WorldWideScience

Sample records for alaska

  1. Gulf of Alaska, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This MODIS true-color image shows the Gulf of Alaska and Kodiak Island, the partially snow-covered island in roughly the center of the image. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

  2. Muskox of Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the muskox of Alaska. The report summarizes the history of muskoxen in Alaska, factors affecting the distribution of muskox, domestication and...

  3. Alaska Radiometric Ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Radiometric Age file is a database of radiometric ages of rocks or minerals sampled from Alaska. The data was collected from professional publications...

  4. The Best of Alaska

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑钧

    2011-01-01

    Nothing awakes Alaska like a whale exploding out of the water or an eagle (鹰) pulling a silver fish from the river. Combine these images with high mountains, brilliant icebergs and wonderful meals and you really do have the best of Alaska!

  5. Alaska geothermal bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liss, S.A.; Motyka, R.J.; Nye, C.J. (comps.)

    1987-05-01

    The Alaska geothermal bibliography lists all publications, through 1986, that discuss any facet of geothermal energy in Alaska. In addition, selected publications about geology, geophysics, hydrology, volcanology, etc., which discuss areas where geothermal resources are located are included, though the geothermal resource itself may not be mentioned. The bibliography contains 748 entries.

  6. Renewable Energy in Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-03-01

    This report examines the opportunities, challenges, and costs associated with renewable energy implementation in Alaska and provides strategies that position Alaska's accumulating knowledge in renewable energy development for export to the rapidly growing energy/electric markets of the developing world.

  7. Census Snapshot: Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Adam P; Baumle, Amanda K; Badgett, M. V. Lee; Gates, Gary J.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the U.S. Census Bureau, this report provides demographic and economic information about same-sex couples and same-sex couples raising children in Alaska. We compare same-sex “unmarried partners,” which the Census Bureau defines as an unmarried couple who “shares living quarters and has a close personal relationship,” to different-sex married couples in Alaska. In many ways, the more than 1,600 same-sex couples living in Alaska are similar to married couples. According...

  8. Profile: American Indian/Alaska Native

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native Profile: American Indian/Alaska Native Spotlight ACA Infographic for American Indians/ ... Program Circle of Life multimedia youth education program American Indian/Alaska Native Profile Great Plains Area Alaska Area ...

  9. Bibliography on Alaska estuaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This bibliography was compiled to assist in working up “profiles” for the estuaries in Alaska. The purpose of the profiles is to list in a narrative form the...

  10. Alaska waterfowl production, 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the Waterfowl Production and Habitat Survey for Alaska during 1964. The primary purpose of the survey is to provide information on duck...

  11. Accretion of southern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillhouse, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Paleomagnetic data from southern Alaska indicate that the Wrangellia and Peninsular terranes collided with central Alaska probably by 65 Ma ago and certainly no later than 55 Ma ago. The accretion of these terranes to the mainland was followed by the arrival of the Ghost Rocks volcanic assemblage at the southern margin of Kodiak Island. Poleward movement of these terranes can be explained by rapid motion of the Kula oceanic plate, mainly from 85 to 43 Ma ago, according to recent reconstructions derived from the hot-spot reference frame. After accretion, much of southwestern Alaska underwent a counterclockwise rotation of about 50 ?? as indicated by paleomagnetic poles from volcanic rocks of Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary age. Compression between North America and Asia during opening of the North Atlantic (68-44 Ma ago) may account for the rotation. ?? 1987.

  12. Current Ethnomusicology in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Thomas F.

    The systematic study of Eskimo, Indian, and Aleut musical sound and behavior in Alaska, though conceded to be an important part of white efforts to foster understanding between different cultural groups and to maintain the native cultural heritage, has received little attention from Alaskan educators. Most existing ethnomusical studies lack one or…

  13. Alaska Peninsula Alutiiq Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Matrona; And Others

    This workbook contains materials for teachers to use in the classroom. An alphabet book, the Pledge of Allegiance, songs, a play, and units on various subjects, such as hunting, picking berries, making a garden, and spring cleaning, are included. The materials are presented in both Alaska Peninsula Alutiiq (Sugpiaq) and English. (CFM)

  14. Coal resources of Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    In the late 1800s, whaling ships carried Alaskan coal, and it was used to thaw ground for placer gold mining. Unfortunate and costly political maneuvers in the early 1900s delayed coal removal, but the Alaska Railroad and then World War II provided incentives for opening mines. Today, 33 million acres (about 9% of the state) is classified as prospectively valuable for coal, much of it under federal title. Although the state's geology is poorly known, potential for discovery of new fields exists. The US Geological Survey estimates are outdated, although still officially used. The total Alaska onshore coal resource is estimated to be 216 to 4216 billion tons of which 141 billion tons are identified resources; an additional 1430 billion tons are believed to lie beneath Cook Inlet. Transportation over mountain ranges and wetlands is the biggest hurdle for removal. Known coal sources and types are described and mapped. 1 figure.

  15. GeoFORCE Alaska, A Successful Summer Exploring Alaska's Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartes, D.

    2012-12-01

    Thirty years old this summer, RAHI, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute is a statewide, six-week, summer college-preparatory bridge program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks for Alaska Native and rural high school juniors and seniors. This summer, in collaboration with the University of Texas Austin, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute launched a new program, GeoFORCE Alaska. This outreach initiative is designed to increase the number and diversity of students pursuing STEM degree programs and entering the future high-tech workforce. It uses Earth science to entice kids to get excited about dinosaurs, volcanoes and earthquakes, and includes physics, chemistry, math, biology and other sciences. Students were recruited from the Alaska's Arctic North Slope schools, in 8th grade to begin the annual program of approximately 8 days, the summer before their 9th grade year and then remain in the program for all four years of high school. They must maintain a B or better grade average and participate in all GeoFORCE events. The culmination is an exciting field event each summer. Over the four-year period, events will include trips to Fairbanks and Anchorage, Arizona, Oregon and the Appalachians. All trips focus on Earth science and include a 100+ page guidebook, with tests every night culminating with a final exam. GeoFORCE Alaska was begun by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in partnership with the University of Texas at Austin, which has had tremendous success with GeoFORCE Texas. GeoFORCE Alaska is managed by UAF's long-standing Rural Alaska Honors Institute, that has been successfully providing intense STEM educational opportunities for Alaskan high school students for over 30 years. The program will add a new cohort of 9th graders each year for the next four years. By the summer of 2015, GeoFORCE Alaska is targeting a capacity of 160 students in grades 9th through 12th. Join us to find out more about this exciting new initiative, which is enticing young Alaska Native

  16. Alaska highway pipeline inquiry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lysyk, K.M.; Bohmer, E.E.; Phelps, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    A public enquiry was held to determine the social and economic impacts associated with the proposed Alaska Highway pipeline. The pipeline was proposed to carry natural gas from Prudhoe Bay to the continental United States. The pipeline would follow the trans-Alaskan pipeline to Fairbanks, and follow the Alaska Highway through southern Yukon into northern British Columbia. The 48 inch pipe would operate at a pressure of 1,260 psi and would carry 2.4 billion cubic feet of gas per day, and could operate at that level for at least 25 years. Issues considered included alternative routes, employment and training, economic impact, social impact, the Yukon Indian land claim, the Dempster Lateral pipeline, planning and regulation, and compensation. The enquiry concluded that the government of Canada should not give approval in principle to the proposed pipeline through the southern Yukon without resolving the issues of an advanced payment towards the settlement of the Yukon Indian land claim, of compensation from the pipeline company, the establishment of a planning and control agency, and the deferral of the commencement of construction of the pipeline. 8 figs.

  17. 2005 Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys Lidar: Unalakleet, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report is a summary of a LiDAR data collection over the community of Unalakleet, in the Norton Sound region of Alaska. The original data were collected on...

  18. Predator control problems in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One of the important wildlife management activities in Alaska is that of predator control. This simple statement requires some explanation. In the course of these...

  19. Interior Alaska Bouguer Gravity Anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 1 kilometer Complete Bouguer Anomaly gravity grid of interior Alaska. Only those grid cells within 10 kilometers of a gravity data point have gravity values....

  20. Interior Alaska Bouguer Gravity Anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 1 kilometer Complete Bouguer Anomaly gravity grid of interior Alaska. All grid cells within the rectangular data area (from 61 to 66 degrees North latitude and...

  1. Alaska waterfowl production survey, 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the Waterfowl Production and Habitat Survey for Alaska during 1968. The primary purpose of the survey is to provide information on duck...

  2. Kevadel Alaska talves / Tiiu Ehrenpreis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ehrenpreis, Tiiu

    2007-01-01

    Autori muljeid 22.-25. märtsini Fairbanksis toimunud Alaska Ülikooli ja Ülemaailmse Arktika Uurimise Keskuse (IARC) juhtimisel GLOBE'i programmi uue projekti "Aastaajad ja bioomid" koolitusseminarist

  3. Alaska Geoid Heights (GEOID96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' geoid height grid for Alaska is distributed as a GEOID96 model. The computation used 1.1 million terrestrial and marine gravity data held in the...

  4. Alaska Athabascan stellar astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Christopher M.

    Stellar astronomy is a fundamental component of Alaska Athabascan cultures that facilitates time-reckoning, navigation, weather forecasting, and cosmology. Evidence from the linguistic record suggests that a group of stars corresponding to the Big Dipper is the only widely attested constellation across the Northern Athabascan languages. However, instruction from expert Athabascan consultants shows that the correlation of these names with the Big Dipper is only partial. In Alaska Gwich'in, Ahtna, and Upper Tanana languages the Big Dipper is identified as one part of a much larger circumpolar humanoid constellation that spans more than 133 degrees across the sky. The Big Dipper is identified as a tail, while the other remaining asterisms within the humanoid constellation are named using other body part terms. The concept of a whole-sky humanoid constellation provides a single unifying system for mapping the night sky, and the reliance on body-part metaphors renders the system highly mnemonic. By recognizing one part of the constellation the stargazer is immediately able to identify the remaining parts based on an existing mental map of the human body. The circumpolar position of a whole-sky constellation yields a highly functional system that facilitates both navigation and time-reckoning in the subarctic. Northern Athabascan astronomy is not only much richer than previously described; it also provides evidence for a completely novel and previously undocumented way of conceptualizing the sky---one that is unique to the subarctic and uniquely adapted to northern cultures. The concept of a large humanoid constellation may be widespread across the entire subarctic and have great antiquity. In addition, the use of cognate body part terms describing asterisms within humanoid constellations is similarly found in Navajo, suggesting a common ancestor from which Northern and Southern Athabascan stellar naming strategies derived.

  5. ALASKA1964_RUNUP - Alaska 1964 Tsunami Runup Heights at Seaside, Oregon (alaska1964_runup.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set is a point shapefile representing tsunami inundation runup heights for the Alaska 1964 event based on observations and associated information obtained...

  6. Alaska GeoFORCE, A New Geologic Adventure in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartes, D.

    2011-12-01

    RAHI, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute is a statewide, six-week, summer college-preparatory bridge program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks for Alaska Native and rural high school juniors and seniors. A program of rigorous academic activity combines with social, cultural, and recreational activities. Students are purposely stretched beyond their comfort levels academically and socially to prepare for the big step from home or village to a large culturally western urban campus. This summer RAHI is launching a new program, GeoFORCE Alaska. This outreach initiative is designed to increase the number and diversity of students pursuing STEM degree programs and entering the future high-tech workforce. It uses Earth science as the hook because most kids get excited about dinosaurs, volcanoes and earthquakes, but it includes physics, chemistry, math, biology and other sciences. Students will be recruited, initially from the Arctic North Slope schools, in the 8th grade to begin the annual program of approximately 8 days, the summer before their 9th grade year and then remain in the program for all four years of high school. They must maintain a B or better grade average and participate in all GeoFORCE events. The carrot on the end of the stick is an exciting field event each summer. Over the four-year period, events will include trips to Fairbanks, Arizona, Oregon and the Appalachians. All trips are focused on Earth science and include a 100+ page guidebook, with tests every night culminating with a final exam. GeoFORCE Alaska is being launched by UAF in partnership with the University of Texas at Austin, which has had tremendous success with GeoFORCE Texas. GeoFORCE Alaska will be managed by UAF's long-standing Rural Alaska Honors Insitute (RAHI) that has been successfully providing intense STEM educational opportunities for Alaskan high school students for almost 30 years. The Texas program, with adjustments for differences in culture and environment, will be

  7. Satellite View of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Alaska map layer is a 200-meter-resolution simulated-natural-color image of Alaska. Vegetation is generally green, with darker greens...

  8. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    OpenAIRE

    Shoffstall-Cone, Sarah; Williard, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Background. In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska’s Tribal Health Organizations (THO) developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities.Objectives. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA) Initiative tha...

  9. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Shoffstall-Cone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska’s Tribal Health Organizations (THO developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. Objectives. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. Results. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Conclusions. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  10. 76 FR 81247 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska; Amendment 88

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... Part 679 Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska... 0648-BA97 Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska... to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA FMP). Amendment 88 is...

  11. 76 FR 52147 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska; Amendment 88

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... Part 679 Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska... 0648-BA97 Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska... to implement Amendment 88 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska...

  12. Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Native > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, ... 54. 1 At a glance – Cancer Rates for American Indian/Alaska Natives (2008-2012) Cancer Incidence Rates per ...

  13. Minority Women's Health: American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health > American Indians/Alaska Natives Minority Women's Health American Indians/Alaska Natives Related information How to Talk to ... disease. Return to top Health conditions common in American Indian and Alaska Native women Accidents Alcoholism and drug ...

  14. Alaska Coal Geology, Resources, and Coalbed Methane Potential

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Estimated Alaska coal resources are largely in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks distributed in three major provinces. Northern Alaska-Slope, Central Alaska-Nenana, and...

  15. 76 FR 303 - Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 239 and 258 Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit... proposes to approve Alaska's modification of its approved Municipal Solid Waste Landfill (MSWLF) permit... Domenic Calabro, Office of Air, Waste, and Toxics, U.S. EPA, Region 10, 1200 Sixth Avenue, Suite...

  16. Northern Alaska Landscape/Permafrost GIS Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — This data set represents an updated Ecological Subsection Map for Northern Alaska. This update includes permafrost mapping to include the following new layers:...

  17. Alaska's renewable energy potential.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-02-01

    This paper delivers a brief survey of renewable energy technologies applicable to Alaska's climate, latitude, geography, and geology. We first identify Alaska's natural renewable energy resources and which renewable energy technologies would be most productive. e survey the current state of renewable energy technologies and research efforts within the U.S. and, where appropriate, internationally. We also present information on the current state of Alaska's renewable energy assets, incentives, and commercial enterprises. Finally, we escribe places where research efforts at Sandia National Laboratories could assist the state of Alaska with its renewable energy technology investment efforts.

  18. Infant Mortality and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alaska Native > Infant Heath & Mortality Infant Mortality and American Indians/Alaska Natives American Indian/Alaska Natives have 1.5 times the infant mortality rate as non-Hispanic whites. American Indian/Alaska Native babies are twice as likely as ...

  19. 75 FR 38452 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Central Gulf of Alaska License Limitation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Central Gulf of Alaska License Limitation Program; Amendment 86 AGENCY: National... the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) to NMFS for review. If approved, Amendment 86 would add a Pacific cod... of Amendment 86 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska, and...

  20. 76 FR 45217 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Central Gulf of Alaska Rockfish Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Central Gulf of Alaska Rockfish Program; Amendment 88 AGENCY: National Marine... submitted Amendment 88 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) for review... gains realized under the Rockfish Pilot Program and viability of the Gulf of Alaska fisheries....

  1. 77 FR 72297 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska; Proposed 2013 and 2014...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska; Proposed 2013 and 2014 Harvest Specifications for Groundfish... the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to establish harvest limits for groundfish during... Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska. The intended effect of this action is to conserve and...

  2. 76 FR 15826 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska License Limitation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska License Limitation Program AGENCY: National... for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska. This action adds a Pacific cod endorsement on licenses issued... the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) under the fishery management plans (FMPs) for groundfish in the...

  3. 77 FR 38013 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska; Amendment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska; Amendment 88; Correction AGENCY: National..., 2011, that implemented Amendment 88 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska... share (QS) under the Central Gulf of Alaska (GOA) Rockfish Program only in proportion to the number...

  4. 78 FR 74079 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska; Proposed 2014 and 2015...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska; Proposed 2014 and 2015 Harvest Specifications for Groundfish... the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to establish harvest limits for groundfish during... Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska. The intended effect of this action is to conserve and...

  5. 76 FR 79620 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska; Proposed 2012 and 2013...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska; Proposed 2012 and 2013 Harvest Specifications for Groundfish... the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to establish harvest limits for groundfish during... Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska. The intended effect of this action is to conserve and...

  6. 78 FR 33040 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Fisheries of the Gulf of Alaska; Amendment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Fisheries of the Gulf of Alaska; Amendment 89 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... Amendment 89 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP). Amendment 89...

  7. Central Gulf of Alaska Rockfish Permit Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The North Pacific Fishery Management Council adopted the Central Gulf of Alaska Rockfish Program (Rockfish Program) on June 14, 2010, to replace the expiring Pilot...

  8. Aerial Gamma-Ray Surveys in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Data generated by aerial sensing of radiation emanating from the earth's surface in Alaska provides general estimates of the geographic distribution of Uranium,...

  9. The human factor in Alaska's economic development

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the human factor in Alaska's economic development. The regions earlier development is discussed and introduction to an evaluation of the...

  10. Continental Shelf Boundary - Alaska NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Continental Shelf Boundaries (CSB) lines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Alaska Region. The CSB defines the seaward limit of federally...

  11. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program (NGP) developed the Alaska Mapping Initiative (AMI) to collaborate with the State and other Federal...

  12. North Slope, Alaska ESI: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for benthic marine habitats for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  13. Southeast Alaska ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for waterfowl in Southeast Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent locations of foraging and rafting...

  14. Western Alaska ESI: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anadromous fish species in Western Alaska. Vector lines in this data set represent species occurrences...

  15. Wild resource use in Northway, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes contemporary and recent historic use of fish and wildlife resources by residents of Northway, Alaska. Northway today consists primarily of an...

  16. ANWR and Alaska Peninsula Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (1252 records) were compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey and the State of Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys. This...

  17. Alaska1(ak1_iso) Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (72,677 records) were compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey and the State of Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys. This...

  18. Alaska1(ak1_wpn) Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (10,578 records) were compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey and the State of Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys. This...

  19. Southeast Alaska ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for estuarine, benthic, and pelagic fish in Southeast Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent locations...

  20. Problems confronting migratory birds in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We describe in this paper problems affecting the wellbeing of Alaskas migratory birds in the belief that recognition of these problems is a step towards finding...

  1. Alaska Steller Sea Lion Pup Count Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database contains counts of Steller sea lion pups on rookeries in Alaska made between 1961 and 2015. Pup counts are conducted in late June-July. Pups are...

  2. Seward, Alaska 8 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 8-second Seward Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 8-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly...

  3. Fish and wildlife research in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Problems, information needs, research facilities, current research, and documents related to long term planning of fish and wildlife research in Alaska. Appendices...

  4. The outlook for conservation in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes conservation efforts in Alaska. Population growth, outdoor recreation, and proposed National Wildlife Refuges are discussed. The report...

  5. Kensington Mine Area Baseline Contaminants Study, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Hardrock mining for gold and other metals is proposed for the Kensington Mine, located on Lynn Canal in Southeast Alaska, approximately 45 miles north of Juneau....

  6. Alaska gold rush trails study: Preliminary draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Preliminary study draft, with maps, of seven gold rush trails in Alaska, to determine suitability for inclusion in the National Scenic Trails system and their...

  7. Sitka, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sitka, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  8. Homer, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1-second Homer Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of .89-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly...

  9. Alaska Simulator - A Journey to Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Barbara; Pinggera, Jakob; Zugal, Stefan; Wild, Werner

    The Alaska Simulator is an interactive software tool developed at the University of Innsbruck which allows people to test, analyze and improve their own planning behavior. In addition, the Alaska Simulator can be used for studying research questions in the context of software project management and other related fields. Thereby, the Alaska Simulator uses a journey as a metaphor for planning a software project. In the context of software project management the simulator can be used to compare traditional rather plan-driven project management methods with more agile approaches. Instead of pre-planning everything in advance agile approaches spread planning activities throughout the project and provide mechanisms for effectively dealing with uncertainty. The biggest challenge thereby is to find the right balance between pre-planning activities and keeping options open. The Alaska Simulator allows to explore how much planning is needed under different circumstances.

  10. Kodiak, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1-second Kodiak Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 0.88-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  11. Sitka, Alaska 3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sitka, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 3 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  12. Lake Louise waterfowl banding report, Alaska, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The report covers the Lake Louise, Alaska banding status. The itinerary for the project, study and methods are discussed. Brood observations are provided.

  13. Alaska East-West Deflections (DEFLEC96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' surface deflection of the vertical grid for Alaska is the DEFLEC96 model. The computation used about 1.1 millionterrestrial and marine gravity data...

  14. Klawock Lagoon, Alaska Benthic Habitats 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Klawock River on Alaska's Prince of Wales Island drains a 29,061 acre watershed with 132 miles of streambed habitat supporting seven salmon and trout species....

  15. Southeast Alaska ESI: FISHPT (Fish Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for anadromous fish streams in Southeast Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent locations of fish streams....

  16. Western Alaska ESI: NESTS (Nest Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for nesting birds in Western Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent locations of nesting birds....

  17. 2004 Alaska highway invasive plants pilot survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We investigated the distribution and abundance of non-native invasive plants along a section of the Alaska Highway adjacent to Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge, 20...

  18. Alaska Steller Sea Lion Food Habits Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains food habits samples, usually scats, collected opportunistically on Steller sea lion rookeries and haulouts in Alaska from 1985 to present....

  19. Seldovia, Alaska 3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 3-second Seldovia Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 3-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly...

  20. Alaska Federal Oil and Gas Historical Leases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains the outlines for historic (i.e., relinquished or inactive) federal oil and gas leases in the Alaska OCS Region through sale 193. They...

  1. Southeast Alaska ESI: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for anadromous fish streams in Southeast Alaska. Vector lines in this data set represent locations of fish streams....

  2. Alaska Marine Mammal Strandings/Entanglements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database represents a summary of information on stranded marine mammals reported to NMFS throughout the State of Alaska in fulfillment of Title IV of the...

  3. North Slope, Alaska ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for diving birds, gulls and terns, seabirds, shorebirds, and waterfowl for the North Slope of Alaska....

  4. North Slope, Alaska ESI: NESTS (Nest Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for waterfowl, seabirds, gulls and terns for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set...

  5. Geologic Map of Alaska: geologic units

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of a polygon coverage and associated attribute data derived from the 1980 Geologic Map of Alaska compiled by H.M. Beikman and published by the...

  6. Cross Cultural Scientific Communication in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, K. B.

    2006-12-01

    An example of cross-cultural education is provided by the Aurora Alive curriculum. Aurora Alive communicates science to Alaska Native students through cross-cultural educational products used in Alaska schools for more than a decade, including (1) a CDROM that provides digital graphics, bilingual (English and Athabascan language) narration-over-text and interactive elements that help students visualize scientific concepts, and (2) Teacher's Manuals containing more than 150 hands-on activities aligned to national science standards, and to Alaska Standards for Culturally Responsive Schools. Created by Native Elders and teachers working together with University Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute scientists, Aurora Alive blends Native "ways of knowing" with current "western" research to teach the physics and math of the aurora.

  7. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: INDEX

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...

  8. 2 minute Southcentral Alaska Elevation Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 2-minute Southcentral Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 2-minute resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  9. Preliminary integrated geologic map data for Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A GIS database of geologic units and structural features in Alaska, with lithology, age, data structure, and format written and arranged just like the other states.

  10. Arctic and Aleutian terns, Amchitka Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Baird 1980 has recently reported on the ecology of Arctic terns Sterna paradisaea and Aleutian terns Sterna aleutica from 4 areas of mainland Alaska. However, prior...

  11. Klawock Lagoon, Alaska Benthic Habitats 2011 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Klawock River on Alaska's Prince of Wales Island drains a 29,061 acre watershed with 132 miles of streambed habitat supporting seven salmon and trout species....

  12. Klawock Lagoon, Alaska Benthic Habitats 2011 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Klawock River on Alaska's Prince of Wales Island drains a 29,061 acre watershed with 132 miles of streambed habitat supporting seven salmon and trout species....

  13. Klawock Lagoon, Alaska Benthic Habitats 2011 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Klawock River on Alaska's Prince of Wales Island drains a 29,061 acre watershed with 132 miles of streambed habitat supporting seven salmon and trout species....

  14. Klawock Lagoon, Alaska Benthic Habitats 2011 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Klawock River on Alaska's Prince of Wales Island drains a 29,061 acre watershed with 132 miles of streambed habitat supporting seven salmon and trout species....

  15. Breeding peregrine falcon survey, Amchitka Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A breeding peregrine falcon (Falco peregrines) survey was conducted on Amchitka Island, Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge from May 2-9, 1981 in conjunction...

  16. Avian Habitat Data; Seward Peninsula, Alaska, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data product contains avian habitat data collected on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, USA, during 21 May – 10 June 2012. We conducted replicated 10-min surveys...

  17. Western Alaska ESI: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in Western Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  18. Generalized thermal maturity map of Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of a polygon coverage and associated attribute data derived from the onshore portion of the 1996 "Generalized Thermal Maturity Map of Alaska"...

  19. Southeast Alaska ESI: MGT (Management Area Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains management area data for National Parks, Wildlife Refuges, and areas designated as Critical Habitat in Southeast Alaska. Vector polygons in...

  20. Permafrost Soils Database for Northern Alaska 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — This database contains soil and permafrost stratigraphy for northern Alaska compiled from numerous project data files and reports. The Access Database has main data...

  1. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: HYDRO (Hydrology)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...

  2. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FACILITY (Facility Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for oil field facilities for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent oil field facility locations. This data...

  3. Geology of the Johnson River Area Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The vegetation, topography, and geology of the Johnson River area are representative of the entire eastern interior region of Alaska. This area has a vegetational...

  4. Caribou survey of northeastern Alaska: Preliminary report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the Caribou survey of Northeastern Alaska. Objectives of the study are to determine the approximate total size of the caribou herd whose main...

  5. Southeast Alaska ESI: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Resource Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for airports, aquaculture sites, boat ramps, marinas, heliports, and log storage areas in Southeast Alaska. Vector...

  6. OCS Planning Areas Alaska NAD 83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains BOEM Planning Area outlines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Alaska Region. The Submerged Lands Act (SLA) boundary, along with the...

  7. Seward, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1 arc-second Seward Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of .89-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  8. Alaska Yukon : Waterfowl Breeding Population Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — AlaskaYukon was again blessed with a generally widespread, early spring breakup in the interior and on the North Slope with perhaps a more normal spring phenology...

  9. Gravity Data for Southwestern Alaska #2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (1294 records) were compiled by the Alaska Geological Survey and the U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California. This data base was...

  10. Mercury in polar bears from Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentfer, J.W.; Galster, W.A.

    1987-04-01

    Alaskan polar bear (Ursus maritimus) muscle and liver samples collected in 1972 were analyzed for total mercury. Bears north of Alaska had more mercury than bears west of Alaska. The only difference between young and adult animals was in the northern area where adults had more mercury in liver tissue than young animals. Levels were probably not high enough to be a serious threat to bears.

  11. Accretion tectonics and crustal structure in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coney, P.J.; Jones, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    The entire width of the North American Cordillera in Alaska is made up of "suspect terranes". Pre-Late Cretaceous paleogeography is poorly constrained and the ultimate origins of the many fragments which make up the state are unclear. The Prince William and Chugach terranes accreted since Late Cretaceous time and represent the collapse of much of the northeast Pacific Ocean swept into what today is southern Alaska. Greater Wrangellia, a composite terrane now dispersed into fragments scattered from Idaho to southern Alaska, apparently accreted into Alaska in Late Cretaceous time crushing an enormous deep-marine flysch basin on its inboard side. Most of interior eastern Alaska is the Yukon Tanana terrane, a very large entirely fault-bounded metamorphic-plutonic assemblage covering thousands of square kilometers in Canada as well as Alaska. The original stratigraphy and relationship to North America of the Yukon-Tanana terrane are both obscure. A collapsed Mesozoic flysch basin, similar to the one inboard of Wrangellia, lies along the northern margin. Much of Arctic Alaska was apparently a vast expanse of upper Paleozoic to Early Mesozoic deep marine sediments and mafic volcanic and plutonic rocks now scattered widely as large telescoped sheets and Klippen thrust over the Ruby geanticline and the Brooks Range, and probably underlying the Yukon-Koyukuk basin and the Yukon flats. The Brooks Range itself is a stack of north vergent nappes, the telescoping of which began in Early Cretaceous time. Despite compelling evidence for thousands of kilometers of relative displacement between the accreted terranes, and large amounts of telescoping, translation, and rotation since accretion, the resulting new continental crust added to North America in Alaska carries few obvious signatures that allow application of currently popular simple plate tectonic models. Intraplate telescoping and strike-slip translations, delamination at mid-crustal levels, and large-scale lithospheric

  12. The future of successful aging in Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Lewis

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is a paucity of research on Alaska Natives and their views on whether or not they believe they will age successfully in their home and community. There is limited understanding of aging experiences across generations. Objective. This research explores the concept of successful aging from an urban Alaska Native perspective and explores whether or not they believe they will achieve a healthy older age. Design. A cultural consensus model (CCM approach was used to gain a sense of the cultural understandings of aging among young Alaska Natives aged 50 years and younger. Results. Research findings indicate that aging successfully is making the conscious decision to live a clean and healthy life, abstaining from drugs and alcohol, but some of Alaska Natives do not feel they will age well due to lifestyle factors. Alaska Natives see the inability to age well as primarily due to the decrease in physical activity, lack of availability of subsistence foods and activities, and the difficulty of living a balanced life in urban settings. Conclusions. This research seeks to inform future studies on successful aging that incorporates the experiences and wisdom of Alaska Natives in hopes of developing an awareness of the importance of practicing a healthy lifestyle and developing guidelines to assist others to age well.

  13. 2011 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Maharrey, J. Zebulon; Neal, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near three separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2011. The year was highlighted by the unrest and eruption of Cleveland Volcano in the central Aleutian Islands. AVO annual summaries no longer report on activity at Russian volcanoes.

  14. 75 FR 3888 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ... Register on November 20, 2009 (74 FR 60228), to propose migratory bird subsistence harvest regulations in... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 92 RIN 1018-AW67 Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska During the 2010 Season AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife...

  15. 76 FR 270 - Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... procedure, Intergovernmental relations, Waste treatment and disposal. 40 CFR Part 258 Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Waste treatment disposal, Water pollution control. Authority: This action is issued... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 239 and 258 Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit...

  16. Legal and institutional problems facing geothermal development in Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-10-01

    The major players and the major difficulties each presents to geothermal development in Alaska are sketched. The following are included: the Alaskan natives, the posture of the state of Alaska, and the federal lands. (MHR)

  17. Some aspects of the southeast Alaska commercial fisheries: Special report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper ascertains what the USFWS can do to help stem the downward trend of the southeastern Alaska salmon fishery by: reviewing biological aspects of Alaska...

  18. Muskox domestication and husbandry: Its prospects in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the muskox domestication and reintroduction and its prospects in Alaska. The history of the muskox in Alaska, habitat and ecology are covered....

  19. Gallstones in American Indian/Alaska Native Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asian-Americans Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders American Indians/Alaska Natives Immigrant and migrant issues Taking care ... Enter email address Submit Home > Minority Women's Health > American Indians/Alaska Natives Minority Women's Health Gallstones Health conditions ...

  20. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Fact ... Vintage 2003 Postcensal Population Estimates from NCHS. The American Indian and Alaska Native Population There are approximately 4. ...

  1. USFWS Guide Use Areas within Alaska's National Wildlife Refuges (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 7 (Alaska) has established Guide Use Areas (GUA) within the National Wildlife Refuges in the state of Alaska....

  2. Crater Peak (Mt. Spurr), Alaska: Eruptions of 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Alaska has a number of active and potentially active volcanoes. More than one-half of the population of Alaska lives within 300 km of an active volcano. In the last...

  3. Grayscale Alaska Shaded Relief ? 200-Meter Resolution - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The grayscale Alaska shaded relief data were derived from National Elevation Dataset (NED) data, and show the terrain of Alaska at a resolution of 200 meters. The...

  4. 100-Meter Resolution Satellite View of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Alaska map layer is a 100-meter resolution simulated natural-color image of Alaska. Vegetation is generally green, with forests in darker...

  5. 100-Meter Resolution Color Shaded Relief of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Color Shaded Relief of Alaska map layer is a 100-meter resolution color-sliced elevation image of Alaska, with relief shading added to accentuate terrain...

  6. 100-Meter Resolution Grayscale Shaded Relief of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Grayscale Shaded Relief of Alaska map layer is a 100-meter resolution grayscale shaded relief image of Alaska, in an Albers Equal-Area Conic projection. Shaded...

  7. Geographic Analysis of Alaska Lake Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arp, C. D.; Jones, B. M.; Zimmerman, C. E.

    2007-12-01

    The state of Alaska has over 400,000 lakes greater than 0.01 km2 in surface area covering approximately 3.3% of the landscape. As in most lake-rich regions, these lakes are unevenly distributed on the landscape. So in order to better understand how lakes are organized on the landscape and relate this geographic organization to other climatologic, geologic, and biogeographic characteristics, we analyzed the spatial distribution of Alaska lakes. Using a combination of numerical abundance and surface-area extent of lakes, we selected lake density thresholds to identify and delineate 22 lake districts in Alaska. The total area of these 22 lakes districts occupy 16% of Alaska, yet encompass 64% of lakes and 76% of lake surface-area. The three largest lake districts are associated with the Yukon-Kuskokwin Delta, the Northern Arctic Coastal Plain, and the mountain front of the Alaskan Range on the Alaska Peninsula. Interestingly, these largest lake districts are covered by >17% lakes, while most of the smaller lake districts we identified have Parks (NP) and National Wildlife Refuges (NWR). Not surprisingly, 12 of these lake districts occur partly or wholly within NWRs, and all but two are associated with other state or federally managed parks or wildlife refuges. Analysis of lake districts in Alaska, or other regions on Earth, may prove to be useful for better understanding lake change, aquatic and terrestrial habitats, and regional hydrologic budgets and regimes. Such fresh views of the landscape may become increasingly important for improving natural resource science and management in Alaska, where future climate change is predicted to be very rapid.

  8. Northern gas : Arctic Canada and Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses supply challenges in relation to Northern gas availability in Arctic Canada and Alaska. A background of BP Canada Energy Company was provided. It was suggested that gas from traditional North American basins would not meet demand, and that incremental sources of supply would be needed. A map of traditional and non-tradition supply sources was presented along with details of supply and infrastructure investment requirements from 2003-2025. The roles of producers, local distribution companies, pipelines and policy makers in infrastructure development were examined. Potential resources in Alaska and the Mackenzie Delta were discussed, along with details of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline project and exploration activities. Alaska's North Slope gas resource was reviewed. Several large projects devolving from the Alaska Gas Pipeline represent an anticipated total investment of $20 billion. Various regulatory and economic conditions necessary for the successful completion of the project include the Alaska Fiscal Contract; Alaska gas provisions in the Federal Energy Bill; details of the Canadian regulatory process; and cost reductions and market outlooks. It was concluded that the Alaska Gas Pipeline would provide thousands of jobs and provide stability of long-term gas prices as well as meeting North America's energy needs. In addition, the pipeline would provide $16 billion in Canadian government revenues and $40 billion in US government revenues. The pipeline would provide 4.5 billion cubic feet per day of clean energy, with half the carbon dioxide emissions of coal. It would also provide hundreds of billions of dollars in consumer savings. tabs, figs

  9. Earthquake Hazard and Risk in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black Porto, N.; Nyst, M.

    2014-12-01

    Alaska is one of the most seismically active and tectonically diverse regions in the United States. To examine risk, we have updated the seismic hazard model in Alaska. The current RMS Alaska hazard model is based on the 2007 probabilistic seismic hazard maps for Alaska (Wesson et al., 2007; Boyd et al., 2007). The 2015 RMS model will update several key source parameters, including: extending the earthquake catalog, implementing a new set of crustal faults, updating the subduction zone geometry and reoccurrence rate. First, we extend the earthquake catalog to 2013; decluster the catalog, and compute new background rates. We then create a crustal fault model, based on the Alaska 2012 fault and fold database. This new model increased the number of crustal faults from ten in 2007, to 91 faults in the 2015 model. This includes the addition of: the western Denali, Cook Inlet folds near Anchorage, and thrust faults near Fairbanks. Previously the subduction zone was modeled at a uniform depth. In this update, we model the intraslab as a series of deep stepping events. We also use the best available data, such as Slab 1.0, to update the geometry of the subduction zone. The city of Anchorage represents 80% of the risk exposure in Alaska. In the 2007 model, the hazard in Alaska was dominated by the frequent rate of magnitude 7 to 8 events (Gutenberg-Richter distribution), and large magnitude 8+ events had a low reoccurrence rate (Characteristic) and therefore didn't contribute as highly to the overall risk. We will review these reoccurrence rates, and will present the results and impact to Anchorage. We will compare our hazard update to the 2007 USGS hazard map, and discuss the changes and drivers for these changes. Finally, we will examine the impact model changes have on Alaska earthquake risk. Consider risk metrics include average annual loss, an annualized expected loss level used by insurers to determine the costs of earthquake insurance (and premium levels), and the

  10. Chariot, Alaska Site Fact Sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chariot site is located in the Ogotoruk Valley in the Cape Thompson region of northwest Alaska. This region is about 125 miles north of (inside) the Arctic Circle and is bounded on the southwest by the Chukchi Sea. The closest populated areas are the Inupiat villages of Point Hope, 32 miles northwest of the site, and Kivalina, 41 miles to the southeast. The site is accessible from Point Hope by ATV in the summer and by snowmobile in the winter. Project Chariot was part of the Plowshare Program, created in 1957 by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to study peaceful uses for atomic energy. Project Chariot began in 1958 when a scientific field team chose Cape Thompson as a potential site to excavate a harbor using a series of nuclear explosions. AEC, with assistance from other agencies, conducted more than 40 pretest bioenvironmental studies of the Cape Thompson area between 1959 and 1962; however, the Plowshare Program work at the Project Chariot site was cancelled because of strong public opposition. No nuclear explosions were conducted at the site.

  11. Chariot, Alaska Site Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-01-16

    The Chariot site is located in the Ogotoruk Valley in the Cape Thompson region of northwest Alaska. This region is about 125 miles north of (inside) the Arctic Circle and is bounded on the southwest by the Chukchi Sea. The closest populated areas are the Inupiat villages of Point Hope, 32 miles northwest of the site, and Kivalina,41 miles to the southeast. The site is accessible from Point Hope by ATV in the summer and by snowmobile in the winter. Project Chariot was part of the Plowshare Program, created in 1957 by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to study peaceful uses for atomic energy. Project Chariot began in 1958 when a scientific field team chose Cape Thompson as a potential site to excavate a harbor using a series of nuclear explosions. AEC, with assistance from other agencies, conducted more than40 pretest bioenvironmental studies of the Cape Thompson area between 1959 and 1962; however, the Plowshare Program work at the Project Chariot site was cancelled because of strong public opposition. No nuclear explosions were conducted at the site.

  12. Amchitka, Alaska Site Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-12-15

    Amchitka Island is near the western end of the Aleutian Island chain and is the largest island in the Rat Island Group that is located about 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, and 870 miles east of the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. The island is 42 miles long and 1 to 4 miles wide, with an area of approximately 74,240 acres. Elevations range from sea level to more than 1,100 feet above sea level. The coastline is rugged; sea cliffs and grassy slopes surround nearly the entire island. Vegetation on the island is low-growing, meadow-like tundra grasses at lower elevations. No trees grow on Amchitka. The lowest elevations are on the eastern third of the island and are characterized by numerous shallow lakes and heavily vegetated drainages. The central portion of the island has higher elevations and fewer lakes. The westernmost 3 miles of the island contains a windswept rocky plateau with sparse vegetation.

  13. Alaska, Gulf spills share similarities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accidental Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska and the deliberate dumping of crude oil into the Persian Gulf as a tactic of war contain both glaring differences and surprising similarities. Public reaction and public response was much greater to the Exxon Valdez spill in pristine Prince William Sound than to the war-related tragedy in the Persian Gulf. More than 12,000 workers helped in the Alaskan cleanup; only 350 have been involved in Kuwait. But in both instances, environmental damages appear to be less than anticipated. Natures highly effective self-cleansing action is primarily responsible for minimizing the damages. One positive action growing out of the two incidents is increased international cooperation and participation in oil-spill clean-up efforts. In 1990, in the aftermath of the Exxon Valdez spill, 94 nations signed an international accord on cooperation in future spills. The spills can be historic environmental landmarks leading to creation of more sophisticated response systems worldwide

  14. Amchitka, Alaska Site Fact Sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amchitka Island is near the western end of the Aleutian Island chain and is the largest island in the Rat Island Group that is located about 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, and 870 miles east of the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. The island is 42 miles long and 1 to 4 miles wide, with an area of approximately 74,240 acres. Elevations range from sea level to more than 1,100 feet above sea level. The coastline is rugged; sea cliffs and grassy slopes surround nearly the entire island. Vegetation on the island is low-growing, meadow-like tundra grasses at lower elevations. No trees grow on Amchitka. The lowest elevations are on the eastern third of the island and are characterized by numerous shallow lakes and heavily vegetated drainages. The central portion of the island has higher elevations and fewer lakes. The westernmost 3 miles of the island contains a windswept rocky plateau with sparse vegetation

  15. 75 FR 43118 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska License Limitation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska License Limitation Program AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries... Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska. This proposed action would add a Pacific cod... economic zone (EEZ) of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area (BSAI) and the Gulf of...

  16. Correlation of tertiary formations of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, F.S.; Wolfe, J.A.; Miller, D.J.; Hopkins, D.M.

    1961-01-01

    Recent stratigraphic and paleontologic studies have resulted in substantial revision of the age assignments and inter-basin correlations of the Tertiary formations of Alaska as given in both an earlier compilation by P. S. Smith (1939) and a tentative chart prepared for distribution at the First International Symposium on Arctic Geology at Calgary, Alberta (Miller, MacNeil, and Wahrhaftig, 1960). Current work in Alaska by the U. S. Geological Survey and several oil companies is furnishing new information at a rapid rate and further revisions may be expected. The correlation chart (Fig. 1), the first published chart to deal exclusively with the Tertiary of Alaska, had the benefit of a considerable amount of stratigraphic data and fossil collections from some oil companies, but recent surface mapping and drilling by other oil companies in several Tertiary basins undoubtedly must have produced much more information. Nevertheless, the extent of available data justifies the publication of a revised correlation chart at this time.

  17. Management of Large Predators in Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boertje, R.D.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Populations of wolves (Canis lupus, brown bears (Ursus arctos, and black bears (Ursus americanus in Alaska are abundant and highly productive. Their long-term future is secure due to abundant habitat and good wildlife management practices. In many areas of Alaska hunting and trapping regulates wolf numbers and keep them "in balance" with moose populations. However, high predation rates by wolves can severely depress prey populations and then hold them at a very low density many years. This is often referred to as a predator pit. Several moose populations in interior Alaska are in predator pits. In some of these areas, high densities of black and brown bears complicate the situation. Bears generally prey on moose calves for only a few weeks after they are born, but in some areas they kill up to 65% of the calves produced. Moose populations faced with high levels of predation by both wolves and bears will not recover without special management actions to reduce the predation rate. Efforts to regulate predator populations outside of normal hunting and trapping seasons are highly controversial. Many people are very strongly opposed to reducing wolf or bear populations to increase moose populations and provide for a higher harvest by humans. Other people that depend on the moose for food and/or recreation strongly support predator management. It is a clash of values that is generates great controversy in Alaska. We provide a brief history of the controversy over predator management in Alaska and make recommendations on how to manage large predators in Alaska.

  18. 2012 Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) Lidar: Whittier, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In support of geologic mapping and hazards evaluation in and near Whittier, Alaska, the Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) acquired, and is...

  19. 76 FR 67635 - Alaska Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ...)(1), concerning construction plans for ponds, impoundments, dams, and embankments; 11 AAC 90.101(a... March 23, 1983, Federal Register (48 FR 12274). You can also find later actions concerning Alaska's... AAC 90.331(d), concerning sedimentation ponds; 11 AAC 90.331(e), concerning removal of...

  20. 77 FR 7228 - Alaska Disaster #AK-00023

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION Alaska Disaster AK-00023 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road.... Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington, DC 20416....

  1. Persistence of triclopyr in Alaska subarctic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field dissipation and vertical mobility of the butoxyethyl ester of triclopyr was assessed in two distinct geographic locations within the state of Alaska. Interior sites near Delta Junction included vegetated plots within highway rights-of-way (ROW) and Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) fields and...

  2. Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Grants Other Grants Planning and Evaluation Grantee Best Practices American Indian/Alaska Native Asthma Cancer Chronic Liver Disease Diabetes Heart Disease Hepatitis HIV/AIDS Immunizations Infant Heath & Mortality Mental Health Obesity Organ and Tissue Donation Stroke Stay Connected ...

  3. Alaska Terrain Corrected Free Air Anomalies (96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' gravity anomaly grid for Alaska is NOT the input data set used in development of the GEOID96 model. This gravity grid models the 1.1 million...

  4. Tundra Rehabilitation in Alaska's Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    Oil exploration in Alaska's Arctic has been conducted for more than 40 years, resulting in over 3,640 ha of gravel fill placed for roads, pads, and airstrips to support the industry. Likewise, tundra disturbance from burying power lines and by tundra vehicle travel are also common. Rehabilitation of disturbed sites began around 2002, with well over 150 ha that has been previously treated or is currently being rehabilitated. Two primary goals of rehabilitation efforts have been 1) revegetation by indigenous species, and 2) limiting thermokarst. Early efforts were concerned that removing gravel and having exposed bare ground would lead to extensive subsidence and eolian erosion. Native grass cultivars (e.g. Poa glauca, Arctagrostis latifolia, and Festuca rubra) were seeded to create vegetation cover quickly with the expectation that these grasses would survive only temporarily. The root masses and leaf litter were also expected to trap indigenous seed to enhance natural recolonization by indigenous plants. Due to the remote location of these sites, many of which are only accessible by helicopter, most are visited only two to three times following cultivation treatments, providing a limited data pool. At many sites, the total live seeded grass cover declined about 15% over the first 5¬-6 years (from around 30% to 15% cover), while total live indigenous vascular cover increased from no or trace cover to an average of 10% cover in that time. Cover of indigenous vascular plants at sites that were not seeded with native grass cultivars averaged just less than 10% after 10 years, showing no appreciable difference between the two approaches. Final surface elevations at the sites affect local hydrology and soil moisture. Other factors that influence the success of vegetation cover are proximity to the Arctic coast (salt effects), depth of remaining gravel, and changes in characteristics of the near-surface soil. Further development of rehabilitation techniques and the

  5. 33 CFR 334.1300 - Blying Sound area, Gulf of Alaska, Alaska; air-to-air gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blying Sound area, Gulf of Alaska, Alaska; air-to-air gunnery practice area, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1300 Section 334.1300... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1300 Blying Sound area, Gulf of Alaska, Alaska;...

  6. Health care delivery for Alaska Natives: A brief overview

    OpenAIRE

    Sherry, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. Describe the Alaska Native Health Care delivery system and some of the historical elements that shaped it. Study Design. Retrospective program review. Methods. Retrospective review of existing administrative and clinical programs. Results. Over the last 10,000 -15,000 years the Alaska Native Health System developed from at traditional tribal based self-care system to a complex system that is interdependent on local, state, federal, and private insurance payers. The Alaska Tribal H...

  7. Mortality trends among Alaska Native people: successes and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Holck, Peter; Day, Gretchen Ehrsam; Provost, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Background. Current mortality rates are essential for monitoring, understanding and developing policy for a population’s health. Disease-specific Alaska Native mortality rates have been undergoing change.Objective. This article reports recent mortality data (20042008) for Alaska Native/American Indian (AN/AI) people, comparing mortality rates to US white rates and examines changes in mortality patterns since 1980.Design. We used death record data from the state of Alaska, Department of Vital ...

  8. Geothermal energy in Alaska: site data base and development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markle, D.

    1979-04-01

    The following are presented: the history of geothermal energy in Alaska; a history of Alaska land ownership; legal and institutional barriers; and economics. Development, the socio-economic and physical data concerning geothermal energy are documented by regions. The six regions presented are those of the present Alaska State Planning Activities and those of the Federal Land Use Commission. Site data summaries of the one hundred and four separate geothermal spring locations are presented by these regions. (MHR)

  9. Cardiovascular disease among Alaska Natives: a review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Schumacher, Catherine; Davidson, Michael; Ehrsam, Gretchen

    2003-01-01

    Background. We reviewed the literature of population-based studies regarding heart disease and stroke occurrence among Alaska Natives. The existing literature suggests that differences in cardiovascular mortality rates and risk factors exist in Alaska Natives by ethnicity and residence. However, data sources are largely limited to mortality data and small community-based studies. Objectives. Because cardiovascular disease occurrence has not been well studied among Alaska Natives, it is import...

  10. Alaska Landscape Conservation Cooperative Boundaries, Feb 2013 update.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — This dataset depicts the terrestrial boundaries of the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCC) within Alaska. Those LCCs are: Aleutian and Bering Sea Islands,...

  11. Forest Fires Produce Dense Smoke over Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    On August 14, 2005, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this stunning image of forest fires raging across the width of Alaska. Smoke from scores of fires (marked in red) filled the state's broad central valley and poured out to sea. Hemmed in by mountains to the north and the south, the smoke spreads westward and spills out over the Bering and Chukchi Seas (image left). More than a hundred fires were burning across the state as of August 14. Air quality warnings have been issued for about 90 percent of the Interior, according to the August 12 report from the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation's Division of Air Quality. Conditions have ranged from 'very unhealthy' to 'hazardous' over the weekend in many locations, including Fairbanks. A large area of high atmospheric pressure spread over much of the state, keeping temperatures high and reducing winds that would clear the air.

  12. Environmental Audit of the Alaska Power Administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the results of the Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit of the Alaska Power Administration (APA) headquartered in Juneau, Alaska. This Audit was conducted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) from August 24 to December 8, 1992. The scope of the Audit was comprehensive, covering all environmental programs and activities with the exception of those relating to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Specifically considered was the compliance status of APA regarding Federal, state, and local statutes and regulations, DOE Orders and Directives, and best management practices. The technical disciplines addressed by the Audit were: air, surface water/drinking water, groundwater, waste management, toxic and chemical materials, quality assurance, inactive waste sites, and environmental management. Due to the nature of the activities carried out at the two Federal hydroelectric projects operated by APA, the area of radiation was not investigated during the Audit

  13. Surface melt dominates Alaska glacier mass balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen Chris F; Burgess, E; Arendt, A.A.; O'Neel, Shad; Johnson, A.J.; Kienholz, C.

    2015-01-01

    Mountain glaciers comprise a small and widely distributed fraction of the world's terrestrial ice, yet their rapid losses presently drive a large percentage of the cryosphere's contribution to sea level rise. Regional mass balance assessments are challenging over large glacier populations due to remote and rugged geography, variable response of individual glaciers to climate change, and episodic calving losses from tidewater glaciers. In Alaska, we use airborne altimetry from 116 glaciers to estimate a regional mass balance of −75 ± 11 Gt yr−1 (1994–2013). Our glacier sample is spatially well distributed, yet pervasive variability in mass balances obscures geospatial and climatic relationships. However, for the first time, these data allow the partitioning of regional mass balance by glacier type. We find that tidewater glaciers are losing mass at substantially slower rates than other glaciers in Alaska and collectively contribute to only 6% of the regional mass loss.

  14. EarthScope's Transportable Array in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, R. W.; Woodward, R.; Hafner, K.

    2013-12-01

    Since 2003, EarthScope has been installing a network of seismometers, known as the Transportable Array-across the continental United States and southern Canada. The station deployments will be completed in the Conterminous US in the fall of 2013. Beginning in October, 2013, and continuing for 5 years, EarthScope's Transportable Array plans to create a grid of seismic sensors in approximately 300 locations In Alaska and Western Canada. The proposed station grid is 85 km, and target locations will supplement or enhance existing seismic stations operating in Alaska. When possible, they will also be co-located with existing GPS stations constructed by the Plate Boundary Observatory. We review the siting plans for stations, the progress towards reconnaissance and permitting, and detail the engineering concept of the stations. In order to be able to determine the required site conditions and descriptions of installation methods to the permitting agencies, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has been supporting exploratory work on seismic station design, sensor emplacement and communication concepts appropriate for the challenging high-latitude environment that is proposed for deployment. IRIS has installed several experimental stations to evaluate different sensor emplacement schemes both in Alaska and the lower-48 U.S. The goal of these tests is to maintain or enhance a station's noise performance while minimizing its footprint and the equipment, materials, and overall expense required for its construction. Motivating this approach are recent developments in posthole broadband seismometer design and the unique conditions for operating in Alaska, where most areas are only accessible by small plane or helicopter, and permafrost underlies much of the region. IRIS has experimented with different portable drills and drilling techniques to create shallow holes (1-5M) in permafrost and rock outcrops. Seasonal changes can affect the performance of seismometers in different

  15. Alaska Highway bibliography, 3rd edition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prange, Laurie

    Since the early 20th century various schemes were considered for the construction of roads, trails or railways 71 to link the Yukon, northern British Columbia and Alaska to the “outside.” These schemes were motivated by economic interests, including mining, lumber and tourism concerns. During the....... The impacts included an increased awareness of the world outside of the Yukon, imported ideas and technology, improved health care, highway transportation, telecommunications, and the development of more mining and tourist-related industries....

  16. Southwest Alaska Regional Geothermal Energy Projec

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdmann, Gwen [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    2015-04-30

    Drilling and temperature logging campaigns between the late 1970's and early 1980’s measured temperatures at Pilgrim Hot Springs in excess of 90°C. Between 2010 and 2014 the University of Alaska used a variety of methods including geophysical surveys, remote sensing techniques, heat budget modeling, and additional drilling to better understand the resource and estimate the available geothermal energy.

  17. Wildlife disease and environmental health in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hemert, Caroline; Pearce, John; Oakley, Karen; Whalen, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Environmental health is defined by connections between the physical environment, ecological health, and human health. Current research within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recognizes the importance of this integrated research philosophy, which includes study of disease and pollutants as they pertain to wildlife and humans. Due to its key geographic location and significant wildlife resources, Alaska is a critical area for future study of environmental health.

  18. 1994 Volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Doukas, Michael P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1995-01-01

    During 1994, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, or false alarms at nine volcanic centers-- Mount Sanford, Iliamna, the Katmai group, Kupreanof, Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Mount Cleveland and Kanaga (table 1). Of these volcanoes, AVO has a real time, continuously recording seismic network only at Iliamna, which is located in the Cook Inlet area of south-central Alaska (fig. 1). AVO has dial-up access to seismic data from a 5-station network in the general region of the Katmai group of volcanoes. The remaining unmonitored volcanoes are located in sparsely populated areas of the Wrangell Mountains, the Alaska Peninsula, and the Aleutian Islands (fig. 1). For these volcanoes, the AVO monitoring program relies chiefly on receipt of pilot reports, observations of local residents and analysis of satellite imagery.

  19. A global change policy for Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alaska Science and Engineering Advisory Committee attempted to formulate a suitable state policy for global climate change. The main elements and rationale for this policy are described, along with lessons learned from the Montreal protocol on global ozone and the policy itself. A discussion of issues relating to public presentation and reaction to a climate change policy indicates that elements necessary for a strategy presenting a case for global change needs to be credible, simple, and unambiguous, with risks clearly defined. Society and business must see themselves as stakeholders in the issue, and policies must be formulated accordingly. The Montreal protocol provides an example of success in advanced planning on a major global issue. The six main components of the Alaskan policy relate to fossil fuel production and marketing, the economic mix of energy production for in-state use, the efficiency and effectiveness of energy end-use services, the impact of climatic change on Alaska as a geographic unit, Alaska as a high-latitude site for climate change monitoring and analysis, and Alaskan participation with other countries in research and policy development. 7 refs

  20. Bryophytes from Tuxedni Wilderness area, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, W.B.; Talbot, S. S.; Talbot, S.L.

    2002-01-01

    The bryoflora of two small maritime islands, Chisik and Duck Island (2,302 ha), comprising Tuxedni Wilderness in western lower Cook Inlet, Alaska, was examined to determine species composition in an area where no previous collections had been reported. The field study was conducted from sites selected to represent the totality of environmental variation within Tuxedni Wilderness. Data were analyzed using published reports to compare the bryophyte distribution patterns at three levels, the Northern Hemisphere, North America, and Alaska. A total of 286 bryophytes were identified: 230 mosses and 56 liverworts. Bryum miniatum, Dichodontium olympicum, and Orthotrichum pollens are new to Alaska. The annotated list of species for Tuxedni Wilderness expands the known range for many species and fills distribution gaps within Hulte??n's Central Pacific Coast district. Compared with bryophyte distribution in the Northern Hemisphere, the bryoflora of Tuxedni Wilderness primarily includes taxa of boreal (61%), montane (13%), temperate (11%), arctic-alpine (7%), cosmopolitan (7%), distribution; 4% of the total moss flora are North America endemics. A brief summary of the botanical exploration of the general area is provided, as is a description of the bryophytes present in the vegetation and habitat types of Chisik and Duck Islands.

  1. Sustainable Energy Solutions for Rural Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Riley [Regulatory Assistance Project, Montpelier, VT (United States); Brutkoski, Donna [Regulatory Assistance Project, Montpelier, VT (United States); Farnsworth, David [Regulatory Assistance Project, Montpelier, VT (United States); Larsen, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-04-22

    The state of Alaska recognizes the challenges these rural communities face and provides financial support via the Power Cost Equalization (PCE) program. The PCE subsidizes the electricity prices paid by customers of these high-cost utilities. The PCE program is designed to spread the benefits of Alaska’s natural resources more evenly throughout the state. Yet even with this subsidy, electricity is still much more expensive for these rural customers. And beyond the PCE, other forms of assistance to rural utilities are becoming scarce given the state’s current fiscal environment. Nearly 90 percent of Alaska’s unrestricted budget funds in recent years have been tied to oil royalties—a sector experiencing significant declines in production and oil prices. Consequently, as Alaska looks to tighten budgets, the challenge of lowering rural utility costs, while encouraging self-sufficiency, has become more urgent.This study examines reliability, capital and strategic planning, management, workforce development, governance, financial performance and system efficiency in the various communities visited by the research team. Using those attributes, a tier system was developed to categorize rural Alaska utilities into Leading and Innovating Systems (Tier I), Advanced Diesel Systems (Tier II), Basic Systems (Tier III), and Underperforming Systems (Tier IV). The tier approach is not meant to label specific utilities, but rather to provide a general set of benchmarks and guideposts for improvement.

  2. Alaska Seismic Network Upgrade and Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandru, J. M.; Hansen, R. A.; Estes, S. A.; Fowler, M.

    2009-12-01

    AEIC (Alaska Earthquake Information Center) has begun the task of upgrading the older regional seismic monitoring sites that have been in place for a number of years. Many of the original sites (some dating to the 1960's) are still single component analog technology. This was a very reasonable and ultra low power reliable system for its day. However with the advanced needs of today's research community, AEIC has begun upgrading to Broadband and Strong Motion Seismometers, 24 bit digitizers and high-speed two-way communications, while still trying to maintain the utmost reliability and maintaining low power consumption. Many sites have been upgraded or will be upgraded from single component to triaxial broad bands and triaxial accerometers. This provided much greater dynamic range over the older antiquated technology. The challenge is compounded by rapidly changing digital technology. Digitizersand data communications based on analog phone lines utilizing 9600 baud modems and RS232 are becoming increasingly difficult to maintain and increasingly expensive compared to current methods that use Ethernet, TCP/IP and UDP connections. Gaining a reliable Internet connection can be as easy as calling up an ISP and having a DSL connection installed or may require installing our own satellite uplink, where other options don't exist. LANs are accomplished with a variety of communications devices such as spread spectrum 900 MHz radios or VHF radios for long troublesome shots. WANs are accomplished with a much wider variety of equipment. Traditional analog phone lines are being used in some instances, however 56K lines are much more desirable. Cellular data links have become a convenient option in semiurban environments where digital cellular coverage is available. Alaska is slightly behind the curve on cellular technology due to its low population density and vast unpopulated areas but has emerged into this new technology in the last few years. Partnerships with organizations

  3. 75 FR 8396 - Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, Cold Bay, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... proposed road corridor through the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge and the Izembek Wilderness Area. We... Wildlife Refuge for the road corridor and approximately 1,600 acres of Federal land within the Alaska..., and from the State of Alaska on June 19, 2009. Our notice of August 6, 2009 (74 FR 39336),...

  4. American Indian/Alaska Native College Student Retention Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillory, Raphael M.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents findings from a qualitative study examining the similarities and differences between American Indian/Alaska Native student perceptions and the perceptions of state representatives, university presidents, and faculty about persistence factors and barriers to degree completion specific to American Indian/Alaska Native students…

  5. Alaska oil and gas: Energy wealth or vanishing opportunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Faulder, D.D.; Harrison, W.E.; Irving, J.S.; Jamison, H.C.; White, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to systematically identify and review (a) the known and undiscovered reserves and resources of arctic Alaska, (b) the economic factors controlling development, (c) the risks and environmental considerations involved in development, and (d) the impacts of a temporary shutdown of the Alaska North Slope Oil Delivery System (ANSODS). 119 refs., 45 figs., 41 tabs.

  6. 78 FR 21597 - Marine Mammals: Alaska Harbor Seal Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... measures to protect glacially-associated harbor seal habitats in Alaska (78 FR 15669; March 12, 2013.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On March 12, 2013, NMFS published an ANPR in the Federal Register (78 FR 15669) to... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-BB71 Marine Mammals: Alaska Harbor Seal...

  7. Facts and Figures about Education in Alaska, 1996-97.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau.

    This booklet provides a variety of demographic information about the Alaska school system covering, in most cases, the past 10 years. The Alaska Commissioners of Education from 1917 to the present are listed, followed by a phone directory of the department, and general district and school information. The section on student information gives…

  8. Market Segmentation, Preferences, and Management Attitudes of Alaska Nonresident Anglers.

    OpenAIRE

    Romberg, William John

    1999-01-01

    Market Segmentation, Preferences, and Management Attitudes of Alaska Nonresident Anglers. William J. Romberg (ABSTRACT) Nonresident angler participation in Alaskan sport fisheries has increased at a higher rate than resident participation during the past decade. Popular sport fisheries have become crowded and stakeholder groups are increasingly concerned about the future direction of Alaska sport fisheries management. To address stakeholder concerns in an informed manner,...

  9. Economic Education Experiences of Award Winning Alaska Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Monica, Ed.

    Award-winning economic education projects devised by Alaska teachers included three elementary (K-6) projects and three second level (7-12) ones. Faith Greenough's students (Chinook Elementary School, Anchorage) compared Tlingit traditional and market economies in Alaska, so economics became an integrated part of elementary instruction. Marie…

  10. Natality and calf mortality of the Northern Alaska Peninsula and Southern Alaska Peninsula caribou herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Sellers

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available We studied natality in the Northern Alaska Peninsula (NAP and Southern Alaska Peninsula (SAP caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti herds during 1996-1999, and mortality and weights of calves during 1998 and 1999- Natality was lower in the NAP than the SAP primarily because most 3-year-old females did not produce calves in the NAP Patterns of calf mortality in the NAP and SAP differed from those in Interior Alaska primarily because neonatal (i.e., during the first 2 weeks of life mortality was relatively low, but mortality continued to be significant through August in both herds, and aggregate annual mortality was extreme (86% in the NAP Predators probably killed more neonatal calves in the SAP, primarily because a wolf den (Canis lupus was located on the calving area. Despite the relatively high density of brown bears (Ursus arctos and bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus, these predators killed surprisingly few calves. Golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos were uncommon on the Alaska Peninsula. At least 2 calves apparently died from pneu¬monia in the range of the NAP but none were suspected to have died from disease in the range of the SAP. Heavy scav¬enging by bald eagles complicated determining cause of death of calves in both the NAP and SAP.

  11. 78 FR 75321 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ... 16, 2002 (67 FR 53511) and most recently on February 21, 2013 (78 FR 11988). Recent Federal Register... 9, 2013 (78 FR 21200), to amend 50 CFR part 20. While that proposed rule dealt primarily with the... FR 16405; March 28, 2000), we identified 7 to 12 partner organizations (Alaska Native nonprofits...

  12. 77 FR 58731 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... migratory birds in Alaska in a proposed rule published in the Federal Register on April 17, 2012, (77 FR..., and a history, was originally addressed in the Federal Register on August 16, 2002 (67 FR 53511) and most recently on March 26, 2012 (77 FR 17353). Recent Federal Register documents, which are...

  13. 76 FR 68263 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... migratory birds in Alaska in a proposed rule published in the Federal Register on April 8, 2011 (76 FR 19876..., and a history, was originally addressed in the Federal Register on August 16, 2002 (67 FR 53511) and most recently on March 29, 2011 (76 FR 17353). Recent Federal Register documents, which are all...

  14. 78 FR 73144 - Subsistence Management Program for Public Lands in Alaska; Western Interior Alaska Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    ..., contact Steve Kessler, Regional Subsistence Program Leader, USDA, Forest Service, Alaska Region; (907) 743... residents with personal knowledge of local conditions and resource requirements to have a meaningful role in.... Steve Kessler, Subsistence Program Leader, USDA-Forest Service. BILLING CODE 3410-11-4310-55-P...

  15. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Zhang, X.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    Data assimilation has been demonstrated very useful in improving both global and regional numerical weather prediction. Alaska has very coarser surface observation sites. On the other hand, it gets much more satellite overpass than lower 48 states. How to utilize satellite data to improve numerical prediction is one of hot topics among weather forecast community in Alaska. The Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at University of Alaska is conducting study on satellite data assimilation for WRF model. AIRS/CRIS sounder profile data are used to assimilate the initial condition for the customized regional WRF model (GINA-WRF model). Normalized standard deviation, RMSE, and correlation statistic analysis methods are applied to analyze one case of 48 hours forecasts and one month of 24-hour forecasts in order to evaluate the improvement of regional numerical model from Data assimilation. The final goal of the research is to provide improved real-time short-time forecast for Alaska regions.

  16. 50 CFR Figure 3 to Part 679 - Gulf of Alaska Reporting Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gulf of Alaska Reporting Areas 3 Figure 3... ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part 679—Gulf of Alaska Reporting Areas ER21AP09.000 b. Coordinates... straight lines between the islands and the Alaska Peninsula connecting the following coordinates in...

  17. 77 FR 22683 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska; Final 2012 and 2013 Harvest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... 14, 2012 (77 FR 15194). A table providing information on 2012 GOA non-American Fisheries Act (AFA... 14, 2012 (77 FR 15194), the following corrections are made to Table 22: 1. On page 15216, in Table 22... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska; Final 2012 and 2013 Harvest Specifications for...

  18. University of Alaska Statewide Community Survey. A Survey of the Higher Education Priorities and Needs of Alaska Households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell Group, Juneau, AK.

    This survey attempted to determine public satisfaction with University of Alaska services, the educational program needs of Alaskan households, and where the university system stands among the priorities of the Alaska public. Telephone interviews with 900 Alaskan households were conducted and results analyzed. Findings are detailed for the…

  19. 77 FR 2478 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska; Amendment 88

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 679 RIN 0648-BA97 Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska; Amendment 88 Correction Sec. 679.81 In...

  20. 75 FR 76352 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Gulf of Alaska; Proposed 2011 and 2012...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ...NMFS proposes 2011 and 2012 harvest specifications, apportionments, and Pacific halibut prohibited species catch limits for the groundfish fishery of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to establish harvest limits for groundfish during the 2011 and 2012 fishing years and to accomplish the goals and objectives of the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska.......

  1. Energy Northwest: Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-10-01

    The four-state area, one of 10 Federal regions established to streamline Federal operations and encourage Federal-state-local cooperation, includes Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The sources of energy and some energy technology are first reviewed briefly. The physical characteristics and regional developments are identified. Energy reserves, production, imports, facilities, and consumption are examined for the Northwest. The following energy issues are examined: conservation, electric rates, Clean Air Act of 1970, continental shelf development, transmission corridors, centralized electric generation, electric generation mix, electric power planning, environment and safety regulations, water use, electric energy forecasts, and oil tankers. (MCW)

  2. Improving Sanitation and Health in Rural Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David L.

    2013-01-01

    In rural Alaskan communities personal health is threatened by energy costs and limited access to clean water, wastewater management, and adequate nutrition. Fuel-­-based energy systems are significant factors in determining local accessibility to clean water, sanitation and food. Increasing fuel costs induce a scarcity of access and impact residents' health. The University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences (SNRAS), NASA's Ames Research Center, and USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) have joined forces to develop high-efficiency, low­-energy consuming techniques for water treatment and food production in rural circumpolar communities. Methods intended for exploration of space and establishment of settlements on the Moon or Mars will ultimately benefit Earth's communities in the circumpolar north. The initial phase of collaboration is completed. Researchers from NASA Ames Research Center and SNRAS, funded by the USDA­-ARS, tested a simple, reliable, low-energy sewage treatment system to recycle wastewater for use in food production and other reuse options in communities. The system extracted up to 70% of the water from sewage and rejected up to 92% of ions in the sewage with no carryover of toxic effects. Biological testing showed that plant growth using recovered water in the nutrient solution was equivalent to that using high-purity distilled water. With successful demonstration that the low energy consuming wastewater treatment system can provide safe water for communities and food production, the team is ready to move forward to a full-scale production testbed. The SNRAS/NASA team (including Alaska students) will design a prototype to match water processing rates and food production to meet rural community sanitation needs and nutritional preferences. This system would be operated in Fairbanks at the University of Alaska through SNRAS. Long­-term performance will be validated and operational needs of the

  3. Alaska's rare earth deposits and resource potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, James C.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2012-01-01

    Alaska’s known mineral endowment includes some of the largest and highest grade deposits of various metals, including gold, copper and zinc. Recently, Alaska has also been active in the worldwide search for sources of rare earth elements (REE) to replace exports now being limitedby China. Driven by limited supply of the rare earths, combined with their increasing use in new ‘green’ energy, lighting, transportation, and many other technological applications, the rare earth metals neodymium, europium and, in particular, the heavy rare earth elements terbium, dysprosium and yttrium are forecast to soon be in critical short supply (U.S. Department of Energy, 2010).

  4. Alaska-US gas line - design considerations for the Alaska segment of ANGTS (Alaska natural gas transportation system)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetland, N.

    1982-01-01

    In 1968, the largest single discovery of oil and natural gas ever found on the North American continent was made at Prudhoe Bay on the North Slope of Alaska. The Prudhoe Bay field contains over 26 tcf of recoverable natural gas, or ca 13% of the proven domestic gas reserves. To bring this natural gas to the market in the Lower 48 states, filings were made with the Federal Power Commission, the predecessor to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, to construct a pipeline transportation system. The gas pipeline project will initially transport ca 2 billion cu ft of gas daily, expandable to 3.2 billion cu ft/day with additional compressor stations. The total ANGTS comprises nearly 4,800 miles of pipeline with diameters ranging from 36 to 56 in., and initially ca 1.4 million hp will be installed to transport 2.0 billion cu ft/day. This presentation concentrates on the Alaska segment of the ANGTS.

  5. BC Alaska-Canada gas pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, K. [BP Canada Energy Company, Calgary, AB (Canada). BP Alaska Canada Gas Pipelines

    2006-07-01

    The Alaska natural gas pipeline project was discussed in relation to the Canadian oil and gas industry and pipeline infrastructure. Total project costs for the pipeline were estimated at approximately $20 billion. Options out of Alberta include increasing existing capacity to the west coast, as well as expanding pipeline capacity to supply midwest and east coast markets. Existing pipeline systems will be expanded, and a new pipeline from Alaska to Chicago has been proposed. The gas pipeline project is expected to be the largest private construction project in the history of North America, and will provide 6500 jobs in both the United States and Canada. Project challenges to date have included the development of relationships with Aboriginals and First Nations groups in Canada and the United States, as well as ensuring access to efficient, competitive market-based regulatory processes. Project risks to date have included capital and operating cost over-runs, regulatory and legal delays, completion risks, and commodity price risks. Stranded gas act processes were discussed, as well as fiscal contracts related to the legislative and public process. Elements of the fiscal contract were provided, as well as details of First Nations relationships and Crown consultation processes. tabs., figs.

  6. Global change and its implications for Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 1980s versions of climate models, the Arctic and Antarctic regions were considered crucial in understanding and predicting climate change, and there is also agreement that climate change will have large impacts in the Arctic since the climate signal is amplified at high latitudes. The earlier climate change scenarios are re-examined for the case of Alaska, in light of more recent information. Observational evidence in the Arctic over the last few decades agrees well with predictions of a current global climate model, including temperature increase over land masses of up to 1 degree C per decade in winter, with smaller changes in summer. Other indirect evidence of a warmer Arctic climate includes receding glaciers and warmer permafrost temperatures. It is predicted that after the CO2 content of the atmosphere doubles, winter temperatures in Alaska will increase 6-8 degree C. In much of the interior, mean annual temperature will rise above freezing, leading to disappearance of discontinuous permafrost. The growing season would be lengthened by about three weeks, vegetation types and the abundance and distribution of mammals will change, and there will be less sea ice along coastal areas. Impacts on human activities will be both adverse and favorable; for example, in the petroleum industry, maintenance of pipelines and roads will be more difficult but offshore exploration and marine supply operations will be made easier. 6 refs., 3 tabs

  7. Biogeochemistry of a treeline watershed, northwestern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stottlemyer, R.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1950, mean annual temperatures in northwestern Alaska have increased. Change in forest floor and soil temperature or moisture could alter N mineralization rates, production of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and organic nitrogen (DON), and their export to the aquatic ecosystem. In 1990, we began study of nutrient cycles in the 800-ha Asik watershed, located at treeline in the Noatak National Preserve, northwestern Alaska. This paper summarizes relationships between topographic aspect, soil temperature and moisture, inorganic and organic N pools, C pools, CO2 efflux, growing season net N mineralization rates, and stream water chemistry. Forest floor (O2) C/N ratios, C pools, temperature, and moisture were greater on south aspects. More rapid melt of the soil active layer (zone of annual freeze-thaw) and permafrost accounted for the higher moisture. The O2 C and N content were correlated with moisture, inorganic N pools, CO2 efflux, and inversely with temperature. Inorganic N pools were correlated with temperature and CO2 efflux. Net N mineralization rates were positive in early summer, and correlated with O2 moisture, temperature, and C and N pools. Net nitrification rates were inversely correlated with moisture, total C and N. The CO2 efflux increased with temperature and moisture, and was greater on south aspects. Stream ion concentrations declined and DOC increased with discharge. Stream inorganic nitrogen (DIN) output exceeded input by 70%. Alpine stream water nitrate (NO-3) and DOC concentrations indicated substantial contributions to the watershed DIN and DOC budgets.

  8. Financing Opportunities for Renewable Energy Development in Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardani, K.; Hillman, D.; Busche, S.

    2013-04-01

    This technical report provides an overview of existing and potential financing structures for renewable energy project development in Alaska with a focus on four primary sources of project funding: government financed or supported (the most commonly used structure in Alaska today), developer equity capital, commercial debt, and third-party tax-equity investment. While privately funded options currently have limited application in Alaska, their implementation is theoretically possible based on successful execution in similar circumstances elsewhere. This report concludes that while tax status is a key consideration in determining appropriate financing structure, there are opportunities for both taxable and tax-exempt entities to participate in renewable energy project development.

  9. 2013 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2013. Beginning with the 2013 AVO Summary of Events, the annual description of the AVO seismograph network and activity, once a stand-alone publication, is now part of this report. Because of this change, the annual summary now contains an expanded description of seismic activity at Alaskan volcanoes. Eruptions occurred at three volcanic centers in 2013: Pavlof Volcano in May and June, Mount Veniaminof Volcano in June through December, and Cleveland Volcano throughout the year. None of these three eruptive events resulted in 24-hour staffing at AVO facilities in Anchorage or Fairbanks.

  10. 2012 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Julie A.; Neal, Christina A.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Dixon, James P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, or suspected unrest at 11 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2012. Of the two verified eruptions, one (Cleveland) was clearly magmatic and the other (Kanaga) was most likely a single phreatic explosion. Two other volcanoes had notable seismic swarms that probably were caused by magmatic intrusions (Iliamna and Little Sitkin). For each period of clear volcanic unrest, AVO staff increased monitoring vigilance as needed, reviewed eruptive histories of the volcanoes in question to help evaluate likely outcomes, and shared observations and interpretations with the public. 2012 also was the 100th anniversary of Alaska’s Katmai-Novarupta eruption of 1912, the largest eruption on Earth in the 20th century and one of the most important volcanic eruptions in modern times. AVO marked this occasion with several public events.

  11. Timing of ore-related magmatism in the western Alaska Range, southwestern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ryan D.; Graham, Garth E.; Anderson, Eric D.; Selby, David

    2014-01-01

    This report presents isotopic age data from mineralized granitic plutons in an area of the Alaska Range located approximately 200 kilometers to the west-northwest of Anchorage in southwestern Alaska. Uranium-lead isotopic data and trace element concentrations of zircons were determined for 12 samples encompassing eight plutonic bodies ranging in age from approximately 76 to 57.4 millions of years ago (Ma). Additionally, a rhenium-osmium age of molybdenite from the Miss Molly molybdenum occurrence is reported (approx. 59 Ma). All of the granitic plutons in this study host gold-, copper-, and (or) molybdenum-rich prospects. These new ages modify previous interpretations regarding the age of magmatic activity and mineralization within the study area. The new ages show that the majority of the gold-quartz vein-hosting plutons examined in this study formed in the Late Cretaceous. Further work is necessary to establish the ages of ore-mineral deposition in these deposits.

  12. 50 CFR Table I to Part 36 - Summary Listing the National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska as established by the Alaska Lands Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Summary Listing the National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska as established by the Alaska Lands Act, Pub. L. 96-487, December 2, 1980 I Table I to... (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM ALASKA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGES Pt. 36, Table I Table I...

  13. 2009 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Girina, Olga A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, and reports of unusual activity at or near eight separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2009. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Redoubt Volcano, one of three active volcanoes on the western side of Cook Inlet and near south-central Alaska's population and commerce centers, which comprise about 62 percent of the State's population of 710,213 (2010 census). AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at ten volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  14. Sensor emplacement testing at Poker Flat, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, A.; Beaudoin, B. C.; Anderson, K. E.; Azevedo, S.; Carothers, L.; Love, M.; Miller, P. E.; Parker, T.; Pfeifer, M.; Slad, G.; Thomas, D.; Aderhold, K.

    2013-12-01

    PASSCAL provides equipment and support for temporary seismic projects. Speed and efficiency of deployments are essential. A revised emplacement technique of putting broadband sensors directly into soil (aka direct burial) is being tested. The first phase (fall 2011 to spring 2013) comparing data quality and sensor stability between the direct burial and the traditional 1 m deep temporary PASSCAL-style vault in a wet and noisy site near San Antonio, NM is complete. Results suggest there is little or no difference in sensor performance in the relatively high-noise environment of this initial test. The second phase was started in November 2012 with the goal of making the same comparison, but at Poker Flat, Alaska, in a low-noise, high-signal, cold and wet environment, alongside a Transportable Array (TA) deployment to be used as a performance control. This location is in an accessible and secure area with very low site noise. In addition to benefiting future worldwide PASSCAL deployments, the Poker Flat experiment serves a secondary purpose of testing modifications necessary to successfully deploy and recover broadband stations in a cold environment with the limited logistics anticipated for remote Flexible Array (FA) and PASSCAL Program deployments in Alaska. Developing emplacement techniques that maintain high data quality and data return while minimizing logistics is critical to enable principle investigators to effectively and efficiently co-locate within the future TA Alaska footprint. Three Nanometrics sensors were installed in November 2012 in power-augered holes 76 cm in depth: a Trillium Compact Posthole (PH) and two Trillium 120PH units (one standard PH and one enhanced PHQ). The installations took less than 8 hours in -30°C conditions with 4 hours of usable daylight. The Compact PH and the 120PHQ are delivering data in realtime, while the 120PH is testing standalone power and data collection systems. Preliminary results compare favorably to each other as

  15. Homer, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Homer, Alaska Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST is...

  16. Adak, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Adak, Alaska Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST is...

  17. Unalaska, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Unalaska, Alaska Forecast Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST is a...

  18. Port Alexander, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Port Alexander, Alaska Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST)...

  19. King Cove, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The King Cove, Alaska Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  20. Kodiak, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Kodiak, Alaska Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  1. Chignik, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Chignik, Alaska Forecast Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST is a...

  2. Nikolski, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Nikolski, Alaska Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  3. Shemya, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Shemya, Alaska Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  4. Craig, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Craig, Alaska Forecast Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST is a...

  5. Aerial Survey Units for Harbor Seals in Coastal Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerial surveys of coastal Alaska are the primary method for estimating abundance of harbor seals. A particular challenge associated with aerial surveys of harbor...

  6. State waterfowl conservation stamp/print programs considerations for Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An Alaska Waterfowl Conservation Stamp program has been proposed in several bills put before the legislature in 1983. The intent of this report is to present a...

  7. Cliff swallow populations in the southern Askinuk Mountains, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — During breeding season, cliff swallows are widely distributed throughout Alaska and North America south to Mexico, and they are locally common in western and...

  8. AFSC/REFM: Alaska groundfish AGEDATA database,1982 to present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AFSC AGEDATA database is a collection of historic and ongoing fish ageing efforts by the Alaska Fisheries Science Center's Age and Growth Program from 1982 to...

  9. Contaminants and sea ducks in Alaska and the Circumpolar region

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In this paper we review nesting sea duck population declines in Alaska during the last several decades and explore the possibility that contaminants may be...

  10. Urban contaminants project: Fish and Hood Creeks, Anchorage, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Urbanization has decreased water quality and adversely impacted biological communities in the lakes and streams of Anchorage, Alaska (Hock, 1981; Brabets, 1987;...

  11. The Trail Inventory of Alaska Maritime NWR [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  12. Southeast Alaska ESI: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for brown bears in Southeast Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent locations of bear concentrations....

  13. Seward, Alaska 1/3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1/3-second Seward Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1/3-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  14. Bald eagle nest survey, 1981, Amchitka Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A nesting survey for bald eagles Haliaeetus leucocephalus was conducted from May 29, 1981, on a portion of Amchitka Island, Aleutian Islands Unit, Alaska Maritime...

  15. North Slope, Alaska ESI: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for brown bears, caribou, and muskoxen for the North Slope, Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set...

  16. Southeast Alaska ESI: HABITATS (Habitat and Plant Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for seagrass habitats in Southeast Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent locations of seagrass...

  17. 100-Meter Resolution Natural Earth of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer contains a natural-earth image of Alaska. The image is land cover in natural colors combined with shaded relief, which produces a naturalistic...

  18. Aerial Images of Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain; 1974-1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is comprised of 10 aerial images of three different study areas on Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain flown by NASA in 1974, 1977, 1979 and obtained from...

  19. Observations of 1981 spring harvest of walrus, Diomede, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes Pacific walrus harvest data that was collected in 1981 in Diomede, Alaska. This year the marine mammal division of the Fish and Wildlife...

  20. Gravity Data for Southwestern Alaska (1294 records compiled)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (1294 records) were compiled by the Alaska Geological Survey and the U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California. This data base was...

  1. An assessment of the reindeer grazing issue in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Reindeer, a domestic relative of the caribou, were brought to Alaska in1892 from Siberia. The objective of this introduction was to provide an alternative food...

  2. Alaska Phocid Argos Telemetry Archive (2004-2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Polar Ecosystems Program conducts research and monitoring on phocid seals in the East Bering Sea, West Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska, Beaufort Sea, and Chukchi Sea...

  3. Alaska waterfowl production survey, 1966, July 14-24, 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the Waterfowl Production and Habitat Survey for Alaska during 1966. The primary purpose of the survey is to provide information on duck...

  4. Alaska map quadrangles at 1:250,000 scale

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Outlines of 1:250,000 scale map quadrangles in Alaska for use as a geographic reference within Google Earth or other software capable of interpreting KML, with...

  5. Ecology of Aleutian Canada geese at Buldir Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The only known breeding population of the endangered Aleutian Canada goose (Branta canadensis leucopareia) was studied from 1974 to 1977 at Buldir Island, Alaska....

  6. Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska ESI: VOLCANOS (Volcano Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains the locations of volcanos in Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. Vector points in the data set represent the location of the volcanos....

  7. AFSC/REFM: Alaska Saltwater Sport Fishing Charter Business Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project was to collect cost, earning, and employment information from the Alaska saltwater sport fishing charter business sector during the...

  8. AFSC/ABL: Ocean Acidification in Southeast Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database contains information from one primary project a Southeast Alaska (SEAK) environmental monitoring study. It also includes support analyses for Kodiak...

  9. Walrus study project, 1980 field collection report, Diomede, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes Pacific walrus harvest data that was collected in 1980 in Diomede, Alaska. Collection and analysis of specimen material from animals killed...

  10. Southeast Alaska ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for seals, porpoises, otters, and whales in coastal Southeast Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  11. AFSC/ABL: Nearshore Fish Atlas of Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Information on the distribution and relative abundance of nearshore fishes from beach seine hauls in Alaska is now available to managers as an online Fish Atlas....

  12. Southeast Alaska ESI: M_MAMPT (Marine Mammal Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for seals and sea lions in Southeast Alaska. Points in this data set represent locations of haulout and rookery...

  13. Western Alaska ESI: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for brown bears in Western Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent terrestrial mammal...

  14. Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for herring spawning areas in Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  15. Fall migration goose and swan observation in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper summarizes the observations of migratory geese and swan in Alaska during the fall of 1965. Whistling Swans, Canada Geese, Black Brant, Emperor Geese, and...

  16. Paleomagnetism of the Mesozoic in Alaska. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    Over 400 oriented cores of Permian, Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous sedimentary and igneous rocks were collected from 34 sites at 10 areas throughout southern Alaska. After magnetic cleaning in successively higher alternating fields 179 samples were considered to be stable and to give statistically consistent results within each site and age group. Due to the lack of a sufficient number of stable samples, the results from Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous rocks were inconclusive. The nine remaining Jurassic sites represent 100 samples from three general areas in southern Alaska. The southern Alaskan Jurassic paleomagnetic pole is significantly different from the North American Jurassic pole. This suggests that since the Jurassic, southern Alaska must have moved approximately 18 degrees north and rotated 52 degrees clockwise to reach its present position. Tectonic interpretation of these results give a possible explanation for many of the geologic features observed in southern Alaska.

  17. Outer Continental Shelf Lease Blocks - Alaska Region NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Outer Continental Shelf block outlines in ArcGIS shapefile format for the BOEM Alaska Region. OCS blocks are used to define small geographic...

  18. Arctic tern survey on Adak Island, Alaska, 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on an Arctic Tern survey on Adak Island in Alaska during 1987. Study area, methods and results are discussed. Pictures and data are also included.

  19. Alaska-Yukon sandhill crane survey data, 1957-1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sandhill cranes have been recorded on Alaska breeding pair surveys since 1957. Observations have been expanded for area only providing mean indexes of 2,200 for...

  20. Burning and browsing effects on willow growth in interior Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The dominant species in mature forests of interior Alaska is either white spruce (Picea glauca} or black spruce (P. mariana), with wood shrubs present at lower...

  1. 100-Meter Resolution Impervious Surface of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer contains impervious surface data for Alaska, in an Albers Equal-Area Conic projection and at a resolution of 100 meters. The impervious surface data...

  2. Seismic Lines in National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska, NPR-A

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is a part of U.S. Geological Survey Central Region Energy Resources Team National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska, Legacy Data Archive. The National...

  3. The swans and geese of Alaska's arctic slope

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A mid-summer aerial search was made on the 23,000 square miles of waterfowl habitat on Alaska's Arctic slope. Observations included 159 whistling swan (Olor...

  4. Western Alaska ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for seals, whales, dolphins, walruses, and Steller sea lions in Western Alaska. Vector polygons in this...

  5. Geothermal energy in Alaska: site data base and development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markle, D.R.

    1979-04-01

    The various factors affecting geothermal resource development are summarized for Alaska including: resource data base, geological description, reservoir characteristics, environmental character, base and development status, institutional factors, economics, population and market, and development potential. (MHR)

  6. Reindeer and seabird survey of Hagemeister Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes the survey effort on Hagemeister Island in the Alaska Maritime NWR. Hagemeister Island is the second largest Bering Sea Island. Reindeer, red...

  7. Seward, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Seward, Alaska Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  8. Sand Point, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sand Point, Alaska Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  9. Atka, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Atka, Alaska Forecast Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST is a...

  10. Elfin Cove, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Elfin Cove, Alaska Forecast Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST is...

  11. AFSC/REFM: Atka mackerel Tagging Studies, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — From 1999-2015, approximately 130,000 Atka mackerel have been tagged and released in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska, specifically at Seguam Pass, Tanaga Pass,...

  12. North Slope, Alaska ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for whales, seals, walruses, and polar bears for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector polygons in this data...

  13. Goose banding, Koyukuk and north slope Alaska, 1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Goose drive trapping and banding was successfully conducted in the Galena and North Slope areas of Alaska in 1978. This was the fourth year of a five consecutive...

  14. Lidar data for the community of Golovin, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This publication presents lidar data collected over the community of Golovin, on the southern coast of the Seward Peninsula in western Alaska (fig. 1). The original...

  15. Avian Point Transect Survey; Seward Peninsula, Alaska, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data product contains avian point-transect survey data and habitat data collected on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, USA, during 21 May – 10 June 2012. We...

  16. Alaska Gravity Data per 2 x 4 min Cell (96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' gravity density grid for Alaska displays the distribution of about 1.1 million terrestrial and marine gravity data held in the National Geodetic Survey...

  17. 100-Meter Resolution Tree Canopy of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer contains tree canopy data for Alaska, in an Albers Equal-Area Conic projection and at a resolution of 100 meters. The tree canopy data were derived...

  18. Notes on village economies and wildlife utilization in arctic Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Visits were made to 12 Eskimo villages in Arctic Alaska during the spring of 1954. At each settlement information was collected regarding the economy and the...

  19. Cordova, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Cordova, Alaska Forecast Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST is a...

  20. Sitka, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sitka, Alaska Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST is...

  1. Breeding ground survey, Alaska, May 18 to June 11, 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the results of a breeding ground survey in Alaska during the 1965 breeding season. This year 206 of the 214, 16 mile transects laid out for...

  2. Alaska Steller sea lion Count Database (Non-pups)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database contains counts of adult and juvenile (non-pup) Steller sea lions on rookeries and haulouts in Alaska made between 1904 and 2015. Non-pup counts have...

  3. Snowshoe hare pellet counts: Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge, eastern Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Snowshoe hares Lepus americanus are a keystone herbivore in the boreal forests of Canada and Alaska, and are cyclical over an approximately 8 to 11 year period....

  4. Avian populations and habitat use in interior Alaska taiga

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Avian community structure, habitat occupancy levels, and species habitat use patterns were examined in the woody habitats of interior Alaska taiga. Some birds...

  5. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture radar studies of Alaska volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong; Wicks, Charles W., Jr.; Dzurisin, Daniel; Power, John A.; Thatcher, Wayne R.; Masterlark, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    In this article, we summarize our recent InSAR studies of 13 Alaska volcanoes, including New Trident, Okmok, Akutan, Kiska, Augustine, Westdahl, Peulik, Makushin, Seguam, Shishaldin, Pavlof, Cleveland, and Korovin volcanoes.

  6. Assessment of lead sources for waterfowl in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Exposure to detrimental concentrations of lead has been documented in waterfowl in Alaska. In spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri) and long-tailed ducks (Clangula...

  7. Mineral exploration and development in Alaska, 1977-1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the mineral exploration and development in Alaska during 19771978. This report covers land ownership and acreages stakes under mining claims,...

  8. Northern fur seal pup weights, Pribilof Islands, Alaska, 1957-present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database contains northern fur seal pup mass and length data by date, island, rookery and sex on the Pribilof Islands, Alaska, collected between 1957-2012....

  9. The higher fungi of Amchitka and Adak Islands, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fruiting body collections of higher fungi, basidiomycetes and ascomycetes, were made during a twelve day field study on two of Alaska's Aleutian Islands, Amchitka...

  10. 2011 Alaska Matanuska and Susitna Boroughs Lidar Point Clouds

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Matanuska Susitna Borough LiDAR/Imagery Project covers 3680 sq/mi of the Matanuska-Susitna Borough in Alaska. Project parnters and funding sources include:...

  11. St. Lazaria Island Alaska Maritime NWR military contaminants investigations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — St. Lazaria Island, part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, has over 540,000 burrow nesting Leach's and fork-tailed storm-petrels (Oceanodroma...

  12. Annual report, Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands areas, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Commercial fishery and other FWS service activities, 1959, Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands, including Stream Guard program, and extensive statistics.

  13. Climate change and health effects in Northwest Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Brubaker, Michael; Berner, James; Chavan, Raj; Warren, John

    2011-01-01

    This article provides examples of adverse health effects, including weather-related injury, food insecurity, mental health issues, and water infrastructure damage, and the responses to these effects that are currently being applied in two Northwest Alaska communities. Background: In Northwest Alaska, warming is resulting in a broad range of unusual weather and environmental conditions, including delayed freeze-up, earlier breakup, storm surge, coastal erosion, and thawing permafrost. These ar...

  14. Habitat correlates of wintering sea duck occurrence in southeast Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Gunn, Theodora

    2009-01-01

    Southeast Alaska provides non-breeding habitat for >300,000 sea ducks, however little is known about habitat features that may influence their distribution within this area. We used an autologistic regression model to examine relationships between 10 species of sea ducks that winter in southeast Alaska [harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus), red breasted merganser (Mergus serrator), common merganser (Mergus merganser), bufflehead (Bucephala albeola), Barrow’s goldeneye (Bucephala isla...

  15. Demographic characteristics of molting black brant near Teshekpuk Lake, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, K.S.; Derksen, D.V.

    1996-01-01

    Molting Brant in the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area (TLSA) on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska were studied from 1987 to 1992 using capture-mark-recapture techniques to determine origin, age and sex composition, return rates and site fidelity. Brant originated from 10 nesting colonies in Canada and Alaska. The captured birds were 76% adults and 57% males. Ninety-one percent of known-age recaptures were

  16. Coal database for Cook Inlet and North Slope, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Gary D.; Spear, Brianne D.; Sprowl, Jennifer M.; Dietrich, John D.; McCauley, Michael I.; Kinney, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    This database is a compilation of published and nonconfidential unpublished coal data from Alaska. Although coal occurs in isolated areas throughout Alaska, this study includes data only from the Cook Inlet and North Slope areas. The data include entries from and interpretations of oil and gas well logs, coal-core geophysical logs (such as density, gamma, and resistivity), seismic shot hole lithology descriptions, measured coal sections, and isolated coal outcrops.

  17. First Record of Diamondback Moth (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) from Interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Populations of Plutella xylostella, the diamondback moth, and subsequent crop damage was detected during 2005 at three locations in interior Alaska (64°50’22N, 148°07’52W; 64°51’22N, 147°51’04W; 64°42’01N, 148°51’42W). This represents the first record of diamondback moth in interior Alaska. Due to...

  18. Understanding Energy Code Acceptance within the Alaska Building Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mapes, Terry S.

    2012-02-14

    This document presents the technical assistance provided to the Alaska Home Financing Corporation on behalf of PNNL regarding the assessment of attitudes toward energy codes within the building community in Alaska. It includes a summary of the existing situation and specific assistance requested by AHFC, the results of a questionnaire designed for builders surveyed in a suburban area of Anchorage, interviews with a lender, a building official, and a research specialist, and recommendations for future action by AHFC.

  19. Development of the Alaska Chadux Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alaska Chadux Corporation is a primary response contractor providing oil spill services to a diverse group of member companies engaged in handling crude oil in Alaskan waters, especially in the Dutch Harbor, Cook Inlet and Kodiak, and Prince William Sound area. The corporation is also involved in the development of an in-house operations manual, development of response and operational policies addressing ISO 9000 and ISO 14000 guidelines and training and strategic development of response capabilities. This paper describes the processes used by Chadux to address the needs of the Corporation's expanding membership, the concerns of regulatory agencies and operational response to the many remote and environmentally sensitive areas of an expanding geographic area. 4 refs

  20. Alaska Arctic marine fish ecology catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The marine fishes in waters of the United States north of the Bering Strait have received new and increased scientific attention over the past decade (2005–15) in conjunction with frontier qualities of the region and societal concerns about the effects of Arctic climate change. Commercial fisheries are negligible in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, but many marine species have important traditional and cultural values to Alaska Native residents. Although baseline conditions are rapidly changing, effective decisions about research and monitoring investments must be based on reliable information and plausible future scenarios. For the first time, this synthesis presents a comprehensive evaluation of the marine fish fauna from both seas in a single reference. Although many unknowns and uncertainties remain in the scientific understanding, information presented here is foundational with respect to understanding marine ecosystems and addressing dual missions of the U.S. Department of the Interior for energy development and resource conservation. 

  1. Southwest Alaska Regional Geothermal Energy Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdmann, Gwen [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    2015-04-30

    The village of Elim, Alaska is 96 miles west of Nome, on the Seward Peninsula. The Darby Mountains north of the village are rich with hydrothermal systems associated with the Darby granitic pluton(s). In addition to the hot springs that have been recorded and studied over the last 100 years, additional hot springs exist. They are known through a rich oral history of the region, though they are not labeled on geothermal maps. This research primarily focused on Kwiniuk Hot Springs, Clear Creek Hot Springs and Molly’s Hot Springs. The highest recorded surface temperatures of these resources exist at Clear Creek Hot Springs (67°C). Repeated water sampling of the resources shows that maximum temperatures at all of the systems are below boiling.

  2. Major disruption of D″ beneath Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Daoyuan; Helmberger, Don; Miller, Meghan S.; Jackson, Jennifer M.

    2016-05-01

    D″ represents one of the most dramatic thermal and compositional layers within our planet. In particular, global tomographic models display relatively fast patches at the base of the mantle along the circum-Pacific which are generally attributed to slab debris. Such distinct patches interact with the bridgmanite (Br) to post-bridgmanite (PBr) phase boundary to generate particularly strong heterogeneity at their edges. Most seismic observations for the D″ come from the lower mantle S wave triplication (Scd). Here we exploit the USArray waveform data to examine one of these sharp transitions in structure beneath Alaska. From west to east beneath Alaska, we observed three different characteristics in D″: (1) the western region with a strong Scd, requiring a sharp δVs = 2.5% increase; (2) the middle region with no clear Scd phases, indicating a lack of D″ (or thin Br-PBr layer); and (3) the eastern region with strong Scd phase, requiring a gradient increase in δVs. To explain such strong lateral variation in the velocity structure, chemical variations must be involved. We suggest that the western region represents relatively normal mantle. In contrast, the eastern region is influenced by a relic slab that has subducted down to the lowermost mantle. In the middle region, we infer an upwelling structure that disrupts the Br-PBr phase boundary. Such an interpretation is based upon a distinct pattern of travel time delays, waveform distortions, and amplitude patterns that reveal a circular-shaped anomaly about 5° across which can be modeled synthetically as a plume-like structure rising about 400 km high with a shear velocity reduction of ~5%, similar to geodynamic modeling predictions of upwellings.

  3. Engaging Elements of Cancer-Related Digital Stories in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Melany; Kuhnley, Regina; Revels, Laura; Schoenberg, Nancy E; Lanier, Anne; Dignan, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The tradition of storytelling is an integral part of Alaska Native cultures that continues to be a way of passing on knowledge. Using a story-based approach to share cancer education is grounded in Alaska Native traditions and people's experiences and has the potential to positively impact cancer knowledge, understandings, and wellness choices. Community health workers (CHWs) in Alaska created a personal digital story as part of a 5-day, in-person cancer education course. To identify engaging elements of digital stories among Alaska Native people, one focus group was held in each of three different Alaska communities with a total of 29 adult participants. After viewing CHWs' digital stories created during CHW cancer education courses, focus group participants commented verbally and in writing about cultural relevance, engaging elements, information learned, and intent to change health behavior. Digital stories were described by Alaska focus group participants as being culturally respectful, informational, inspiring, and motivational. Viewers shared that they liked digital stories because they were short (only 2-3 min); nondirective and not preachy; emotional, told as a personal story and not just facts and figures; and relevant, using photos that showed Alaskan places and people. PMID:25865400

  4. Discovering unique tobacco use patterns among Alaska Native people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Dilley

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . Alaska Native people are disproportionately impacted by tobacco-related diseases in comparison to non-Native Alaskans. Design. We used Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS to describe tobacco use among more than 4,100 Alaska Native adults, stratified by geographic region and demographic groups. Results . Overall tobacco use was high: approximately 2 out of every 5 Alaska Native adults reported smoking cigarettes (41.2% and 1 in 10 reported using smokeless tobacco (SLT, 12.3%. A small percentage overall (4.8% reported using iq'mik, an SLT variant unique to Alaska Native people. When examined by geographic region, cigarette smoking was highest in remote geographic regions; SLT use was highest in the southwest region of the state. Use of iq'mik was primarily confined to a specific area of the state; further analysis showed that 1 in 3 women currently used iq'mik in this region. Conclusion . Our results suggest that different types of tobacco use are epidemic among diverse Alaska Native communities. Our results also illustrate that detailed analysis within racial/ethnic groups can be useful for public health programme planning to reduce health disparities.

  5. Exploring Alaska's Seamounts on RV Atlantis in North Pacific Ocean and Gulf of Alaska between 20040730 and 20040823

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Five seamounts (Denson, Dickins, Pratt, Welker and Giacomini) in the Gulf of Alaska that had not previously been observed by manned submersible or ROV were...

  6. Alaska Science Center: Providing Timely, Relevant, and Impartial Study of the Landscape, Natural Resources, and Natural Hazards for Alaska and Our Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    USGS Alaska Science Center

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Nation's largest water, earth, and biological science and civilian mapping agency, has studied the natural features of Alaska since its earliest geologic expeditions in the 1800s. The USGS Alaska Science Center (ASC), with headquarters in Anchorage, Alaska, studies the complex natural science phenomena of Alaska to provide scientific products and results to a wide variety of partners. The complexity of Alaska's unique landscapes and ecosystems requires USGS expertise from many science disciplines to conduct thorough, integrated research.

  7. 1996 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    During 1996, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity, anomalous seismicity, or suspected volcanic activity at 10 of the approximately 40 active volcanic centers in the state of Alaska. As part of a formal role in KVERT (the Kamchatkan Volcano Eruption Response Team), AVO staff also disseminated information about eruptions and other volcanic unrest at six volcanic centers on the Kamchatka Peninsula and in the Kurile Islands, Russia.

  8. 2010 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Herrick, Julie; Girina, O.A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at 12 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2010. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash emissions from long-active Cleveland volcano in the Aleutian Islands. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of an ongoing collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  9. Uric Acid, Hypertension, and CKD among Alaska Eskimos—the Genetics of Coronary Artery Disease in Alaska Natives (GOCADAN) Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jolly, Stacey E.; Mete, Mihriye; Wang, Hong; Zhu, Jianhui; Ebbesson, Sven O. E.; Voruganti, V. Saroja; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Howard, Barbara V.; Umans, Jason G.

    2012-01-01

    It is unknown what role uric acid may play in the increasing cardiovascular disease (CVD) among Alaska Eskimos. Uric acid is associated with both hypertension (HTN) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). We analyzed 1078 Genetics of Coronary Artery Disease in Alaska Natives (GOCADAN) participants. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated from serum creatinine measures using the MDRD equation. CKD was defined by an eGFR of

  10. Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB) - Geochemical Data for Rock, Sediment, Soil, Mineral, and Concentrate Sample Media

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB) was created and designed to compile and integrate geochemical data from Alaska in order to facilitate geologic mapping,...

  11. USGS Small-scale Dataset - Satellite View of Alaska 200605 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Alaska map layer is a 200-meter-resolution simulated-natural-color image of Alaska. Vegetation is generally green, with darker greens...

  12. USGS Small-scale Dataset - Satellite View of Alaska, with Shaded Relief 200605 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Alaska, with Shaded Relief map layer is a 200- meter-resolution simulated-natural-color image of Alaska. Vegetation is generally green, with...

  13. AFSC/REFM: Community Profiles for North Pacific Fisheries, Alaska 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2005, the Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC) compiled baseline socioeconomic information about 136 Alaska communities most involved in commercial fisheries....

  14. Alaska Steller Sea Lion and Northern Fur Seal Argos Telemetry Data Archive

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Alaska Ecosystems Program of the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center National Marine Mammal Laboratory conducts research and monitoring on Steller sea lions...

  15. FastStats: Health of American Indian or Alaska Native Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Health of American Indian or Alaska Native Population Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Health, United States, trend tables with data for American Indian or Alaska Native population Tables of Summary Health ...

  16. 76 FR 58263 - Kenai Pipe Line Company; Tesoro Alaska Company; Tesoro Logistics Operations, LLC; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Kenai Pipe Line Company; Tesoro Alaska Company; Tesoro Logistics Operations... Company (Tesoro Alaska), and Tesoro Logistics, LLC (TLO) (collectively, Tesoro) filed a Request...

  17. Grayscale Alaska Shaded Relief ? 200-Meter Resolution, Albers projection - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The grayscale Alaska shaded relief data were derived from National Elevation Dataset (NED) data, and show the terrain of Alaska at a resolution of 200 meters. The...

  18. Color Alaska Shaded Relief ? 200-Meter Resolution, Albers projection - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The color Alaska shaded relief data were derived from National Elevation Dataset (NED) data, and show the terrain of Alaska at a resolution of 200 meters. The NED...

  19. Alaska Program Point and Line Feature GIS Data from COMIDA, ANIMIDA and cANIMIDA Programs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — Alaska Program Map Service contains point and line features from the following BOEM Alaska Region environmental monitoring programs: Chukchi Sea Offshore Monitoring...

  20. A five-year plan for the management and development of the Alaska fisheries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This 5-year management program of the Alaska fisheries combines the ideas of the field men and administrators of the Division of Alaska Fisheries. Requirements for...

  1. Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Alaska Maritime NWR (including the Alaska Peninsula Unit, the Aleutian Islands Unit, the Bering Sea Unit, the Chukchi Sea Unit, and...

  2. 100-Meter Resolution Satellite View with Shaded Relief of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View with Shaded Relief of Alaska map layer is a 100-meter resolution simulated natural-color image of Alaska, with relief shading added to accentuate...

  3. USGS Small-scale Dataset - Grayscale Alaska Shaded Relief - 200-Meter Resolution 200509 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The grayscale Alaska shaded relief data were derived from National Elevation Dataset (NED) data, and show the terrain of Alaska at a resolution of 200 meters. The...

  4. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 100-Meter Resolution Satellite View of Alaska 201304 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Alaska map layer is a 100-meter resolution simulated natural-color image of Alaska. Vegetation is generally green, with forests in darker...

  5. NWS Alaska Sea Ice Program: Operations and Decision Support Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreck, M. B.; Nelson, J. A., Jr.; Heim, R.

    2015-12-01

    The National Weather Service's Alaska Sea Ice Program is designed to service customers and partners operating and planning operations within Alaska waters. The Alaska Sea Ice Program offers daily sea ice and sea surface temperature analysis products. The program also delivers a five day sea ice forecast 3 times each week, provides a 3 month sea ice outlook at the end of each month, and has staff available to respond to sea ice related information inquiries. These analysis and forecast products are utilized by many entities around the state of Alaska and nationally for safety of navigation and community strategic planning. The list of current customers stem from academia and research institutions, to local state and federal agencies, to resupply barges, to coastal subsistence hunters, to gold dredgers, to fisheries, to the general public. Due to a longer sea ice free season over recent years, activity in the waters around Alaska has increased. This has led to a rise in decision support services from the Alaska Sea Ice Program. The ASIP is in constant contact with the National Ice Center as well as the United States Coast Guard (USCG) for safety of navigation. In the past, the ASIP provided briefings to the USCG when in support of search and rescue efforts. Currently, not only does that support remain, but our team is also briefing on sea ice outlooks into the next few months. As traffic in the Arctic increases, the ASIP will be called upon to provide more and more services on varying time scales to meet customer needs. This talk will address the many facets of the current Alaska Sea Ice Program as well as delve into what we see as the future of the ASIP.

  6. Reconstruction of recent climate change in Alaska from the Aurora Peak ice core, central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, A.; Matoba, S.; Shiraiwa, T.; Okamoto, S.; Sasaki, H.; Solie, D. J.; Yoshikawa, K.

    2015-02-01

    A 180.17 m ice core was drilled at Aurora Peak in the central part of the Alaska Range, Alaska, in 2008 to allow reconstruction of centennial-scale climate change in the northern North Pacific. The 10 m depth temperature in the borehole was -2.2 °C, which corresponded to the annual mean air temperature at the drilling site. In this ice core, there were many melt-refreeze layers due to high temperature and/or strong insolation during summer seasons. We analyzed stable hydrogen isotopes (δD) and chemical species in the ice core. The ice core age was determined by annual counts of δD and seasonal cycles of Na+, and we used reference horizons of tritium peaks in 1963 and 1964, major volcanic eruptions of Mount Spurr in 1992 and Mount Katmai in 1912, and a large forest fire in 2004 as age controls. Here, we show that the chronology of the Aurora Peak ice core from 95.61 m to the top corresponds to the period from 1900 to the summer season of 2008, with a dating error of ± 3 years. We estimated that the mean accumulation rate from 1997 to 2007 (except for 2004) was 2.04 m w.eq. yr-1. Our results suggest that temporal variations in δD and annual accumulation rates are strongly related to shifts in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation index (PDOI). The remarkable increase in annual precipitation since the 1970s has likely been the result of enhanced storm activity associated with shifts in the PDOI during winter in the Gulf of Alaska.

  7. 25 CFR 142.8 - Is economy of operation a requirement for the Alaska Resupply Operation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Is economy of operation a requirement for the Alaska... FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES ALASKA RESUPPLY OPERATION § 142.8 Is economy of operation a requirement for the Alaska..., or cooperative arrangements. Whenever possible joint arrangements for economy will be entered...

  8. 76 FR 33314 - Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and Urban Indian Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and... American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and Urban Indian Communities Announcement Type: New. Funding... Centers serving American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) Tribes and urban Indian communities. This program...

  9. 14 CFR 91.323 - Increased maximum certificated weights for certain airplanes operated in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Civil Air Regulations (14 CFR part 4a, 1964 ed.) if that airplane is operated in the State of Alaska by... certain airplanes operated in Alaska. 91.323 Section 91.323 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... certain airplanes operated in Alaska. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of the Federal...

  10. 76 FR 45253 - Public Water Supply Supervision Program; Program Revision for the State of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... AGENCY Public Water Supply Supervision Program; Program Revision for the State of Alaska AGENCY... State of Alaska has revised its approved State Public Water Supply Supervision Primacy Program. Alaska has adopted regulations analogous to the EPA's Ground Water Rule. The EPA has determined that...

  11. 30 CFR 902.20 - Approval of Alaska abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... available at: (a) Department of Natural Resources, Division of Mining and Water Management, 3601 C Street... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Alaska abandoned mine land... § 902.20 Approval of Alaska abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Alaska Reclamation Plan,...

  12. 7 CFR 318.13-21 - Avocados from Hawaii to Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Avocados from Hawaii to Alaska. 318.13-21 Section 318... Articles From Hawaii and the Territories § 318.13-21 Avocados from Hawaii to Alaska. Avocados may be moved... marking requirements. The avocados may be moved interstate for distribution in Alaska only, the boxes...

  13. 50 CFR Table 10 to Part 679 - Gulf of Alaska Retainable Percentages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gulf of Alaska Retainable Percentages 10 Table 10 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 10 Table 10 to Part 679—Gulf of Alaska Retainable Percentages ER30NO09.002...

  14. 50 CFR Table 26 to Part 679 - Gulf of Alaska Coral Habitat Protection Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gulf of Alaska Coral Habitat Protection Areas 26 Table 26 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 26 Table 26 to Part 679—Gulf of Alaska Coral Habitat...

  15. 50 CFR Table 27 to Part 679 - Gulf of Alaska Slope Habitat Conservation Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gulf of Alaska Slope Habitat Conservation Areas 27 Table 27 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 27 Table 27 to Part 679—Gulf of Alaska Slope Habitat...

  16. Sobriety and alcohol use among rural Alaska Native elders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica C. Skewes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although notable health disparities related to alcohol use persist among Alaska Native people living in rural communities, there is a paucity of research examining drinking behaviour in particular segments of this population, including elders. One explanation for this is the distrust of behavioural health research in general and alcohol research in particular following the legacy of the Barrow Alcohol Study, still regarded as a notable example of ethics violations in cross-cultural research. Objective: The present study reports findings from one of the first research studies asking directly about alcohol abuse among rural Alaska Natives (AN since the study in Barrow took place in 1979. Design: We report findings regarding self-reported alcohol use included in an elder needs assessment conducted with 134 Alaska Native elders from 5 rural villages off the road system in Alaska. Data were collected in partnership between academic researchers and community members in accordance with the principles of Community-Based Participatory Research. Results: Findings showed very high rates of sobriety and low rates of alcohol use, contradicting stereotypes of widespread alcohol abuse among AN. Possible explanations and future research directions are discussed. Conclusions: This research represents one step forward in mending academic–community relationships in rural Alaska to further research on alcohol use and related health disparities.

  17. Sobriety and alcohol use among rural Alaska Native elders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skewes, Monica C.; Lewis, Jordan P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although notable health disparities related to alcohol use persist among Alaska Native people living in rural communities, there is a paucity of research examining drinking behaviour in particular segments of this population, including elders. One explanation for this is the distrust of behavioural health research in general and alcohol research in particular following the legacy of the Barrow Alcohol Study, still regarded as a notable example of ethics violations in cross-cultural research. Objective The present study reports findings from one of the first research studies asking directly about alcohol abuse among rural Alaska Natives (AN) since the study in Barrow took place in 1979. Design We report findings regarding self-reported alcohol use included in an elder needs assessment conducted with 134 Alaska Native elders from 5 rural villages off the road system in Alaska. Data were collected in partnership between academic researchers and community members in accordance with the principles of Community-Based Participatory Research. Results Findings showed very high rates of sobriety and low rates of alcohol use, contradicting stereotypes of widespread alcohol abuse among AN. Possible explanations and future research directions are discussed. Conclusions This research represents one step forward in mending academic–community relationships in rural Alaska to further research on alcohol use and related health disparities. PMID:26850112

  18. 2006 Compilation of Alaska Gravity Data and Historical Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltus, Richard W.; Brown, Philip J., II; Morin, Robert L.; Hill, Patricia L.

    2008-01-01

    Gravity anomalies provide fundamental geophysical information about Earth structure and dynamics. To increase geologic and geodynamic understanding of Alaska, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected and processed Alaska gravity data for the past 50 years. This report introduces and describes an integrated, State-wide gravity database and provides accompanying gravity calculation tools to assist in its application. Additional information includes gravity base station descriptions and digital scans of historical USGS reports. The gravity calculation tools enable the user to reduce new gravity data in a consistent manner for combination with the existing database. This database has sufficient resolution to define the regional gravity anomalies of Alaska. Interpretation of regional gravity anomalies in parts of the State are hampered by the lack of local isostatic compensation in both southern and northern Alaska. However, when filtered appropriately, the Alaska gravity data show regional features having geologic significance. These features include gravity lows caused by low-density rocks of Cenozoic basins, flysch belts, and felsic intrusions, as well as many gravity highs associated with high-density mafic and ultramafic complexes.

  19. Local sources of pollution and their impacts in Alaska (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molders, N.

    2013-12-01

    The movie 'Into the Wilde' evoke the impression of the last frontier in a great wide and pristine land. With over half a million people living in Alaska an area as larger as the distance from the US West to the East Coast, this idea comes naturally. The three major cities are the main emission source in an otherwise relative clean atmosphere. On the North Slope oil drilling and production is the main anthropogenic emission sources. Along Alaska's coasts ship traffic including cruises is another anthropogenic emission source that is expected to increase as sea-ice recedes. In summer, wildfires in Alaska, Canada and/or Siberia may cause poor air quality. In winter inversions may lead poor air quality and in spring. In spring, aged polluted air is often advected into Alaska. These different emission sources yield quite different atmospheric composition and air quality impacts. While this may make understanding Alaska's atmospheric composition at-large a challenging task, it also provides great opportunities to examine impacts without co-founders. The talk will give a review of the performed research, and insight into the challenges.

  20. Alaska Gas: future options for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An examination of industry trends indicate a growth in the proportion of the gas component in the worldwide production of the three primary energy sources of coal, oil and natural gas. BP, as one of the leading North American producers of natural gas, is well positioned in all of the most attractive basins for growth in market share, and to maintain an aggressive leadership position in terms of price competition. BP's Alaska holdings and operations are outlined, including its gas-to-liquid technology facility, construction of which is scheduled to start in 2002. Development of Alaskan LNG in consortium with Phillips, Foothills and Marubeni, which is premised on the assumption of exporting the LNG to the Far East, is also reviewed. The project is expected to cost between five and six billion dollars, not including ships to transport the product. Construction of a gas pipeline to the lower 48 states to gain access to the extensive North American grid is also under study. Three routes are being considered; construction will employ high-strength steel, automated welding, improved pipeline monitoring, advanced computer control and instrumentation, advanced protective coating and operation at high pressures in excess of 2,500 psig. Current cost estimates range from six to ten billion dollars. The pipeline route through Canada seems to hold the most promise at this time. BP's position regarding construction of the pipeline should be finalized in 2001

  1. Amchitka Island, Alaska, special sampling project 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-06-28

    This 1997 special sampling project represents a special radiobiological sampling effort to augment the 1996 Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program (LTHMP) for Amchitka Island in Alaska. Lying in the western portion of the Aleutian Islands arc, near the International Date Line, Amchitka Island is one of the southernmost islands of the Rat Island Chain. Between 1965 and 1971, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission conducted three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka Island. In 1996, Greenpeace collected biota samples and speculated that several long-lived, man-made radionuclides detected (i.e., americium-241, plutonium-239 and -240, beryllium-7, and cesium-137) leaked into the surface environment from underground cavities created during the testing. The nuclides of interest are detected at extremely low concentrations throughout the environment. The objectives of this special sampling project were to scientifically refute the Greenpeace conclusions that the underground cavities were leaking contaminants to the surface. This was achieved by first confirming the presence of these radionuclides in the Amchitka Island surface environment and, second, if the radionuclides were present, determining if the source is the underground cavity or worldwide fallout. This special sampling and analysis determined that the only nonfallout-related radionuclide detected was a low level of tritium from the Long Shot test, which had been previously documented. The tritium contamination is monitored and continues a decreasing trend due to radioactive decay and dilution.

  2. Tropospheric nitrogen oxide measurements at Barrow, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen oxides play a critical role in the chemistry of the atmosphere and indirectly influence global warming through the production of ozone. At Barrow, Alaska, the NOAA long-term surface ozone record indicates an increase of about 2% per year during the summer months. Since NOx (NO+NO2) concentrations above about 30 ppt (parts per trillion) result in net ozone production in the presence of sunlight, the authors propose that the observed Barrow surface ozone increase is related to anthropogenic nitrogen oxide emissions. A high-sensitivity chemiluminescent instrument for measurements of nitrogen oxides has been built to test this hypothesis. Measurement campaigns have been conducted during summer 1988 and spring 1989, and are continuing during spring and summer 1990. Periods during which the NOV concentrations measured at the GMCC site were unaffected by local (Barrow) emissions were selected from the data record. Observations during these periods suggest that nitrogen oxide concentrations are, at times, very elevated at Barrow and sufficient to account for photochemical O3 production. Based on simultaneous collection of meteorological, sulfur, and NOy data, several sources of nitrogen oxides have been tentatively identified at Barrow. These include (1) long-range transport of pollution from Eurasia; (2) Prudhoe Bay NOx emissions; and (3) soil emissions

  3. 76 FR 37763 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod Allocations in the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod Allocations in the Gulf of Alaska; Amendment 83 AGENCY: National... the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) to NMFS for review. If approved, Amendment 83 would establish Pacific cod allocations in the Central and Western Gulf of Alaska regulatory areas among various sectors and...

  4. 76 FR 11394 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the A season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  5. 78 FR 57097 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the C season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  6. 77 FR 14698 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the B season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  7. 76 FR 53658 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the C season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  8. 78 FR 17135 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the B season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  9. 75 FR 64958 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 of the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 of the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... Statistical Area 630 of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) for 72 hours. This action is necessary to fully use the 2010... Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under authority of...

  10. 76 FR 58156 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the C season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  11. 78 FR 8985 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the A season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  12. 78 FR 15643 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the B season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  13. 77 FR 65330 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... Statistical Area 620 of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to fully use the 2012 total... the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North...

  14. 78 FR 63899 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... Statistical Area 630 of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to fully use the 2013 total... the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North...

  15. 77 FR 12505 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the A season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  16. 76 FR 13097 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... Statistical Area 630 of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to fully use the A season allowance... Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under authority of...

  17. 77 FR 64762 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the 2012 total allowable... exclusive economic zone according to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska...

  18. 75 FR 14359 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... Statistical Area 630 of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) for 72 hours. This action is necessary to fully use the B... zone according to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared...

  19. 78 FR 11789 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the A season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  20. 75 FR 57702 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 of the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 of the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... Statistical Area 630 of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to fully use the C season allowance... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  1. 75 FR 19562 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the B season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  2. 77 FR 20317 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ... (77 FR 15194, March 14, 2012). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(a)(5)(iv)(B), the Administrator, Alaska... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the B season allowance...

  3. 76 FR 14319 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the B season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  4. 75 FR 6589 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the A season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  5. 78 FR 63405 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... Statistical Area 620 of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to fully use the 2013 total... the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North...

  6. 77 FR 58505 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the C season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  7. 77 FR 16481 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the B season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  8. 77 FR 9588 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... Statistical Area 630 of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to fully use the A season allowance... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  9. 77 FR 56564 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the C season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  10. 75 FR 11749 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the B season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  11. 76 FR 17793 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the B season allowance of... Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under authority of...

  12. 77 FR 64240 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the 2012 total allowable... exclusive economic zone according to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska...

  13. 75 FR 64172 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 of the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 of the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... Statistical Area 610 of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) for 72 hours. This action is necessary to fully use the 2010... Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under authority of...

  14. 76 FR 11393 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... Statistical Area 630 of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) for 24 hours. This action is necessary to fully use the A... Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under authority of...

  15. 78 FR 20037 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the B season allowance of... of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under...

  16. 75 FR 61638 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... for pollock in Statistical Area 630 of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) 36 hours after opening directed... economic zone according to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP)...

  17. 75 FR 52891 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... (75 FR 11749, March 12, 2010). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(a)(5)(iv)(B) the Administrator, Alaska... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the C season allowance...

  18. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 10. Alaska region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, J.L.; Wentink, T. Jr.; Becker, R. Jr.; Comiskey, A.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-12-01

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each subregion of Alaska. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a state scale is given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each subregion are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the Alaska wind energy resource. An outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each subregion is included. Assessments for individual subregions are presented as separate chapters. The subregion wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the Alaska wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the subregion chapters.

  19. A Compilation and Review of Alaska Energy Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlon Tussing; Steve Colt

    2008-12-31

    There have been many energy projects proposed in Alaska over the past several decades, from large scale hydro projects that have never been built to small scale village power projects to use local alternative energy sources, many of which have also not been built. This project was initially intended to review these rejected projects to evaluate the economic feasibility of these ideas in the light of current economics. This review included contacting the agencies responsible for reviewing and funding these projects in Alaska, including the Alaska Energy Authority, the Denali Commission, and the Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory, obtaining available information about these projects, and analyzing the economic data. Unfortunately, the most apparent result of this effort was that the data associated with these projects was not collected in a systematic way that allowed this information to be analyzed.

  20. Decadal changes in Gulf of Alaska upwelling source waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo Buil, Mercedes; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele

    2015-03-01

    Decadal changes in sea surface temperature (SST) in the Gulf of Alaska are linked to long-term transitions in the marine ecosystem. While previous studies have identified the atmospheric variability of the Aleutian Low as an important driver of Ekman pumping and low-frequency SST anomalies, the role of subsurface gyre-scale dynamics remains unexplored. Using a set of reanalysis data sets from 1958 to the present, we find that subsurface temperature anomalies generated along the North Pacific Current significantly contribute through mean upwelling to decadal changes of SST in the Gulf of Alaska. This influence is comparable to the contribution associated with variations in atmospheric winds. Given the exceptional low-frequency character of the propagation of subsurface anomalies (e.g., multidecadal) along the gyre, monitoring subsurface temperature anomalies up stream along the North Pacific Current may enhance the decadal predictability of SST in the Gulf of Alaska and its impact on local marine ecosystems.

  1. Renewable energy and sustainable communities: Alaska's wind generator experience†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Steven Konkel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . In 1984, the Alaska Department of Commerce and Economic Development (DCED issued the State's first inventory/economic assessment of wind generators, documenting installed wind generator capacity and the economics of replacing diesel-fuel-generated electricity. Alaska's wind generation capacity had grown from hundreds of installed kilowatts to over 15.3 megawatts (MW by January 2012. Method . This article reviews data and conclusions presented in “Alaska's Wind Energy Systems; Inventory and Economic Assessment” (1. (Alaska Department of Commerce and Economic Development, S. Konkel, 1984. It provides a foundation and baseline for understanding the development of this renewable energy source. Results . Today's technologies have evolved at an astonishing pace; a typical generator in an Alaska wind farm now is likely rated at 1.5-MW capacity, compared to the single-kilowatt (kW machines present in 1984. Installed capacity has mushroomed, illustrated by Unalakleet's 600-kW wind farm dwarfing the original three 10-kW machines included in the 1984 inventory. Kodiak Electric had three 1.5-MW turbines installed at Pillar Mountain in 2009, with three additional turbines of 4.5-MW capacity installed in 2012. Utilities now actively plan for wind generation and compete for state funding. Discussion . State of Alaska energy policy provides the context for energy project decision-making. Substantial renewable energy fund (REF awards – $202,000,000 to date for 227 REF projects in the first 5 cycles of funding – along with numerous energy conservation programs – are now in place. Increasing investment in wind is driven by multiple factors. Stakeholders have interests both in public policy and meeting private investment objectives. Wind generator investors should consider project economics and potential impacts of energy decisions on human health. Specifically this article considers: a. changing environmental conditions in remote Alaska

  2. A survey of radioactive fallout data in Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable attention has been directed by the scientific community to assessing the levels and fate of radionuclides in Arctic ecosystems. The following text and tables present available data and discussion of radionuclide fallout in Alaska. A literature search of 23 on-line databases (Table 1) using Alaska, Strontium (Sr), Cesium (Cs), Plutonium (Pu) and Radionuclide as constraint terms responded with 177 possible citations. After eliminating duplicate citations, 31 articles were available: 17 were relevant to the subject matter; the remainder addressed geologic issues. All of the cited literature addressed 137Cs, 90Sr and 239,240Pu as a result of radionuclide fallout from nuclear testing or accidental release

  3. Dietary intake of Alaska Native people in two regions and implications for health: the Alaska Native Dietary and Subsistence Food Assessment Project

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jennifer S.; Elizabeth D. Nobmann; Asay, Elvin; Lanier, Anne P.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. To calculate the energy and nutrient intake in 2 regions of Alaska and to describe theimplications for development of chronic disease among Alaska Native people (AN).Study design. Cross-sectional observation; 10 villages and 2 hub communities in rural Alaska;333 participants ages 13 to 88 years old.Methods. Trained interviewers collected 24-hour diet recalls during 4 seasons.Results. In both regions, AN reported a combination of traditional Native foods and store boughtfoods; most...

  4. 2006 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Manevich, Alexander; Rybin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2006. A significant explosive eruption at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet marked the first eruption within several hundred kilometers of principal population centers in Alaska since 1992. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the fall of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of volcanic gas into 2007. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  5. 2007 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Dixon, James P.; Malik, Nataliya; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2007. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Pavlof, one of Alaska's most frequently active volcanoes. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the autumn of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of steam and volcanic gas into 2007. Redoubt Volcano showed the first signs of the unrest that would unfold in 2008-09. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  6. 1995 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.

    1996-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity (SVA) at 6 volcanic centers in 1995: Mount Martin (Katmai Group), Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Kliuchef/Korovin, and Kanaga. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) on the 1995 eruptions of 2 Russian volcanoes: Bezymianny and Karymsky. This report summarizes volcanic activity in Alaska during 1995 and the AVO response, as well as information on the 2 Kamchatkan eruptions. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a "significant" investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of phone calls throughout the year reporting steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1995 response record.

  7. Ecohydrology of Interior Alaska boreal forest systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, J.; Bolton, W. R.

    2012-12-01

    The ecohydrology of boreal forest ecosystems of Interior Alaska is not well understood largely because of challenges posed by the presence of discontinuous permafrost. Near-surface permafrost results in storage-dominated systems with cold, poorly drained soils, and slow growing, low statured coniferous trees (Picea mariana) or CDE's. The transition to permafrost-free areas can occur over a few meters and is accompanied by a vegetation community dominated by large deciduous trees (Populus sp. and Betula sp.) or DDE's. Typically, areas with permafrost are on north facing slopes and valley bottoms, and areas without permafrost are south facing. In Alaska's boreal forest, the permafrost is very warm and vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Once permafrost begins to thaw, the vegetation community shifts from coniferous to deciduous dominated. Streamflow in watersheds with a larger permafrost distribution tends to be higher and more responsive to precipitation events than in watersheds with low permafrost distribution. In fact, precipitation events in the low permafrost areas do not infiltrate past the rooting zone of the deciduous trees (~5-40 cm). This suggests that the deciduous trees may remove water from the system via uptake and transpiration. We focus on how vegetation water use affects boreal forest hydrology in areas of discontinuous permafrost. Specifically, we ask: what are the patterns of vegetation water use in areas with and without permafrost? This study focuses on the CDE and DDE systems. Our research sites are established on low and high locations on each aspect (south facing DDE, north facing CDE) to capture the variability associated with the different hillside drainage properties. At each of the four sites during the growing season, we measured various aspects of plant water use dynamics, including water flux, water content, water sources, depth of water uptake in the soil, and water stress. We use a Bayesian framework to analyze the data. We

  8. Geologic framework of lower Cook Inlet, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M.A.; Magoon, L.B.

    1978-01-01

    Three seismic reflectors are present throughout the lower Cook Inlet basin and can be correlated with onshore geologic features. The reflections come from unconformities at the base of the Tertiary sequence, at the base of Upper Cretaceous rocks, and near the base of Upper Jurassic strata. A contour map of the deepest horizon shows that Mesozoic rocks are formed into a northeast-trending syncline. Along the southeast flank of the basin, the northwest-dipping Mesozoic rocks are truncated at the base of Tertiary rocks. The Augustine-Seldovia arch trends across the basin axis between Augustine Island and Seldovia. Tertiary rocks thin onto the arch from the north and south. Numerous anticlines, smaller in structural relief and breadth than the Augustine-Seldovia arch, trend northeast parallel with the basin, and intersect the arch at oblique angles. The stratigraphic record shows four cycles of sedimentation and tectonism that are bounded by three regional unconformities in lower Cook Inlet and by four thrust faults and the modern Benioff zone in flysch rocks of the Kenai Peninsula and the Gulf of Alaska. The four cycles of sedimentation are, from oldest to youngest, the early Mesozoic, late Mesozoic, early Cenozoic, and late Cenozoic. Data on organic geochemistry of the rocks from one well suggest that Middle Jurassic strata may be a source of hydrocarbons. Seismic data show that structural traps are formed by northeast-trending anticlines and by structures formed at the intersections of these anticlines with the transbasin arch. Stratigraphic traps may be formed beneath the unconformity at the base of Tertiary strata and beneath unconformities within Mesozoic strata.

  9. 1984 Results of trans-Alaska crustal transect in Chugach Mountains and Copper River Basin, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nokleberg, W.J.; Ambos, E.L.; Fuis, G.S.; Mooney, W.D.; Page, R.A.; Plafker, G.; Campbell, D.L.

    1985-04-01

    The Trans-Alaska Crustal Transect (TACT) program, a multidisciplinary investigation of the continental crust and its evolution along the Trans-Alaska pipeline corridor was started by the USGS during 1984. Preliminary results of geologic, geophysical, and wide-angle reflection/refraction data obtained across the Chugach terrane (CGT) and the composite Wrangellia/Peninsular terrane (WRT/PET) suggest the following: (a) the CGT is composed of accretionary sequences that include, from south to north, Late Cretaceous schistose flysch, uppermost Jurassic to Early Cretaceous sheared melange, and Early(.) Jurassic blueschist/greenschist. (b) The CGT accretionary sequences have local broad, low-amplitude magnetic or gravity anomalies. (c) Seismic data show that the CGT along latitude 61/sup 0/N, by alternating high- (6.9-8.0. km/sec) and low-velocity layers is suggestive of multiple thin slices of subducted oceanic crust and upper mantle. (d) Mafic and ultramafic cumulate rocks along the south margin of the WRT/PET have strong magnetic and gravity signatures and are interpreted as the uplifted root of a Jurassic magmatic arc superimposed on a late Paleozoic volcanic arc. Magnetic data suggest that comparable rocks underlie most of the PET. (e) The Northdipping border Ranges fault (BRF) marks the suture along which the northern margin of the CGT was relatively underthrust at least 40 km beneath the WRT/PET. (f) Beneath the northern CGT and southern WRT/PET, a prominent seismic reflector (v = 7.7 km/sec), suggestive of oceanic upper mantle rocks, dips about 3/sup 0/N and extends from a depth of 12 km beneath the Tasnuna River to 16 km beneath the BRF, where the dip appears to steepen to about 15/sup 0/ beneath the southern margin of the PET.

  10. Seismicity and plate tectonics in south central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wormer, J. D.; Davies, J.; Gedney, L.

    1974-01-01

    Hypocenter distribution shows that the Benioff zone associated with the Aleutian arc terminates in interior Alaska some 75 km north of the Denali fault. There appears to be a break in the subducting Pacific plate in the Yentna River-Prince William Sound area which separates two seismically independent blocks, similar to the segmented structure reported for the central Aleutian arc.

  11. Environmental assessment: Kotzebue Wind Installation Project, Kotzebue, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DOE is proposing to provide financial assistance to the Kotzebue Electric Association to expand its existing wind installation near Kotzebue, Alaska. Like many rural Alaska towns, Kotzebue uses diesel-powered generators to produce its electricity, the high cost of which is currently subsidized by the Alaska State government. In an effort to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce dependence on diesel fuel, and reduce air pollutants, the DOE is proposing to fund an experimental wind installation to test commercially available wind turbines under Arctic conditions. The results would provide valuable information to other Alaska communities experiencing similar dependence on diesel-powered generators. The environmental assessment for the proposed wind installation assessed impacts to biological resources, land use, electromagnetic interference, coastal zone, air quality, cultural resources, and noise. It was determined that the project does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE has issued a Finding of No Significant Impact

  12. 33 CFR 162.240 - Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation. 162.240 Section 162.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.240...

  13. STUDY OF THE SUBARCTIC HEAT ISLAND AT FAIRBANKS, ALASKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The heat island associated with the City of Fairbanks, Alaska was studied as a means of isolating the effects of self-heating modified radiative transfer from other causes of heat islands. Minimal winter insolation virtually eliminated the effects of variable albedo and the daily...

  14. Project RavenCare: global multimedia telemedicine in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohme, Walid G.; Collmann, Jeff R.; Mun, Seong K.; Vastola, David J.

    1995-05-01

    Project RavenCare is a testbed for assessing the utility of teleradiology, telemedicine and electronic patient records systems for delivering health care to Native Alaskans in remote villages. It is being established as a joint project between the department of radiology at Georgetown University Medical Center and the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Corporation (SEARHC) in Sitka, Alaska. This initiative will establish a sustained routine clinical multimedia telemedicine support for a village clinic in Hoonah, Alaska and a regional hospital in Sitka. It will link the village clinic in Hoonah to Mt. Edgecumbe Hospital in Sitka. This regional hospital will in turn be linked to Georgetown University Hospital through the T1- VSAT (very small aperture terminal) of the NASA-ACTS (Advanced Communication Technology Satellite). Regional physicians in Hoonah lack support in providing relatively routine care in areas such as radiology and pathology. This project is an initial step in a general plan to upgrade telecommunications in the health care system of the Southeast Alaska region and will address aspects of two problems; limited communication between the village health clinics and the hospital and lack of subspecialty support for hospital-based physicians in Sitka.

  15. Environmental assessment: Kotzebue Wind Installation Project, Kotzebue, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The DOE is proposing to provide financial assistance to the Kotzebue Electric Association to expand its existing wind installation near Kotzebue, Alaska. Like many rural Alaska towns, Kotzebue uses diesel-powered generators to produce its electricity, the high cost of which is currently subsidized by the Alaska State government. In an effort to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce dependence on diesel fuel, and reduce air pollutants, the DOE is proposing to fund an experimental wind installation to test commercially available wind turbines under Arctic conditions. The results would provide valuable information to other Alaska communities experiencing similar dependence on diesel-powered generators. The environmental assessment for the proposed wind installation assessed impacts to biological resources, land use, electromagnetic interference, coastal zone, air quality, cultural resources, and noise. It was determined that the project does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE has issued a Finding of No Significant Impact.

  16. Women and Rapid Economic Change: The Alaska Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Monica E.

    The Trans Alaska Oil Pipeline project and accompanying increases in economic wealth have had an enormous impact, particularly on Alaskan women. Prior to pipeline construction, the civilian labor force participation by Alaskan women was close to the national average. During and since pipeline construction, this participation rate has soared.…

  17. Copper River hydraulic study at Million Dollar Bridge, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stanley H.; Barber, William F.

    1980-01-01

    The Copper River hydraulic conditions in the vicinity of the Million-Dollar Bridge, Alaska, at the outlet to Miles Lake are described. The water discharge, lake and river bed profiles, bathymetry, velocity, and direction of flow are presented. (Kosco-USGS)

  18. Aerial Image of Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain; 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is comprised of a single aerial image of a single area on Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain taken on 21 June 1955 by the U.S. Air Force and obtained from...

  19. Cancer Prevention and Control in American Indians/Alaska Natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, James W.

    1992-01-01

    Examines differences among American Indian tribes and Alaska Natives with regard to incidence and mortality rates for various types of cancer, particularly lung, cervix, breast, biliary, gastric, colorectal, prostate, and primary hepatic cancer. Discusses the influence of genetic and environmental factors, smoking, and inadequate medical…

  20. Climate change and health effects in Northwest Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Brubaker

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article provides examples of adverse health effects, including weather-related injury, food insecurity, mental health issues, and water infrastructure damage, and the responses to these effects that are currently being applied in two Northwest Alaska communities.In Northwest Alaska, warming is resulting in a broad range of unusual weather and environmental conditions, including delayed freeze-up, earlier breakup, storm surge, coastal erosion, and thawing permafrost. These are just some of the climate impacts that are driving concerns about weather-related injury, the spread of disease, mental health issues, infrastructure damage, and food and water security. Local leaders are challenged to identify appropriate adaptation strategies to address climate impacts and related health effects.The tribal health system is combining local observations, traditional knowledge, and western science to perform community-specific climate change health impact assessments. Local leaders are applying this information to develop adaptation responses.The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium will describe relationships between climate impacts and health effects and provide examples of community-scaled adaptation actions currently being applied in Northwest Alaska.Climate change is increasing vulnerability to injury, disease, mental stress, food insecurity, and water insecurity. Northwest communities are applying adaptation approaches that are both specific and appropriate.The health impact assessment process is effective in raising awareness, encouraging discussion, engaging partners, and implementing adaptation planning. With community-specific information, local leaders are applying health protective adaptation measures.

  1. Educational Innovation in Community Colleges of the Northwest and Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitan, Henry M.; And Others

    This report results from a comparison between two inventories of educational innovation mailed out to community colleges in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. The first inventory was sent in July and August, 1968; the second was mailed in the late summer of 1973. The report has a two-fold purpose: (1) to determine changes in the use of educational…

  2. Long Range Program, Library Development in Alaska 1973-1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of State Libraries.

    A statewide library development program designed to provide total library services to meet educational, informational, and cultural needs of the people of Alaska is outlined in this document. The body of the report is divided into three sections. In the first, the purpose, scope, and development of the plan are summarized. The second section…

  3. 78 FR 41942 - Alaska; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... Unemployment Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to... Assistance--Disaster Housing Operations for Individuals and Households; 97.050, Presidentially Declared... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Alaska; Major Disaster and Related Determinations...

  4. Aerial Images of Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain; 1948, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is comprised of 36 black and white 9x9 inch aerial images of four different study areas on Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain taken between 1948-1949 and...

  5. Population structure and genetic diversity of moose in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jennifer I; Hundertmark, Kris J; Bowyer, R Terry; McCracken, Kevin G

    2009-01-01

    Moose (Alces alces) are highly mobile mammals that occur across arboreal regions of North America, Europe, and Asia. Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas) range across much of Alaska and are primary herbivore consumers, exerting a prominent influence on ecosystem structure and functioning. Increased knowledge gained from population genetics provides insights into their population dynamics, history, and dispersal of these unique large herbivores and can aid in conservation efforts. We examined the genetic diversity and population structure of moose (n = 141) with 8 polymorphic microsatellites from 6 regions spanning much of Alaska. Expected heterozygosity was moderate (H(E) = 0.483-0.612), and private alleles ranged from 0 to 6. Both F(ST) and R(ST) indicated significant population structure (P moose from the Yakutat and Tetlin regions versus all other moose, with slight substructure observed among the second population. Estimates of dispersal differed between analytical approaches, indicating a high level of historical or current gene flow. Mantel tests indicated that isolation-by-distance partially explained observed structure among moose populations (R(2) = 0.45, P moose in Alaska with population expansion from interior Alaska westward toward the coast. PMID:18836148

  6. Alternative perspectives on the sustainability of Alaska's commercial fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, Philip A

    2013-02-01

    Many believe commercial fisheries in Alaska (U.S.A.) are sustainability success stories, but ongoing socioeconomic problems across the state raise questions about how this sustainability is being defined and evaluated. Problems such as food insecurity and the disenfranchisement of Alaska Natives from fishing rights are well documented, yet these concerns are obscured by marketing campaigns that convey images of flourishing fishing communities and initiatives to certify Alaska's fisheries as responsibly managed. Fisheries management mandates and approaches built on such metrics and technologies as maximum sustainable yield and systems of tradable quotas actually serve to constrain, circumscribe, and marginalize some Alaskans' opportunities for effecting change in how the benefits of these fisheries are allocated. Beneath the narrative of sustainability, these management technologies perpetuate a cognitive ecological model of sustainability that is oriented to single-species outcomes, that casts people as parasites, and thus assumes the necessity of trade-offs between biological and social goals. Alternative cognitive models are available that draw metaphors from different ecological concepts such as keystone species and mutualisms. Such models, when used to inform management approaches, may improve societal outcomes in Alaska and elsewhere by promoting food security and sustainability through diversified natural resource harvest strategies that are more flexible and responsive to environmental variability and change. PMID:22988912

  7. Alaska Native Community Energy Planning and Projects (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-06-01

    This fact sheet provides information on the Alaska Native villages selected to receive assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy 2013 Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, which provides technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects on tribal lands.

  8. Status of EarthScope's Transportable Array in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, K.; Busby, R. W.; Enders, M.

    2014-12-01

    The EarthScope's Transportable Array has completed its first year of operations in Alaska. The proposed station grid uses 85 km spacing & consists of ~290 locations in Alaska and Western Canada. About 60 of the grid locations will be at existing seismic stations operated by the AEC, AVO & ATWC and are being upgraded with shallow borehole installations or higher quality sensors as appropriate. About 10 new stations will be collocated with PBO GPS stations. At the end of July 2014, 90% of the site reconnaissance has been completed, & 25 sites have been permitted with private landowners or the State of Alaska. 11 new TA stations have been installed, & 7 existing stations (AK network code) have been upgraded. Data from these stations is flowing to the Array Network Facility (ANF) and being archived at the IRIS DMC. As the Transportable Array has moved to Alaska, IRIS has experimented with different portable drills and drilling techniques to create shallow holes (1-5 m deep, 15-20 cm in diameter) in permafrost and rock outcrops for seismometer installation. The goal of these new methods is to maintain or enhance a station's noise performance while minimizing its footprint & the equipment, materials, and overall expense required for its construction. Motivating this approach are recent developments in posthole broadband seismometer design & the unique conditions for operating in Alaska, where most areas are only accessible by small plane or helicopter, & permafrost underlies much of the region. IRIS contracted with a drilling specialist to create a prototype Transportable Drill (less than 1300 lbs with tooling) that is capable of augering to 5 m in unconsolidated materials and permafrost, downhole hammering to 2.5 m in bedrock with a steel casing following the bit and diamond coring in solid rock to 2 m. This drill has been successfully deployed by helicopter to create a hole 2.7 m deep and 15 cm diameter in bedrock. The auger mode was used successfully to install a

  9. Ocean-Glacier Interactions in Alaska and Comparison to Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motyka, R. J.; Truffer, M.

    2011-12-01

    Meltwater from Alaska's coastal glaciers and icefields accounts for nearly half of the total freshwater discharged into the Gulf of Alaska (GOA), with 10% coming from glacier volume loss associated with rapid thinning and retreat of glaciers (Neal et al, 2010). This glacier freshwater discharge contributes to maintaining the Alaska Coastal Current (ACC), which eventually reaches the Arctic Ocean (Royer and Grosch, 2006), thereby linking changes of glaciers along the coast of Alaska to the whole Arctic system. Water column temperatures on the shelf of northern GOA, monitored at buoy GAK1 near Seward, have increased by about 1 deg C since 1970 throughout the 250 m depth and vertical density stratification has also increased. Roughly half of the glacier contribution to ACC is derived from the ~ 50 tidewater glaciers (TWG) that drain from Alaska's coastal mountains into the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). Fjord systems link these TWGs to the GOA, with fjord circulation patterns driven in part by buoyancy-driven convection of subglacial freshwater discharge at the head of the fjord. Neoglacial shallow sills (< 50 m deep) modulate the influx of warm ocean waters (up to 10 deg C) into these fjords. Convection of these warm waters melts icebergs and submerged faces of TWGs. The study of interactions between glaciers, fjords, and the ocean in coastal Alaska has had a long but very sporadic history. We examine this record starting with the "TWG cycle" hypothesis. We next examine recent hydrographic data from several different TWG fjords, representative of advancing and retreating TWGs (Columbia, Yahtse, Hubbard, and LeConte Glaciers), evaluate similarities and differences, and estimate the relative contributions of submarine glacier melting and subglacial discharge to fjord circulation. Circulation of warm ocean waters in fjords has also been hypothesized to play an important role in destabilizing and modulating glacier discharge from outlet glaciers in Greenland. We therefore compare

  10. On the climate and climate change of Sitka, Southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, Gerd; Galloway, Kevin; Stuefer, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Sitka, located in southeastern coastal Alaska, is the only meteorological station in Alaska and northern coastal British Columbia, with a long climatological record, going back to the first half of the nineteenth century. Sitka was the capital of Alaska, when it was part of the Russian Empire, to which Alaska belonged until 1867, when the American government purchased it. In 1827, the Russian established an observatory on Baranof Island, Sitka Harbor, which made 17-hourly observations, later extended to 19 and thereafter to all hours of the day. When analyzing the data, the 12-day time difference between the Russian (Julian) calendar, at which the observations were made, and ours (Gregorian) has to be considered. The climate of Sitka is maritime, with relative warm winter temperatures—there is no month with a mean temperature below freezing—and moderately warm summer temperatures with 4 months above the 10 °C level and plentiful precipitation all-year long. It is the warmest zone of Alaska. Even though there is a substantial break in observations in the late nineteenth century, these are the only observation, which started so early in the nineteenth century. Systematic US-based observations commenced much later normally in connection with the gold rush, whaling in Northern Alaska, and the fur trade, predominantly along the Yukon River. During the 186 years of observations from 1827 to 2013, the best linear fit gave a temperature increase of 1.56 °C for the whole period or 0.86 °C per century, somewhat lower than expected for the relatively high latitudes. The increase was nonlinear, with several multi-decadal variations. However, when comparing the first normal (1831-1860) to the last normal (1981-2010) and assuming a linear trend, a higher value of 1.06 °C per century was calculated. The discrepancy might be explained by nonlinearity and the fact that during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, observations were sporadic. Furthermore, the

  11. Alaska-Washington effects on northern oil and gas projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persily, L. [Alaska Dept. of Revenue, Juneau, AK (United States)

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents a review of a natural gas project proposal for Alaska. The proven reserves of the Alaskan North Slope total 35 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of natural gas. Potential gas reserves are estimated at about 100 tcf, but the gas is stranded and far from markets. The challenge of developing the resource lies in the development and construction of a pipeline to Alberta. While many companies have expressed interest in the project, investors believe the risk is too high for the multi-billion-dollar construction cost. In 1977, the government of Alaska created an oil-wealth savings account from the profits of the Prudhoe Bay oil discovery. The author suggested that instead of using the account for paying dividends to Alaskans as is currently done, the government should consider using the money to help reduce the risk and encourage private investors. BP and ConocoPhillips have indicated that they want risk-sharing help from the U.S. Treasury to build the pipeline. The author explained why gas price risk is such a concern and why North Slope producers are asking for financial assurances. Some Alaskans would prefer that a public corporation build, own and operate a gas project. Instead of building a pipeline to Alberta, they would prefer to build and operate a pipeline from Prudhoe Bay to a coastal liquefaction plant where a fleet of tankers would bring the refined LNG product to markets. The Alaska Native concern is another issue that requires attention. The issues which are important to Alaska natives include maintaining local control over taxation, social issues, and a financial stake in the project. Several Native corporations have formed a partnership and hope to buy into the Alaska gas project.

  12. 76 FR 52301 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Allocating Gulf of Alaska Fishery Resources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ...NMFS will present two public workshops on the Central Gulf of Alaska Rockfish Program (Rockfish Program) for potentially eligible participants and other interested parties. At each workshop, NMFS will provide an overview of the proposed Rockfish Program, discuss the key differences between the Rockfish Program and the Rockfish Pilot Program, provide information on the proposed rule comment......

  13. U.S. Global Climate Change Impacts Report, Alaska Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, D.

    2009-12-01

    The assessment of the Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States includes analyses of the potential climate change impacts in Alaska. The resulting findings are discussed in this presentation, with the effects on water resources discussed separately. Major findings include: Summers are getting hotter and drier, with increasing evaporation outpacing increased precipitation. Climate changes are already affecting water, energy, transportation, agriculture, ecosystems, and health. These impacts are different from region to region and will grow under projected climate change. Wildfires and insect problems are increasing. Climate plays a key role in determining the extent and severity of insect outbreaks and wildfire. The area burned in North America’s northern forest that spans Alaska and Canada tripled from the 1960s to the 1990s. During the 1990s, south-central Alaska experienced the largest outbreak of spruce bark beetles in the world because of warmer weather in all seasons of the year. Under changing climate conditions, the average area burned per year in Alaska is projected to double by the middle of this century10. By the end of this century, area burned by fire is projected to triple under a moderate greenhouse gas emissions scenario and to quadruple under a higher emissions scenario. Close-bodied lakes are declining in area. A continued decline in the area of surface water would present challenges for the management of natural resources and ecosystems on National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska. These refuges, which cover over 77 million acres (21 percent of Alaska) and comprise 81 percent of the U.S. National Wildlife Refuge System, provide a breeding habitat for millions of waterfowl and shorebirds that winter in the lower 48 states. Permafrost thawing will damage public and private infrastructure. Land subsidence (sinking) associated with the thawing of permafrost presents substantial challenges to engineers attempting to preserve infrastructure in

  14. Case studies: Alaska - Doyon, Limited and the Red Dog experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alaska, the northernmost state of the USA, provides a range of examples of sustainable mineral resource development involving aboriginal people. For several decades the aboriginal people of Alaska have been active participants in efforts to integrate mineral development with traditional lifestyles. This opportunity is the result of an innovative agreement between Alaska's native people and the US Government designed to integrate native interests into the economic development of the state while preserving traditional native culture. Alaska was purchased from Russia in 1867, but it was not until 1971 that the US government reached a settlement with Alaska's native people. This was formalized as the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA), an act of the US Congress that provided land, cash, and other rights and obligations to Alaska natives. As part of ANCSA, the state was divided into 12 separate geographical regions representative of the ethnic variety of Alaska's native population (Alaska Miners Association, 2003 Handbook and Service Directory; www.alaskaminers.org). Within each region a privately held corporation was established; these were owned and managed principally by natives who could demonstrate a relationship to the respective ethnic group. These corporations are known as 'regional corporations' and their native American owners are 'shareholders'. Each regional corporation was given land, mineral rights, and cash. Each regional corporation received a different amount of each, largely determined by the number of shareholders and the extent of the region. The regional corporations have both social and economic obligations to their shareholders. Within each region approximately 10 to 15% of the land was provided to the natives in a number of distinct parcels distributed across the region. Some land was provided in areas of traditional native habitation, such as near native villages, allowing a continuation of traditional lifestyles. For various reasons

  15. Geomorphic Consequences of Volcanic Eruptions in Alaska: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    Eruptions of Alaska volcanoes have significant and sometimes profound geomorphic consequences on surrounding landscapes and ecosystems. The effects of eruptions on the landscape can range from complete burial of surface vegetation and preexisting topography to subtle, short-term perturbations of geomorphic and ecological systems. In some cases, an eruption will allow for new landscapes to form in response to the accumulation and erosion of recently deposited volcaniclastic material. In other cases, the geomorphic response to a major eruptive event may set in motion a series of landscape changes that could take centuries to millennia to be realized. The effects of volcanic eruptions on the landscape and how these effects influence surface processes has not been a specific focus of most studies concerned with the physical volcanology of Alaska volcanoes. Thus, what is needed is a review of eruptive activity in Alaska in the context of how this activity influences the geomorphology of affected areas. To illustrate the relationship between geomorphology and volcanic activity in Alaska, several eruptions and their geomorphic impacts will be reviewed. These eruptions include the 1912 Novarupta–Katmai eruption, the 1989–1990 and 2009 eruptions of Redoubt volcano, the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, and the recent historical eruptions of Pavlof volcano. The geomorphic consequences of eruptive activity associated with these eruptions are described, and where possible, information about surface processes, rates of landscape change, and the temporal and spatial scale of impacts are discussed.A common feature of volcanoes in Alaska is their extensive cover of glacier ice, seasonal snow, or both. As a result, the generation of meltwater and a variety of sediment–water mass flows, including debris-flow lahars, hyperconcentrated-flow lahars, and sediment-laden water floods, are typical outcomes of most types of eruptive activity. Occasionally, such flows can be quite

  16. Internet and broadband adoption in indigenous communities: An analysis of rural Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, Heather E.

    2012-01-01

    Alaska is the largest state in the U.S., but with the nation's lowest population density of only 1.2 persons per square mile. About 15 percent of the population are Alaska Natives. Approximately two-thirds of this indigenous population live in more than 200 villages, most of which are remote settlements without road access. A current broadband infrastructure project in rural southwest Alaska provides an opportunity to gather reliable data on rural broadband adoption and use, and perceived bar...

  17. Blood Politics, Ethnic Identity, and Racial Misclassification among American Indians and Alaska Natives

    OpenAIRE

    Haozous, Emily A.; Carolyn J. Strickland; Palacios, Janelle F.; Teshia G. Arambula Solomon

    2014-01-01

    Misclassification of race in medical and mortality records has long been documented as an issue in American Indian/Alaska Native data. Yet, little has been shared in a cohesive narrative which outlines why misclassification of American Indian/Alaska Native identity occurs. The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of the current state of the science in racial misclassification among American Indians and Alaska Natives. We also provide a historical context on the importance of this pro...

  18. Numerical modeling of the 1964 Alaska tsunami in western Passage Canal and Whittier, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Nicolsky

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model of the wave dynamics in Passage Canal, Alaska during the Mw 9.2 megathrust earthquake is presented. During the earthquake, several types of waves were identified at the city of Whittier, located at the head of Passage Canal. The first wave is thought to have been a seiche, while the other two waves were probably triggered by submarine landslides. We model the seiche wave, landslide-generated tsunami, and tectonic tsunami in Passage Canal and compute inundation by each type of wave during the 1964 event. Modeled results are compared with eyewitness reports and an observed inundation line. Results of the numerical experiments let us identify where the submarine landslides might have occurred during the 1964 event. We identify regions at the head and along the northern shore of Passage Canal, where landslides triggered a wave that caused most of the damage in Whittier. An explanation of the fact that the 1964 tectonic tsunami in Whittier was unnoticed is presented as well. The simulated inundation by the seiche, landslide-generated tsunami, and tectonic tsunami can help to mitigate tsunami hazards and prepare Whittier for a potential tsunami.

  19. Blood Politics, Ethnic Identity, and Racial Misclassification among American Indians and Alaska Natives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. Haozous

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Misclassification of race in medical and mortality records has long been documented as an issue in American Indian/Alaska Native data. Yet, little has been shared in a cohesive narrative which outlines why misclassification of American Indian/Alaska Native identity occurs. The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary of the current state of the science in racial misclassification among American Indians and Alaska Natives. We also provide a historical context on the importance of this problem and describe the ongoing political processes that both affect racial misclassification and contribute to the context of American Indian and Alaska Native identity.

  20. 76 FR 56789 - Call for Nominations: North Slope Science Initiative, Science Technical Advisory Panel, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... biology, biometrics, sociology, cultural anthropology, economics, ornithology, oceanography, fisheries... minimum of 5 years of work experience in Alaska in their field of expertise, preferably in the North...

  1. A survey of radioactive fallout data in Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePhillips, M.P.

    1995-10-23

    Considerable attention has been directed by the scientific community to assessing the levels and fate of radionuclides in Arctic ecosystems. The following text and tables present available data and discussion of radionuclide fallout in Alaska. A literature search of 23 on-line databases (Table 1) using Alaska, Strontium (Sr), Cesium (Cs), Plutonium (Pu) and Radionuclide as constraint terms responded with 177 possible citations. After eliminating duplicate citations, 31 articles were available: 17 were relevant to the subject matter; the remainder addressed geologic issues. All of the cited literature addressed {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 239,240}Pu as a result of radionuclide fallout from nuclear testing or accidental release.

  2. Distribution and character of naleds in northeastern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Deborah; Barnes, Peter W.; Reimnitz, Erk

    1977-01-01

    An examination of the distribution of river naleds seen in Landsat satellite imagery and high- and low-altitude aerial photography of Alaska's North Slope indicates that these features are widespread east of the Colville River and less abundant to the west. Where naleds occur, stream channels are wide and often form braided channels. Their distribution can be related to changes in stream gradient and to the occurrence of springs. Large naleds, such as on the Kongakut River, often remain through the summer melt season to form the nucleus of icing in the succeeding winter. Major naleds also are likely to significantly influence the nature of permafrost in their immediate vicinity. The map of naleds may serve as a guide to the occurrence of year-round flowing water, a sparse commodity in northern Alaska.

  3. Climate Change Implications to Vegetation Production in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neigh, Christopher S.R.

    2008-01-01

    Investigation of long-term meteorological satellite data revealed statistically significant vegetation response to climate drivers of temperature, precipitation and solar radiation with exclusion of fire disturbance in Alaska. Abiotic trends were correlated to satellite remote sensing observations of normalized difference vegetation index to understand biophysical processes that could impact ecosystem carbon storage. Warming resulted in disparate trajectories for vegetation growth due to precipitation and photosynthetically active radiation variation. Interior spruce forest low lands in late summer through winter had precipitation deficit which resulted in extensive fire disturbance and browning of undisturbed vegetation with reduced post-fire recovery while Northern slope moist alpine tundra had increased production due to warmer-wetter conditions during the late 1990s and early 2000s. Coupled investigation of Alaska s vegetation response to warming climate found spatially dynamic abiotic processes with vegetation browning not a result from increased fire disturbance.

  4. Northern Alaska oil fields and caribou: a commentary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the status of caribou, Rangifer tarandus, herds relative to oil field development in the Prudhoe Bay region of Alaska. The Central Arctic caribou herd, which spends June and July in and around oil fields in the Prudhoe Bay region, has increased since the inception of oil field development and has demographics similar to those of adjacent herds which are not near oil fields. Although oil field development may impact individual caribou through disturbance or impedance of movements, herd-level impacts of the oil fields are not apparent. Caribou populations characteristically fluctuate dramatically, and differentiating human and non-human impacts is difficult or impossible. The herd is the unit of management, and management objectives are being met. The experience in northern Alaska's oil fields indicates resource extraction and wildlife populations can be compatible when managed properly. (Author)

  5. From Alaska to the Soviet Union through the Verkhoyansk ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Salva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available During the great Patriotic war on the territory of the Soviet Union in Eastern Siberia took place air route Alaska – Siberia (ALSIB which was distilled combat and transport aircraft, which were imported from the United States of America under lend-lease (from the English words "lend" to lend, to borrow and "lease" – lease. This article tells about those who were pushing, where distilled, as well as many pilots were killed on this track. In the work of the drawing shows the monument of the first cosmonaut of the world Yuri Gagarin, in whose honor was named Avenue in the city of Yakutsk, a memorial complex dedicated ferry route Alaska – Siberia and the American military aircraft Airacobra designed modern Yakut engineers and technicians for aviation and technical base of the air company "Sakha Avia".

  6. Physical data from CTD casts from the ALPHA HELIX from the Gulf of Alaska in support of Gulf of Alaska-1 from 30 May 1995 to 25 June 1995 (NODC Accession 0000136)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CTD data were collected from the ALPHA HELIX from the Gulf of Alaska. Data were collected by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks; Institute of Marine Science...

  7. Sobriety and alcohol use among rural Alaska Native elders

    OpenAIRE

    Monica C. Skewes; Lewis, Jordan P.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although notable health disparities related to alcohol use persist among Alaska Native people living in rural communities, there is a paucity of research examining drinking behaviour in particular segments of this population, including elders. One explanation for this is the distrust of behavioural health research in general and alcohol research in particular following the legacy of the Barrow Alcohol Study, still regarded as a notable example of ethics violations in cross-cultura...

  8. Renewable energy and sustainable communities: Alaska's wind generator experience†

    OpenAIRE

    Konkel, R. Steven

    2013-01-01

    Background. In 1984, the Alaska Department of Commerce and Economic Development (DCED) issued the State’s first inventory/economic assessment of wind generators, documenting installed wind generator capacity and the economics of replacing diesel-fuel-generated electricity. Alaska’s wind generation capacity had grown from hundreds of installed kilowatts to over 15.3 megawatts (MW) by January 2012.Method. This article reviews data and conclusions presented in ‘‘Alaska’s Wind Energy Systems; Inv...

  9. DOE/NREL supported wind energy activities in Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drouilhet, S.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes three wind energy projects implemented in Alaska. The first, a sustainable technology energy partnerships (STEP) wind energy deployment project in Kotzebue will install 6 AOC 15/50 wind turbines and connect to the existing village diesel grid, consisting of approximately 1 MW average load. It seeks to develop solutions to the problems of arctic wind energy installations (transport, foundations, erection, operation, and maintenance), to establish a wind turbine test site, and to establish the Kotzebue Electric Association as a training and deployment center for wind/diesel technology in rural Alaska. The second project, a large village medium-penetration wind/diesel system, also in Kotzebue, will install a 1-2 MW windfarm, which will supplement the AOC turbines of the STEP project. The program will investigate the impact of medium penetration wind energy on power quality and system stability. The third project, the Alaska high-penetration wind/diesel village power pilot project in Wales will install a high penetration (80-100%) wind/diesel system in a remote Alaskan village. The system will include about 180 kW installed wind capacity, meeting an average village load of about 60 kW. This program will provide a model for high penetration wind retrofits to village diesel power systems and build the capability in Alaska to operate, maintain, and replicate wind/diesel technology. The program will also address problems of: effective use of excess wind energy; reliable diesel-off operation; and the role of energy storage.

  10. Ocean acidification risk assessment for Alaska's fishery sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, J. T.; Cooley, S. R.; Lucey, N.; Colt, S.; Ekstrom, J.; Hurst, T.; Hauri, C.; Evans, W.; Cross, J. N.; Feely, R. A.

    2015-08-01

    The highly productive fisheries of Alaska are located in seas projected to experience strong global change, including rapid transitions in temperature and ocean acidification-driven changes in pH and other chemical parameters. Many of the marine organisms that are most intensely affected by ocean acidification (OA) contribute substantially to the state's commercial fisheries and traditional subsistence way of life. Prior studies of OA's potential impacts on human communities have focused only on possible direct economic losses from specific scenarios of human dependence on commercial harvests and damages to marine species. However, other economic and social impacts, such as changes in food security or livelihoods, are also likely to result from climate change. This study evaluates patterns of dependence on marine resources within Alaska that could be negatively impacted by OA and current community characteristics to assess the potential risk to the fishery sector from OA. Here, we used a risk assessment framework based on one developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to analyze earth-system global ocean model hindcasts and projections of ocean chemistry, fisheries harvest data, and demographic information. The fisheries examined were: shellfish, salmon and other finfish. The final index incorporates all of these data to compare overall risk among Alaska's federally designated census areas. The analysis showed that regions in southeast and southwest Alaska that are highly reliant on fishery harvests and have relatively lower incomes and employment alternatives likely face the highest risk from OA. Although this study is an intermediate step toward our full understanding, the results presented here show that OA merits consideration in policy planning, as it may represent another challenge to Alaskan communities, some of which are already under acute socio-economic strains.

  11. Energy intensive industry for Alaska. Volume II: case analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-09-01

    A case analysis of the attractiveness of the primary aluminium metal industry in Alaska is presented. Part 1 provides a discussion on the economics of the industry and provides a conceptual Alaskan smelter including its physical nature, employment, and tax consequences, and its environmental attributes. Part 2 discusses the social and economic impacts. Part 3 discusses the state management options for involvement with the industry. (MCW)

  12. Presence of rapidly degrading permafrost plateaus in southcentral Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin M. Jones; Carson A. Baughman; Vladimir E.Romanovsky; Parsekian, Andrew D.; Babcock, Esther L.; Miriam C. Jones; Grosse, GUido; Berg, Edward E.

    2016-01-01

    Permafrost presence is determined by a complex interaction of climatic, topographic, and ecological conditions operating over long time scales. In particular, vegetation and organic layer characteristics may act to protect permafrost in regions with a mean annual air temperature (MAAT) above 0 °C. In this study, we document the presence of residual permafrost plateaus on the western Kenai Peninsula lowlands of southcentral Alaska, a region with a MAAT of 1.5 ± 1 °C (1981 to 2010). Continuo...

  13. Seasonal thaw settlement at drained thermokarst lake basins, Arctic Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    L. Liu; K. Schaefer; A. Gusmeroli; G. Grosse; Jones, B. M.; Zhang, T.; Parsekian, A.D.; Zebker, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Drained thermokarst lake basins (DTLBs) are ubiquitous landforms on Arctic tundra lowland. Their dynamic states are seldom investigated, despite their importance for landscape stability, hydrology, nutrient fluxes, and carbon cycling. Here we report results based on high-resolution Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements using space-borne data for a study area located on the North Slope of Alaska near Prudhoe Bay, where we focus on the seasonal thaw...

  14. Deriving Snow Cover Metrics for Alaska from MODIS

    OpenAIRE

    Chuck Lindsay; Jiang Zhu; Amy E. Miller; Peter Kirchner; Wilson, Tammy L.

    2015-01-01

    Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) daily snow cover products provide an opportunity for determining snow onset and melt dates across broad geographic regions; however, cloud cover and polar darkness are limiting factors at higher latitudes. This study presents snow onset and melt dates for Alaska, portions of western Canada and the Russian Far East derived from Terra MODIS snow cover daily 500 m grid data (MOD10A1) and evaluates our method for filling data gaps caused by cl...

  15. Preserving Alaska's early Cold War legacy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffecker, J.; Whorton, M.

    1999-03-08

    The US Air Force owns and operates numerous facilities that were constructed during the Cold War era. The end of the Cold War prompted many changes in the operation of these properties: missions changed, facilities were modified, and entire bases were closed or realigned. The widespread downsizing of the US military stimulated concern over the potential loss of properties that had acquired historical value in the context of the Cold War. In response, the US Department of Defense in 1991 initiated a broad effort to inventory properties of this era. US Air Force installations in Alaska were in the forefront of these evaluations because of the role of the Cold War in the state's development and history and the high interest on the part of the Alaska State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) in these properties. The 611th Air Support Group (611 ASG) owns many of Alaska's early Cold War properties, most were associated with strategic air defense. The 611 ASG determined that three systems it operates, which were all part of the integrated defense against Soviet nuclear strategic bomber threat, were eligible for the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) and would require treatment as historic properties. These systems include the Aircraft Control and Warning (AC&W) System, the Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line, and Forward Operating Bases (FOBs). As part of a massive cleanup operation, Clean Sweep, the 611 ASG plans to demolish many of the properties associated with these systems. To mitigate the effects of demolition, the 611 ASG negotiated agreements on the system level (e.g., the DEW Line) with the Alaska SHPO to document the history and architectural/engineering features associated with these properties. This system approach allowed the US Air Force to mitigate effects on many individual properties in a more cost-effective and efficient manner.

  16. ALASKA OIL AND GAS EXPLORATION, DEVELOPMENT, AND PERMITTING PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard McMahon; Robert Crandall; Chas Dense; Sean Weems

    2003-11-19

    This is the second technical report, covering the period from April 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. This project brings together three parts of the oil exploration, development, and permitting process to form the foundation for a more fully integrated information technology infrastructure for the State of Alaska. The geo-technical component is a shared effort between the State Department of Administration and the US Department of Energy. The Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission is rapidly converting high volumes of paper documents and geo-technical information to formats suitable for search and retrieval over the Internet. The permitting component is under the lead of the DNR Office of Project Management and Permitting. A web-based system will enable the public and other review participants to track permit status, submit and view comments, and obtain important project information on-line. By automating several functions of the current manual process, permit applications will be completed more quickly and accurately, and agencies will be able to complete reviews with fewer delays. Structural changes are taking place in terms of organization, statutory authority, and regulatory requirements. Geographic Information Systems are a central component to the organization of information, and the delivery of on-line services. Progress has been made to deploy the foundation system for the shared GIS based on open GIS protocols to the extent feasible. Alaska has nearly one-quarter of the nation's supply of crude oil, at least five billion barrels of proven reserves. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists report that the 1995 National Assessment identified the North Slope as having 7.4 billion barrels of technically recoverable oil and over 63 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. From these reserves, Alaska produces roughly one-fifth of the nation's daily crude oil production, or approximately one million barrels per day from over 1,800 active wells.

  17. The effects of compressibility on the GIA in southeast Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiyuki Tanaka; Tadahiro Sato; Yusaku Ohta; Satoshi Miura; Jeffrey T. Freymueller; V. Klemann

    2015-01-01

    Recent theoretical simulations on the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) have revealed that the model differences arising from considering mantle compressibility are not necessarily negligible if compared with the observation accuracy of present-day deformation rates. In this study, a compressible model is constructed for the GIA in southeast Alaska, and the uplift rate is compared with GPS data and the incompressible case for the first time. It is shown that, for Maxwell rheology, the incomp...

  18. Preliminary evaluation of wind energy potential: Cook Inlet area, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiester, T.R.

    1980-06-01

    This report summarizes work on a project performed under contract to the Alaska Power Administration (APA). The objective of this research was to make a preliminary assessment of the wind energy potential for interconnection with the Cook Inlet area electric power transmission and distribution systems, to identify the most likely candidate regions (25 to 100 square miles each) for energy potential, and to recommend a monitoring program sufficient to quantify the potential.

  19. Alaska Oil and Gas Exploration, Development, and Permitting Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard McMahon; Robert Crandall

    2006-03-31

    This is the final technical report for Project 15446, covering the grant period of October 2002 through March 2006. This project connects three parts of the oil exploration, development, and permitting process to form the foundation for an advanced information technology infrastructure to better support resource development and resource conservation. Alaska has nearly one-quarter of the nation's supply of crude oil, at least five billion barrels of proven reserves. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists report that the 1995 National Assessment identified the North Slope as having 7.4 billion barrels of technically recoverable oil and over 63 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. From these reserves, Alaska produces roughly one-fifth of the nation's daily crude oil production, or approximately one million barrels per day from over 1,800 active wells. The broad goal of this grant is to increase domestic production from Alaska's known producing fields through the implementation of preferred upstream management practices. (PUMP). Internet publication of extensive and detailed geotechnical data is the first task, improving the permitting process is the second task, and building an advanced geographical information system to offer continuing support and public access of the first two goals is the third task. Excellent progress has been made on all three tasks; the technical objectives as defined by the approved grant sub-tasks have been met. The end date for the grant was March 31, 2006.

  20. Alaska Melilotus invasions: Distribution, origin, and susceptibility of plant communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, J.S.; Beattie, K.L.; Shephard, M.A.; Carlson, M.L.; Lapina, I.; Hebert, M.; Gronquist, R.; Densmore, R.; Rasy, M.

    2008-01-01

    Melilotus alba and M. officinalis were introduced to Alaska in 1913 as potential forage crops. These species have become naturalized and are now invading large, exotic plant-free regions of Alaska. We determined distributions of M. alba and M. officinalis in Alaska from surveys conducted each summer from 2002 to 2005. Melilotus alba and M. officinalis occurred at 721 and 205 sites, respectively (39,756 total sites surveyed). The northward limit for M. alba and M. officinalis was 67.15??N and 64.87??N, respectively. Both species were strictly associated with soil disturbance. Melilotus alba extended no farther than 15 m from road edges except where M. alba on roadsides met river floodplains and dispersed downriver (Matanuska and Nenana Rivers). Melilotus has now reached the Tanana River, a tributary of the Yukon River. Populations on floodplains were most extensive on braided sections. On the Nenana River, soil characteristics did not differ between where M. alba was growing versus similar areas where it had not yet reached. The pH of river soils (7.9-8.3) was higher than highway soils (7.3). Upland taiga plant communities grow on acid soils which may protect them from invasion by Melilotus, which prefer alkaline soils; however, early succession communities on river floodplains are susceptible because soils are alkaline. ?? 2008 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  1. Uranium investigations in southeastern Alaska. Geologic report 44

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive mineral deposits at 14 localities in Southeastern Alaska are discussed to assist in the exploration for uranium. These areas, visited during the 1970 field season, were selected because of known or reported radioactivity and (or) favorable geology. Vein deposits and nonmarine Tertiary sandstones were examined. Radiometric surveys were made on foot, and small areas were mapped to show the spatial relationship between radioactivity and certain ore deposits. Previously unreported low radioactive anomalies were found at several localities, but none of the deposits was indicated to be of commercial grade. Slightly radioactive sandstones were found at Port Camden and on the west side of Zarembo Island. Radioactive pegmatites at Endicott Arm and elsewhere in Southeastern Alaska do not appear to have commercial possibilities, but may serve as guides to mineralization. Geochemical stream-sediment samples were collected at most of the localities examined. A total of 205 samples were taken. Results of atomic absorption analyses are given for copper, lead and zinc. Strong geochemical anomalies were found at William Henry Bay and Kook Lake. The best guides for uranium exploration in Southeastern Alaska are soda-rich granite and the ores and gangue minerals frequently associated with uranium. These include minerals containing copper, silver, cobalt and molybdenum, and hematite and fluorite. There is some indication that unusual amounts of uranium minerals are present in zones peripheral to major copper districts

  2. Inconsistency in precipitation measurements across the Alaska-Yukon border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaff, L.; Yang, D.; Li, Y.; Mekis, E.

    2015-12-01

    This study quantifies the inconsistency in gauge precipitation observations across the border of Alaska and Yukon. It analyses the precipitation measurements by the national standard gauges (National Weather Service (NWS) 8 in. gauge and Nipher gauge) and the bias-corrected data to account for wind effect on the gauge catch, wetting loss and trace events. The bias corrections show a significant amount of errors in the gauge records due to the windy and cold environment in the northern areas of Alaska and Yukon. Monthly corrections increase solid precipitation by 136 % in January and 20 % for July at the Barter Island in Alaska, and about 31 % for January and 4 % for July at the Yukon stations. Regression analyses of the monthly precipitation data show a stronger correlation for the warm months (mainly rainfall) than for cold month (mainly snowfall) between the station pairs, and small changes in the precipitation relationship due to the bias corrections. Double mass curves also indicate changes in the cumulative precipitation over the study periods. This change leads to a smaller and inverted precipitation gradient across the border, representing a significant modification in the precipitation pattern over the northern region. Overall, this study discovers significant inconsistency in the precipitation measurements across the USA-Canada border. This discontinuity is greater for snowfall than for rainfall, as gauge snowfall observations have large errors in windy and cold conditions. This result will certainly impact regional, particularly cross-border, climate and hydrology investigations.

  3. A winter season synoptic climatology of Alaska: 1956-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An objective, descriptive study of Alaska's winter climate is undertaken to identify regional monthly mean surface temperature and precipitation variability during the thirty-year period from 1956-57 to 1985-86. Ten basic anomaly 700-mb height patterns are described in terms of frequency of occurrence and possible associations with the surface climate variability observed in the nine NOAA land-based climate divisions of Alaska and the Gulf of Alaska (tenth division). Results indicate a cool, dry period from 1964-1976. Anomaly height patterns occurring during this period were predominantly characterized by northerly/northwesterly flow from the High Arctic or northeasterly flow from the Canadian Interior. The period from 1956-1962 was generally warm, and the most frequently occurring anomaly height patterns were characterized by southerly flow. The period following 1977 is the most variable of the thirty-year record. This period also includes some of the warmest temperatures seen in the records. Cold anomaly height patterns are interspersed among the slightly more frequent warm anomaly height patterns from 1977-1986. Overall seasonal-scale linear (best-fit approximations) trends appear to indicate a warmer, drier shift in the Interior climate and a warmer, wetter shift in the southern coastal climate

  4. Marine Mammal Sighting and Census data from Coastal Alaska from 05 May 1985 to 13 June 1985 (NODC Accession 8600633)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Mammal Sighting and Census data were collected from Coastal Alaska. Data were collected by Alaska Department of Fish and Game from 05 May 1985 to 13 June...

  5. Delineation of landform and lithologic units for Ecological Landtype-Association analysis in Glacier Bay National Park, Southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brew, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Landform and generalized bedrock lithologic units have been delineated for ecological landtype association analysis in Glacier Bay National Park in southeast Alaska (as the Park boundaries were defined before the 1971 Alaska National Interest Lands expansion).

  6. USGS Small-scale Dataset - Color Alaska Shaded Relief - 200-Meter Resolution, Albers projection 200603 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The color Alaska shaded relief data were derived from National Elevation Dataset (NED) data, and show the terrain of Alaska at a resolution of 200 meters. The NED...

  7. USGS Small-scale Dataset - Grayscale Alaska Shaded Relief - 200-Meter Resolution, Albers projection 200603 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The grayscale Alaska shaded relief data were derived from National Elevation Dataset (NED) data, and show the terrain of Alaska at a resolution of 200 meters. The...

  8. AK-Mercury and methyl-mercury in northern pike (Esox lucius) from National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — All National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska except Kenai include “continued use for subsistence activities” as a defined refuge purpose under the Alaska National...

  9. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 100-Meter Resolution Satellite View with Shaded Relief of Alaska 201304 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View with Shaded Relief of Alaska map layer is a 100-meter resolution simulated natural-color image of Alaska, with relief shading added to accentuate...

  10. 75 FR 5575 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Navy Training Activities Conducted in the Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... Training Activities Conducted in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... readiness training activities to be conducted in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) Temporary Maritime Activities...

  11. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 100-Meter Resolution Color Shaded Relief of Alaska 201304 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Color Shaded Relief of Alaska map layer is a 100-meter resolution color-sliced elevation image of Alaska, with relief shading added to accentuate terrain...

  12. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 100-Meter Resolution Grayscale Shaded Relief of Alaska 201304 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Grayscale Shaded Relief of Alaska map layer is a 100-meter resolution grayscale shaded relief image of Alaska, in an Albers Equal-Area Conic projection. Shaded...

  13. Wildlife management series no. 1: The black-tailed deer in Alaska: An outline of management methods

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes changes in the population of deer in Alaska. The objectives of deer management in Alaska are to promote maximum utilization of our deer herds...

  14. 2008 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Nuzhdaev, Anton A.; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at seven separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2008. Significant explosive eruptions at Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes in July and August dominated Observatory operations in the summer and autumn. AVO maintained 24-hour staffing at the Anchorage facility from July 12 through August 28. Minor eruptive activity continued at Veniaminof and Cleveland Volcanoes. Observed volcanic unrest at Cook Inlet's Redoubt Volcano presaged a significant eruption in the spring of 2009. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at nine volcanoes in Russia as part of a collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  15. 78 FR 14076 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska; Central...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ...NMFS publishes the standard ex-vessel prices and fee percentage for cost recovery under the Central Gulf of Alaska Rockfish Program. This action is intended to provide participants in a rockfish cooperative with the standard prices and fee percentage for the 2012 fishing year, which was authorized from May 1 through November 15. The fee percentage is 1.4 percent. The fee liability payments......

  16. Oceanographic data collected during the Gulf of Alaska 2004 Expedition (alaska2004) on RV Atlantis in Gulf of Alaska from July 30, 2004 - August 23, 2004 (NODC Accession 0072310)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 2004 Gulf of Alaska Seamount Expedition will use the deep submergence vehicle (DSV) Alvin to explore five large seamounts. Giacomini, Pratt, Welker, Denson, and...

  17. Science for Alaska: Public Understanding of University Research Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D.

    2015-12-01

    Science for Alaska: Public Understanding of Science D. L. Campbell11University of Alaska Fairbanks, USA Around 200 people brave 40-below-zero temperatures to listen to university researchers and scientists give lectures about their work at an event called the Science for Alaska Lecture Series, hosted by the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute. It is held once a week, for six weeks during the coldest part of a Fairbanks, Alaska, winter. The topics range from space physics to remote sensing. The lectures last for 45 minutes with 15 minutes for audience questions and answers. It has been popular for about 20 years and is one of many public outreach efforts of the institute. The scientists are careful in their preparations for presentations and GI's Public Relations staff chooses the speakers based on topic, diversity and public interest. The staff also considers the speaker's ability to speak to a general audience, based on style, clarity and experience. I conducted a qualitative research project to find out about the people who attended the event, why they attend and what they do with the information they hear about. The participants were volunteers who attended the event and either stayed after the lectures for an interview or signed up to be contacted later. I used used an interview technique with open-ended questions, recorded and transcribed the interview. I identified themes in the interviews, using narrative analysis. Preliminary data show that the lecture series is a form of entertainment for people who are highly educated and work in demanding and stressful jobs. They come with family and friends. Sometimes it's a date with a significant other. Others want to expose their children to science. The findings are in keeping with the current literature that suggests that public events meant to increase public understanding of science instead draws like-minded people. The findings are different from Campbell's hypothesis that attendance was based

  18. 2005 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGimsey, R.G.; Neal, C.A.; Dixon, J.P.; Ushakov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity at or near 16 volcanoes in Alaska during 2005, including the high profile precursory activity associated with the 2005?06 eruption of Augustine Volcano. AVO continues to participate in distributing information about eruptive activity on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, and in the Kurile Islands of the Russian Far East, in conjunction with the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT), respectively. In 2005, AVO helped broadcast alerts about activity at 8 Russian volcanoes. The most serious hazard posed from volcanic eruptions in Alaska, Kamchatka, or the Kurile Islands is the placement of ash into the atmosphere at altitudes traversed by jet aircraft along the North Pacific and Russian Trans East air routes. AVO, KVERT, and SVERT work collaboratively with the National Weather Service, Federal Aviation Administration, and the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers to provide timely warnings of volcanic eruptions and the production and movement of ash clouds.

  19. Spatial distribution of thermokarst landforms across Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, L. M.; Grosse, G.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Jones, B. M.; Arp, C. D.; McGuire, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic Alaska is characterized by widespread past and present thaw of ice rich permafrost and subsequent thermokarst development. Variations in ice content and distribution, and topography across Arctic Alaska result in thermokarst landform diversity. Thermokarst causes a number of biogeochemical and ecological shifts that include changes in soil carbon dynamics, nutrient cycling, vegetation composition, wildlife habitat, and fresh water availability. Ongoing climate change may lead to an increase in thermokarst landscape features. Thus, a better understanding of the current temporal and spatial dynamics of thermokarst is needed in order to project its future dynamics. Understanding how vulnerable Arctic Alaska is to future thermokarst development is critical for resource management, industry development, and subsistence hunting. We focused on the distribution of thermokarst landforms among ten study sites aligned with the NSF CALON (Towards a Circum-Arctic Lakes Observation Network) project in Arctic Alaska. Sites represent diverse substrates including eolian silt, eolian sand, marine sand, deltaic, and marine silt. We conducted thermokarst landform mapping and spatial and morphometric analyses using high-resolution aerial photography, an interferometric synthetic aperture radar derived digital elevation model (IfSAR DEM), and hydrographic layers from the National Land Cover Database derived from Landsat-7. Non-lake thermokarst landforms were visually mapped and hand digitized using aerial photographs and the IfSAR DEM. Initial results show thermokarst forms are most prevalent in marine silt areas with up to 99% of study areas affected by thermokarst activity. Eolian sand areas are the least thermokarst affected (mean of 57%). Drained thermokarst lake basins, thermokarst lakes, and areas affected by thermokarst pit formation were the dominant thermokarst landforms, covering up to 70%, 54%, and 8% of the landscape. The number of overlapping lake and basin

  20. 77 FR 40305 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pelagic Shelf Rockfish in the Western...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... GOA (77 FR 15194, March 14, 2012). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(i), the Administrator, Alaska... rockfish in the Western Regulatory Area of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent... the GOA. DATES: Effective 1200 hrs, Alaska local time (A.l.t.), July 5, 2012, through 2400 hrs,...

  1. 42 CFR 457.535 - Cost-sharing protection to ensure enrollment of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... American Indians and Alaska Natives. 457.535 Section 457.535 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... § 457.535 Cost-sharing protection to ensure enrollment of American Indians and Alaska Natives. States... children who are American Indians or Alaska Natives, as defined in § 457.10....

  2. 77 FR 54837 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow-Water Species Fishery by Vessels...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow- Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Gulf of Alaska... comprise the shallow-water species fishery by vessels using trawl gear in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This... of the GOA (77 FR 15194, March 14, 2012), for the period 1200 hrs, A.l.t., September 1, 2012,...

  3. 75 FR 23189 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Gulf of Alaska... comprise the deep-water species fishery by vessels using trawl gear in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This... the GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12, 2010), for the period 1200 hrs, A.l.t., April 1, 2010, through...

  4. 75 FR 54290 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow-Water Species Fishery by Vessels...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow- Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Gulf of Alaska... comprise the shallow-water species fishery by vessels using trawl gear in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This... of the GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12, 2010), for the period 1200 hrs, A.l.t., September 1, 2010,...

  5. 77 FR 33103 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow-Water Species Fishery by Vessels...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow- Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Gulf of Alaska... comprise the shallow-water species fishery by vessels using trawl gear in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This... of the GOA (77 FR 15194, March 14, 2012), for the period 1200 hrs, A.l.t., April 1, 2012,...

  6. 77 FR 19146 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow-Water Species Fishery by Vessels...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow- Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Gulf of Alaska... comprise the shallow-water species fishery by vessels using trawl gear in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This... of the GOA (77 FR 15194, March 14, 2012), for the period 1200 hrs, A.l.t., January 20, 2012,...

  7. 77 FR 24154 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    ... Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Gulf of Alaska... comprise the deep-water species fishery by vessels using trawl gear in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This... the GOA (77 FR 15194, March 14, 2012), for the period 1200 hrs, A.l.t., April 1, 2012, through...

  8. 76 FR 55276 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow-Water Species Fishery by Vessels...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Shallow- Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Gulf of Alaska... comprise the shallow-water species fishery by vessels using trawl gear in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This... of the GOA (76 FR 11111, March 11, 2011), for the period 1200 hrs, A.l.t., September 1, 2011,...

  9. 78 FR 30242 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Gulf of Alaska... comprise the deep-water species fishery by vessels using trawl gear in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This... the GOA (78 FR 13162, February 26, 2013), for the period 1200 hours, A.l.t., April 1, 2013,...

  10. 76 FR 23511 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using Trawl Gear in the Gulf of Alaska... comprise the deep-water species fishery by vessels using trawl gear in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This... the GOA (76 FR 11111, March 1, 2011), for the period 1200 hrs, A.l.t., April 1, 2011, through 1200...

  11. "How Will I Sew My Baskets?" Women Vendors, Market Art, and Incipient Political Activism in Anchorage, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Molly

    2003-01-01

    In this article the author examines the multifaceted role of the Alaska Federation of Natives crafts fair in the lives of Alaska Native women who have left their home villages and moved into Anchorage, Alaska's largest city. At the same time, this discussion raises broader issues such as the evolving politicization of women traders and the growing…

  12. FY10 RARE Final Report to Region 10: The functional Assessment of Alaska Peatlands in Cook Inlet Basin - report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peatlands in south central Alaska form the predominant wetland class in the lowlands that encompass Cook Inlet. These peatlands are also in areas of increasing human development in Alaska. Currently Alaska peatlands are extensive and largely pristine. This study focused onobtaini...

  13. 78 FR 17886 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... Statistical Area 630 of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) for 96 hours. This action is necessary to fully use the 2013... FR 15643, March 12, 2012). As of March 18, 2013, NMFS has determined that approximately 2,400...

  14. 78 FR 9849 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... Statistical Area 630 of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to fully use the 2013 total... (78 FR 5145, January 24, 2012). As of February 5, 2013, NMFS has determined that approximately...

  15. 77 FR 64917 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... Statistical Area 610 of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) for 96 hours. This action is necessary to fully use the 2012... (77 FR 64240, October 19, 2012). As of October 17, 2012, NMFS has determined that approximately...

  16. 76 FR 16699 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ...-XA319 Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf... for pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent... Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery...

  17. 75 FR 63104 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 610 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the 2010 total allowable... 2011 harvest specifications for groundfish of the GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12, 2010). In accordance...

  18. 76 FR 44699 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod Allocations in the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... (76 FR 11111, March 1, 2011). Figure 1. Map of State GHL Pacific cod management areas (South Alaska... Gulf of Alaska; Amendment 83; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76 , No. 143 / Tuesday, July...; Pacific Cod Allocations in the Gulf of Alaska; Amendment 83 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries...

  19. 77 FR 16950 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... Statistical Area 630 of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) for 72 hours. This action is necessary to fully use the B... FR 14698, March 13, 2012). As of March 15, 2012, NMFS has determined that approximately 1,389...

  20. 76 FR 81872 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod Allocations in the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod Allocations in the Gulf of Alaska; Amendment 83; Correction AGENCY... pertaining to Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod Allocations in the Gulf of... FR 74670) that revises several sections of regulations that pertain to the management of Pacific...

  1. 78 FR 17340 - Control Date for Qualifying Landings History in the Western Gulf of Alaska Trawl Groundfish...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... Landings History in the Western Gulf of Alaska Trawl Groundfish Fisheries AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries... history for an allocation-based management or catch share program in the Western Gulf of Alaska (GOA... economic zone (EEZ) of the GOA under the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska...

  2. 78 FR 62005 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-11

    ...; Pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS...: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for pollock in Statistical Area 630 in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA... the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska (FMP) prepared by the North...

  3. 76 FR 74670 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod Allocations in the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod Allocations in the Gulf of Alaska... 83 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). Amendment 83 allocates... Federal Register on June 28, 2011 (76 FR 37763), with a 60-day comment period that ended August 29,...

  4. 75 FR 62482 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pollock in Statistical Area 620 in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National Marine... in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the 2010 total allowable... 2011 harvest specifications for groundfish of the GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12, 2010). In accordance...

  5. Developmental Education and College Readiness at the University of Alaska. REL 2016-123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodara, Michelle; Cox, Monica

    2016-01-01

    This study explores developmental education placement rates and how well high school grade point average and exam performance predicted performance in college-level courses among first-time students who enrolled in the University of Alaska system from fall 2008 to spring 2012. Like other colleges and universities, the University of Alaska, the…

  6. 75 FR 57767 - Alaska Power and Telephone Company; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... project would also consist of the following: (1) A new powerhouse; (2) a turbine/generator unit with an... Energy Regulatory Commission Alaska Power and Telephone Company; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2010. On December 21, 2009, the Alaska Power and Telephone Company filed an application for...

  7. 75 FR 8329 - Regulations Governing the Conduct of Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... opportunity to learn about and discuss the procedures and process for commenting upon and holding an open... Energy Regulatory Commission Regulations Governing the Conduct of Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects; Notice of Rescheduled Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects Open Season...

  8. 77 FR 8252 - Adequacy Status of the Anchorage, Alaska, Carbon Monoxide Maintenance Plan for Transportation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... existing violations, or delay timely attainment of the national ambient air quality standards. The minimum... AGENCY Adequacy Status of the Anchorage, Alaska, Carbon Monoxide Maintenance Plan for Transportation... budget (MVEB) in the Anchorage, Alaska, Carbon Monoxide (CO) Maintenance Plan, submitted by the State...

  9. 76 FR 5157 - Public Water Supply Supervision Program; Program Revision for the State of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Public Water Supply Supervision Program; Program Revision for the State of Alaska AGENCY... that the State of Alaska has revised its approved State Public Water Supply Supervision Primacy...

  10. 75 FR 48321 - ORPC Alaska, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-10

    ... the Cook Inlet ] Tidal Energy Project to be located in Cook Inlet in the vicinity of Anchorage, Alaska... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ORPC Alaska, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted...

  11. Serving Fish in School Meals: Perceptions of School Nutrition Professionals in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Betty T.; Pickus, Hayley A.; Contesti, Amy; Dawson, Jo; Bersamin, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Fish and other seafood high in omega-3 fats are important components of a healthy diet. The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions regarding serving fish in school meals among nutrition professionals in Alaska. Methods: Interviews with 22 school nutrition professionals in Alaska were conducted to investigate the…

  12. Gaps in Data for American Indians and Alaska Natives in the National Healthcare Disparities Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Ernest; Smith, Colleen Ryan; Johansson, Patrik; Andrews, Roxanne

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and quantify gaps in health care data for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Findings indicate that only 42% of measures of health care quality and access tracked in the National Healthcare Disparities Report could be used to assess disparities among American Indians and Alaska Natives. Patient safety data…

  13. American Indian/Alaska Native Alcohol-Related Incarceration and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein, Sarah W.; Venner, Kamilla L.; May, Philip A.

    2006-01-01

    American Indian/Alaska Natives have high rates of alcohol-related arrests and are overrepresented in justice systems. To understand the relationship between alcohol dependence, treatment, and alcoholrelated incarceration, this study queried American Indian/Alaska Natives currently in remission from alcohol dependence. Participants reported…

  14. Strategies for Successful Retention of Alaska Native and American Indian Study Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwood, Diana; Leston, Jessica; Asay, Elvin; Ferucci, Elizabeth; Etzel, Ruth; Lanier, Anne P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the strategies used to track and follow 3,828 Alaska Native and American Indian study participants in the city of Anchorage and more rural areas of Alaska and provides characteristics of respondents and non-respondents. Over 88% were successfully followed-up, with 49% of respondents completed in three or fewer attempts.…

  15. A Special Report on the Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education--Collection of Defaulted Student Loans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, Randy S.

    In accordance with a Legislative Budget and Audit Committee special request and the provisions of Title 24 of the Alaska Statutes, a review was conducted of the Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education's experience with various collection contractors used to collect defaulted student loans. The primary purpose was to assess the success that…

  16. 76 FR 62090 - Public Meeting for the National Park Service (NPS) Alaska Region's Subsistence Resource...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... National Park Service Public Meeting for the National Park Service (NPS) Alaska Region's Subsistence... for the National Park Service (NPS) Alaska Region's Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC) program. SUMMARY: The Cape Krusenstern National Monument SRC will meet to develop and continue work on...

  17. 75 FR 51103 - Notice of Public Meetings for the National Park Service (NPS) Alaska Region's Subsistence...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... National Park Service Notice of Public Meetings for the National Park Service (NPS) Alaska Region's... public meetings for the National Park Service (NPS) Alaska Region's Subsistence Resource Commission (SRC... SRC plan to meet to develop and continue work on National Park Service (NPS) subsistence...

  18. 75 FR 33589 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Alaska Native-Serving and Native...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-14

    ... under this notice. At the time of application, an Alaska Native-Serving institution must have an... application, a Native Hawaiian-Serving Institution must have an enrollment of undergraduate students that is... Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Alaska Native-Serving and Native...

  19. Gathering and Gardening in Alaska: Why IPM cannot be overlooked even at Latitude 64° North

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because of its geographical isolation and climatic constraints, Alaska agriculture is considered relatively free of diseases and insect pests. Early colonizers into the state did not encounter the pest problems of modern farmers. However, since 1973, the winter temperatures in Alaska have increased ...

  20. Assessment of Gas Hydrate Resources on the North Slope, Alaska, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Agena, Warren F.; Lee, Myung W.; Zyrianova, Margarita V.; Bird, Kenneth J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy; Houseknect, David W.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed the first assessment of the undiscovered technically recoverable gas-hydrate resources on the North Slope of Alaska. Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the USGS estimates that there are about 85 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of undiscovered, technically recoverable gas resources within gas hydrates in northern Alaska.

  1. Patterns of Injury Mortality among Athabascan Indians in Interior Alaska 1977-1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andon, Helen B.

    1997-01-01

    During 1977-87, almost half of all deaths in rural interior Alaska resulted from accidents, suicide, or homicide. These causes of death were significantly higher among Natives compared to non-Natives or to other Alaska Native populations, among males compared to females, and among adolescents and young adults compared to other age groups. Includes…

  2. Can a Week Make a Difference? Changing Perceptions about Teaching and Living in Rural Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsch, T. R.; Boylan, Colin R.

    2008-01-01

    Many Alaskan schools are located in extremely remote or "fly-in" places. These geographical extremes affect the recruitment and retention of teachers to remote rural schools. Through a partnership between the Southwest Region School District of Alaska and the Department of Education at Alaska Pacific University (APU), 14 pre-service teachers…

  3. Determination of semi-diurnal ocean tide loading constituents using GPS in Alaska

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Tscherning, C.C.

    2001-01-01

    , K-2, M-2 and N-2). For this purpose a test is carried out using two GPS stations in Alaska. One station, Chi3, is located on an island in the Gulf of Alaska, while the second station, Fair, is located far away from the coastal areas. Processing hourly GPS solutions for the baseline between Fair and...

  4. Alaska Power Administration combined financial statements, schedules and supplemental reports, September 30, 1996 and 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Department of Energy`s Alaska Power Administration`s (Alaska) financial statements as of September 30, 1996. The auditors have expressed an unqualified opinion on the 1996 combined statements of assets, Federal investment and liabilities, and the related combined statements of revenues, expenses and accumulated net revenues, and cash flows. The auditors` report on Alaska`s internal control structure disclosed no reportable conditions that could have a material effect on the financial statements. The auditors also considered the overview and performance measure data for completeness and material consistency with the basic financial statements, as noted in the internal control report. The auditor`s report on compliance with laws and regulations disclosed no instances of noncompliance by Alaska.

  5. POPs data for salmonids and macroinvertebrates from Glacier Bay, Alaska - Measuring persistent organic pollutants in resident salmonids and benthic macroinvertebrates in streams near Glacier National Park, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 2007 pilot study was initiated by the University of Alaska Southeast in which baseline levels of contaminants, including persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and...

  6. Counts of Alaska Steller sea lion pups conducted on rookeries in Alaska from 1961-06-22 to 2015-07-18 (NCEI Accession 0128189)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database contains counts of Steller sea lion pups on rookeries in Alaska made between 1961 and 2015. Pup counts are conducted in late June-July. Pups are...

  7. Age of vegetation simulated by Boreal ALFRESCO for the state of Alaska. Dataset generated in 2010. NAD83, Alaska Albers projection, http://spatialreference.org/ref/epsg/3338/

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — These rasters represent output from the Boreal ALFRESCO (Alaska Frame Based Ecosystem Code) model. Boreal ALFRESCO operates on an annual time step, in a landscape...

  8. The place of conservation in the settlement of Alaska native land claims: An address to the Alaska Chapter, the Sierra Club

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This address summarizes claims of Alaska Natives against the United States government. These claims include withdrawals of land for federal purposes, such as...

  9. Technology and Engineering Advances Supporting EarthScope's Alaska Transportable Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, J.; Enders, M.; Busby, R.

    2015-12-01

    EarthScope's Transportable Array (TA) in Alaska and Canada is an ongoing deployment of 261 high quality broadband seismographs. The Alaska TA is the continuation of the rolling TA/USArray deployment of 400 broadband seismographs in the lower 48 contiguous states and builds on the success of the TA project there. The TA in Alaska and Canada is operated by the IRIS Consortium on behalf of the National Science Foundation as part of the EarthScope program. By Sept 2015, it is anticipated that the TA network in Alaska and Canada will be operating 105 stations. During the summer of 2015, TA field crews comprised of IRIS and HTSI station specialists, as well as representatives from our partner agencies the Alaska Earthquake Center and the Alaska Volcano Observatory and engineers from the UNAVCO Plate Boundary Observatory will have completed a total of 36 new station installations. Additionally, we will have completed upgrades at 9 existing Alaska Earthquake Center stations with borehole seismometers and the adoption of an additional 35 existing stations. Continued development of battery systems using LiFePO4 chemistries, integration of BGAN, Iridium, Cellular and VSAT technologies for real time data transfer, and modifications to electronic systems are a driving force for year two of the Alaska Transportable Array. Station deployment utilizes custom heliportable drills for sensor emplacement in remote regions. The autonomous station design evolution include hardening the sites for Arctic, sub-Arctic and Alpine conditions as well as the integration of rechargeable Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries with traditional AGM batteries We will present new design aspects, outcomes, and lessons learned from past and ongoing deployments, as well as efforts to integrate TA stations with other existing networks in Alaska including the Plate Boundary Observatory and the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

  10. Science and common sense in Port Valdez, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, P. [EVS Consultants, N. Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Bridgman, J. [RCAC, Valdez, AK (United States); Kitagawa, J.; Dickason, G. [Alyeska, Anchorage, AK (United States); Dailey, A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Valdez, Alaska achieved worldwide attention with the Exxon Valdez oil spill. This exacerbated an already polarized situation (industry, government, citizens, environmental groups) regarding the Valdez Terminal of the Trans Alaska Pipeline System. Other than spills, the major focus of environmental concern was and remains the Terminal`s Ballast Water Treatment Plant (BWTP) which discharges into Port Valdez. The previous NPDES wastewater discharge permits for this facility have been contentious for almost the entire period of pipeline operation. The draft NPDES permit is scheduled to be proposed for reissuance this year. However, a significant change has been initiated which so far is resulting in cooperation rather than confrontation between the various primary stakeholders. This presentation will explain how this change was initiated, how it is being maintained, and how what is happening could be a model for progress through cooperation. Although EPA and the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC) remain the final decision makers, key ingredients to this change and to the resulting progress include: (1) EPA opening up public discussion on the permit early in the permit development process; (2) willingness of involved parties to listen and explore non-traditional approaches; (3) a subsequent non-binding Scientific Meeting to discuss the permit, attended only by scientific representatives, with set Ground-Rules and Agenda and a nonstakeholder moderator, which resulted in eight general points of agreement; (4) use of these points of agreement to discuss what environmental monitoring should be in the permit, what should comprise separate studies, and what should not be done; (5) continuing cross-stakeholder communication and discussion; (6) an open and highly visible process.

  11. Remote-site power generation opportunities for Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, M.L.

    1997-03-01

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been working with the Federal Energy Technology Center in Morgantown, West Virginia, to assess options for small, low-cost, environmental acceptable power generation for application in remote areas of Alaska. The goal of this activity was to reduce the use of fuel in Alaskan villages by developing small, low-cost power generation applications. Because of the abundance of high-quality coal throughout Alaska, emphasis was placed on clean coal applications, but other energy sources, including geothermal, wind, hydro, and coalbed methane, were also considered. The use of indigenous energy sources would provide cheaper cleaner power, reduce the need for PCE (Power Cost Equalization program) subsidies, increase self-sufficiency, and retain hard currency in the state while at the same time creating jobs in the region. The introduction of economical, small power generation systems into Alaska by US equipment suppliers and technology developers aided by the EERC would create the opportunities for these companies to learn how to engineer, package, transport, finance, and operate small systems in remote locations. All of this experience would put the US developers and equipment supply companies in an excellent position to export similar types of small power systems to rural areas or developing countries. Thus activities in this task that relate to determining the generic suitability of these technologies for other countries can increase US competitiveness and help US companies sell these technologies in foreign countries, increasing the number of US jobs. The bulk of this report is contained in the two appendices: Small alternative power workshop, topical report and Global market assessment of coalbed methane, fluidized-bed combustion, and coal-fired diesel technologies in remote applications.

  12. Science and common sense in Port Valdez, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdez, Alaska achieved worldwide attention with the Exxon Valdez oil spill. This exacerbated an already polarized situation (industry, government, citizens, environmental groups) regarding the Valdez Terminal of the Trans Alaska Pipeline System. Other than spills, the major focus of environmental concern was and remains the Terminal's Ballast Water Treatment Plant (BWTP) which discharges into Port Valdez. The previous NPDES wastewater discharge permits for this facility have been contentious for almost the entire period of pipeline operation. The draft NPDES permit is scheduled to be proposed for reissuance this year. However, a significant change has been initiated which so far is resulting in cooperation rather than confrontation between the various primary stakeholders. This presentation will explain how this change was initiated, how it is being maintained, and how what is happening could be a model for progress through cooperation. Although EPA and the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC) remain the final decision makers, key ingredients to this change and to the resulting progress include: (1) EPA opening up public discussion on the permit early in the permit development process; (2) willingness of involved parties to listen and explore non-traditional approaches; (3) a subsequent non-binding Scientific Meeting to discuss the permit, attended only by scientific representatives, with set Ground-Rules and Agenda and a nonstakeholder moderator, which resulted in eight general points of agreement; (4) use of these points of agreement to discuss what environmental monitoring should be in the permit, what should comprise separate studies, and what should not be done; (5) continuing cross-stakeholder communication and discussion; (6) an open and highly visible process

  13. Alaska at the Crossroads of Migration: Space Based Ornithology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppe, Jill; Wessels, Konrad; Smith, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding bird migration on a global scale is one of the most compelling and challenging problems of modern biology with major implications for human health and conservation biology. Revolutionary advances in remote sensing now provide us with near real-time measurements of atmospheric and land surface conditions at high spatial resolution over entire continents. We use spatially-explicit, individual based bird migration models driven by numerical weather prediction models of atmospheric conditions, dynamic habitat suitability maps derived from remotely sensed land surface conditions, biophysiological models, and biological field data to simulate migration routes, timing, energy budgets, and survival of individual birds and populations. Long-distance migratory birds travel annually between breeding grounds in Alaska and wintering grounds in Latin Amierica. Approximately 25% of these species are potential vectors of Avian Influenza. Alaska is at the crossroads of Asian and New World migratory flyways and is likely to be a point of introduction of Asian H5N1 AI into the western hemisphere. If/when an infected bird is detected, a pressing question will be where was this bird several days ago, and where is it likely to go after it was released from the survey site? Answers to such questions will increase effectiveness of AI surveillance and mitigation measures. From a conservation perspective, Alaska's diverse landscape provides breeding sites for many migrants, and climatic and land surface changes along migratory flyways in the western hemisphere may reduce bird survival and physical condition upon arrival at Alaskan breeding territories, success and migrant populations.

  14. Record of Decision for Amchitka Surface Closure, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-08-01

    This Record of Decision has been prepared to document the remedial actions taken on Amchitka Island to stabilize contaminants associated with drilling mud pits generated as a result of nuclear testing operations conducted on the island. This document has been prepared in accordance with the recommended outline in the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation guidance on decision documentation under the Site Cleanup Rules (18 AAC 75.325-18 AAC 75.390) (ADEC 1999). It also describes the decision-making process used to establish the remedial action plans and defines the associated human health and ecological risks for the remediation.

  15. Ranking Alaska moose nutrition: Signals to begin liberal antlerless harvests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boertje, R.D.; Kellie, K.A.; Seaton, C.T.; Keech, M.A.; Young, D.D.; Dale, B.W.; Adams, L.G.; Aderman, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    We focused on describing low nutritional status in an increasing moose (Alces alces gigas) population with reduced predation in Game Management Unit (GMU) 20A near Fairbanks, Alaska, USA. A skeptical public disallowed liberal antlerless harvests of this moose population until we provided convincing data on low nutritional status. We ranked nutritional status in 15 Alaska moose populations (in boreal forests and coastal tundra) based on multiyear twinning rates. Data on age-of-first-reproduction and parturition rates provided a ranking consistent with twinning rates in the 6 areas where comparative data were available. Also, short-yearling mass provided a ranking consistent with twinning rates in 5 of the 6 areas where data were available. Data from 5 areas implied an inverse relationship between twinning rate and browse removal rate. Only in GMU 20A did nutritional indices reach low levels where justification for halting population growth was apparent, which supports prior findings that nutrition is a minor factor limiting most Alaska moose populations compared to predation. With predator reductions, the GMU 20A moose population increased from 1976 until liberal antlerless harvests in 2004. During 1997–2005, GMU 20A moose exhibited the lowest nutritional status reported to date for wild, noninsular, North American populations, including 1) delayed reproduction until moose reached 36 months of age and the lowest parturition rate among 36-month-old moose (29%, n = 147); 2) the lowest average multiyear twinning rates from late-May aerial surveys (x̄ = 7%, SE = 0.9%, n = 9 yr, range = 3–10%) and delayed twinning until moose reached 60 months of age; 3) the lowest average mass of female short-yearlings in Alaska (x̄ = 155 ± 1.6 [SE] kg in the Tanana Flats subpopulation, up to 58 kg below average masses found elsewhere); and 4) high removal (42%) of current annual browse biomass compared to 9–26% elsewhere in boreal forests. When average multiyear twinning

  16. Record of Decision for Amchitka Surface Closure, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Record of Decision has been prepared to document the remedial actions taken on Amchitka Island to stabilize contaminants associated with drilling mud pits generated as a result of nuclear testing operations conducted on the island. This document has been prepared in accordance with the recommended outline in the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation guidance on decision documentation under the Site Cleanup Rules (18 AAC 75.325-18 AAC 75.390) (ADEC 1999). It also describes the decision-making process used to establish the remedial action plans and defines the associated human health and ecological risks for the remediation.

  17. The oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeGrange A.R.

    1990-02-01

    Full Text Available Following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound Alaska, on March 24, 1989, treatment centres for sea otters were set up at Valdez, Seward and Homer. Otter survival rates were lower at Valdez than at Seward, probably because the animals collected were closer to the spill in time and space, and oil toxicity was at a maximum. Otters collected in Prince William Sound were predominantly female and pregnant or lactating. Weathered oil persists in otter habitats throughout the spill zone - long term studies are underway to assess the effects of this.

  18. Alaska - Russian Far East connection in volcano research and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Eichelberger, J. C.; Gordeev, E.; Neal, C. A.; Chebrov, V. N.; Girina, O. A.; Demyanchuk, Y. V.; Rybin, A. V.

    2012-12-01

    The Kurile-Kamchatka-Alaska portion of the Pacific Rim of Fire spans for nearly 5400 km. It includes more than 80 active volcanoes and averages 4-6 eruptions per year. Resulting ash clouds travel for hundreds to thousands of kilometers defying political borders. To mitigate volcano hazard to aviation and local communities, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (IVS), in partnership with the Kamchatkan Branch of the Geophysical Survey of the Russian Academy of Sciences (KBGS), have established a collaborative program with three integrated components: (1) volcano monitoring with rapid information exchange, (2) cooperation in research projects at active volcanoes, and (3) volcanological field schools for students and young scientists. Cooperation in volcano monitoring includes dissemination of daily information on the state of volcanic activity in neighboring regions, satellite and visual data exchange, as well as sharing expertise and technologies between AVO and the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT). Collaboration in scientific research is best illustrated by involvement of AVO, IVS, and KBGS faculty and graduate students in mutual international studies. One of the most recent examples is the NSF-funded Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE)-Kamchatka project focusing on multi-disciplinary study of Bezymianny volcano in Kamchatka. This international project is one of many that have been initiated as a direct result of a bi-annual series of meetings known as Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) workshops that we organize together with colleagues from Hokkaido University, Japan. The most recent JKASP meeting was held in August 2011 in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and brought together more than 130 scientists and students from Russia, Japan, and the United States. The key educational component of our collaborative program

  19. Harvest estimates of the Western Arctic caribou herd, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Sutherland

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available A generalized least squares regression model was developed to estimate local harvest of the Western Arctic caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti herd. This model provides herd and community level harvest based on community size, proximity of the herd to the village. The model utilizes community harvest survey information from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Subsistence Division and cooperation from the nonprofit organizations Maniliq and Kawerak. The model will assist in an annual selection of communities to survey. The predicted local resident harvest of the Western Arctic caribou herd is 14 700 with 95% lower and upper confidence limits of 10 100 and 19 700 respectively.

  20. Gulf of Alaska as seen from STS-59

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The spring thaw along the coast of the Gulf of Alaska has not touched the St. Elias Mountains, southeast of Yakutat Bay and Malaspina Glacier. A prominent glacier flows from Mt. Fairweather (15,300 feet) at right center, to form Cape Fairweather. Another glacier to the northwest almost reaches the sea; the valley of the Alsek River forms a broad, braided plain at upper left. the low sun elevation and oblique angle of this photograph provide a 3-dimensional appearance to the black-and-white landscape.