WorldWideScience

Sample records for alaska linking wildlife

  1. Fish and wildlife research in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Problems, information needs, research facilities, current research, and documents related to long term planning of fish and wildlife research in Alaska. Appendices...

  2. USFWS Guide Use Areas within Alaska's National Wildlife Refuges (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 7 (Alaska) has established Guide Use Areas (GUA) within the National Wildlife Refuges in the state of Alaska....

  3. Wildlife disease and environmental health in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hemert, Caroline; Pearce, John; Oakley, Karen; Whalen, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Environmental health is defined by connections between the physical environment, ecological health, and human health. Current research within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recognizes the importance of this integrated research philosophy, which includes study of disease and pollutants as they pertain to wildlife and humans. Due to its key geographic location and significant wildlife resources, Alaska is a critical area for future study of environmental health.

  4. 75 FR 8396 - Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, Cold Bay, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... proposed road corridor through the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge and the Izembek Wilderness Area. We... Wildlife Refuge for the road corridor and approximately 1,600 acres of Federal land within the Alaska..., and from the State of Alaska on June 19, 2009. Our notice of August 6, 2009 (74 FR 39336),...

  5. Notes on village economies and wildlife utilization in arctic Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Visits were made to 12 Eskimo villages in Arctic Alaska during the spring of 1954. At each settlement information was collected regarding the economy and the...

  6. Snowshoe hare pellet counts: Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge, eastern Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Snowshoe hares Lepus americanus are a keystone herbivore in the boreal forests of Canada and Alaska, and are cyclical over an approximately 8 to 11 year period....

  7. Wildlife inventory plan, Becharof National Wildlife Refuge, King Salmon, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This wildlife inventory plan for Becharof National Wildlife Refuge outlines the different projects and surveys that will help conserve fish and wildlife populations...

  8. Wildlife response on the Alaska North Slope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recognizing the need for a comprehensive plan to deal with potentially oiled wildlife on the Alaskan North Slope, a multifaceted wildlife protection strategy was developed and implemented during 1991. The strategy incorporated all aspects of wildlife response including protection of critical habitat, hazing, capture and stabilization, long term rehabilitation, and release. The primary wildlife response strategy emphasizes controlling of the release and spreading of spilled oil at the source to prevent or reduce contamination of potentially affected species and/or their habitat. A secondary response strategy concentrates on keeping potentially affected wildlife away from an oiled area through the use of deterrent techniques. Tertiary response involves the capture and treatment of oiled wildlife. Implementation of the strategy included the development of specialized training, the procurement of equipment, and the construction of a bird stabilization center. The result of this initiative is a comprehensive wildlife response capability on the Alaskan North Slope. 1 ref., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  9. 50 CFR Table I to Part 36 - Summary Listing the National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska as established by the Alaska Lands Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Summary Listing the National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska as established by the Alaska Lands Act, Pub. L. 96-487, December 2, 1980 I Table I to... (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM ALASKA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGES Pt. 36, Table I Table I...

  10. Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Alaska Maritime NWR (including the Alaska Peninsula Unit, the Aleutian Islands Unit, the Bering Sea Unit, the Chukchi Sea Unit, and...

  11. Wetlands & Wildlife: Alaska Wildlife Curriculum Junior & Senior High Teacher's Guide 7-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, Marilyn; And Others

    This curriculum guide was designed to give students at the secondary level an awareness of Alaska's wetlands and the fish and wildlife that live there. The guide is divided into the following sections which include related learning activities: (1) definition and location of wetlands; (2) wetland functions in energy flow and ecological balance; (3)…

  12. Characteristics, trapping techniques and views of trappers on a wildlife refuge in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Persons requesting permits to trap on a 691,000 ha wildlife refuge on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula answered questions about their trapping experience, trapping...

  13. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) removal from the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, October 1984 and 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the removal of polychlorinated biphenyl PCB from Kenai National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska during October 1984 and 1985. Atlantic Ritchfield...

  14. Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge: Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan, Wilderness Review, and Environmental Impact Statement

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) describes three alternatives for managing Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge and identifies the possible...

  15. Lake Habitat and Fish Surveys on Interior Alaska National Wildlife Refuges, 1984–1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A large-scale lake study on Interior Alaska National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) was undertaken from 1984–1986. Six NWRs were surveyed (Innoko, Kanuti, Koyukuk, Nowitna,...

  16. The Trail Inventory of Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge [Cycle 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  17. 50 CFR Appendix I to Part 37 - Legal Description of the Coastal Plain, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska I Appendix I to Part 37 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, ALASKA Pt....

  18. AK-Mercury and methyl-mercury in northern pike (Esox lucius) from National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — All National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska except Kenai include “continued use for subsistence activities” as a defined refuge purpose under the Alaska National...

  19. Moose movement and distribution in response to winter seismological exploration on the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Although oil and gas development first occurred in Alaska on the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge (KNWR) in 1957, impacts on wildlife from oil exploration and...

  20. Alaska Peninsula National Wildlife Refuge: Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan, Environmental Impact Statement, and Wilderness Review

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document includes a final environmental impact statement EIS for the Alaska Peninsula Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan. It describes five alternative...

  1. Revised Comprehensive Conservation Plan: Alaska Peninsula and Becharof National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Alaska Peninsula and Becharof NWRs for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  2. Ecology of wolverines in northwest Alaska: Report to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In response to proposed oil and gas exploration and development activities in the National Petroleum Reserve Alaska NPRA, a study of wolverine ecology was initiated...

  3. A raptor survey of the Canning and Kongakut Rivers, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) directs the Department of the Interior to assess the potential for oil and natural gas resources of the...

  4. Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Alaska Maritime NWR (including the Aleutian Island Unit) outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1982 calendar year. The report...

  5. Wildlife management series no. 1: The black-tailed deer in Alaska: An outline of management methods

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes changes in the population of deer in Alaska. The objectives of deer management in Alaska are to promote maximum utilization of our deer herds...

  6. Asbestos investigations in fish and wildlife in the upper Yukon River region, Alaska 1977-1982: Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — High Concentrations of asbestos were first discovered in the upper Yukon River near Eagle, Alaska in the summer of 1977 by Fish and Wildlife Service Biologists....

  7. Conceptual ecological models to support detection of ecological change on Alaska National Wildlife Refuges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Andrea; Beever, Erik A.

    2011-01-01

    More than 31 million hectares of land are protected and managed in 16 refuges by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in Alaska. The vastness and isolation of Alaskan refuges give rise to relatively intact and complete ecosystems. The potential for these lands to provide habitat for trust species is likely to be altered, however, due to global climate change, which is having dramatic effects at high latitudes. The ability of USFWS to effectively manage these lands in the future will be enhanced by a regional inventory and monitoring program that integrates and supplements monitoring currently being implemented by individual refuges. Conceptual models inform monitoring programs in a number of ways, including summarizing important ecosystem components and processes as well as facilitating communication, discussion and debate about the nature of the system and important management issues. This process can lead to hypotheses regarding future changes, likely results of alternative management actions, identification of monitoring indicators, and ultimately, interpretation of monitoring results. As a first step towards developing a monitoring program, the 16 refuges in Alaska each created a conceptual model of their refuge and the landscape context. Models include prominent ecosystem components, drivers, and processes by which components are linked or altered. The Alaska refuge system also recognizes that designing and implementing monitoring at regional and ecoregional extents has numerous scientific, fiscal, logistical, and political advantages over monitoring conducted exclusively at refuge-specific scales. Broad-scale monitoring is particularly advantageous for examining phenomena such as climate change because effects are best interpreted at broader spatial extents. To enable an ecoregional perspective, a rationale was developed for deriving ecoregional boundaries for four ecoregions (Polar, Interior Alaska, Bering Coast, and North Pacific Coast) from the

  8. Wilderness record, Nunivak National Wildlife Refuge, Second Judicial District, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Wilderness study report; mineral appraisal; master plan; Federal Register notice; materials sent to news media; public hearing package, mailing list, handout...

  9. Wildlife, Snow, Coffee, and Video: The IPY Activities of the University of Alaska Young Researchers' Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, D.; Alvarez-Aviles, L.; Carlson, D.; Harbeck, J.; Druckenmiller, M.; Newman, K.; Mueller, D.; Petrich, C.; Roberts, A.; Wang, Y.

    2007-12-01

    The University of Alaska International Polar Year (IPY) Young Researchers' Network is a group of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. Our interdisciplinary group operates as a volunteer network to promote the International Polar Year through education and outreach aimed at the general public and Alaskan students of all ages. The Young Researchers' Network sponsors and organizes science talks or Science Cafés by guest speakers in public venues such as coffee shops and bookstores. We actively engage high school students in IPY research concerning the ionic concentrations and isotopic ratios of precipitation through Project Snowball. Our network provides hands-on science activities to encourage environmental awareness and initiate community wildlife monitoring programs such as Wildlife Day by Day. We mentor individual high school students pursuing their own research projects related to IPY through the Alaska High School Science Symposium. Our group also interacts with the general public at community events and festivals to share the excitement of IPY for example at the World Ice Art Championship and Alaska State Fair. The UA IPY Young Researchers' Network continues to explore new partnerships with educators and students in an effort to enhance science and education related to Alaska and the polar regions in general. For more information please visit: http://ipy-youth.uaf.edu or e-mail: ipy-youth@alaska.edu

  10. Activities, attitudes and management preferences of recreationists in the Arctic National Wildlife Range, Alaska in 1977: Draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study of recreational users of arctic Alaska was conducted to identify the impacts of increased use on the visitor experience and the resources of the Arctic...

  11. Migratory bird use of the coastal lagoon system of the Beaufort Sea coastline within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the migratory bird use of the coastal lagoon system of the Beaufort Sea coastline within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska. Aerial...

  12. ANWR progress report number FY84-6: Movement of molting oldsquaws within the Beaufort Sea coastal lagoons of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the movement of molting oldsquaw within the Beaufort Sea Coastal lagoons of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska. During August, 1983, 16...

  13. Species accounts of migratory birds at three study areas on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the species accounts of migratory birds at 3 study areas on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska during 1983. The...

  14. Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii antibody prevalence in Alaska wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieve, Erica; Beckmen, Kimberlee; Kania, Stephen A; Widner, Amanda; Patton, Sharon

    2010-04-01

    Free-ranging caribou and moose populations in some regions of Alaska undergo periodic declines in numbers. Caribou and moose are managed by the state as valuable resources for not only sustenance and subsistence, but also for cultural heritage. Incidence and prevalence of diseases that may impact herd health and recruitment from year to year are relevant to management decisions aimed to protect the long-term viability of these herds. Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii are two apicomplexan parasites that can cause neurologic disease and abortions in their intermediate hosts and less frequently cause disease in their definitive hosts. The definitive hosts of N. caninum and T. gondii are canids and felids, respectively, and prevalence in the environment is in part dependent on maintenance of the life cycle through the definitive hosts. Serum samples from caribou (Rangifer tarandus, n=453), wolf (Canis lupus, n=324), moose (Alces alces, n=201), black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus, n=55), coyote (Canis latrans, n=12), and fox (Vulpes vulpes, n=9) collected in Alaska were assayed for N. caninum- and T. gondii-reactive antibodies with an immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT) and a modified agglutination test (MAT), respectively. Seroprevalence of N. caninum was greater in caribou (11.5%) than in wolves (9.0%), moose (0.5%), or black-tailed deer (0%). Seroprevalence of T. gondii was greater in wolves (17.8%) than in caribou (0.4%), moose (0%), or black-tailed deer (0%). Seroprevalence of N. caninum and T. gondii were 16.7% and 0.0% in coyotes and 0.0% and 12.5% in fox, but small sample sizes prevented further analysis. Antibodies to N. caninum in young caribou compared to adult caribou suggest that vertical transmission may be an important component of new infections in Alaskan caribou. The spatial distribution of antibody-positive individuals across Alaska may reflect differences in frequency of definitive hosts and alteration of predation patterns among regions

  15. Linking Movement Ecology with Wildlife Management and Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mark Allen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A common challenge in species conservation and management is how to incorporate species movements into management objectives. There often is a lack of knowledge of where, when and why species move. The field of movement ecology has grown rapidly in the last decade and is now providing the knowledge needed to incorporate movements of species into management planning. This knowledge can also be used to develop management strategies that are flexible in time and space and may improve the effectiveness of management actions. Therefore, wildlife management and conservation may benefit by strengthening the link with movement ecology. We present a framework that illustrates how animal movement can be used to enhance conservation planning and identify management actions that are complementary to existing strategies. The framework contains five steps that identify (1 the movement attributes of a species, (2 their impacts on ecosystems, (3 how this knowledge can be used to guide the scale and type of management, (4 the implementation, and (5 the evaluation of management actions. We discuss these five steps in detail, highlighting why the step is important and how the information can be obtained. We illustrate the framework through a case study of managing a highly mobile species, the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar, a harvested species of conservation concern. We believe that the movement-management framework provides an important, and timely, link between movement ecology and wildlife management and conservation, and highlights the potential for complementary, dynamic solutions for managing wildlife.

  16. Cadmium in arctic Alaska wildlife: Kidney and liver residues and potential exposure in indigenous people

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Hara, T. [Department of Wildlife Management, Barrow, AK (United States); Fairbrother, A. [e, p, and t, inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Becker, P. [Army Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Tarpley, R. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). College of Veterinary Medicine

    1995-12-31

    In arctic Alaska, cadmium (Cd) levels are of concern in kidney and liver of terrestrial and marine mammals including: bowhead whale, beluga whale, walrus, caribou, and ringed seal. Cd levels in some animals exceed threshold criteria in kidney for renal dysfunction and other effects, tolerance levels for human consumption (liver = 1 ppm, kidney = 3 ppm), and WHO weekly intake limits (500 ug Cd/week). An assessment of risk to indigenous people and to wildlife populations, will be presented. Cigarette smoking is another major source of Cd to be considered. Reports from Greenland have concluded a health risk from Cd exposure from marine dietary sources and smoking exist for these residents. Bowhead whale kidney and walrus kidney and liver represent major dietary sources of Cd (blubber and meat have very little Cd). Followed by: ringed seal liver (kidney data not available), beluga whale liver and kidney, and caribou kidney. Small portions of bowhead and walrus kidney (< 10g/week) exceed weekly intake levels. Age positively correlates with Cd levels in kidney indicating that avoiding older (larger) animals would reduce exposure. Adverse effects of Cd in wildlife were not grossly evident, however, with no historic data, it is difficult to determine if tissue concentrations are elevated. Harvest of wildlife is important to many arctic people for nutritional and cultural survival. Assessing risks associated with contaminants is essential for the wellbeing of indigenous people and wildlife. The nutritional value of the local resources and the potential inadequate alternatives must be considered.

  17. Migratory bird studies in Alaska: Comparative behavior and ecology of loons: Annual progress report, Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center, January 1, 1970 to December 31, 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Breeding biology of loon in the North slope region of Alaska. Mentions yellow-billed loons, artic loons, and red-throated loons. Studied courtship, nesting,...

  18. Wildlife

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes wildlife observations on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge) between 1992 and 2009.

  19. The North Slope of Alaska and Tourism: Potential Impacts on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, L. R.

    2004-12-01

    The hydrocarbon industry of Alaska is currently the leading producer of revenue for the Alaskan state economy. Second only to hydrocarbons is the tourism industry. Tourism has been a viable industry since the 1890's when cruises touted the beauty of glaciers and icebergs along the Alaskan coastline. This industry has seen a steady growth for the past few decades throughout the state. The North Slope of Alaska, particularly Prudhoe Bay and the National Petroleum Reserve, has long been associated with hydrocarbon development and today displays a landscape dotted with gravel drill pads, gas and oil pipelines and housing for the oil workers. While tourism is not usually considered hand in hand with the hydrocarbon industry, it has mimicked the development of hydrocarbons almost since the beginning. Today one not only sees the effects of the oil industry on the North Slope, but also the tourist industry as planes unload dozens of tourists, or tour buses and private vehicles arrive daily via the Dalton Highway. In Deadhorse, hotels that once only housed the oil workers now welcome the tourist, offering tours of the oil fields and adjacent areas and have become jumping off sites for wilderness trips. Tourism will create jobs as well as revenue. However, at present, there are few restrictions or guidelines in place that will deal with the potential impacts of increased tourism. Because of this there are many concerns about the possible impacts tourism and the infrastructure development will have on the North Slope. To list several concerns: (1) What are the impacts of increased tourism and the infrastructure development? (2) What will the impacts be on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), which sits a mere 60 miles to the east of Deadhorse? (3) Will hydrocarbon development in ANWR and the associated infrastructure exacerbate potential impact by encouraging greater use of the Refuge by tourists? (4) Will tourism itself have a negative impact on this fragile

  20. Landsat-facilitated vegetation map and vegetation reconnaissance of Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A Landsat assisted vegetation map was prepared for Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge (925,000 acres). The refuge lies within the northern boreal subzone of eastern...

  1. Stream Temperature Monitoring on Togiak National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 2001-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Stream temperature was monitored at 18 sites on 14 rivers in Togiak National Wildlife Refuge between 2001 and 2012. Temperature was recorded on an hourly basis...

  2. Bird populations and habitat use, Canning River Delta, Alaska: Report to Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bird populations and use of habitat at the Canning River Delta, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, was the subject of a study during the summer of 1979 and 1980....

  3. Tundra swan populations, productivity, and local movements on Selawik National Wildlife Refuge, northwest Alaska, 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the monitoring of populations and production of tundra swans on Selawik National Wildlife Refuge in 1985 as part of a longterm study. Radio...

  4. Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge, Kodiak, Alaska, master plan back-up volume

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge Master Plan has been developed as a resource document as well as a guide for Refuge management. Content of the Master Plan...

  5. Contaminants Survey: Bear Creek Well Number 1: Alaska Peninsula/Becharof National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1988, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) funded a contaminants project with the following objectives : 1) conduct a reconnaissance-level field...

  6. Marten Ecology and Distribution on the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Marten (Martes americana) were studied on the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge from June 1986 through July 1988 to determine factors limiting their current...

  7. Bird populations in coastal habitats, Arctic National Wildlife Range, Alaska: Results of 1978 and 1979 surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Within the coastal zone of the Arctic National Wildlife Range, the highest breeding populations of birds occurred in wet and flooded sedge tundra areas surrounded...

  8. Ecology of Nesting Bald Eagles on the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) were censused in a boreal forest region on and near the 688,000 ha Kenai National Wildlife Refuge for the first time in 1979....

  9. Progress Report on the fish and wildlife resources of Virginia Lake Basin, Territory of Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a progress report on the fish and wildlife resources of Virginia Lake Basin. This report specifically looks at the potential for hydroelectric power...

  10. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Northwest Arctic, Alaska: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anadromous fish species in Northwest Arctic, Alaska. Vector arcs in this data set represent species...

  11. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Northwest Arctic, Alaska: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine and estuarine invertebrate species in Northwest Arctic, Alaska. Vector polygons in this data...

  12. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Northwest Arctic, Alaska: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, freshwater, and anadromous fish species in Northwest Arctic, Alaska. Vector...

  13. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Northwest Arctic, Alaska: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in Northwest Arctic, Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set...

  14. Range Expansion of Moose in Arctic Alaska Linked to Warming and Increased Shrub Habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tape, Ken D; Gustine, David D; Ruess, Roger W; Adams, Layne G; Clark, Jason A

    2016-01-01

    Twentieth century warming has increased vegetation productivity and shrub cover across northern tundra and treeline regions, but effects on terrestrial wildlife have not been demonstrated on a comparable scale. During this period, Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas) extended their range from the boreal forest into tundra riparian shrub habitat; similar extensions have been observed in Canada (A. a. andersoni) and Eurasia (A. a. alces). Northern moose distribution is thought to be limited by forage availability above the snow in late winter, so the observed increase in shrub habitat could be causing the northward moose establishment, but a previous hypothesis suggested that hunting cessation triggered moose establishment. Here, we use recent changes in shrub cover and empirical relationships between shrub height and growing season temperature to estimate available moose habitat in Arctic Alaska c. 1860. We estimate that riparian shrubs were approximately 1.1 m tall c. 1860, greatly reducing the available forage above the snowpack, compared to 2 m tall in 2009. We believe that increases in riparian shrub habitat after 1860 allowed moose to colonize tundra regions of Alaska hundreds of kilometers north and west of previous distribution limits. The northern shift in the distribution of moose, like that of snowshoe hares, has been in response to the spread of their shrub habitat in the Arctic, but at the same time, herbivores have likely had pronounced impacts on the structure and function of these shrub communities. These northward range shifts are a bellwether for other boreal species and their associated predators. PMID:27074023

  15. Contaminants as contributing factors to wood frog abnormalities on the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Amphibian abnormalities and diseases are not well understood, and appear to be increasing while global populations decline. OBJECTIVES: The goals of this study were...

  16. Resource development and related environmental problems in arctic Alaska: Impact on fish and wildlife

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The present distributional patterns of birds and mammals on the surface of the earth are the combined result of historic and current factors. The historic factors...

  17. Distribution and abundance of caribou on Selawik National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1984-1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the caribou distribution and abundance data through the fall of 1989. Results of a literature review prior to preparation of the Refuge...

  18. Report of findings: Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge Womens Bay contaminant study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The potential for contaminant problems has existed for decades, and will likely increase in the future. Womens Bay has been and continues to be affected by...

  19. Togiak, Alaska, navigation improvements: Draft Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following recommendations are made on the basis of a field investigation, existing literature, and design information made available to date. (1) All instream...

  20. The wilderness record, Chamisso wilderness proposal, Chamisso National Wildlife Refuge, Second Judicial District, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Wilderness study report; Federal Register notice; materials sent to news media; public hearing package, mailing list, handout materials, attendance list, and...

  1. Aleutian Islands Unit, Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, 13 July to 22 July 1987: Trip report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The majority of the seabirds on the refuge use Puffin Island. Table 2 indicates the species composition and number of seabirds censused on 13 August from 1200 -...

  2. Contaminants Survey: Island Bay Barrel Cache: Alaska Peninsula/Becharof National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Organochlorines were detected in Pit 2 (samples 34, 35), Pit 12 (samples 37, 38), and Pit 13 (samples 39, 40) (see Appendix B3). Concentrations of PCBs (total) were...

  3. Effects of winter seismic exploration on the coastal plain, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The impacts of the 1984 winter seismic exploration program upon thevegetation, thermal regime, and visual resources of the Arctic Coastal Plainwere measured....

  4. Karluk Lake bear studies, 1958, Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge, Kodiak, Alaska: Special report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Karluk Lake bear studies in 1958 concerned (1) experiments in live trapping bear; (2) continuation of total population determination and composition. Eight bear...

  5. Recolonization of walrus: A study conducted at Cape Peirce, Alaska, Togiak National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — From 1 June 1985 to 1 October 1985 the social behavior and population fluctuation of the walrus herd utilizing the Cape Peirce hauling grounds was observed and...

  6. Wildlife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the significant activities conducted in 1994 to monitor the wildlife resources of the Site. Wildlife populations inhabiting the Hanford Site are monitored in order to measure the status and condition of the populations and assess effects of Hanford operations

  7. Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, L.L.; Simmons, M.A.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the significant activities conducted in 1994 to monitor the wildlife resources of the Site. Wildlife populations inhabiting the Hanford Site are monitored in order to measure the status and condition of the populations and assess effects of Hanford operations.

  8. The status of the peregrine falcon (Falco peregrines) in northeastern Alaska: East fork Chandalar River drainage east to the Canadian Border, Arctic Ocean south to the Porcupine and Chandalar Rivers (including the Arctic National Wildlife Range) and the S

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Prior to 1972, little was known about the Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) populations that breed in northeastern Alaska. The following is a report of peregrine...

  9. 78 FR 54905 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Southwest Alaska Distinct Population Segment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... Alaska DPS of the northern sea otter as threatened on August 9, 2005 (70 FR 46366). For a description of... 8, 2009 (74 FR 51988). On October 12, 2010, the Service published in the Federal Register a notice... (75 FR 62562) and requested comments on the draft recovery plan. We received six comments in...

  10. Predicting the effects of climate change on ecosystems and wildlife habitat in northwest Alaska: results from the WildCast project

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGange, Anthony R.; Marcot, Bruce G.; Lawler, James; Jorgenson, Torre; Winfree, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We used a modeling framework and a recent ecological land classification and land cover map to predict how ecosystems and wildlife habitat in northwest Alaska might change in response to increasing temperature. Our results suggest modest increases in forest and tall shrub ecotypes in Northwest Alaska by the end of this century thereby increasing habitat for forest-dwelling and shrub-using birds and mammals. Conversely, we predict declines in several more open low shrub, tussock, and meadow ecotypes favored by many waterbird, shorebird, and small mammal species.

  11. Alaska tundra vegetation trends and their links to the large-scale climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniek, P. A.; Bhatt, U. S.; Walker, D. A.; Raynolds, M. K.; Comiso, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    The arctic Normalized Vegetation Index (NDVI) data set (a measure of vegetation photosynthetic capacity) has been used to document coherent temporal relationships between near-coastal sea ice, summer tundra land surface temperatures, and vegetation productivity throughout the Arctic (Bhatt et al. 2010). Land warming over North America has displayed larger trends (+30%) when compared to Eurasia (+16%) since 1982. In the tundra of northern Alaska the greatest change was found in absolute maximum NDVI along the Beaufort Sea coast (+14%). In contrast, tundra areas in southwest Alaska along the Bering Sea have seen a decline (-4%). Greenup date in these regions has been occurring as much as 1-4 days earlier per decade, but trends are mixed. Winter snow water equivalent (SWE) has only increased slightly (+0.1 mm/yr) in the Arctic region of Alaska since 1987 (R. Muskett, personal communication). These findings suggest that there have been changes in the seasonal climate in Alaska during the NDVI record. The tundra trends are further investigated by evaluating remotely sensed sea ice, surface air temperature, SWE, daily snow cover, and NDVI3g. While the snow data has a relatively short record (1999-2010), notable trends can be observed in snow melt, occurring as much 15 days earlier per decade in northern Alaska. Unfortunately, other snow data sets have been found to be problematic and could not be used to extend our analysis. This highlights the need for a long-term pan-arctic snow data set that is suitable for climate analysis. Possible climate drivers are also investigated. Results show that the summer tundra, in terms of NDVI and summer warmth index (SWI), has few direct links with the large-scale climate. However, the sea ice concentration along the coast of the tundra regions has strong preseason links to the large-scale climate. This suggests that the large-scale climate influences the sea ice concentration which then affects the NDVI and SWI. Three tundra regions

  12. Muskox of Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the muskox of Alaska. The report summarizes the history of muskoxen in Alaska, factors affecting the distribution of muskox, domestication and...

  13. Range expansion of moose in arctic Alaska linked to warming and increased shrub habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tape, Ken D.; Gustine, David D.; Reuss, Roger W.; Adams, Layne G.; Clark, Jason A.

    2016-01-01

    Twentieth century warming has increased vegetation productivity and shrub cover across northern tundra and treeline regions, but effects on terrestrial wildlife have not been demonstrated on a comparable scale. During this period, Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas) extended their range from the boreal forest into tundra riparian shrub habitat; similar extensions have been observed in Canada (A. a. andersoni) and Eurasia (A. a. alces). Northern moose distribution is thought to be limited by forage availability above the snow in late winter, so the observed increase in shrub habitat could be causing the northward moose establishment, but a previous hypothesis suggested that hunting cessation triggered moose establishment. Here, we use recent changes in shrub cover and empirical relationships between shrub height and growing season temperature to estimate available moose habitat in Arctic Alaska c. 1860. We estimate that riparian shrubs were approximately 1.1 m tall c. 1860, greatly reducing the available forage above the snowpack, compared to 2 m tall in 2009. We believe that increases in riparian shrub habitat after 1860 allowed moose to colonize tundra regions of Alaska hundreds of kilometers north and west of previous distribution limits. The northern shift in the distribution of moose, like that of snowshoe hares, has been in response to the spread of their shrub habitat in the Arctic, but at the same time, herbivores have likely had pronounced impacts on the structure and function of these shrub communities. These northward range shifts are a bellwether for other boreal species and their associated predators.

  14. Miscellaneous Wildlife Outputs

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of species donated to ADF&G and the Alaska Zoo from Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. Animals include sockeye salmon eggs, rainbow trout eggs,...

  15. Organochlorine concentrations in burbot (Lota lota) livers from Fairbanks, Alaska, and, Kanuti, Tetlin and Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuges, Alaska, 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study was conducted by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists during 1998 and 1999. Burbot liver was the tissue of choice for this study because chlorinated...

  16. Wildlife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Site serves a refuge for migratory waterfowl, upland game birds, and a variety of mammals. These wildlife have unrestricted access to several areas near site facilities (primarily waste-water ponds) that contain low levels of radionuclides attributable to site operations. Sampling is performed routinely in the vicinity of operating areas where the highest potential exists for uptake of radionuclides by wildlife. The number of animals that visit these areas is small compared to the total population in the area, and, as a result, human consumption of an animal from one of the sampling locations is unlikely. Nevertheless, these samples help provide an estimate of the maximum potential dose impact if onsite game were consumed. Fish sampling is also performed routinely along the Hanford reach of the Columbia River. Results provide an indication of the average radionuclide concentrations attributable to Hanford in local fish so that the potential dose impact to humans for this pathway can be evaluated. Analytical results of terrestrial wildlife samples collected during 1981 were very similar to those observed in recent previous years. Samples of fish collected from the Columbia River along the Hanford Site showed no discernible difference in radionuclide concentration compared to samples collected upstream of the Site. The dose that would be received by a person following consumption of any of the sampled species at the maximum radionuclide concentration observed in 1982 would be well within the applicable DOE dose standards

  17. Distribution, abundance, and productivity of tundra swans in the coastal wetlands of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the distribution, abundance, and productivity of tundra swans in the coastal wetlands of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Two aerial surveys...

  18. Contaminant and Water Quality Baseline Data for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1988 - 1989. Volume 2, Raw Data.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Metal, hydrocarbon, or nutrient data have not been recorded for the Arctic coastal plain 1002 area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (Arctic Refuge) in areas...

  19. Effects of winter seismic exploration on vegetation and soil of the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — When winter seismic exploration was conducted on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Arctic NWR, little data were available on the longterm...

  20. Airphoto analysis of winter seismic trails on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Color infrared airphotos 1:6000 were used to assess the impacts of winter seismic trail on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. An accuracy...

  1. Predator control problems in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One of the important wildlife management activities in Alaska is that of predator control. This simple statement requires some explanation. In the course of these...

  2. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Northwest Arctic, Alaska: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for seals, whales, walruses, polar bears, and Steller sea lions in Northwest Arctic, Alaska. Vector...

  3. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Northwest Arctic, Alaska: M_MAMPT (Marine Mammal Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for Steller sea lions and polar bears in Northwest Arctic, Alaska. Vector points in this data set...

  4. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Northwest Arctic, Alaska: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for terrestrial mammals in Northwest Arctic, Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent muskoxen...

  5. An archaeological site survey and inventory for the Aleutian Islands National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska 1972: A report submitted to the Wilderness Studies Branch, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Anchorage, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes a 1972 voyage in the Aleutian archipelago to locate prehistoric and historic archeological sites. The report centers on the problems...

  6. Bibliography on Alaska estuaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This bibliography was compiled to assist in working up “profiles” for the estuaries in Alaska. The purpose of the profiles is to list in a narrative form the...

  7. Alaska waterfowl production, 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the Waterfowl Production and Habitat Survey for Alaska during 1964. The primary purpose of the survey is to provide information on duck...

  8. Tertiary thrust systems and fluid flow beneath the Beaufort coastal plain (1002 area), Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Christopher J.; Grow, John A.; Perry, William J., Jr.; Moore, Thomas E.; O'Sullivan, Paul B.; Phillips, Jeffrey D.; Saltus, Richard W.

    2004-01-01

    Beneath the Arctic coastal plain (commonly referred to as "the 1002 area") in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, northeastern Alaska, United States, seismic reflection data show that the northernmost and youngest part of the Brookian orogen is preserved as a Paleogene to Neogene system of blind and buried thrust-related structures. These structures involve Proterozoic to Miocene (and younger?) rocks that contain several potential petroleum reservoir facies. Thermal maturity data indicate that the deformed rocks are mature to overmature with respect to hydrocarbon generation. Oil seeps and stains in outcrops and shows in nearby wells indicate that oil has migrated through the region; geochemical studies have identified three potential petroleum systems. Hydrocarbons that were generated from Mesozoic source rocks in the deformed belt were apparently expelled and migrated northward in the Paleogene, before much of the deformation in this part of the orogen. It is also possible that Neogene petroleum, which was generated in Tertiary rocks offshore in the Arctic Ocean, migrated southward into Neogene structural traps at the thrust front. However, the hydrocarbon resource potential of this largely unexplored region of Alaska's North Slope remains poorly known.

  9. Accuracy assessment of airphoto interpretation of vegetation types and disturance levels on winter seismic trails, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An accuracy assessment was conducted to evaluate the photointerpretation of vegetation types and disturbance levels along seismic trails in the Arctic National...

  10. Accuracy assessment of airphoto interpretation of vegetation types and disturance levels on winter seismic trails, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An accuracy assessment was conducted to evaluate the photo-interpretation of vegetation types and disturbance levels along seismic trails in the Arctic National...

  11. Summary report for Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge: Projected vegetation and fire regime response to future climate change in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project is part of a statewide model analysis of future vegetation and fire regimer esponse to projected future climate. This document provides a summary of...

  12. YFNWR project report number 87-5: Beaver food cache survey, Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1986: Management study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Beaver colonies remained relatively stable or increased slightly within the two survey areas as indicated through aerial food-cache surveys. The Lodge/Water Bodies...

  13. YFNWR project report number 85-3: Beaver food cache survey, Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska: Management study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of the annual beaver food cache survey is to determine trends in the relative abundance of beaver in representative drainages within the Yukon Flats...

  14. Contaminant Baseline Data for Water, Sediments, and Fish of Selawik National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1987-1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — No effects of off-refuge placer mining were found on the Selawik Refuge during this study. Water quality characteristics of rivers sampled during this study are...

  15. Metal and Metalloid Contaminants in Water, Sediments, Fish, and Mammals of Kanuti National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1985-1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — No effects of off-refuge placer mining within the refuge were found. However, this study was not designed to specifically examine the effects of placer mining on...

  16. Implementation of an integrated resource information system and its application in the management of fish and wildlife resources in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the origins of the Integrated Resource Information System (IRIS) and the implementation and integration of IRIS with other subsystems used by...

  17. Linking anthropogenic resources to wildlife-pathogen dynamics: a review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Daniel J; Streicker, Daniel; Altizer, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Urbanisation and agriculture cause declines for many wildlife, but some species benefit from novel resources, especially food, provided in human-dominated habitats. Resulting shifts in wildlife ecology can alter infectious disease dynamics and create opportunities for cross-species transmission, yet predicting host–pathogen responses to resource provisioning is challenging. Factors enhancing transmission, such as increased aggregation, could be offset by better host immunity due to improved n...

  18. Tree Species Linked to Large Differences in Ecosystem Carbon Distribution in the Boreal Forest of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, A. M.; Mack, M. C.; Johnstone, J. F.; Schuur, E. A. G.; Genet, H.; McGuire, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    In the boreal forest of Alaska, increased fire severity associated with climate change is altering plant-soil-microbial feedbacks and ecosystem carbon (C) dynamics. The boreal landscape has historically been dominated by black spruce (Picea mariana), a tree species associated with slow C turnover and large soil organic matter (SOM) accumulation. Historically, low severity fires have led to black spruce regeneration post-fire, thereby maintaining slow C cycling rates and large SOM pools. In recent decades however, an increase in high severity fires has led to greater consumption of the soil organic layer (SOL) during fire and subsequent establishment of deciduous tree species in areas previously dominated by black spruce. This shift to a more deciduous dominated landscape has many implications for ecosystem structure and function, as well as feedbacks to global C cycling. To improve our understanding of how boreal tree species affect C cycling, we quantified above- and belowground C stocks and fluxes in adjacent, mid-successional stands of black spruce and Alaska paper birch (Betula neoalaskana) that established following a 1958 fire near Fairbanks, Alaska. Although total ecosystem C pools (aboveground live tree biomass + dead wood + SOL + top 10 cm of mineral soil) were similar for the two stand types, the distribution of C among pools was markedly different. In black spruce, 78% of measured C was found in soil pools, primarily in the SOL, where spruce contained twice the C stored in paper birch (4.8 ± 0.3 vs. 2.4 ± 0.1 kg C m-2). In contrast, aboveground biomass dominated ecosystem C pools in birch forest (6.0 ± 0.3 vs. 2.5 ± 0.2 kg C m-2 in birch and spruce, respectively). Our findings suggest that tree species exert a strong influence over plant-soil-microbial feedbacks and may have long-term effects on ecosystem C sequestration and storage that feedback to the climate system.

  19. Detection of Anaplasma antibodies in wildlife and domestic species in wildlife-livestock interface areas of Kenya by major surface protein 5 competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    OpenAIRE

    J.J.N. Ngeranwa; S.P. Shompole; E.H. Venter; Wambugu, A.; J.E. Crafford; Penzhorn, B.L.

    2008-01-01

    The seroprevalence of Anaplasma antibodies in wildlife (eland, blue wildebeest, kongoni, impala, Thomson's gazelle, Grant's gazelle, giraffe and plains zebra) and domestic animal (cattle, sheep and goat) populations was studied in wildlife / livestock interface areas of Kenya. Serum samples were analyzed by competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CI-ELISA), using a recombinant antigen (MSP-5) from Anaplasma marginale surface membrane. A monoclonal antibody, FC-16, was ...

  20. Range Expansion of Moose in Arctic Alaska Linked to Warming and Increased Shrub Habitat

    OpenAIRE

    Tape, Ken D.; Gustine, David D.; Ruess, Roger W.; Adams, Layne G.; Clark, Jason A

    2016-01-01

    Twentieth century warming has increased vegetation productivity and shrub cover across northern tundra and treeline regions, but effects on terrestrial wildlife have not been demonstrated on a comparable scale. During this period, Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas) extended their range from the boreal forest into tundra riparian shrub habitat; similar extensions have been observed in Canada (A. a. andersoni) and Eurasia (A. a. alces). Northern moose distribution is thought to be limited by for...

  1. Organic matter and nutrient cycling in linked glacier-stream ecosystems along the Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D.; Hood, E. W.; Nassry, M. Q.; Vermilyea, A.

    2010-12-01

    Glacial ecosystems cover approximately 10% of the Earth’s surface and contribute large volumes of runoff to rivers and coastal oceans. Moreover, anticipated future changes in glacial runoff are markedly larger than those projected for non-glacial river systems. Recent research on the biogeochemistry of glacier ecosystems has shown that glacier environments contain abundant microbial communities and are more biogeochemically active than was previously believed. Runoff from glaciers typically contains low concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and nutrients, however at low latitudes and in coastal regions, high water fluxes can amplify material concentrations, such that biogeochemical (C, N, and P) fluxes from glacial watersheds can be substantial. As a result, glacier runoff has the potential to be an important biogeochemical subsidy to downstream freshwater and marine ecosystems. Glaciers in coastal watersheds along the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) are thinning and receding at rapid rates, leading to a transition from ecosystems dominated by glacial ice and rock to ecosystems containing developed soils and vegetation. Within this context, we are examining how the quality and quantity of carbon and nutrients within stream networks changes as a function of landcover. Our research is focused on a series of watersheds, primarily in southeastern Alaska, that range in glacier coverage from 0 to >60%. We are using these watersheds to substitute space for time and begin to unravel how both the magnitude and timing of watershed fluxes of C, N, and P may change as glaciers continue to recede. Our previous results have shown that different levels of glacial coverage alter the timing and magnitude of fresh water, dissolved organic matter and nutrient yields. Our results suggest that a lower extent of glacial coverage within a watershed leads to higher amounts of dissolved organic matter, but decreased phosphorous yields. We have also found that the glaciers are a

  2. Wild resource use in Northway, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes contemporary and recent historic use of fish and wildlife resources by residents of Northway, Alaska. Northway today consists primarily of an...

  3. The outlook for conservation in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes conservation efforts in Alaska. Population growth, outdoor recreation, and proposed National Wildlife Refuges are discussed. The report...

  4. 2004 Alaska highway invasive plants pilot survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We investigated the distribution and abundance of non-native invasive plants along a section of the Alaska Highway adjacent to Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge, 20...

  5. Breeding peregrine falcon survey, Amchitka Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A breeding peregrine falcon (Falco peregrines) survey was conducted on Amchitka Island, Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge from May 2-9, 1981 in conjunction...

  6. Bering Sea National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness study area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a brief report on a wilderness study area located in the Bering Sea National Wildlife Refuge now part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife...

  7. DOI/GTN-P climate and active-layer data acquired in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Frank E.; Clow, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    This report provides data collected by the climate monitoring array of the U.S. Department of the Interior on Federal lands in Arctic Alaska over the period August 1998 to July 2013; this array is part of the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost, (DOI/GTN-P). In addition to presenting data, this report also describes monitoring, data collection, and quality-control methods. This array of 16 monitoring stations spans lat 68.5°N. to 70.5°N. and long 142.5°W. to 161°W., an area of approximately 150,000 square kilometers. Climate summaries are presented along with quality-controlled data. Data collection is ongoing and includes the following climate- and permafrost-related variables: air temperature, wind speed and direction, ground temperature, soil moisture, snow depth, rainfall totals, up- and downwelling shortwave radiation, and atmospheric pressure. These data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in close collaboration with the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  8. DOI/GTN-P climate and active-layer data acquired in the National Petroleum Reserve: Alaska and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, 1998-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Frank E.; Clow, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    This report provides data collected by the climate monitoring array of the U.S. Department of the Interior on Federal lands in Arctic Alaska over the period August 1998 to July 2011; this array is part of the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost, (DOI/GTN-P). In addition to presenting data, this report also describes monitoring, data collection, and quality-control methodology. This array of 16 monitoring stations spans lat 68.5°N. to 70.5°N. and long 142.5°W. to 161°W., an area of approximately 150,000 square kilometers. Climate summaries are presented along with quality-controlled data. Data collection is ongoing and includes the following climate- and permafrost-related variables: air temperature, wind speed and direction, ground temperature and soil moisture, snow depth, rainfall, up- and downwelling shortwave radiation, and atmospheric pressure. These data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in close collaboration with the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  9. DOI/GTN-P Climate and active-layer data acquired in the National Petroleum Reserve–Alaska and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, 1998–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Frank E.; Clow, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    This report provides data collected by the climate monitoring array of the U.S. Department of the Interior on Federal lands in Arctic Alaska over the period August 1998 to July 2014; this array is part of the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (DOI/GTN-P). In addition to presenting data, this report also describes monitoring, data collection, and quality-control methods. The array of 16 monitoring stations spans lat 68.5°N. to 70.5°N. and long 142.5°W. to 161°W., an area of approximately 150,000 square kilometers. Climate summaries are presented along with quality-controlled data. Data collection is ongoing and includes the following climate- and permafrost-related variables: air temperature, wind speed and direction, ground temperature, soil moisture, snow depth, rainfall totals, up- and downwelling shortwave radiation, and atmospheric pressure. These data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in close collaboration with the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  10. Air temperature, wind speed, and wind direction in the National Petroleum Reserve—Alaska and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, 1998–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Frank E.; Clow, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    This report provides air temperature, wind speed, and wind direction data collected on Federal lands in Arctic Alaska over the period August 1998 to July 2011 by the U.S. Department of the Interior's climate monitoring array, part of the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost. In addition to presenting data, this report also describes monitoring, data collection, and quality control methodology. This array of 16 monitoring stations spans 68.5°N to 70.5°N and 142.5°W to 161°W, an area of roughly 150,000 square kilometers. Climate summaries are presented along with provisional quality-controlled data. Data collection is ongoing and includes several additional climate variables to be released in subsequent reports, including ground temperature and soil moisture, snow depth, rainfall, up- and downwelling shortwave radiation, and atmospheric pressure. These data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in close collaboration with the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  11. A data report on fish and wildlife resources of the Yukon River Basin based on 1956 field investigations, Territory of Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Survey of fish and wildlife resources, use and dependency on fish and wildlife resources by native and other human populations, and determination of methods to...

  12. Link between plate fabric, hydration and subduction zone seismicity in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillington, Donna J.; Bécel, Anne; Nedimović, Mladen R.; Kuehn, Harold; Webb, Spahr C.; Abers, Geoffrey A.; Keranen, Katie M.; Li, Jiyao; Delescluse, Matthias; Mattei-Salicrup, Gabriel A.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction zones worldwide exhibit remarkable variation in seismic activity over short distances of about tens of kilometres along their length. The properties of the subducting oceanic plate are believed to influence this seismic behaviour. However, comparisons between seismicity and plate attributes such as thermal structure made over large scales of hundreds of kilometres typically yield poor correlations. Here we present results from controlled-source seismic data collected offshore of the Alaska Peninsula. We find that fabric in the subducting oceanic plate--the orientation and style of remnant faults originally created at the mid-ocean ridge--can contribute to abrupt changes in faulting and hydration of the plate during bending before subduction. Variations in fabric, bending faulting and hydration correlate with changes in seismicity throughout the subduction zone. More interplate and intermediate-depth intraplate earthquakes are observed where the pre-existing fabric is aligned with the trench and there is more bend faulting and hydration. This suggests that pre-existing structures in the subducting plate are an important control on abrupt variations in deformation and plate hydration and on globally observed short-wavelength variations in seismicity at subduction zones.

  13. Alaska waterfowl production survey, 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the Waterfowl Production and Habitat Survey for Alaska during 1968. The primary purpose of the survey is to provide information on duck...

  14. Detection of Anaplasma antibodies in wildlife and domestic species in wildlife-livestock interface areas of Kenya by major surface protein 5 competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J.N. Ngeranwa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The seroprevalence of Anaplasma antibodies in wildlife (eland, blue wildebeest, kongoni, impala, Thomson's gazelle, Grant's gazelle, giraffe and plains zebra and domestic animal (cattle, sheep and goat populations was studied in wildlife / livestock interface areas of Kenya. Serum samples were analyzed by competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CI-ELISA, using a recombinant antigen (MSP-5 from Anaplasma marginale surface membrane. A monoclonal antibody, FC-16, was used as the primary antibody, while anti-mouse conjugated to horseradish peroxidase was used as the secondary antibody. The results indicate a high seroprevalence in both wildlife and livestock populations, in contrast to earlier reports from Kenya, which indicated a low seroprevalence. The differences are attributed to the accurate analytical method used (CI-ELISA, as compared with agglutination techniques, clinical signs and microscopy employed by the earlier workers.

  15. Detection of Anaplasma antibodies in wildlife and domestic species in wildlife-livestock interface areas of Kenya by major surface protein 5 competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeranwa, J J N; Shompole, S P; Venter, E H; Wambugu, A; Crafford, J E; Penzhorn, B L

    2008-09-01

    The seroprevalence of Anaplasma antibodies in wildlife (eland, blue wildebeest, kongoni, impala, Thomson's gazelle, Grant's gazelle, giraffe and plains zebra) and domestic animal (cattle, sheep and goat) populations was studied in wildlife/livestock interface areas of Kenya. Serum samples were analyzed by competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CI-ELISA), using a recombinant antigen (MSP-5) from Anaplasma marginale surface membrane. A monoclonal antibody, FC-16, was used as the primary antibody, while anti-mouse conjugated to horseradish peroxidase was used as the secondary antibody. The results indicate a high seroprevalence in both wildlife and livestock populations, in contrast to earlier reports from Kenya, which indicated a low seroprevalence. The differences are attributed to the accurate analytical method used (CI-ELISA), as compared with agglutination techniques, clinical signs and microscopy employed by the earlier workers. PMID:19040134

  16. Some aspects of the southeast Alaska commercial fisheries: Special report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper ascertains what the USFWS can do to help stem the downward trend of the southeastern Alaska salmon fishery by: reviewing biological aspects of Alaska...

  17. Muskox domestication and husbandry: Its prospects in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the muskox domestication and reintroduction and its prospects in Alaska. The history of the muskox in Alaska, habitat and ecology are covered....

  18. Effects of winter seismic trails on visual resources, vegetation, and surface stability of the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Winter seismic exploration in 1984 and 1985 left visible trails on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Thirtyfour permanent intensive study...

  19. Technical report: Water quality and metal and metalloid contaminants in sediments, and fish of Koyukuk, Nowitna, and the Northern Unit of Innoko National Wildlife Refuges, Alaska, 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study was conducted by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists during 1991. The study goals were to monitor water quality and concentrations of metals and...

  20. Prey utilization by wolves and a preliminary assessment of wolf and prey densities in three drainages within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the prey utilization by wolves and an assessment of wolf and prey densities in 3 drainages within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The...

  1. ANWR progress report FY87: Accuracy assessment of Landsat land cover maps of the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Accuracy assessments of two versions of Landsatassisted land cover maps were conducted on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Ground...

  2. Contaminant and Water Quality Baseline Data for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1988 - 1989. Volume 3, Quality Assurance/Quality Control Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Metal, hydrocarbon, or nutrient data have not been recorded for the Arctic coastal plain 1002 area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (Arctic Refuge) in areas...

  3. Water quality, and metal and metalloid concentrations in water, sediment, and fish tissues from Innoko National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1995-1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study was conducted by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists from 1995-1997. The study goals were to determine selected metal and metalloid concentrations...

  4. ANWR progress report number FY83-7: Population size, productivity and distribution of muskoxen in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska Series

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Data on population size and productivity of muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) Ln the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge were collected during surveys in April and October...

  5. Migratory bird use of the coastal lagoon system of the Beaufort Sea coastline within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1981 and 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes aerial surveys conducted in coastal lagoons of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge during 1982 to obtain an index of relative numbers of...

  6. 75 FR 3888 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ... Register on November 20, 2009 (74 FR 60228), to propose migratory bird subsistence harvest regulations in... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 92 RIN 1018-AW67 Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska During the 2010 Season AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife...

  7. Wind power: Addressing wildlife impacts, assessing effects on tourism, and examining the link between climate change perceptions and support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Meredith Blaydes

    As the world's most rapidly growing source of energy, wind power has vast potential for mitigating climate change and advancing global environmental sustainability. Yet, the challenges facing wind energy remain both complex and substantial. Two such challenges are: 1) wildlife impacts; and 2) perceived negative effects on tourism. This dissertation examines these challenges in a multi-paper format, and also investigates the role that climate change perceptions play in garnering public support for wind power. The first paper assesses optimal approaches for addressing wind power's wildlife impacts. Comparative analysis reveals that avian mortality from turbines ranks far behind avian mortality from a number of other anthropogenic sources. Additionally, although bats have recently emerged as more vulnerable to wind turbines than birds, they are generally less federally protected. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) protects over 800 bird species, regardless of their threatened or endangered status. Moreover, it criminalizes the incidental take of birds without a permit and simultaneously grants no permits for such incidental take, thereby creating a legal conundrum for the wind industry. An examination of the legislative and case history of the MBTA, however, reveals that wind operators are not likely to be prosecuted for incidental take if they cooperate with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) and take reasonable steps to reduce siting and operational impacts. Furthermore, this study's analysis reveals modest wildlife impacts from wind power, in comparison with numerous other energy sources. Scientific-research, legal, and policy recommendations are provided to update the present legal and regulatory regime under the MBTA and to minimize avian and bat impacts. For instance, FWS should: establish comprehensive federal guidelines for wind facility siting, permitting, monitoring, and mitigation; and promulgate regulations under the MBTA for the issuance of

  8. The Trail Inventory of Alaska Maritime NWR [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  9. Observations of 1981 spring harvest of walrus, Diomede, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes Pacific walrus harvest data that was collected in 1981 in Diomede, Alaska. This year the marine mammal division of the Fish and Wildlife...

  10. St. Lazaria Island Alaska Maritime NWR military contaminants investigations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — St. Lazaria Island, part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, has over 540,000 burrow nesting Leach's and fork-tailed storm-petrels (Oceanodroma...

  11. A mechanistic approach to link biological effects of radioactive substances from molecules to populations in wildlife species - A mechanistic approach to link biological effects of radionuclides from molecules to populations in wildlife species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonzo, Frederic; Parisot, Florian; Plaire, Delphine; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Garnier- Laplace, Jacqueline [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV, SERIS, LECO, Cadarache, Saint-Paul- Lez-Durance, 13115 (France)

    2014-07-01

    Understanding how toxic contaminants affect wildlife species at various levels of biological organisation (sub-cellular, histological, physiological, organism, population levels) is a major research goal in both ecotoxicology and radioecology. A mechanistic understanding of the links between the different observed perturbations is necessary to predict consequences for survival, growth and reproduction which are critical for population dynamics. However, time scales at which such links are established in the laboratory are rarely relevant for natural populations. With a small size and short life cycle, the cladoceran micro-crustacean Daphnia magna is a particularly suitable biological model for studying effects of radioactive contaminants over several generations. Multi-generational exposures are much more representative of the environmental context of field populations for which contaminations can last for durations which largely exceed individual longevity and involve exposure of many successive generations. Over the last decade, multi-generational investigations of toxic effects were conducted under controlled conditions in D. magna exposed to various radionuclides including depleted uranium, americium-241 and cesium-137, representing respectively a dominantly chemo-toxic metal, an alpha internal contamination and a gamma external radiation. Results showed in all cases that toxic effects on physiology and life history (survival, body size, fecundity) increased in severity across generations. These observations demonstrated that measured effects in one generation might not be representative of toxicity in the following offspring generations, and ultimately of the population response. Reduction in somatic growth and reproduction induced by uranium were analysed using the mechanistic modelling approach known as DEBtox (model of dynamic energy budget applied to toxicology). Modelling results suggested that uranium primarily affects assimilation. This metabolic mode

  12. A mechanistic approach to link biological effects of radioactive substances from molecules to populations in wildlife species - A mechanistic approach to link biological effects of radionuclides from molecules to populations in wildlife species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding how toxic contaminants affect wildlife species at various levels of biological organisation (sub-cellular, histological, physiological, organism, population levels) is a major research goal in both ecotoxicology and radioecology. A mechanistic understanding of the links between the different observed perturbations is necessary to predict consequences for survival, growth and reproduction which are critical for population dynamics. However, time scales at which such links are established in the laboratory are rarely relevant for natural populations. With a small size and short life cycle, the cladoceran micro-crustacean Daphnia magna is a particularly suitable biological model for studying effects of radioactive contaminants over several generations. Multi-generational exposures are much more representative of the environmental context of field populations for which contaminations can last for durations which largely exceed individual longevity and involve exposure of many successive generations. Over the last decade, multi-generational investigations of toxic effects were conducted under controlled conditions in D. magna exposed to various radionuclides including depleted uranium, americium-241 and cesium-137, representing respectively a dominantly chemo-toxic metal, an alpha internal contamination and a gamma external radiation. Results showed in all cases that toxic effects on physiology and life history (survival, body size, fecundity) increased in severity across generations. These observations demonstrated that measured effects in one generation might not be representative of toxicity in the following offspring generations, and ultimately of the population response. Reduction in somatic growth and reproduction induced by uranium were analysed using the mechanistic modelling approach known as DEBtox (model of dynamic energy budget applied to toxicology). Modelling results suggested that uranium primarily affects assimilation. This metabolic mode

  13. Impacts of rural development on Yellowstone wildlife: linking grizzly bear Ursus arctos demographics with projected residential growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Charles C.; Gude, Patricia H.; Landenburger, Lisa; Haroldson, Mark A.; Podruzny, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Exurban development is consuming wildlife habitat within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem with potential consequences to the long-term conservation of grizzly bears Ursus arctos. We assessed the impacts of alternative future land-use scenarios by linking an existing regression-based simulation model predicting rural development with a spatially explicit model that predicted bear survival. Using demographic criteria that predict population trajectory, we portioned habitats into either source or sink, and projected the loss of source habitat associated with four different build out (new home construction) scenarios through 2020. Under boom growth, we predicted that 12 km2 of source habitat were converted to sink habitat within the Grizzly Bear Recovery Zone (RZ), 189 km2 were converted within the current distribution of grizzly bears outside of the RZ, and 289 km2 were converted in the area outside the RZ identified as suitable grizzly bear habitat. Our findings showed that extremely low densities of residential development created sink habitats. We suggest that tools, such as those outlined in this article, in addition to zoning and subdivision regulation may prove more practical, and the most effective means of retaining large areas of undeveloped land and conserving grizzly bear source habitat will likely require a landscape-scale approach. We recommend a focus on land conservation efforts that retain open space (easements, purchases and trades) coupled with the implementation of ‘bear community programmes’ on an ecosystem wide basis in an effort to minimize human-bear conflicts, minimize management-related bear mortalities associated with preventable conflicts and to safeguard human communities. Our approach has application to other species and areas, and it has illustrated how spatially explicit demographic models can be combined with models predicting land-use change to help focus conservation priorities.

  14. Linking scientists, decision makers, and organizations to improve understanding of climate-driven changes in coastal storms and their impacts in Western Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, J. H.; Murphy, K.

    2012-12-01

    The coastal zones of Western Alaska are expected to experience a nexus of climate-driven changes in landform processes resulting from the impacts of sea ice loss; sea level change; permafrost thaw; and changes in frequency, intensity, and direction of coastal storms, etc. These climate-driven changes will cascade through the near-shore and coastal physical systems, ecological systems, and human communities, and thus present major sources of uncertainty for a wide variety of the region's decision makers. To effectively and efficiently address some of the information needs of these decision makers, the Western Alaska Landscape Conservation Cooperative created a two-year program of applied science focused on 'Changes in Coastal Storms and their Impacts'. We summarize program components that successfully advanced applied science to address these decision maker information needs. All the components share a common feature of promoting linkages: (i) among resource decision makers, stakeholders and scientists, to identify and address key areas of uncertainty associated with coastal storms and thus align the science activities with decision maker needs for a variety of climate vulnerability assessments; (ii) among researchers, to mutually advance their science efforts; and (iii) among organizations, to efficiently address shared science needs. Resulting applied science benefits include (i) integrative projects using very fine resolution surge modeling to assess impacts of saltwater inundation on migratory waterfowl breeding populations and habitat; (ii) coordinating the selection of historic storms for reanalysis by two surge modeling efforts of differing resolution and domain, thus allowing for cross-model comparisons of performance over their shared spatial domain and future regional-scale application of the higher resolution model; and (iii) collaborative, cross-agency efforts to establish a water level network that meets multiple purposes (from model calibration to

  15. Memorandum of Understanding between the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Alaska Department of Natural Resources , U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife : Chickaloon Flats Management Agreement

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Chickaloon Flats, as per the attached legal description and map involving fortyeight thousand acres, more or less, are recognized by the agreement participants...

  16. 50 CFR Table 10 to Part 679 - Gulf of Alaska Retainable Percentages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gulf of Alaska Retainable Percentages 10 Table 10 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 10 Table 10 to Part 679—Gulf of Alaska Retainable Percentages ER30NO09.002...

  17. 50 CFR Table 26 to Part 679 - Gulf of Alaska Coral Habitat Protection Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gulf of Alaska Coral Habitat Protection Areas 26 Table 26 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 26 Table 26 to Part 679—Gulf of Alaska Coral Habitat...

  18. 50 CFR Table 27 to Part 679 - Gulf of Alaska Slope Habitat Conservation Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gulf of Alaska Slope Habitat Conservation Areas 27 Table 27 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 27 Table 27 to Part 679—Gulf of Alaska Slope Habitat...

  19. The human factor in Alaska's economic development

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the human factor in Alaska's economic development. The regions earlier development is discussed and introduction to an evaluation of the...

  20. Problems confronting migratory birds in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We describe in this paper problems affecting the wellbeing of Alaskas migratory birds in the belief that recognition of these problems is a step towards finding...

  1. Kensington Mine Area Baseline Contaminants Study, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Hardrock mining for gold and other metals is proposed for the Kensington Mine, located on Lynn Canal in Southeast Alaska, approximately 45 miles north of Juneau....

  2. Alaska gold rush trails study: Preliminary draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Preliminary study draft, with maps, of seven gold rush trails in Alaska, to determine suitability for inclusion in the National Scenic Trails system and their...

  3. Lake Louise waterfowl banding report, Alaska, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The report covers the Lake Louise, Alaska banding status. The itinerary for the project, study and methods are discussed. Brood observations are provided.

  4. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: INDEX

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...

  5. Arctic and Aleutian terns, Amchitka Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Baird 1980 has recently reported on the ecology of Arctic terns Sterna paradisaea and Aleutian terns Sterna aleutica from 4 areas of mainland Alaska. However, prior...

  6. Southeast Alaska ESI: MGT (Management Area Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains management area data for National Parks, Wildlife Refuges, and areas designated as Critical Habitat in Southeast Alaska. Vector polygons in...

  7. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: HYDRO (Hydrology)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...

  8. Geology of the Johnson River Area Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The vegetation, topography, and geology of the Johnson River area are representative of the entire eastern interior region of Alaska. This area has a vegetational...

  9. Caribou survey of northeastern Alaska: Preliminary report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the Caribou survey of Northeastern Alaska. Objectives of the study are to determine the approximate total size of the caribou herd whose main...

  10. Alaska Yukon : Waterfowl Breeding Population Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — AlaskaYukon was again blessed with a generally widespread, early spring breakup in the interior and on the North Slope with perhaps a more normal spring phenology...

  11. Post compound 1080 wildlife surveys, Kiska Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, 25 March-30 March 1987 (in support of EPA experimental use permit 6704-EUP-28)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To survey the target and nontarget mammal and bird species of Kiska Island and monitor the effect of the Compound 1080 treatment on the respective species. The...

  12. Testing air quality monitoring methods in the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge's Tuxedni Wilderness Area (Chisik Island): Pilot project report [Draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project facilitated a partnership between USFWS efforts to document the botanical resources of Chisik Island and establish an analytical chemistry baseline in...

  13. Post compound 1080 wildlife surveys, Kiska Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, 25 March-30 March 1987 (in support of EPA experimental use permit 6704-EUP-28)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To survey the target and non-target mammal and bird species of Kiska Island and monitor the effect of the Compound 1080 treatment on the respective species. The...

  14. Baseline data for metals in sediments and waters of Braided Creek and Landlocked Creek/Bluff Creek, Alaska Peninsula National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Appendix A contains the data which met QA/QC criteria. Concentrations (ppm) for each element are individually tabulated. Values for sediment, total waters,...

  15. Distribution and productivity of fall staging snow geese on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, and North Slope, Yukon Territory: Results of 1980 surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Population and distribution and productivity of snow geese from the Banks Island. Population that stage in fall on the arctic coastal plain between Barter Island,...

  16. Gulf of Alaska, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This MODIS true-color image shows the Gulf of Alaska and Kodiak Island, the partially snow-covered island in roughly the center of the image. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

  17. 50 CFR Figure 3 to Part 679 - Gulf of Alaska Reporting Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gulf of Alaska Reporting Areas 3 Figure 3... ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part 679—Gulf of Alaska Reporting Areas ER21AP09.000 b. Coordinates... straight lines between the islands and the Alaska Peninsula connecting the following coordinates in...

  18. A five-year plan for the management and development of the Alaska fisheries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This 5-year management program of the Alaska fisheries combines the ideas of the field men and administrators of the Division of Alaska Fisheries. Requirements for...

  19. 1983 walrus harvest, health, and welfare study at Little Diomede, Alaska: Progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Little Diomede was one of five western Alaska villages for the fourth consecutive year where the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducted a Pacific walrus...

  20. Tundra Disturbance and Recovery Nine Years After Winter Seismic Exploration in Northern Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Seismic exploration was conducted during the winters of 1984 and 1985 on the coastal plain tundra of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska. In 1986, 1989, and...

  1. Factors influencing furbearer populations and harvest on the Kenai National Moose Range, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Natural factors have influenced several furbearer populations on the 691,000 ha Kenai National Moose Range wildlife refuge in southcentral Alaska. The 1964...

  2. Results of elemental analyses of water and waterborne sediment samples from areas of Alaska proposed for the Chukchi Imuruk National Reserve, Selawik National Wildlife Refuge, and Cape Krusenstern National Monument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During July--August 1976, waters and sediments were collected from streams and lakes over an area of 100,000 km2 around Kotzebue, Alaska, as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance. The work provides multielement results for 949 waters and 886 sediments from 979 locations. Of these, 492 waters and 452 sediments are from 517 locations in the proposed Chukchi Imuruk Reserve; 447 waters and 423 sediments are from 451 locations in the proposed Selawik Wildlife Refuge; and 10 waters and 11 sediments are from 11 locations in the proposed Cape Krusenstern Monument. The field data, with concentrations of 13 elements in the waters and 43 in the sediments, are presented, and the sample locations are shown on accompanying plates. The waters were analyzed for uranium by fluorometry or delayed-neutron counting and calcium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, titanium, and zinc by plasma-source emission spectrography. The sediment samples were analyzed for uranium by delayed-neutron counting, beryllium and lithium by arc-source emission spectrography, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, niobium, silver, tin, and tungsten by x-ray fluorescence, and aluminum, antimony, barium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, potassium, rubidium, samarium, scandium, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, thorium, titanium, vanadium, ytterbium, and zinc by neutron activation. Uranium to thorium ratios in each sediment are also provided

  3. State waterfowl conservation stamp/print programs considerations for Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An Alaska Waterfowl Conservation Stamp program has been proposed in several bills put before the legislature in 1983. The intent of this report is to present a...

  4. Cliff swallow populations in the southern Askinuk Mountains, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — During breeding season, cliff swallows are widely distributed throughout Alaska and North America south to Mexico, and they are locally common in western and...

  5. Contaminants and sea ducks in Alaska and the Circumpolar region

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In this paper we review nesting sea duck population declines in Alaska during the last several decades and explore the possibility that contaminants may be...

  6. Urban contaminants project: Fish and Hood Creeks, Anchorage, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Urbanization has decreased water quality and adversely impacted biological communities in the lakes and streams of Anchorage, Alaska (Hock, 1981; Brabets, 1987;...

  7. Bald eagle nest survey, 1981, Amchitka Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A nesting survey for bald eagles Haliaeetus leucocephalus was conducted from May 29, 1981, on a portion of Amchitka Island, Aleutian Islands Unit, Alaska Maritime...

  8. An assessment of the reindeer grazing issue in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Reindeer, a domestic relative of the caribou, were brought to Alaska in1892 from Siberia. The objective of this introduction was to provide an alternative food...

  9. Alaska waterfowl production survey, 1966, July 14-24, 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the Waterfowl Production and Habitat Survey for Alaska during 1966. The primary purpose of the survey is to provide information on duck...

  10. Ecology of Aleutian Canada geese at Buldir Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The only known breeding population of the endangered Aleutian Canada goose (Branta canadensis leucopareia) was studied from 1974 to 1977 at Buldir Island, Alaska....

  11. Walrus study project, 1980 field collection report, Diomede, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes Pacific walrus harvest data that was collected in 1980 in Diomede, Alaska. Collection and analysis of specimen material from animals killed...

  12. Fall migration goose and swan observation in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper summarizes the observations of migratory geese and swan in Alaska during the fall of 1965. Whistling Swans, Canada Geese, Black Brant, Emperor Geese, and...

  13. Arctic tern survey on Adak Island, Alaska, 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on an Arctic Tern survey on Adak Island in Alaska during 1987. Study area, methods and results are discussed. Pictures and data are also included.

  14. Alaska-Yukon sandhill crane survey data, 1957-1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sandhill cranes have been recorded on Alaska breeding pair surveys since 1957. Observations have been expanded for area only providing mean indexes of 2,200 for...

  15. Burning and browsing effects on willow growth in interior Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The dominant species in mature forests of interior Alaska is either white spruce (Picea glauca} or black spruce (P. mariana), with wood shrubs present at lower...

  16. The swans and geese of Alaska's arctic slope

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A mid-summer aerial search was made on the 23,000 square miles of waterfowl habitat on Alaska's Arctic slope. Observations included 159 whistling swan (Olor...

  17. Reindeer and seabird survey of Hagemeister Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes the survey effort on Hagemeister Island in the Alaska Maritime NWR. Hagemeister Island is the second largest Bering Sea Island. Reindeer, red...

  18. Goose banding, Koyukuk and north slope Alaska, 1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Goose drive trapping and banding was successfully conducted in the Galena and North Slope areas of Alaska in 1978. This was the fourth year of a five consecutive...

  19. Breeding ground survey, Alaska, May 18 to June 11, 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the results of a breeding ground survey in Alaska during the 1965 breeding season. This year 206 of the 214, 16 mile transects laid out for...

  20. Avian populations and habitat use in interior Alaska taiga

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Avian community structure, habitat occupancy levels, and species habitat use patterns were examined in the woody habitats of interior Alaska taiga. Some birds...

  1. Assessment of lead sources for waterfowl in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Exposure to detrimental concentrations of lead has been documented in waterfowl in Alaska. In spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri) and long-tailed ducks (Clangula...

  2. Mineral exploration and development in Alaska, 1977-1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the mineral exploration and development in Alaska during 19771978. This report covers land ownership and acreages stakes under mining claims,...

  3. The higher fungi of Amchitka and Adak Islands, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fruiting body collections of higher fungi, basidiomycetes and ascomycetes, were made during a twelve day field study on two of Alaska's Aleutian Islands, Amchitka...

  4. Annual report, Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands areas, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Commercial fishery and other FWS service activities, 1959, Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands, including Stream Guard program, and extensive statistics.

  5. Linking Spatio-Temporal Land Cover Change to Biodiversity Conservation in the Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Chaudhary

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Land cover change has been one of the major drivers of change leading to an alteration of critical habitats for many of the threatened species worldwide. Species with a narrow range and specialized habitats such as wetland ecosystems are at higher risk. The present paper describes spatial and temporal land use and cover change over the period of last 34 years (1976–2010 in the Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve (KTWR, Nepal. High spatial resolution Indian Remote-Sensing Satellite (IRS Linear Imaging and Self Scanning Sensor (LISS-4 from 2005 and medium spatial resolution Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS from 1976; Thematic Mapper (TM from 1989; Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+ from 1999 and TM from 2010 were used to generate a land use/land cover map and change analysis. Acquired IRS LISS-4 and Landsat image was orthorectified into Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM, Zone 45 based on generated digital terrain model (DTM from a topographic map and Ground Control Point (GCP from the field. After rectifying all the images, eCognition developer software was used for object-based image analysis (OBIA. The change in the land cover and land use types were compared with the potential habitat of twenty globally significant species present in the reserve. The habitat information was collected from the literature and a map was prepared based on ‘presence’ data, habits and habitats used to identify their distribution pattern. The analysis revealed that the KTWR has gone through significant changes in land cover and ecosystems over the last 34 years due to the change in river course and anthropogenic pressure leading to direct change in habitats of the species. Forests have been reduced by 94% from their original state whereas the grassland has increased by 79% from its original state. On the basis of total land cover, forests, river and stream, swamp and marshes decreased by 16%, 14% and 3% respectively over the last 34 years whereas the grassland has

  6. User's Guide for the Land-Cover map of the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A landcover map of the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Alaska was produced using LANOSA T Thematic Mapper satellite imagery,...

  7. Wildlife Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Kim Arild; Therkildsen, Ole Roland; Karstoft, Henrik;

    This report contains a progress report for the ph.d. project titled “Wildlife Communication”. The project focuses on investigating how signal processing and pattern recognition can be used to improve wildlife management in agriculture. Wildlife management systems used today experience habituation...

  8. A protein A/G indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of anti-Brucella antibodies in Arctic wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nymo, Ingebjørg H; Godfroid, Jacques; Åsbakk, Kjetil; Larsen, Anett K; das Neves, Carlos G; Rødven, Rolf; Tryland, Morten

    2013-05-01

    A species-independent indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) based on chimeric protein A/G was established for the detection of anti-Brucella antibodies in Arctic wildlife species and compared to previously established brucellosis serological tests for hooded seals (Cystophora cristata), minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata), sei whales (Balaenoptera borealis), fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus), and polar bears (Ursus maritimus), as well as bacteriology results for reindeer and caribou (Rangifer tarandus sp.). The protein A/G iELISA results were consistent with the other serological tests with Cohen kappa values between 0.47 and 0.92, and the protein A/G iELISA can thus offer a technically simple method for these species yielding results consistent with established brucellosis serological tests. Receiver operator characteristics analysis proved that the reindeer and caribou protein A/G iELISA results were consistent with the bacteriological gold standard with an area under the curve of 0.99, and the protein A/G iELISA was thus validated as a sensitive and specific serological method for the detection of anti-Brucella antibodies in reindeer and caribou. The binding of the antibodies from the respective species to protein A and G were also evaluated in the iELISA. The antibodies from hooded seals and polar bears reacted stronger to protein A than to G. The sei whale, fin whale, reindeer, and caribou antibodies reacted stronger to protein G than to A. The minke whale antibodies reacted to both protein A and G. There was a strong correlation (r s = 0.88-0.98) between the optical density results obtained with the iELISA with protein A/G and protein A or G, showing that protein A/G is as well suited as protein A or G for the detection of anti-Brucella antibodies in these species with the iELISA. PMID:23572454

  9. The place of conservation in the settlement of Alaska native land claims: An address to the Alaska Chapter, the Sierra Club

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This address summarizes claims of Alaska Natives against the United States government. These claims include withdrawals of land for federal purposes, such as...

  10. Bird kills from oil contamination in the Gulf of Alaska, February-March 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Outlines potential solutions for identifying oil threats to Alaska birds. Makes recommendations on activities, partners, research, and plans to undertake to better...

  11. 1984 walrus harvest, health and welfare study at Savoonga, Alaska: Progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes walrus harvest data that was collected in the spring of 1984 from 26 April to 20 June in Savoonga, Alaska. One hundred and forty-four pairs...

  12. 1982 walrus harvest, health, and welfare study at Savoonga, Alaska: Progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report details the harvest, health, and welfare study of the Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) as undertaken at Savoonga, Alaska, on St. Lawrence...

  13. Evaluation of the 100 meter protective zone for bald eagle nests in southeast Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nests in southeast Alaska have been protected by a 100 m buffer zone since 1968. Nests near logging developments were surveyed...

  14. Arctic Health Research Center report no. 101: Combating mosquitoes in arctic Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers combating mosquitoes in Arctic Alaska. The physiology and biology of mosquitoes is discussed, followed by techniques to combated mosquitoes.

  15. The current status and future of the Alaska trumpeter swan population

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An extensive aerial survey of trumpeter swans in Alaska in 1975 disclosed a total of 4,170 birds. An adjusted comparison with a somewhat less complete survey in...

  16. Breeding Canada geese of the Port Etches area, Hinchinbrook Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report discusses the breeding of Canada geese of the Port Etches area in Hinchinbrook Island, Alaska. Nesting habits and habitat, broods, predators are...

  17. Alaska-Yukon waterfowl breeding pair survey, May 20 to June 10, 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey for Alaska during 1970. The primary purpose of the survey is to provide information on...

  18. Walrus harvest, health/welfare study, Wales, Alaska: Progress report 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Charles Adsit was the FIVS representative stationed in Wales, Alaska to collect walrus harvest information during a period extending from May 11 to June 22, 1981....

  19. 1983 walrus harvest, health, and welfare study at Savoonga, Alaska: Progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Between April 14th and June 5th, the FWS monitored the spring harvest of walruses taken by Native hunters of Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska. The effort was...

  20. Innovations and guidelines for evaluating salmon enhancement channel sites in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the innovations and guidelines for evaluating salmon enhancement of channel sites in Alaska. An alternative salmon enhancement approach is that...

  1. Results of a shoreline waterbird survey in Passage Canal, Prince William Sound, Alaska, 1 September 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers findings from shoreline water birds surveys of Passage Canal, Prince William Sound in Alaska. Methods, results and discussion are included,...

  2. Census, nesting and productivity of bald eagles in southeast Alaska, 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A study of the bald eagle Haliaeetus leucocephalus in southeast Alaska was conducted during the period March 15, 1966 to July 7, 1966. The first surveys were for...

  3. Skirmishing Over The Last Frontier--The Alaska Lands Proposals: A Conservationist's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiberling, John F.

    1978-01-01

    The House of Representatives Bill 39, if passed, would designate new or expanded national parks, wildlife refuges, forests, wild and scenic rivers, and wilderness areas on less than 100 million acres of public land in Alaska. (Author/MJB)

  4. Population status, reproductive ecology and trophic relationships of seabirds in northwestern Alaska: Final report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Numbers of murres at two major breeding colonies in northern Alaska are declining and annual variability is high in a variety of elements of murre and kittiwake...

  5. Breeding and feeding ecology of pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba) at Naked Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the breeding and feeding ecology of the pigeon guillemot at Naked Island, Alaska, as well as surveys of the Naked Island complex. Methods...

  6. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...

  7. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: M_MAMPT (Marine Mammal Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...

  8. Present status and possible future management of wolf populations in interior and arctic Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper discusses the status and possible future of wolf management in interior and arctic Alaska. The paper begins by discussing the history of the human-wolf...

  9. Distribution and abundance of breeding seabirds in Chiniak and southern Marmot Bays, Kodiak Island, Alaska, 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A census survey of breeding seabirds was conducted by boat and airplane in Chiniak and southern Marmot Bays, Kodiak Island, Alaska, from 15 June to 14 August 1975....

  10. Results of a modeling workshop concerning development of the Beluga coal resource in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the results of a modeling workshop concerning development of the Beluga coal resource in Alaska. The workshop was facilitated by the AEA...

  11. 1984 Pacific walrus harvest, health, and welfare study at Little Diomede Island, Alaska: Progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a progress update on the Pacific walrus harvest study that has been conducted in Diomede, Alaska in previous years. Study methods and results are...

  12. Sandhill crane aerial surveys in Alaska and the Yukon Territory, 1957-1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sandhill cranes have been recorded on Alaska waterfowl breeding population surveys since 1957. Aerial observations provide mean indexes of 2,200 cranes for...

  13. A survey for nesting birds of prey along the Copper River, Alaska, 1987/88

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the findings of a survey for nesting birds of prey along the Cooper River in Alaska. The primary objectives of the study were as follows:...

  14. Results of the 1986 seabird monitoring program at Cape Lisburne, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the results of the 1986 seabird monitoring program at Cape Lisburne, Alaska. Objectives of this reports includes determining reproductive...

  15. A survey of waterfowl problems in Alaska for the purpose of identifying research needs: Preliminary draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report highlights the many and varied problems facing the waterfowl resource of Alaska. Current waterfowl investigations and management programs aimed at...

  16. Aerial Breeding Pair Surveys of the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska : Distribution and Abundance 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An aerial breeding pair survey was conducted on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska for the 10th consecutive year in 1995. The population estimate for the northern...

  17. Alaska-Yukon waterfowl breeding pair survey, May 17 to June 7, 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey for Alaska during 1969. The primary purpose of the survey is to provide information on...

  18. The distribution and abundance of seabirds along the Aleutian Islands and Alaska Peninsula, fall 1974

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the distribution and abundance of sea birds along the Aleutian Islands and Alaska peninsula during fall 1974. Quantitative observations on the...

  19. Birch Creek, Alaska, a wild and scenic river analysis: Preliminary draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Upper Birch Creek, Alaska possessed values which qualify it for inclusion in the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. The upper Birch Creek and its immediate...

  20. Charley River and tributaries, Alaska, a wild and scenic river analysis: Preliminary draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Charley River, Alaska, and its principal tributaries possess values which qualify it for inclusion in the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. The Charley...

  1. Tissue concentrations of elemental and organochlorine compounds in sea otters in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) are found in coastal waters of Alaska from the southeast part of the state through the Aleutian Islands. Sea otters and their principle...

  2. Alaska polar bear harvest characteristics 1980-1982: Status report: Draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Polar bear harvests in Alaska coastal villages from November 1980 to April 1982. Hunters from 13 villages killed polar bears during this period. The documented...

  3. Aerial breeding pair surveys of the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska - 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1996 an aerial breeding pair survey was conducted on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska for the 11th consecutive year. All major species of waterfowl indicated...

  4. Peale's peregrine (Falco peregrinus pealei) prey items from southeast Alaska in 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper reports the findings of a survey of Peregrine Falcons conducted along the coast of southeast Alaska from Dall Island to Sitka from June 8 to June 25,...

  5. Peale's peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus pealei) studies in Alaska, June 12-24, 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Survey coverage for peregrines along the Alaska Coast has been incomplete and variable in intensity. The lack of trend data, increased development activity in...

  6. 1980 raptor survey: The breeding peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) population of Amchitka Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A survey of the breeding peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) population was made on Amchitka Island, Alaska, during the 1980 summer field season. The survey was...

  7. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: ESI (Environmental Sensitivity Index Shoreline Types)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...

  8. Survey of waterfowl populations and habitat on Nelson Island, Alaska: Progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a progress report on the survey of waterfowl populations and habitat on Nelson Island in Alaska. Aerial surveys and ground surveys are covered....

  9. Environmental contaminants in three eider species from Alaska and Arctic Russia

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study provides baseline data on contaminant concentrations in three eider species from coastal areas of western and northern Alaska and arctic Russia....

  10. Effects of land use on ranges and populations on moose and caribou in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Moose and caribou are the most important ungulate mammals throughout most of Alaska by the criteria of biomass, area occupied, and use for meat. Our objective has...

  11. Aerial survey of potential sites for raptor migration studies along the Gulf of Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An investigation into raptor migration along the southern coast of Alaska was initiated in 1982. Spring and fall counts of migrant raptors were recorded in the...

  12. Reproductive ecology of seabirds at Middleton Island, Alaska, 15-24 June 1983: Trip report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Middleton Island harbors the largest colony of Pelagic Cormorants and Blacklegged Kittiwakes in the Gulf of Alaska. Goals of the study were to assess the current...

  13. Den ecology, distribution, and productivity of foxes at Kokechik Bay, Alaska: Annual report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In May 1985 fieldwork was initiated at Kokechik Bay, Alaska to collect information on the ecology of foxes inhabiting the nesting grounds of geese on the...

  14. Summer bird use of a barrier island near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The number and distribution of birds near a barrier island west of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, were recorded during the summer of 1972. Eiders fed and rested in the open...

  15. Yellow-billed loon populations on the Colville River Delta, arctic Alaska: Supplemental project report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the yellow-billed loon populations on the Colville river delta in the Arctic Alaska. The estimates sizes of the 1982 and 1984 yellow-billed look...

  16. Sea otter distribution and abundance in western Prince William Sound, Alaska: Progress report 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sea otters recently recolonized Prince William sound (PWS), Alaska after being extirpated in the 18th and 19th centuries. Twenty-five years ago a few otters...

  17. Population age composition, breeding biology and notes on the wolverine in Alaska and Yukon Territory

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes the population age, composition, breeding biology and notes on the wolverine in Alaska and the Yukon territory. Life history, physical...

  18. ANWR progress report number FY86: Effects of winter oil and gas exploration on visual resources, vegetation, and surface stability of the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1986 and 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A statistically significant loss of plant cover occurred at most disturbed plots, but few plots showed recovery. In riparian shrubland, cover values for horsetails...

  19. Introduced arctic fox compound 1080 baiting and wildlife surveys, Kiska Island, Aleutian Island, Alaska, 24 March-04 April 1986 (in support of EPA experimental use permit 6704-EUP-28)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To accomplish eradication of introduced arctic fox on Kiska, the FWS is testing and evaluating the toxicant sodium monofluoroacetate (Compound 1080). Incumbent upon...

  20. ANWR progress report number FY84-4: Population size, composition, and distribution of moose along the Canning and Kongakut Rivers within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, fall 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial surveys to determine the population size, composition, and distribution of moose (Alces alces) along the Canning and Kongakut River drainages were conducted...

  1. Geographic Analysis of Alaska Lake Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arp, C. D.; Jones, B. M.; Zimmerman, C. E.

    2007-12-01

    The state of Alaska has over 400,000 lakes greater than 0.01 km2 in surface area covering approximately 3.3% of the landscape. As in most lake-rich regions, these lakes are unevenly distributed on the landscape. So in order to better understand how lakes are organized on the landscape and relate this geographic organization to other climatologic, geologic, and biogeographic characteristics, we analyzed the spatial distribution of Alaska lakes. Using a combination of numerical abundance and surface-area extent of lakes, we selected lake density thresholds to identify and delineate 22 lake districts in Alaska. The total area of these 22 lakes districts occupy 16% of Alaska, yet encompass 64% of lakes and 76% of lake surface-area. The three largest lake districts are associated with the Yukon-Kuskokwin Delta, the Northern Arctic Coastal Plain, and the mountain front of the Alaskan Range on the Alaska Peninsula. Interestingly, these largest lake districts are covered by >17% lakes, while most of the smaller lake districts we identified have Parks (NP) and National Wildlife Refuges (NWR). Not surprisingly, 12 of these lake districts occur partly or wholly within NWRs, and all but two are associated with other state or federally managed parks or wildlife refuges. Analysis of lake districts in Alaska, or other regions on Earth, may prove to be useful for better understanding lake change, aquatic and terrestrial habitats, and regional hydrologic budgets and regimes. Such fresh views of the landscape may become increasingly important for improving natural resource science and management in Alaska, where future climate change is predicted to be very rapid.

  2. Origins of cattle on Chirikof Island, Alaska, elucidated from genome-wide SNP genotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Decker, J.E.; Taylor, J. F.; Kantanen, J.; Millbrooke, A; Schnabel, R D; Alexander, L. J.; MacNeil, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Feral livestock may harbor genetic variation of commercial, scientific, historical or esthetic value. The origins and uniqueness of feral cattle on Chirikof Island, Alaska, are uncertain. The island is now part of the Alaska Maritime Wildlife Refuge and Federal wildlife managers want grazing to cease, presumably leading to demise of the cattle. Here we characterize the cattle of Chirikof Island relative to extant breeds and discern their origins. Our analyses support the inference that Yakut ...

  3. Auditing wildlife

    OpenAIRE

    B.K. Reilly; Y. Reillly

    2003-01-01

    Reilly B.K. and Y. Reilly. 2003. Auditing wildlife. Koedoe 46(2): 97–102. Pretoria. ISSN 0075-6458. Accountants and auditors are increasingly confronted with the problem of auditing wildlife populations on game ranches as their clients' asset base expands into this industry. This paper aims to provide guidelines on these actions based on case study data and research in the field of wildlife monitoring. Parties entering into dispute on numbers of animals on a property often resort to their au...

  4. Auditing wildlife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.K. Reilly

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Reilly B.K. and Y. Reilly. 2003. Auditing wildlife. Koedoe 46(2: 97–102. Pretoria. ISSN 0075-6458. Accountants and auditors are increasingly confronted with the problem of auditing wildlife populations on game ranches as their clients' asset base expands into this industry. This paper aims to provide guidelines on these actions based on case study data and research in the field of wildlife monitoring. Parties entering into dispute on numbers of animals on a property often resort to their auditors for advice. This paper tracks a method of deciding on whether or not to audit the population based on wildlife value and an initial sample count. This will act as a guideline for the accounting profession when confronted by this problem.

  5. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Mingo National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Wildlife Inventory Plan for Mingo NWR outlines procedures for monitoring the distribution, abundance, and population dynamics of the species of wildlife...

  6. Wildlife Inventory Plan: Seney National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Wildlife Inventory Plan is the guideline employed to obtain useful parameters related to the distribution, abundance, and population dynamics of wildlife...

  7. Wildlife Inventory Plan : [Tewaukon National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document outlines the wildlife inventory objectives for Tewaukon National Wildlife Refuge. Procedures are outlined for the following surveys: goose census,...

  8. Stillwater Wildlife Management Area Wildlife Inventory Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Wildlife Inventory Plan discusses the following protocols; wildlife inventory procedures, physical facility needs, manpower days, and special considerations.

  9. 75 FR 22725 - Western Interior Alaska Federal Subsistence Regional Advisory Council Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... Forest Service 36 CFR Part 242 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 100 Western Interior Alaska Federal Subsistence Regional Advisory Council Meeting AGENCY: Forest Service, Agriculture; Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting (teleconference). SUMMARY:...

  10. Effects of petroleum exposure on the breeding ecology of the Gulf of Alaska herring gull group (Larus argentatus x Larus glaucenscens) and reproductive ecology of large gulls in the northeastern Gulf of Alaska: Annual report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is an investigation of primary and potential secondary effects of gas and oil development on large gulls Larsus in the northeast Gulf of Alaska. Our...

  11. Aerial survey of sea otters and other marine mammals Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands, 19 April to 9 May 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An aerial survey, 19 April to 9 May 1965 yielded information on marine animals and birds in the Aleutian Islands and limited areas along the Alaska Peninsula. In...

  12. Nesting ecology and habitat requirements of geese at Kokechik Bay, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska: Annual report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper summarizes the results of the third of a five-year study on the breeding biology and habitat requirements of geese nesting at Kokechik Bay, Alaska. Data...

  13. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Aleutian Islands, Alaska, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0014927)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps for the Aleutian Islands, Alaska. ESI data characterize coastal environments and wildlife by...

  14. Toxicity and water quality of natural waterbodies, reserve pits and selected sites at North Slope, Alaska, oilfields

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Oilfield activities on the North Slope of Alaska result in production of large amounts of wastes and fugitive dust. Surface storage and disposal of these wastes may...

  15. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon, organochlorine pesticide, and trace element concentrations in six fox livers from the Prudhoe Bay Oilfield, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study was a portion of a multi-year assessment of contaminant concentrations from a variety of biotic and abiotic samples on the North Slope of Alaska. The...

  16. Contaminant Case Report: Spectacled eider (Somateria fischeri) eggs and feathers from the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We collected spectacled eider (Somateria fischeri) eggs and shed breast contour feathers from nests on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska, in 1992 to evaluate...

  17. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Northwest Arctic, Alaska, volume 2, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0046028)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Northwest Arctic, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  18. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Prince William Sound, Alaska, Volumes 1 and 2, geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0019218)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife...

  19. Population and productivity studies of black-legged kittiwakes, common murres, and pelagic cormorants at Cape Peirce, Alaska, summer 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Cape Peirce, Alaska, was the site of a nesting seabird study from June 16 to August 20, 1988. Three species of nesting seabirds Blacklegged Kittiwakes, Common...

  20. Evaluation of techniques used to study vegetation and avifauna in National Petroleum Reserve of Alaska: 1976 NPRA final report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The report covers the evaluation of techniques used to study vegetation and avifauna in National Petroleum Reserve of Alaska. This is the 1976 NPRA final report....

  1. Investigations of interior Arctic coastal plain avifauna in National Petroleum Reserve of Alaska: 1977 Singiluk final report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document covers the investigations of interior Arctic coastal plains avifauna in national petroleum reserve of Alaska. The effects of petroleum development on...

  2. An assessment of waterbird populations wintering in Port Frederick, Chichagof Island, Alaska, 19-23 February 1982: Boat surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Information is presented on the waterbird population of Port Frederick, Chichagof Island, Alaska, as revealed by small boat surveys during February 1982. The...

  3. Distribution, abundance, and productivity of fall staging lesser snow geese on coastal habitats of northeast Alaska and northwest Canada, 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the distribution, abundance, and productivity of fall staging lesser snow geese on coastal habitats of northeast Alaska and northwest Canada. The...

  4. Alaska Radiometric Ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Radiometric Age file is a database of radiometric ages of rocks or minerals sampled from Alaska. The data was collected from professional publications...

  5. 36 CFR 242.26 - Subsistence taking of wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE SUBSISTENCE MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS FOR PUBLIC LANDS IN ALASKA Subsistence Taking of Fish and... individual, gear, or wildlife during an emergency rescue operation in a life-threatening situation; (4... this paragraph, and black bears of all color phases taken in Units 1-7, 11-17, and 20. (2) You may...

  6. Management of Large Predators in Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boertje, R.D.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Populations of wolves (Canis lupus, brown bears (Ursus arctos, and black bears (Ursus americanus in Alaska are abundant and highly productive. Their long-term future is secure due to abundant habitat and good wildlife management practices. In many areas of Alaska hunting and trapping regulates wolf numbers and keep them "in balance" with moose populations. However, high predation rates by wolves can severely depress prey populations and then hold them at a very low density many years. This is often referred to as a predator pit. Several moose populations in interior Alaska are in predator pits. In some of these areas, high densities of black and brown bears complicate the situation. Bears generally prey on moose calves for only a few weeks after they are born, but in some areas they kill up to 65% of the calves produced. Moose populations faced with high levels of predation by both wolves and bears will not recover without special management actions to reduce the predation rate. Efforts to regulate predator populations outside of normal hunting and trapping seasons are highly controversial. Many people are very strongly opposed to reducing wolf or bear populations to increase moose populations and provide for a higher harvest by humans. Other people that depend on the moose for food and/or recreation strongly support predator management. It is a clash of values that is generates great controversy in Alaska. We provide a brief history of the controversy over predator management in Alaska and make recommendations on how to manage large predators in Alaska.

  7. Wildlife inventory plan [1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1938 as a refuge and breeding ground for migratory birds and other wildlife. While the refuge represents...

  8. Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge wildlife checklist

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Checklist with habitat, season, and abundance codes for wildlife species at Ruby Lake NWR. Includes bird, mammal, amphibian, reptile, and fish species.

  9. Wildlife Inventory Plan: Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this inventory plan for Tetlin NWR is to provide a management tool for the measurement of progress in attaining wildlife population goals. This...

  10. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Necedah National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a plan to obtain useful parameters related to the distribution, abundance, and population dynamics of the species of wildlife inhabiting Necedah NWR. The...

  11. Wildlife management memoradum: Utilization of wildlife resources

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Outlines the interview technique designed to determine harvest of wildlife resources by subsistence and native hunters. Collections of birds, eggs, mammals, etc....

  12. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge : Wildlife Inventory Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Wildlife Inventory Plan for Ottawa NWR describes the inventory program’s relation to Refuge objectives and outlines the program’s policies and administration....

  13. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Muscatatuck NWR Wildlife Inventory Plan summarizes procedures for monitoring wood duck production, monitoring Canada goose and mallard production, and...

  14. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The primary objective at Shiawassee is to provide food and cover for migratory birds, with emphasis on waterfowl, during spring and fall migrations. A Wildlife...

  15. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge : Wildlife Inventory Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Wildlife Inventory Plan for Ottawa NWR describes the inventory programs relation to Refuge objectives and outlines the programs policies and administration....

  16. Feeding ecology of the pigeon guillemot (Cepphus columba) at Naked Island, Prince William Sound, Alaska and surveys of the Naked Island complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the feeding ecology of the pigeon guillemot at Naked Island and Prince William Sound, Alaska, as well as surveys of the Naked Island complex....

  17. A reconnaissance of the breeding distribution of colonial nesting of seabirds on the south coast of the Alaska Peninsula, May 30 - June 19, 1973

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These field notes respond to the need for more knowledge about colonial seabirds, a neglected segment of Alaskas natural resources. Refuges, research and what was...

  18. Population, movements and seasonal distribution of the Kilbuck Caribou Herd, southwest Alaska: Progress report, Kilbuck Caribou study, September 1985-May 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This progress report covers work done on the Kilbuck Caribou herd in southwest Alaska from September of 1985 to May of 1988. The study area is described, as well as...

  19. A progress report on fishery surveys along the route of the proposed Trans-Alaska Pipeline between the Yukon River and Atigun Pass during 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This progress report represents a summary of findings of the field work conducted by USFWS during the summer of 1971 along the route of the proposed Trans-Alaska...

  20. Waterfowl populations, production and habitat ecology on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska: Population and ecology of cackling geese: Progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a progress report on the waterfowl populations, production and habitat ecology on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska, specifically the populations and...

  1. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Western Alaska - volume 1, geographic information systems data and data tables and volume 2, maps in portable document format (PDF) (NODC Accession 0046030)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Western Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by their...

  2. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Southeast Alaska - volume 1, geographic information systems data and volume 2, maps in portable document format (NCEI Accession 0046029)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Northwest Arctic, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  3. Report to the Governor of Alaska on cooperative predatory-animal investigations and control in the Territory for the period March 1, 1929, to February 28, 1931

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a report to the governor of Alaska on cooperative predatory animal investigations and control in the territory for the period March 1, 1929 to...

  4. Population dynamics and trophic relationships of marine birds in the Gulf of Alaska and southern Bering Sea: Part I, general introduction: Annual report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sitespecific studies of marine birds were conducted at 13 locations in the Gulf of Alaska and southern Bering Sea during the 1976 field season. Although the studies...

  5. Potential role of environmental contaminants in the pathology of beak deformities among Black-capped chickadees in South-central Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — More than 1,400 individual Black-capped Chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) with beak deformities were recorded in south-central Alaska between 1991 and 2005. Over...

  6. Winter feeding ecology and trophic relationships of marine birds in Kachemak Bay, Alaska: Final report to the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The winter feeding ecology of oldsquaw, white-winged scoters, common murres and marbled murrelet was studied on Kachemak Bay, Alaska, from November 1977 through...

  7. The Best of Alaska

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑钧

    2011-01-01

    Nothing awakes Alaska like a whale exploding out of the water or an eagle (鹰) pulling a silver fish from the river. Combine these images with high mountains, brilliant icebergs and wonderful meals and you really do have the best of Alaska!

  8. Alaska geothermal bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liss, S.A.; Motyka, R.J.; Nye, C.J. (comps.)

    1987-05-01

    The Alaska geothermal bibliography lists all publications, through 1986, that discuss any facet of geothermal energy in Alaska. In addition, selected publications about geology, geophysics, hydrology, volcanology, etc., which discuss areas where geothermal resources are located are included, though the geothermal resource itself may not be mentioned. The bibliography contains 748 entries.

  9. Renewable Energy in Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-03-01

    This report examines the opportunities, challenges, and costs associated with renewable energy implementation in Alaska and provides strategies that position Alaska's accumulating knowledge in renewable energy development for export to the rapidly growing energy/electric markets of the developing world.

  10. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge : Wildlife Inventory Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge Wildlife Inventory Plan outlines the strategy, techniques and purpose of a wildlife inventory on the Refuge. Futhermore...

  11. Wildlife inventory plan [1973

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1938, and presently contains 37,631 acres. The refuge marshes provide production, resting, and feeding habitat...

  12. Designated Wildlife Lakes - points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This is a point shapefile of Designated Wildlife Lakes in Minnesota. This shapefile was created by converting lake polygons from the Designated Wildlife Lakes...

  13. The prospect of wildlife tourism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUYuan; ZHANGWei; TANGXiao-dong

    2004-01-01

    The paper extends an overview of the worldwided velopment of wildlife tourism, introduced the conception of wildlife tourism and its components, and analyzed the development of international wildlife tourism and its international trends. The sustainability of wildlife tourism, the protection of wildlife habitat, as well as the possible impacts of wildlife tourism development in China were discussed.

  14. Census Snapshot: Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Adam P; Baumle, Amanda K; Badgett, M. V. Lee; Gates, Gary J.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the U.S. Census Bureau, this report provides demographic and economic information about same-sex couples and same-sex couples raising children in Alaska. We compare same-sex “unmarried partners,” which the Census Bureau defines as an unmarried couple who “shares living quarters and has a close personal relationship,” to different-sex married couples in Alaska. In many ways, the more than 1,600 same-sex couples living in Alaska are similar to married couples. According...

  15. Profile: American Indian/Alaska Native

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native Profile: American Indian/Alaska Native Spotlight ACA Infographic for American Indians/ ... Program Circle of Life multimedia youth education program American Indian/Alaska Native Profile Great Plains Area Alaska Area ...

  16. Alaska Highway bibliography, 3rd edition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prange, Laurie

    Since the early 20th century various schemes were considered for the construction of roads, trails or railways 71 to link the Yukon, northern British Columbia and Alaska to the “outside.” These schemes were motivated by economic interests, including mining, lumber and tourism concerns. During the....... The impacts included an increased awareness of the world outside of the Yukon, imported ideas and technology, improved health care, highway transportation, telecommunications, and the development of more mining and tourist-related industries....

  17. The plant ecology of Amchita Island, Alaska: Report on a research contract between the Department of Botany, the University of Tennessee and Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Laboratories for the period 1 August 1967 through 30 June 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Department of Botany of The University of Tennessee is conducting a study of the plant ecology of Amchitka Island, Alaska, as a subcontractor for Battelle...

  18. 77 FR 65201 - Proposed Information Collection; Alaska Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest Household Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-25

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Proposed Information Collection; Alaska Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest... frequent the United States and for setting harvest regulations that allow for the conservation of those... characteristics of migratory bird harvest. We use harvest data to review regulation proposals and to issue...

  19. A conceptual model for the impact of climate change on fox rabies in Alaska, 1980–2010

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Bryan I.; Blanton, Jesse D.; Gilbert, Amy; Castrodale, Louisa; Hueffer, Karsten; Slate, Dennis; Rupprecht, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    The direct and interactive effects of climate change on host species and infectious disease dynamics are likely to initially manifest at latitudinal extremes. As such, Alaska represents a region in the United States for introspection on climate change and disease. Rabies is enzootic among arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) throughout the northern polar region. In Alaska, arctic and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) are reservoirs for rabies, with most domestic animal and wildlife cases reported from north...

  20. Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge : Wildlife Inventory Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following objectives for Agassiz NWR are described in this plan: 1 to provide waterfowl habitat for production and maintenance; 2 to provide suitable habitat...

  1. Human- Wildlife Conflict - The case of elephant at Mole National Park

    OpenAIRE

    Akenten, Zodiac

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts between wildlife and humans, particularly people who share immediate boundaries with protected areas, are common phenomenon. Declining wildlife resources has been linked to human actions through overexploitation, habitat destruction, and habitat fragmentation among others. Local people also look at wildlife as a liability to them. This view is provoked by a bitter experience they have had due to costs inflicted by wildlife conservation. Such costs include; loss of access to legitima...

  2. Reelfoot and Lake Isom National Wildlife Refuges : Wildlife Inventory Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This wildlife inventory plan for Reelfoot and Lake Isom National Wildlife Refuges includes survey procedure forms that represent cost effective inventory of the...

  3. Wildlife Inventory Plan Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document outlines wildlife monitoring guidelines for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge. The objectives of this plan are; 1 to standardize inventory...

  4. Wildlife Inventory Plan: Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document outlines wildlife monitoring guidelines for Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge. The objectives of this plan are; 1 to standardize inventory...

  5. Wildlife and Habitat Review : St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Wildlife and Habitat review for St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge discusses refuge establishment and management, future refuge management, the contribution...

  6. Accretion of southern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillhouse, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Paleomagnetic data from southern Alaska indicate that the Wrangellia and Peninsular terranes collided with central Alaska probably by 65 Ma ago and certainly no later than 55 Ma ago. The accretion of these terranes to the mainland was followed by the arrival of the Ghost Rocks volcanic assemblage at the southern margin of Kodiak Island. Poleward movement of these terranes can be explained by rapid motion of the Kula oceanic plate, mainly from 85 to 43 Ma ago, according to recent reconstructions derived from the hot-spot reference frame. After accretion, much of southwestern Alaska underwent a counterclockwise rotation of about 50 ?? as indicated by paleomagnetic poles from volcanic rocks of Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary age. Compression between North America and Asia during opening of the North Atlantic (68-44 Ma ago) may account for the rotation. ?? 1987.

  7. Marais Des Cygnes Wildlife Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This brochure is for the Marais des Cygnes Wildlife Area, managed by Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism, and located in the floodplain of the Marais...

  8. Gulf Island National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document provides a brief history and describes physical features of the Gulf Island National Wildlife Refuges. The Gulf Island National Wildlife Refuges...

  9. U.S. Geological Survey Activities Related to American Indians and Alaska Natives: Fiscal Year 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction This report describes the activities that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted with American Indian and Alaska Native governments, educational institutions, and individuals during Federal fiscal year (FY) 2005. Most of these USGS activities were collaborations with Tribes, Tribal organizations, or professional societies. Others were conducted cooperatively with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) or other Federal entities. The USGS is the earth and natural science bureau within the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI). The USGS does not have regulatory or land management responsibilities. As described in this report, there are many USGS activities that are directly relevant to American Indians, Alaska Natives, and to Native lands. A USGS website, dedicated to making USGS more accessible to American Indians, Alaska Natives, their governments, and institutions, is available at www.usgs.gov/indian. This website includes information on how to contact USGS American Indian/Alaska Native Liaisons, training opportunities, and links to other information resources. This report and previous editions are also available through the website. The USGS realizes that Native knowledge and cultural traditions of living in harmony with nature result in unique Native perspectives that enrich USGS studies. USGS seeks to increase the sensitivity and openness of its scientists to the breadth of Native knowledge, expanding the information on which their research is based. USGS scientific studies include data collection, mapping, natural resource modeling, and research projects. These projects typically last 2 or 3 years, although some are parts of longer-term activities. Some projects are funded cooperatively, with USGS funds matched or supplemented by individual Tribal governments, or by the BIA. These projects may also receive funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the Indian Health Service (part of the Department of Health and Human Services

  10. Wildlife and wildlife management in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Tim; Davenport, Tim R B

    2016-08-01

    Tanzania, arguably mainland Africa's most important nation for conservation, is losing habitat and natural resources rapidly. Moving away from a charcoal energy base and developing sustainable finance mechanisms for natural forests are critical to slowing persistent deforestation. Addressing governance and capacity deficits, including law enforcement, technical skills, and funding, across parts of the wildlife sector are key to effective wildlife protection. These changes could occur in tandem with bringing new models of natural resource management into play that include capacity building, corporate payment for ecosystem services, empowering nongovernmental organizations in law enforcement, greater private-sector involvement, and novel community conservation strategies. The future of Tanzania's wildlife looks uncertain-as epitomized by the current elephant crisis-unless the country confronts issues of governance, embraces innovation, and fosters greater collaboration with the international community. PMID:26681228

  11. Effects of the 1976 Seney National Wildlife Refuge wildfire on wildlife and wildlife habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In the summer of 1976 a wildfire burned 260 square-km on the Seney National Wildlife Refuge in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...

  12. Averaging and Captive Wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRosa, Bill; Finch, Patty A.

    1985-01-01

    Offers a teaching technique that proposes to enliven instruction of statistics for mathematics students. This activity focuses on questions and associated calculations pertaining to wildlife in captivity. Directives for the lesson as well as a complete listing of questions and answers on captive wildlife are included. (ML)

  13. Massive wildlife project outlined

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — News article on the Chase Lake Prairie Project that is centered on the Chase Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Over the next 11 years the project aims to support 1.3...

  14. Wildlife Management Objectives

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Parker River National Wildlife Refuge provided an average of 1,411,000 duck use days during the 7-year period (1954-1960), with a high of 2,270,000 use days in...

  15. Current Ethnomusicology in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Thomas F.

    The systematic study of Eskimo, Indian, and Aleut musical sound and behavior in Alaska, though conceded to be an important part of white efforts to foster understanding between different cultural groups and to maintain the native cultural heritage, has received little attention from Alaskan educators. Most existing ethnomusical studies lack one or…

  16. Alaska Peninsula Alutiiq Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Matrona; And Others

    This workbook contains materials for teachers to use in the classroom. An alphabet book, the Pledge of Allegiance, songs, a play, and units on various subjects, such as hunting, picking berries, making a garden, and spring cleaning, are included. The materials are presented in both Alaska Peninsula Alutiiq (Sugpiaq) and English. (CFM)

  17. Northern Alaska oil fields and caribou: a commentary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the status of caribou, Rangifer tarandus, herds relative to oil field development in the Prudhoe Bay region of Alaska. The Central Arctic caribou herd, which spends June and July in and around oil fields in the Prudhoe Bay region, has increased since the inception of oil field development and has demographics similar to those of adjacent herds which are not near oil fields. Although oil field development may impact individual caribou through disturbance or impedance of movements, herd-level impacts of the oil fields are not apparent. Caribou populations characteristically fluctuate dramatically, and differentiating human and non-human impacts is difficult or impossible. The herd is the unit of management, and management objectives are being met. The experience in northern Alaska's oil fields indicates resource extraction and wildlife populations can be compatible when managed properly. (Author)

  18. Pesticides and their effects on wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driver, C.J.

    1994-07-01

    About 560 active ingredients are currently used as pesticides. Applications of these pesticides are made to agricultural lands and other areas inhabited by wildlife. Unfortunately, many agricultural-use pesticides also entail some measure of risk to organisms other than the pest species. Because testing of pesticides prior to registration cannot evaluate all the potential environmental-pesticide-wildlife/fish interactions, current methods of risk assessment do not always provide sufficient safety to nontarget organisms. This is evidenced by die-offs of fish and wildlife from applications of pesticides at environmentally {open_quotes}safe{close_quotes} rates, the linking of population declines of some species with agrochemical use, and observations of survival-threatening behavioral changes in laboratory and field animals exposed to typical field levels of pesticides. It is important to note, however, that the majority of pesticides, when properly applied, have not caused significant injury to wildlife. A brief summary of pesticide effects on wildlife and fish are presented for the common classes of pesticides in use today.

  19. Locally acquired disseminated histoplasmosis in a northern sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) in Alaska, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burek-Huntington, Kathy A; Gill, Verena; Bradway, Daniel S

    2014-04-01

    Histoplasmosis of local origin has not been reported in humans or wildlife in Alaska, and the disease has never been reported in a free-ranging marine mammal. In 2005 a northern sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) was found on Kodiak Island, Alaska, at 57° latitude north, far outside the known distribution of Histoplasma capsulatum. The animal died of disseminated histoplasmosis. Microorganisms consistent with Histoplasma sp. were observed on histopathology, and H. capsulatum was identified by PCR and sequencing. We suggest migratory seabirds or aerosol transmission through prevailing winds may have resulted in transmission to the sea otter. PMID:24484503

  20. Tilting at wildlife: reconsidering human-wildlife conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Redpath, Stephen Mark; Bhatia, Saloni; Young, Juliette

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts between people over wildlife are widespread and damaging to both the wildlife and people involved. Such issues are often termed human–wildlife conflicts. We argue that this term is misleading and may exacerbate the problems and hinder resolution. A review of 100 recent articles on human–wildlife conflicts reveals that 97 were between conservation and other human activities, particularly those associated with livelihoods. We suggest that we should distinguish between human–wildlife i...

  1. History of the Wildlife Areas Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, Oak Orchard Wildlife Management Area, Tonawanda Wildlife Management Area, John White Wildlife Management Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides a history of four management areas in Western New York: Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, Oak Orchard Management Area, Tonawanda Wildlife...

  2. Alaska Seismic Network Upgrade and Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandru, J. M.; Hansen, R. A.; Estes, S. A.; Fowler, M.

    2009-12-01

    AEIC (Alaska Earthquake Information Center) has begun the task of upgrading the older regional seismic monitoring sites that have been in place for a number of years. Many of the original sites (some dating to the 1960's) are still single component analog technology. This was a very reasonable and ultra low power reliable system for its day. However with the advanced needs of today's research community, AEIC has begun upgrading to Broadband and Strong Motion Seismometers, 24 bit digitizers and high-speed two-way communications, while still trying to maintain the utmost reliability and maintaining low power consumption. Many sites have been upgraded or will be upgraded from single component to triaxial broad bands and triaxial accerometers. This provided much greater dynamic range over the older antiquated technology. The challenge is compounded by rapidly changing digital technology. Digitizersand data communications based on analog phone lines utilizing 9600 baud modems and RS232 are becoming increasingly difficult to maintain and increasingly expensive compared to current methods that use Ethernet, TCP/IP and UDP connections. Gaining a reliable Internet connection can be as easy as calling up an ISP and having a DSL connection installed or may require installing our own satellite uplink, where other options don't exist. LANs are accomplished with a variety of communications devices such as spread spectrum 900 MHz radios or VHF radios for long troublesome shots. WANs are accomplished with a much wider variety of equipment. Traditional analog phone lines are being used in some instances, however 56K lines are much more desirable. Cellular data links have become a convenient option in semiurban environments where digital cellular coverage is available. Alaska is slightly behind the curve on cellular technology due to its low population density and vast unpopulated areas but has emerged into this new technology in the last few years. Partnerships with organizations

  3. National Wildlife Refuge System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — When President Theodore Roosevelt made Floridas tiny Pelican Island a refuge for birds in 1903, he wrote the first chapter of a great American conservation success...

  4. National Wildlife Refuge System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — When President Theodore Roosevelt made Florida's tiny Pelican Island a refuge for birds in 1903, he wrote the ¬first chapter of a great American conservation...

  5. Wildlife value orientations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamborg, Christian; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard

    2016-01-01

    This article examined value orientations toward wildlife among the adult general Danish public in relation to age, sex, past and present residence, education, and income, using a U.S. survey instrument on Wildlife Value Orientations (WVO). The study used an Internet-based questionnaire sent to a...... representative sample of the Danish public in 2012 (n = 1,001). As predicted, there was a predominance of mutualists and a large segment of distanced individuals. Sex was the only variable shown to have a pronounced effect on WVO, with females being more mutualist-oriented than males. Information about the...... general public’s WVO can be used to check against the orientation of other specific groups such as landowners and hunters. It can also prove useful for developing specific hunting and wildlife policies such as certification of wildlife managers....

  6. Radioactivity and wildlife: Taking stock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection standards were developed with the express aim of protecting human health asserting that these would therefore protect non-human biota, an assertion which did not derive from evidence. English Nature (then Nature Conservancy Council) commissioned a report in 1988 to examine the issue of radioactivity and wildlife and, again in 2001 with the Environment Agency, sought to update the original work in the light of new evidence. The organisation took an interest because of the persistence, capacity for bioaccumulation of some radionuclides and chronic toxic effects at low doses and the potential concerns for wildlife at the site-specific level as well as the distribution of radioisotopes more widely in the environment. In the last decade, biodiversity legislation such as the Habitats Directive and Regulations has been enacted which specifically prohibits damage to the 'integrity' of internationally important habitats and species. The history of developments in knowledge about the health effects in humans and other species following exposure to radioactivity is reviewed. Currently, there is a dearth of information in certain areas including the effects of specific radionuclides, the behaviour and pathways of naturally occurring radionuclides, chronic as opposed to acute effects, interactions with other stressors, some taxa and alternative exposure scenarios. English Nature and the Environment Agency have adopted a precautionary principle in judging whether a significant effect is likely or not following a radioactive impact. Developments at the cellular level could provide a joint basis on which to base assessments of radiation damage regardless of the species affected. However, it will be some time before any possible links between such damage and the development of an associated pathology become clear whether in humans or wildlife species. Knowledge about the impacts of radiation continues to evolve and needs to be taken into account. (author)

  7. Coal resources of Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    In the late 1800s, whaling ships carried Alaskan coal, and it was used to thaw ground for placer gold mining. Unfortunate and costly political maneuvers in the early 1900s delayed coal removal, but the Alaska Railroad and then World War II provided incentives for opening mines. Today, 33 million acres (about 9% of the state) is classified as prospectively valuable for coal, much of it under federal title. Although the state's geology is poorly known, potential for discovery of new fields exists. The US Geological Survey estimates are outdated, although still officially used. The total Alaska onshore coal resource is estimated to be 216 to 4216 billion tons of which 141 billion tons are identified resources; an additional 1430 billion tons are believed to lie beneath Cook Inlet. Transportation over mountain ranges and wetlands is the biggest hurdle for removal. Known coal sources and types are described and mapped. 1 figure.

  8. Foodborne parasites from wildlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapel, Christian Moliin Outzen; Fredensborg, Brian Lund

    2015-01-01

    The majority of wild foods consumed by humans are sourced from intensively managed or semi-farmed populations. Management practices inevitably affect wildlife density and habitat characteristics, which are key elements in the transmission of parasites. We consider the risk of transmission...... of foodborne parasites to humans from wildlife maintained under natural or semi-natural conditions. A deeper understanding will be useful in counteracting foodborne parasites arising from the growing industry of novel and exotic foods....

  9. Fish and wildlife surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the monitoring of radioactive contaminants in fish and wildlife species that inhabit the Colombia River and Hanford Site. Wildlife have access to areas of the Site containing radioactive contamination, and fish can be exposed to contamination in spring water entering the river along the shoreline. Therefore, samples are collected at various locations annually, generally during the hunting or fishing season, for selected species

  10. Fish and wildlife surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, T.M.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the monitoring of radioactive contaminants in fish and wildlife species that inhabit the Colombia River and Hanford Site. Wildlife have access to areas of the Site containing radioactive contamination, and fish can be exposed to contamination in spring water entering the river along the shoreline. Therefore, samples are collected at various locations annually, generally during the hunting or fishing season, for selected species.

  11. Fish and wildlife survey of the Atigun River after the June 10, 1979 Alyeska Pipeline crude oil spill

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A crude oil spill estimated at 60 – 10,000 gallons was discovered at the Alyeska Trans Alaska Pipeline on the north side of Atigun Pass in the Brooks Range on June...

  12. Sea otter studies in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The final objective of the present Fish and Wildlife sea otter program is to learn enough of the ecology, population, reproductive potential, and requirements in...

  13. Kenai National Moose Range Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This book presents a summary of the history, wildlife, recreational opportunities, economic uses, and future plans for Kenai National Moose Range.

  14. Conceptual data modeling of wildlife response indicators to ecosystem change in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walworth, Dennis; Pearce, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Large research studies are often challenged to effectively expose and document the types of information being collected and the reasons for data collection across what are often a diverse cadre of investigators of differing disciplines. We applied concepts from the field of information or data modeling to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Changing Arctic Ecosystems (CAE) initiative to prototype an application of information modeling. The USGS CAE initiative is collecting information from marine and terrestrial environments in Alaska to identify and understand the links between rapid physical changes in the Arctic and response of wildlife populations to these ecosystem changes. An associated need is to understand how data collection strategies are informing the overall science initiative and facilitating communication of those strategies to a wide audience. We explored the use of conceptual data modeling to provide a method by which to document, describe, and visually communicate both enterprise and study level data; provide a simple means to analyze commonalities and differences in data acquisition strategies between studies; and provide a tool for discussing those strategies among researchers and managers.

  15. Decadal changes in Gulf of Alaska upwelling source waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo Buil, Mercedes; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele

    2015-03-01

    Decadal changes in sea surface temperature (SST) in the Gulf of Alaska are linked to long-term transitions in the marine ecosystem. While previous studies have identified the atmospheric variability of the Aleutian Low as an important driver of Ekman pumping and low-frequency SST anomalies, the role of subsurface gyre-scale dynamics remains unexplored. Using a set of reanalysis data sets from 1958 to the present, we find that subsurface temperature anomalies generated along the North Pacific Current significantly contribute through mean upwelling to decadal changes of SST in the Gulf of Alaska. This influence is comparable to the contribution associated with variations in atmospheric winds. Given the exceptional low-frequency character of the propagation of subsurface anomalies (e.g., multidecadal) along the gyre, monitoring subsurface temperature anomalies up stream along the North Pacific Current may enhance the decadal predictability of SST in the Gulf of Alaska and its impact on local marine ecosystems.

  16. [Ellicott Slough National Wildlife Refuge, Farallon National Wildlife Refuge, Salinas River National Wildlife Refuge: Annual Narrative Report: Calendar Year 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ellicott Slough National Wildlife Refuge, Farallon National Wildlife Refuge, and Salinas River National Wildlife Refuge outlines...

  17. Institutional innovation in less than ideal conditions: Management of commons by an Alaska Native village corporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixie Dayo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Alaska Natives have experienced less than ideal conditions for engaging in management of their homeland commons. During the first 100 years after the Treaty of Cession of 1867, Alaska Natives received limited recognition by the United States. The Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971 (ANCSA was signed into law by President Richard Nixon after tedious negotiations by Alaska Natives, the United States Congress, and special interest groups. As part of the settlement, 12 regional corporations and over 200 village corporations were established to receive fee title to 40 million acres of land and a cash settlement of $962.5 million for lands lost. This arrangement has been considered by some as an act of social engineering to assimilate Alaska Natives into a capitalist economy. In spite of the goal of assimilation, Alaska Natives have utilized ANCSA to strengthen their indigenous identity and revitalize their cultural traditions. This paper examines the innovative efforts of Alaska Natives to successfully manage their commons despite the introduction of new and foreign institutions. Since the passing of ANSCA, Alaska Natives have cultivated good skills to navigate and modify legal systems and engage bureaucracies with considerable success. More than 36 years after the passage of ANCSA, most Alaska Native homelands remain intact in ways not previously imagined. Village corporations have used a number of legal methods to allocate land to shareholders, manage ownership of stocks, and contribute to the Alaska economy. ANCSA provided no special aboriginal rights for harvesting and management of fish and wildlife. Resultant rural-urban conflicts have been confronted with a novel mix of agency-Native cooperation and litigation. Although aspects of the arrangement are not ideal, the conditions are not hopeless. Our paper explores the hypothesis that while formal institutions matter, informal institutions have considerable potential to generate

  18. U.S. Global Climate Change Impacts Report, Alaska Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, D.

    2009-12-01

    The assessment of the Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States includes analyses of the potential climate change impacts in Alaska. The resulting findings are discussed in this presentation, with the effects on water resources discussed separately. Major findings include: Summers are getting hotter and drier, with increasing evaporation outpacing increased precipitation. Climate changes are already affecting water, energy, transportation, agriculture, ecosystems, and health. These impacts are different from region to region and will grow under projected climate change. Wildfires and insect problems are increasing. Climate plays a key role in determining the extent and severity of insect outbreaks and wildfire. The area burned in North America’s northern forest that spans Alaska and Canada tripled from the 1960s to the 1990s. During the 1990s, south-central Alaska experienced the largest outbreak of spruce bark beetles in the world because of warmer weather in all seasons of the year. Under changing climate conditions, the average area burned per year in Alaska is projected to double by the middle of this century10. By the end of this century, area burned by fire is projected to triple under a moderate greenhouse gas emissions scenario and to quadruple under a higher emissions scenario. Close-bodied lakes are declining in area. A continued decline in the area of surface water would present challenges for the management of natural resources and ecosystems on National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska. These refuges, which cover over 77 million acres (21 percent of Alaska) and comprise 81 percent of the U.S. National Wildlife Refuge System, provide a breeding habitat for millions of waterfowl and shorebirds that winter in the lower 48 states. Permafrost thawing will damage public and private infrastructure. Land subsidence (sinking) associated with the thawing of permafrost presents substantial challenges to engineers attempting to preserve infrastructure in

  19. 50 CFR Table 2 to Part 226 - Major Stellar Sea Lion Haulout Sites in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Major Stellar Sea Lion Haulout Sites in.... 226, Table 2 Table 2 to Part 226—Major Stellar Sea Lion Haulout Sites in Alaska Major Steller sea lion...: Northeast Point 1 57 15.0N 170 06.5W Sea Lion Rock 1 57 06.0N 170 17.5W St. George I: S Rookery 1 56...

  20. GeoFORCE Alaska, A Successful Summer Exploring Alaska's Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartes, D.

    2012-12-01

    Thirty years old this summer, RAHI, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute is a statewide, six-week, summer college-preparatory bridge program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks for Alaska Native and rural high school juniors and seniors. This summer, in collaboration with the University of Texas Austin, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute launched a new program, GeoFORCE Alaska. This outreach initiative is designed to increase the number and diversity of students pursuing STEM degree programs and entering the future high-tech workforce. It uses Earth science to entice kids to get excited about dinosaurs, volcanoes and earthquakes, and includes physics, chemistry, math, biology and other sciences. Students were recruited from the Alaska's Arctic North Slope schools, in 8th grade to begin the annual program of approximately 8 days, the summer before their 9th grade year and then remain in the program for all four years of high school. They must maintain a B or better grade average and participate in all GeoFORCE events. The culmination is an exciting field event each summer. Over the four-year period, events will include trips to Fairbanks and Anchorage, Arizona, Oregon and the Appalachians. All trips focus on Earth science and include a 100+ page guidebook, with tests every night culminating with a final exam. GeoFORCE Alaska was begun by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in partnership with the University of Texas at Austin, which has had tremendous success with GeoFORCE Texas. GeoFORCE Alaska is managed by UAF's long-standing Rural Alaska Honors Institute, that has been successfully providing intense STEM educational opportunities for Alaskan high school students for over 30 years. The program will add a new cohort of 9th graders each year for the next four years. By the summer of 2015, GeoFORCE Alaska is targeting a capacity of 160 students in grades 9th through 12th. Join us to find out more about this exciting new initiative, which is enticing young Alaska Native

  1. [Wildlife inventory plan : Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This wildlife inventory plan describes methods for collecting migratory birds, upland birds, big game, predator, and small mammal surveys at Des Lacs National...

  2. Wildlife Inventory Plan: Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan outlines wildlife inventory procedures for Rice Lake NWR. Waterfowl inventories, breeding pair counts, brood counts, nest searches, weekly bird surveys,...

  3. Wildlife Inventory Plan. Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge, Ortonville, Minnesota

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Refuge's Wildlife Inventory Plan provides procedures for the following surveys; waterfowl populations, goose and duck production, cavity nesting ducks, marsh...

  4. Wildlife Inventory Plan : Parker River National Wildlife Refuge [draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Wildlife Inventory Plan for Parker River NWR outlines procedures for the following surveys: spotlight deer survey, aerial deer survey, predator scent station...

  5. Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, Santee National Wildlife Refuge, 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is an unpublished report by the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study of the Parasitology College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia....

  6. Wildlife Inventory Plan: Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The goals for this Wildlife Inventory Plan for Minnesota Valley NWR are: (1) to provide as good a survey method as possible to estimate population levels of key...

  7. Stillwater Wildlife Management Area : Wildlife Inventory Plan : Calendar Year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report outlines the purpose and procedure to inventory the colonial waterbirds on the Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge. Species include American White...

  8. Wildlife Inventory Plan Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — It is the purpose of this plan to determine how information is gathered for waterfowl and other wildlife species on the refuge. Other goals of this plan are 1 to...

  9. Wildlife Inventory Plan Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge was established for the preservation of the waterfowl resource. The refuge is still managed principally for the benefit of...

  10. Wildlife Inventory Plan Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge was established for the preservation of the waterfowl resource. The refuge is still managed principally for the benefit of...

  11. Wildlife Inventory Plan Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge was established for the preservation of the waterfowl resource. The refuge is still managed principally for the benefit of...

  12. Fishery management plan: Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This management plan was prepared by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge. Data was provided by the Refuge and Area Office Wildlife...

  13. Project RavenCare: global multimedia telemedicine in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohme, Walid G.; Collmann, Jeff R.; Mun, Seong K.; Vastola, David J.

    1995-05-01

    Project RavenCare is a testbed for assessing the utility of teleradiology, telemedicine and electronic patient records systems for delivering health care to Native Alaskans in remote villages. It is being established as a joint project between the department of radiology at Georgetown University Medical Center and the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Corporation (SEARHC) in Sitka, Alaska. This initiative will establish a sustained routine clinical multimedia telemedicine support for a village clinic in Hoonah, Alaska and a regional hospital in Sitka. It will link the village clinic in Hoonah to Mt. Edgecumbe Hospital in Sitka. This regional hospital will in turn be linked to Georgetown University Hospital through the T1- VSAT (very small aperture terminal) of the NASA-ACTS (Advanced Communication Technology Satellite). Regional physicians in Hoonah lack support in providing relatively routine care in areas such as radiology and pathology. This project is an initial step in a general plan to upgrade telecommunications in the health care system of the Southeast Alaska region and will address aspects of two problems; limited communication between the village health clinics and the hospital and lack of subspecialty support for hospital-based physicians in Sitka.

  14. Prospectus: Proposed National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Document includes letters of support for creation of a National Wildlife Refuge in Mashpee, Masschusetts. Includes description of habitat, history of land...

  15. Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes the history of Benton Lake NWR including refuge development, accomplishments, management, wildlife, and waterfowl. Future management plans are...

  16. Alaska highway pipeline inquiry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lysyk, K.M.; Bohmer, E.E.; Phelps, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    A public enquiry was held to determine the social and economic impacts associated with the proposed Alaska Highway pipeline. The pipeline was proposed to carry natural gas from Prudhoe Bay to the continental United States. The pipeline would follow the trans-Alaskan pipeline to Fairbanks, and follow the Alaska Highway through southern Yukon into northern British Columbia. The 48 inch pipe would operate at a pressure of 1,260 psi and would carry 2.4 billion cubic feet of gas per day, and could operate at that level for at least 25 years. Issues considered included alternative routes, employment and training, economic impact, social impact, the Yukon Indian land claim, the Dempster Lateral pipeline, planning and regulation, and compensation. The enquiry concluded that the government of Canada should not give approval in principle to the proposed pipeline through the southern Yukon without resolving the issues of an advanced payment towards the settlement of the Yukon Indian land claim, of compensation from the pipeline company, the establishment of a planning and control agency, and the deferral of the commencement of construction of the pipeline. 8 figs.

  17. Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge and Fallon National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Fallon, Stillwater and Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuges are located in northwest Nevada and are administered by the refuge administrative office in...

  18. Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge and Fallon National Wildlife refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Weather conditions for the year were near normal and had no significant effect on refuge outputs or operations. Stillwater Wildlife Management Area was plagued with...

  19. Application of the Ceditest FMDV type O and FMDV-NS enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for detection of antibodies against Foot-and-mouth disease virus in selected livestock and wildlife species in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Ayebazibwe, Chrisostom; Mwiine, Frank Norbert; Balinda, Sheila Nina; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Alexandersen, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and control of Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) requires rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests. Two antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits, Ceditest FMDV-NS for the detection of antibodies against the nonstructural proteins of all FMDV serotypes and Ceditest FMDV type O for the detection of antibodies against serotype O, were evaluated under African endemic conditions where the presence of multiple serotypes and the use of nonpurified vaccines complicate serologic...

  20. 2005 Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys Lidar: Unalakleet, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report is a summary of a LiDAR data collection over the community of Unalakleet, in the Norton Sound region of Alaska. The original data were collected on...

  1. WILDLIFE HABITAT INVENTORY

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNDOĞDU, Ebubekir

    2009-01-01

    This study focused on what does habitat mean in wildlife, which factors it contains, how to make inventory for these factors and how to analyses habitat according to chosen species. In spite of habitat inventory has various meanings for varying areas and species by examining literature on this issue the most preferred habitat inventory standards are presented in this article. Keywords: Habitat, Inventory, Mapping

  2. Wildlife for sale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E; Redford, T

    2000-02-01

    Myanmar, famous for the smuggling of opium and gemstones, is losing much of its wildlife to illegal traders. In 1998, a survey of goods for sale in two border towns showed a thriving trade in body parts from some of the world's most endangered species. PMID:11190214

  3. Planting for Wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Chad P.; Decker, Daniel J.

    1979-01-01

    Songbirds and small mammals can be encouraged to visit and live in residential yards if structures such as bird feeders and birdbaths are provided and if vegetation is planted to provide basic requirements of wildlife habitat. Examples and instructions are provided. (RE)

  4. Interior Alaska Bouguer Gravity Anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 1 kilometer Complete Bouguer Anomaly gravity grid of interior Alaska. Only those grid cells within 10 kilometers of a gravity data point have gravity values....

  5. Interior Alaska Bouguer Gravity Anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 1 kilometer Complete Bouguer Anomaly gravity grid of interior Alaska. All grid cells within the rectangular data area (from 61 to 66 degrees North latitude and...

  6. Kevadel Alaska talves / Tiiu Ehrenpreis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ehrenpreis, Tiiu

    2007-01-01

    Autori muljeid 22.-25. märtsini Fairbanksis toimunud Alaska Ülikooli ja Ülemaailmse Arktika Uurimise Keskuse (IARC) juhtimisel GLOBE'i programmi uue projekti "Aastaajad ja bioomid" koolitusseminarist

  7. Alaska Geoid Heights (GEOID96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' geoid height grid for Alaska is distributed as a GEOID96 model. The computation used 1.1 million terrestrial and marine gravity data held in the...

  8. Assessment of the impact of a Trans-Alaska Pipeline oil spill on the birds and mammals of the Atigun River system

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An oil spill resulting from a crack in the Trans-Alaska Pipeline was discovered on June 10, 1979 near pipeline mile post 166, on the north side of Atigun Pass....

  9. Alaska Athabascan stellar astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Christopher M.

    Stellar astronomy is a fundamental component of Alaska Athabascan cultures that facilitates time-reckoning, navigation, weather forecasting, and cosmology. Evidence from the linguistic record suggests that a group of stars corresponding to the Big Dipper is the only widely attested constellation across the Northern Athabascan languages. However, instruction from expert Athabascan consultants shows that the correlation of these names with the Big Dipper is only partial. In Alaska Gwich'in, Ahtna, and Upper Tanana languages the Big Dipper is identified as one part of a much larger circumpolar humanoid constellation that spans more than 133 degrees across the sky. The Big Dipper is identified as a tail, while the other remaining asterisms within the humanoid constellation are named using other body part terms. The concept of a whole-sky humanoid constellation provides a single unifying system for mapping the night sky, and the reliance on body-part metaphors renders the system highly mnemonic. By recognizing one part of the constellation the stargazer is immediately able to identify the remaining parts based on an existing mental map of the human body. The circumpolar position of a whole-sky constellation yields a highly functional system that facilitates both navigation and time-reckoning in the subarctic. Northern Athabascan astronomy is not only much richer than previously described; it also provides evidence for a completely novel and previously undocumented way of conceptualizing the sky---one that is unique to the subarctic and uniquely adapted to northern cultures. The concept of a large humanoid constellation may be widespread across the entire subarctic and have great antiquity. In addition, the use of cognate body part terms describing asterisms within humanoid constellations is similarly found in Navajo, suggesting a common ancestor from which Northern and Southern Athabascan stellar naming strategies derived.

  10. Ocean-Glacier Interactions in Alaska and Comparison to Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motyka, R. J.; Truffer, M.

    2011-12-01

    Meltwater from Alaska's coastal glaciers and icefields accounts for nearly half of the total freshwater discharged into the Gulf of Alaska (GOA), with 10% coming from glacier volume loss associated with rapid thinning and retreat of glaciers (Neal et al, 2010). This glacier freshwater discharge contributes to maintaining the Alaska Coastal Current (ACC), which eventually reaches the Arctic Ocean (Royer and Grosch, 2006), thereby linking changes of glaciers along the coast of Alaska to the whole Arctic system. Water column temperatures on the shelf of northern GOA, monitored at buoy GAK1 near Seward, have increased by about 1 deg C since 1970 throughout the 250 m depth and vertical density stratification has also increased. Roughly half of the glacier contribution to ACC is derived from the ~ 50 tidewater glaciers (TWG) that drain from Alaska's coastal mountains into the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). Fjord systems link these TWGs to the GOA, with fjord circulation patterns driven in part by buoyancy-driven convection of subglacial freshwater discharge at the head of the fjord. Neoglacial shallow sills (< 50 m deep) modulate the influx of warm ocean waters (up to 10 deg C) into these fjords. Convection of these warm waters melts icebergs and submerged faces of TWGs. The study of interactions between glaciers, fjords, and the ocean in coastal Alaska has had a long but very sporadic history. We examine this record starting with the "TWG cycle" hypothesis. We next examine recent hydrographic data from several different TWG fjords, representative of advancing and retreating TWGs (Columbia, Yahtse, Hubbard, and LeConte Glaciers), evaluate similarities and differences, and estimate the relative contributions of submarine glacier melting and subglacial discharge to fjord circulation. Circulation of warm ocean waters in fjords has also been hypothesized to play an important role in destabilizing and modulating glacier discharge from outlet glaciers in Greenland. We therefore compare

  11. ALASKA1964_RUNUP - Alaska 1964 Tsunami Runup Heights at Seaside, Oregon (alaska1964_runup.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set is a point shapefile representing tsunami inundation runup heights for the Alaska 1964 event based on observations and associated information obtained...

  12. Application of the Ceditest FMDV type O and FMDV-NS enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for detection of antibodies against Foot-and-mouth disease virus in selected livestock and wildlife species in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayebazibwe, Chrisostom; Mwiine, Frank Norbert; Balinda, Sheila Nina;

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and control of Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) requires rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests. Two antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits, Ceditest FMDV-NS for the detection of antibodies against the nonstructural proteins of all FMDV serotypes and Ceditest FMDV type O......, and selected samples were tested not only in serotype-specific ELISAs for antibodies against primarily FMDV serotype O, but also against other serotypes. The FMDV-NS assay detected far more positive samples (93%) than the FMDV type O assay (30%) in buffalo (P ... the South African Territories (SAT) serotypes, while the seroprevalence was generally comparable in cattle with antibodies against serotype O elicited by infection and/or vaccination. However, some districts had higher seroprevalence using the FMDV type O assay indicating vaccination without infection...

  13. Wildlife monitoring program plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebesta, P.; Arno, R.

    1979-01-01

    A plan for integrating the various requirements for wildlife monitoring with modern aerospace technology is presented. This plan is responsive to user needs, recognizes legal requirements, and is based on an evolutionary growth from domestic animals and larger animals to smaller, more scarce and remote species. The basis for animal study selection was made from the 1973 Santa Cruz Summer Study on Wildlife Monitoring. As techniques are developed the monitoring and management tasks will be interfaced with and eventually operated by the user agencies. Field efforts, aircraft and satellites, will be supplemented by laboratory investigations. Sixty percent of the effort will be in hardware research and development (satellite technology, microminiaturization) and the rest for gathering and interpreting data.

  14. Antimicrobial resistance in wildlife

    OpenAIRE

    Vittecoq, M.; Godreuil, S.; Prugnolle, Franck; Durand, P.; Brazier, L; Renaud, N; Arnal, A.; Aberkane, S.; Jean-Pierre, H.; Gauthier-Clerc, M; Thomas, F.; Renaud, F.

    2016-01-01

    The spread of antimicrobial resistance is of major concern for human health and leads to growing economic costs. While it is increasingly hypothesized that wildlife could play an important role in antimicrobial-resistant bacteria dynamics, empirical data remain scarce. The present work builds on a systematic review of the available data in order to highlight the main information we have and to suggest research pathways that should be followed if we aim to fill the gaps in our current knowledg...

  15. History of wildlife toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, Barnett A

    2009-10-01

    The field of wildlife toxicology can be traced to the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Initial reports included unintentional poisoning of birds from ingestion of spent lead shot and predator control agents, alkali poisoning of waterbirds, and die-offs from maritime oil spills. With the advent of synthetic pesticides in the 1930s and 1940s, effects of DDT and other pesticides were investigated in free-ranging and captive wildlife. In response to research findings in the US and UK, and the publication of Silent Spring in 1962, public debate on the hazards of pollutants arose and national contaminant monitoring programs were initiated. Shortly thereafter, population-level effects of DDT on raptorial and fish-eating birds were documented, and effects on other species (e.g., bats) were suspected. Realization of the global nature of organochlorine pesticide contamination, and the discovery of PCBs in environmental samples, launched long-range studies in birds and mammals. With the birth of ecotoxicology in 1969 and the establishment of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry in 1979, an international infrastructure began to emerge. In the 1980s, heavy metal pollution related to mining and smelting, agrichemical practices and non-target effects, selenium toxicosis, and disasters such as Chernobyl and the Exxon Valdez dominated the field. Biomarker development, endocrine disruption, population modeling, and studies with amphibians and reptiles were major issues of the 1990s. With the turn of the century, there was interest in new and emerging compounds (pharmaceuticals, flame retardants, surfactants), and potential population-level effects of some compounds. Based upon its history, wildlife toxicology is driven by chemical use and misuse, ecological disasters, and pollution-related events affecting humans. Current challenges include the need to more thoroughly estimate and predict exposure and effects of chemical-related anthropogenic

  16. Alaska GeoFORCE, A New Geologic Adventure in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartes, D.

    2011-12-01

    RAHI, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute is a statewide, six-week, summer college-preparatory bridge program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks for Alaska Native and rural high school juniors and seniors. A program of rigorous academic activity combines with social, cultural, and recreational activities. Students are purposely stretched beyond their comfort levels academically and socially to prepare for the big step from home or village to a large culturally western urban campus. This summer RAHI is launching a new program, GeoFORCE Alaska. This outreach initiative is designed to increase the number and diversity of students pursuing STEM degree programs and entering the future high-tech workforce. It uses Earth science as the hook because most kids get excited about dinosaurs, volcanoes and earthquakes, but it includes physics, chemistry, math, biology and other sciences. Students will be recruited, initially from the Arctic North Slope schools, in the 8th grade to begin the annual program of approximately 8 days, the summer before their 9th grade year and then remain in the program for all four years of high school. They must maintain a B or better grade average and participate in all GeoFORCE events. The carrot on the end of the stick is an exciting field event each summer. Over the four-year period, events will include trips to Fairbanks, Arizona, Oregon and the Appalachians. All trips are focused on Earth science and include a 100+ page guidebook, with tests every night culminating with a final exam. GeoFORCE Alaska is being launched by UAF in partnership with the University of Texas at Austin, which has had tremendous success with GeoFORCE Texas. GeoFORCE Alaska will be managed by UAF's long-standing Rural Alaska Honors Insitute (RAHI) that has been successfully providing intense STEM educational opportunities for Alaskan high school students for almost 30 years. The Texas program, with adjustments for differences in culture and environment, will be

  17. A conceptual model for the impact of climate change on fox rabies in Alaska, 1980-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B I; Blanton, J D; Gilbert, A; Castrodale, L; Hueffer, K; Slate, D; Rupprecht, C E

    2014-02-01

    The direct and interactive effects of climate change on host species and infectious disease dynamics are likely to initially manifest\\ at latitudinal extremes. As such, Alaska represents a region in the United States for introspection on climate change and disease. Rabies is enzootic among arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) throughout the northern polar region. In Alaska, arctic and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) are reservoirs for rabies, with most domestic animal and wildlife cases reported from northern and western coastal Alaska. Based on passive surveillance, a pronounced seasonal trend in rabid foxes occurs in Alaska, with a peak in winter and spring. This study describes climatic factors that may be associated with reported cyclic rabies occurrence. Based upon probabilistic modelling, a stronger seasonal effect in reported fox rabies cases appears at higher latitudes in Alaska, and rabies in arctic foxes appear disproportionately affected by climatic factors in comparison with red foxes. As temperatures continue a warming trend, a decrease in reported rabid arctic foxes may be expected. The overall epidemiology of rabies in Alaska is likely to shift to increased viral transmission among red foxes as the primary reservoir in the region. Information on fox and lemming demographics, in addition to enhanced rabies surveillance among foxes at finer geographic scales, will be critical to develop more comprehensive models for rabies virus transmission in the region. PMID:23452510

  18. Carbon-sequestration and ecosystem services in the boreal ecoregion of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Manies, K.; Labay, K.; Johnson, W. N.; Harden, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Managing public lands for carbon (C) sequestration is increasingly discussed as a component of national carbon policies. However, management of public land to facilitate carbon sequestration must be considered in the context of other management mandates and the effects on other ecosystem services. Of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service's (USFWS) National Wildlife Refuge lands in Alaska, about 35% are in the boreal ecoregion; primarily in the Intermountain and the Alaska Range Transition ecoregions. These refuges were established to conserve wildlife habitat, fulfill treaty obligations, provide for continued subsistence uses, and ensure necessary water quality and quantity. One of the major factors in determining ecosystem distribution in the boreal ecoregion is disturbance. Fire is the dominant disturbance for Alaska's boreal region. Most USFWS refuge lands are managed with "limited" suppression, where fires burn naturally and are monitored to assure the protection of human life, property, and site specific values (such as historical or religious). However, there is increasing interest in biomass harvest and combustion for local energy production. Harvest and fire can have differing effects on both the spatial and temporal aspects of carbon storage. The current biomass harvest for energy production proposals are considered to be C neutral because they focus on "hazardous" biomass which would burn naturally or in a prescribed burn. The goal of this effort is to explore the relation between C storage and other public land management priorities, as well as, to explore how disturbance type (fire and harvest) affect C storage and boreal ecosystem distribution in the context of wildlife habitat and subsistence use management priorities. We present a conceptual model that defines the linkages among these management priorities, a data gap analysis, and scenarios to be evaluated.

  19. Satellite View of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Alaska map layer is a 200-meter-resolution simulated-natural-color image of Alaska. Vegetation is generally green, with darker greens...

  20. US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    1993-08-01

    This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

  1. Has the time come for big science in wildlife health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeman, Jonathan Mark

    2013-12-01

    The consequences of wildlife emerging diseases are global and profound with increased burden on the public health system, negative impacts on the global economy, declines and extinctions of wildlife species, and subsequent loss of ecological integrity. Examples of health threats to wildlife include Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, which causes a cutaneous fungal infection of amphibians and is linked to declines of amphibians globally; and the recently discovered Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destructans, the etiologic agent of white nose syndrome which has caused precipitous declines of North American bat species. Of particular concern are the novel pathogens that have emerged as they are particularly devastating and challenging to manage. A big science approach to wildlife health research is needed if we are to make significant and enduring progress in managing these diseases. The advent of new analytical models and bench assays will provide us with the mathematical and molecular tools to identify and anticipate threats to wildlife, and understand the ecology and epidemiology of these diseases. Specifically, new molecular diagnostic techniques have opened up avenues for pathogen discovery, and the application of spatially referenced databases allows for risk assessments that can assist in targeting surveillance. Long-term, systematic collection of data for wildlife health and integration with other datasets is also essential. Multidisciplinary research programs should be expanded to increase our understanding of the drivers of emerging diseases and allow for the development of better disease prevention and management tools, such as vaccines. Finally, we need to create a National Fish and Wildlife Health Network that provides the operational framework (governance, policies, procedures, etc.) by which entities with a stake in wildlife health cooperate and collaborate to achieve optimal outcomes for human, animal, and ecosystem health. PMID:24136386

  2. Meredosia National Wildlife Refuge : Cropland Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Meredosia National Wildlife Refuge Cropland Management Plan focuses on the production of supplemental grain and browse foods to maintain wildlife populations at...

  3. Cropland Management Plan: Louisa National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Louisa National Wildlife Refuge Cropland Management Plan focuses to the production of supplemental grain and browse foods to maintain wildlife populations at...

  4. Contaminants investigation at Grulla National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In August, 2003, a contaminants investigation was initiated at Grulla National Wildlife Refuge (Grulla NWR) by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service personnel. The purpose...

  5. Inventory Plan : St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The inventory procedures outlined in this plan represent a cost effective inventory of the wildlife populations on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge. Winter...

  6. Wilderness Study Summary Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This brochure describes a national wildlife refuge that has been studied by the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife at the direction of the Secretary of the...

  7. Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge : Law Enforcement Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge Law Enforcement Plan clarifies U.S. Fish and Wildlife enforcement policies as they apply to the Refuge. It provides...

  8. Toxicological Benchmarks for Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E. Opresko, D.M. Suter, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated by using a two-tiered process. In the first tier, a screening assessment is performed where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks represent concentrations of chemicals (i.e., concentrations presumed to be nonhazardous to the biota) in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.). While exceedance of these benchmarks does not indicate any particular level or type of risk, concentrations below the benchmarks should not result in significant effects. In practice, when contaminant concentrations in food or water resources are less than these toxicological benchmarks, the contaminants may be excluded from further consideration. However, if the concentration of a contaminant exceeds a benchmark, that contaminant should be retained as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) and investigated further. The second tier in ecological risk assessment, the baseline ecological risk assessment, may use toxicological benchmarks as part of a weight-of-evidence approach (Suter 1993). Under this approach, based toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. Other sources of evidence include media toxicity tests, surveys of biota (abundance and diversity), measures of contaminant body burdens, and biomarkers. This report presents NOAEL- and lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 85 chemicals on 9 representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, little brown bat, meadow vole, white-footed mouse, cottontail rabbit, mink, red fox, and whitetail deer) or 11 avian wildlife species (American robin, rough-winged swallow, American woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, barn owl, Cooper's hawk, and red

  9. Using commodity-indexed financing to fund OPEC/Alaska's development projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An impediment to the process of economic diversification in OPEC and Alaska is the lack of favourable access to local and international capital markets to finance development projects, particularly mineral resource development. This paper highlights the importance of commodity-indexed bonds, including oil- and gold- indexed bonds, as a financing alternative to supplement the supply shortage of loanable funds from conventional, local and international commercial banks. The indexation concept is discussed, features of different bonds issued to date are contrasted and the benefits and risks for borrowers and investors are highlighted. An analysis is made of the experience of OPEC and Alaska in using commodity-indexed bonds and the feasibility of Alaska and some OPEC countries entering into commodity-linked-financed joint ventures is examined. Future prospects for commodity-linked bonds are explored. Not withstanding the fact that the immediate market timing is unfavourable, the long-term benefits of commodity-indexed securities are recognized. (U.K.)

  10. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    OpenAIRE

    Shoffstall-Cone, Sarah; Williard, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Background. In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska’s Tribal Health Organizations (THO) developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities.Objectives. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA) Initiative tha...

  11. Wildlife Emergency and Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jennifer; Barron, Heather

    2016-05-01

    Wildlife patients often present as emergencies. For veterinarians who do not typically treat wildlife, it is important to be able to stabilize and determine the underlying cause of the animal's signs. This article discusses initial assessment, stabilization, and treatment of common emergency presentations in wild birds, reptiles, and mammals. PMID:26948268

  12. Winter waterfowl survey, southeastern Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Little is known of the total numbers of wintering waterfowl within the north pacific coastal region. The random stratified plot sampling methods used in 1980, as...

  13. Wildlife in Chernobyl forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article is a review of a book addressed Wormwood Forest: a natural history of Chernobyl which describes life in Europe's largest wildlife sanctuary in the region surrounding the Chernobyl station. Since the accident, the area has largely been a safe haven from hunters and farmers, allowing the wildlife to live in an undisturbed environment. Against this backdrop, the book describes in detail, a highly controversial programme that released an endangered species of horse into the zone. Lack of funding for such programmes makes it nearly impossible to administer them. The book blends reportage, popular science and encounters with the zone's few residents. The result is an account of a remarkable land, its people and animals seen through the eyes of the locals, the author and the zoologists, botanists and radiologists who travelled with her around the zone. The radiation is the book's ever-present protagonist, as the author describes in detail how it works itself through the entire food chain and environment. Along the author's journey through the affected regions of Belarus and Ukraine she debunks several myths surrounding Chernobyl and the nuclear industry in general. In fact, while there have been a small number of cases of mutations observed in some species, these are not as dramatic as the Chernobyl mythology.

  14. Human disturbances of denning polar bears in Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amstrup, S.C. (Alaska Fish and Wildlife Research Center, Anchorage, AK (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) give birth in dens of snow and ice. The altricial neonates cannot leave the den for >2 months post-partum and are potentially vulnerable to disturbances near dens. The coastal plain (1002) area of Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) lies in a region of known polar bear denning and also may contain >9 billion barrels of recoverable oil. Polar bears in dens could be affected in many ways by hydrocarbon development. The distribution of dens on ANWR was documented between 1981 and 1992 and responses of bears in dens to various anthropogenic disturbances were observed. Of 44 dens located by radiotelemetry on the mainland coast of Alaska and Canada, 20 (45%) were on ANWR and 15 (34%) were within the 1002 area. Thus, development of ANWR will increase the potential that denning polar bears are disturbed by human activities. However, perturbations resulting from capture, marking, and radiotracking maternal bears did not affect litter sizes or stature of cubs produced. Likewise, 10 of 12 denned polar bears tolerated exposure to exceptional levels of activity. This tolerance and the fact that investment in the denning effort increases through the winter indicated that spatial and temporal restrictions on developments could prevent the potential for many disruptions of denned bears from being realized. 16 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Human disturbances of denning polar bears in Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) give birth in dens of snow and ice. The altricial neonates cannot leave the den for >2 months post-partum and are potentially vulnerable to disturbances near dens. The coastal plain (1002) area of Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) lies in a region of known polar bear denning and also may contain >9 billion barrels of recoverable oil. Polar bears in dens could be affected in many ways by hydrocarbon development. The distribution of dens on ANWR was documented between 1981 and 1992 and responses of bears in dens to various anthropogenic disturbances were observed. Of 44 dens located by radiotelemetry on the mainland coast of Alaska and Canada, 20 (45%) were on ANWR and 15 (34%) were within the 1002 area. Thus, development of ANWR will increase the potential that denning polar bears are disturbed by human activities. However, perturbations resulting from capture, marking, and radiotracking maternal bears did not affect litter sizes or stature of cubs produced. Likewise, 10 of 12 denned polar bears tolerated exposure to exceptional levels of activity. This tolerance and the fact that investment in the denning effort increases through the winter indicated that spatial and temporal restrictions on developments could prevent the potential for many disruptions of denned bears from being realized. 16 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  16. 76 FR 17442 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Teleconference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Teleconference AGENCY... Wildlife Service (Service), announce a public teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage...) Benefit recreational hunting; (b) Benefit wildlife resources; and (c) Encourage partnership among...

  17. 76 FR 3155 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed...

  18. 76 FR 12130 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Teleconference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Teleconference AGENCY... Wildlife Service (Service), announce a public teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage...) Benefit recreational hunting; (b) Benefit wildlife resources; and (c) Encourage partnership among...

  19. Benefits of wildlife consumption to child nutrition in a biodiversity hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Christopher D; Fernald, Lia C H; Brashares, Justin S; Rasolofoniaina, B J Rodolph; Kremen, Claire

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial wildlife is the primary source of meat for hundreds of millions of people throughout the developing world. Despite widespread human reliance on wildlife for food, the impact of wildlife depletion on human health remains poorly understood. Here we studied a prospective longitudinal cohort of 77 preadolescent children (under 12 y of age) in rural northeastern Madagascar and show that consuming more wildlife was associated with significantly higher hemoglobin concentrations. Our empirical models demonstrate that removing access to wildlife would induce a 29% increase in the numbers of children suffering from anemia and a tripling of anemia cases among children in the poorest households. The well-known progression from anemia to future disease demonstrates the powerful and far-reaching effects of lost wildlife access on a variety of human health outcomes, including cognitive, motor, and physical deficits. Loss of access to wildlife could arise either from the diligent enforcement of existing conservation policy or from unbridled unsustainable harvest, leading to depletion. Conservation enforcement would enact a more rapid restriction of resources, but self-depletion would potentially lead, albeit more slowly, both to irrevocable local wildlife extinctions and loss of the harvested resource. Our research quantifies costs of reduced access to wildlife for a rural community in Madagascar and illuminates pathways that may broadly link reduced natural resource access to declines in childhood health. PMID:22106297

  20. The trans-Alaska pipeline controversy: Technology, conservation, and the frontier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Trans-Alaska Pipeline was the object of perhaps the most passionately fought conservation battle in the U.S. Although numerous authors documented the pipeline construction during its construction, there is, surprisingly, no previous scholarly treatment of this event written by an historian. Coates is an environmental historian who views the most interesting aspect of the controversy to be open-quote its relationship to earlier engineering projects and technological innovations in Alaska and the debates that accompanied them.close quotes Thus, he describes how the conservationist and environmental ideas arose during numerous earlier major Alaskan projects and controversies, including the Alaska Highway (1938-41), Canol Pipeline (1943-45), exploration of Naval Petroleum Reserve Number Four (Pet 4, 1944-1953), DEWline (1953-57), oil development in the Kenai National Moose Range (1957-58), statehood (1958), the creation of the Arctic Wildlife Refuge (1960), Project Chariot (1958-63), and Rampart Dam (1959-67). The history starts with the acquisition of Alaska in 1867 and finishes about the time of the Valdez oil spill in 1989

  1. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Shoffstall-Cone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska’s Tribal Health Organizations (THO developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. Objectives. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. Results. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Conclusions. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  2. Wildlife reserves, populations, and hunting outcome with smart wildlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank; Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl; Strange, Niels;

    2014-01-01

    same qualitative results arise when comparing a situation with and without stress effects, but of course at a higher level of hunting. We also show that when net social benefits of hunting dominate the net social benefits of populations, wildlife reserves are optimally placed in areas of low carrying...... the populations’ migration decisions depend on both hunting pressure and relative population densities. In the social optimum a pure stress effect on the behavior of smart wildlife exists. This implies that the population level in the wildlife reserve tends to increase and the population level in the...

  3. 76 FR 81247 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska; Amendment 88

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... Part 679 Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska... 0648-BA97 Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska... to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA FMP). Amendment 88 is...

  4. 76 FR 52147 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska; Amendment 88

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... Part 679 Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska... 0648-BA97 Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska... to implement Amendment 88 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska...

  5. Light Pollution and Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffek, J.

    2008-12-01

    for Educational Program IYA Dark Skies Education Session Fall American Geophysical Union San Francisco, December 15-19, 2008 Light Pollution and Wildlife This is a very exciting time to be a part of the mission to keep the nighttime skies natural. The International Year of Astronomy (IYA) 2009 is developing programs for all areas of Dark Skies Awareness. For many years the issue of light pollution focused on the impact to the astronomy industry. While this is an important area, research has shown that light pollution negatively impacts wildlife, their habitat, human health, and is a significant waste of energy. Since the message and impact of the effects of light pollution are much broader now, the message conveyed to the public must also be broader. Education programs directed at youth are a new frontier to reach out to a new audience about the adverse effects of too much artificial light at night. The International Dark-Sky Association (IDA) has developed educational presentations using the National Science Teachers Association Education Standards. These programs focus on youth between the ages of 5 to 17exploring new territory in the education of light pollution. The IDA education programs are broken down into three age groups; ages 5-9, 8-13, 12 and older. The presentations come complete with PowerPoint slides, discussion notes for each slide, and workbooks including age appropriate games to keep young audiences involved. A new presentation reflects the growing area of interest regarding the effects of too much artificial light at night on wildlife. This presentation outlines the known problems for ecosystems caused by artificial light at night. Insects are attracted to artificial lights and may stay near that light all night. This attraction interferes with their ability to migrate, mate, and look for food. Such behavior leads to smaller insect populations. Fewer insects in turn affect birds and bats, because they rely on insects as a food source. The IDA

  6. Amchitka Island, Alaska, Biological Monitoring Report 2011 Sampling Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-09-01

    The Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTS&M) Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) Amchitka Island sites describes how LM plans to conduct its mission to protect human health and the environment at the three nuclear test sites located on Amchitka Island, Alaska. Amchitka Island, near the western end of the Aleutian Islands, is approximately 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. Amchitka is part of the Aleutian Island Unit of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, which is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Since World War II, Amchitka has been used by multiple U.S. government agencies for various military and research activities. From 1943 to 1950, it was used as a forward air base for the U.S. Armed Forces. During the middle 1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) used a portion of the island as a site for underground nuclear tests. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the U.S. Navy constructed and operated a radar station on the island. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. DOD, in conjunction with AEC, conducted the first nuclear test (named Long Shot) in 1965 to provide data that would improve the United States' capability of detecting underground nuclear explosions. The second nuclear test (Milrow) was a weapons-related test conducted by AEC in 1969 as a means to study the feasibility of detonating a much larger device. Cannikin, the third nuclear test on Amchitka, was a weapons-related test detonated on November 6, 1971. With the exception of small concentrations of tritium detected in surface water shortly after the Long Shot test, radioactive fission products from the tests remain in the subsurface at each test location As a continuation of the environmental monitoring that has taken place on Amchitka Island since before 1965, LM in the summer of 2011 collected biological

  7. Amchitka Island, Alaska, Biological Monitoring Report 2011 Sampling Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTS&M) Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) Amchitka Island sites describes how LM plans to conduct its mission to protect human health and the environment at the three nuclear test sites located on Amchitka Island, Alaska. Amchitka Island, near the western end of the Aleutian Islands, is approximately 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. Amchitka is part of the Aleutian Island Unit of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, which is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Since World War II, Amchitka has been used by multiple U.S. government agencies for various military and research activities. From 1943 to 1950, it was used as a forward air base for the U.S. Armed Forces. During the middle 1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) used a portion of the island as a site for underground nuclear tests. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the U.S. Navy constructed and operated a radar station on the island. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. DOD, in conjunction with AEC, conducted the first nuclear test (named Long Shot) in 1965 to provide data that would improve the United States' capability of detecting underground nuclear explosions. The second nuclear test (Milrow) was a weapons-related test conducted by AEC in 1969 as a means to study the feasibility of detonating a much larger device. Cannikin, the third nuclear test on Amchitka, was a weapons-related test detonated on November 6, 1971. With the exception of small concentrations of tritium detected in surface water shortly after the Long Shot test, radioactive fission products from the tests remain in the subsurface at each test location As a continuation of the environmental monitoring that has taken place on Amchitka Island since before 1965, LM in the summer of 2011 collected biological and

  8. Scandinavian links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann; Knowles, Richard D.

    The European Round Table of Industrialists identified in the 1980ies 14 missing links in the transportation network of the continent. Three of them were found around the Danish island of Zealand. One link is within the nation, the other two are between nations. One link connects heavy economic ce...

  9. Spatial distribution of thermokarst landforms across Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, L. M.; Grosse, G.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Jones, B. M.; Arp, C. D.; McGuire, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic Alaska is characterized by widespread past and present thaw of ice rich permafrost and subsequent thermokarst development. Variations in ice content and distribution, and topography across Arctic Alaska result in thermokarst landform diversity. Thermokarst causes a number of biogeochemical and ecological shifts that include changes in soil carbon dynamics, nutrient cycling, vegetation composition, wildlife habitat, and fresh water availability. Ongoing climate change may lead to an increase in thermokarst landscape features. Thus, a better understanding of the current temporal and spatial dynamics of thermokarst is needed in order to project its future dynamics. Understanding how vulnerable Arctic Alaska is to future thermokarst development is critical for resource management, industry development, and subsistence hunting. We focused on the distribution of thermokarst landforms among ten study sites aligned with the NSF CALON (Towards a Circum-Arctic Lakes Observation Network) project in Arctic Alaska. Sites represent diverse substrates including eolian silt, eolian sand, marine sand, deltaic, and marine silt. We conducted thermokarst landform mapping and spatial and morphometric analyses using high-resolution aerial photography, an interferometric synthetic aperture radar derived digital elevation model (IfSAR DEM), and hydrographic layers from the National Land Cover Database derived from Landsat-7. Non-lake thermokarst landforms were visually mapped and hand digitized using aerial photographs and the IfSAR DEM. Initial results show thermokarst forms are most prevalent in marine silt areas with up to 99% of study areas affected by thermokarst activity. Eolian sand areas are the least thermokarst affected (mean of 57%). Drained thermokarst lake basins, thermokarst lakes, and areas affected by thermokarst pit formation were the dominant thermokarst landforms, covering up to 70%, 54%, and 8% of the landscape. The number of overlapping lake and basin

  10. Fish and Wildlife Service's authority on easement national wildlife refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This memorandum is a response to questions asked by the Regional Director of Region 6 relating to uses and activities that are occurring on 3 easement refuges in...

  11. Wildlife Management Objectives for Presquile National Wildlife Refuge 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report details both the management objectives and refuge usage for the following: waterfowl, upland game birds, whitetailed deer, furbearers, water, and the...

  12. 50 CFR 216.87 - Wildlife research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wildlife research. 216.87 Section 216.87... Pribilof Islands Administration § 216.87 Wildlife research. (a) Wildlife research, other than research on... to the following conditions: (1) Any person or agency, seeking to conduct such research shall...

  13. Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Native > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, ... 54. 1 At a glance – Cancer Rates for American Indian/Alaska Natives (2008-2012) Cancer Incidence Rates per ...

  14. Minority Women's Health: American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health > American Indians/Alaska Natives Minority Women's Health American Indians/Alaska Natives Related information How to Talk to ... disease. Return to top Health conditions common in American Indian and Alaska Native women Accidents Alcoholism and drug ...

  15. Alaska Coal Geology, Resources, and Coalbed Methane Potential

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Estimated Alaska coal resources are largely in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks distributed in three major provinces. Northern Alaska-Slope, Central Alaska-Nenana, and...

  16. 76 FR 303 - Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 239 and 258 Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit... proposes to approve Alaska's modification of its approved Municipal Solid Waste Landfill (MSWLF) permit... Domenic Calabro, Office of Air, Waste, and Toxics, U.S. EPA, Region 10, 1200 Sixth Avenue, Suite...

  17. Simulated nests in wildlife management

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Many of us have studied game bird nests. Usually we hoped to learn something about nesting cover, cover management and the birds and animals which seemed to eat the...

  18. Lead poisoning of spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri) and of a common eider (Somateria mollissima) in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franson, J.C.; Petersen, M.R.; Meteyer, C.U.; Smith, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Lead poisoning was diagnosed in four spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri) and one common eider (Somateria mollissima) found dead or moribund at the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska (USA) in 1992, 1993, and 1994. Ingested lead shot was found in the lower esophagus of one spectacled eider and in the gizzard of the common eider. Lead concentrations in the livers of the spectacled eiders were 26 to 38 ppm wet weight, and 52 ppm wet weight in the liver of the common eider. A blood sample collected from one of the spectacled eiders before it was euthanized had a lead concentration of 8.5 ppm wet weight. This is the first known report of lead poisoning in the spectacled eider, recently listed as a threatened species by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  19. Ecotoxicology of mercury in fish and wildlife: Recent advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuhammer, Anton M.; Basu, Niladri; Evers, David C.; Heinz, Gary H.; Sandheinrich, Mark B.; Bank, Michael S.; Bank, Michael S., (Edited By)

    2012-01-01

    A number of recent studies have documented subtle, yet potentially important effects of mercury on behavior, neurochemistry, and endocrine function in fish and wildlife at currently realistic levels of environmental exposure. Current levels of environmental methylmercury exposure are sufficient to cause significant biological impairment, both in individuals and in whole populations, in some ecosystems. Future toxicological studies on fish and wildlife will focus on linking biomarkers of methylmercury exposure and associated oxidative stress to effects on reproduction and population change; determining the genetic basis for mercury-related neurotoxic and other biological changes; determining the genetic basis for species differences in sensitivity to methylmercury; and linking toxic effects of methylmercury in individual animals to population-level changes.

  20. Fires in nature and wildlife

    OpenAIRE

    Adamič, Miha

    2001-01-01

    Wildfires are common abiotic factors in many ecosystems worldwide. In Slovenia, they seldom occur spontaneously, but are, largely, set by humans. The life strategies of native wildlife species in Slovenia, therefore, have merely adequate abilities to avoid fire, compated to those in vast arid zones, where wildfires regularly occur. Fires bring direct threats to wildlife, but also bring changes to existing food, cover and nesting conditions of habitats. Territorial species, occupying small hom...

  1. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1958 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, and Easement Refuges - District...

  2. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1959 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, and Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, and Easement Refuges - District...

  3. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1959 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, and Easement Refuges - District...

  4. Narrative report September, October, November, December, 1961 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Reufge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, and Easement Refuges - District...

  5. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1960 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo Naitonal Wildlife Refuge, and Easement Refuges District IV...

  6. Narrative report May, June, July, August, 1958 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, and Easement Refuges District IV...

  7. Narrative report January, February, March, April, 1960 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, and Easement Refuges District IV...

  8. Narrative report January, February, March, April, 1961 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, and Easement Refuges Districts IV...

  9. Narrative report January February, March, April, 1959 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, and Easement Refuges District IV...

  10. Narrative report January, February, March, April, 1958 Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, & Easement Refuges - District IV & IVa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Des Lacs National Wildlife Refuge, Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Ilo National Wildlife Refuge, and Easement Refuges District IV...

  11. Northern Alaska Landscape/Permafrost GIS Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — This data set represents an updated Ecological Subsection Map for Northern Alaska. This update includes permafrost mapping to include the following new layers:...

  12. Alaska's renewable energy potential.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-02-01

    This paper delivers a brief survey of renewable energy technologies applicable to Alaska's climate, latitude, geography, and geology. We first identify Alaska's natural renewable energy resources and which renewable energy technologies would be most productive. e survey the current state of renewable energy technologies and research efforts within the U.S. and, where appropriate, internationally. We also present information on the current state of Alaska's renewable energy assets, incentives, and commercial enterprises. Finally, we escribe places where research efforts at Sandia National Laboratories could assist the state of Alaska with its renewable energy technology investment efforts.

  13. Water Resources Inventory and Assessment for Kern National Wildlife Refuge and Tulare Basin Wildlife Management Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Water Resource Inventory and Assessment report for Kern National Wildlife Refuge and Tulare Basin Wildlife Management Area describes hydrologic information,...

  14. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The...

  15. [Wildlife Inventory Plan: Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge: Savanna District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides wildlife monitoring procedures used at Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge Savanna District. Refuge background, physical facilities,...

  16. [Wildlife Inventory Plan: Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge: Cassville District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides wildlife monitoring procedures used at Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge Cassville District. Refuge background, physical...

  17. [Wildlife Inventory Plan: Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge: Winona District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides wildlife monitoring procedures used at Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge Winona District. Refuge background, physical facilities,...

  18. [Wildlife Inventory Plan: Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge: Lansing District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides wildlife monitoring procedures used at Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge Lansing District. Refuge background, physical facilities,...

  19. [Wildlife Inventory Plan: Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge: La Crosse District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides wildlife monitoring procedures used at Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge La Crosse District. Refuge background, physical...

  20. Tallahatchie National Wildlife Refuge and Dahomey National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Tallahatchie National Wildlife Refuge and Dahomey National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1992 calendar...

  1. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  2. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was...

  3. [Wildlife Inventory Plan: Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge: Savanna District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides wildlife monitoring procedures used at Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge - Savanna District. Refuge background, physical...

  4. [Wildlife Inventory Plan: Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge: Cassville District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides wildlife monitoring procedures used at Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge - Cassville District. Refuge background, physical...

  5. [Wildlife Inventory Plan: Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge: Winona District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides wildlife monitoring procedures used at Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge - Winona District. Refuge background, physical...

  6. [Wildlife Inventory Plan: Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge: Lansing District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides wildlife monitoring procedures used at Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge - Lansing District. Refuge background, physical...

  7. [Wildlife Inventory Plan: Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge: La Crosse District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides wildlife monitoring procedures used at Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge - La Crosse District. Refuge background, physical...

  8. Exposure and effects of metal accumulation by wildlife on Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Three topics concerning trace element contamination in wildlife at Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge are summarized below: Cadmium, chromium and mercury...

  9. Narrative report Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge and Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge: Calendar year 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge and Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities for calendar year 1971....

  10. Narrative Report Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge and Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge: Calendar year 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge and Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities for calendar year 1970....

  11. Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge Complex: Annual narrative report: Fiscal year 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge and Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge Complex outlines accomplishments during the 2000 fiscal...

  12. [Wildlife Inventory Plan: Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge: Prairie du Chien District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides wildlife monitoring procedures used at Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge - Prairie du Chien District. Refuge background, physical...

  13. Evaluating Environmental Contaminants at Tijuana Slough National Wildlife Refuge and Sweetwater Marsh National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — It appears that in comparison, Sweetwater Marsh National Wildlife Refuge had higher levels of environmental contaminants than did Tijuana Slough National Wildlife...

  14. Kirtland's Warbler Annual Census - Seney National Wildlife Refuge (Kirtland's Warbler Wildlife Management Area)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Adaptation of Kirtland's Warbler Recovery Team census protocol as applied to Seney National Wildlife Refuge and Kirtland's Warbler Wildlife Management Area

  15. Assessing the extent and nature of wildlife trade on the dark web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Joseph R; Roberts, David L; Hernandez-Castro, Julio

    2016-08-01

    Use of the internet as a trade platform has resulted in a shift in the illegal wildlife trade. Increased scrutiny of illegal wildlife trade has led to concerns that online trade of wildlife will move onto the dark web. To provide a baseline of illegal wildlife trade on the dark web, we downloaded and archived 9852 items (individual posts) from the dark web, then searched these based on a list of 121 keywords associated with illegal online wildlife trade, including 30 keywords associated with illegally traded elephant ivory on the surface web. Results were compared with items known to be illegally traded on the dark web, specifically cannabis, cocaine, and heroin, to compare the extent of the trade. Of these 121 keywords, 4 resulted in hits, of which only one was potentially linked to illegal wildlife trade. This sole case was the sale and discussion of Echinopsis pachanoi (San Pedro cactus), which has hallucinogenic properties. This negligible level of activity related to the illegal trade of wildlife on the dark web relative to the open and increasing trade on the surface web may indicate a lack of successful enforcement against illegal wildlife trade on the surface web. PMID:26918590

  16. North American Decision Guidelines for Mitigating Roads for Wildlife

    OpenAIRE

    Bissonette, John

    2007-01-01

    Our primary purpose was to develop, to the extent that data are available, and as part of a web-based wildlife and roads resource, clearly written decision guidelines for: 1) the selection, configuration, and location of crossing types; 2) the monitoring and evaluation of crossing effectiveness; and 3) for maintenance. Until recently, concerted and purposeful activity towards linking transportation and ecological services into a context-sensitive planning, construction, and monitorin...

  17. Sea otter survey, southeast Alaska, 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the sex and age distribution of the 1987 to 1988 marten harvest on Nowitna National Wildlife Refuge. Harvest statistics were obtained from marten...

  18. Polar bear research in Alaska, spring 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An investigation of the ecology and population dynamics of Alaskan polar bears has continued since 1967. As part of that program, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...

  19. Polar bear research in Alaska, spring 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An investigation of the ecology and population dynamics of Alaskan polar bears has continued since 1967. As part of that program, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...

  20. Man-Made Wildlife Tourism Destination: The Visitors Perspective on Lok Kawi Wildlife Park, Sabah, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd Sun Fatt; Johnny Cindy; Bakansing Shirley M.

    2014-01-01

    Sabah is blessed with natural forest habitats and rich with floras and faunas. Amongst its’ attraction is wildlife endemism. Lok Kawi Wildlife Park was established to provide an alternative wildlife tourism destination with its inhabitants from the wildlife species of Borneo. Since its opening in 2007, multitudes of tourists have visited the park. However, there has been no study to identify the visitor’s perspective on Lok Kawi Wildlife Park as man-made wildlife tourism destination. The stud...

  1. Metagenomic survey for viruses in Western Arctic caribou, Alaska, through iterative assembly of taxonomic units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita C Schürch

    Full Text Available Pathogen surveillance in animals does not provide a sufficient level of vigilance because it is generally confined to surveillance of pathogens with known economic impact in domestic animals and practically nonexistent in wildlife species. As most (re-emerging viral infections originate from animal sources, it is important to obtain insight into viral pathogens present in the wildlife reservoir from a public health perspective. When monitoring living, free-ranging wildlife for viruses, sample collection can be challenging and availability of nucleic acids isolated from samples is often limited. The development of viral metagenomics platforms allows a more comprehensive inventory of viruses present in wildlife. We report a metagenomic viral survey of the Western Arctic herd of barren ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti in Alaska, USA. The presence of mammalian viruses in eye and nose swabs of 39 free-ranging caribou was investigated by random amplification combined with a metagenomic analysis approach that applied exhaustive iterative assembly of sequencing results to define taxonomic units of each metagenome. Through homology search methods we identified the presence of several mammalian viruses, including different papillomaviruses, a novel parvovirus, polyomavirus, and a virus that potentially represents a member of a novel genus in the family Coronaviridae.

  2. Reducing Wildlife Damage with Cost-Effective Management Programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Cheryl R; Stanley, Margaret C; Burns, Bruce R; Choquenot, David; Etherington, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    Limiting the impact of wildlife damage in a cost effective manner requires an understanding of how control inputs change the occurrence of damage through their effect on animal density. Despite this, there are few studies linking wildlife management (control), with changes in animal abundance and prevailing levels of wildlife damage. We use the impact and management of wild pigs as a case study to demonstrate this linkage. Ground disturbance by wild pigs has become a conservation issue of global concern because of its potential effects on successional changes in vegetation structure and composition, habitat for other species, and functional soil properties. In this study, we used a 3-year pig control programme (ground hunting) undertaken in a temperate rainforest area of northern New Zealand to evaluate effects on pig abundance, and patterns and rates of ground disturbance and ground disturbance recovery and the cost effectiveness of differing control strategies. Control reduced pig densities by over a third of the estimated carrying capacity, but more than halved average prevailing ground disturbance. Rates of new ground disturbance accelerated with increasing pig density, while rates of ground disturbance recovery were not related to prevailing pig density. Stochastic simulation models based on the measured relationships between control, pig density and rate of ground disturbance and recovery indicated that control could reduce ground disturbance substantially. However, the rate at which prevailing ground disturbance was reduced diminished rapidly as more intense, and hence expensive, pig control regimes were simulated. The model produced in this study provides a framework that links conservation of indigenous ecological communities to control inputs through the reduction of wildlife damage and suggests that managers should consider carefully the marginal cost of higher investment in wildlife damage control, relative to its marginal conservation return. PMID

  3. Reducing Wildlife Damage with Cost-Effective Management Programmes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl R Krull

    Full Text Available Limiting the impact of wildlife damage in a cost effective manner requires an understanding of how control inputs change the occurrence of damage through their effect on animal density. Despite this, there are few studies linking wildlife management (control, with changes in animal abundance and prevailing levels of wildlife damage. We use the impact and management of wild pigs as a case study to demonstrate this linkage. Ground disturbance by wild pigs has become a conservation issue of global concern because of its potential effects on successional changes in vegetation structure and composition, habitat for other species, and functional soil properties. In this study, we used a 3-year pig control programme (ground hunting undertaken in a temperate rainforest area of northern New Zealand to evaluate effects on pig abundance, and patterns and rates of ground disturbance and ground disturbance recovery and the cost effectiveness of differing control strategies. Control reduced pig densities by over a third of the estimated carrying capacity, but more than halved average prevailing ground disturbance. Rates of new ground disturbance accelerated with increasing pig density, while rates of ground disturbance recovery were not related to prevailing pig density. Stochastic simulation models based on the measured relationships between control, pig density and rate of ground disturbance and recovery indicated that control could reduce ground disturbance substantially. However, the rate at which prevailing ground disturbance was reduced diminished rapidly as more intense, and hence expensive, pig control regimes were simulated. The model produced in this study provides a framework that links conservation of indigenous ecological communities to control inputs through the reduction of wildlife damage and suggests that managers should consider carefully the marginal cost of higher investment in wildlife damage control, relative to its marginal conservation

  4. Evaluation of the toxic properties of naturally weathered Exxon Valdez crude oil to surrogate wildlife species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toxic properties of naturally weathered Exxon Valdez crude oil (WEVC) to avian and mammalian wildlife species were evaluated using the surrogate species, mallard duck, Anas platyrhynchos, and European ferret, Mustela putorius. This study was conducted to evaluate the potential for toxic (rather than physical) injury to wildlife species that may have been exposed to WEVC, either through external contact or through dietary uptake. Previous studies have assessed the toxicity of unweathered crude oils, including Alaska North Slope Crude, but little information exists regarding the toxicity of a naturally weathered crude oil, typical of that encountered following a spill. A battery of laboratory toxicity tests was conducted, in compliance with standard and published test procedures, to evaluate acute and subchronic toxicity of WEVC. These included tests of food avoidance, reproductive effects, and direct eggshell application toxicity. Naturally weathered EVC, recovered postspill from Prince William Sound, was used as the test material. 36 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Seney National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report summarizes activities for Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Kirtland’s Warbler National Wildlife Refuge, Harbor Island National Wildlife...

  6. Seney National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Michigan Islands National Wildlife Refuge, Harbor Island National Wildlife Refuge, Huron Islands...

  7. Audubon National Wildlife Refuge: FY 1974 narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Audubon National Wildlife Refuge (including Lake Nettie National Wildlife Refuge, McLean National Wildlife Refuge, Hiddenwood...

  8. Seney National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report summarizes activities for Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Kirtland’s Warbler National Wildlife Refuge, Harbor Island National Wildlife...

  9. Seney National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report summarizes activities for Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Kirtland’s Warbler National Wildlife Refuge, Harbor Island National Wildlife...

  10. Seney National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Michigan Islands National Wildlife Refuge, Harbor Island National Wildlife Refuge, Huron Islands...

  11. Seney National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report summarizes activities for Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Kirtland’s Warbler National Wildlife Refuge, Harbor Island National Wildlife...

  12. 2009 Annual Narrative Report : Seney National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Michigan Islands National Wildlife Refuge, Harbor Island National Wildlife Refuge, Huron Islands...

  13. Seney National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report summarizes activities for Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Harbor Island National Wildlife Refuge, and Huron Islands National Wildlife...

  14. Audubon National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1976

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Audubon National Wildlife Refuge, Lake Nettie National Wildlife Refuge, McLean National Wildlife Refuge, Strawberry Lake Refuge, Lake Otis...

  15. Technical Report: Master Plan Parker River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The National Wildlife Refuge System is a network of lands and waters managed specifically for the protection of wildlife and wildlife habitat. Refuges are also...

  16. Infant Mortality and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alaska Native > Infant Heath & Mortality Infant Mortality and American Indians/Alaska Natives American Indian/Alaska Natives have 1.5 times the infant mortality rate as non-Hispanic whites. American Indian/Alaska Native babies are twice as likely as ...

  17. Origins of cattle on Chirikof Island, Alaska, elucidated from genome-wide SNP genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, J E; Taylor, J F; Kantanen, J; Millbrooke, A; Schnabel, R D; Alexander, L J; MacNeil, M D

    2016-06-01

    Feral livestock may harbor genetic variation of commercial, scientific, historical or esthetic value. The origins and uniqueness of feral cattle on Chirikof Island, Alaska, are uncertain. The island is now part of the Alaska Maritime Wildlife Refuge and Federal wildlife managers want grazing to cease, presumably leading to demise of the cattle. Here we characterize the cattle of Chirikof Island relative to extant breeds and discern their origins. Our analyses support the inference that Yakut cattle from Russia arrived first on Chirikof Island, then ~120 years ago the first European taurine cattle were introduced to the island, and finally a large wave of Hereford cattle were introduced on average 40 years ago. In addition, this mixture of European and East-Asian cattle is unique compared with other North American breeds and we find evidence that natural selection in the relatively harsh environment of Chirikof Island has further impacted their genetic architecture. These results provide an objective basis for decisions regarding conservation of the Chirikof Island cattle. PMID:26860198

  18. A Whole Ecosystem Approach to Studying Climate Change in Interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggins, Susan; Striegl, Robert; McHale, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Yukon River Basin Principal Investigators Workshop; Portland, Oregon, 18-20 January 2011 ; High latitudes are known to be particularly susceptible to climate warming, leading to an emphasis of field and modeling research on arctic regions. Subarctic and boreal regions such as the Yukon River Basin (YRB) of interior Alaska and western Canada are less well studied, although they encompass large areas that are vulnerable to changes in forest composition, permafrost distribution, and hydrology. There is an urgent need to understand the resiliency and vulnerability of these complex ecosystems as well as their feedbacks to the global climate system. Consequently, U.S. Geological Survey scientists, with other federal agency, university, and private industry partners, is focusing subarctic interdisciplinary studies on the Beaver Creek Wild and Scenic River watershed (http://www.blm.gov/pgdata/content/ak/en/prog/nlcs/beavercrk_nwsr.html) and Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge (http://yukonflats.fws.gov/ ) in the YRB, south and west of Fort Yukon, Alaska. These areas are national treasures of wetlands, lakes, and uplands that support large populations of wildlife and waterfowl and are home to vibrant native Alaskan communities that depend on the area for a subsistence lifestyle.

  19. A whole ecosystem approach to studying climate change in interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggins, Susan; Striegl, Robert; McHale, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Yukon River Basin Principal Investigators Workshop; Portland, Oregon, 18-20 January 2011; High latitudes are known to be particularly susceptible to climate warming, leading to an emphasis of field and modeling research on arctic regions. Subarctic and boreal regions such as the Yukon River Basin (YRB) of interior Alaska and western Canada are less well studied, although they encompass large areas that are vulnerable to changes in forest composition, permafrost distribution, and hydrology. There is an urgent need to understand the resiliency and vulnerability of these complex ecosystems as well as their feedbacks to the global climate system. Consequently, U.S. Geological Survey scientists, with other federal agency, university, and private industry partners, is focusing subarctic interdisciplinary studies on the Beaver Creek Wild and Scenic River watershed (http://www.blm.gov/pgdata/content/ak/en/prog/nlcs/beavercrk_nwsr.html) and Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge (http://yukonflats.fws.gov/) in the YRB, south and west of Fort Yukon, Alaska. These areas are national treasures of wetlands, lakes, and uplands that support large populations of wildlife and waterfowl and are home to vibrant native Alaskan communities that depend on the area for a subsistence lifestyle.

  20. Models for managing wildlife disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCALLUM, Hamish

    2016-06-01

    Modelling wildlife disease poses some unique challenges. Wildlife disease systems are data poor in comparison with human or livestock disease systems, and the impact of disease on population size is often the key question of interest. This review concentrates specifically on the application of dynamic models to evaluate and guide management strategies. Models have proved useful particularly in two areas. They have been widely used to evaluate vaccination strategies, both for protecting endangered species and for preventing spillover from wildlife to humans or livestock. They have also been extensively used to evaluate culling strategies, again both for diseases in species of conservation interest and to prevent spillover. In addition, models are important to evaluate the potential of parasites and pathogens as biological control agents. The review concludes by identifying some key research gaps, which are further development of models of macroparasites, deciding on appropriate levels of complexity, modelling genetic management and connecting models to data. PMID:26283059

  1. Link Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoho, Steve

    Link analysis is a collection of techniques that operate on data that can be represented as nodes and links. This chapter surveys a variety of techniques including subgraph matching, finding cliques and K-plexes, maximizing spread of influence, visualization, finding hubs and authorities, and combining with traditional techniques (classification, clustering, etc). It also surveys applications including social network analysis, viral marketing, Internet search, fraud detection, and crime prevention.

  2. Law Enforcement Plan : Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa NWR Complex Law Enforcement Plan clarifies U.S. Fish and Wildlife enforcement policies as they apply to the Refuge. It provides information about...

  3. Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge Steelhead Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The goals of this project are to help to improve management of Toppenish Creek Steelhead and Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan.The...

  4. Sign Plan : Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge Sign Plan explains how signs are used on the Refuge to help guide and educate visitors. An inventory of current signs is...

  5. Sign Plan : Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge Sign Plan explains how signs are used on the Refuge to help guide and educate visitors. An inventory of current signs is...

  6. Sign Plan : Necedah National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Necedah National Wildlife Refuge Sign Plan explains how signs are used on the Refuge to help guide and educate visitors. An inventory of current signs is given...

  7. Havasu National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Havasu National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  8. Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge boundaries correspondence

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a collection of letters and attached documents between the director of the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife and the director of region 1. The...

  9. Letter to President [Valentine National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a letter from the Secretary of the Interior to the President regarding the establishment of the Valentine National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness area....

  10. National Wildlife Refuge System Survey Protocol Template

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This template was developed for drafting National Wildlife Refuge System NWRS Survey Protocols. The template is arranged in the same order as the eight basic...

  11. Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge, Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge and Fallon National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Fallon, Stillwater and Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuges are located in northwest Nevada and are administered by the refuge administrative office in...

  12. Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  13. Sign Plan Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge Sign Plan explains how signs are used on the Refuge to help guide and educate visitors. An inventory of current signs is...

  14. [Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  15. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1970 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  16. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  17. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1969 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  18. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1971 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  19. Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report: 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  20. Wildlife Habitat Models for Terrestrial Vertebrates

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The project developed habitat capability models for representative wildlife species. It was part of a project led by the University of Massachusetts Amherst to...