscular atrophy without sensory symptoms. To date twenty-three genes for dHMN have been reported and four of them encode for chaperones: DNAJB2, which encodes a member of the HSP40/DNAJ co-chaperone family, and HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode three members of the family of small heat shock proteins. Except for HSPB1, with around thirty different mutations, the remaining three genes comprise a much low number of cases. Thus, only one case has been described caused by an HSPB3 mutation, whereas few DNAJB2 and HSPB8 cases are known, most of them caused by a founder c.352+1G>A mutation in DNAJB2 and by mutations affecting the hot spot K141 residue of the HSPB8 chaperone. This low number of cases makes it difficult to understand the pathomechanism underlying the neuropathy. Chaperones can assemble in multi-chaperone complexes forming an integrative chaperone network in the cell, which plays relevant cellular roles in a variety of processes such as the correct folding of newly synthesized proteins, their escort to their precise cellular locations to form functional proteins and complexes and the response to protein misfolding, including the degradation of proteins that fail to refold properly. Despite of this variety of functions, mutations in some of them lead to diseases with a similar clinical picture, suggesting common pathways. This review gives an overview of the genetics of dHMNs caused by mutations in four genes, DNAJB2, HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode chaperones and show a common disease mechanism.

  5. The Pathology of Hereditary Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honrado Emiliano

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several studies have demonstrated that familial breast cancers associated with BRCA1 or BRCA2 germline mutations differ in their morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics. Cancers associated with BRCA1 are poorly differentiated infiltrating ductal carcinomas (IDCs with higher mitotic counts and pleomorphism and less tubule formation than sporadic tumours. In addition, more cases with the morphological features of typical or atypical medullary carcinoma are seen in these patients. Breast carcinomas from BRCA2 mutation carriers tend to be of higher grade than sporadic age-matched controls. Regarding immunophenotypic features. BRCA1 tumours have been found to be more frequently oestrogen receptor- (ER and progesterone receptor-(PR negative, and p53-positive than age-matched controls, whereas these differences are not usually found in BRCA2-associated tumours. A higher frequency and unusual location of p53 mutations have been described in BRCA1/2 carcinomas. Furthermore, BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast carcinomas show a low frequency of HER-2 expression. Recent studies have shown that most BRCA1 carcinomas belong to the basal cell phenotype, a subtype of high grade, highly proliferating ER/HER2-negative breast carcinoma characterized by the expression of basal or myoepithelial markers, such as basal keratins, P-cadherin, EGFR, etc. This phenotype occurs with a higher incidence in BRCA1 tumours than in sporadic carcinomas and is rarely found in BRCA2 carcinomas. Hereditary carcinomas not attributable to BRCA1/2 mutations have phenotypic similarities with BRCA2 tumours, but tend to be of lesser grade and lower proliferation index. The pathological features of hereditary breast cancer can drive specific treatment and influence the process of mutation screening.

  6. Chaperonopathies: Spotlight on Hereditary Motor Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Vincenzo; Aguado, Carmen; Knecht, Erwin; Espinós, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN) are a group of rare hereditary neuromuscular disorders characterized by an atrophy that affects peroneal muscles in the absence of sensory symptoms. To date, 23 genes are thought to be responsible for dHMN, four of which encode chaperones: DNAJB2, which encodes a member of the HSP40/DNAJ co-chaperone family; and HSPB1, HSPB3, and HSPB8, encoding three members of the small heat shock protein family. While around 30 different mutations in HSPB1 have been identified, the remaining three genes are altered in many fewer cases. Indeed, a mutation of HSPB3 has only been described in one case, whereas a few cases have been reported carrying mutations in DNAJB2 and HSPB8, most of them caused by a founder c.352+1G>A mutation in DNAJB2 and by mutations affecting the K141 residue in the HSPB8 chaperone. Hence, their rare occurrence makes it difficult to understand the pathological mechanisms driven by such mutations in this neuropathy. Chaperones can assemble into multi-chaperone complexes that form an integrated chaperone network within the cell. Such complexes fulfill relevant roles in a variety of processes, such as the correct folding of newly synthesized proteins, in which chaperones escort them to precise cellular locations, and as a response to protein misfolding, which includes the degradation of proteins that fail to refold properly. Despite this range of functions, mutations in some of these chaperones lead to diseases with a similar clinical profile, suggesting common pathways. This review provides an overview of the genetics of those dHMNs that share a common disease mechanism and that are caused by mutations in four genes encoding chaperones: DNAJB2, HSPB1, HSPB3, and HSPB8.

  7. Deranged Wnt signaling is frequent in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Therkildsen, Christina; Bernstein, Inge;

    2011-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is frequently deranged in colorectal cancer and is a key target for future preventive and therapeutic approaches. Colorectal cancers associated with the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome are characterized by wide-spread microsatellite instability...

  8. Systemic treatment for hereditary cancers: a 2012 update

    OpenAIRE

    Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Byrski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    The history of specific therapy for hereditary tumors dates back to mid 1980s and involves a number of reports demonstrating regression of familial colon polyps upon administration of sulindac. Virtually no clinical studies on other hereditary cancer types were available until the year 2009, when Byrski et al. presented the data on unprecedented sensitivity of BRCA1-associated breast malignancies to cisplatin. This breakthrough has revived interest to the treatment of cancer in germ-line muta...

  9. [Hereditary spherocytosis: Review. Part I. History, demographics, pathogenesis, and diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Hugo; Crisp, Renée Leonor; Rapetti, María Cristina; García, Eliana; Attie, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis is the most frequent hereditary anemia excluding beta thalassemia in Argentina. Historical, demographic, genetic and pathogenic aspects of the disease are reviewed, and confirmatory laboratory tests are described. Special characteristics on the outcome of the disease in our population and prevalent protein deficiencies in our country are described. Emphasis is given on new available laboratory tests, which allow an earlier diagnosis using volume of blood samples significantly smaller than required for conventional tests.

  10. An adolescent with hereditary spherocytosis who presented with splenic infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lara; Refai, Zafer; Linney, Mike

    2015-07-02

    A 16-year-old male patient with known hereditary spherocytosis presented with a 4-day history of chest pain and lethargy. On admission, he had a low-grade fever and was grossly anaemic; examination revealed splenomegaly. An ultrasound scan confirmed splenomegaly with areas of splenic infarction. Subsequent tests suggested possible Epstein-Barr virus infection. The patient recovered well and had a functional spleen on discharge. This case report presents an unusual complication of isolated hereditary spherocytosis.

  11. Pyoderma Gangrenosum in a Patient with Hereditary Spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyoung Il; Paek, Jun Oh; Kim, Jeoung Eun; Ro, Young Suck; Ko, Joo Yeon

    2016-03-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare, relapsing cutaneous disease with 4 distinctive clinical manifestations: ulcerative, bullous, pustular, and vegetative lesions. It mainly occurs in adults and is frequently associated with systemic diseases, most commonly inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatologic disease, or hematological dyscrasias. However, there have been no previous reports of PG in a patient with hereditary spherocytosis, a common inherited hemolytic anemia. We report here a unique case of PG in a 15-year-old boy with underlying hereditary spherocytosis.

  12. Acute edema blisters in a hereditary angioedema cutaneous attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Romero, D; Di Marco, P; Malbrán, A

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by recurrent episodes of acute edema affecting the skin and the respiratory and digestive tracts. Acute edema blisters or hydro-static bullae develop after rapid accumulation of interstitial fluid usually associated to cardiac insufficiency. Lesions contain sterile fluid and break up easily resolving without scars. Blisters disappear when fluid accumulation resolves. We describe a patient developing recurrent acute edema blisters as a consequence of cutaneous hereditary angioedema attacks.

  13. Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy and anaesthesia - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini Dave

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies are a rare group of disorders characterized by progressive loss of function that predominantly affects the peripheral sensory nerves. Autonomic dysfunction is present to a variable degree and can have several implications for anaesthesia. We report the case of a patient with Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy who was posted for a below knee amputation and discuss the anaesthesia management.

  14. Hereditary neuropathies: systematization and diagnostics (clinical case of hereditary motor and sensor neuropathy of the IA type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolokolova A.M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the value of routine methods (clinical symptoms, electrophysiological findings and results of DNA analysis in diagnostics of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy type IA in outpatient clinics. Material and Methods. The review of foreign literature is represented. The phenotypic polymorphism, genetic heterogeneity and the difficulties of diagnostics are identified. A family with hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype is presented, which was diagnosed on the base of available methods in outpatient practice (clinical symptoms, genealogical method, electro-physiological findings and DNA analysis results. Results. Routine algorithm (consistent valuation of clinical symptoms, neurophysiologic findings and the results of DNA analysis helped to verify the diagnosis of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype in outpatient practice after more than 20 years of the onset of the disease. Conclusion. The neurologists of outpatient clinics and other specialists must be informed about the availability of diagnostics of hereditary diseases of nervous system.

  15. Coinheritance of hereditary spherocytosis and reversibility of cirrhosis in a young female patient with hereditary hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höblinger A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Here we report a 33-years-old woman with hereditary spherocytosis and hemochromatosis due to homozygosity for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene. The coinheritance of both conditions led to severe iron overload and liver cirrhosis at young age. The patient was treated by repeated phlebotomy, and reversibility of cirrhosis was documented by transient elastography. This report discusses the pathophysiology of iron accumulation in patients with hemolytic anemia combined with HFE C282Y homozygosity. The case indicates that patients with hematological disorders characterized by increased erythropoetic activity should be screened for HFE mutations.

  16. 儿童遗传性肾脏疾病%Hereditary kidney diseases in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琰琴; 丁洁; 王芳; 张宏文

    2013-01-01

    About 10 to 15 percent of kidney diseases are inherited or related to genetic factors. While, hereditary kidney diseases have no specific clinical manifestations and react poorly to the therapy, as a result, about 30 percent of hospitalized children with chronic renal failure is due to hereditary kidney diseases in our country. Hereditary kidney diseases are related to many genes. Molecular genetic analysis plays an important role in the diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis of hereditary kidney diseases. Our group have made a series of research in hereditary kidney diseases for nearly 30 years. Here we review the research work and the main results in hereditary kidney diseases of our group.

  17. Advances in laboratory diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Mariela Granero

    2016-11-12

    Among the red cell membrane disorders, hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is one of the most common causes of inherited hemolytic anemia. HS results from the deficiency or dysfunction of red blood cell membrane proteins, such as α spectrin, β spectrin, ankyrin, anion channel protein (Band-3 protein), protein 4.1 and protein 4.2. Conventionally, HS diagnosis is established through a series of tests, which include spherocytes identification in peripheral smear, reticulocyte count, osmotic fragility, etc. Currently, different hematological analyzers provide erythrocyte indicators that estimate the presence of spherocytes and correlate that with HS, which can be useful for disease screening. The most traditional method is the osmotic fragility (OF) test, which is labor-intensive and time-consuming to perform and presents low sensitivity and specificity values. Thus, new methods have been developed for HS diagnosis, such as flow cytometry. Current guidelines recommend the use of flow cytometry as a screening test for HS diagnosis using the eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA) binding test. Thus, HS diagnosis is the result of a collaboration between clinicians and laboratories, who should take into account the family history and the exclusion of other causes of secondary spherocytosis.

  18. Automated reticulocyte parameters for hereditary spherocytosis screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarova, Elena; Pradier, Olivier; Cotton, Frédéric; Gulbis, Béatrice

    2014-11-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is based on several screening and confirmatory tests; our algorithm includes clinical features, red blood cell morphology analysis and cryohaemolysis test, and, in case of positive screening, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as a diagnostic test. Using the UniCel DxH800 (Beckman Coulter) haematology analyser, we investigated automated reticulocyte parameters as HS screening tool, i.e. mean reticulocyte volume (MRV), immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF) and mean sphered cell volume (MSCV). A total of 410 samples were screened. Gel electrophoresis was applied to 159 samples that were positive for the screening tests. A total of 48 patients were diagnosed as HS, and seven were diagnosed as acquired autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA). Some other 31 anaemic conditions were also studied. From the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, both delta (mean cell volume (MCV)-MSCV) and MRV presented an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.98. At the diagnostic cut-off of 100 % sensitivity, MRV showed the best specificity of 88 % and a positive likelihood ratio of 8.7. The parameters IRF, MRV and MSCV discriminated HS not only from controls and other tested pathologies but also from AIHA contrary to the cryohaemolysis test. In conclusion, automated reticulocyte parameters might be helpful for haemolytic anaemia diagnostic orientation even for general laboratories. In combination with cryohaemolysis, they ensure an effective and time-saving screening for HS for more specialised laboratories.

  19. [Hereditary sideroblastic anemia: a rare diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahem-Jmili, N; Salem, N; Abdelkefi, S; Champ, B Grand; Bekri, S; Sboui, H; Mahjoub, T; Yacoub, S; Kortas, M

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary sideroblastic anemia is a very rare disease recessive and X-linked that affect heme biosynthesis by deficit or decreased of delta aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS) activity. We report a case of a six-month-old boy, admitted in the hospital for anemic syndrome. The hemogram showed anemia (hemoglobin: 4.5 g/dL), frankly hypochronic microcytic and a regenerated (mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration: 26 g/dL, mean cell volume: 53 fl, reticulocytes: 10 x 10(9)/L) with red cells morphologic disorders in smears (anisopoikylocytosis) without attack of the other lineages; white blood cells: 11 x 10(9)/L (neutrophils: 64% and lymphocytes: 35%); platelets: 350 x 10(9)/L. Examination of bone marrow showed an important erythroid hyperplasia (about 69%) with dyserythropoiesis. Perls stain revealed intense siderosis with 90% of ringed sideroblasts and a large number of siderocytes. Exploration of ALAS2 and ABC7 genes on the DNA of the infant was not found abnormalities. Treatment with pyridoxine corrects moderately the anemia. By the way, we proposed to remind that iron deficiency, inflammatory syndrome and thalassemia are the common microcytic anemia. However, it's mandatory to explore other causes if diagnosis is not solved.

  20. Multimodal Imaging in Hereditary Retinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pichi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In this retrospective study we evaluated the multimodal visualization of retinal genetic diseases to better understand their natural course. Material and Methods. We reviewed the charts of 70 consecutive patients with different genetic retinal pathologies who had previously undergone multimodal imaging analyses. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and genotyped at the known locus for the different diseases. Results. The medical records of 3 families of a 4-generation pedigree affected by North Carolina macular dystrophy were reviewed. A total of 8 patients with Stargardt disease were evaluated for their two main defining clinical characteristics, yellow subretinal flecks and central atrophy. Nine male patients with a previous diagnosis of choroideremia and eleven female carriers were evaluated. Fourteen patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy and 6 family members with autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy were included. Seven patients with enhanced s-cone syndrome were ascertained. Lastly, we included 3 unrelated patients with fundus albipunctatus. Conclusions. In hereditary retinal diseases, clinical examination is often not sufficient for evaluating the patient’s condition. Retinal imaging then becomes important in making the diagnosis, in monitoring the progression of disease, and as a surrogate outcome measure of the efficacy of an intervention.

  1. Growth and development: hereditary and mechanical modulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jeremy J; Nah, Hyun-Duck

    2004-06-01

    Growth and development is the net result of environmental modulation of genetic inheritance. Mesenchymal cells differentiate into chondrogenic, osteogenic, and fibrogenic cells: the first 2 are chiefly responsible for endochondral ossification, and the last 2 for sutural growth. Cells are influenced by genes and environmental cues to migrate, proliferate, differentiate, and synthesize extracellular matrix in specific directions and magnitudes, ultimately resulting in macroscopic shapes such as the nose and the chin. Mechanical forces, the most studied environmental cues, readily modulate bone and cartilage growth. Recent experimental evidence demonstrates that cyclic forces evoke greater anabolic responses of not only craniofacial sutures, but also cranial base cartilage. Mechanical forces are transmitted as tissue-borne and cell-borne mechanical strain that in turn regulates gene expression, cell proliferation, differentiation, maturation, and matrix synthesis, the totality of which is growth and development. Thus, hereditary and mechanical modulations of growth and development share a common pathway via genes. Combined approaches using genetics, bioengineering, and quantitative biology are expected to bring new insight into growth and development, and might lead to innovative therapies for craniofacial skeletal dysplasia including malocclusion, dentofacial deformities, and craniofacial anomalies such as cleft palate and craniosynostosis, as well as disorders associated with the temporomandibular joint.

  2. Hypercoagulability in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Finsterer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent data indicate that in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia (HHT, low iron levels due to inadequate replacement after hemorrhagic iron losses are associated with elevated factor-VIII plasma levels and consecutively increased risk of venous thrombo-embolism. Here, we report a patient with HHT, low iron levels, elevated factor-VIII, and recurrent venous thrombo-embolism. A 64-year-old multimorbid Serbian gipsy was diagnosed with HHT at age 62 years. He had a history of recurrent epistaxis, teleangiectasias on the lips, renal and pulmonary arterio-venous malformations, and a family history positive for HHT. He had experienced recurrent venous thrombosis (mesenteric vein thrombosis, portal venous thrombosis, deep venous thrombosis, insufficiently treated with phenprocoumon during 16 months and gastro-intestinal bleeding. Blood tests revealed sideropenia and elevated plasma levels of coagulation factor-VIII. His history was positive for diabetes, arterial hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, cerebral abscess, recurrent ischemic stroke, recurrent ileus, peripheral arterial occluding disease, polyneuropathy, mild renal insufficiency, and epilepsy. Following recent findings, hypercoagulability was attributed to the sideropenia-induced elevation of coagulation factor-VIII. In conclusion, HHT may be associated with hypercoagulability due to elevated factor-VIII associated with low serum iron levels from recurrent bleeding. Iron substitution may prevent HHT patients from hypercoagulability.

  3. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  4. [Designation criteria for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Makoto; Mimura, Osamu; Wakakura, Masato; Inatani, Masaru; Nakazawa, Toru; Shiraga, Fumio

    2015-05-01

    Designation criteria for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) have been established by a working group for retino-choroidal and optic atrophy funded by the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare (MHLW) of Japan in collaboration with the Japanese Neuro-ophthalmology Society. The criteria are composed of three major symptoms and three ancillary test findings. According to the number and the combination of these symptoms and findings, subjects are classified into definite, probable, and possible LHON cases and asymptomatic carriers. The major symptoms include bilateral involvement with a time-lag, a papillomacular bundle atrophy, both characteristic optic disc findings at the acute phase. In the ancillary testings, mitochondrial DNA mutations specific for LHON are detailed with a table listing the mutation loci being attached. To enhance readers' understanding of description of the major symptoms and ancillary test findings, explanatory remarks on 11 parameters are supplemented. The establishment of the criteria facilitates epidemiological survey of LHON by MHLW and contributes to improvement of welfare for patients with LHON in Japan.

  5. Pathogenesis of acidosis in hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R M; Little, J A; Patten, R L; Goldstein, M B; Halperin, M L

    1979-11-01

    An 18-yr-old man with a classical history of hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) developed typical biochemical changes following an oral fructose load: fructosemia, hypoglycemia, hypophosphatemia, hyperuricemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hypokalemia (3.1 meq/liter) was also noted. Three aspects of this case expand the published literature on this syndrome: (1) Metabolic acidosis was found to be due to both lactic acidosis and proximal renal tubular acidosis (RTA). We could quantitate the relative contribution of each, and found that urinary bicarbonate loss due to proximal RTA accounted for less than 10% of the fall in serum bicarbonate. The major cause of the metabolic acidosis was lactic acidosis. (2) Hypokalemia was found to be due to movement of potassium out of the extracellular space rather than to urinary loss. Potassium may have entered cells with phosphate or may have been sequestered in the gastrointestinal tract. (3) The coexistence of proximal RTA and acidemia made it possible to study the effect of acidemia on the urine-blood partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) gradient in alkaline urine (U-B PCO2). The U-B PCO2 measured during acidemia was much higher at the same urine bicarbonate concentration than in normal controls during alkalemia, providing evidence in humans that acidemia stimulates distal nephron hydrogen-ion secretion.

  6. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells.

  7. Hereditary pancreatitis and secondary screening for early pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitone, L J; Greenhalf, W; Howes, N R; Neoptolemos, J P

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant disease with incomplete penetrance (80%), accounting for approximately 1% of all cases of pancreatitis. It is characterized by the onset of recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis in childhood and frequent progression to chronic pancreatitis. Whitcomb et al. identified the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1) on chromosome 7q35 as the site of the mutation that causes hereditary pancreatitis. The European registry of hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer (EUROPAC) aims to identify and make provisions for those affected by hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer. The most common mutations in hereditary pancreatitis are R122H, N29I and A16V but many families have been described with clinically defined hereditary pancreatitis where there is no PRSS1 mutation. It is known that the cumulative lifetime risk (to age 70 years) of pancreatic cancer is 40% in individuals with hereditary pancreatitis. This subset of individuals form an ideal group for the development of a screening programme aimed at detecting pancreatic cancer at an early stage in an attempt to improve the presently poor long-term survival. Current screening strategies involve multimodality imaging (computed tomography, endoluminal ultrasound) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for pancreatic juice collection followed by molecular analysis of the DNA extracted from the juice. The potential benefit of screening (curative resection) must be balanced against the associated morbidity and mortality of surgery. Philosophically, the individual's best interest must be sought in light of the latest advances in medicine and science following discussions with a multidisciplinary team in specialist pancreatic centres.

  8. Hereditary Spherocytosis and Hereditary Elliptocytosis: Aberrant Protein Sorting during Erythroblast Enucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomao, Marcela; Chen, Ke; Villalobos, Jonathan; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2010-02-08

    During erythroblast enucleation, membrane proteins distribute between extruded nuclei and reticulocytes. In hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), deficiencies of membrane proteins, in addition to those encoded by the mutant gene, occur. Elliptocytes, resulting from protein 4.1R gene mutations, lack not only 4.1R but also glycophorin C, which links the cytoskeleton and bilayer. In HS resulting from ankyrin-1 mutations, band 3, Rh-associated antigen, and glycophorin A are deficient. The current study was undertaken to explore whether aberrant protein sorting, during enucleation, creates these membrane-spanning protein deficiencies. We found that although glycophorin C sorts to reticulocytes normally, it distributes to nuclei in 4.1R-deficient HE cells. Further, glycophorin A and Rh-associated antigen, which normally partition predominantly to reticulocytes, distribute to both nuclei and reticulocytes in an ankyrin-1-deficient murine model of HS. We conclude that aberrant protein sorting is one mechanistic basis for protein deficiencies in HE and HS.

  9. Chapter 22: Hereditary and acquired angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgy, Mary S; Pongracic, Jacqueline A

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disorder defined by a deficiency of functional C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). Acquired angioedema (AAE) is caused by either consumption (type 1) or inactivation (type 2) of CI-INH. Both HAE and AAE can be life-threatening. The screening test for both conditions is complement component C4, which is low to absent at times of angioedema or during quiescent periods. A useful test to differentiate HAE from AAE is C1q protein, which is normal in HAE and low in AAE. There are three types of HAE: type 1 HAE is most common, occurring in ∼85% of patients and characterized by decreased production of C1-INH, resulting in reduced functional activity to 5-30% of normal. In type 2, which occurs in 15% of cases, C1-INH is detectable in normal or elevated quantities but is dysfunctional. Finally, type 3, which is rare and almost exclusively occurs in women, is estrogen dependent and associated with normal CI-INH and C4 levels. One-third of these patients have a gain-of-function mutation in clotting factor XII leading to kallikrein-driven bradykinin production. Although the anabolic steroid, danazol, is useful in increasing the concentration of C4 and reducing the episodes of angioedema in HAE and AAE, it has expected adverse effects. Fortunately, disease-specific therapies are available and include C1-INH enzyme for i.v. infusion either acutely or empirically, ecallantide, an inhibitor of kallikrein, and icatibant, a bradykinin B2-receptor antagonist, both approved for acute angioedema and administered, subcutaneously.

  10. Outcomes of Lensectomy in Hereditary Lens Subluxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Hossein Dehghan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the results of pars plana lensectomy in patients with hereditary lens subluxation. METHOD: Hospital records of patients with hereditary lens subluxation who had undergone pars plana lensectomy at Labbafinejad Medical Center, Tehran-Iran from 1996 to 2003 were reviewed. Patients with more than 6 months of follow up were included. Underlying disorders, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA before and after surgery, intraocular pressure (IOP, postoperative refraction and complications were evaluated. RESULTS: Overall, records of 87 eyes of 49 patients including 27 male and 22 female subjects were reviewed. Mean follow up duration was 20±18 months. Underlying disorders leading to lens subluxation included Marfan syndrome (79.5%, Weill-Marchesani syndrome (8.2%, simple ectopia lentis (8.2%, and homocystinuria (4.1%. The most common indication for surgery was non-correctable refractive error (92.1%. Mean BCVA was 1.13 LogMAR (20/250 preoperatively, which improved to 0.26 LogMAR (20/30-20/40 postoperatively (P < 0.001. BCVA better than 20/40 was achieved in 82.8% of cases after surgery. Angle-supported anterior chamber intraocular lens (ACIOL was implanted in

  11. Hereditary spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and other red cell membrane disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Lydie; Galimand, Julie; Fenneteau, Odile; Mohandas, Narla

    2013-07-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis and elliptocytosis are the two most common inherited red cell membrane disorders resulting from mutations in genes encoding various red cell membrane and skeletal proteins. Red cell membrane, a composite structure composed of lipid bilayer linked to spectrin-based membrane skeleton is responsible for the unique features of flexibility and mechanical stability of the cell. Defects in various proteins involved in linking the lipid bilayer to membrane skeleton result in loss in membrane cohesion leading to surface area loss and hereditary spherocytosis while defects in proteins involved in lateral interactions of the spectrin-based skeleton lead to decreased mechanical stability, membrane fragmentation and hereditary elliptocytosis. The disease severity is primarily dependent on the extent of membrane surface area loss. Both these diseases can be readily diagnosed by various laboratory approaches that include red blood cell cytology, flow cytometry, ektacytometry, electrophoresis of the red cell membrane proteins, and mutational analysis of gene encoding red cell membrane proteins.

  12. A Case of hereditary spherocytosis coexisting with Gilbert's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Jae; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Kang, Seung Hwa; Mun, Se Kwon; Kim, Heyjin; Han, Chul Ju; Kim, Jin; Kang, Hye Jin

    2013-03-25

    We recently encountered a case of hereditary spherocytosis coexisting with Gilbert's syndrome. Patient was initially diagnosed with Gilbert's syndrome and observed, but other findings suggestive of concurrent hemolysis, such as splenomegaly and gallstones were noted during the follow-up period. Therefore, further evaluations, including a peripheral blood smear, osmotic fragility test, autohemolysis test, and red blood cell membrane protein test were performed, and coexisting hereditary spherocytosis was diagnosed. Genotyping of the conjugation enzyme uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase was used to confirm Gilbert's syndrome. Because of the high prevalence rates and similar symptoms of these 2 diseases, hereditary spherocytosis can be masked in patients with Gilbert's syndrome. In review of a case and other article, the possibility of the coexistence of these 2 diseases should be considered, especially in patients with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia who also have splenomegaly and gallstones.

  13. Characteristic modules and tensor products over quasi-hereditary algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-hui ZHANG; Shi-ying SHEN; Ping-kai YE

    2007-01-01

    Let A be a monomial quasi-hereditary algebra with a pure strong exact Borel subalgebra B. It is proved that the category of induced good modules over B is contained in the category of good modules over A; that the characteristic module of A is an induced module of that of B via the exact functor - (×)B A if and only if the induced A-module of an injective B-module remains injective as a B-module. Moreover, it is shown that an exact Borel subalgebra of a basic quasi-hereditary serial algebra is right serial and that the characteristic module of a basic quasi-hereditary serial algebra is exactly the induced module of that of its exact Borel subalgebra.

  14. Characteristic modules and tensor products over quasi-hereditary algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Let A be a monomial quasi-hereditary algebra with a pure strong exact Borel subalgebra B.It is proved that the category of induced good modules over B is contained in the category of good modules over A;that the characteristic module of A is an induced module of that of B via the exact functor-(?)_B A if and only if the induced A-module of an injective B-module remains injective as a B-module.Moreover,it is shown that an exact Borel subalgebra of a basic quasi-hereditary serial algebra is right serial and that the characteristic module of a basic quasi-hereditary serial algebra is exactly the induced module of that of its exact Borel subalgebra.

  15. Anaesthetic management of a patient with hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nergis Ataol

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by reduced activity of the C1 esterase inhibitor. Patients with hereditary angioedema are clinically characterized by recurrent episodes of swelling of the extremities, face, trunk, airways and abdominal organs. Attacks may occur either spontaneously or following trauma, stress, surgery, infections and hormonal fluctuations. The most common cause of death is asphyxia related to laryngeal edema. Giving C1 esterase inhibitor is the most effective method of treatment. Also fresh frozen plasma, androgen steroids, quinine pathway inhibitors, antifibrinolytics and bradykinin receptor antagonists can be used as treatment. In this paper, the anesthetic management of a patient with hereditary angioedema undergoing inguinal hernia repair surgery is reported.

  16. Neuromyelitis optica antibody in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Mesquita Simão

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica antibody (or aquaporin-4 antibody is a well stablished serum marker associated to high-risk neuromyelitis optica syndrome that presents as an inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by the occurrence of bilateral and simultaneous optic neuritis without complete visual recovery or it occurs as an isolated episode of transverse myelitis accompanied by longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. On the other hand, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a primarily hereditary disorder that affects all tissues of the body and its clinical presentation is tissue-specific for the optic nerve and, eventually, it might reach the spinal cord. Overlapping clinical features of neuromyelitis optica and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy may suggest common target organ diseases. The case report described herein emphasizes the coexistence of serum markers of both diseases, and suggests that further investigation of this challenging clinical presentation is warranted to confirm or rule out this association.

  17. Neuromyelitis optica antibody in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simão, Luciano Mesquita

    2012-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica antibody (or aquaporin-4 antibody) is a well established serum marker associated to high-risk neuromyelitis optica syndrome that presents as an inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by the occurrence of bilateral and simultaneous optic neuritis without complete visual recovery or it occurs as an isolated episode of transverse myelitis accompanied by longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. On the other hand, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a primarily hereditary disorder that affects all tissues of the body and its clinical presentation is tissue-specific for the optic nerve and, eventually, it might reach the spinal cord. Overlapping clinical features of neuromyelitis optica and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy may suggest common target organ diseases. The case report described herein emphasizes the coexistence of serum markers of both diseases, and suggests that further investigation of this challenging clinical presentation is warranted to confirm or rule out this association.

  18. Principally Left Hereditary and Principally Left Strong Radicals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Tumurbat; R. Wiegandt

    2001-01-01

    A radical γ is normal if and only if γ is principally left hereditary and principally left strong (i.e., γ(L) = L e A and Lz ∈γ for all z ∈ L imply L γ(A)). Let a radical γ satisfy that A°∈γ and S° A° imply S°∈γ.Then γ is a hereditary normal radical if and only if γ is principally left strong and γ {A | (A, +,◇a) ∈γ a ∈ A}, where the multiplication ◇a is defined by x ◇a y = xay. The Behrens radical class B is the largest principally left hereditary subclass of the Brown-McCoy radical class G. Neither3 nor G is principally left strong.

  19. 骨化三醇联合鲑鱼降钙素治疗肾性骨病的临床疗效分析%Therapeutic Analysis of Combination of Calcitriol and Salmon Calcitonin on Renal Osteodystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈景; 唐东兴; 张琳; 章可铸

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyse the clinical efficacy of the calcitriol and salmon calcitonin combination therapy on renal osteodystrophy. Method 30 patients suffered from renal osteodystrophy were treated with calcitriol ( control group, n=15) or calcitriol and salmon calcitonin (CSC group,n=15),respectively. The clinical efficacy,biochemical indicators and adverse reactions were compared. Results Bone pain,joint pain,skin itching and other symptoms after treatment have improved compared with those before treatment. The total clinical effective rate in CSC group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0. 05). After treatment,the serum phosphorus and PTH levels were decreased in varying degrees compared with that before treatment and serum calcium levels were elevated (P<0. 05). Indicators of treatment group improved more obviously compared with that in control group (P<0. 05). No adverse effects were found in the two groups during the medication. Conclusion Combination of calcitriol and salmon calcium in treatment of renal osteodys-trophy can effectively alleviate the clinical symptoms,such as bone pain,joint pain,and itchy skin,etc,which is worthy of being recommended.%目的分析骨化三醇和鲑鱼降钙素联合治疗肾性骨病的临床疗效。方法回顾分析2010年1月~2012年12月在本院治疗的肾性骨病患者30例,选择经骨化三醇联合鲑鱼降钙素治疗患者为治疗组,单纯运用骨化三醇治疗的患者为对照组,每组15例。比较两组临床疗效、生化指标改善情况及不良反应发生情况。结果两组患者治疗后骨痛、关节痛、皮肤瘙痒等临床症状均较治疗前有不同程度的改善,联合组患者临床总有效率明显高于对照组(P<0.05)。两组患者治疗后血清磷和PTH水平均较治疗前有不同程度的下降,而血清钙水平较治疗前有不同程度的升高(P<0.05)。两组患者服药期间未发现明显不良反应。结论骨化三醇联合鲑

  20. Diagnostic evaluation of hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE and non-HFE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardou-Jacquet, Edouard; Brissot, Pierre

    2014-08-01

    The management and understanding of hereditary hemochromatosis have evolved with recent advances in iron biology and the associated discovery of numerous genes involved in iron metabolism. HFE-related (type 1) hemochromatosis remains the most frequent form, characterized by C282Y mutation homozygosity. Rare forms of hereditary hemochromatosis include type 2 (A and B, juvenile hemochromatosis caused by HJV and HAMP mutation), type 3 (related to TFR2 mutation), and type 4 (A and B, ferroportin disease). The diagnostic evaluation relies on comprehension of the involved pathophysiologic defect, and careful characterization of the phenotype, which gives clues to guide appropriate genetic testing.

  1. [Hereditary hemachromatosis: clinical case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, Ricardo; Tagle, Martín

    2006-01-01

    Hemachromatosis is a hereditary condition, producing progressive iron overload as a result of the mutation in proteins that regulate intestinal iron absorption. It is a systemic disease with several manifestations including cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, cardiomyopathy, joint disease and a proportion of asymptomatic patients. When it is diagnosed and treatment with phlebotomies is initiated before any organ damage is developed, the prognosis is very good, with normal survival free of manifestations. This condition is common in European populations. We report the case of a Peruvian patient of European ancestry who is asymptomatic, but has high levels of aminotransferases and elevated iron markers. Genetic testing confirmed the patient's diagnosis of hereditary hemachromatosis.

  2. Intragenic Duplication A Novel Mutational Mechanism in Hereditary Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, M. T.; Geisz, A.; Brusgaard, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In a hereditary pancreatitis family from Denmark, we identified a novel intragenic duplication of 9 nucleotides in exon-2 of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene (c.63_71dup) which at the amino-acid level resulted in the insertion of 3 amino acids within the activation peptide...... pancreatitis. The accelerated activation of p.K23_I24insIDK by cathepsin B is a unique biochemical property not found in any other pancreatitis-associated trypsinogen mutant. In contrast, the robust autoactivation of the novel mutant confirms the notion that increased autoactivation is a disease......-relevant mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis....

  3. Benefits and risks of danazol in hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Konrad; Bygum, Anette; Hardt, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary angioedema (HAE) due to C1 inhibitor deficiency is clinically characterized by relapsing skin swellings, abdominal pain attacks, and life-threatening upper airway obstruction. Treatment with androgens prevents attacks for those with this condition. OBJECTIVE: To examine....... In the other patients, hereditary angioedema ran a mild course. The frequency of acute attacks during danazol treatment was reduced to 16.2%, and the attacks were considerably milder than before treatment. Laryngeal edema was reduced to 4.8%. Adverse effects (weight gain, virilization, menstrual irregularities...

  4. Hereditary Gigantism-the biblical giant Goliath and his brothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Deirdre E; Morrison, Patrick J

    2014-05-01

    The biblical giant Goliath has an identifiable family tree suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. We suggest that he had a hereditary pituitary disorder possibly due to the AIP gene, causing early onset and familial acromegaly or gigantism. We comment on the evidence within the scriptures for his other relatives including a relative with six digits and speculate on possible causes of the six digits. Recognition of a hereditary pituitary disorder in the biblical Goliath and his family sheds additional information on his and other family members' battles with David and his relatives.

  5. The molecular basis of hereditary fructose intolerance in Italian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, R; Scarano, M I; Esposito, G; Chiandetti, L; Izzo, P; Salvatore, F

    1993-10-01

    We investigated the molecular defects of the aldolase B gene in five unrelated patients affected by hereditary fructose intolerance. The techniques used were DNA amplification, direct sequencing and allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization. The most frequent substitutions found in the hereditary fructose intolerance alleles analysed were the A174D and the A149P mutations, which account for 50% and 30% of the alleles, respectively. In two unrelated families, we found a rare mutation, the MD delta 4 previously described only in one British family, which may be an important cause of the disease in Italy.

  6. Hereditary benign telangiectasia without family history in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Lin; SUN Qing-miao; ZANG Dong-jie; ZHANG Jian-zhong

    2011-01-01

    A case of hereditary benign telangiectasia without family history was reported. A 39-year-old woman presented with small and tiny telangiectases on the face, neck, upper trunk and forearms at birth. The numbers and sizes of the lesions increased gradually and she had no hemorrhagic diathesis and systemic diseases. No similar patients were found in her family. Upon physical examination, telangiectases were found on the face, neck, upper trunk and forearms; and a telangiectatic erythema was found on the right forearm 25 mm ×40 mm in size. Histopathology examination showed a normal epidermis and dilation of the capillaries at upper dermis. Hereditary benign telangiectasia without family history was diagnosed.

  7. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  8. The optic nerve head in hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Evelyn C; Mackey, David A; Connell, Paul P; Hewitt, Alex W; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V; Crowston, Jonathan G

    2009-05-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are a prominent cause of blindness in both children and adults. The disorders in this group share many overlapping clinical characteristics, including morphological changes that occur at the optic nerve head. Accurate and prompt clinical diagnosis, supplemented with imaging when indicated, is essential for optimum management of the relevant optic neuropathy and appropriate counseling of the patient on its natural history. Patient history, visual field assessment, optic disc findings and imaging are the cornerstones of a correct diagnosis. This Review highlights the characteristic optic nerve head features that are common to the various hereditary optic neuropathies, and describes the features that enable the conditions to be differentiated.

  9. Unilateral adrenalectomy can be an alternative therapy for infantile onset Cushing' s syndrome caused by ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamajima, Takashi; Maruwaka, Kaori; Homma, Keiko; Matsuo, Kumihiro; Fujieda, Kenji; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2010-01-01

    We report herein the case of a 1-year-old boy with McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) who presented with infantile-onset Cushing' s syndrome caused by ACTH independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH). Abdominal CT, MRI, and adrenal scintigraphy with (131)I-adosterol identified bilateral adrenal involvement with the left adrenal gland being larger and functionally more active. Unilateral adrenalectomy of the left gland was performed and ameliorated many clinical symptoms, such as Cushingoid appearance and height restriction, and it also normalized many endocrinological data, such as diurnal rhythms of ACTH and cortisol, ACTH and cortisol responses to CRH, and urinary 24 hr free cortisol. Glucocorticoid was replaced for the first 1 year and 6 months after the operation. One adrenal crisis episode occurred at 3 weeks after the operation, but none have occurred since. These results suggest that unilateral adrenalectomy of the larger gland can be an alternative therapy for infantile onset Cushing' s syndrome caused by AIMAH with MAS, when asymmetric involvement is evident and the smaller gland is not markedly enlarged.

  10. Treatment protocols for growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas combined with craniofacial fibrous dysplasia: A case report of atypical McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia; Li, Xi; Lv, Chang-Sheng; Chen, Ying; Wang, Meng; Liu, Jian-Feng; Gui, Lai

    2014-09-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare, post-zygotic (non-germline) disorder, characterized by hypersecretory endocrinopathies, fibrous dysplasia of the bone and café-au-lait macules. The most common endocrine dysfunction is gonadal hyperfunction; thus, hypersecretion of growth hormones (GHs) as a manifestation of endocrine hyperfunction in MAS is rarely reported. MAS affects both genders, although the majority of cases have been reported in young females. Atypical presentations of MAS, with only one or two of the classic symptoms, have been previously described, but remain particularly challenging due to the lack of a diagnostic phenotype. In patients with atypical MAS, analysis of mutations in the gene of the α-subunit of the stimulatory G-protein is limited; thus, diagnosis is based on clinical judgment. In the present study, a male with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and GH-secreting pituitary adenomas, diagnosed with atypical MAS, was reported. The pituitary adenoma was effectively treated with radiotherapy and the patient underwent surgery for the polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, with marked improvements observed in appearance.

  11. Hypothyroidism in McCune–Albright Syndrome and Role of Bone Scan in Management of Fibrous Dysplasia: An Unusual Case Scenario with Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narvesh; Kheruka, Subhash Chand; Singh, Rani Kunti R.; Ravina, Mudalsha; Dutta, Deepanksha; Gambhir, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    The McCune–Albright syndrome (MAS) is a triad of café-au-lait skin pigmentation, precocious puberty (PP), and polyostotic fibrous dysplasia of bone (FD). In general, FD seems to be the most common component of MAS but very rarely precocious puberty can be found in association with café-au-lait skin pigmentation in the absence of FD (about 1% of the cases). Therefore, a more clinically relevant definition of MAS is fibrous dysplasia of bone (FD) and at least one of the typical hyperfunctioning endocrinopathy and/or café-au-lait spots, with almost any combination possible. Bone scan can be the modality of choice to look for bone disease burden of fibrous dysplasia in most patients of MAS and may change the management accordingly. Most of the cases of MAS reported worldwide are associated with hyperthyroidism, up to best of our knowledge on the basis of literature search in pubmed and Google; no case was reported with hypothyroidism. Herein, we report a 12-year-old girl diagnosed with MAS and associated hypothyroidism. We have also reviewed the MAS related literature. PMID:28242980

  12. Hypothyroidism in McCune-Albright Syndrome and Role of Bone Scan in Management of Fibrous Dysplasia: An Unusual Case Scenario with Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narvesh; Kheruka, Subhash Chand; Singh, Rani Kunti R; Ravina, Mudalsha; Dutta, Deepanksha; Gambhir, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    The McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a triad of café-au-lait skin pigmentation, precocious puberty (PP), and polyostotic fibrous dysplasia of bone (FD). In general, FD seems to be the most common component of MAS but very rarely precocious puberty can be found in association with café-au-lait skin pigmentation in the absence of FD (about 1% of the cases). Therefore, a more clinically relevant definition of MAS is fibrous dysplasia of bone (FD) and at least one of the typical hyperfunctioning endocrinopathy and/or café-au-lait spots, with almost any combination possible. Bone scan can be the modality of choice to look for bone disease burden of fibrous dysplasia in most patients of MAS and may change the management accordingly. Most of the cases of MAS reported worldwide are associated with hyperthyroidism, up to best of our knowledge on the basis of literature search in pubmed and Google; no case was reported with hypothyroidism. Herein, we report a 12-year-old girl diagnosed with MAS and associated hypothyroidism. We have also reviewed the MAS related literature.

  13. An activating G{sub s}{alpha} mutation is present in fibrous dysplasia of bone in the McCune-Albright syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenker, A.; Weinstein, L.S.; Spiegel, A.M. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Sweet, D.E. [Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a sporadic disease characterized by polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, cafe-au-lait spots, and multiple endocrinopathies. The etiology of fibrous dysplasia is unknown. Activating mutations of codon 201 in the gene encoding the {alpha}-subunit of G{sub s}, the G-protein that stimulates adenylyl cyclase, have been found in all affected MAS tissues that have been studied. Initial attempts to amplify DNA from decalcified paraffin-embedded bone specimens from frozen surgical bone specimens from five MAS patients using polymerase chain reaction and allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization. Most of the cells in four specimens of dysplastic bone contained a heterozygous mutation encoding substitution of Arg{sup 201} of G{sub s}{alpha} with His, but the mutation was barely detectable in peripheral blood specimens from the patients. Only a small amount of mutant allele was detected in a specimen of normal cortical bone from the fifth patient, although this patients had a high proportion of mutation in other, affected tissues. The mosaic distribution of mutant alleles is consistent with an embryological somatic cell mutation of the G{sub s}{alpha} gene in MAS. The presence of an activating mutation of G{sub s}{alpha} in osteoblastic progenitor cells may cause them to exhibit increased proliferation and abnormal differentiation, thereby producing the lesions of fibrous dysplasia. 43 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Combined treatment with bicalutamide and anastrozole in a young boy with peripheral precocious puberty due to McCune-Albright Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessaris, Daniele; Matarazzo, Patrizia; Mussa, Alessandro; Tuli, Gerdi; Verna, Francesca; Fiore, Ludovica; Lala, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    McCune-Albright Syndrome (MAS) is a congenital endocrine disorder due to mosaic tissutal hyper-function. We describe a boy with a molecularly confirmed MAS, clinically evident with congenital café-au-lait spots, bone fibrous dysplasia, hyperthyroidism, and renal phosphate wasting syndrome. At 4.6 years of age he disclosed a rapid progression of peripheral puberty, so we decided to treat him with bicalutamide 25 mg/day and anastrozole 1 mg/day. Combined third generation aromatase inhibitors - competitive androgen receptor blockers were employed in familial male precocious puberty (FMPP). Combined treatment was performed for 49 months from the age of 4.6 to 6.7 years. The patient underwent clinical, laboratory, and instrumental evaluation twice a year from the first admission to the current age. This treatment caused a rapid normalization of growth velocity, subsequent reduction of penile androgenization, and stabilization of testicular volume. The therapy was well tolerated for all its duration and neither side effects, nor secondary hypothalamic activation were noted. This report provides further evidence of effectiveness and safety of combined third generation aromatase inhibitors - competitive androgen receptor blockers in male precocious peripheral puberty, firstly employed in male MAS, and contributes to expand the spectrum of disorders in which their employment may reveal promising.

  15. The diagnosis of hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, B; Gitzelmann, R

    1981-09-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a potentially life-threatening disorder and can be suspected from a detailed nutritional history. The usefulness of 2 diagnostic procedures, fructose tolerance test (FTT) and aldolase assay on biopsied liver, was studied. A standardized intravenous FTT with 200 mg/kg b.w. was done on 11 children with HFI, 17 age-matched contrast children, 6 adults with HFI and 6 adult controls. Blood glucose, phosphorus, urate, magnesium and fructose were followed for 2 hours. By the FTT, each HFI individual was reliably distinguished from controls and contrasts and even from those with acute liver disease other than HFI. Both children with non-HFI hepatopathy examined by both procedures had a normal FTT in spite of reduced liver fructaldolase activity. HFI children responded to the FTT by earlier and more pronounced hypoglycemia than adults, and one girl converted to an adult type response between the ages 12 and 181/2 years. Responses of two HFI sibling pairs and of one set of monozygotic twins were typical for age, but resemblance was no greater than within the unrelated HFI probands. The intravenous FTT is judged a reliable diagnostic tool, simple and harmless if done in hospital. Essential fructosuria is readily diagnosed by the FTT, but fructose-1,6-diphosphatase deficiency and HFI are not differentiated with certainty. Liver biopsies were obtained from 35 children with HFI, 14 contrast persons and 10 controls (of which 9 organ donors) and examined enzymatically. Deficiency of fructaldolase was observed in all HFI children but also in some contrast children suffering from acute liver disease other than HFI. In these, HFI could only be excluded when the reduced activity of reference enzymes such as fructose-1,6-diphosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase and liver histology were included in the evaluation. In one deceased HFI infant, fructaldolase was deficient in both, liver and kidney cortex. Extent of antibody activation and of heat

  16. Topological Structures and Membrane Nanostructures of Erythrocytes after Splenectomy in Hereditary Spherocytosis Patients via Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ying; Lu, Liyuan; Li, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis is an inherited red blood cell membrane disorder resulting from mutations of genes encoding erythrocyte membrane and cytoskeletal proteins. Few equipments can observe the structural characteristics of hereditary spherocytosis directly expect for atomic force microscopy In our study, we proved atomic force microscopy is a powerful and sensitive instrument to describe the characteristics of hereditary spherocytosis. Erythrocytes from hereditary spherocytosis patients we...

  17. The Almost Split Sequences for Trivial Extensions of Hereditary Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yu-lin; Yao Hai-lou

    2014-01-01

    Let A be a basic hereditary artin algebra and R=AnQ be the trivial extension of A by its minimal injective cogenerator Q. We construct some right (left) almost split morphisms and irreducible morphisms in modR through the correspond-ing morphisms in modA. Furthermore, we can determine its almost split sequences in modR.

  18. Systemic treatment for hereditary cancers: a 2012 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Byrski, Tomasz

    2013-04-01

    The history of specific therapy for hereditary tumors dates back to mid 1980s and involves a number of reports demonstrating regression of familial colon polyps upon administration of sulindac. Virtually no clinical studies on other hereditary cancer types were available until the year 2009, when Byrski et al. presented the data on unprecedented sensitivity of BRCA1-associated breast malignancies to cisplatin. This breakthrough has revived interest to the treatment of cancer in germ-line mutation carriers. Recent trials and clinical observations have confirmed the efficacy of platinating agents and PARP inhibitors in BRCA1/2-driven breast, ovarian and pancreatic carcinomas. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin may be considered as a promising treatment option for BRCA1/2-related ovarian cancer after the failure of platinum-containing therapy. Several novel drugs have been recently introduced in the management of rare familial tumor syndromes. Vandetanib, a low-molecular weight RET kinase inhibitor, demonstrated substantial efficacy in the treatment of hereditary and sporadic medullary thyroid cancer. Vismodegib, an inhibitor of SMO oncoprotein, caused regression of basal-cell carcinomas in patients with Gorlin syndrome. Down-regulation of mTOR kinase by everolimus has been successfully used for the therapy of subependymal giant-cell astrocytomas in patients with tuberous sclerosis. The achievements in the prevention, diagnostics and treatment of hereditary cancers may serve as an excellent example of triumph of translational medicine.

  19. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  20. Hereditary spherocytosis diagnosed with the eosin-5'-maleimide binding test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Toru; Ono, Hiroyuki; Tajima, Iwao; Ishigaki, Hidetoshi; Hakamata, Akio; Shirai, Masami; Endoh, Akira; Hongo, Teruaki

    2014-06-01

    We describe three cases of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) diagnosed using the eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA) binding test and discuss the relevance of the EMA binding test. In Japan, this test is not widely used because the prevalence of HS is low. This test is a valuable screening test for the diagnosis of HS.

  1. Study of glycolytic intermediates in hereditary elliptocytosis with thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavri Roshan

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycolytic intermediates like ATP, DPG and GSH have been studied in a family with. hereditary elliptocytosis and thalassemia. Results indicate a fall in ATP with a concomitant rise in DPG in the Patient. Findings are discussed in relation to other data.

  2. Sulindac treatment in hereditary non-pollyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, Fleur E. M.; Hollema, Harry; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; van der Sluis, Tineke; Ek, Wytske Boersma-van; Kleibeuker, Jan H.

    2007-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, e.g. sulindac have been extensively studied for chemoprevention in familial adenomatous polyposis, but not in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). We evaluated these effects in HNPCC using surrogate end-points for cancer risk. In a randomised dou

  3. Intragenic duplication: a novel mutational mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Maiken T; Geisz, Andrea; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    In a hereditary pancreatitis family from Denmark, we identified a novel intragenic duplication of 9 nucleotides in exon-2 of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene (c.63_71dup) which at the amino-acid level resulted in the insertion of 3 amino acids within the activation peptide of cationic...

  4. Hereditary Angioedema Attacks : Local Swelling at Multiple Sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, Zonne L M; Relan, Anurag; Hack, C. Erik

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients experience recurrent local swelling in various parts of the body including painful swelling of the intestine and life-threatening laryngeal oedema. Most HAE literature is about attacks located in one anatomical site, though it is mentioned that HAE attacks may al

  5. Motor activation in SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, KH; Nielsen, JE; Krabbe, Katja

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of motor cortical functional reorganisation in patients with SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia by exploring cortical motor activation related to movements of clinically affected (lower) and unaffected (upper) limbs. METHODS...

  6. Hereditary spastic paraplegia caused by the PLP1 'rumpshaker mutation'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, Kirsten; Giraud, Geneviève; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders characterised by progressive spasticity and weakness in the lower limbs. Mutations in PLP1 on the X chromosome cause spastic paraplegia type 2 (SPG2) or the allelic...

  7. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pott, Jan Willem R.; Wong, Kwok H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited optic neuropathy caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). It is also believed that several epigenetic factors have an influence on the development of LHON. Methods: A case series was observed. Results: Three pa

  8. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is an important cause of progressive painless visual loss among young male patients. OBJECTIVE: To report on a case of a young patient with a clinical and neurophysiological condition suggestive of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, confirmed by genetic testing. CASE REPORT: We describe a 17-year-old male with progressive bilateral visual loss. Two maternal uncles had had similar patterns of visual loss. The patient had a history of smoking and alcohol abuse. Neuro-ophthalmological examination revealed visual acuity of 20/800 in both eyes, with decreased direct and consensual pupillary light reflexes. Fundus examination demonstrated pale optic discs. The visual evoked potential test showed signs of conduction disturbances in both optic nerves and campimetric study showed complete visual loss in all fields of both eyes. A diagnosis of bilateral optic neuropathy with a clinical suspicion of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy was made. A blood sample was submitted to genetic analysis in relation to the principal mutations of this disorder, and homoplasmic mutation in 11778 was detected, thereby confirming the diagnosis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

  9. Gene-environment interactions in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Kirkman; P. Yu-Wai-Man (Patrick); A. Korsten (Alex); M. Leonhardt (Miriam); K. Dimitriadis (Konstantin); I.F.M. de Coo (René); T. Klopstock (Thomas); P.F. Chinnery

    2009-01-01

    textabstractLeber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a genetic disorder primarily due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Environmental factors are thought to precipitate the visual failure and explain the marked incomplete penetrance of LHON, but previous small studies have failed to conf

  10. On the many faces of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostra, RJ; Tijmes, NT; Cobben, JM; Bolhuis, PA; vanNesselrooij, BPM; Houtman, WA; deKokNazaruk, MM; BleekerWagemakers, EM

    1997-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited disorder, associated with mutations in the mitochondrial DNA, which is notorious for its aspecific presentations. Two pedigrees are described with cases that are atypical for LHON with respect to sex, age of onset, interval between t

  11. Allelic imbalance in hereditary and sporadic prostate cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhage, B.; Houwelingen, K.P. van; Ruijter, T.E.G.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Schalken, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study, we evaluate the pattern of allelic imbalance (AI) in both sporadic prostate cancer (SPC) and hereditary prostate cancer (HPC) at loci that frequently show allelic imbalance in sporadic prostate cancer, or are believed to have a putative role in the disease. METHODS: DNA ob

  12. Hereditary fructose intolerance and alpha(1) antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillebrand, G; Schneppenheim, R; Oldigs, H D; Santer, R

    2000-07-01

    A patient with coexisting hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) and alpha(1) antitrypsin deficiency (alpha(1)ATD) is described. Protease inhibitor typing was not conclusive, presumably because of impaired N-glycosylation secondary to HFI. The case underlines the diagnostic role of molecular genetic techniques in inborn errors of metabolism.

  13. Visual Rehabilitation of Persons with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudanko, S.-L.

    1995-01-01

    This article presents results of a noncontrolled clinical study of 20 persons with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy who were treated from 1976 to 1990 at the Low Vision Centre of the Finnish Federation of the Visually Handicapped. The importance of early functional visual rehabilitation is emphasized, as is the use of low vision aids to help…

  14. Prognostic Factors for Distress After Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorwinden, Jan S; Jaspers, Jan P C

    2015-01-01

    The psychological impact of an unfavorable genetic test result for counselees at risk for hereditary cancer seems to be limited: only 10-20 % of counselees have psychological problems after testing positive for a known familial mutation. The objective of this study was to find prognostic factors tha

  15. Mitochondrial processes are impaired in hereditary inclusion body myopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenberg, I.; Novershtern, N.; Itzhaki, Z.; Becker-Cohen, M.; Sadeh, M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Friedman, N.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Mitrani-Rosenbaum, S.

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM) is an adult onset, slowly progressive distal and proximal myopathy. Although the causing gene, GNE, encodes for a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of sialic acid, its primary function in HIBM remains unknown. To elucidate the pathological mechanisms leading fr

  16. Non-recurrent SEPT9 duplications cause hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collie, A.M.; Landsverk, M.L.; Ruzzo, E.; Mefford, H.C.; Buysse, K.; Adkins, J.R.; Knutzen, D.M.; Barnett, K.; Brown Jr., R.H.; Parry, G.J.; Yum, S.W.; Simpson, D.A.; Olney, R.K.; Chinnery, P.F.; Eichler, E.E.; Chance, P.F.; Hannibal, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genomic copy number variants have been shown to be responsible for multiple genetic diseases. Recently, a duplication in septin 9 (SEPT9) was shown to be causal for hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA), an episodic peripheral neuropathy with autosomal dominant inheritance. This duplicat

  17. Alterations of red blood cell metabolome in overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darghouth, D.; Koehl, B.; Heilier, J.F.; Madalinski, G.; Bovee, P.H.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Delaunay, J.; Junot, C.; Romeo, P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis, clinically characterized by hemolytic anemia, is a rare disorder of the erythrocyte membrane permeability to monovalent cations, associated with mutations in the Rh-associated glycoprotein gene. We assessed the red blood cell metabolome of 4 patients with this

  18. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Kjeldsen, J

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding occurs in a number of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and may lead to a high transfusion need. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and severity of gastrointestinal bleeding in a geographically well defined HHT population....

  19. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer: Not Only BRCA 1 and 2 Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Toss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65–85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making.

  20. Oestrogens ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Carla; Montopoli, Monica; Perli, Elena; Orlandi, Maurizia; Fantin, Marianna; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Caparrotta, Laura; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Ghelli, Anna; Sadun, Alfredo A; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, the most frequent mitochondrial disease due to mitochondrial DNA point mutations in complex I, is characterized by the selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells, leading to optic atrophy and loss of central vision prevalently in young males. The current study investigated the reasons for the higher prevalence of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in males, exploring the potential compensatory effects of oestrogens on mutant cell metabolism. Control and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy osteosarcoma-derived cybrids (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6) were grown in glucose or glucose-free, galactose-supplemented medium. After having shown the nuclear and mitochondrial localization of oestrogen receptors in cybrids, experiments were carried out by adding 100 nM of 17β-oestradiol. In a set of experiments, cells were pre-incubated with the oestrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy cybrids in galactose medium presented overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which led to decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increased apoptotic rate, loss of cell viability and hyper-fragmented mitochondrial morphology compared with control cybrids. Treatment with 17β-oestradiol significantly rescued these pathological features and led to the activation of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 2. In addition, 17β-oestradiol induced a general activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and a small although significant improvement in energetic competence. All these effects were oestrogen receptor mediated. Finally, we showed that the oestrogen receptor β localizes to the mitochondrial network of human retinal ganglion cells. Our results strongly support a metabolic basis for the unexplained male prevalence in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and hold promises for a therapeutic use for oestrogen-like molecules.

  1. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr eAlaarg

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterised by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely asessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary

  2. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M; van Solinge, Wouter W; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-12-13

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias.

  3. Osteodistrofia Hipertrófica en Weimaraner. Un nuevo concepto a tener en cuenta para su prevención (Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy in the Weimaraner. A new concept to consider for its prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo D. Mauro

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Sumario. El Weimaraner es una raza que ha tenido gran difusión en nuestro país durante los últimos años. Algunos de sus ejemplares, pueden presentar particularidades en la respuesta inmunologica, que el veterinario especializado en pequeñas especies no debiera ignorar. Existe cierta predisposición en estos animales, a presentar una forma mas grave de Osteodistrofia Hipertrófica, asociada a síntomas orgánicos generalizados. En esta presentación se postulan algunas hipótesis sobre la etiología de esta enfermedad, y se intenta concientizar al profesional sobre la necesidad de aplicar planes de vacunación diferenciados, en animales potencialmente predispuestos a sufrir algún tipo de reacción indeseada, a consecuencia de la aplicación de una vacuna. Summary. The Weimaraner breed has had great diffusion in our country in these last years. Some specimens of this breed may present certain inmunologic response particularities, which the small animal practitioner should keep in mind. These animals have a certain predisposition to suffer a severe form of Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy, associated with generalized organic simptomatology. In this presentation some hypothesis about the disease aethiology are postulated, and the necessity of making practitioners aware of imposing differential vaccination plans for potentially predisposed animals, based on the probability of suffering adverse reactions to the vaccine applied, is stated.

  4. Inherited focal, episodic neuropathies: hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies and hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Phillip F

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP; also called tomaculous neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder that produces a painless episodic, recurrent, focal demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP generally develops during adolescence, and may cause attacks of numbness, muscular weakness, and atrophy. Peroneal palsies, carpal tunnel syndrome, and other entrapment neuropathies may be frequent manifestations of HNPP. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities may be reduced in clinically affected patients, as well as in asymptomatic gene carriers. The histopathological changes observed in peripheral nerves of HNPP patients include segmental demyelination and tomaculous or "sausage-like" formations. Mild overlap of clinical features with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 1 (CMT1) may lead patients with HNPP to be misdiagnosed as having CMT1. HNPP and CMT1 are both demyelinating neuropathies, however, their clinical, pathological, and electrophysiological features are quite distinct. HNPP is most frequently associated with a 1.4-Mb pair deletion on chromosome 17p12. A duplication of the identical region leads to CMT1A. Both HNPP and CMT1A result from a dosage effect of the PMP22 gene, which is contained within the deleted/duplicated region. This is reflected in reduced mRNA and protein levels in sural nerve biopsy samples from HNPP patients. Treatment for HNPP consists of preventative and symptom-easing measures. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA; also called familial brachial plexus neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder causing episodes of paralysis and muscle weakness initiated by severe pain. Individuals with HNA may suffer repeated episodes of intense pain, paralysis, and sensory disturbances in an affected limb. The onset of HNA is at birth or later in childhood with prognosis for recovery usually favorable; however, persons with HNA may have permanent residual neurological dysfunction following attack(s). Episodes are often

  5. Role of detection of microsatellite instability in Chinese with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Zhi Liu; Feng Jin; Zhen-Hai Zhang; Shu-Bao Wang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To detect microsatellite instability (MSI) in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and to provide criteria for screening the kindreds with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer at molecular level.METHODS: MSI was detected in the specimens from 20 cases with HNPCC, 20 cases with ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and 20 cases with sporadic colorectal cancer by means of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism.RESULTS: The positive rate of MSI was 85% (17/20) in HNPCC group, 40% (8/20) in ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer group and 10% (2/20) in the sporadic colorectal cancer group respectively. The differences were significant. The mean ages of the three groups were 43.6, 52.2, and 61.8 years respectively, which increased gradually. The incidence of right hemicolon cancer was 64.7%, 37.5%, and 0% respectively, which decreased gradually and had significant difference. The expression ratio of BAT26 and BAT25 was 94.1% respectively, which was highest in the 5 gene sites studied. The incidence of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was 70.6% in HNPCC group among high frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H), which was higher than the other two groups, which had 50% and 50% respectively.CONCLUSION: The incidence of MSI-H is higher in HNPCC group. The detection of MSI is simple and economical and has high correlation with the clinicopathologic feature of HNPCC and can be used as a screening method to detect the germ line mutation of the mismatch repair gene.

  6. New treatments addressing the pathophysiology of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Alvin E

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary angioedema is a serious medical condition caused by a deficiency of C1-inhibitor. The condition is the result of a defect in the gene controlling the synthesis of C1-inhibitor, which regulates the activity of a number of plasma cascade systems. Although the prevalence of hereditary angioedema is low – between 1:10,000 to 1:50,000 – the condition can result in considerable pain, debilitation, reduced quality of life, and even death in those afflicted. Hereditary angioedema presents clinically as cutaneous swelling of the extremities, face, genitals, and trunk, or painful swelling of the gastrointestinal mucosa. Angioedema of the upper airways is extremely serious and has resulted in death by asphyxiation. Subnormal levels of C1-inhibitor are associated with the inappropriate activation of a number of pathways – including, in particular, the complement and contact systems, and to some extent, the fibrinolysis and coagulation systems. Current findings indicate bradykinin, a product of contact system activation, as the primary mediator of angioedema in patients with C1-inhibitor deficiency. However, other systems may play a role in bradykinin's rapid and excessive generation by depleting available levels of C1-inhibitor. There are currently no effective therapies in the United States to treat acute attacks of hereditary angioedema, and currently available agents used to treat hereditary angioedema prophylactically are suboptimal. Five new agents are, however, in Phase III development. Three of these agents replace C1-inhibitor, directly addressing the underlying cause of hereditary angioedema and re-establishing regulatory control of all pathways and proteases involved in its pathogenesis. These agents include a nano-filtered C1-inhibitor replacement therapy, a pasteurized C1-inhibitor, and a recombinant C1-inhibitor isolated from the milk of transgenic rabbits. All C1-inhibitors are being investigated for acute angioedema

  7. Genetic and biochemical impairment of mitochondrial complex I activity in a family with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and hereditary spastic dystonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeVries, DD; Went, LN; Bruyn, GW; Scholte, HR; Hofstra, RMW; Bolhuis, PA; vanOost, BA

    1996-01-01

    A rare form of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) that is associated with hereditary spastic dystonia has been studied in a large Dutch family. Neuropathy and ophthalmological lesions were present together in some family members, whereas only one type of abnormality was found in others. mtDNA

  8. Pamidronic acid and cabergoline as effective long-term therapy in a 12-year-old girl with extended facial polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, prolactinoma and acromegaly in McCune-Albright syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Classen Carl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction McCune-Albright syndrome is a complex inborn disorder due to early embryonal postzygotic somatic activating mutations in the GNAS1 gene. The phenotype is very heterogeneous and includes polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, typically involving the facial skull, numerous café-au-lait spots and autonomous hyperfunctions of several endocrine systems, leading to hyperthyroidism, hypercortisolism, precocious puberty and acromegaly. Case presentation Here, we describe a 12-year-old Caucasian girl with severe facial involvement of fibrous dysplasia, along with massive acromegaly due to growth hormone excess and precocious puberty, with a prolactinoma. Our patient was treated with a bisphosphonate and the prolactin antagonist, cabergoline, resulting in the inhibition of fibrous dysplasia and involution of both the prolactinoma and growth hormone excess. During a follow-up of more than two years, no severe side effects were noted. Conclusion Treatment with bisphosphonates in combination with cabergoline is a suitable option in patients with McCune-Albright syndrome, especially in order to circumvent surgical interventions in patients suffering from polyostotic fibrous dysplasia involving the skull base.

  9. Hereditary Angioedema - Consequences of a New Treatment Paradigm in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    impact on their lives and restricted their physical activities. By December 2012, a total of 39 patients (49%) were practicing home treatment of acute attacks. Home therapy reduced the mean number of acute hospital visits by 84% and significantly improved burden of illness items. In conclusion, home......Experiences from a Danish patient cohort with hereditary angioedema are reported with focus on home therapy and burden of illness. Eighty patients have been prospectively followed over 11 years, having experienced a total of 7,809 attacks over 469 patient years. More than half of the patients...... stopped long-term prophylaxis with danazol or tranexamic acid and changed treatment regimen to on-demand treatment with C1 inhibitor concentrate or icatibant. At least 10% of the attacks remained un-treated. More than half of the patients felt that hereditary angioedema had a significant psychological...

  10. [Band 3 deficiency as a cause of hereditary spherocytosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Hideho; Suemori, Shin-Ichiro; Nakanishi, Hidekazu; Sugihara, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Band 3 protein accounts for the largest percentage of whole erythrocyte membrane proteins. Abnormalities in this protein are closely associated with pathologies including hereditary spherocytosis (HS), Southeast Asian ovalocytosis and distant renal tubular acidosis. Currently, EMA binding capacity measurement in erythrocytes is the most useful screening test for diagnosing HS. We have also demonstrated reduced EMA binding capacity in patients with HS who have deficiencies of membrane proteins such as ankyrin not directly binding to EMA and who have as yet undetectable abnormalities of membrane proteins. However, even patients with hereditary elliptocytosis, who have a partial spectrin deficiency, were found to show reduced EMA binding capacity. Six of 7 had spherocytic elliptocytosis. Therefore, it is necessary to meticulously diagnose HS by ruling out all other possibilities.

  11. Spinal Exostosis in a Boy with Multiple Hereditary Exostoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al Kaissi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a 13-year-old boy who presented with multiple hereditary exostosis and had development of back pain, associated with neurological deficits, and was found to have exostoses in the spinal canal. Spine radiograph showed a cauliflower-like abnormality of multiple exostoses of the posterior arch (pedicle of the thoracic vertebrae (T3–5. Reformatted CT scanning revealed the simultaneous development of intra- and extraspinal osteochondromatosis of T3–5. The spinal cord was compressed by the intraspinal exostosis. Our patient was surgically treated for intraspinal exostoses and showed cessation of neurological deficits. We report what might be a rare association of spinal cord compression in a patient with multiple hereditary exostoses.

  12. Proteolipid protein 1 gene sequencing of hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Gao; Lumei Chi; Yinshi Jin; Guangxian Nan

    2012-01-01

    PCR amplification and sequencing of whole blood DNA from an individual with hereditary spastic paraplegia, as well as family members, revealed a fragment of proteolipid protein 1 (PLP1) gene exon 1, which excluded the possibility of isomer 1 expression for this family. The fragment sequence of exon 3 and exon 5 was consistent with the proteolipid protein 1 sequence at NCBI. In the proband samples, a PLP1 point mutation in exon 4 was detected at the basic group of position 844, T→C, phenylalanine→leucine. In proband samples from a male cousin, the basic group at position 844 was C, but gene sequencing signals revealed mixed signals of T and C, indicating possible mutation at this locus. Results demonstrated that changes in PLP1 exon 4 amino acids were associated with onset of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

  13. The Autosomal Recessive Inheritance of Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulami Majumder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF is a rare condition which is marked by enlargement of gingival tissue that covers teeth to various extents leading to aesthetic disfigurement. This study presents a case of a 28-year-old female patient and 18-year-old male who belong to the same family suffering from HGF with chief complaint of overgrowing swelling gingiva. The presence of enlarged gingiva with the same eruption was found in their other family members with no concomitant drug or medical history, and the occurrence of HGF has been found in one generation of this family which may indicate the autosomal recessive inheritance pattern of HGF. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is an idiopathic condition as its etiology is unknown and it was found to recur in some cases even after surgical treatment. Both patients underwent thorough oral prophylaxis and later surgical therapy to correct the deformity.

  14. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy associated with multiple sclerosis: Harding's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry-Jones, A R; Mitchell, J D; Gunarwardena, W J; Shaunak, S

    2008-04-01

    We describe a 32-year-old woman with sequential, severe, painless visual loss in one eye and then the other, and three temporally distinct episodes of neurological disturbance suggestive of demyelination in the spinal cord. She was positive for the T14484C mutation in the mitochondrial genome, one of three common mutations causing Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. In addition, MRI identified areas of demyelination within the periventricular white matter of the brain and within the spinal cord. The coexistence of multiple sclerosis and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (Harding's syndrome) is known to occur more often than would be expected by chance; therefore, screening for the Leber's mutations in multiple sclerosis patients with severe visual loss should be considered because this has important prognostic and genetic implications.

  15. Glaucoma progression associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucci, Carlo; Martucci, Alessio; Mancino, Raffaele; Cerulli, Luciano

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a case of open-angle glaucoma progression associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. Single case analysis method is used. A 53-year-old woman with a previous diagnosis of glaucoma presented with progressive visual field loss. Complete ophthalmological examination and blood tests were negative for other concomitant diseases. Genetic counseling revealed mitochondrial DNA mutation compatible with the diagnosis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. In conclusion, the case describes the concomitant occurrence of open-angle glaucoma and Leber's optic neuropathy. We hypothesize that the two diseases may have a cumulative effect on oxidative stress and retinal ganglion cell death with the consequent rapid progression of visual impairment. Screening for mitochondrial DNA mutations may be requested in patients with glaucoma who, despite pharmacologically controlled intraocular pressure, show rapid progression of the disease.

  16. Could Ossification of the Achilles Tendon Have a Hereditary Component?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chawki Cortbaoui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ossification of the Achilles tendon (OTA is an unusual clinical condition. It is characterized by the presence of an ossified mass within the fibrocartilaginous substance of the Achilles tendon. The etiology of the ossification of the Achilles tendon is unknown. Review of the literature suggests that its etiology is multifactorial. The major contributing factors are trauma and surgery with other minor causes such as systemic diseases, metabolic conditions, and infections. To our knowledge, no previous reports suggest any genetic/hereditary predisposition in OAT. We report 3 siblings who have OAT with no history of any of the aforementioned predisposing factors. Could OAT have a hereditary component as one of its etiologies?

  17. The potential of disease management for neuromuscular hereditary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Gagnon, Cynthia; Laberge, Luc; Tremblay, Carmen; Côté, Charlotte; Leclerc, Nadine; Mathieu, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular hereditary disorders require long-term multidisciplinary rehabilitation management. Although the need for coordinated healthcare management has long been recognized, most neuromuscular disorders are still lacking clinical guidelines about their long-term management and structured evaluation plan with associated services. One of the most prevalent adult-onset neuromuscular disorders, myotonic dystrophy type 1, generally presents several comorbidities and a variable clinical picture, making management a constant challenge. This article presents a healthcare follow-up plan and proposes a nursing case management within a disease management program as an innovative and promising approach. This disease management program and model consists of eight components including population identification processes, evidence-based practice guidelines, collaborative practice, patient self-management education, and process outcomes evaluation (Disease Management Association of America, 2004). It is believed to have the potential to significantly improve healthcare management for neuromuscular hereditary disorders and will prove useful to nurses delivering and organizing services for this population.

  18. [Clinical and molecular genetic analysis of hereditary optic neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetisov, S É; Sheremet, N L; Vorob'eva, O K; Eliseeva, É G; Chukhrova, A L; Loginova, A N; Khanakova, N A; Poliakov, A V

    2013-01-01

    DNA samples of 50 patients with optic neuropathy (ON) associated with congenital cataract were studied to find 3 major mt-DNA mutations (m.11778G>A, m.3460G>A, m.14484T>C), mutations in "hot" regions of OPA 1 gene (exons 8, 14, 15, 16, 18, 27, 28) and in the entire coding sequence of OPA3 gene for molecular genetic confirmation of diagnosis of hereditary Leber and autosomal dominant ON. Primary mutations of mtDNA responsible for hereditary Leber ON were found in 16 patients (32%). Pathogenic mutations of OPAl gene (c.869G>A and c. 2850delT) were identified in 2 patients (4%), these mutations were not found in the literature. OPA3 gene mutations were not revealed.

  19. Disease mechanisms in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpoorten, Nathalie; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2006-02-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies are common monogenically inherited diseases of the peripheral nervous system. In the most common variant, i.e., the hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies, both motor and sensory nerves are affected. In contrast, sensory abnormalities predominate or are exclusively present in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN). HSAN are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and are subdivided according to mode of inheritance, age of onset and clinical evolution. In recent years, 6 disease-causing genes have been identified for autosomal dominant and recessive HSAN. However, vesicular transport and axonal trafficking seem important common pathways leading to degeneration of sensory and autonomic neurons. This review discusses the HSAN-related genes and their biological role in the disease mechanisms leading to HSAN.

  20. [Hereditary ataxias, spastic parapareses and neuropathies in Eastern Canada].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, N; Chrestian, N; Thiffault, I; Brais, B; Rouleau, G A; Bouchard, J-P

    2008-01-01

    It has been demonstrated, for many inherited diseases, that historical events have shaped the various regional gene pools of Eastern Canada. In so doing, it has given rise to the increased prevalence of some rare diseases due, to founder effects. The following neurogenetic disorders were first identified in patients from Eastern Canada: AOA-2, Arsacs, HSN-2, Arca-1, HMSN/ACC and Arsal. The population of Eastern Canada, we are convinced, will still allow the identification of new rare forms of hereditary ataxias, spastic parapareses and neuropathies as well as contribute to the uncovering of their mutated genes. We have summarized our current knowledge of the various hereditary ataxias, spastic parapareses and neuropathies in Eastern Canada. The study of the more common and homogenous features of these diseases has been largely completed.

  1. Hereditary peripheral neuropathies of childhood: an overview for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmshurst, Jo M; Ouvrier, Robert

    2011-11-01

    This review focuses on the "pure" hereditary peripheral neuropathies where peripheral nerve disease is the main manifestation and does not address neurodegenerative disorders associated with but not dominated by peripheral neuropathy. Aetiologies of childhood-onset peripheral neuropathies differ from those of adult-onset, with more inherited conditions, especially autosomal recessive. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is the commonest neuromuscular disorder. The genetic labels of CMT (Charcot-Marie-Tooth) disease types 1-4 are the preferred sub-type terms. Clinical presentations and molecular genetic heterogeneity of hereditary peripheral neuropathies are diverse. For most patients worldwide, diagnostic studies are limited to clinical assessment. Such markers which could be used to identify specific sub-types include presentation in early childhood, scoliosis, marked sensory involvement, respiratory compromise, upper limb involvement, visual or hearing impairment, pyramidal signs and mental retardation. These key markers may assist targeted genetic testing and aid in diagnosing children where DNA testing is not possible.

  2. Hereditary hearing loss: from human mutation to mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Danielle R; Avraham, Karen B

    2011-11-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of hereditary hearing loss is thus far represented by hundreds of genes encoding a large variety of proteins. Mutations in these genes have been discovered for patients with different modes of inheritance and types of hearing loss, ranging from syndromic to non-syndromic and mild to profound. In many cases, the mechanisms whereby the mutations lead to hearing loss have been partly elucidated using cell culture systems and mouse and other animal models. The discovery of the genes has completely changed the practice of genetic counseling in this area, providing potential diagnosis in many cases that can be coupled with clinical phenotypes and offer predictive information for families. In this review we provide three examples of gene discovery in families with hereditary hearing loss, all associated with elucidation of some of the mechanisms leading to hair cell degeneration and pathology of deafness.

  3. Hereditary vitamin D rickets: a case series in a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surender, Kumar; Kochar, I P S; Ahmad, Ayesha; Kapoor, Meenal

    2014-11-01

    Hereditary vitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by end-organ resistance to 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3). Clinically, the syndrome is recognized by severe early onset rickets with bowing of the lower extremities, short stature, and often alopecia. Here, we report a case series on three siblings who had HVDRR with varied clinical findings.

  4. The molecular basis of hereditary enamel defects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J T; Carrion, I A; Morris, C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel.

  5. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain in Children: Hereditary Angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Özçeker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema (HA is a rare, autosomal-dominant genetic disorder presenting with recurrent attacks of angioedema. The most commonly involved organs include the extremites, face, neck, upper respiratory tract, genital region and the gastrointestinal tract. Edema of the intestinal mucosa can cause temporary obstruction and severe abdominal pain that can be confused with acute abdomen. Pediatricians and emergency physicians should keep in mind this rare disease in the differential diagnosis of severe abdominal pain.

  6. Hereditary angioedema: quality of life in Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Abadia Consuelo M. S. Gomide

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hereditary angioedema is a serious medical condition caused by a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder and it is associated with deficient production or dysfunction of the C1 esterase inhibitor. In most cases, affected patients experience unexpected and recurrent crises of subcutaneous, gastrointestinal and laryngeal edema. The unpredictability, intensity and other factors associated with the disease impact the quality of life of hereditary angioedema patients. We evaluated the quality of life in Brazilian hereditary angioedema patients. METHODS: Patients older than 15 years with any severity of hereditary angioedema and laboratory confirmation of C1 inhibitor deficiency were included. Two questionnaires were used: a clinical questionnaire and the SF-36 (a generic questionnaire. This protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo. RESULTS: The SF-36 showed that 90.4% (mean of all the patients had a score below 70 and 9.6% had scores equal to or higher than 70. The scores of the eight dimensions ranged from 51.03 to 75.95; vitality and social aspects were more affected than other arenas. The internal consistency of the evaluation was demonstrated by a Cronbach's alpha value above 0.7 in seven of the eight domains. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, Brazilian patients demonstrated an impaired quality of life, as measured by the SF-36. The most affected domains were those related to vitality and social characteristics. The generic SF-36 questionnaire was relevant to the evaluation of quality of life; however, there is a need for more specific instruments for better evaluation.

  7. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with a thin corpus callosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somasundaram, Sivaraman; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Trivandrum (India); Raghavendra, Seetharam; Singh, Atampreet; Nair, Muraleedharan [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Neurology, Trivandrum (India)

    2007-05-15

    We report a 15-year-old boy with autosomal recessive complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia with a thin corpus callosum (HSP-TCC). The involvement of the corpus callosum was characteristic with the genu and body predominantly affected with relative sparing of the splenium. HSP-TCC is being increasingly recognized over a wider geographical area than earlier believed. We now report a case of HSP-TCC from the Indian subcontinent. (orig.)

  8. One novel transcript of human hereditary multipleexostoses 2 (EXT2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The encoding sequence of human hereditary multiple exostoses gene EXT2.1 is 30 bp longer than EXT2, and they differ in a sequence of 90 base pairs. In order to clarify EXT2.1 structure, this 90 bp sequence was analyzed with the Human Sequence Draft, a database provided by Celera Genomics. The result shows that EXT2.1 is a novel transcript of EXT2 gene, suggesting a rare event of alternative splicing.

  9. Hereditary Nonsyndromic Gingival Fibromatosis: Report of Family Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Wali Peeran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF is a rare, benign disorder with slowly progressive enlargement of maxillary and mandibular gingiva. Herewith, we report the first case series of HGF presenting among mother and all of her 3 children. Their complaints included unaesthetic appearance due to gingival growth, malocclusion, and difficulty in mastication. Conventional gingivectomy with oral hygiene measures and regular followup is the treatment of choice for such presentation.

  10. HEREDITARY INTRAVENTRICULAR CONDUCTION DISORDERS IN THE FAMILY FROM KRASNOYARSK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Chernova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pedigree of the family from Krasnoyarsk city with hereditary disorders of intracardiac conduction was studied. The diagnosis of each family member was verified by electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography , bicycle ergometry , ECG Holter monitoring. The family 10-year follow-up showed familial aggregation of intracardiac conduction disorders in grandson, niece, son of the proband niece, ie, in the III-degree relatives. Family history of III-degree relatives with intracardiac conduction disorders and discordant pathology is identified.

  11. Renal fructose-metabolizing enzymes: significance in hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranhold, J F; Loh, D; Morris, R C

    1969-07-25

    In patients with hereditary fructose intolerance, which is characterized by deficient aldolase activity toward fructose-1-phosphate, fructose induces a renal tubular dysfunction that implicates only the proximal convoluted tubule. Because normal metabolism of fructose by way of fructose-1-phosphate requires fructokinase, aldolase "B," and triokinase, the exclusively cortical location of these enzymes indicates that the medulla is not involved in the metabolic abnormality presumably causal of the renal dysfunction.

  12. A possible case of transient hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catto-Smith, A G; Adams, A

    1993-01-01

    A patient is described who presented with the signs and symptoms of hereditary fructose intolerance a few hours after her first fructose challenge. The diagnosis was confirmed by the demonstration of reduced activity of hepatic aldolase B towards fructose-1-phosphate. A second liver biopsy 10 months later had normal aldolase B activity towards fructose-1-phosphate and a fructose tolerance test was also normal. A possible explanation for these findings is proposed.

  13. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: types II, III, and IV

    OpenAIRE

    Axelrod Felicia B; Gold-von Simson Gabrielle

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) encompass a number of inherited disorders that are associated with sensory dysfunction (depressed reflexes, altered pain and temperature perception) and varying degrees of autonomic dysfunction (gastroesophageal reflux, postural hypotention, excessive sweating). Subsequent to the numerical classification of four distinct forms of HSAN that was proposed by Dyck and Ohta, additional entities continue to be described, so that iden...

  14. The Molecular Basis of Hereditary Enamel Defects in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, I.A.; Morris, C.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel. PMID:25389004

  15. 2010 International consensus algorithm for the diagnosis, therapy and management of hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowen, Tom; Cicardi, Marco; Farkas, Henriette

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We published the Canadian 2003 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE; C1 inhibitor [C1-INH] deficiency) and updated this as Hereditary angioedema: a current state-of-the-art review: Canadian Hungarian 2007...... International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema. OBJECTIVE: To update the International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (circa 2010). METHODS: The Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN...... approach. The Consensus document was reviewed at the meeting and then circulated for review. RESULTS: This manuscript is the 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema that resulted from that conference. CONCLUSIONS: Consensus approach is only...

  16. An overview of novel therapies for acute hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firszt, Rafael; Frank, Michael M

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an episodic swelling disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance. Attacks are characterized by nonpitting edema of external or mucosal body surfaces. Patients often present with swelling of the extremities, abdominal pain, and swelling of the mouth and throat, which can at times lead to asphyxiation. The disease is caused by a mutation in the gene encoding the complement C1-inhibitor protein, which leads to unregulated production of bradykinin. Long-term therapy has depended on the use of attenuated androgens or plasmin inhibitors but in the US there was, until recently, no specific therapy for acute attacks. As well, many patients with hereditary angioedema in the US were either not adequately controlled on previously available therapies or required doses of medications that exposed them to the risk of serious adverse effects. Five companies have completed or are currently conducting phase III clinical trials in the development of specific therapies to terminate acute attacks or to be used as prophylaxis. These products are based on either replacement therapy with purified plasma-derived or recombinant C1-inhibitor, or inhibition of the kinin-generating pathways with a recombinant plasma kallikrein inhibitor or bradykinin type 2 receptor antagonist. Published studies thus far suggest that all of these products are likely to be effective. These new therapies will likely lead to a totally new approach in treating hereditary angioedema.

  17. Management of hereditary angioedema in pregnant women: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caballero T

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Teresa Caballero,1,2 Julio Canabal,1 Daniela Rivero-Paparoni,1 Rosario Cabañas1 1Hospital La Paz Institute for Health Research, (IdiPaz 2Biomedical Research Network on Rare Diseases-U754 (CIBERER, Madrid, Spain Abstract: Three types of hereditary angioedema (HAE have been described: two are due to C1 inhibitor (C1-INH deficiency (C1-INH-HAE types I and II and one is characterized by normal C1-INH (nC1-INH-HAE. The management of pregnancy in patients with HAE is often a clinical challenge owing to potential worsening of the disease in relation to the physiological increase in estrogens and the limited treatment options. This review addresses the potential influence of pregnancy on the clinical severity of hereditary angioedema and the management of this disease during pregnancy with currently available treatments. Keywords: hereditary angioedema, pregnancy, female, treatment, C1 inhibitor concentrate, tranexamic acid

  18. Small Heat Shock Proteins and Distal Hereditary Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedova, V V; Muranova, L K; Sudnitsyna, M V; Ryzhavskaya, A S; Gusev, N B

    2015-12-01

    Classification of small heat shock proteins (sHsp) is presented and processes regulated by sHsp are described. Symptoms of hereditary distal neuropathy are described and the genes whose mutations are associated with development of this congenital disease are listed. The literature data and our own results concerning physicochemical properties of HspB1 mutants associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease are analyzed. Mutations of HspB1, associated with hereditary motor neuron disease, can be accompanied by change of the size of HspB1 oligomers, by decreased stability under unfavorable conditions, by changes in the interaction with protein partners, and as a rule by decrease of chaperone-like activity. The largest part of these mutations is accompanied by change of oligomer stability (that can be either increased or decreased) or by change of intermonomer interaction inside an oligomer. Data on point mutation of HspB3 associated with axonal neuropathy are presented. Data concerning point mutations of Lys141 of HspB8 and those associated with hereditary neuropathy and different forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease are analyzed. It is supposed that point mutations of sHsp associated with distal neuropathies lead either to loss of function (for instance, decrease of chaperone-like activity) or to gain of harmful functions (for instance, increase of interaction with certain protein partners).

  19. [Diagnosis of the peripheral hereditary neuropathies and its molecular genetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Zamora, Edgar; Arenas-Sordo, María de la Luz

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies include a wide range of pathological disorders characterized by damage of peripheral nerves. Among them, peripheral hereditary neuropathies are a group of frequent illnesses and early evolution. They have been named hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) or peripheral hereditary neuropathies type Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT). The most frequent types are CMT1, CMT2 and CMTX. Approximately 70% of the cases correspond to subtype CMT1A, associated with tandem duplication of a 1.5 Mb DNA fragment on chromosome 17p11.2-p12 that codifies the peripheral myelin protein PMP22. So far, there five different types of CMT (1,2,3,4,X) with approximately 32 subtypes, associated with more than 30 genes. Have been reported genetic heterogeneity and expression variability of the illness makes it necessary to carry on diagnostic strategies that integrate clinical study for determining genetic clinical history, family history, complete physical exploration, muscular strength, physical deformities, reflexes and sensitivity, and molecular studies allow detection of different types of mutations and help establish a correct diagnosis and an adequate genetic counseling.

  20. Heterogeneity of Hereditary Hearing Loss in Iran: a Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshtian, Maryam; Babanejad, Mojgan; Azaiez, Hela; Bazazzadegan, Niloofar; Kolbe, Diana; Sloan-Heggen, Christina; Arzhangi, Sanaz; Booth, Kevin; Mohseni, Marzieh; Frees, Kathy; Azizi, Mohammad Hossein; Daneshi, Ahmad; Farhadi, Mohammad; Kahrizi, Kimia; Smith, Richard Jh; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    A significant contribution to the causes of hereditary hearing impairment comes from genetic factors. More than 120 genes and 160 loci have been identified to be involved in hearing impairment. Given that consanguine populations are more vulnerable to most inherited diseases, such as hereditary hearing loss (HHL), the genetic picture of HHL among the Iranian population, which consists of at least eight ethnic subgroups with a high rate of intermarriage, is expected to be highly heterogeneous. Using an electronic literature review through various databases such as PubMed, MEDLINE, and Scopus, we review the current picture of HHL in Iran. In this review, we present more than 39 deafness genes reported to cause non-syndromic HHL in Iran, of which the most prevalent causative genes include GJB2, SLC26A4, MYO15A, and MYO7A. In addition, we highlight some of the more common genetic causes of syndromic HHL in Iran. These results are of importance for further investigation and elucidation of the molecular basis of HHL in Iran and also for developing a national diagnostic tool tailored to the Iranian context enabling early and efficient diagnosis of hereditary hearing impairment.

  1. Hereditary Spherocytosis in a Middle-aged Man Complicated with Common Bile Duct Stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawahara, Hiroaki; Iwamuro, Masaya; Harada, Ryo; Yoshioka, Masao; Niguma, Takefumi; Mimura, Tetsushige; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis is the most common form of hemolytic anemia and is characterized by spherical, osmotically fragile erythrocytes that are selectively trapped by the spleen. Hereditary spherocytosis is typically diagnosed in childhood. We herein experienced a rare case of hereditary spherocytosis diagnosed in middle age. The patient presented with cholelithiasis and hyperbilirubinemia. He had no anemia and was asymptomatic with mild splenomegaly. In the differential diagnosis of these symptoms, the possibility of hereditary spherocytosis should be considered, even in patients who are middle-aged and lack anemia.

  2. Dispersion of compound muscle action potential in hereditary neuropathies and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Michael; Pannoni, Valerie; Lewis, Richard A; Logigian, Eric L; Naguib, Demian; Shy, Michael E; Cleland, James; Herrmann, David N

    2006-10-01

    Distal compound muscle action potential (DCMAP) dispersion, defined as a DCMAP duration > or = 9 ms, and proximal-distal (P-D) CMAP dispersion are considered useful in the electrodiagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Distal and P-D CMAP dispersion have not been fully studied in hereditary neuropathies, and it is not known whether these measures distinguish hereditary from acquired demyelination. We compared DCMAP duration and P-D CMAP dispersion in 91 genetically characterized hereditary neuropathies and 33 subjects with CIDP. DCMAP dispersion was more frequent in nerves affected by CIDP (41.5%) than in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT)1A (24.4%), CMT1B (7.4%), hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) (10.5%), or CMTX (9.8%). P-D CMAP dispersion was more frequent in CIDP (27.7% of nerves) than in hereditary neuropathies (16.3%) when applying American Academy of Neurology (AAN) criteria; however, its frequency was similar in CIDP and the hereditary neuropathies using the more restrictive criteria of the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM). Although dispersion is more common in CIDP than in the hereditary neuropathies, DCMAP and P-D dispersion occur in at least one motor nerve in a significant proportion of hereditary neuropathies, and cannot be used in isolation to distinguish acquired from hereditary demyelination.

  3. Cranial nerves palsy as an initial feature of an early onset distal hereditary motor neuropathy--a new distal hereditary motor neuropathy phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberlová, J; Claeys, K G; De Jonghe, P; Seeman, P

    2009-06-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterised by a pure motor axonal neuropathy. It is occasionally associated with additional signs such as facial weakness, vocal cord paralysis, weakness of the diaphragm, and pyramidal signs. Although predominantly the inheritance is autosomal dominant, all types of inheritance have been described. Here we report a Czech family with cranial nerves palsy as an initial feature of a non progressive infantile onset dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy. This family may represent a new subtype of distal hereditary motor neuropathy.

  4. Gait Patterns in Patients with Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranavolo, Alberto; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Martino, Giovanni; Leonardi, Luca; Conte, Carmela; Varrecchia, Tiwana; Draicchio, Francesco; Coppola, Gianluca; Casali, Carlo; Pierelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Background Spastic gait is a key feature in patients with hereditary spastic paraparesis, but the gait characterization and the relationship between the gait impairment and clinical characteristics have not been investigated. Objectives To describe the gait patterns in hereditary spastic paraparesis and to identify subgroups of patients according to specific kinematic features of walking. Methods We evaluated fifty patients by computerized gait analysis and compared them to healthy participants. We computed time-distance parameters of walking and the range of angular motion at hip, knee, and ankle joints, and at the trunk and pelvis. Lower limb joint moments and muscle co-activation values were also evaluated. Results We identified three distinct subgroups of patients based on the range of motion values. Subgroup one was characterized by reduced hip, knee, and ankle joint range of motion. These patients were the most severely affected from a clinical standpoint, had the highest spasticity, and walked at the slowest speed. Subgroup three was characterized by an increased hip joint range of motion, but knee and ankle joint range of motion values close to control values. These patients were the most mildly affected and had the highest walking speed. Finally, subgroup two showed reduced knee and ankle joint range of motion, and hip range of motion values close to control values. Disease severity and gait speed in subgroup two were between those of subgroups one and three. Conclusions We identified three distinctive gait patterns in patients with hereditary spastic paraparesis that correlated robustly with clinical data. Distinguishing specific features in the gait patterns of these patients may help tailor pharmacological and rehabilitative treatments and may help evaluate therapeutic effects over time. PMID:27732632

  5. Unchanged binding of /sup 99/Molybdenum to red cell membrane proteins in hereditary spherocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marik, T.; Kselikova, M.; Bibr, B.; Brabec, V.; Lener, J. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Prague. Ustav Nuklearni Biologie a Radiochemie; Institut Hygieny a Epidemiologie, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of /sup 99/Mo with red cell membrane proteins was found specific for spectrin both in normal red cells and those of hereditary spherocytosis. In addition, no significant quantitative differences were observed in labelling patterns between these two types of red cells, thus indicating no major alterations in the spectrin molecules of hereditary spherocytosis.

  6. Comprehensive mutational screening in a cohort of Danish families with hereditary congenital cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Mikkelsen, Annemette; Nürnberg, Peter

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Identification of the causal mutations in 28 unrelated families and individuals with hereditary congenital cataract identified from a national Danish register of hereditary eye diseases. Seven families have been published previously, and the data of the remaining 21 families are presente...... populations, the applied sequencing strategy seems to be suitable for the exploration of the large group of isolated cataracts with unknown etiology....

  7. A family with hereditary ankyloglossia complicated by heterochromia irides and a congenital clasped thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Iida, M; Yamaguchi, Y

    1983-10-01

    We experienced a family with hereditary ankyloglossia complicated by heterochromia irides and a congenital clasped thumb. This is considered to be a rare case because, to our knowledge, there have been no published reports on such cases of hereditary complications to date.

  8. Descriptive Epidemiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics of Hereditary Prostate Cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon, Diem Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    A search for markers that can differentiate indolent prostate cancers from more aggressive forms. Assessment of clinical differences between hereditary and sporadicc prostate cancer.......A search for markers that can differentiate indolent prostate cancers from more aggressive forms. Assessment of clinical differences between hereditary and sporadicc prostate cancer....

  9. A MELAS-associated ND1 mutation causing leber hereditary optic neuropathy and spastic dystonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, L.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Hendrickx, A.; Bettink-Remeijer, M.W.; Maat-Kievit, A.; Schoonderwoerd, K.C.; Sluiter, W.; Coo, I.F.M. de; Hintzen, R.Q.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report a novel mutation that is associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) within the same family affected by spastic dystonia. DESIGN: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by isolated central visual loss. Of patients with LHON, 95%

  10. Estimation of EuroQol 5-Dimensions health status utility values in hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aygören-Pürsün, Emel; Bygum, Anette; Beusterien, Kathleen;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate health status utility (preference) weights for hereditary angioedema (HAE) during an attack and between attacks using data from the Hereditary Angioedema Burden of Illness Study in Europe (HAE-BOIS-Europe) survey. Utility measures quantitatively describe the net impact of a...

  11. [Hereditary angioedema. Control and treatment in 7 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marqués, L; Dordal, T; Baltasar, M; Guspi, R; Nogueiras, C; Cadahia, A

    1992-03-14

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is due to a deficit of the C1 inhibitor (C1 INH) of a dominant autosomic inheritance. Seven patients are presented from a family with HAE, four of whom with poor prognosis due to the frequency and site of the angioedema. Prophylaxis was obtained with long-term danazol since antifibrinolytic drugs are not efficient in the prevention of outbreaks of angioedema. In three cases a concentrate of C1 INH was administered and in another as short term prophylaxis prior to surgery. C1 INH was more efficient under these indications than fresh plasma or antifibrinolytic drugs.

  12. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis with distinct dental, skeletal and developmental abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Joseph; Guelmann, Marcio; Barak, Shlomo

    2002-01-01

    A case of a 9-year-old child with hereditary gingival fibromatosis, supernumerary tooth, chest deformities, auricular cartilage deformation, joint laxity and undescended testes is described. The exact mode of inheritance is unclear; a new mutation pattern is possible. These features resemble but differ from the previously reported Laband syndrome. The dental treatment consisted of surgical removal of the fibrous tissue and conservative restorative treatment under general anesthesia. The dental practitioner should be alert for developmental abnormalities such as supernumerary teeth and delayed tooth eruption. A comprehensive medical history and physical systemic evaluation is essential to rule out other systemic abnormalities. Genetic consultation is mandatory for future family planing.

  13. Moyamoya disease in a patient with hereditary spherocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holz, A.; Woldenberg, R.; Miller, D.; Kalina, P.; Black, K.; Lane, E. [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, New York University School of Medicine, 300 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030 (United States)

    1998-02-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebral vasculopathy characterized by occlusion of the supraclinoid portion of the internal carotid artery and proximal portions of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Patients develop an extensive collateral network of parenchymal, transdural and leptomeningeal vessels to supply the compromised brain. These collateral channels, also known as ``moyamoya vessels,`` may be seen in a number of disorders which lead to intracranial vascular occlusion. We report a case of MMD in a child with hereditary spherocytosis. (orig.) With 4 figs., 5 refs.

  14. Hereditary vitamin D-resistant rickets presenting as alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Genevieve; McPherson, Tess; Kini, Usha; Ryan, Fiona; Taibjee, Saleem M; Moss, Celia; Burge, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary vitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene. We report the case of an infant presenting with alopecia, growth failure, and gross motor developmental delay. Serum biochemistry and skeletal survey were consistent with rickets. After a poor response to standard treatment, genetic testing confirmed a c.147-2A>T novel mutation in the VDR gene consistent with HVDRR. It is important for dermatologists and pediatricians to recognize alopecia as a presenting sign of HVDRR because appropriate treatment leads to better growth and development of the child.

  15. NIPA1 mutation in complex hereditary spastic paraplegia with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, Kirsten; Møller, R S; Christensen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders characterized in the 'pure' phenotype by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. In the 'complex' phenotype, additional neurologic symptoms...... or signs are found. Mutations in the NIPA1 gene have been reported to cause spastic paraplegia type 6 (SPG6) in 10 families. SPG6 is a rare form of autosomal dominantly inherited HSP associated with a pure phenotype; however, in one complex SPG6 family, idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) has been...

  16. Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana A. Janicijevic Petrovic

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy is a neuro-ophthalmological entity characterized by acute or subacute bilateral, not simultaneous visual loss with centro cekal scotoma and occasional further visual improvement. This rare ophthalmological disease can be accompanied with dyschromatopsia. It is associated with a matrilineal inheritance pattern. Its diagnosis used to be solely clini¬cal, aided by imaging and neuro-physiological studies, until the advent of descriptions of mitochondrial biochemical abnormalities and genetic testing. We describe a case of 24 year old male with progressive painless deterioration of visual acuity and positive family history.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Singh, Gurparkash; Lott, Marie T.; Hodge, Judy A.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Lezza, Angela M. S.; Elsas, Louis J.; Nikoskelainen, Eeva K.

    1988-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease resulting in optic nerve degeneration and cardiac dysrhythmia. A mitochondrial DNA replacement mutation was identified that correlated with this disease in multiple families. This mutation converted a highly conserved arginine to a histidine at codon 340 in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene and eliminated an Sfa NI site, thus providing a simple diagnostic test. This finding demonstrated that a nucleotide change in a mitochondrial DNA energy production gene can result in a neurological disease.

  18. Current concepts in the treatment of hereditary ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Braga Neto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hereditary ataxias (HA represents an extensive group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative diseases, characterized by progressive ataxia combined with extra-cerebellar and multi-systemic involvements, including peripheral neuropathy, pyramidal signs, movement disorders, seizures, and cognitive dysfunction. There is no effective treatment for HA, and management remains supportive and symptomatic. In this review, we will focus on the symptomatic treatment of the main autosomal recessive ataxias, autosomal dominant ataxias, X-linked cerebellar ataxias and mitochondrial ataxias. We describe management for different clinical symptoms, mechanism-based approaches, rehabilitation therapy, disease modifying therapy, future clinical trials and perspectives, genetic counseling and preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

  19. CDH1 germline mutations and hereditary lobular breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Giovanni; Intra, Mattia; Trentin, Chiara; Veronesi, Paolo; Galimberti, Viviana

    2016-04-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is an autosomal dominant inherited disease associated of CDH1 germline mutations (that encodes for the E-cadherin protein), and lobular breast cancer is the second most frequent type of neoplasia. Recently, novel E-cadherin constitutional alterations have been identified in pedigree clustering only for lobular breast carcinoma without evidence of diffuse gastric tumors and in absence of BRCA1/2 mutations. This first evidence opens novel questions about the inherited correlation between diffuse gastric and lobular breast cancers. In this brief review we revise the literature data about the CDH1 mutation frequency affecting exclusively lobular breast cancer, providing clinical recommendation for asymptomatic mutation carriers.

  20. Hereditary properties of Amenability modulo an ideal of Banach algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Rahimi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate some hereditary properties of amenability modulo an ideal of Banach algebras. We show thatif $(e_{\\alpha}_{\\alpha}$ is a bounded approximate identity modulo $I$ of a Banach algebra $A$ and $X$ is a neo-unital modulo $I$, then $(e_{\\alpha}_{\\alpha}$ is a bounded approximate identity for $X$. Moreover we show that amenability modulo an ideal of a Banach algebra $A$ can be only considered by the neo-unital modulo $I$ Banach algebra over $A$

  1. [Organization of therapeutic aid to patients with hereditary neuromuscular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, V A; Temin, P A; Arkhipov, B A; Zavadenko, N N

    1989-01-01

    The paper summarizes experience gained for many years by the All-Union Research Methodological Center for Study of Hereditary Neuromuscular Diseases. The specialists of the Center render counselling and therapeutic assistance to patients afflicted with neuromuscular diseases. The counselling and diagnostic services are characterized by the fact that it is based on the activity of a large hospital intended for the treatment of various diseases. The problems which are being solved by the out- and inpatient services of the Center are considered in detail. The advantages of the setting up of the common in- and outpatient complex on the basis of the hospital intended for the treatment of various diseases are described.

  2. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Associated with Bilateral Macular Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yoshiaki; Horiguchi, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) causes visual loss, predominantly in healthy young men. We recently examined a patient who previously had bilateral macular holes and subsequently developed LHON at 74 years of age. Although his central scotomas were initially attributed to the macular holes, his visual acuity declined following an initial improvement after operative closure of the macular holes; thus, other diagnoses, including LHON, were considered. Furthermore, macular optical coherence tomography (OCT) images remained unchanged in this time. A mitochondrial genetic analysis identified a 11778G→A mutation. From this case, we propose that LHON remains in the differential diagnosis even in older patients, as has previously been reported. PMID:27335507

  3. Mutation analysis in Turkish patients with hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, A; Kalkanoğlu, H S; Coşkun, T; Tokatli, A; Bittner, R; Koçak, N; Yüce, A; Ozalp, I; Boehme, H J

    2001-10-01

    Thirteen Turkish patients with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) were screened for the three common mutations, A149P, A174D and N334K, in the aldolase B gene that have been detected frequently in European population. We found that nine of the patients carry the A149P mutation in both alleles, which corresponds to a frequency of about 55%. Single-strand conformation analysis of all coding exons of the gene was also performed to detect unknown mutations in four patients not carrying the three common mutations. No aberrant migration patterns were observed in these patients.

  4. Atypical Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: 18 Year Interval Between Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohden, Kaitlyn L; Tang, Peter H; Lilley, Chrystia C; Lee, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy developed profound loss of vision in his right eye and was found to have a 11778 mitochondrial point mutation consistent with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). He maintained 20/20 vision in the left eye for 18 years until age 23, when he experienced loss of vision in that eye. This 18 year interval between eye involvement in LHON is the longest reported to date and reinforces the variability in presentation and progression seen in this disease.

  5. Late-onset Leber hereditary optic neuropathy mimicking Susac's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccolella, Stefano; Petruzzella, Vittoria; Prascina, Francesco; Artuso, Lucia; Pacillo, Francesca; Dell'Aglio, Rosa; Avolio, Carlo; Delle Noci, Nicola; Attimonelli, Marcella; Specchio, Luigi Maria

    2010-12-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by bilateral painless optic atrophy and blindness. It usually occurs in young men in association with three major mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). We report a patient with a history of alcohol abuse who developed at age 63 years visual impairment, sensorineural hearing loss, and memory dysfunction, suggestive of Susac's syndrome. The patient carried the heteroplasmic mt. 11778G>A mutation on the T2e mtDNA haplogroup. It remains unclear if chronic alcohol abuse combined with the mitochondrial genetic background prompted an aged-related neurodegeneration or deferred the onset of the LHON disease.

  6. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: Bringing the Lab to the Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Nailyn; Lessell, Simmons; Cestari, Dean M

    2016-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was the first clinically characterized mitochondrial disorder. Since its first description in 1871, much has been discovered regarding the genetics and pathophysiology of the disease. This has enabled the development of in vitro cell and animal models that can be used to try to determine not only the effects of the genetic mutation upon the clinical phenotype but to also test potential novel therapies. Treatments for LHON have ranged from vitamins and minerals to immunosuppressants and, more recently, targeted gene therapy. This article reviews the pathophysiology and clinical features of LHON with a focus on translational research.

  7. Postangioedema attack skin blisters: an unusual presentation of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesen, Jonathan; Gonzalez-Estrada, Alexei; Auron, Moises

    2014-04-10

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by attacks of self-limited swelling affecting extremities, face and intra-abdominal organs, most often caused by mutations in the C1-inhibitor gene with secondary Bradykinin-mediated increased vascular permeability. We describe a 36-year-old man with a history of HAE who presented with painful interdigital bullae secondary to an acute oedema exacerbation. Biopsy and cultures of the lesions were negative and they resolved spontaneously. It is important to highlight and recognise the development of oedema blisters after resolution of a flare of HAE (only 1 previous case report), and hence avoid unnecessary dermatological diagnostic workup and treatment.

  8. A case of hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G P Prashanth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV (HSAN -IV, also known as congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis, is a very rare condition that presents in infancy with anhidrosis, absence of pain sensation and self -mutilation. Developmental delay and mental retardation are usually present. Ultrastructural study of the peripheral nerves demonstrates loss of the unmyelinated and small myelinated fibers. We here report a 8 year -old boy with HSAN IV with typical clinical features where the diagnosis was supported by nerve biopsy findings. However, our case was unusual since mental development was normal.

  9. Congenital optic nerve anomalies and hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidary, Gena

    2014-12-01

    Congenital and hereditary optic nerve anomalies represent a significant cause of visual dysfunction. While some optic nerve abnormalities affect the visual system alone, others may be associated with neurologic and systemic findings. Correct identification of the optic nerve disease therefore is crucial both for developing a treatment plan with respect to visual rehabilitation, but also for initiating the appropriate multidisciplinary evaluation. The purpose of this review is to highlight common examples of congenital and inherited optic nerve abnormalities in an effort to familiarize the clinician with salient clinical features of these diseases and to review important systemic testing when relevant.

  10. Did Robert Louis Stevenson have hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmacher, A E; Callahan, J R

    2000-03-06

    Chronic illness played a major role in the life and literary success of Robert Louis Stevenson. However, the exact nature of his chronic illness remains unclear. It is possible that Stevenson had hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Osler-Rendu-Weber Syndrome). This would explain his chronic respiratory complaints, recurrent episodes of pulmonary hemorrhage, and his death, at age 44 years, of probable cerebral hemorrhage. It would also explain his mother's hitherto unreported but apparent stroke, at age 38 years. Further support for this hypothesis might come from new details about the health of Stevenson and his relatives or from molecular analysis of tissue specimens remaining from him.

  11. Prevalence of hereditary angioedema in untested first-degree blood relatives of known subjects with hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Marc A; Lumry, William R; Busse, Paula; Levy, Howard; Steele, Tamara; Dayno, Jeffrey; Li, H Henry

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare autosomal-dominant disease characterized by recurring attacks of nonpruritic, nonpitting edema caused by an inherited deficiency or dysfunction of C1 esterase inhibitor (C1 INH). Symptoms can present years before an accurate diagnosis is made. The objective of this study, the Angioedema Clinical Epidemiology Testing Initiative for the Study of Hereditary Angioedema, was to determine the prevalence and clinical manifestations of HAE in untested first-degree blood relatives of known patients with HAE. Patients with a confirmed diagnosis of HAE recruited first-degree relatives who had not been evaluated for HAE. Enrolled subjects underwent complement testing (C4, C1 INH antigen, and functional C1 INH). If the lab tests were abnormal, the enrolled subjects returned to the site for a follow-up visit and questionnaire. Overall, 31 patients with HAE and 46 first-degree relatives enrolled in the study. Of 46 enrolled relatives, 30 (65%) had lab test results that ruled out a diagnosis of HAE, two (4%) were categorized as "HAE not ruled out," and 14 (30%) were newly diagnosed with HAE. Of 14 newly diagnosed subjects, nine (64%) reported having experienced symptoms that may have been related to HAE, such as swelling in the throat, face, or extremities or abdominal pain. When reported, median age of symptom onset in these 14 subjects was nine years whereas newly diagnosed asymptomatic subjects had a median chronological age of six years. These 14 subjects reported a historic mean standard deviation rate of 2.51 (5.59) swelling episodes per month with a mean standard deviation duration of 1.6 (0.74) days. This study's findings reinforce the importance of testing family members of patients with HAE to detect this hereditary condition.

  12. Progressive cerebellar atrophy: hereditary ataxias and disorders with spinocerebellar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Nicole I; Koenig, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias with onset in childhood are a group of heterogeneous disorders, usually with autosomal recessive inheritance. In many of them, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows cerebellar atrophy. The most prominent exception to this is Friedreich's ataxia, where MRI shows normal cerebellar volume, but sometimes spinal cord atrophy. In several of the hereditary ataxias, the causative gene plays an important role in DNA repair: ataxia telangiectasia and ataxia telangiectasia-like disorder, and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type I and II. Mitochondrial metabolism is impaired in another group of inherited ataxias including the emergent group of defects in coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Few of these disorders are amenable to effective treatment, the most important of these being vitamin E-responsive ataxia. The autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias are rare in childhood. Some of them, especially SCA7 and SCA2, may begin in childhood or even infancy, family history being positive in these cases. Additional clinical clues such as presence or absence of neuropathy or oculomotor apraxia still help in making a definitive diagnosis albeit there are still many unsolved cases. In pontocerebellar hypoplasia, a neurodegenerative disease with prenatal onset, the genetic basis of the different subtypes has recently been elucidated and involves genes with different functions.

  13. Generation of plasmin during acute attacks of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugno, M; Hack, C E; de Boer, J P; Eerenberg, A J; Agostoni, A; Cicardi, M

    1993-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is caused by a genetic deficiency of C1-inhibitor, a serine protease inhibitor that regulates activation of complement, contact, and fibrinolytic systems. Symptoms (bouts of subcutaneous and mucous swelling) depend on the release of a vasoactive mediator, probably through activation of these three systems. We studied the interrelationship among complement, contact, and fibrinolytic activation in 23 patients with hereditary angiodema, 18 during remission and five during an attack, by measuring plasma levels of C1-C1 inhibitor, factor XIIa-C1 inhibitor, kallikrein-C1 inhibitor, and plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complexes, tissue plasminogen activator, and urokinase plasminogen activator. In addition, cleavage of high-molecular weight kininogen was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and quantified by densitometry. During remission, plasma levels of C1-C1 inhibitor complexes were elevated (p = 0.0002), whereas the other parameters were within the normal range. During acute attacks, not only plasma levels of C1-C1 inhibitor complexes but also those of plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complexes (P = 0.0009) and cleaved high-molecular weight kininogen were elevated. A positive correlation between plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin complexes and cleaved high-molecular weight kininogen was observed (r = 0.75, p attacks is associated with the activation of the fibrinolytic system.

  14. Studies on four hereditary blood disorders in Iceland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensson, O.

    1978-01-01

    An Icelandic family with fifty elliptocytic individuals is reviewed. Pedigree studies indicate strongly that affected members of the family are descendants of a common ancestor. The hereditary pattern is typical of a dominant autosomal gene with full penetrance. Thirty members with typical hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and over 70 apparently unaffected members belonging to 12 families have been studied. Pedigree studies on one of the families indicate that the HS gene or genes have been transmitted through six generations over the past 200 years. Much reduced penetrance of the HS gene or the presence of the so-called mild form is upheld as the main explanation for the unevenness in the genetic ratio. An Icelandic family containing fourteen members with Pelger anomaly is reviewed. It is possible that this family is the only one with this type of mutation in Icelanders. Genealogical information indicates that the Pelger anomaly gene has been present in this family over 200 years. Three families with Von Willebrand's disease (VW) are reviewed. Severe symptoms of bleeding predominate in the males, two of whom have died from hemorrhage. There is a reduced expressivity of the mutant gene, amounting to nonpenetrance, mainly in the female members of the families. It is thought probable that the mutant gene present in the three families has originated from a common ancestor in a district which is common to the three families. (KRM)

  15. Hereditary hemochromatosis and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Grande, Peer;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We tested the hypothesis that the hereditary hemochromatosis genotypes C282Y/C282Y, C282Y/H63D, or C282Y/wild-type are risk factors for ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a prospective study of 9178 individuals from the Danish...... risk of IHD or MI in prospective studies, overall or stratified by gender. We had 90% power to detect a hazard ratio for IHD of 3.4 for C282Y/C282Y, 1.9 for C282Y/H63D, and 1.3 for C282Y/wild-type versus wild-type/wild-type. Furthermore, these genotypes were not associated with increased risk of IHD...... or MI in case-control studies, overall or stratified by gender. We had 90% power to detect an odds ratio for IHD of 3.6 for C282Y/C282Y, 1.8 for C282Y/H63D, and 1.3 for C282Y/wild-type versus wild-type/wild-type. CONCLUSIONS: In these studies, hereditary hemochromatosis C282Y/C282Y, C282Y/H63D, and C282...

  16. Pediatric hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkas Henriette

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary angioedema (HAE resulting from the deficiency of the C1 inhibitor (C1-INH is a rare, life-threatening disorder. It is characterized by attacks of angioedema involving the skin and/or the mucosa of the upper airways, as well as the intestinal mucosa. In approximately 50 per cent of cases, clinical manifestations may appear during childhood. The complex management of HAE in pediatric patients is in many respects different from the management of adults. Establishing the diagnosis early, preferably before the onset of clinical symptoms, is essential in cases with a positive family history. Complement studies usually afford accurate diagnosis, whereas molecular genetics tests may prove helpful in uncertain cases. Appropriate therapy, supported by counselling, suitable modification of lifestyle, and avoidance of triggering factors (which primarily include mechanical trauma, mental stress and airway infections in children may spare the patient unnecessary surgery and may prevent mortality. Prompt control of edematous attacks, short-term prophylaxis and intermittent therapy are recommended as the primary means for the management of pediatric cases. Medicinal products currently used for the treatment of children with hereditary angioedema include antifibrinolytics, attenuated androgens, and C1-INH replacement therapy. Current guidelines favour antifibrinolytics for long-term prophylaxis because of their favorable safety profile but efficacy may be lacking. Attenuated androgens administered in the lowest effective dose are another option. C1-INH replacement therapy is also an effective and safe agent for children. Regular monitoring and follow-up of patients are necessary.

  17. Targeted high throughput sequencing in hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koht, Jeanette; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Rengmark, Aina H.; Henriksen, Sandra P.; Tallaksen, Chantal M. E.; Toft, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia are heterogeneous monogenic neurodegenerative disorders. To date, a large number of individuals with such disorders remain undiagnosed. Here, we have assessed molecular diagnosis by gene panel sequencing in 105 early and late-onset hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia probands, in whom extensive previous investigations had failed to identify the genetic cause of disease. Pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants were identified in 20 probands (19%) and variants of uncertain significance in ten probands (10%). Together these accounted for 30 probands (29%) and involved 18 different genes. Among several interesting findings, dominantly inherited KIF1A variants, p.(Val8Met) and p.(Ile27Thr) segregated in two independent families, both presenting with a pure spastic paraplegia phenotype. Two homozygous missense variants, p.(Gly4230Ser) and p.(Leu4221Val) were found in SACS in one consanguineous family, presenting with spastic ataxia and isolated cerebellar atrophy. The average disease duration in probands with pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants was 31 years, ranging from 4 to 51 years. In conclusion, this study confirmed and expanded the clinical phenotypes associated with known disease genes. The results demonstrate that gene panel sequencing and similar sequencing approaches can serve as efficient diagnostic tools for different heterogeneous disorders. Early use of such strategies may help to reduce both costs and time of the diagnostic process. PMID:28362824

  18. Molecular and genetic characteristics of hereditary autoinflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunca, Mehmet; Ozdogan, Huri

    2005-02-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are defined as recurrent "unprovoked" inflammatory events which do not produce high-titer autoantibodies or antigen-specific T cells. There are currently eight hereditary forms of these diseases: Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), hyperimmunoglobulinemia D with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS), tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous articular (CINCA) syndrome or neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID), pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA) and Blau syndrome. Apart from FMF (which has a prevalence of about 0.1 percent among non-Ashkenazi Jews, Armenians, Turks and Arabs), they are very rare disorders. FMF and HIDS are autosomal recessive diseases, all the other members of the family are autosomal and dominantly transmitted. Their common clinical features are recurrent and usually short attacks of synovitis and various skin eruptions; abdominal pain and fever are also frequently observed. The genes of all of these diseases have been discovered and, with the exception of HIDS, it was found that the proteins they encode share certain domains taking part in innate immunity and apoptosis. Thus it was evident that hereditary autoinflammatory diseases may help us understand better a number of important and prevalent pathologic events. We have reviewed the recent and rapidly accumulating knowledge on the molecular aspects of these disorders.

  19. Antimyosin scintigraphy in patients with acquired and hereditary muscular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefberg, M. (Dept. of Neurology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)); Liewendahl, K. (Dept. of Clinical Chemistry, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)); Savolainen, S. (Dept. of Clinical Chemistry, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)); Nikkinen, P. (Dept. of Clinical Chemistry, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)); Lamminen, A. (Dept. of Radiology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)); Tiula, E. (First Dept. of Internal Medicine, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)); Somer, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland))

    1994-10-01

    Scintigraphy with indium-111 labelled antimyosin has an established role in the evaluation of cardiac muscle damage. This antibody has been shown to cross-react with myosin in skeletal muscle. We therefore studied the usefulness of this method for the detection of skeletal muscle lesions in rhabdomyolysis, myositis and hereditary muscular dystrophies. All nine patients with rhabdomyolysis had focal uptake of antimyosin antibody which correlated with the clinical findings of soft tissue damage. However, a number of symptomless lesions were also detected by immunoscintigraphy. In rhabdomyolysis the target to non-target uptake ratios varied from 1.3 to 7.6. Diffuse uptake of antibody in skeletal muscle was observed in all three patients with polymyositis-dermatomyositis and in 12 out of 13 patients with muscular dystrophies. In myositis the intensity of antibody accumulation correlated reasonably well with the magnitude of oedema detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Most patients with Becker type or non-X-chromosomal muscular dystrophies showed slight or moderate uptake of antibody, mainly in the lower extremities. In these patients more antibody accumulated in the calves than in the thighs, whereas the findings on MRI were more prominent in the thighs than in the calves, presumably because of the better preserved muscle bulk in the calves. We conclude that antimyosin scintigraphy can be used for the detection of muscle lesions not only in acquired muscle diseases but also in hereditary muscular disorders, and that immunoscintigraphy provides information on muscle disease activity not obtainable with MRI. (orig.)

  20. Guidelines for the genetic diagnosis of hereditary recurrent fevers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shinar, Y; Obici, L; Aksentijevich, I

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary recurrent fevers (HRFs) are a group of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases characterised by recurrent bouts of fever and serosal inflammation that are caused by pathogenic variants in genes important for the regulation of innate immunity. Discovery of the molecular defects responsible ...... and 19 September 2011 to ratify the draft and obtain a final consensus document. An agreed set of best practice guidelines was proposed for genetic diagnostic testing of HRFs, for reporting the genetic results and for defining their clinical significance.......Hereditary recurrent fevers (HRFs) are a group of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases characterised by recurrent bouts of fever and serosal inflammation that are caused by pathogenic variants in genes important for the regulation of innate immunity. Discovery of the molecular defects responsible...... for these diseases has initiated genetic diagnostics in many countries around the world, including the Middle East, Europe, USA, Japan and Australia. However, diverse testing methods and reporting practices are employed and there is a clear need for consensus guidelines for HRF genetic testing. Draft guidelines were...

  1. Síndrome de McCune-Albrigth: Evaluación del Compromiso Craneofacial y de Columna por Imágenes de Resonancia Magnética McCune-Albright syndrome: Evaluation of craniofacial and spinal alterations on MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Garcés

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta a un paciente de sexo femenino de 27 años de edad con el cuadro clásico de Síndrome de Mc Cune- Albright, caracterizado por: pubertad precoz, manchas color café con leche, displasia fibrosa poliostótica y gigantismo. Se describen los hallazgos en Resonancia Magnética de la región craneofacial y del raquis.We report on a 27-year-old female with the classical McCune-Albright syndrome. This condition is characterized by precocious puberty, café-au-lait spots, polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and gigantism. MR findings are described in skull, face and spine.

  2. Clinical characteristics of McCune-Albright syndrome in Chinese patients%中国人McCune-Albright综合征的临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马瑾; 赵潺; 单广良; 李小圳; 徐馥梅; 钟勇

    2011-01-01

    Objective To present the ophthalmological characteristics of McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS).Methods Case series study.Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA),visual field,color vision,retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness,visual evoked potentials (VEP),fundus examination,computed tomography (CT) imaging of the optic canal,follow up results of multidisciplinary comprehensive treatments were analyzed.Results Of the 6 patients,three were male and three were female.Their age were between 4 to 43 years old (median,16 years old ). Based on CT imaging of the optic canal,encasement of the optic canal was found in all 6 patients (12 eyes ); three patients (6 eyes ) had circumferential encasement of the optic canal ; the remaining 3 patients ( 6 eyes ) had partial encasement of the optic canal. Two patients (3 eyes ) with circumferential encasement of the optic canal had optic neuropathy versus none in the remaining 9 eyes with circumferential or partial optic canal encasement.In addition,lengthening of the optic nerve was found in all 4 patients ( 8 eyes).Conclusion Optic canal encasement and lengthening of the optic nerve are common in MAS patients,which is worthy of attention in clinical practice.%目的 探讨McCune-Albright综合征(MAS)的眼部临床特点.方法 系列病例研究.分析从2008年1月至2011年6月就诊北京协和医院眼科的6例MAS患者最佳矫正视力、视野、色觉、视网膜神经纤维层厚度、视觉诱发电位、眼底、视神经管CT扫描,多科综合治疗方法及随访结果.结果 6例MAS患者中男性3例,女性3例,就诊年龄在4~ 43岁(中位数16岁).视神经管CT扫描发现6例(12只眼)MAS患者视神经管有不同程度的缩窄,其中全周缩窄3例(6只眼)、部分缩窄3例(6只眼),视神经管全周缩窄中有2例(3只眼)发现有视神经病变,其余9只眼均未发现有视神经病变.有4例(8只眼)MAS患者视神经被不同程度拉长.结论 MAS患者视神经管有不同程度的缩窄,

  3. ANAESTHETIC MANAGEMENT OF A CASE OF HEREDITARY SPHEROCYTOSIS FOR SPLENECTOMY AND CHOLECYSTECTOMY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: We report successful anaesthetic management of a pat ient with hereditary spherocytosis who underwent laproscopic splenectomy, ch olecystectomy and appendioectomy. Hereditary spherocytosis is a familial hemolytic di sorder with marked heterogeneity of clinical features, ranging from asymptomatic condition to a f ulminant hemolytic anaemia. Commonly recommended perioperative management in these patien ts includes preemptive erythrocyte transfusion, aggressive hydration and avoidance of hypoxia, aplastic crisis, hypothermia and acidosis. The management of such a case is challeng ing from anaesthetic point of view because of sickling oriented anaesthetic approach. Key words: Hereditary spherocytosis, splenectomy, cholecystectomy, perioperative management.

  4. Renal AA amyloidosis in a patient with hereditary complete complement C4 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imed Helal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary complete C4 deficiency has until now been reported in 30 cases only. A disturbed clearance of immune- complexes probably predisposes these individuals to systemic lupus erythematosus, other immune- complex diseases and recurrent microbial infections. We present here a 20- year- old female with hereditary complete C4 deficiency. Renal biopsy demonstrated renal AA amyloidosis. This unique case further substantiates that deficiency of classical pathway components predisposes to the development of recurrent microbial infections and that the patients may develop AA amyloidosis. Furthermore, in clinical practice, the nephrotic syndrome occurring in a patient with hereditary complete complement C4 deficiency should lead to the suspicion of renal AA amyloidosis.

  5. Sepsis and siderosis, Yersinia enterocolitica and hereditary haemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwaites, Phoebe A; Woods, Marion L

    2017-01-04

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted with sepsis, relative bradycardia, CT evidence of numerous small liver abscesses and 'skin bronzing' consistent with hereditary haemochromatosis (HH). Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 infection was confirmed by serology specimens taken 10 days apart. Iron overload was detected, and homozygous C282Y gene mutation confirmed HH. Liver biopsy revealed grade IV siderosis with micronodular cirrhosis. Haemochromatosis is a common, inherited disorder leading to iron overload that can produce end-organ damage from excess iron deposition. Haemochromatosis diagnosis allowed aggressive medical management with phlebotomy achieving normalisation of iron stores. Screening for complications of cirrhosis was started that included hepatoma surveillance. Iron overload states are known to increase patient susceptibility to infections caused by lower virulence bacteria lacking sophisticated iron metabolism pathways, for example, Yersinia enterocolitica Although these serious disseminated infections are rare, they may serve as markers for occult iron overload and should prompt haemochromatosis screening.

  6. Dementia with non-hereditary cystatin C angiopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Jóhannesson, G

    1989-01-01

    Brain biopsies from two patients with non-hereditary cerebral hemorrhages and eighty autopsied cases with the clinical diagnosis of dementia are presented. The biopsied cases, both males aged 64 and 59, had a sudden onset of cerebral hemorrhage, mild progressive dementia and cystatin C cerebral...... amyloid angiopathy. Of the autopsied cases 59 had senile plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy was also found in 36 of them. Both senile plaques and the blood vessel amyloid stained positively with beta-protein antibodies, and five of them also showed a positive reaction to cystatin C antibodies....... These cystatin C positive cases were three males aged 76, 80 and 83, and one female 93 years old and the fifth case was a female aged 47 with Down's syndrome....

  7. Occurrence of Wilms' tumor in a child with hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özyörük, Derya; Demir, Hacı Ahmet; Emir, Suna; Karakuş, Esra; Tunç, Bahattin

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is the most frequent cause of congenital hemolytic anemia. It is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by cell membrane abnormalities, specifically in red blood cells. Although the association between benign, borderline and malignant tumors and HS is not clear, various tumors such as splenoma, adrenal myolipoma, pancreatic schwannoma, ganglioneuroma, extramedullary hematopoiesis, myeloproliferative disorders, multiple myeloma, B-cell lymphoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been presented in case reports concerning HS patients. Here we describe a 6-year-old boy with HS who presented with a mass in the left kidney. Tru-cut biopsy revealed Wilms' tumor (WT). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of WT associated with HS to be reported in the literature.

  8. [Hereditary spherocytosis. Review. Part II. Symptomatology, outcome, complications, and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Hugo; Crisp, Renée Leonor; Rapetti, María Cristina; García, Eliana; Attie, Myriam

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis must always be suspected in children with anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, splenomegaly or cholelithiasis, in the asymptomatic individual with an affected relative, and in the neonate with hyperbilirubinemia with no blood group incompatibility; its early detection is key to avoid kernicterus. Follow-up of these patients is based on periodical control and supply of information on the adequate management of hemolytic or aplastic crisis, and early detection of cholelithiasis. The decision to perform splenectomy is usually associated with quality of life rather than life-threatening risk, and it should result from a consensus between patient, parents and physicians. The postsplenectomy follow-up is based on control of compliance with the prophylactic antibiotic therapy and the early diagnosis of infectious disorders.

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of hereditary tyrosinemia in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Matsumoto, Shirou; Mitsubuchi, Hiroshi; Endo, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia is an autosomal recessive inherited disease that manifests as three types (types I-III). We conducted a nationwide survey of this disease in Japan, and here review the results in relation to prevalence, clinical characteristics, and treatment and diagnosis. A definitive diagnosis of tyrosinemia type I is difficult to obtain based only on blood tyrosine level. Detection of succinylacetone using dried blood spots or urinary organic acid analysis, however, is useful for diagnosis. In tyrosinemia type I, dietary therapy and nitisinone (Orfandin®) are effective. Prognosis is greatly affected by the complications of liver cancer and hypophosphatemic rickets; even patients that are treated early with nitisinone may develop liver cancer. Long-term survival can be expected in type I if nitisinone therapy is effective. Prognosis in types II and III is relatively good.

  10. [Gene therapy for hereditary ophthalmological diseases: Advances and future perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Camacho, Óscar Francisco; Astorga-Carballo, Aline; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising new therapeutic strategy that could provide a novel and more effective way of targeting hereditary ophthalmological diseases. The eye is easily accessible, highly compartmentalized, and an immune-privileged organ that gives advantages as an ideal gene therapy target. Recently, important advances in the availability of various intraocular vector delivery routes and viral vectors that are able to efficiently transduce specific ocular cell types have been described. Gene therapy has advanced in some retinal inherited dystrophies; in this way, preliminary success is now being reported for the treatment of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). This review will provide an update in the field of gene therapy for the treatment of ocular inherited diseases.

  11. Lung Involvement in Children with Hereditary Autoinflammatory Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Giusyda; Esposito, Susanna; Andreozzi, Laura; Bracci, Benedetta; D’Errico, Francesca; Rigante, Donato

    2016-01-01

    Short-lived systemic inflammatory reactions arising from disrupted rules in the innate immune system are the operating platforms of hereditary autoinflammatory disorders (HAIDs). Multiple organs may be involved and aseptic inflammation leading to disease-specific phenotypes defines most HAIDs. Lungs are infrequently involved in children with HAIDs: the most common pulmonary manifestation is pleuritis in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), respectively caused by mutations in the MEFV and TNFRSF1A genes, while interstitial lung disease can be observed in STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy (SAVI), caused by mutations in the TMEM173 gene. The specific pleuropulmonary diseases may range from sub-clinical abnormalities during inflammatory flares of FMF and TRAPS to a severe life-threatening disorder in children with SAVI. PMID:27983684

  12. UNILATERAL RETINAL VASCULAR MALFORMATION IN HEREDITARY HEMORRHAGIC TELANGIECTASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananth Bhandary

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemorrhagic telangeiectasia (HHT is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder that leads to vascular malformations. It was first recognized in the 19th century as a familial disorder with abnormal vascular structures causing bleeding from the nose and gastrointestinal tract. HHT is characterized by telangiectatic lesions of the nose, lips, lungs, brain, and spinal cord. The reported incidence in Europe and Japan is between 1:5000 and 1:8000; but is widely variable in other regions. It is seen more frequently in whites. Ocular involvement has been reported in patients with HHT. Although conjunctival telangiectasia is the most common manifestation, rarely intraocular vascular lesions such as retinal telangiectasia and arteriovenous malformations in the retina, are seen. We describe a patient with HHT who had an abnormal unilateral retinal vascular abnormality along with tortuous conjunctival vasculature in the other eye, which has not been reported till date

  13. Bilateral sandwiched scapulae: A rare presentation of hereditary multiple exostoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffarian, Kamran; Farahani, Mohammad Javad; Vosoughi, Amir Reza

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary multiple exostoses, an autosomal dominant condition, is a common benign tumor which is characterized by the development of multiple osteochondromas. Bilateral dorsal and ventral involvement of scapulae is extremely rare without any reported case in the literature. An 18-year-old girl was referred because of bilateral prominent scapulae and left-sided pain on shoulder girdle motion especially at more than 90° abduction and forward flexion. Radiograph evaluation showed multiple exostoses on ventral and dorsal surfaces of body of both scapulae; hence simple excision of the lesion was impossible. The patient was symptom-free about 18 months after partial scapulectomy of left side. Partial scapulectomy seems to be an effective treatment for the sandwiched scapula between dorsal and ventral benign tumors.

  14. Safety and Usage of C1-Inhibitor in Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedl, Marc A; Bygum, Anette; Lumry, William

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The plasma-derived, highly purified, nanofiltered C1-inhibitor concentrate (Berinert; "pnfC1-INH") is approved in the United States for treating hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks and in many European countries for attack treatment and short-term prophylaxis. OBJECTIVE: The objective...... of this study was to describe safety and usage patterns of pnfC1-INH. METHODS: A multicenter, observational, registry was conducted between 2010 and 2014 at 30 United States and 7 European sites to obtain both prospective (occurring after enrollment) and retrospective (occurring before enrollment) safety...... and usage data on subjects receiving pnfC1-INH for any reason. RESULTS: Of 343 enrolled patients, 318 received 1 or more doses of pnfC1-INH for HAE attacks (11,848 infusions) or for prophylaxis (3142 infusions), comprising the safety population. Median dosages per infusion were 10.8 IU/kg (attack treatment...

  15. Hereditary angioedema (HAE): a cause for recurrent abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Parita; Kumar, Vivek; Alliu, Samson; Shetty, Vijay

    2016-11-14

    A 44-year-old Hispanic woman presented to the emergency room with a 2-day history of sudden onset of severe cramping left lower quadrant abdominal pain associated with ∼20 episodes diarrhoea. Abdominal CT scan exhibited bowel wall oedema and acute extensive colitis. On the basis of the preliminary diagnosis of acute abdomen, the patient was admitted under the surgical team and treated for acute colitis. Since her family history was significant for hereditary angioedema (HAE), complement studies were performed which revealed low complement C4 levels and abnormally low values of C1q esterase inhibitor. Thus, the diagnosis of HAE type I was established. This case report summarises that the symptoms of HAE are often non-specific, hence making the underlying cause difficult to diagnose.

  16. Lung Involvement in Children with Hereditary Autoinflammatory Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giusyda Tarantino

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Short-lived systemic inflammatory reactions arising from disrupted rules in the innate immune system are the operating platforms of hereditary autoinflammatory disorders (HAIDs. Multiple organs may be involved and aseptic inflammation leading to disease-specific phenotypes defines most HAIDs. Lungs are infrequently involved in children with HAIDs: the most common pulmonary manifestation is pleuritis in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS, respectively caused by mutations in the MEFV and TNFRSF1A genes, while interstitial lung disease can be observed in STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy (SAVI, caused by mutations in the TMEM173 gene. The specific pleuropulmonary diseases may range from sub-clinical abnormalities during inflammatory flares of FMF and TRAPS to a severe life-threatening disorder in children with SAVI.

  17. Motor activation in SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, KH; Nielsen, JE; Krabbe, Katja

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of motor cortical functional reorganisation in patients with SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia by exploring cortical motor activation related to movements of clinically affected (lower) and unaffected (upper) limbs. METHODS......) and between-group comparisons of movement vs. rest (group x behavioural state interaction) were performed using a random effects approach and statistical parametric mapping (SPM99). RESULTS: Patterns of motor activation were generally comparable between groups during both tasks, although patients had...... a tendency towards more widespread activation in sensorimotor cortical and cerebellar regions. Statistically significant differences were restricted to the ankle movement response, however, where patients showed significantly increased regional cerebral blood flow in the right and left primary motor cortices...

  18. Clinical features and management of hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Faber

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP is a group of genetically-determined disorders characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of lower limbs. An apparently sporadic case of adult-onset spastic paraplegia is a frequent clinical problem and a significant proportion of cases are likely to be of genetic origin. HSP is clinically divided into pure and complicated forms. The later present with a wide range of additional neurological and systemic features. To date, there are up to 60 genetic subtypes described. All modes of monogenic inheritance have been described: autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked and mitochondrial traits. Recent advances point to abnormal axonal transport as a key mechanism leading to the degeneration of the long motor neuron axons in the central nervous system in HSP. In this review we aim to address recent advances in the field, placing emphasis on key diagnostic features that will help practicing neurologists to identify and manage these conditions.

  19. Therapeutic strategies for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: A current update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueven, Nuri; Faldu, Dharmesh

    2013-11-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a rare mitochondrial retinopathy, caused by mutations in subunits of complex I of the respiratory chain, which leads to elevated levels of oxidative stress and an insufficient energy supply. This molecular pathology is thought to be responsible for the dysfunction and eventual apoptotic loss of retinal ganglion cells in the eye, which ultimately results in blindness. Many strategies, ranging from neuroprotectants, antioxidants, anti-apoptotic- and anti-inflammatory compounds have been tested with mixed results. Currently, the most promising compounds are short-chain quinones that have been shown to protect the vision of LHON patients during the early stages of the disease. This commentary gives a brief overview on the current status of tested therapeutics and also addresses future developments such as the use of gene therapy that hopefully will provide safe and efficient therapy options for all LHON patients.

  20. Antiretroviral therapy-induced Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Moodley

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Optic neuropathy in HIV-infected patients results from the HIV infection itself, post-infectious auto-immune disease, opportunistic infections and drugs. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs such as zidovudine and stavudine have known mitochondrial toxicity and can cause mitochondrial myopathies, neuropathies, hyperlactataemia, and can induce mitochondrial genetic disorders. Individuals with the mutation for Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON, a mitochondrial disorder, are usually asymptomatic but develop visual loss when exposed to external triggers such as smoking. We report on two HIV-infected patients with LHON mutations (m.14484T>C and m.11778G>A who developed profound visual loss with antiretroviral therapy. We postulate that the phenotypic expression of LHON in these genetically predisposed individuals was triggered by NRTI drugs lamivudine and tenofovir when used in combination, despite their relatively weak mitochondrial toxic effects. 

  1. Depressive symptoms associated with hereditary Alzheimer's disease: a case description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Mónica Yicette Sánchez; Vargas, Paula Alejandra Osorio; Ramos, Lucero Rengifo; Velandia, Rafael Alarcón

    The authors describe a family group studied by the Centro de Biología Molecular y Biotecnología, and the Clínica de la Memoria, las Demencias y el Envejecimiento (Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira, Colombia), and evaluate the association of depressive symptoms with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This family presented a hereditary pattern for AD characterized by an early onset of dementia symptoms, a long preclinical depressive course, and, once the first symptoms of dementia appeared, a rapid progression to severe cognitive function impairment. The authors found a high prevalence of depressive symptoms in this family and propose that the symptoms could be an important risk factor for developing AD in the presence of other risk factors such as the APOE E4 allele.

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of a hereditary gingival fibromatosis case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min; Xu, Li; Meng, Huan Xin

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare condition characterised by severe gingival hyperplasia, which could result in serious aesthetic and emotional problems and functional impairment. Here the present authors report a case of a 28-year-old female patient with generalised severe gingival enlargement covering almost all of the teeth and diagnosed as HGF. Her family history was of significance, since her father and 3-year-old daughter suffered from the same symptoms. Many studies have agreed that surgical removal should be used in the treatment of HGF, and gingivectomy is the most common method. This study tried both external and internal bevel incisions. The results suggest that the former is better for shaping gingival contour, if the attached gingiva is adequate. Correct physiological contour of the marginal gingiva, good oral hygiene and periodic recall can decrease recurrence risk. Post-surgical follow-up after 26 months demonstrated no recurrence and the patient was satisfied with her appearance.

  3. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: a cause of preventable morbidity and mortality.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brady, A P

    2012-01-31

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant condition whose effects are mediated through deficient blood vessel formation and regeneration, with multisystem involvement. Patients are usually aware of resulting skin telangiectasia and epistaxis, but are also exposed to dangers posed by occult vascular malformations in other organs. About 15-35% of HHT patients have pulmonary AVMs (PAVMs), 10% have cerebral AVMs (CAVMs), 25-33% suffer significant GI blood loss from GI tract telangiectasia, and an unknown but high percentage have liver involvement. In total, 10% of affected individuals die prematurely or suffer major disability from HHT, largely because of bleeding from CAVMs and PAVMs, or paradoxical embolization through PAVMs. Screening for and early intervention to treat occult PAVMs and CAVMs can largely eliminate these risks, and should be undertaken in a specialist centre. The National HHT Center in The Mercy University Hospital in Cork is the referral centre for HHT screening in Ireland.

  4. Hereditary Breast Cancer: The Era of New Susceptibility Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Apostolou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among females. 5%–10% of breast cancer cases are hereditary and are caused by pathogenic mutations in the considered reference BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. As sequencing technologies evolve, more susceptible genes have been discovered and BRCA1 and BRCA2 predisposition seems to be only a part of the story. These new findings include rare germline mutations in other high penetrant genes, the most important of which include TP53 mutations in Li-Fraumeni syndrome, STK11 mutations in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and PTEN mutations in Cowden syndrome. Furthermore, more frequent, but less penetrant, mutations have been identified in families with breast cancer clustering, in moderate or low penetrant genes, such as CHEK2, ATM, PALB2, and BRIP1. This paper will summarize all current data on new findings in breast cancer susceptibility genes.

  5. Multiple sclerosis associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palace, Jacqueline

    2009-11-15

    The cause of multiple sclerosis is unknown although it is recognised to involve an inflammatory process associated with demyelinating plaques and more widespread neurodegeneration. It appears to have become progressively more common in females which is further discussed in this issue, and genetic factors, as identified to date, appear to play only a moderate role. One curious observation is that Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON), a rare genetic syndrome, presents clinically overwhelmingly in males, but can be associated with an MS-like illness and when it does it occurs mainly in females. It is interesting to examine this further to assess if this could give us any clues as to the pathogenesis of MS.

  6. [Adults with hereditary fructose intolerance: risks of fructose infusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steegmanns, I; Rittmann, M; Bayerl, J R; Gitzelmann, R

    1990-04-06

    After her first grand mal seizure a 30-year-old woman was given a fructose infusion by an emergency doctor. On admission to hospital she complained of severe nausea. Ultrasonography revealed hepatosplenomegaly and the gamma-GT concentration was raised to 25 U/l. As hyperinsulinism was suspected an oral glucose tolerance test was suggested, but refused by the patient. She reported marked aversion to all sweet foods. Examination of an endoscopically obtained liver biopsy revealed clear reduction in fructoaldolase activity in liver tissue, i.e. the diagnosis of hereditary fructose intolerance. Three of the patient's siblings were also affected. The widespread use of infusion solutions containing sorbitol and fructose has twice proved acutely hazardous in this patient and is generally life-threatening for persons with an inborn error of metabolism whose pathologic status often remains undiagnosed to an adult age.

  7. Simple method for detection of mutations causing hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullberg-Lindh, C; Hannoun, C; Lindh, M

    2002-11-01

    Aldolase B is critical for sugar metabolism, and a catalytic deficiency due to mutations in its gene may result in hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) syndrome, with hypoglycaemia and severe abdominal symptoms. This report describes two cases of HFI, which were identified by intravenous fructose tolerance test and a new RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) test that detects the two most common mutations, A149P and A174D. The method includes PCR of a 224-base-pair segment of exon 5, a subsequent 3 h incubation with Cac8I and agarose electrophoresis, which reveals either or both of the mutations in one single reaction. The method might be useful for screening of these mutations, which may account for more than 70% of the mutations causing HFI.

  8. Fruit-induced FPIES masquerading as hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocchi, Alessandro; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Cotugno, Giovanna; Koch, Pierluigi; Dahdah, Lamia

    2014-08-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) symptoms develop at first introduction of fruit during weaning. We report on an infant with suspected HFI who presented with repeated episodes of vomiting and hypotension after ingestion of fruit-containing meals. The first episode occurred at age 4 months. Despite negative genetic testing for HFI, strict avoidance of fruit ingestion resulted in lack of recurrence of symptoms. Oral-fructose-tolerance testing conducted with an apple mousse did not determine hypoglycemia or fructosuria but caused severe hypotension. Allergy evaluations were negative, and the history was diagnostic for fruit-induced food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome. Because this non-immunoglobulin E-mediated gastrointestinal food hypersensitivity manifests as profuse, repetitive vomiting, often with diarrhea, leading to acute dehydration and lethargy, it may be misinterpreted as HFI. We advise pediatricians to consider food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome in the differential diagnosis when there is a suspicion of HFI.

  9. Hereditary hemochromatosis in an Indian origin: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R L Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is manifested as an iron overload in different organs due to homozygosity of a single autosomal mutation. If untreated it leads to conditions such as liver cirrhosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, cardiomyopathy, arthritis, and bronze coloring of the skin. Hemochromatosis affects as many as 1 in every 200 people in the United States, but in India the reports of genetic study are rare and virtually unexplored. It is also possible that in India clinical hemochromatosis could be masked by iron deficiency. Patients with HH may be either asymptomatic or symptomatic. When symptomatic, there is a wide range of symptoms and a high index of suspicion based on the symptoms is necessary to diagnose the entity. We report an interesting and rare case of HH in a 35-year-old male of Indian origin, who presented with icterus and fever of acute onset with negative HFE genetic mutations.

  10. Hereditary motor-sensory, motor, and sensory neuropathies in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrieu, Pierre; Baets, Jonathan; De Jonghe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathies (HN) are categorized according to clinical presentation, pathogenic mechanism based on electrophysiology, genetic transmission, age of occurrence, and, in selected cases, pathological findings. The combination of these parameters frequently orients towards specific genetic disorders. Ruling out a neuropathy secondary to a generalized metabolic disorder remains the first pediatric concern. Primary, motor-sensory are the most frequent HN and are dominated by demyelinating AD forms (CMT1). Others are demyelinating AR forms, axonal AD/AR forms, and forms with "intermediate" electrophysiological phenotype. Pure motor HN represent40 genes with various biological functions have been found responsible for HN. Many are responsible for various phenotypes, including some without the polyneuropathic trait: for the pediatric neurologist, phenotype/genotype correlations constitute a permanent bidirectional exercise.

  11. Efficiency of laser treatment in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Gita; Lange, Bibi; Wanscher, Jens Højberg;

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown the effect of laser treatment on epistaxis in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). At the present time, only very few prospective trials have been performed, and many studies are based on patients' subjective assessment of the severity of epistaxis....... This prospective study measures the objective effect of laser treatment in HHT patients with mild to moderate epistaxis. We introduce an objective measure to assess the severity of epistaxis: the bleeding time (BT). Before and after treatment, the quality of life, as measured by the patient, was assessed...... and compared to normative data. In 30 patients, we measured the BT before laser treatment 1.5 and 6.5 months after treatment. The Short form 36 (SF-36), a validated health questionnaire, was completed before and 6.5 months after treatment. Compared to preoperative value, BT was significantly reduced 1.5 and 6...

  12. Hereditary angioedema: what the gastroenterologist needs to know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali MA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available M Aamir Ali, Marie L Borum Division of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Up to 93% of patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE experience recurrent abdominal pain. Many of these patients, who often present to emergency departments, primary care physicians, general surgeons, or gastroenterologists, are misdiagnosed for years and undergo unnecessary testing and surgical procedures. Making the diagnosis of HAE can be challenging because symptoms and attack locations are often inconsistent from one episode to the next. Abdominal attacks are common and can occur without other attack locations. An early, accurate diagnosis is central to managing HAE. Unexplained abdominal pain, particularly when accompanied by swelling of the face and extremities, suggests the diagnosis of HAE. A family history and radiologic imaging demonstrating edematous bowel also support an HAE diagnosis. Once HAE is suspected, C4 and C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH laboratory studies are usually diagnostic. Patients with HAE may benefit from recently approved specific treatments, including plasma-derived C1-INH or recombinant C1-INH, a bradykinin B2-receptor antagonist, or a kallikrein inhibitor as first-line therapy and solvent/detergent-treated or fresh frozen plasma as second-line therapy for acute episodes. Short-term or long-term prophylaxis with nanofiltered C1-INH or attenuated androgens will prevent or reduce the frequency and severity of episodes. Gastroenterologists can play a critical role in identifying and treating patients with HAE, and should have a high index of suspicion when encountering patients with recurrent, unexplained bouts of abdominal pain. Given the high rate of abdominal attacks in HAE, it is important for gastroenterologists to appropriately diagnose and promptly recognize and treat HAE, or refer patients with HAE to an allergist. Keywords: hereditary angioedema, abdominal pain, diagnosis

  13. Laparoscopic splenectomy for hereditary spherocytosis-preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogulski, Robert; Adamowicz-Salach, Anna; Matysiak, Michał; Piotrowski, Dariusz; Gogolewski, Michał; Piotrowska, Anna; Roik, Danuta; Kamiński, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    Splenectomy is considered standard surgical therapy in hereditary spherocytosis. The procedure is indicated in patients with severe anemia, recurrent hemolytic, and aplastic crises. The aim of the study was to assess treatment outcomes in patients with hereditary spherocytosis who underwent total or partial laparoscopic splenectomy. Fifteen patients aged 4-17 yr underwent laparoscopic splenectomy from 2009 to 2012. Partial and total splenectomies were performed (five and 10 children, respectively). Hematologic parameters, liver function tests, and splenic volume before and after the surgery were analyzed retrospectively. Total follow-up was 1-30 months. Hospitalization and operating time were similar in both groups. In partial splenectomy group, branches of splenic arteries gave better blood supply than short gastric vessels. In both groups, hematologic parameters were improved. Postoperative markedly elevated platelet count was maintained up to 6 months, and after that, platelet count gradually decreased to normal values. Bilirubin level was decreased in early postoperative period; however, it increased later to achieve levels lower than in preoperative period. No severe general infections were observed in both groups. Laboratory parameters (hemoglobin and bilirubin concentrations and RBC) after the surgery improved in all patients, and the effect was maintained during 12 months of follow-up. Platelet count increased significantly after the surgery and was maintained at high levels during the next 6 months. However, it returned to preoperative levels within a year after the surgery. Our study showed that partial splenectomy was not inferior to total splenectomy. However, full assessment requires longer follow-up and larger group of patients.

  14. Hereditary hypophosphatemias: new genes in the bone-kidney axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Armando L

    2007-08-01

    Hypophosphatemia due to isolated renal phosphate wasting is a genetically heterogeneous disease. Two new genes linked to two different forms of hereditary hypophosphatemias have recently been described. Autosomal recessive form of hypophosphatemic rickets was mapped to chromosome 4q21 and identified homozygous mutations in dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) gene, which encodes a non-collagenous bone matrix protein. Intact plasma levels of the phosphaturic protein FGF23 (fibroblast growth factor 23) were clearly elevated in some of the affected individuals, providing a possible explanation for the phosphaturia and inappropriately normal 1,25(OH)2D levels, and suggesting that DMP1 may regulate FGF23 expression. Hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets with hypercalciuria is another rare disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance. Affected individuals present with hypercalciuria due to increased serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels and increased intestinal calcium absorption. The disease was mapped to a 1.6 Mbp region on chromosome 9q34, which contains SLC34A3, the gene encoding the renal sodium-phosphate cotransporter NaPi-IIc. This was the first demonstration that NaPi-IIc has a key role in the regulation of phosphate homeostasis. Thus, DMP1 and NaPi-IIc add two new members to the bone-kidney axis proposed since it was discovered that the first phosphatonin, FGF23, was of osteoblastic/osteocyte origin. This provides a mechanism for the skeleton to communicate with the kidney to coordinate the mineralization of extracelular matrix and the renal handling of phosphate.

  15. The Hereditary Hyperferritinemia-Cataract Syndrome in 2 Italian Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Perruccio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two 8- and 9-year-old brothers were referred to the Pediatric Oncology Unit, Perugia General Hospital, because of hyperferritinemia. Both had a history of bilateral cataract and epilepsy. Genetic investigation revealed two distinct mutations in iron haemostasis genes; homozygosity for the HFE gene H63D mutation in the younger and heterozygosity in the elder. Both displayed heterozygosity for C33T mutation in the ferritin light chain iron response element. A 7-year-old boy from another family was referred to our unit because of hyperferritinemia. Genetic analyses did not reveal HFE gene mutations. Family history showed that his mother was also affected by hyperferritinemia without HFE gene mutations. Magnetic resonance imaging in the mother was positive for iron overload in the spleen. Cataract was diagnosed in mother and child. Further genetic investigation revealed the C29G mutation of the ferritin light chain iron response element. C33T and C29G mutations in the ferritin light chain iron response element underlie the Hereditary Hyperferritinemia-Cataract Syndrome (HHCS. The HFE gene H63D mutation underlies Hereditary Haemochromatosis (HH, which needs treatment to prevent organ damages by iron overload. HHCS was definitively diagnosed in all three children. HHCS is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by increased L-ferritin production. L-Ferritin aggregates accumulate preferentially in the lens, provoking bilateral cataract since childhood, as unique known organ damage. Epilepsy in one case and the spleen iron overload in another could suggest the misleading diagnosis of HH. Consequently, the differential diagnosis between alterations of iron storage system was essential, particularly in children, and required further genetic investigation.

  16. The Hereditary Hyperferritinemia-Cataract Syndrome in 2 Italian Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcioni, Francesco; Cerri, Carla; La Starza, Roberta; Romanelli, Donatella; Capolsini, Ilaria; Caniglia, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Two 8- and 9-year-old brothers were referred to the Pediatric Oncology Unit, Perugia General Hospital, because of hyperferritinemia. Both had a history of bilateral cataract and epilepsy. Genetic investigation revealed two distinct mutations in iron haemostasis genes; homozygosity for the HFE gene H63D mutation in the younger and heterozygosity in the elder. Both displayed heterozygosity for C33T mutation in the ferritin light chain iron response element. A 7-year-old boy from another family was referred to our unit because of hyperferritinemia. Genetic analyses did not reveal HFE gene mutations. Family history showed that his mother was also affected by hyperferritinemia without HFE gene mutations. Magnetic resonance imaging in the mother was positive for iron overload in the spleen. Cataract was diagnosed in mother and child. Further genetic investigation revealed the C29G mutation of the ferritin light chain iron response element. C33T and C29G mutations in the ferritin light chain iron response element underlie the Hereditary Hyperferritinemia-Cataract Syndrome (HHCS). The HFE gene H63D mutation underlies Hereditary Haemochromatosis (HH), which needs treatment to prevent organ damages by iron overload. HHCS was definitively diagnosed in all three children. HHCS is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by increased L-ferritin production. L-Ferritin aggregates accumulate preferentially in the lens, provoking bilateral cataract since childhood, as unique known organ damage. Epilepsy in one case and the spleen iron overload in another could suggest the misleading diagnosis of HH. Consequently, the differential diagnosis between alterations of iron storage system was essential, particularly in children, and required further genetic investigation. PMID:24368960

  17. [Review of the recent literature on hereditary neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birouk, N

    2014-12-01

    The recent literature included interesting reports on the pathogenic mechanisms of hereditary neuropathies. The axonal traffic and its abnormalities in some forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease were particularly reviewed by Bucci et al. Many genes related to CMT disease code for proteins that are involved directly or not in intracellular traffic. KIF1B controls vesicle motility on microtubules. MTMR2, MTMR13 and FIG4 regulate the metabolism of phosphoinositide at the level of endosomes. The HSPs are involved in the proteasomal degradation. GDAP1 and MFN2 regulate the mitochondrial fission and fusion respectively and the mitochondial transport within the axon. Pareyson et al. reported a review on peripheral neuropathies in mitochondrial disorders. They used the term of "mitochondrial CMT" for the forms of CMT with abnormal mitochondrial dynamic or structure. Among the new entities, we can draw the attention to a proximal form of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with autosomal dominant inheritance, which is characterized by motor deficit with cramps and fasciculations predominating in proximal muscles. Distal sensory deficit can be present. The gene TFG on chromosome 3 has been recently identified to be responsible for this form. Another rare form of axonal autosomal recessive neuropathy due to HNT1 gene mutation is characterized by the presence of hands myotonia that appears later than neuropathy but constitute an interesting clinical hallmark to orientate the diagnosis of this form. In terms of differential diagnosis, CMT4J due to FIG4 mutation can present with a rapidly progressive and asymmetric weakness that resembles CIDP. Bouhy et al. made an interesting review on the therapeutic trials, animal models and the future therapeutic strategies to be developed in CMT disease.

  18. Gilbert Syndrome with Concomitant Hereditary Spherocytosis Presenting with Moderate Unconjugated Hyperbilirubinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiso, Mitsuhiko; Yagi, Minami; Tanaka, Atsushi; Miura, Kotaro; Miura, Ryo; Arizumi, Toshihiko; Takamori, Yoriyuki; Nakahara, Sayuri; Maruo, Yoshihiro; Takikawa, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    We experienced a case of a 19-year-old man with Gilbert syndrome with concomitant hereditary spherocytosis. The patient presented with moderate unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia, and inherited etiology was strongly suspected. The diagnosis of Gilbert syndrome was confirmed by the genetic analysis of the UGT1A1 gene, demonstrating UGT1A1*28 and compound heterozygote UGT1A1*6. In addition, since the laboratory findings and imaging studies revealed lysemia as well as gallstone and splenomegaly, a diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis was made as a comorbidity. Both Gilbert syndrome and hereditary spherocytosis are hereditary diseases with a high frequency, and the hyperbilirubinemia may be exacerbated when these two diseases are concomitant.

  19. Open-label, multicenter study of self-administered icatibant for attacks of hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aberer, W; Maurer, M; Reshef, A

    2014-01-01

    Historically, treatment for hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks has been administered by healthcare professionals (HCPs). Patient self-administration could reduce delays between symptom onset and treatment, and attack burden. The primary objective was to assess the safety of self...

  20. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: a population-based study of prevalence and mortality in Danish patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Vase, P; Green, A

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by telangiectatic lesions. The disease manifestations are variable and include epistaxis, gastrointestinal bleeding, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and cerebral arteriovenous malformations. Early d...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary angiopathy with nephropathy, aneurysms, and muscle cramps syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic Conditions Diagnosis & Management Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Angiopathy, hereditary, with nephropathy, aneurysms, and muscle cramps Other Diagnosis and Management ...

  2. Increased expression of collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylases in Chinese patients with hereditary gingival fibromatosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, L.; Huang, M.; Ye, X.; Fan, M.; Bian, Z.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is characterized by excess accumulation of interstitial collagen. However, until now, there has been controversy about the mechanism of collagen accumulation in HGF gingivae. The present study aimed to clarify the pathogenic mechanisms potentially i

  3. Genes for hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies : a genotype-phenotype correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Jacobs, An; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Levy, Nicolas; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Weis, Joachim; Nascimento, Andres; Swinkels, Marielle; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Jordanova, Albena; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by axonal atrophy and degeneration, exclusively or predominantly affecting the sensory and autonomic neurons. So far, disease-associated mutations have been identified in seven g

  4. UOK 268 Cell Line for Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Carcinoma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Urologic Oncology Branch seeks parties to co-develop the UOK 262 immortalized cell line as research tool to study aggressive hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC)-associated recurring kidney cancer.

  5. Studies on bone scintigraphy in renal osteodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchimochi, Makoto (Nippon Dental Univ., Niigata)

    1983-12-01

    Bone scintigraphy was superior over roentgenography for detection of abnormal bone findings in chronic dialysis patients. According to the type of scintigraphic findings, an increase in the hot area in the cranium or the mandibule seemed to express fibrous osteitis due to secondary hyperparathyroidism. Multiple coin-shaped hot areas in ribs were thought to indicate advanced osteomalacia or osteomalacia in patients with aluminum poisoning. The 4 hr-B/St ratio of the cranium was thought to serve as a quantitative indicator of the status of fibrous osteitis due to secondary hyperparathyroidism to show the progress and therapeutic course of the disease.

  6. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with oral manifestations. Report of periodontal treatment in two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, G B; Quart, A M; Novak, B

    1981-03-01

    The periodontal conditions of two patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia were successfully treated by a two-phase plan. The first phase of treatment eliminated inflammation from local etiologic factors by removing plaque and plaque-retaining factors. The second phase eliminated the residual anatomic defects of periodontal disease. Gingival bleeding has been indicated as a symptomatic factor of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, but such bleeding is more likely the result of periodontal inflammation.

  7. Management of hereditary gingival fibromatosis: A 2 years follow-up case report

    OpenAIRE

    Amitandra Kumar Tripathi; Gopal Dete; Charanjeet Singh Saimbi; Vivek Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare hereditary condition characterized by slow, progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of gingiva due to increase in sub-mucosal connective tissue component. This paper presents a case report of an 18-year-old female suffering from HGF with positive family history. Her 42-year-old mother also have enlargement of the gums. After through clinical examination of both the patients, routine blood investigation was advised. All the investigatio...

  8. Bocses corresponding to the hereditary algebras of tame type(II)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张英伯; 林亚南

    1996-01-01

    The bocs corresponding to each hereditary algebra of representation tame type is shown. And the minimal bocs obtained from it is given with only irreducible maps for each dimension d. The minimal bocs (after deleting finitely many vertices) coincides with a full subquiver of the AR-quiver of hereditary algebra, in which the indecomposable modules M have the property dim (top M)

  9. Mutations in the hereditary haemochromatosis gene HFE in professional endurance athletes

    OpenAIRE

    López Chicharro, José; Hoyos, J; Gómez Gallego, Félix; Villa Vicente, José Gerardo; Bandrés Moya, Fernando; Celaya, P; Lucía Mulas, Alejandro

    2004-01-01

    Background: Hereditary haemochromatosis, a disease that affects iron metabolism, progresses with a greater or lesser tendency to induce iron overload, possibly leading to severe organ dysfunction. Most elite endurance athletes take iron supplements during their active sporting life, which could aggravate this condition. Objective: To determine the prevalence and discuss potential clinical implications of mutations of HFE (the gene responsible for hereditary haemochromatosis) in endurance athl...

  10. Inhibition of TFG function causes hereditary axon degeneration by impairing endoplasmic reticulum structure

    OpenAIRE

    Beetz, Christian; Johnson, Adam; Schuh, Amber L.; Thakur, Seema; Varga, Rita-Eva; Fothergill, Thomas; Hertel, Nicole; Bomba-Warczak, Ewa; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Altmüller, Janine; Saxena, Renu; Chapman, Edwin R.; Dent, Erik W.; Nürnberg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of gait disorders. Their pathological hallmark is a length-dependent distal axonopathy of nerve fibers in the corticospinal tract. Involvement of other neurons can cause additional neurological symptoms, which define a diverse set of complex hereditary spastic paraplegias. We present two siblings who have the unusual combination of early-onset spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy, and neuropathy. Genome-wide SNP-...

  11. Hereditary nephritis (with unusual renal histology): report of a first case from the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, J S; Jankey, N

    1976-11-01

    A 21-year-old Grenadian girl undergoing investigation in Trinidad for anaemia was diagnosed as a case of hereditary nephritis. She had the clinical features of a nephropathy, nerve deafness and an ocular defect. Renal histology was exceptional in that in addition to the typical findings of a hereditary nephritis, cystic areas generally associated with medullary cystic disease were noted. Several members of the patient's maternal family were afflicted with either deafness visual distrubances or renal disease.

  12. Estimation of EuroQol 5-Dimensions health status utility values in hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aygören-Pürsün, Emel; Bygum, Anette; Beusterien, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate health status utility (preference) weights for hereditary angioedema (HAE) during an attack and between attacks using data from the Hereditary Angioedema Burden of Illness Study in Europe (HAE-BOIS-Europe) survey. Utility measures quantitatively describe the net impact of a...... across countries with regard to pain severity and in comparison to similar disease states. The results can be used to raise awareness of HAE as a serious disease with wide-ranging personal and social impacts....

  13. 2010 International consensus algorithm for the diagnosis, therapy and management of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We published the Canadian 2003 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE; C1 inhibitor [C1-INH] deficiency and updated this as Hereditary angioedema: a current state-of-the-art review: Canadian Hungarian 2007 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema. Objective To update the International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (circa 2010. Methods The Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN/Réseau Canadien d'angioédème héréditaire (RCAH http://www.haecanada.com and cosponsors University of Calgary and the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (with an unrestricted educational grant from CSL Behring held our third Conference May 15th to 16th, 2010 in Toronto Canada to update our consensus approach. The Consensus document was reviewed at the meeting and then circulated for review. Results This manuscript is the 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema that resulted from that conference. Conclusions Consensus approach is only an interim guide to a complex disorder such as HAE and should be replaced as soon as possible with large phase III and IV clinical trials, meta analyses, and using data base registry validation of approaches including quality of life and cost benefit analyses, followed by large head-to-head clinical trials and then evidence-based guidelines and standards for HAE disease management.

  14. Systematic review: hereditary thrombophilia associated to pediatric strokes and cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius M. Torres

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This review aimed to organize and consolidate the latest knowledge about mutations and genetic polymorphisms related to hereditary thrombophilia and their potential association with pediatric stroke and cerebral palsy (CP. SOURCES: Scientific articles published from 1993 to 2013, written in Portuguese, English, French, and Spanish, were selected and reviewed. The publications were searched in electronic databases, and also in the collections of local libraries. The terms "hereditary thrombophilia", "polymorphisms", "mutation", "pediatric strokes", and "cerebral palsy" were used for the research. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: The search in databases and in the bibliographic references retrieved 75 articles for inclusion in this review. Studies that investigated hereditary thrombophilias and their associations to CP and arterial and venous pediatric stroke presented contradictory results. The meta-analysis and case-control studies that showed positive results for this association described only slightly increased relative risks and sometimes had questionable conclusions. The association of two or more hereditary thrombophilias, or the association between thrombophilia and other specific clinical risk factors, suggest a higher risk of CP and pediatric stroke than isolated hereditary thrombophilia. CONCLUSIONS: Larger, multicenter studies should be developed in order to elucidate the role of mutations leading to hereditary thrombophilia and the development of CP and pediatric stroke. The complex and multifactorial etiology of CP and stroke makes this an arduous and difficult task; however, the benefits generated by these studies are immeasurable.

  15. [Prophylactic use of icatibant before tracheal intubation of a patient with hereditary angioedema type III. (A literature review of perioperative management of patients with hereditary angioedema type III)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturri Clavero, F; González Uriarte, A; Tamayo Medel, G; Gamboa Setién, P M

    2014-01-01

    Type III hereditary angioedema is a rare familial disorder that has recently been described as a separate condition. Triggers for episodes of angioedema include surgery, dental procedures, and tracheal intubation maneuvers. Since episodes affecting the upper airway are potentially life-threatening, prophylactic treatment is recommended in these situations. The use of icatibant (Firazyr(®)), for prevention of angioedema prior to tracheal intubation, is reported in a patient with type iii hereditary angioedema. A literature review on the anesthetic management of this condition was conducted.

  16. Hereditary angioedema: epidemiology, management, and role of icatibant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazi A

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aasia Ghazi, J Andrew GrantUniversity of Texas Medical Branch, Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Galveston, TX, USAAbstract: Hereditary angioedema (HAE is an autosomal dominant, potentially life-threatening condition, manifesting as recurrent and self-limiting episodes of facial, laryngeal, genital, or peripheral swelling with abdominal pain secondary to intra-abdominal edema. The estimated prevalence of HAE in the general population is one individual per 50,000, with reported ranges from 1:10,000 to 1:150,000, without major sex or ethnic differences. Various treatment options for acute attacks and prophylaxis of HAE are authorized and available in the market, including plasma-derived (Berinert®, Cinryze®, and Cetor® and recombinant (Rhucin® and Ruconest™ C1 inhibitors, kallikrein inhibitor-ecallantide (Kalbitor®, and bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist-icatibant (Firazyr®. Some of these drugs are used only to treat HAE attacks, whereas others are only approved for prophylactic therapies and all of them have improved disease outcomes due to their different mechanisms of action. Bradykinin and its binding to B2 receptor have been demonstrated to be responsible for most of the symptoms of HAE. Thus icatibant (Firazyr®, a bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist, has proven to be an effective and more targeted treatment option and has been approved for the treatment of acute attacks of HAE. Rapid and stable relief from symptoms of cutaneous, abdominal, or laryngeal HAE attacks has been demonstrated by 30 mg of icatibant in Phase III clinical trials. Self-resolving mild to moderate local site reactions after subcutaneous injection of icatibant were observed. Icatibant is a new, safe, and effective treatment for acute attacks of HAE. HAE has been reported to result in enormous humanistic burden to patients, affecting both physical and mental health, with a negative impact on education, career, and work productivity, and with substantial

  17. Elucidating the Mechanism of Gain of Toxic Function From Mutant C1 Inhibitor Proteins in Hereditary Angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    in Hereditary Angioedema PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Bruce Zuraw, M.D. CONTRACTING: ORGANIZATION Veterans Medical Research Foundation San...C1 Inhibitor 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Proteins in Hereditary Angioedema 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0506 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr...unique structural characteristics of C1INH make it more susceptible to GOTF than other serpins. 2. KEYWORDS: Hereditary angioedema , C1 inhibitor, serpin

  18. The Role of GNAS and Other Imprinted Genes in the Development of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Lee S.; Xie, Tao; Qasem, Ahmed; Wang, Jie; Chen, Min

    2010-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon affecting a small number of genes which leads to differential expression from the two parental alleles. Imprinted genes are known to regulate fetal growth and a ‘kinship’ or ‘parental conflict’ model predicts that paternally- and maternally-expressed imprinted genes promote and inhibit fetal growth, respectively. In this review we examine the role of imprinted genes in postnatal growth and metabolism, with an emphasis on the GNAS/Gnas locus. GNAS is a complex imprinted locus with multiple oppositely imprinted gene products, including the G protein α-subunit Gsα which is expressed primarily from the maternal allele in some tissues and the Gsα isoform XLαs which is expressed only from the paternal allele. Maternal, but not paternal, Gsα mutations lead to obesity in Albright hereditary osteodystrophy. Mouse studies show that this phenomenon is due to Gsα imprinting in the central nervous system leading to a specific defect in the ability of central melanocortins to stimulate sympathetic nervous system activity and energy expenditure. In contrast mutation of paternally-expressed XLαs leads to opposite metabolic effects in mice. While these findings conform to the ‘kinship’ model, the effects of other imprinted genes on body weight regulation do not conform to this model. PMID:19844212

  19. Coexistence of two different pseudohypoparathyroidism subtypes (Ia and Ib) in the same kindred with independent Gsα coding mutations and GNAS imprinting defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecumberri, B; Fernández-Rebollo, E; Sentchordi, L; Saavedra, P; Bernal-Chico, A; Pallardo, L F; Jiménez Bustos, J M; Castaño, L; de Santiago, M; Hiort, O; Pérez de Nanclares, G; Bastepe, M

    2011-01-01

    Background Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) defines a rare group of disorders whose common feature is resistance to the parathyroid hormone. Patients with PHP-Ia display additional hormone resistance, Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) and reduced Gsα activity in easily accessible cells. This form of PHP is associated with heterozygous inactivating mutations in Gsα-coding exons of GNAS, an imprinted gene locus on chromosome 20q13.3. Patients with PHP-Ib typically have isolated parathyroid hormone resistance, lack AHO features and demonstrate normal erythrocyte Gsα activity. Instead of coding Gsα mutations, patients with PHP-Ib display imprinting defects of GNAS, caused, at least in some cases, by genetic mutations within or nearby this gene. Patients Two unrelated PHP families, each of which includes at least one patient with a Gsα coding mutation and another with GNAS loss of imprinting, are reported here. Results One of the patients with GNAS imprinting defects has paternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 20q, explaining the observed imprinting abnormalities. The identified Gsα coding mutations include a tetranucleotide deletion in exon 7, which is frequently found in PHP-Ia, and a novel single nucleotide change at the acceptor splice junction of intron 11. Conclusions These molecular data reveal an interesting mixture, in the same family, of both genetic and epigenetic mutations of the same gene. PMID:19858129

  20. The Association of Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ia with Chiari Malformation Type I: A Coincidence or a Common Link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A 19-month-old boy was referred for progressive weight gain. His past medical history included congenital hypothyroidism and developmental delay. Physical examination revealed characteristics of Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy, macrocephaly, and calcinosis cutis. He had hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and elevated Parathyroid Hormone levels. Genetic testing revealed a known mutation of GNAS gene, confirming the diagnosis of Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ia (PHP-Ia) (c.34C>T (p.G1n12X)). He had a normal brain MRI at three months, but developmental delay prompted a repeat MRI that revealed Chiari Malformation Type I (CM-I) with hydrocephalus requiring neurosurgical intervention. This was followed by improvement in attaining developmental milestones. Recently, he was diagnosed with growth hormone deficiency. This case suggests the potential association of CM-I with PHP-Ia. Larger studies are needed to assess whether CM-I with hydrocephalus are common associations with PHP-Ia and to define potential genetic links between these conditions. We propose a low threshold in performing brain MRI on PHP-1a patients, especially those with persistent developmental delay to rule out CM-I. Early intervention may improve neurodevelopmental outcomes and prevent neurosurgical emergencies. PMID:27703483

  1. Recent advances in GNAS epigenetic research of pseudohypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzi, B; Van Geet, C; Freson, K

    2012-06-01

    Endocrinopathies in patients with hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia that share resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH) are grouped under the term pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP). Patients with PHP type Ia (PHP-Ia) often present with additional hormonal resistance and show characteristic physical features that are jointly termed as having an Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) phenotype. Alternatively, PHPIb patients predominantly have PTH and sometimes TSH resistance but do not present with AHO features. Most of these PHP forms are caused by defects in GNAS, an imprinted gene locus consisting of maternal, paternal and biallelic transcripts. PHP-Ia is caused by heterozygous inactivating mutations in those exons of GNAS encoding the alpha subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein (Gsalpha) while PHPIb results from epigenetic GNAS defects. Familial and sporadic forms of PHP-Ib have distinct GNAS imprinting patterns: familial PHP-Ib patients have an exon A/B-only imprinting defect whereas sporadic PHP-Ib cases have abnormal imprinting of the three differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in GNAS. This classification of PHP was made years ago but was recently questioned since different studies showed GNAS epigenetic defects in PHP-Ia patients. In this review, we focus on the epigenetic description and screening methods of GNAS, the associated pathology and the recent need for a PHP reclassification.

  2. [Diagnostic image (153). A boy with chronic hereditary pancreatitis and nocturnal abdominal pain. Multiple, large pseudo-cysts of the pancreas, caused by chronic hereditary pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaars, R.; Wildenberg, F.J. van den

    2003-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy with chronic hereditary pancreatitis developed nocturnal episodes of pain in the back and abdomen. CT revealed two large pseudocysts of the pancreas and one smaller pseudocyst near the hilus of the spleen. The two largest pseudocysts were surgically drained into the stomach and the

  3. MLH1 and MSH2 protein expression as a pre-screening marker in hereditary and non-hereditary endometrial hyperplasia and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, MJW; Hollema, H; Wu, Y; van der Sluis, T; Mensink, RGJ; ten Hoor, KA; Sijmons, RH; de Vries, EGE; Pras, E; Mourits, MJE; Hofstra, RMW; Buys, CHCM; Kleibeuker, JH; van der Zee, AGJ

    2001-01-01

    The predictive value of MLH1 or MSH2 protein expression for the presence of truncating germline mutations was examined in benign and (pre)malignant endometrial samples from 3 patient groups: (1) 10 endometrial cancer patients from hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families with (n =

  4. New therapies for hereditary angioedema: disease outlook changes dramatically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Michael M; Jiang, Haixiang

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease associated with episodic attacks of nonpitting edema that may affect any external or mucosal body surface. Attacks most often affect the extremities, causing local swelling, the GI tract, leading to severe abdominal pain, and the mouth and throat, at times causing asphyxiation. Most patients with HAE have low levels of the plasma serine protease inhibitor C1 inhibitor. The edema in these patients is caused by unregulated generation of bradykinin. Effective chronic therapy of patients with impeded androgens or plasmin inhibitors has been available for decades, but in the United States, we do not have therapy for acute attacks. Five companies have completed or are in the process of conducting phase 3 clinical trials, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of products designed to terminate acute attacks or to be used in prophylaxis. Two companies, Lev Pharmaceuticals and CSL Behring, have preparations of C1 inhibitor purified from plasma that have been used in Europe for decades (trade names Cinryze and Berinert P, respectively). One company, Pharming, has developed a recombinant C1 inhibitor preparation. One company, Dyax, is testing a kallikrein inhibitor (ecallantide), and one company, Jerini, is completing testing of a bradykinin type 2 receptor antagonist (Icatibant). Although little has been published thus far, all of these products may prove effective. It is likely that HAE treatment will change dramatically within the next few years.

  5. Mutation study of Spanish patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanco Francisco J

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT is an autosomal dominant and age-dependent vascular disorder characterised mainly by mutations in the Endoglin (ENG or activin receptor-like kinase-1 (ALK1, ACVRL1 genes. Methods Here, we have identified 22 ALK1 mutations and 15 ENG mutations, many of which had not previously been reported, in independent Spanish families afflicted with HHT. Results We identified mutations in thirty-seven unrelated families. A detailed analysis of clinical symptoms was recorded for each patient analyzed, with a higher significant presence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM in HHT1 patients over HHT2. Twenty-two mutations in ALK1 and fifteen in ENG genes were identified. Many of them, almost half, represented new mutations in ALK1 and in ENG. Missense mutations in ENG and ALK1 were localized in a tridimensional protein structure model. Conclusion Overall, ALK1 mutations (HHT2 were predominant over ENG mutations (HHT1 in our Spanish population, in agreement with previous data from our country and other Mediterranean countries (France, Italy, but different to Northern Europe or North America. There was a significant increase of PAVM associated with HHT1 over HHT2 in these families.

  6. CT findings of hereditary dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokiguchi, Susumu; Kurashima, Akihiko; Tsuchiya, Toshiaki; Ito, Jusuke; Naito, Haruhiko; Nagai, Hiroko; Wakabayashi, Masatoshi; Morita, Masahiro

    1987-12-01

    Hereditary dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) has recently been recognized as a clinicopathological entity. It may be defined as a multisystem degenerative disease of dominant inheritance, and characterized clinically by a combination of epilepsy, myoclonus, ataxia, dementia, and choreo-athetosis. This paper reports on the CT findings of ten patients (in four families) with DRPLA. In two families, the diagnosis was established on the basis of the clinicopathological findings, while in the other two, the diagnosis was made clinically. Although the CT findings were not identical in all patients, some degree of atrophic change was always observed in the cerebellum, brainstem, and cerebral cortex. Cerebellar atrophy was always accompanied by a dilatation of the fourth ventricle. Midbrain atrophy was characterized by a prominent tegmental atrophy and aqueductal dilatation, such as is seen in progressive supranuclear palsy. Of the four patients over 40 years of age, three had a diffuse hypodensity of the cerebral white matter on CT. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports on this hypodensity in patients with spino-cerebellar degeneration or Huntington's chorea. CT may be helpful in the differential diagnosis of progressive neuro-degenerative disorders.

  7. CDH1 germline mutation in hereditary gastric carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Dan Wang; Jun Ren; Lian Zhang

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a bird's-eye view both in preclinical and clinical aspects of E-cadherin germline gene (CDH1)in gastric cancer patients and their families. E-cadherin,a product of CDH1 gene, belonging to the functionally related trans-membrane glycoprotein family, is responsible for the Ca2+-dependent cell-cell adhesion mechanism and contributes to dissociation followed by acquisition of cell motility, which usually occurs in the first step of cancer invasion and metastasis. CDH1 gene germline mutation is common in many types of carcinoma,and occurs very frequent in hereditary gastric carcinoma (HGC) patients and their families. Recently, more and more researches support that E-cadherin plays an important role in the differentiation, growth and invasion of HGC. So it is of great value to clarify its mechanisms both for understanding HGC pathogenesis and for clinical therapy, especially in China, where there are a high risk population of gastric cancer and a high HGC incidence rate. In this paper, recent researches on CDH1 gene mutation, especially its role in tumor genesis and progress of HGC, are reviewed, and advances in evaluation of its mutation status for HGC diagnosis, therapy and prognosis,are also discussed briefly.

  8. Research on Potential Biomarkers in Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Maria Botella

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, involving mutations in two predominant genes known as Endoglin (ENG; HHT1 and Activin receptor like kinase 1 (ACVRL1/ALK1; HHT2, as well as in some less frequent genes, such as MADH4/SMAD4 (JP-HHT or BMP9/GDF2 (HHT5. The diagnosis of HHT patients currently remains at the clinical level, according to the Curaçao criteria, whereas the molecular diagnosis is used to confirm or rule out suspected HHT cases, especially when a well characterized index case is present in the family or in an isolated population. Unfortunately, many suspected patients do not present a clear HHT diagnosis or do not show pathogenic mutations in HHT genes, prompting the need to investigate additional biomarkers of the disease. Here, several HHT biomarkers and novel methodological approaches developed during the last years will be reviewed. On one hand, products detected in plasma or serum samples: soluble proteins (VEGF, TGF-β1, soluble endoglin, angiopoietin-2 and microRNA variants (miR-27a, miR-205, miR-210. On the other hand, differential HHT gene expression fingerprinting, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS of a panel of genes involved in HHT, and infrared spectroscopy combined with Artificial Neural Network (ANN patterns will also be reviewed. All these biomarkers might help to improve and refine HHT diagnosis by distinguishing from the non-HHT population.

  9. Hereditary hemochromatosis: HFE mutation analysis in Greeks reveals genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, G; Politou, M; Terpos, E; Fourlemadis, S; Sakellaropoulos, N; Loukopoulos, D

    2000-04-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is common among Caucasians; reported disease frequencies vary from 0.3 to 0.8%. Identification of a candidate HFE gene in 1996 was soon followed by the description of two ancestral mutations, i.e., c.845G-->A (C282Y) and c.187C-->G (H63D). To these was recently added the mutation S65C, which may represent a simple polymorphism. The incidence of HH in Greece is unknown but clinical cases are rare. Also unknown is the carrier frequency of the two mutant alleles. A first estimate of the latter is given in the present report. It is based on data from the genetic analysis of 10 unrelated patients of Greek origin who were referred to our center for genotyping and 158 unselected male blood donors. The allele frequencies for the C282Y and H63D mutations were 0.003 and 0.145, respectively. The C282Y allele was detected in 50% of HH patients. This is considerably lower than the frequencies reported for HH patients in the U.S.A. (82%) and France (91 %) and closer to that reported in Italy (64%). Five patients did not carry any known HFE mutation; three may represent cases of juvenile hemochromatosis, given their early onset with iron overload, hypogonadism, and heart disease. We suggest that genetic heterogeneity is more prominent in Southern Europe. It is also possible that the penetrance of the responsible genes is different across the Mediterranean.

  10. A UK national audit of hereditary and acquired angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolles, S; Williams, P; Carne, E; Mian, H; Huissoon, A; Wong, G; Hackett, S; Lortan, J; Platts, V; Longhurst, H; Grigoriadou, S; Dempster, J; Deacock, S; Khan, S; Darroch, J; Simon, C; Thomas, M; Pavaladurai, V; Alachkar, H; Herwadkar, A; Abinun, M; Arkwright, P; Tarzi, M; Helbert, M; Bangs, C; Pastacaldi, C; Phillips, C; Bennett, H; El-Shanawany, T

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) and acquired angioedema (AAE) are rare life-threatening conditions caused by deficiency of C1 inhibitor (C1INH). Both are characterized by recurrent unpredictable episodes of mucosal swelling involving three main areas: the skin, gastrointestinal tract and larynx. Swelling in the gastrointestinal tract results in abdominal pain and vomiting, while swelling in the larynx may be fatal. There are limited UK data on these patients to help improve practice and understand more clearly the burden of disease. An audit tool was designed, informed by the published UK consensus document and clinical practice, and sent to clinicians involved in the care of HAE patients through a number of national organizations. Data sets on 376 patients were received from 14 centres in England, Scotland and Wales. There were 55 deaths from HAE in 33 families, emphasizing the potentially lethal nature of this disease. These data also show that there is a significant diagnostic delay of on average 10 years for type I HAE, 18 years for type II HAE and 5 years for AAE. For HAE the average annual frequency of swellings per patient affecting the periphery was eight, abdomen 5 and airway 0·5, with wide individual variation. The impact on quality of life was rated as moderate or severe by 37% of adult patients. The audit has helped to define the burden of disease in the UK and has aided planning new treatments for UK patients.

  11. Novel usage of fresh frozen plasma in hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanizah, N; Affirul, C A; Farah, N A; Shamila, M A; Ridzuan, M I

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare and potentially life threatening autosomal dominant disease characterized by recurrent episodes of cutaneous and mucosal oedema. It results from reduced expression or loss of function of CI-esterase inhibitors (C1-INH). As opposed to the more common histamine-mediated angioedema, HAE does not respond well to conventional treatments with anti-histamines, steroids and adrenaline. Early recognition and timely intervention with the correct treatment are crucial particularly preventing airway obstruction. New disease specific treatment including plasma derived or recombinant C1-INH, ecallantide and icatibant have recently emerged and its appropriate use can reduce HAE-associated mortality and morbidity. However due to its costs, these disease specific treatments have yet to reach Malaysia. Despite that no randomized clinical trial on FFP has been performed, its efficacy in treating acute attacks of HAE is only demonstrated in case studies. This case report illustrates the successful treatment of acute HAE episode with FFP in a Malaysian government hospital setting.

  12. Hereditary Angioedema Attacks: Local Swelling at Multiple Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Zonne L M; Relan, Anurag; Hack, C Erik

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients experience recurrent local swelling in various parts of the body including painful swelling of the intestine and life-threatening laryngeal oedema. Most HAE literature is about attacks located in one anatomical site, though it is mentioned that HAE attacks may also involve multiple anatomical sites simultaneously. A detailed description of such multi-location attacks is currently lacking. This study investigated the occurrence, severity and clinical course of HAE attacks with multiple anatomical locations. HAE patients included in a clinical database of recombinant human C1-inhibitor (rhC1INH) studies were evaluated. Visual analog scale scores filled out by the patients for various symptoms at various locations and investigator symptoms scores during the attack were analysed. Data of 219 eligible attacks in 119 patients was analysed. Thirty-three patients (28%) had symptoms at multiple locations in anatomically unrelated regions at the same time during their first attack. Up to five simultaneously affected locations were reported. The observation that severe HAE attacks often affect multiple sites in the body suggests that HAE symptoms result from a systemic rather than from a local process as is currently believed.

  13. Hereditary angioedema with normal C1-INH (HAE type III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) with normal C1 inhibitor (C1-INH), also known as HAE type III, is a familial condition only clinically recognized within the past three decades. Similar to HAE from C1-INH deficiency (HAE types I and II), affected individuals experience unpredictable angioedema episodes of the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and airway. Unique clinical features of HAE with normal C1-INH include the predominance of affected women, frequent exacerbation by estrogen, and a prominence of angioedema that involves the face and oropharynx. The underlying pathophysiology of HAE with normal C1-INH is poorly understood, but indirect evidence points to contact pathway dysregulation with bradykinin-mediated angioedema. Currently, evaluation is complicated by a lack of confirmatory laboratory testing such that clinical criteria must often be used to make the diagnosis of HAE with normal C1-INH. Factor XII mutations have been identified in only a minority of persons affected by HAE with normal C1-INH, limiting the utility of such analysis. To date, no controlled clinical studies have examined the efficacy of therapeutic agents for HAE with normal C1-INH, although published evidence supports frequent clinical benefit with medications shown effective in HAE due to C1-INH deficiency.

  14. Hereditary Angioedema: Three Cases Report, Members of the Same Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Kolokotronis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This current clinical case report highlights three cases of Hereditary angioedema (HAE patients who are all members of the same family (father and his two daughters. The father has C1–INH deficiency, while his daughters have low C1–INH levels: the first possesses only 10% function and the second has low C1–INH level with 0% function. Of note, the second daughter was discovered to have HAE at the age of 2, thus making her the youngest known HAE case report in the English literature.Methods: Assess the efficacy of administration of C1-INH before dental operation as regards the prevention of HAE episode, when total or partial C1-INH deficiency exists.Results: Acute angioedema leading to laryngeal oedema is a possibly fatal complication for HAE patients undergoing dental procedures. Use of both short-term and long-term HAE prophylaxis prior to dental operations might be life saving for those patients.Conclusions: Prevention and early recognition of potential laryngeal oedema that can occur as a complication of dental procedures may be lifesaving for HAE patients.

  15. Hereditary angioedema: New therapeutic options for a potentially deadly disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eidelman Frank J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although the biochemistry of hereditary angioedema (HAE is fairly well understood today, the lag in diagnosis of a decade or more suggests that clinicians have low awareness of this disease. This lag in diagnosis and hence treatment certainly stems from the rarity and complexity of the presentation which can be easily mistaken for allergic and non-allergic reactions alike. The symptoms of the disease include acute swelling of any or multiple parts of the body. The attacks may be frequent or rare, and they may vary substantially in severity, causing stomach discomfort or periorbital swelling in mild cases and hypovolemic shock due to abdominal fluid shift or asphyxiation in the most severe cases. Given that these patients are at significant risk for poor quality of life and death, greater awareness of this disease is needed to ensure that newly available, effective medications are used in these patients. These new medications represent significant advances in HAE therapy because they are targeted at the plasma cascades implicated in the pathophysiology of this disease. The clinical presentation of HAE, overlapping symptoms with other angioedemas, and available therapies are reviewed.

  16. Management of upper airway edema caused by hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkas Henriette

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary angioedema is a rare disorder with a genetic background involving mutations in the genes encoding C1-INH and of factor XII. Its etiology is unknown in a proportion of cases. Recurrent edema formation may involve the subcutis and the submucosa - the latter can produce obstruction in the upper airways and thereby lead to life-threatening asphyxia. This is the reason for the high, 30-to 50-per-cent mortality of undiagnosed or improperly managed cases. Airway obstruction can be prevented through early diagnosis, meaningful patient information, timely recognition of initial symptoms, state-of-the-art emergency therapy, and close monitoring of the patient. Prophylaxis can substantially mitigate the risk of upper airway edema and also improve the patients' quality of life. Notwithstanding the foregoing, any form of upper airway edema should be regarded as a potentially life-threatening condition. None of the currently available prophylactic modalities is capable of preventing UAE with absolute certainty.

  17. Hereditary prosopagnosia (HPA): the first report outside the Caucasian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennerknecht, Ingo; Plümpe, Nina; Edwards, Steve; Raman, Rajiva

    2007-01-01

    Prosopagnosia (PA) or face blindness is characterized by a deficiency in identifying familiar faces. Almost all reports are single cases or collections of unrelated patients who acquired prosopagnosia after brain injuries, strokes or atrophy of at least the right occipito-temporal cortex. Until 2001, the inborn form - in the absence of any brain lesions - was described in fewer than 20 probands exclusively of Caucasian origin. We recently found that in the German Caucasian population, congenital prosopagnosia has a very high prevalence of at least 2.5% and that it is genetically determined. It is best described by autosomal-dominant inheritance in the more than 50 families investigated. We therefore introduced the term non-syndromic hereditary PA for the congenital form of a monosymptomatic or isolated PA. This surprisingly high frequency in the Caucasian population prompted us to extend our search to other ethnic groups. We performed a questionnaire-based screening among 198 native Indian students at Banaras Hindu University in Varanasi. In a then selected subset, we found after further detailed diagnostic interviews one Bengali female student with visual agnosia for face recognition only. Several other members of her large family reported the same impairment of face recognition. The segregation pattern of PA in this family is also compatible with autosomal-dominant inheritance.

  18. Psychiatric manifestations of treatable hereditary metabolic disorders in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demily, Caroline; Sedel, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Detecting psychiatric disorders of secondary origin is a crucial concern for the psychiatrist. But how can this reliably be done among a large number of conditions, most of which have a very low prevalence? Metabolic screening undertaken in a population of subjects with psychosis demonstrated the presence of treatable metabolic disorders in a significant number of cases. The nature of the symptoms that should alert the clinician is also a fundamental issue and is not limited to psychosis. Hereditary metabolic disorders (HMD) are a rare but important cause of psychiatric disorders in adolescents and adults, the signs of which may remain isolated for years before other more specific organic signs appear. HMDs that present purely with psychiatric symptoms are very difficult to diagnose due to low awareness of these rare diseases among psychiatrists. However, it is important to identify HMDs in order to refer patients to specialist centres for appropriate management, disease-specific treatment and possible prevention of irreversible physical and neurological complications. Genetic counselling can also be provided. This review focuses on three HMD categories: acute, treatable HMDs (urea cycle abnormalities, remethylation disorders, acute intermittent porphyria); chronic, treatable HMDs (Wilson's disease, Niemann-Pick disease type C, homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis); and chronic HMDs that are difficult to treat (lysosomal storage diseases, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, creatine deficiency syndrome). We also propose an algorithm for the diagnosis of HMDs in patients with psychiatric symptoms.

  19. Anti-angiogenic therapeutic strategies in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela S. Ardelean

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is an autosomal dominant vascular dysplastic disorder, characterized by recurrent nosebleeds (epistaxis, multiple telangiectases and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs in major organs. Mutations in Endoglin (ENG or CD105 and Activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ACVRL1 or ALK1 genes of the TGF-β superfamily receptors are responsible for HHT1 and HHT2 respectively and account for the majority of HHT cases. Haploinsufficiency in ENG and ALK1 is recognized at the underlying cause of HHT. However, the mechanisms responsible for the predisposition to and generation of AVMs, the hallmark of this disease, are poorly understood. Recent data suggest that dysregulated angiogenesis contributes to the pathogenesis of HHT and that the vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF, may be implicated in this disease, by modulating the angiogenic balance in the affected tissues. Hence, anti-angiogenic therapies that target the abnormal vessels and restore the angiogenic balance are candidates for treatment of HHT. Here we review the experimental evidence for dysregulated angiogenesis in HHT, the anti-angiogenic therapeutic strategies used in animal models and some patients with HHT and the potential benefit of the anti-angiogenic treatment for ameliorating this severe, progressive vascular disease.

  20. Unusual presentation of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andary Michael T

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP is an autosomal-dominant painless peripheral neuropathy characterized by episodes of repeated focal pressure neuropathies at sites of entrapment/compression, with a considerable variability in the clinical course. Electrodiagnostic and genetic testing are important in the diagnostic evaluation of these patients. Case presentation We report an unusual HNPP phenotype, five compression neuropathies in four nerves in a patient with bilateral hand numbness. A 42-year-old female, presented with acute bilateral paresthesias and weakness in her hands after starting yoga exercises requiring hyperextension of her hands at the wrists. Her presentation was complicated by: a a remote history of acute onset foot drop and subsequent improvement, b previous diagnoses of demyelinating peripheral neuropathy, possibly Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and c exposure to leprosy. Electrodiagnostic testing showed 5 separate compression neuropathies in 4 nerves including: severe left and right ulnar neuropathies at the wrist, left and right median neuropathies at the wrist and left ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. There was a mild generalized, primarily demyelinating, peripheral polyneuropathy. Based on the clinical suspicion and electrodiagnostic findings, consistent with profound demyelination in areas of compression, genetic analysis was done which identified a deletion of the PMP-22 gene consistent with HNPP. Conclusion HNPP can present with unusual phenotypes, such as 5 separate mononeuropathies, bilateral ulnar and median neuropathies at the wrists and ulnar neuropathy at the elbow with mild peripheral demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with the PMP-22 gene deletion.