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Sample records for alarming oxygen depletion

  1. Alarming Oxygen Depletion Caused by Hydrogen Combustion and Fuel Cells and their Resolution by Magnegas$^{TM}$

    OpenAIRE

    Santilli, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    We recall that hydrogen combustion does resolve the environmental problems of fossil fuels due to excessive emission of carcinogenic substances and carbon dioxide. However, hydrogen combustion implies the permanent removal from our atmosphere of directly usable oxygen, a serious environmental problem called oxygen depletion, since the combustion turns oxygen into water whose separation to restore the original oxygen is prohibitive due to cost. We then show that a conceivable global use of hyd...

  2. Alarming Oxygen Depletion Caused by Hydrogen Combustion and Fuel Cells and their Resolution by Magnegas$^{TM}$

    CERN Document Server

    Santilli, R M

    2000-01-01

    We recall that hydrogen combustion does resolve the environmental problems of fossil fuels due to excessive emission of carcinogenic substances and carbon dioxide. However, hydrogen combustion implies the permanent removal from our atmosphere of directly usable oxygen, a serious environmental problem called oxygen depletion, since the combustion turns oxygen into water whose separation to restore the original oxygen is prohibitive due to cost. We then show that a conceivable global use of hydrogen in complete replacement of fossil fuels would imply the permanent removal from our atmosphere of 2.8875x10^7 metric tons O_2/day. Fuel cells are briefly discussed to point out similarly serious environmental problems, again, for large uses. We propose the possibility of resolving these problems by upgrading hydrogen to the new combustible fuel called magnegas^TM, whose chemical structure is composed by the new chemical species of magnecules, whose energy content and other features are beyond the descriptive capaciti...

  3. Alarm points for fixed oxygen monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen concentration monitors were installed in a vault where numerous pipes carried inert cryogens and gases to the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) experimental vessel at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The problems associated with oxygen-monitoring systems and the reasons why such monitors were installed were reviewed. As a result of this review, the MFTF-B monitors were set to sound an evacuation alarm when the oxygen concentration fell below 18%. We chose the 18% alarm criterion to minimize false alarms and to allow time for personnel to escape in an oxygen-deficient environment

  4. Seasonal oxygen depletion in the North Sea, a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcu, H D; Brockmann, U H

    2015-10-15

    Seasonal mean oxygen depletion in offshore and coastal North Sea bottom waters was shown to range between 0.9 and 1.8 mg/L, corresponding to 95-83% saturation, between July and October over a 30-year assessment period (1980-2010). The magnitude of oxygen depletion was controlled by thermal stratification, modulated by water depth and nitrogen availability. Analyses were based on about 19,000 combined data sets. Eutrophication problem areas were identified mainly in coastal waters by oxygen minima, the lower 10th percentile of oxygen concentrations, and deviations of oxygen depletion from correlated stratification values. Connections between oxygen consumption and nitrogen sources and conversion, including denitrification, were indicated by correlations. Mean oxygen consumption reflected a minimum seasonal turnover of 3.1 g N/m(2) in the south-eastern North Sea, including denitrification of 1 g N/m(2). Oxygen depletion was underestimated in shallow coastal waters due to repeated erosion of stratification as indicated by local high variability. PMID:26234616

  5. Inhomogeneous depletion of oxygen ions in metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vykhodets, Vladimir B.; Jarvis, Emily A. A.; Kurennykh, Tatiana E.; Beketov, Igor V.; Obukhov, Sviatoslav I.; Samatov, Oleg M.; Medvedev, Anatoly I.; Davletshin, Andrey E.; Whyte, Travis H.

    2016-02-01

    Zirconia and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) have multiple uses, including catalysis, fuel cells, dental applications, and thermal coatings. We employ nuclear reaction analysis to determine elemental composition of YSZ nanoparticles synthesized by laser evaporation including 18O studies to distinguish between oxide and adsorbed oxygen content as a function of surface area. We see dramatic deviation from stoichiometry that can be traced to loss of oxygen from the oxide near the surface of these nanopowders. Density functional calculations are coupled with these experimental studies to explore the electronic structure of nonstoichiometric surfaces achieved through depletion of oxygen. Our results show oxygen-depleted surfaces present under oxygen potentials where stoichiometric, oxygen-terminated surfaces would be favored thermodynamically for crystalline systems. Oxygen depletion at nanopowder surfaces can create effective two-dimensional surface metallic states while maintaining stoichiometry in the underlying nanoparticle core. This insight into nanopowder surfaces applies to dissimilar oxides of aluminum and zirconium indicating synthesis conditions may be more influential than the inherent oxide properties and displaying need for distinct models for nanopowders of these important engineering materials where surface chemistry dominates performance.

  6. Monitoring bioremediation of weathered diesel NAPL using oxygen depletion profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semicontinuous logging of oxygen concentrations at multiple depths has been used to evaluate the progress of an in situ bioremediation trial at a site contaminated by weathered diesel nonaqueous-phase liquid (NAPL). The evaluation trial consisted of periodic addition of nutrients and aeration of a 100-m2 trial plot. During the bioremediation trial, aeration was stopped periodically, and decreases in dissolved and gaseous oxygen concentrations were monitored using data loggers attached to in situ oxygen sensors placed at multiple depths above and within a thin NAPL-contaminated zone. Oxygen usage rate coefficients were determined by fitting zero- and first-order rate equations to the oxygen depletion curves. For nutrient-amended sites within the trial plot, estimates of oxygen usage rate coefficients were significantly higher than estimates from unamended sites. These rates also converted to NPL degradation rates, comparable to those achieved in previous studies, despite the high concentrations and weathered state of the NAPL at this test site

  7. Drivers of summer oxygen depletion in the central North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queste, Bastien Y.; Fernand, Liam; Jickells, Timothy D.; Heywood, Karen J.; Hind, Andrew J.

    2016-02-01

    In stratified shelf seas, oxygen depletion beneath the thermocline is a result of a greater rate of biological oxygen demand than the rate of supply of oxygenated water. Suitably equipped gliders are uniquely placed to observe both the supply through the thermocline and the consumption of oxygen in the bottom layers. A Seaglider was deployed in the shallow (≍ 100 m) stratified North Sea in a region of known low oxygen during August 2011 to investigate the processes regulating supply and consumption of dissolved oxygen below the pycnocline. The first deployment of such a device in this area, it provided extremely high-resolution observations, 316 profiles (every 16 min, vertical resolution of 1 m) of conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD), dissolved oxygen concentrations, backscatter, and fluorescence during a 3-day deployment.The high temporal resolution observations revealed occasional small-scale events (North Sea. However, the glider data show a net oxygen consumption rate of 2.8 ± 0.3 µmol dm-3 day-1, indicating a localized or short-lived (< 200 m or 6 h) increase in oxygen consumption rates. This high rate of oxygen consumption is indicative of an unidentified oxygen sink. We propose that this elevated oxygen consumption is linked to localized depocentres and rapid remineralization of resuspended organic matter.The glider proved to be an excellent tool for monitoring shelf sea processes despite challenges to glider flight posed by high tidal velocities, shallow bathymetry, and very strong density gradients. The direct observation of these processes allows more up to date rates to be used in the development of ecosystem models.

  8. Oxygen depletion off the Changjiang (Yangtze River)Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Daoji; (李道季); ZHANG; Jing; (张经); HUANG; Daji; (黄大吉); WU; Ying; (吴莹); LIANG; Jun; (梁俊)

    2002-01-01

    In a survey on the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea on August 20-30 of 1999, we found a hypoxic zone (<2 mg/L) of 13700 km2 with an average thickness of 20m at the bottom of the Changjiang (Yangtze River) Estuary, with an oxygen minimum value of 1 mg/L. The extension of the dissolved oxygen deficiency extended to the 100m isobath in a southeastward direction along the bottom of the continental shelf of the East China Sea. During the last two decades, the minimum dissolved oxygen values in the low oxygen region of the Changjiang Estuary have decreased from 2.85 mg/L to 1 mg/L. In the hypoxic zone, the apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) was 5.8 mg/L and the total oxygen depletion approximately 1.59×106 t. The strong halocline above the hypoxic zone, as a result of affluent water from the Changjiang, Taiwan Warm Current (TWC), and the high concentrations of particle organic carbon (POC) and nitrogen (PON) are the major factors causing the formation of the hypoxic zone. The POC: PON ratios and nutrient concentration distributions in the hypoxic zone suggest that the oxygen deficiency in the bottom water during the summer in the East China Sea off the Changjiang is the result of organic carbon production enhanced by nutrients from the Changjiang and fluvial organic matter input, followed by a shift in regeneration of nutrients in the East China Sea.

  9. OXYGEN DEPLETION IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: IMPLICATIONS FOR GRAIN MODELS AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF ELEMENTAL OXYGEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper assesses the implications of a recent discovery that atomic oxygen is being depleted from diffuse interstellar gas at a rate that cannot be accounted for by its presence in silicate and metallic oxide particles. To place this discovery in context, the uptake of elemental O into dust is considered over a wide range of environments, from the tenuous intercloud gas and diffuse clouds sampled by the depletion observations to dense clouds where ice mantles and gaseous CO become important reservoirs of O. The distribution of O in these contrasting regions is quantified in terms of a common parameter, the mean number density of hydrogen (nH). At the interface between diffuse and dense phases (just before the onset of ice-mantle growth) as much as ∼160 ppm of the O abundance is unaccounted for. If this reservoir of depleted oxygen persists to higher densities it has implications for the oxygen budget in molecular clouds, where a shortfall of the same order is observed. Of various potential carriers, the most plausible appears to be a form of O-bearing carbonaceous matter similar to the organics found in cometary particles returned by the Stardust mission. The 'organic refractory' model for interstellar dust is re-examined in the light of these findings, and it is concluded that further observations and laboratory work are needed to determine whether this class of material is present in quantities sufficient to account for a significant fraction of the unidentified depleted oxygen.

  10. Long-term ocean oxygen depletion caused by decomposition of submarine methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Akitomo; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro; Oka, Akira; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako

    2014-05-01

    Ocean oxygen depletion associated with global warming significantly affects macrofauna and ocean biogeochemical cycles over thousands of years. Methane released from the decomposition of submarine methane hydrates accelerates oxygen depletion via oxidation in seawater; however, the global impact of this process is yet to be quantitatively investigated. We have projected the potential impact of oxygen depletion due to methane hydrate decomposition via numerical modeling. We find that the global methane hydrate inventory decreases by approximately 70% under four times CO2 concentration and is accompanied by significant global oxygen depletion on a timescale of thousands of years. In particular, we demonstrate the great expansion of suboxic and hypoxic regions, having adverse impact on marine organisms and ocean biogeochemical cycles. The expansion induced by methane release is half (same) of that induced by oxygen solubility decrease due to seawater warming, under the condition that half (all) the methane decomposed into free gas is released from the seafloor to the ocean. This is because methane hydrate decomposition primarily occurs in the Pacific Ocean, where present-day seawater has low oxygen concentration. Consequently, severe oxygen depletion occurs in this region, particularly in so-called oxygen minimum zones. Besides the decrease in oxygen solubility and reduced ventilation associated with global warming, the process described in this study is also important in oxygen depletion.

  11. Long-term ocean oxygen depletion in response to carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaffer, G.; Olsen, S.M.; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing global warming could persist far into the future, because natural processes require decades to hundreds of thousands of years to remove carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel burning from the atmosphere(1-3). Future warming may have large global impacts including ocean oxygen depletion and...... solubility from surface-layer warming accounts for most of the enhanced oxygen depletion in the upper 500 m of the ocean. Possible weakening of ocean overturning and convection lead to further oxygen depletion, also in the deep ocean. We conclude that substantial reductions in fossil-fuel use over the next...

  12. Benthic foraminifera as proxy for oxygen-depleted conditions off the central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Mazumder, A.; Henriques, P.J.; Saraswat, R.

    In order to study the response of benthic foraminifera, especially the rectilinear bi- and tri-serial benthic foraminifera (RBF) to oxygen-depleted conditions from the Arabian Sea off central west coast of India, 103 surface sediment samples...

  13. Magnetic properties of oxygen-depleted YBa2Cu3O7-y single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic properties and flux pinning of oxygen-deficient YBa2Cu3O7-y single crystals have been studied. The superconducting transition temperature and inductive critical current density decrease as the level of oxygen depletion increases. No obvious enhancement in the pinning strength was found in the oxygen-depleted YBa2Cu3O7-y system for the applied field along the c axis. We attribute this absence of enhanced pinning to the mismatch of the oxygen vacancy size with the superconducting coherence length over the entire superconducting regime

  14. Effects of glutathione depletion by buthionine sulfoximine on radiosensitization by oxygen and misonidazole in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) has been used to deplete glutathione (GSH) in V79-379A cells in vitro, and the effect on the efficiency of oxygen and misonidazole (MISO) as radiosensitizers has been determined. Treatment with 50 or 500 μM BSO caused a rapid decline in GSH content to less than 5% of control values after 10 hr of exposure. Removal of BSO resulted in a rapid regeneration of GSH after 50 μM BSO, but little regeneration was observed over the subsequent 10-hr period after 500 μM. Cells irradiated in monolayer on glass had an oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) of 3.1. After 10-14 hr pretreatment with 50 μM BSO, washed cells were radiosensitized by GSH depletion at all oxygen tensions tested. The OER was reduced to 2.6, due to greater radiosensitization of hypoxic cells than aerated ones by GSH depletion. In similar experiments performed with MISO, an enhancement ratio of 2.0 could be achieved with 0.2 mM MISO in anoxic BSO-pretreated cells, compared to 2.7 mM MISO in non-BSO-treated cells. These apparent increases in radiosensitizer efficiency in GSH-depleted cells could be explained on the basis of radiosensitization of hypoxic cells by GSH depletion alone. These results are consistent with hypoxic cell radiosensitization by GSH depletion and by MISO or oxygen acting by separate mechanisms

  15. Oxygen-depleted zones inside reproductive structures of Brassicaceae: implications for oxygen control of seed development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porterfield, D. M.; Kuang, A.; Smith, P. J.; Crispi, M. L.; Musgrave, M. E.

    1999-01-01

    Growth of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. in decreasing oxygen partial pressures revealed a linear decrease in seed production below 15 kPa, with a complete absence of seed production at 2.5 kPa oxygen. This control of plant reproduction by oxygen had previously been attributed to an oxygen effect on the partitioning between vegetative and reproductive growth. However, plants grown in a series of decreasing oxygen concentrations produced progressively smaller embryos that had stopped developing at progressively younger stages, suggesting instead that their growth is limited by oxygen. Internal oxygen concentrations of buds, pistils, and developing siliques of Brassica rapa L. and siliques of Arabidopsis were measured using a small-diameter glass electrode that was moved into the structures using a micromanipulator. Oxygen partial pressures were found to be lowest in the developing perianth (11.1 kPa) and pistils (15.2 kPa) of the unopened buds. Pollination reduced oxygen concentration inside the pistils by 3 kPa after just 24 h. Inside Brassica silique locules, partial pressures of oxygen averaged 12.2 kPa in darkness, and increased linearly with increasing light levels to 16.2 kPa. Measurements inside Arabidopsis siliques averaged 6.1 kPa in the dark and rose to 12.2 kPa with light. Hypoxia in these microenvironments is postulated to be the point of control of plant reproduction by oxygen.

  16. Oxygen depletion recorded in upper waters of the glacial Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zunli; Hoogakker, Babette A. A.; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Zhou, Xiaoli; Thomas, Ellen; Gutchess, Kristina M.; Lu, Wanyi; Jones, Luke; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.

    2016-03-01

    Oxygen depletion in the upper ocean is commonly associated with poor ventilation and storage of respired carbon, potentially linked to atmospheric CO2 levels. Iodine to calcium ratios (I/Ca) in recent planktonic foraminifera suggest that values less than ~2.5 μmol mol-1 indicate the presence of O2-depleted water. Here we apply this proxy to estimate past dissolved oxygen concentrations in the near surface waters of the currently well-oxygenated Southern Ocean, which played a critical role in carbon sequestration during glacial times. A down-core planktonic I/Ca record from south of the Antarctic Polar Front (APF) suggests that minimum O2 concentrations in the upper ocean fell below 70 μmol kg-1 during the last two glacial periods, indicating persistent glacial O2 depletion at the heart of the carbon engine of the Earth's climate system. These new estimates of past ocean oxygenation variability may assist in resolving mechanisms responsible for the much-debated ice-age atmospheric CO2 decline.

  17. Oxygen depletion recorded in upper waters of the glacial Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zunli; Hoogakker, Babette A A; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Zhou, Xiaoli; Thomas, Ellen; Gutchess, Kristina M; Lu, Wanyi; Jones, Luke; Rickaby, Rosalind E M

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen depletion in the upper ocean is commonly associated with poor ventilation and storage of respired carbon, potentially linked to atmospheric CO2 levels. Iodine to calcium ratios (I/Ca) in recent planktonic foraminifera suggest that values less than ∼2.5 μmol mol(-1) indicate the presence of O2-depleted water. Here we apply this proxy to estimate past dissolved oxygen concentrations in the near surface waters of the currently well-oxygenated Southern Ocean, which played a critical role in carbon sequestration during glacial times. A down-core planktonic I/Ca record from south of the Antarctic Polar Front (APF) suggests that minimum O2 concentrations in the upper ocean fell below 70 μmol kg(-1) during the last two glacial periods, indicating persistent glacial O2 depletion at the heart of the carbon engine of the Earth's climate system. These new estimates of past ocean oxygenation variability may assist in resolving mechanisms responsible for the much-debated ice-age atmospheric CO2 decline. PMID:27029225

  18. Phosphatidylglycerol effect on oxygen-evolving activity in Ca2+-depleted photosystem Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The effect of anionic phosphatidylglycerol (PG) on oxygen evolution in a photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ) particle depleted of Ca2+ (designated dCaPSⅡ) has been investigated. The major finding is the observation of a new role of PG in the PSⅡ function. That is, PG restores nearly the lost oxygen evolution in dCaPSⅡ particle owing to Ca2+ depletion to the levels in intact PSⅡ. Furthermore, there is a stimulation of oxygen-evolving activity in the dCaPSⅡ complexed with PG in the presence of exogenous CaCl2, which PG enhances increasingly oxygen evolution with increasing CaCl2 concentration. It is suggested that PG-induced oxygen evolution recovery of dCa PSⅡ particle results from resumption of normal structure in protein by PG effect, whereas the enhancement of oxygen evolution in complex subject to CaCl2 is ascribed to the optimization of such a structure due to coordination complex formation of Ca2+ ions with PG.

  19. Microsensor and transcriptomic signatures of oxygen depletion in biofilms associated with chronic wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Garth A.; Zhao, Alice G.; Usui, Marcia; Underwood, Robert A.; Nguyen, Hung D.; Beyenal, Haluk; Pulcini, Elinor; Agostinho, Alessandra; Bernstein, Hans C.; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John; Williamson, Kerry S.; Franklin, Michael J.; Stewart, Philip S.

    2016-01-07

    Polymicrobial biofilms have been implicated in delayed wound healing, although the mechanisms by which biofilms impair wound healing are poorly understood. Many species of bacteria produce exotoxins and exoenzymes that may inhibit healing. In addition, oxygen consumption by biofilms may impede wound healing. In this study, we used oxygen microsensors to measure oxygen transects through in vitro-cultured biofilms, biofilms formed in vivo in a diabetic (db/db) mouse model, and ex vivo human chronic wound specimens. The results show that oxygen levels within both euthanized and live mouse wounds had steep gradients that reached minima ranging from 19 to 61% oxygen partial pressure, compared to atmospheric oxygen levels. The oxygen gradients in the mouse wounds were similar to those observed for clinical isolates cultured in vitro and for human ex vivo scabs. No oxygen gradients were observed for heat-killed scabs, suggesting that active metabolism by the viable bacteria contributed to the reduced oxygen partial pressure of the wounds. To characterize the metabolic activities of the bacteria in the mouse wounds, we performed transcriptomics analyses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms associated with the db/db mice wounds using Affymetrix microarrays. The results demonstrated that the bacteria expressed genes for metabolic activities associated with cell growth. Interestingly, the transcriptome results indicated that the bacteria within the wounds also experienced oxygen-limitation stress. Among the bacterial genes that were expressed in vivo were genes associated with the Anr-mediated hypoxia-stress response. Other bacterial stress response genes highly expressed in vivo were genes associated with stationary-phase growth, osmotic stress, and RpoH-mediated heat shock stress. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that the metabolic activities of bacteria in biofilms act as oxygen sinks in chronic wounds and that the depletion of oxygen contributes to the

  20. Nebular water depletion as the cause of Jupiter's low oxygen abundance

    OpenAIRE

    Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by recent spectroscopic observations suggesting that atmospheres of some extrasolar giant-planets are carbon-rich, i.e. carbon/oxygen ratio (C/O) $\\ge$ 1, we find that the whole set of compositional data for Jupiter is consistent with the hypothesis that it be a carbon-rich giant planet. We show that the formation of Jupiter in the cold outer part of an oxygen-depleted disk (C/O $\\sim$1) reproduces the measured Jovian elemental abundances at least as well as the hitherto canonical m...

  1. Monitoring of singlet oxygen in the lower troposphere and processes of ozone depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasenko, Egor; Chelibanov, Vladimir; Marugin, Alexander; Kozliner, Marat

    2016-04-01

    The processes of ozone depletion in the atmosphere are widely discussed now in a connection with the problem of a global climate changes. It is known fact that photolysis of ozone in the upper atmosphere is the source of metastable molecules of oxygen. But, metastable molecules of oxygen can be formed as a result of photo initiated heterogeneous oxidation of molecules adsorbed on the surface of natural aerosol particles. During the outdoor experiment, we observed a formation of Singlet oxygen (1Δg) at concentration level of 2 ... 5 ppb when ice crystals have been exposed to the sun light. In experiments, we used Analyzers of Singlet oxygen and Ozone (produced by JSC "OPTEC") that utilize solid-state chemiluminescence technology. We assumed that the singlet oxygen is formed in the active centers on the surface of ice crystals in the presence or absence of anthropogenic pollutants in the atmosphere. Identified efficiency of heterogeneous reaction of O2 (1Δg) formation suggests the importance of the additional channel O3 + O2 (1Δg) → 2O2 + O (3P) of atmospheric ozone removal comparable with other well known cycles of ozone depletion.

  2. Nitrate reduction by fungi in marine oxygen-depleted laboratory microcosms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Manohar, C.S.; Raghukumar, C.

    of many groups such as alveolates, straminopiles and fungi in oxygen-depleted marine environments (Takishita et al. 2005, 2007a, b, Stoeck et al. 2006). Several terrestrial forms such as Fusarium oxysporum Schltdl., Aspergillus oryzea (Ahlb.) E. Cohn... the pathway largely stops with the reduction of NO to N 2 O. Fungal denitrification accounts for nearly 80% of the microbial nitrous oxide production in grassland ecosystems (Laughlin et al. 2009). Fungi are also involved in co-denitrification and chemo...

  3. Microsensor and transcriptomic signatures of oxygen depletion in biofilms associated with chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Garth A; Ge Zhao, Alice; Usui, Marcia; Underwood, Robert A; Nguyen, Hung; Beyenal, Haluk; deLancey Pulcini, Elinor; Agostinho Hunt, Alessandra; Bernstein, Hans C; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John; Williamson, Kerry S; Franklin, Michael J; Stewart, Philip S

    2016-03-01

    Biofilms have been implicated in delayed wound healing, although the mechanisms by which biofilms impair wound healing are poorly understood. Many species of bacteria produce exotoxins and exoenzymes that may inhibit healing. In addition, oxygen consumption by biofilms and by the responding leukocytes, may impede wound healing by depleting the oxygen that is required for healing. In this study, oxygen microsensors to measure oxygen transects through in vitro cultured biofilms, biofilms formed in vivo within scabs from a diabetic (db/db) mouse wound model, and ex vivo human chronic wound specimens was used. The results showed that oxygen levels within mouse scabs had steep gradients that reached minima ranging from 17 to 72 mmHg on live mice and from 6.4 to 1.1 mmHg on euthanized mice. The oxygen gradients in the mouse scabs were similar to those observed for clinical isolates cultured in vitro and for human ex vivo specimens. To characterize the metabolic activities of the bacteria in the mouse scabs, transcriptomics analyses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms associated with the db/db mice wounds was performed. The results demonstrated that the bacteria expressed genes for metabolic activities associated with cell growth. Interestingly, the transcriptome results also indicated that the bacteria within the wounds experienced oxygen-limitation stress. Among the bacterial genes that were expressed in vivo were genes associated with the Anr-mediated hypoxia-stress response. Other bacterial stress response genes highly expressed in vivo were genes associated with stationary-phase growth, osmotic stress, and RpoH-mediated heat shock stress. Overall, the results supported the hypothesis that bacterial biofilms in chronic wounds promote chronicity by contributing to the maintenance of localized low oxygen tensions, through their metabolic activities and through their recruitment of cells that consume oxygen for host defensive processes. PMID:26748963

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Adaptation to Gradually Oxygen Depletion Condition Is a Key Factor for Latency of Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M NajafiMosleh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is ample evidence that the basis for latent tuberculosis infection in humans is persistence of tubercle bacilli for long periods of time even though lifetime. This status is currently defined as non-replicating persistence (NRP. Documented evidence from both macrophage physiology & the nature of TB granuloumas in human lungs suggests that gradually depletion of oxygen, hypoxia and micro aerobic condition is a major factor in inducing NRP state of tubercle bacilli. Methods: 100 clinically isolated tubercle bacilli were examined by the slowly stirred head space ratio method (0.5 HSR, which involve a slow depletion of oxygen within a sealed, slow stirred culture tube. The in-vitro induced hypoxically different stages of NRP was setting up, and the expression of the alpha-crystalline chaperone protein that are expressed when MTB undergoes to NRP srate was detected. Indeed the activity of rifampin, isoniazide, pyrazynamide, ciprofloxacin and meteronidazole were evaluated against two NRP stages of MTB. Results: During oxygen shift-down bacterial physiology changes from active growth to a NRP state. Two characteristic stages of NRP are seen; NRP-1 occurs when the oxygen concentration gradually dropped to microaerophilic condition. The 16 KD α- crystalline protein was expressed at just beginning of NRP-1 stage. The NRP-2 stages occur when the oxygen concentration dropped to anaerobic condition. When the NRP-2 state transferred to an oxygen – reach fresh medium the bacteria consume oxygen and resume growth in a synchronized replication manner from NRP-2 state. Conclusion: slow depletion of O2 appears to permit the occurrence of adaptations that favor long-term non replicating persistence of tubercle bacilli under microaerophilic conditions and also enhance the ability of the bacilli to survive in anaerobic conditions. This versatility could account for long-term latency of tuberculosis in the human host. The model presented here

  5. Gene regulatory and metabolic adaptation processes of Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12T during oxygen depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laass, Sebastian; Kleist, Sarah; Bill, Nelli; Drüppel, Katharina; Kossmehl, Sebastian; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Klein, Johannes; Rohde, Manfred; Bartsch, Annekathrin; Wittmann, Christoph; Schmidt-Hohagen, Kerstin; Tielen, Petra; Jahn, Dieter; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2014-05-01

    Metabolic flexibility is the key to the ecological success of the marine Roseobacter clade bacteria. We investigated the metabolic adaptation and the underlying changes in gene expression of Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12(T) to anoxic life by a combination of metabolome, proteome, and transcriptome analyses. Time-resolved studies during continuous oxygen depletion were performed in a chemostat using nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor. Formation of the denitrification machinery was found enhanced on the transcriptional and proteome level, indicating that D. shibae DFL12(T) established nitrate respiration to compensate for the depletion of the electron acceptor oxygen. In parallel, arginine fermentation was induced. During the transition state, growth and ATP concentration were found to be reduced, as reflected by a decrease of A578 values and viable cell counts. In parallel, the central metabolism, including gluconeogenesis, protein biosynthesis, and purine/pyrimidine synthesis was found transiently reduced in agreement with the decreased demand for cellular building blocks. Surprisingly, an accumulation of poly-3-hydroxybutanoate was observed during prolonged incubation under anoxic conditions. One possible explanation is the storage of accumulated metabolites and the regeneration of NADP(+) from NADPH during poly-3-hydroxybutanoate synthesis (NADPH sink). Although D. shibae DFL12(T) was cultivated in the dark, biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophyll was increased, possibly to prepare for additional energy generation via aerobic anoxygenic photophosphorylation. Overall, oxygen depletion led to a metabolic crisis with partly blocked pathways and the accumulation of metabolites. In response, major energy-consuming processes were reduced until the alternative respiratory denitrification machinery was operative. PMID:24648520

  6. NEBULAR WATER DEPLETION AS THE CAUSE OF JUPITER'S LOW OXYGEN ABUNDANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motivated by recent spectroscopic observations suggesting that atmospheres of some extrasolar giant planets are carbon-rich, i.e., carbon/oxygen ratio (C/O) ≥ 1, we find that the whole set of compositional data for Jupiter is consistent with the hypothesis that it should be a carbon-rich giant planet. We show that the formation of Jupiter in the cold outer part of an oxygen-depleted disk (C/O ∼ 1) reproduces the measured Jovian elemental abundances at least as well as the hitherto canonical model of Jupiter formed in a disk of solar composition (C/O 0.54). The resulting O abundance in Jupiter's envelope is then moderately enriched by a factor of ∼2 × solar (instead of ∼7 × solar) and is found to be consistent with values predicted by thermochemical models of the atmosphere. That Jupiter formed in a disk with C/O ∼ 1 implies that water ice was heterogeneously distributed over several AU beyond the snow line in the primordial nebula and that the fraction of water contained in icy planetesimals was a strong function of their formation location and time. The Jovian oxygen abundance to be measured by NASA's Juno mission en route to Jupiter will provide a direct and strict test of our predictions.

  7. NEBULAR WATER DEPLETION AS THE CAUSE OF JUPITER'S LOW OXYGEN ABUNDANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousis, Olivier [Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut UTINAM, CNRS/INSU, UMR 6213, Observatoire des Sciences de l' Univers de Besancon (France); Lunine, Jonathan I. [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Johnson, Torrence V., E-mail: olivier.mousis@obs-besancon.fr [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-05-20

    Motivated by recent spectroscopic observations suggesting that atmospheres of some extrasolar giant planets are carbon-rich, i.e., carbon/oxygen ratio (C/O) {>=} 1, we find that the whole set of compositional data for Jupiter is consistent with the hypothesis that it should be a carbon-rich giant planet. We show that the formation of Jupiter in the cold outer part of an oxygen-depleted disk (C/O {approx} 1) reproduces the measured Jovian elemental abundances at least as well as the hitherto canonical model of Jupiter formed in a disk of solar composition (C/O 0.54). The resulting O abundance in Jupiter's envelope is then moderately enriched by a factor of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign solar (instead of {approx}7 Multiplication-Sign solar) and is found to be consistent with values predicted by thermochemical models of the atmosphere. That Jupiter formed in a disk with C/O {approx} 1 implies that water ice was heterogeneously distributed over several AU beyond the snow line in the primordial nebula and that the fraction of water contained in icy planetesimals was a strong function of their formation location and time. The Jovian oxygen abundance to be measured by NASA's Juno mission en route to Jupiter will provide a direct and strict test of our predictions.

  8. The enhanced cytotoxicity of misonidazole in the thiol depleted state - An oxygen dependent mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incubating A549 cells in the presence of L-buthionine-S, R-sulfoximine and misonidazole under aerobic conditions results in lowered rates of cell growth and greater cytotoxicity than is seen with either drug alone. The authors previously demonstrated the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide from cells treated with misonidazole following the inhibition of GSH-peroxidase with thiol depleting agents. They hypothesize that the enhancement of misonidazole toxicity by L-BSO results from the increased exposure to hydrogen peroxide, and the possible formation of the highly reactive hydroxyl radical in the presence of trace metals via Fenton chemistry. Support for this hypothesis comes from their observations that addition of radical scavengers (such as SOD and catalase) and nutritional antioxidants (vitamin E) to the culture medium will partially inhibit the cytotoxic effects. Further work is being done to measure the products of reaction of toxic oxygen species with cellular macromolecules, i.e. lipids

  9. Sediment Mobilization From Reservoirs Can Cause Short Term Oxygen Depletion In Downstream Receiving Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.; Schenk, L.; Bragg, H.; Singer, M.; Hume, N.

    2013-12-01

    Reservoir management can cause incidences of short-term sediment mobilization, e.g. during dam removal or drawdown for maintenance or habitat purposes. Much of the associated planning focuses on predicting, quantifying, and mitigating the physical impacts of sediment mobilization, transport, and deposition. Sediment pulses can cause multiple regulatory and management concerns, such as turbidity or suspended sediment concentrations that may exceed State standards, geomorphic change and effects on property or infrastructure, or wildlife impacts such as stress to fish via gill abrasion or burial of critical habitat. Water-quality issues associated with sediment mobilization, including nutrient and contaminant transport, are often given less attention, presumably because their effects are less immediate or because of resource constraints. Recent experience with large pulses of sediment from several western reservoirs involving dam removals and temporary drawdowns indicates that oxygen demand, leading to depletion of downstream dissolved oxygen (DO), can also be a significant short-term concern. During the October 2011 Condit Dam removal on the White Salmon River in Washington, DO in receiving waters about 4.5 km downstream of the dam dropped to less than 1 mg/L within 2 hours of the demolition; in response, salmonids were observed to be in distress, apparently gulping for air at the water surface. DO remained low for at least 24 hours in this reach, and dead fish were observed. In December 2012, during a drawdown designed to aid juvenile-salmonid migration through Fall Creek Reservoir in Oregon, DO dropped precipitously about 1.5 km downstream as turbidity peaked, and a muted DO decrease was also observed approximately 14 miles further downstream despite a large dilution from unaffected sources. Laboratory experiments and modeling using sediments from reservoirs proposed for removal on the Klamath River, California, demonstrated the likelihood for downstream DO

  10. Alarming atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie; Kinch, Sofie

    2014-01-01

    . As a response to this situation, our design artefact, the interactive furniture Kidkit, invites children to become accustomed to the alarming sounds sampled from the ward while they are waiting in the waiting room. Our design acknowledges how atmospheres emerge as temporal negotiations between the...

  11. Whole-rock regional oxygen-isotope depletion patterns as a guide to epithermal gold exploration in north Queensland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recognition of regional oxygen-isotope depletion patterns in high-level igneous rocks provides a means to discriminate areas potentially prospective for low sulphidation (adularia sericite type) epithermal gold mineralisation. The coincidence of an extensive regional oxygen-isotope depletion pattern over most of the northern Drummond Basin with a recently discovered epithermal district is consistent with a similar association for younger world-class epithermal districts in the United States. Reconnaissance whole-rock oxygen-isotope data for Permo-Carboniferous volcanic rocks in the northern Coen Inlier indicate an area of isotopic depletion that correlates with regional stream-sediment geochemical anomalies normally associated with epithermal deposits. The data suggest that the northern Coen Inlier is a region of high epithermal potential worthy of more systematic exploration. Whole-rock oxygen isotope values are predominantly near normal, and isotopic depletion is confined largely to the Late Carboniferous volcanic rocks in the southern areas of the complex, particularly along caldera margins where major structures provided pathways for fluid circulation. The data are consistent with earlier observations that the Late Carboniferous sequence is more closely associated with hydrothermal activity than the Early Permian volcanics, and that meteoric fluids were focussed through these major structures, at least during the waning stages of igneous activity. 41 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs

  12. Depletion of oxygen, nitrate and nitrite in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone cause an imbalance of benthic nitrogen fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S.; Gier, J.; Treude, T.; Lomnitz, U.; Dengler, M.; Cardich, J.; Dale, A. W.

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) are key regions for fixed nitrogen loss in both the sediments and the water column. During this study, the benthic contribution to N cycling was investigated at ten sites along a depth transect (74-989 m) across the Peruvian OMZ at 12°S. O2 levels were below detection limit down to ~500 m. Benthic fluxes of N2, NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, H2S and O2 were measured using benthic landers. Flux measurements on the shelf were made under extreme geochemical conditions consisting of a lack of O2, NO3- and NO2- in the bottom water and elevated seafloor sulphide release. These particular conditions were associated with a large imbalance in the benthic nitrogen cycle. The sediments on the shelf were densely covered by filamentous sulphur bacteria Thioploca, and were identified as major recycling sites for DIN releasing high amounts of NH4+up to 21.2 mmol m-2 d-1 that were far in excess of NH4+ release by ammonification. This difference was attributed to dissimilatory nitrate (or nitrite) reduction to ammonium (DNRA) that was partly being sustained by NO3- stored within the sulphur oxidizing bacteria. Sediments within the core of the OMZ (ca. 200-400 m) also displayed an excess flux of N of 3.5 mmol m-2 d-1 mainly as N2. Benthic nitrogen and sulphur cycling in the Peruvian OMZ appears to be particularly susceptible to bottom water fluctuations in O2, NO3- and NO2-, and may accelerate the onset of pelagic euxinia when NO3- and NO2- become depleted.

  13. A small molecule that induces reactive oxygen species via cellular glutathione depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Tatsuro; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Muroi, Makoto; Kawatani, Makoto; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2014-10-01

    Induction of excessive levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by small-molecule compounds has been considered a potentially effective therapeutic strategy against cancer cells, which are often subjected to chronic oxidative stress. However, to elucidate the mechanisms of action of bioactive compounds is generally a time-consuming process. We have recently identified NPD926, a small molecule that induces rapid cell death in cancer cells. Using a combination of two comprehensive and complementary approaches, proteomic profiling and affinity purification, together with the subsequent biochemical assays, we have elucidated the mechanism of action underlying NPD926-induced cell death: conjugation with glutathione mediated by GST, depletion of cellular glutathione and subsequent ROS generation. NPD926 preferentially induced effects in KRAS-transformed fibroblast cells, compared with their untransformed counterparts. Furthermore, NPD926 sensitized cells to inhibitors of system x(c)⁻, a cystine-glutamate antiporter considered to be a potential therapeutic target in cancers including cancer stem cells. These data show the effectiveness of a newly identified ROS inducer, which targets glutathione metabolism, in cancer treatment. PMID:25011393

  14. Modelling the mitigation of hydrogen deflagrations in a nuclear waste silo ullage by depleting the oxygen concentration with nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Examine the effect of reduced O2 on H2 burning velocity. • Model the effect of reduced oxygen level on overpressure for a transient H2 release. • Low O2 levels significantly reduce H2 burning velocity and explosion overpressure. -- Abstract: It is expected that significant transient releases of hydrogen could occur during the decommissioning of a nuclear waste storage plant that would result in a transient flammable atmosphere. Interest has been expressed in the use of nitrogen dilution in a vented silo ullage space in order to reduce the oxygen level and thereby mitigate the overpressure rise should a hydrogen–air deflagration occur. In the work presented here the data characterising the influence of oxygen depletion via nitrogen dilution upon the burning velocity of hydrogen–air mixtures have been obtained using the COSILAB code (and also compared with experimental test data). These data have then been used with the FLACS-HYDROGEN CFD-tool to try to predict the potential explosion overpressure reduction that might be achieved using oxygen depletion (via nitrogen dilution), for a transient hydrogen bubble sudden gaseous release (SGR) scenario occurring in a silo ullage type geometry. The simulation results suggest that using nitrogen dilution to deplete the oxygen levels to 12.5% or 9.9% would produce only a relatively modest reduction in the predicted peak overpressure. However, with an oxygen depletion level of 7%, the rate of pressure rise is more substantially slowed and the predicted maximum pressure rise is significantly reduced

  15. Uptake of phytodetritus by benthic foraminifera under oxygen depletion at the Indian margin (Arabian Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enge, A. J.; Witte, U.; Kucera, M.; Heinz, P.

    2014-04-01

    Benthic foraminifera in sediments on the Indian margin of the Arabian Sea, where the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) impinges on the continental slope, are exposed to particularly severe levels of oxygen depletion. Food supply for the benthic community is high but delivered in distinct pulses during upwelling and water mixing events associated with summer and winter monsoon periods. In order to investigate the response by benthic foraminifera to such pulsed food delivery under oxygen concentrations of less than 0.1 mL L-1 (4.5 μmol L-1), an in situ isotope labeling experiment (13C, 15N) was performed on the western continental slope of India at 540 m water depth (OMZ core region). The assemblage of living foraminifera (>125 μm) in the uppermost centimeter at this depth is characterized by an unexpectedly high population density of 3982 individuals 10 cm-2 and a strong dominance by few calcareous species. For the experiment, we concentrated on the nine most abundant taxa, which constitute 93% of the entire foraminiferal population at 0-1 cm sediment depth. Increased concentrations of 13C and 15N in the cytoplasm indicate that all investigated taxa took up labeled phytodetritus during the 4 day experimental phase. In total, these nine species had assimilated 113.8 mg C m-2 (17.5% of the total added carbon). Uptake of nitrogen by the three most abundant taxa (Bolivina aff. B. dilatata, Cassidulina sp., Bulimina gibba) was 2.7 mg N m-2 (2% of the total added nitrogen). The response to the offered phytodetritus varied largely among foraminiferal species with Uvigerina schwageri being by far the most important species in short-term processing, whereas the most abundant taxa Bolivina aff. B. dilatata and Cassidulina sp. showed comparably low uptake of the offered food. We suggest the observed species-specific differences are related to species biomass and specific feeding preferences. In summary, the experiment in the OMZ core region shows rapid processing of fresh

  16. Effects of phytoplankton vertical migration on the formation of oxygen depleted water in a shallow coastal sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Chiba, S.; Shimizu, Y.; Nagao, M.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, oxygen budget was estimated for the lower layer of water column in a semi-enclosed bay, Ago Bay, Japan. Benthic oxygen consumption rates were measured directly with an in situ measurement device from 13 July to 16 August 2004. Oxygen budget was calculated based on physical, chemical and biological processes using the observed data. Along with the change of the water column structure at the time of a hit of typhoon, dominant phytoplankton species shifted from the diatom Skeletonema costatum to the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa circularisquama. During the diatom-dominating period, oxygen supply rate in the lower layer due to photosynthesis was comparable to or slightly lower than the sediment oxygen consumption rate. In contrast, during the dominance of the dinoflagellate, net oxygen budget was significantly negative in the lower layer while it was positive in the upper layer. This could be attributed to the migration behavior of the dominant dinoflagellate H. circularisquama that swim up to the upper layer and produce oxygen in daytime, and swim down to the lower layer and consume oxygen in nighttime. The results of the present study suggest that phytoplankton migration behavior can enhance the development of oxygen depleted water mass in the lower layer of eutrophic shallow coastal seas.

  17. Alarm filtering and presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses alarm filtering and presentation in the control room of nuclear and other process control plants. Alarm generation and presentation is widely recognized as a general process control problem. Alarm systems often fail to provide meaningful alarms to operators. Alarm generation and presentation is an area in which computer aiding is feasible and provides clear benefits. Therefore, researchers have developed several computerized alarm filtering and presentation approaches. This paper discusses problems associated with alarm generation and presentation. Approaches to improving the alarm situation and installation issues of alarm system improvements are discussed. The impact of artificial intelligence (AI) technology on alarm system improvements is assessed. (orig.)

  18. Depletion of phosphatidylglycerol head-group induces changes in oxygen evolution and protein secondary structures of photosystemⅡ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The techniques of oxygen electrode polarography and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were employed to explore the roles of polar head-group of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) molecules in the functional and structural aspects of photosystemⅡ(PSⅡ) through enzymatic approach. It was shown that the depletion of PG by treatment of phospholipase C (PLC) on PSⅡ particles caused the inhibition of oxygen evolving activity in PSⅡ. This effect also gave rise to changes in the protein secondary structures of PSⅡ, that is, an increase in α-helical conformation which is compensated by the loss of β-strand structures. It revealed that the head-group of PG molecules plays an important structural role in the maintenance of normal structure of PSⅡ proteins, which is required to maintain the appropriate physiological activity of the PSⅡ complex such as the oxygen evolving activity. It is suggested that there most probably exist hydrogen-bonding interactions between PG molecules and PSⅡ proteins.

  19. Vitamin D Depletion in Pregnancy Decreases Survival Time, Oxygen Saturation, Lung Weight and Body Weight in Preterm Rat Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykkedegn, Sine; Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Beck-Nielsen, Signe Sparre; Pilecki, Bartosz; Duelund, Lars; Marcussen, Niels; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies suggest a role of vitamin D in fetal lung development although not studied in preterm animals. We tested the hypothesis that vitamin D depletion aggravates respiratory insufficiency in preterm rat offspring. Furthermore, the effects of vitamin D depletion on growth and lung surfactant were investigated. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned low vitamin D (VDL) or control diet before mating and followed with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s-25(OH)D) determinations. After cesarean section at gestational day 19 (E19) or day 22 (E22), placental weight, birth weight, crown-rump-length (CRL), oxygenation (SaO2) at 30 min and survival time were recorded. The pup lungs were analyzed for phospholipid levels, surfactant protein A-D mRNA and the expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). S-25(OH)D was significantly lower in the VDL group at cesarean section (12 vs. 30nmol/L, p<0.0001). Compared to the controls, E19 VDL pups had lower birth weight (2.13 vs. 2.29g, p<0.001), lung weight (0.09 vs. 0.10g, p = 0.002), SaO2 (54% vs. 69%, p = 0.002) as well as reduced survival time (0.50 vs. 1.25h, p<0.0001). At E22, the VDL-induced pulmonary differences were leveled out, but VDL pups had lower CRL (4.0 vs. 4.5cm, p<0.0001). The phospholipid levels and the surfactant protein mRNA expression did not differ between the dietary groups. In conclusion, Vitamin D depletion led to lower oxygenation and reduced survival time in the preterm offspring, associated with reduced lung weight and birth weight. Further studies of vitamin D depletion in respiratory insufficiency in preterm neonates are warranted. PMID:27571350

  20. Cyclic magnetite dissolution in Pleistocene sediments of the abyssal northwest Pacific Ocean: Evidence for glacial oxygen depletion and carbon trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korff, Lucia; Dobeneck, Tilo; Frederichs, Thomas; Kasten, Sabine; Kuhn, Gerhard; Gersonde, Rainer; Diekmann, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    The carbonate-free abyss of the North Pacific defies most paleoceanographic proxy methods and hence remains a "blank spot" in ocean and climate history. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic, geochemical, and sedimentological methods were combined to date and analyze seven middle to late Pleistocene northwest Pacific sediment cores from water depths of 5100 to 5700 m. Besides largely coherent tephra layers, the most striking features of these records are nearly magnetite-free zones corresponding to glacial marine isotope stages (MISs) 22, 12, 10, 8, 6, and 2. Magnetite depletion is correlated with organic carbon and quartz content and anticorrelated with biogenic barite and opal content. Within interglacial sections and mid-Pleistocene transition glacial stages MIS 20, 18, 16, and 14, magnetite fractions of detrital, volcanic, and bacterial origin are all well preserved. Such alternating successions of magnetic iron mineral preservation and depletion are known from sapropel-marl cycles, which accumulated under periodically changing bottom water oxygen and redox conditions. In the open central northwest Pacific Ocean, the only conceivable mechanism to cause such abrupt change is a modified glacial bottom water circulation. During all major glaciations since MIS 12, oxygen-depleted Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW)-sourced bottom water seems to have crept into the abyssal northwest Pacific below ~5000 m depth, thereby changing redox conditions in the sediment, trapping and preserving dissolved and particulate organic matter and, in consequence, reducing and dissolving both, biogenic and detrital magnetite. At deglaciation, a downward progressing oxidation front apparently remineralized and released these sedimentary carbon reservoirs without replenishing the magnetite losses.

  1. Transmigrating neutrophils shape the mucosal microenvironment through localized oxygen depletion to influence resolution of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Eric L; Bruyninckx, Walter J; Kelly, Caleb J; Glover, Louise E; McNamee, Eóin N; Bowers, Brittelle E; Bayless, Amanda J; Scully, Melanie; Saeedi, Bejan J; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Ehrentraut, Stefan F; Curtis, Valerie F; Burgess, Adrianne; Garvey, John F; Sorensen, Amber; Nemenoff, Raphael; Jedlicka, Paul; Taylor, Cormac T; Kominsky, Douglas J; Colgan, Sean P

    2014-01-16

    Acute intestinal inflammation involves early accumulation of neutrophils (PMNs) followed by either resolution or progression to chronic inflammation. Based on recent evidence that mucosal metabolism influences disease outcomes, we hypothesized that transmigrating PMNs influence the transcriptional profile of the surrounding mucosa. Microarray studies revealed a cohort of hypoxia-responsive genes regulated by PMN-epithelial crosstalk. Transmigrating PMNs rapidly depleted microenvironmental O2 sufficiently to stabilize intestinal epithelial cell hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). By utilizing HIF reporter mice in an acute colitis model, we investigated the relative contribution of PMNs and the respiratory burst to "inflammatory hypoxia" in vivo. CGD mice, lacking a respiratory burst, developed accentuated colitis compared to control, with exaggerated PMN infiltration and diminished inflammatory hypoxia. Finally, pharmacological HIF stabilization within the mucosa protected CGD mice from severe colitis. In conclusion, transcriptional imprinting by infiltrating neutrophils modulates the host response to inflammation, via localized O2 depletion, resulting in microenvironmental hypoxia and effective inflammatory resolution. PMID:24412613

  2. High sensitivity of Lobelia dortmanna to sediment oxygen depletion following organic enrichment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Claus Lindskov; Jensen, Kaj Sand

    2011-01-01

    • Lobelia dortmanna thrives in oligotrophic, softwater lakes thanks to O(2) and CO(2) exchange across roots and uptake of sediment nutrients. We hypothesize that low gas permeability of leaves constrains Lobelia to pristine habitats because plants go anoxic in the dark if O(2) vanishes from...... sediments. • We added organic matter to sediments and followed O(2) dynamics in plants and sediments using microelectrodes. To investigate plant stress, nutrient content and photosynthetic capacity of leaves were measured. • Small additions of organic matter triggered O(2) depletion and accumulation of NH(4......)(+), Fe(2+) and CO(2) in sediments. O(2) in leaf lacunae fluctuated from above air saturation in the light to anoxia late in the dark in natural sediments, but organic enrichment prolonged anoxia because of higher O(2) consumption and restricted uptake from the water. Leaf N and P dropped below minimum...

  3. Leak monitoring for CFC's, HCFC's, HFC's and oxygen depletion: Recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implementation of the Montreal Protocol and Title VI of the Clean Air Act of 1990 are having significant effects on the supply and cost of halocarbon refrigerants. In the US, there will be no new CFC's produced after 1995. Conservation measures which include recovery and recycling are enhanced by continuous monitoring for leaks in refrigeration systems. Some of the non-ozone depleting substitutes for CFC's have toxicity and flammability properties which require continuous monitoring for health and safety. Both economic and safety considerations have led to an increased use of monitoring instruments for halocarbon refrigerant emissions. Halocarbon refrigerants are colorless, odorless and, in general, boil at or below room temperature. In addition, they are high molecular weight compounds with vapor densities three to five times that of air. When refrigerants escape from closed systems, they can be expected to settle into low lying areas (in the absence of air movement)

  4. Summertime in situ monitoring of oxygen depletion in Amursky Bay (Japan/East Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishchenko, Petr; Tishchenko, Pavel; Lobanov, Vyacheslav; Sergeev, Alexander; Semkin, Pavel; Zvalinsky, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    For more than three months in 2011, in situ monitoring of temperature (T), salinity (S) and dissolved oxygen concentrations (DO) was carried out using a Water Quality Monitor (WQM) station deployed on the seafloor of Amursky Bay (Japan/East Sea). During this period, hypoxia in the bottom waters persisted for 93 days. In the summers of 2012 and 2013, the spatial distribution of DO was measured during ship surveys. Using these time series of DO, the biological oxygen demand (BOD) and ventilation rates in bottom waters were estimated from May 10 to August 7. The seasonal change in the dominant direction of the wind, which occurs twice a year (spring and autumn), was an important natural factor in development and termination of seasonal hypoxia in the bay. Dominant southern winds in the summer induced downwelling circulation on the northwestern part of the Japan/East Sea shelf. Under this circulation, hypoxia developed in the bottom waters of Amursky Bay. In autumn, dominant northern winds induced upwelling, causing the advection of cold, oxygenated seawater into the bay, ending the period of hypoxia. Short-term fluctuations in wind direction in the summertime influenced spatial and vertical distribution of T, S and DO. At the end of the summer, the oscillation of the downwelling/upwelling circulations revealed complicated temporal-space distributions of hydrological parameters in Amursky Bay.

  5. Optimal Alarm Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An optimal alarm system is simply an optimal level-crossing predictor that can be designed to elicit the fewest false alarms for a fixed detection probability. It...

  6. Potential involvement of oxygen intermediates and glutathione depletion in UV-induced epidermal cell injury in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of glutathione (GSH) are suggested as the cytotoxic mechanisms for UVB-induced cellular damage. Primary monolayer cultures of epidermal keratinocytes (KCs) prepared from the skin of neonatal rats were irradiated with UVB at levels of 0.25-3.0 J/cm2. Cytotoxicity was measured at 3, 6, and 12 hr after UVB radiation. Exposure of KCs to UVB resulted in time- and dose-related toxic responses as determined by plasma membrane integrity, lysosomal function and mitochondrial metabolic activity. Irradiated KCs generated superoxide in a dose-dependent manner when compared to sham-irradiated cells. Superoxide formation, which occurred before and concomitant with cell injury, was decreased by superoxide dismutase (SOD). Cell injury was also significantly prevented by ROS scavengers, SOD and catalase. Pretreatment of cells with endocytosis inhibitors, cytochalasin B and methylamine, suppressed the ability of SOD and catalase to protect keratinocytes from UVB-induced toxicity. Irradiation of cells with UVB caused rapid depletion of GSH to about 30% of unirradiated levels within 15 min. UVB-irradiation led to a rapid transient increase in GSH peroxidase activity, concomitant with a marked decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio. After 1 hr., while the GSH/GSSG ratio remained low, the GSH peroxidase activity declined below the control levels in UVB-treated epidermal cells. Following extensive GSH depletion in cells preincubated with 0.1 mM buthiomine sulfoximine, KCs became strongly sensitized to the cytotoxic action of UVB. These results indicate that UVB-induced cell injury in cultured KCs may be mediated by ROs and that endogenous GSH may play an important protective role against the cytotoxic action of UVB

  7. Warm acclimation and oxygen depletion induce species-specific responses in salmonids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttila, Katja; Lewis, Mario; Prokkola, Jenni M; Kanerva, Mirella; Seppänen, Eila; Kolari, Irma; Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2015-05-15

    Anthropogenic activities are greatly altering the habitats of animals, whereby fish are already encountering several stressors simultaneously. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the capacity of fish to respond to two different environmental stressors (high temperature and overnight hypoxia) separately and together. We found that acclimation to increased temperature (from 7.7±0.02°C to 14.9±0.05°C) and overnight hypoxia (daily changes from normoxia to 63-67% oxygen saturation), simulating climate change and eutrophication, had both antagonistic and synergistic effects on the capacity of fish to tolerate these stressors. The thermal tolerance of Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and landlocked salmon (Salmo salar m. sebago) increased with warm acclimation by 1.3 and 2.2°C, respectively, but decreased when warm temperature was combined with overnight hypoxia (by 0.2 and 0.4°C, respectively). In contrast, the combination of the stressors more than doubled hypoxia tolerance in salmon and also increased hypoxia tolerance in char by 22%. Salmon had 1.2°C higher thermal tolerance than char, but char tolerated much lower oxygen levels than salmon at a given temperature. The changes in hypoxia tolerance were connected to the responses of the oxygen supply and delivery system. The relative ventricle mass was higher in cold- than in warm-acclimated salmon but the thickness of the compact layer of the ventricle increased with the combination of warm and hypoxia acclimation in both species. Char had also significantly larger hearts and thicker compact layers than salmon. The results illustrate that while fish can have protective responses when encountering a single environmental stressor, the combination of stressors can have unexpected species-specific effects that will influence their survival capacity. PMID:25827840

  8. From nitrogen enrichment to oxygen depletion: a mechanistic model of coastal marine ecosystems response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosme, Nuno Miguel Dias; Koski, Marja; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    oxygen (DO) consumption as a function of N input. Such indicator is the basis for an eXposure Factor (XF) applied in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) to estimate impacts from N enrichment. The Large Marine Ecosystems (LME) biogeographical classification system was adopted to address the spatial...... variation of the modelled parameters and to characterise spatially differentiated N-emissions. Preliminary XF results range from 0.5 kgO2·kgN-1 in the Central Arctic Ocean to 16 kgO2·kgN-1 in the Baltic Sea, out of a total of 66 LME-dependent XFs. All the relevant processes were included in a mechanistic...

  9. Safety alarms at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Ninin, P; Henny, L

    1998-01-01

    In order to operate the CERN accelerators complex safely, the acquisition, transport and management of safety alarms is of crucial importance. The French regulatory authority [Direction de Sûreté des Installations Nucléaires de Base (INB)] defines them as Level 3 alarms; they represent as such a danger for the life and require an immediate intervention of the Fire Brigade. Safety alarms are generated by fire and flammable gas detection systems, electrical emergency stops, and other safety related systems. Level 3 alarms are transmitted for reliability reasons to their operation centre: the CERN Safety Control Room (SCR) using two different media: the hard-wired network and a computer based system. The hard-wired networks are connected to local panels summarizing in 34 security areas the overall CERN geography. The computer based system offers data management facilities such as alarm acquisition, distribution, archiving and information correlation. The Level 3 alarms system is in constant evolution in order...

  10. Hypolyminetic Oxygen Depletion And Dynamics of P Binding Forms: Insights From Modeling Sediment Early Diagenesis Coupled With Automatic Parameter Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafei, Babak; Schmid, Martin; Müller, Beat; Chwalek, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Sediment diagenesis can significantly impact on lake water quality through depleting hypolimnion oxygen and acting as a sink or source of nutrients and contaminants. In this study, we apply MATsedLAB, a sediment diagenesis module developed in MATLAB [1, 2] to quantify benthic oxygen consumption and biogeochemical cycling of phosphate (P) in lacustrine sediments of Lake Baldegg, located in central Switzerland. MATsedLAB provides an access to the advanced computational and visualization capabilities of the interactive programming environment of MATLAB. It allows for a flexible definition of non steady-state boundary conditions at the sediment-water interface (SWI), the model parameters as well as transport and biogeochemical reactions. The model has been extended to facilitate the model-independent parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis using the software package, PEST. Lake Baldegg represents an interesting case where sediment-water interactions control P loading in an eutrophic lake. It is of 5.2 km2 surface area and has been artificially aerated since 1982. Between 1960 and 1980, low oxygen concentrations and meromictic condition were established as a result of high productivity. Here, we use the cores for the measurements of anions and cations which were collected in April and June 2012 respectively from the deepest location (66 m), by Torres et al. (2013) to calibrate the developed model [3]. Depth profiles of thirty three species were simulated by including thirty mixed kinetic-equilibrium biogeochemical processes as well as imposing the fluxes of organic and inorganic matters along with solute concentrations at the SWI as dynamic boundary conditions. The diffusive transport in the boundary layer (DBL) above the SWI was included as the supply of O2 to the sediment surface can be diffusion-limited, and applying a constant O2 concentration at the sediment surface may overestimate O2 consumption. Benthic oxygen consumption was calculated as a function of

  11. Design of Alarm Clock

    OpenAIRE

    Budík, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to create alarm clock, which respect the functional, technical and aesthetic requirements of this device and attain an attractive design of this product. The final draft should be innovative, original and user attractive alarm clock.

  12. Intelligent Alarm Management System (IAMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large number of alarms in a nuclear power plant (NPP) are related to one causative event/alarm. When such an event happens, it triggers a cascade of alarms (called alarm avalanche) that comes in quick succession. These alarms may or may not come in a particular time-sequence each time the cause event is triggered. Alarm avalanches in an emergency situation can affect the performance of even the most seasoned operators. If a cause-consequence relationship can be established among a set of alarms, then such avalanches can be avoided by annunciating only the rootcause alarm. Intelligent Alarm Management System (IAMS) is a knowledge-based alarm processing system to reduce the number of presented alarms. The processing is based on the functional cause-consequence knowledge-base of the plant, wherein an alarm on a function denotes degradation/unavailability of the function.The knowledge is modeled using a graphical construct called Function Graph. (author)

  13. Effects of severe oxygen depletion on macrobenthos in the Pomeranian Bay (southern Baltic Sea): a case study in a shallow, sublittoral habitat characterised by low species richness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powilleit, Martin; Kube, Jan

    1999-11-01

    Severe oxygen depletion was detected in shallow parts of the Pomeranian Bay (southern Baltic Sea) for the first time in July/August 1994. A combination of extraordinary meteorological and hydrographical conditions along with generally high nutrient loads in this coastal area is thought to have led to extensive hypoxia/anoxia. Effects of this event on the macrobenthos were studied by comparing the community structure before and after summer 1994 at four sites which differed in degree of oxygen deficiency. Observed changes in the macrobenthos at three stations were attributed mainly to the hypoxia/anoxia event in summer 1994. Macrobenthos recovery after the oxygen depletion did not follow the commonly described succession pattern after a disturbance event, which is characterised by a mass recruitment of opportunistic species together with a rapid species turnover. At station 2, the most severely affected site, species number, total abundance, and total biomass of macrobenthos decreased significantly after the oxygen deficiency event, and recolonisation was still not complete two years later. Stations 1 and 3, which were moderately affected, showed almost complete recovery with respect to species composition and abundance within two years, but biomass was still lower. While recolonisation by juvenile and adult stages from nearby unimpacted coastal areas occurred at stations 1 and 3, succession was dominated by post-larval colonisation from planktonic dispersal at station 2. Station 4 was not affected by oxygen depletion and showed only small variation of community structure. The generally very slow recovery of amphipods at all three affected stations and even of the oligochaetes ( Tubificoides ( Peloscolex) benedeni and Heterochaeta ( Tubifex) costata) at station 2 further underline the severity of this oxygen deficiency in Pomeranian Bay sediments.

  14. Smart smoke alarm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warmack, Robert J. Bruce; Wolf, Dennis A; Frank, Steven Shane

    2015-04-28

    Methods and apparatus for smoke detection are disclosed. In one embodiment, a smoke detector uses linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to determine whether observed conditions indicate that an alarm is warranted.

  15. Speech Alarms Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Aniko; Moses, Haifa

    2016-01-01

    Speech alarms have been used extensively in aviation and included in International Building Codes (IBC) and National Fire Protection Association's (NFPA) Life Safety Code. However, they have not been implemented on space vehicles. Previous studies conducted at NASA JSC showed that speech alarms lead to faster identification and higher accuracy. This research evaluated updated speech and tone alerts in a laboratory environment and in the Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) in a realistic setup.

  16. Effect of oxygen breathing on micro oxygen bubbles in nitrogen-depleted rat adipose tissue at sea level and 25 kPa altitude exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randsoe, Thomas; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The standard treatment of altitude decompression sickness (aDCS) caused by nitrogen bubble formation is oxygen breathing and recompression. However, micro air bubbles (containing 79% nitrogen), injected into adipose tissue, grow and stabilize at 25 kPa regardless of continued oxygen breathing...... at 101.3 kPa (sea level) or at 25 kPa altitude exposures during continued oxygen breathing. In keeping with previous observations and bubble kinetic models, we hypothesize that oxygen breathing may contribute to oxygen bubble growth at altitude. Anesthetized rats were exposed to 3 h of oxygen...... prebreathing at 101.3 kPa (sea level). Micro oxygen bubbles of 500-800 nl were then injected into the exposed abdominal adipose tissue. The oxygen bubbles were studied for up to 3.5 h during continued oxygen breathing at either 101.3 or 25 kPa ambient pressures. At 101.3 kPa, all bubbles shrank consistently...

  17. Video methods for evaluating physiologic monitor alarms and alarm responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafide, Christopher P; Zander, Miriam; Graham, Christian Sarkis; Weirich Paine, Christine M; Rock, Whitney; Rich, Andrew; Roberts, Kathryn E; Fortino, Margaret; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Lin, Richard; Keren, Ron

    2014-01-01

    False physiologic monitor alarms are extremely common in the hospital environment. High false alarm rates have the potential to lead to alarm fatigue, leading nurses to delay their responses to alarms, ignore alarms, or disable them entirely. Recent evidence from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and The Joint Commission has demonstrated a link between alarm fatigue and patient deaths. Yet, very little scientific effort has focused on the rigorous quantitative measurement of alarms and responses in the hospital setting. We developed a system using multiple temporarily mounted, minimally obtrusive video cameras in hospitalized patients' rooms to characterize physiologic monitor alarms and nurse responses as a proxy for alarm fatigue. This allowed us to efficiently categorize each alarm's cause, technical validity, actionable characteristics, and determine the nurse's response time. We describe and illustrate the methods we used to acquire the video, synchronize and process the video, manage the large digital files, integrate the video with data from the physiologic monitor alarm network, archive the video to secure servers, and perform expert review and annotation using alarm "bookmarks." We discuss the technical and logistical challenges we encountered, including the root causes of hardware failures as well as issues with consent, confidentiality, protection of the video from litigation, and Hawthorne-like effects. The description of this video method may be useful to multidisciplinary teams interested in evaluating physiologic monitor alarms and alarm responses to better characterize alarm fatigue and other patient safety issues in clinical settings. PMID:24847936

  18. The LEP alarm system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlike alarm systems for previous accelerators, the LEP alarm system caters not only for the operation of the accelerator but also for technical services and provides the direct channel for personnel safety. It was commissioned during 1989 and has seen a continued development up to the present day. The system, comprising over 50 computers including 5 different platforms and 4 different operating systems, is described. The hierarchical structure of the software is outlined from the interface to the equipment groups, through the front end computers to the central server, and finally to the operator consoles. Reasons are given for choosing a conventional, as opposed to a 'knowledge based' approach. Finally, references are made to a prototype real time expert system for surveying the power converters of LEP, which was conducted during 1990 as part of the alarm development program. (author)

  19. Gynecological cancer alarm symptoms:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasubramaniam, Kirubakaran; Ravn, Pernille; dePont Christensen, René;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To determine the proportion of patients who were referred to specialist care after reporting gynecological cancer alarm symptoms to their general practitioner. To investigate whether contact with specialist care was associated with lifestyle factors or socioeconomic status. MATERIAL...... care and odds ratios (ORs) for associations between specialist care contact, lifestyle factors and socioeconomic status. RESULTS: The study included 25 866 non-pregnant women; 2957 reported the onset of at least one gynecological cancer alarm symptom, and 683 of these (23.1%) reported symptoms to their.......17-2.95). CONCLUSIONS: Educational level influence contact with specialist care among patients with gynecological cancer alarm symptoms. Future studies should investigate inequalities in access to the secondary healthcare system. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  20. Depletion of hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 induces apoptotic sensitization of radioresistant A549 cells via reactive oxygen species-dependent p53 activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hong Shik; Hong, Eun-Hee [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su-Jae [Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Jeong-Hwa [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Woo [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Ji-Hye; Um, Hong-Duck [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sang-Gu, E-mail: sgh63@kcch.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-27

    Highlights: •HRP-3 is a radiation- and anticancer drug-responsive protein in A549 cells. •Depletion of HRP-3 induces apoptosis of radio- and chemoresistant A549 cells. •Depletion of HRP-3 promotes ROS generation via inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. •Depletion of HRP-3 enhances ROS-dependent p53 activation and PUMA expression. -- Abstract: Biomarkers based on functional signaling have the potential to provide greater insight into the pathogenesis of cancer and may offer additional targets for anticancer therapeutics. Here, we identified hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 (HRP-3) as a radioresistance-related gene and characterized the molecular mechanism by which its encoded protein regulates the radio- and chemoresistant phenotype of lung cancer-derived A549 cells. Knockdown of HRP-3 promoted apoptosis of A549 cells and potentiated the apoptosis-inducing action of radio- and chemotherapy. This increase in apoptosis was associated with a substantial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that was attributable to inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway and resulted in enhanced ROS-dependent p53 activation and p53-dependent expression of PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis). Therefore, the HRP-3/Nrf2/HO-1/ROS/p53/PUMA cascade is an essential feature of the A549 cell phenotype and a potential radiotherapy target, extending the range of targets in multimodal therapies against lung cancer.

  1. Depletion of hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 induces apoptotic sensitization of radioresistant A549 cells via reactive oxygen species-dependent p53 activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •HRP-3 is a radiation- and anticancer drug-responsive protein in A549 cells. •Depletion of HRP-3 induces apoptosis of radio- and chemoresistant A549 cells. •Depletion of HRP-3 promotes ROS generation via inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. •Depletion of HRP-3 enhances ROS-dependent p53 activation and PUMA expression. -- Abstract: Biomarkers based on functional signaling have the potential to provide greater insight into the pathogenesis of cancer and may offer additional targets for anticancer therapeutics. Here, we identified hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 (HRP-3) as a radioresistance-related gene and characterized the molecular mechanism by which its encoded protein regulates the radio- and chemoresistant phenotype of lung cancer-derived A549 cells. Knockdown of HRP-3 promoted apoptosis of A549 cells and potentiated the apoptosis-inducing action of radio- and chemotherapy. This increase in apoptosis was associated with a substantial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that was attributable to inhibition of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway and resulted in enhanced ROS-dependent p53 activation and p53-dependent expression of PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis). Therefore, the HRP-3/Nrf2/HO-1/ROS/p53/PUMA cascade is an essential feature of the A549 cell phenotype and a potential radiotherapy target, extending the range of targets in multimodal therapies against lung cancer

  2. Dynamic alarm response procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dynamic Alarm Response Procedure (DARP) system provides a robust, Web-based alternative to existing hard-copy alarm response procedures. This paperless system improves performance by eliminating time wasted looking up paper procedures by number, looking up plant process values and equipment and component status at graphical display or panels, and maintenance of the procedures. Because it is a Web-based system, it is platform independent. DARP's can be served from any Web server that supports CGI scripting, such as ApacheR, IISR, TclHTTPD, and others. DARP pages can be viewed in any Web browser that supports Javascript and Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG), such as NetscapeR, Microsoft Internet ExplorerR, Mozilla FirefoxR, OperaR, and others. (authors)

  3. Toxicity alarm: Case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In late fall 1991, the Novacor petrochemical plant near Joffre, Alberta experienced a toxicity alarm, the first since its startup 14 years ago. Fish exposed to a normal toxicity test were stressed within 2 h and showed 100% mortality after 24 h. A history of the events leading up to, during, and after the toxicity alarm is presented. The major effluent sources were three cooling water systems. Although these sources are well characterized, the event causes were not immediately clear. Initial toxic screening indicated that one was very toxic, another moderately toxic, and the third not toxic at all. All three systems utilized the same chemical treatment program to avoid fouling: stabilized phosphates with minor variants. The most toxic of the cooling systems operated at 10-12 cycles, had three chemicals for biocide control, and had three makeup streams. Toxic and nontoxic system characteristics were compared. An in-depth modified toxicity identification and evaluation program was then performed to identify and evaluate the cause of the toxicity alarm for future prevention. The most probable causes of toxicity were identified by elimination. The combination of high numbers of cycles, hydrocarbons in the makeup water, and bromine added as an antifoulant resulted in formation of aromatic bromamines which are capable of causing the toxic condition experienced. 2 tabs

  4. Clinical Alarms in Intensive Care Units: Perceived Obstacles of Alarm Management and Alarm Fatigue in Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Ok Min; Kim, Hwasoon; Lee, Young Whee; Cho, Insook

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this descriptive study was to investigate the current situation of clinical alarms in intensive care unit (ICU), nurses' recognition of and fatigue in relation to clinical alarms, and obstacles in alarm management. Methods Subjects were ICU nurses and devices from 48 critically ill patient cases. Data were collected through direct observation of alarm occurrence and questionnaires that were completed by the ICU nurses. The observation time unit was one hour block. On...

  5. The Coast Alarm System Editor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OECD Halden Reactor Project has for several years worked in the field of alarm handling. COAST was developed based on long experience with several different methods for identification of plant status and detection of plant anomalies. COAST has been delivered to a number of different organisations which generate their own applications. With COAST one can implement many alarm generation or structuring methods. So far, the alarm system is defined using a COAST language, COLA. Now, a first version of an editor to implement alarm systems is available, to support alarm system designers to write and structure their COLA code. It is developed based on general guidelines for user interface design and a thorough discussion of different editor types. The most important functionality needed when designing alarm systems for complex processes was emphasized when choosing the type of editor. A structure-oriented editor is currently implemented, and the report gives a description for how to include graphic features towards a more complete editor in the future. Support and encouragement for reuse of code is obtained by defining classes in a class library browser. Separate applications with their specific object definitions are constructed in an application browser. In this way the alarm classes from the class libraries can easily be used in several applications. The application browser offers the possibility to organize the alarm objects in a structured hierarchy. In big complex alarm systems such a structuring feature is of vital importance to keep the overview of the alarm system and to perform maintenance. (author)

  6. Long-term oxygen depletion from infiltrating groundwaters: Model development and application to intra-glaciation and glaciation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidborn, M.; Neretnieks, I.

    2008-08-01

    Processes that control the redox conditions in deep groundwaters have been studied. The understanding of such processes in a long-term perspective is important for the safety assessment of a deep geological repository for high-level nuclear waste. An oxidising environment at the depth of the repository would increase the solubility and mobility of many radionuclides, and increase the potential risk for radioactive contamination at the ground surface. Proposed repository concepts also include engineered barriers such as copper canisters, the corrosion of which increases considerably in an oxidising environment compared to prevailing reducing conditions. Swedish granitic rocks are typically relatively sparsely fractured and are best treated as a dual-porosity medium with fast flowing channels through fractures in the rock with a surrounding porous matrix, the pores of which are accessible from the fracture by diffusive transport. Highly simplified problems have been explored with the aim to gain understanding of the underlying transport processes, thermodynamics and chemical reaction kinetics. The degree of complexity is increased successively, and mechanisms and processes identified as of key importance are included in a model framework. For highly complex models, analytical expressions are not fully capable of describing the processes involved, and in such cases the solutions are obtained by numerical calculations. Deep in the rock the main source for reducing capacity is identified as reducing minerals. Such minerals are found inside the porous rock matrix and as infill particles or coatings in fractures in the rock. The model formulation also allows for different flow modes such as flow along discrete fractures in sparsely fractured rocks and along flowpaths in a fracture network. The scavenging of oxygen is exemplified for these cases as well as for more comprehensive applications, including glaciation considerations. Results show that chemical reaction kinetics

  7. Life in the Slow, Dark, Salty, Cold and Oxygen-Depleted Lane - Insights on Habitability from Lake Vida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, A.

    2014-04-01

    Ice-entrained Lake Vida brine has provided an accessible natural habitat to study life in the slow lane - where cellular growth is limited, but not extinguished. We measured in situ stable isotopic signatures of N2O, SO42-, H2, conducted experiments utilizing stable isotope geochemical tracers to detect microbial transformations and employed radioisotopically-labeled amino acid precursors to detect cellular macromolecule biosynthesis. The results indicated a dominance of abiotic processes in the brine - yet support metabolically active life through detection of nominal rates of protein biosynthesis. At the same time, the brine has posed a challenge to our understanding of ecosystem energetics. Data collected thus far suggests that the brine is isolated from surfical processes and receives no new mass or energy from above. Calculations have estimated carbon remineralization rates, which indicate that resources should be depleted to the level of small molecules perhaps supporting a methanogenic ecosystem given the amount of time since encapsulation at the temperatures recorded - yet the brine is resource-rich harboring abundant bacteria and large molecules, in addition to a complex mixture of both reduced and oxidized compounds. This has motivated explorations into alternative sources of energy such as hydrogen - which was detected at levels ~ 10 micromolar - that could be generated by brine-rock interactions and supply endogenous energy to this closed ecosystem. This cold, salty, anoxic and organically rich brine, provides insight into a new category of habitable earth ecosystems that may also give us food for thought when considering habitability of giant planet icy worlds or of icy exoplanets. However, the methods we use, and the framework of scientific inquiry applied, are limited by perception and familiarity of rates of change that are important in human time scales. The Vida-icy brine ecosystem provides a model for expansion of our understanding of

  8. Survival of Campylobacter jejuni in co-culture with Acanthamoeba castellanii: role of amoeba-mediated depletion of dissolved oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bui, Thanh Xuan; Winding, Anne; Qvortrup, Klaus;

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of infectious diarrhoea worldwide but relatively little is known about its ecology. In this study, we examined its interactions with Acanthamoeba castellanii, a protozoan suspected to serve as a reservoir for bacterial pathogens. We observed rapid degradation...... of intracellular C. jejuni in A. castellanii 5 h post gentamicin treatment at 25°C. Conversely, we found that A. castellanii promoted the extracellular growth of C. jejuni in co-cultures at 37°C in aerobic conditions. This growth-promoting effect did not require amoebae – bacteria contact. The growth....... Interestingly, the dissolved oxygen levels of co-cultures with or without amoebae – bacteria contact were much lower than those observed with culture media or with C. jejuni alone incubated in aerobic conditions, and were comparable with levels obtained after 24 h of growth of C. jejuni under microaerophilic...

  9. Tuning the threshold voltage from depletion to enhancement mode in a multilayer MoS2 transistor via oxygen adsorption and desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jie; Dhar, Sarit

    2016-01-14

    Selective chemical doping in two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is attractive for tailoring electrical properties according to device requirements. However, the ultra-thin 2D nature of MoS2 makes it difficult to realize effective doping by conventional ion implantation. Here, a simple method based on low-temperature (150 °C) annealing in air is developed for effective chemical doping in MoS2. We have demonstrated that the threshold voltage (V(th)) of multilayer MoS2 FET can be effectively tuned from depletion mode (V(th) = -1.8 V) to enhancement mode (V(th) = 1.1 V) by annealing in air at 150 °C. An energy band model based on electron trapping/detrapping due to oxygen adsorption on the MoS2 surface is proposed to explain the underlying mechanism. The model is consistent with an oxygen adsorption-desorption process evidenced by vacuum annealing that recovers the V(th) to its original value. These results can provide a simple approach for V(th) engineering and make a significant step toward 2D nanoelectronic device applications. PMID:26658374

  10. A climate of alarm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional view among scientists is that man-made global warming is real and potentially devastating. Climate physicist Richard Lindzen tells Edwin Cartlidge why he disagrees. Lindzen believes that even if man were indeed responsible for the vast majority of the warming observed in the last 100 years, he thinks there is still no cause for alarm. He claims the climate models used by the IPCC are far too sensitive to changes in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and estimates that the Earth will in fact warm up by perhaps just a few tenths of a degree over the next century. Needless to say, this is a conclusion that other climate researchers strongly disagree with. Certainly in public, Richard Lindzen is in the minority when it comes to his belief that man is not seriously heating up the Earth. (U.K.)

  11. Line supervision of alarm communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to explain the role and application of alarm communication link supervision in security systems such as for nuclear facilities. The vulnerabilities of the various types of alarm communication links will be presented. Throughout the paper, an effort has been made to describe only those technologies commercially available and to avoid speculative theoretical solutions

  12. Fundamental Principles of Alarm Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Us, Tolga; Jensen, Niels; Lind, Morten;

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally alarms are designed on the basis of empirical guidelines rather than on a sound scientific framework rooted in a theoretical foundation for process and control system design. This paper proposes scientific principles and a methodology for design of alarms based on a functional...... modeling technique (MFM) which represents a process in terms of its goals, functions and operating requirements. The reasoning capabilities of MFM enable identification of operational situations which threaten to generate an alarm and derivation of potential response scenarios. The design methodology can...... be applied to any engineering system which can be modeled by MFM. The methodology provides a set of alarms which can facilitate event interpretation and operator support for abnormal situation management. The proposed design methodology provides the information content of the alarms, but does not...

  13. Alarm fatigue: a patient safety concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendelbach, Sue; Funk, Marjorie

    2013-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that 72% to 99% of clinical alarms are false. The high number of false alarms has led to alarm fatigue. Alarm fatigue is sensory overload when clinicians are exposed to an excessive number of alarms, which can result in desensitization to alarms and missed alarms. Patient deaths have been attributed to alarm fatigue. Patient safety and regulatory agencies have focused on the issue of alarm fatigue, and it is a 2014 Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal. Quality improvement projects have demonstrated that strategies such as daily electrocardiogram electrode changes, proper skin preparation, education, and customization of alarm parameters have been able to decrease the number of false alarms. These and other strategies need to be tested in rigorous clinical trials to determine whether they reduce alarm burden without compromising patient safety. PMID:24153215

  14. N-Acetyl Cysteine Depletes Reactive Oxygen Species and Prevents Dental Monomer-Induced Intrinsic Mitochondrial Apoptosis In Vitro in Human Dental Pulp Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jiao

    Full Text Available To investigate the involvement of intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis in dental monomer-induced cytotoxicity and the influences of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC on this process.Human dental pulp cells (hDPCs were exposed to several dental monomers in the absence or presence of NAC, and cell viability, intracellular redox balance, morphology and function of mitochondria and key indicators of intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis were evaluated using various commercial kits.Dental monomers exerted dose-dependent cytotoxic effects on hDPCs. Concomitant to the over-production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and depletion of glutathione (GSH, differential changes in activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase were detected. Apoptosis, as indicated by positive Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI staining and activation of caspase-3, was observed after dental monomer treatment. Dental monomers impaired the morphology and function of mitochondria, and induced intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis in hDPCs via up-regulation of p53, Bax and cleaved caspase-3, and down-regulation of Bcl-2. NAC restored cell viability, relieved oxidative stress and blocked the apoptotic effects of dental monomers.Dental monomers induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial intrinsic apoptosis in hDPCs. NAC could reduce the oxidative stress and thus protect hDPCs against dental monomer-induced apoptosis.

  15. Alarm system advances and innovations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alarm: 'a signal (as a loud noise or flashing light) that warns or alerts; also: a device that signals... '. This statement, this definition as simple as it is sums up every alarm system for every control system that has ever existed, but what it's missing from it is the complexity and uniqueness required by a Nuclear Power Plant. With advances in computerized control and engineering technologies within these plants, the need for more comprehensive alarm control and monitoring systems is as critical as the operation itself. (authors)

  16. Fundamental principles of alarm design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditionally alarms are designed on the basis of empirical guidelines rather than on a sound scientific framework rooted in a theoretical foundation for process and control system design. This paper proposes scientific principles and a methodology for design of alarms based on a functional modeling technique (MFM) which represents a process in terms of its goals, functions and operating requirements. The reasoning capabilities of MFM enable identification of operational situations which threaten to generate an alarm and derivation of potential response scenarios. The design methodology can be applied to any engineering system which can be modeled by MFM. The methodology provides a set of alarms which can facilitate event interpretation and operator support for abnormal situation management. The proposed design methodology provides the information content of the alarms, but does not deal with alarm presentation or display design issues. A hydraulically powered grinding process is employed as an industrially relevant system to show the applicability of the proposed design methodology with promising results. (author)

  17. Use of pagers with an alarm escalation system to reduce cardiac monitor alarm signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvach, Maria M; Frank, Robert J; Doyle, Pete; Stevens, Zeina Khouri

    2014-01-01

    Alarm fatigue desensitizes nurses to alarm signals and presents potential for patient harm. This project describes an innovative method of communicating cardiac monitor alarms to pagers using an alarm escalation algorithm. This innovation was tested on 2 surgical progressive care units over a 6-month period. There was a significant decrease in mean frequency and duration of high-priority monitor alarms and improvement in nurses' perception of alarm response time, using this method of alarm communication. PMID:23963169

  18. Central alarm system replacement in NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current NPP Krsko central alarm system consists of three main segments. Main Control Board alarm system (BETA 1000), Ventilation Control Board alarm system (BETA 1000) and Electrical Control Board alarm system (BETA 1100). All sections are equipped with specific BetaTone audible alarms and silence, acknowledge as well as test push buttons. The main reason for central alarm system replacement is system obsolescence and problems with maintenance, due to lack of spare parts. Other issue is lack of system redundancy, which could lead to loss of several Alarm Light Boxes in the event of particular power supply failure. Current central alarm system does not provide means of alarm optimization, grouping or prioritization. There are three main options for central alarm system replacement: Conventional annunciator system, hybrid annunciator system and advanced alarm system. Advanced alarm system implementation requires Main Control Board upgrade, integration of process instrumentation and plant process computer as well as long time for replacement. NPP Krsko has decided to implement hybrid alarm system with patchwork approach. The new central alarm system will be stand alone, digital, with advanced filtering and alarm grouping options. Sequence of event recorder will be linked with plant process computer and time synchronized with redundant GPS signal. Advanced functions such as link to plant procedures will be implemented with plant process computer upgrade in outage 2006. Central alarm system replacement is due in outage 2004.(author)

  19. Functional alarming and information retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with two facets of the design and efficient utilisation by operating personnel of computer-based interfaces for monitoring and the supervisory control of complex industrial systems - e.g., power stations, chemical plants, etc. These are alarming and information retrieval both of which are extremely sensitive to computerisation. For example, the advent of computers for display requires that some means of assuring easy and rapid access to large amounts of relevant stored information be found. In this paper, alarming and information retrieval are linked together through a multilevel functional description of the target plant. This representation serves as a framework for structuring the access to information as well as defining associated ''alarms'' at the various descriptive levels. Particular attention is paid to the level where mass and energy flows and balances are relevant. It is shown that the number of alarms here is reduced considerably while information about content and interrelationships is enhanced - which at the same time eases the retrieval problem. (author)

  20. Rapid depletion of dissolved oxygen in 96 well microtitre plate Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm assays promotes biofilm development and is influenced by inoculum cell concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Cotter, John J.; O'Gara, James P.; CASEY, Eoin

    2009-01-01

    Biofilm-related research using 96-well microtiter plates involves static incubation of plates indiscriminate of environmental conditions, making oxygen availability an important variable which has not been considered to date. By directly measuring dissolved oxygen concentration over time we report here that dissolved oxygen is rapidly consumed in Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm cultures grown in 96-well plates irrespective of the oxygen concentration in the gaseous environment in which the...

  1. Design strategies of alarm system for SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high level goal of the SMART-AS (Alarm System for System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) is for operators to enthusiastically accept a new technology that will improve their response to alarms during plant transient conditions. Three alarm system design characteristics were included: (1) alarm processing (degree of alarm reduction); (2) alarm availability (prioritization and suppression); and (3) alarm display (a dedicated tile format, a mixed tile and message list format, and a format in which alarm information is integrated into the process displays). The SMART-AS prioritizes alarms based on the state of the plant; reduces the amount of information presented to the operator by grouping and display the arms in accordance with the present state of the plant; and allows nuisance alarms to be suppressed. This paper provides an introduction into applying the data mining techniques for the alarm processing of SMART-AS. In this paper, we describe our data mining algorithms, and illustrate how to apply these algorithms to generate an alarm suppression model from the alarm data. (authors)

  2. Fire auto alarm system intelligent trend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author gives the course and trend of the fire alarm system going to more computerized and more intelligent. It is described that only the system applied artificial intelligent and confusion control is the true intelligent fire alarm system. The author gives the detailed analysis on the signal treatment of artificial intelligent applied to analogue fire alarm system as well as the alarm system controlled by confusion technology and artificial nervous net

  3. 10 CFR 74.57 - Alarm resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alarm resolution. 74.57 Section 74.57 Energy NUCLEAR... Quantities of Strategic Special Nuclear Material § 74.57 Alarm resolution. (a) Licensees subject to § 74.51 shall provide the MC&A alarm resolution capabilities described in paragraphs (b) through (f) of...

  4. 21 CFR 876.2040 - Enuresis alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enuresis alarm. 876.2040 Section 876.2040 Food and... GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 876.2040 Enuresis alarm. (a) Identification. An enuresis... type of device includes conditioned response enuresis alarms. (b) Classification. Class II...

  5. SUBSURFACE VISUAL ALARM SYSTEM ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ''Subsurface Fire Hazard Analysis'' (CRWMS M andO 1998, page 61), and the document, ''Title III Evaluation Report for the Surface and Subsurface Communication System'', (CRWMS M andO 1999a, pages 21 and 23), both indicate the installed communication system is adequate to support Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) activities with the exception of the mine phone system for emergency notification purposes. They recommend the installation of a visual alarm system to supplement the page/party phone system The purpose of this analysis is to identify data communication highway design approaches, and provide justification for the selected or recommended alternatives for the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system. This analysis is being prepared to document a basis for the design selection of the data communication method. This analysis will briefly describe existing data or voice communication or monitoring systems within the ESF, and look at how these may be revised or adapted to support the needed data highway of the subsurface visual alarm. system. The existing PLC communication system installed in subsurface is providing data communication for alcove No.5 ventilation fans, south portal ventilation fans, bulkhead doors and generator monitoring system. It is given that the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system will be a digital based system. It is also given that it is most feasible to take advantage of existing systems and equipment and not consider an entirely new data communication system design and installation. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Briefly review and describe existing available data communication highways or systems within the ESF. (2) Examine technical characteristics of an existing system to disqualify a design alternative is paramount in minimizing the number of and depth of a system review. (3) Apply general engineering design practices or criteria such as relative cost, and degree

  6. CERN alarms data management: state and improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CERN Alarms System - LASER is a centralized service ensuring the capturing, storing and notification of anomalies for the whole accelerator chain, including the technical infrastructure at CERN. The underlying database holds the pre-defined configuration data for the alarm definitions, for the Operators alarms consoles as well as the time-stamped, run-time alarm events, propagated through the Alarms Systems. The article will discuss the current state of the Alarms database and recent improvements that have been introduced. It will look into the data management challenges related to the alarms configuration data that is taken from numerous sources. Specially developed Extract-Transform-Load (ETL) processes must be applied to this data in order to transform it into an appropriate format and load it into the Alarms database. The recorded alarms events together with some additional data, necessary for providing events statistics to users, are transferred to the long-term alarms archive. The article will cover as well the data management challenges related to the recently developed suite of data management interfaces in respect of keeping data consistency between the alarms configuration data coming from external data sources and the data modifications introduced by the end-users. (authors)

  7. Alarm system for ABWR main control panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TOSHIBA has developed integrated digital control and instrumentation system for ABWR, which is the third-generation man machine interface system for main control room that we call A-PODIA (Advanced PODIA). A-Podia has been introduced the first actual ABWR plant in Japan. in A-PODIA, TOSHIBA has realized improvement of alarm system that all operator crews in the control room can recognize plant anomalies easily. The alarm system can recognize essential alarms for plant safety easily and understand annunciators with each integrated annunciators and their prioritized color easily by classifying alarms into plant-level essential annunciators, system-level integrated annunciators and equipment level individual annunciators with hierarchical structure. This paper describes conventional alarm system and the design philosophy, alarm system design and operation of ''Alarm System for ABWR Main Control Panels''. (author). 5 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  8. Alarm-Processing in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information overload due to the activation of a great number of alarms in a short time is a common problem for the operator in the control room of a industrial plant, mainly in complex process like the nuclear power plants.The problem is the conventional conception of the alarm system, that defines each alarm like a separated and independent entity of the global situation of the plant.A direct consequence is the generation of multiple alarms during a significative disturbance in the process, being most of them redundant and irrelevant to the actual process state wich involves an extra load to the operator, who wastes time in acting selecting the important alarms of the group that appears or lead to a an erroneous action.The present work first describes the techniques developed in the last years to attack the avalanche of alarms problem.Later we present our approach to alarm-processing: an expert system as alarm-filter.Our objective is collect in the system the state of the art in the development of advanced alarm systems, offering an improvement of the information flow to the operators through the suppression of nonsignificant alarms and a structured visualization of the process state.Such support is important during a disturbance for the identification of plant state, diagnosis, consequence prediction and corrective actions.The system is arranged in three stages: alarm-generation, alarm-filter and alarm-presentation.The alarm-generation uses conventional techniques or receives them from an external system.The alarm-filter uses suppression techniques based on: irrelevance analysis with the operation mode and the state of components, causal reasoning and static importance analysis.The alarm presentation is made through a structured way using a priority scheme with three level.The knowledge representation of each alarm is based on frames and a graph of alarms for global knowledge, where the connections between nodes represent causal and irrelevance relations

  9. HOME INSECURITY: NO ALARMS, FALSE ALARMS, AND SIGINT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, Logan M [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The market share of home security systems has substantially increased as vendors incorporate more desirable features: intrusion detection, automation, wireless, and LCD touch panel controls. Wireless connectivity allows vendors to manufacture cheaper, more featureful products that require little to no home modification to install. Consumer win, since adding devices is easier. The result: an ostensibly more secure, convenient, and connected home for a larger number of citizens. Sadly, this hypothesis is flawed; the idea of covering a home with more security sensors does not translate into a more secure home. Additionally, the number of homes using these vulnerable systems is large, and the growth rate is increasing producing a even larger problem. In this talk, I will demonstrate a generalized approach for compromising three systems: ADT, the largest home security dealer in North America; Honeywell, one of the largest manufacturers of security devices; and Vivint, a top 5 security dealer. We will suppress alarms, create false alarms, and collect artifacts that facilitate tracking the movements of individuals in their homes.

  10. Video systems for alarm assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees in designing closed-circuit television systems for video alarm assessment. There is a section on each of the major components in a video system: camera, lens, lighting, transmission, synchronization, switcher, monitor, and recorder. Each section includes information on component selection, procurement, installation, test, and maintenance. Considerations for system integration of the components are contained in each section. System emphasis is focused on perimeter intrusion detection and assessment systems. A glossary of video terms is included. 13 figs., 9 tabs

  11. Tracking alarm causes by logic diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An operator should provide the correct and fast actions on a cause of alarms and failure for reducing the effect of failure. There are a lot of study. But most of those studies may use a physical knowledges or causal relationships. Most of those studies impose on high level information like the physical knowledges or causal relationships of failure rather than the logical states or process signals as the detail causes of failure. It is very difficult that the physical knowledges or causal relationships are to be implemented and verified. This paper proposes a methodology for tracking alarm by logic of alarms. This methodology uses the proper logical knowledges on the proven logic and alarm diagram or electrical alarm relay logic than the uncertain physical knowledges or causal relationships. This system is to display the highlighted alarm procedure related to the causes. The system can be used for operator to identify the detail causes of alarm without checking all candidates for causes in alarm response procedure and the logical states of alarm with alarm logic disgrams provided on CRT dynamically

  12. Alarm management for storage and transportation terminals; Gerenciamento de alarmes para terminais de transferencia e estocagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Patricia [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Feldman, Rafael Noac [PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    Recently, in many industrial segments, it has been taken into account the issues related to the high amount of alarms that are announced in the control rooms, even if the industrial process is under normal conditions. Recent studies and surveys have shown that the three major problems related to it are: alarms that remain active during normal operation; alarms that remain chattering during an operational period; the phenomenon called Alarm flood, that occurs when an extensive amount of alarms is announced and the operator does not have enough time to take effective actions. In order to reduce or to eliminate the two above mentioned causes, alarm analysis and housekeeping, called Alarm Rationalization, have been efficient in major cases, because such facts occur mainly due to inadequate limits definition and/or equipment and instruments out of service or in maintenance. Such alarms are called in the literature as bad-actors or villains, and their occurrences may reach up to 50% of the daily total amount of alarms. This paper aims to present the main results of a project named Alarm Management for Transfer and Storage Terminals. The project development is based on two different terminal surveys, in order not only to identify the most frequent causes of undesirable alarms, but also to generate design standards. The main phases of the project are: alarm rationalization based on bad-actors detection; generate a set of design and operation standards; generate an Alarm Philosophy document for the Terminals. (author)

  13. Alarm system management: evidence-based guidance encouraging direct measurement of informativeness to improve alarm response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayo, Michael F; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D

    2015-04-01

    Although there are powerful incentives for creating alarm management programmes to reduce 'alarm fatigue', they do not provide guidance on how to reduce the likelihood that clinicians will disregard critical alarms. The literature cites numerous phenomena that contribute to alarm fatigue, although many of these, including total rate of alarms, are not supported in the literature as factors that directly impact alarm response. The contributor that is most frequently associated with alarm response is informativeness, which is defined as the proportion of total alarms that successfully conveys a specific event, and the extent to which it is a hazard. Informativeness is low across all healthcare applications, consistently ranging from 1% to 20%. Because of its likelihood and strong evidential support, informativeness should be evaluated before other contributors are considered. Methods for measuring informativeness and alarm response are discussed. Design directions for potential interventions, as well as design alternatives to traditional alarms, are also discussed. With the increased attention and investment in alarm system management that alarm interventions are currently receiving, initiatives that focus on informativeness and the other evidence-based measures identified will allow us to more effectively, efficiently and reliably redirect clinician attention, ultimately improving alarm response. PMID:25734193

  14. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Mohamed ElBaradei, issued today the following statement: The IAEA has been involved in United Nations efforts relating to the impact of the use of depleted uranium (DU) ammunition in Kosovo. It has supported the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) in the assessment which it is making, at the request of the Secretary-General, of that impact. In this connection, in November 2000, Agency experts participated in a UNEP-led fact-finding mission in Kosovo. DU is only slightly radioactive, being about 40% as radioactive as natural uranium. Chemically and physically, DU behaves in the same way as natural uranium. The chemical toxicity is normally the dominant factor for human health. However, it is necessary to carefully assess the impact of DU in the special circumstances in which it was used, e.g. to determine whether it was inhaled or ingested or whether fragments came into close contact with individuals. It is therefore essential, before an authoritative conclusion can be reached, that a detailed survey of the territory in which DU was used and of the people who came in contact with the depleted uranium in any form be carried out. In the meantime it would be prudent, as recommended by the leader of the November UNEP mission, to adopt precautionary measures. Depending on the results of the survey further measures may be necessary. The Agency, within its statutory responsibilities and on the basis of internationally accepted radiation safety standards, will continue to co-operate with other organizations, in particular WHO and UNEP, with a view to carrying out a comprehensive assessment. Co-operation by and additional information from NATO will be prerequisites. The experience gained from such an assessment could be useful for similar studies that may be carried out elsewhere in the Balkans or in the Gulf. (author)

  15. TMACS test procedure TP001: Alarm management. Revision 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project's acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure addresses the Alarm Management requirements of the TMACS. The features to be tested are: real-time alarming on high and low level and discrete alarms, equipment alarms, dead-band filtering, alarm display color coding, alarm acknowledgement, and alarm logging

  16. False alarm reduction in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Gari D; Silva, Ikaro; Moody, Benjamin; Li, Qiao; Kella, Danesh; Chahin, Abdullah; Kooistra, Tristan; Perry, Diane; Mark, Roger G

    2016-08-01

    High false alarm rates in the ICU decrease quality of care by slowing staff response times while increasing patient delirium through noise pollution. The 2015 PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge provides a set of 1250 multi-parameter ICU data segments associated with critical arrhythmia alarms, and challenges the general research community to address the issue of false alarm suppression using all available signals. Each data segment was 5 minutes long (for real time analysis), ending at the time of the alarm. For retrospective analysis, we provided a further 30 seconds of data after the alarm was triggered. A total of 750 data segments were made available for training and 500 were held back for testing. Each alarm was reviewed by expert annotators, at least two of whom agreed that the alarm was either true or false. Challenge participants were invited to submit a complete, working algorithm to distinguish true from false alarms, and received a score based on their program's performance on the hidden test set. This score was based on the percentage of alarms correct, but with a penalty that weights the suppression of true alarms five times more heavily than acceptance of false alarms. We provided three example entries based on well-known, open source signal processing algorithms, to serve as a basis for comparison and as a starting point for participants to develop their own code. A total of 38 teams submitted a total of 215 entries in this year's Challenge. This editorial reviews the background issues for this challenge, the design of the challenge itself, the key achievements, and the follow-up research generated as a result of the Challenge, published in the concurrent special issue of Physiological Measurement. Additionally we make some recommendations for future changes in the field of patient monitoring as a result of the Challenge. PMID:27454172

  17. The induction of mutations to 2-thioxanthine resistance in inhibitor depleted conidia of Aspergillus nidulans by gamma-radiation in the presence of oxygen or nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strain of Aspergillus nidulans has been used to study the inactivating and mutagenic effect of 60Coγ-rays in the presence of oxygen or nitrogen. Mutation was studied by the 2-thioxanthine system which selectively detects forward mutation at a number of gene loci (at least 16). Mutants resistant to conidial pigmentation effects of 2-thioxanthine can be divided into four main classes (2TxR, hx, uaY and cnx) and three of these classes (hx, uaY and cnx) can be further characterized at the gene level. The results demonstrate the existence of a marked differential forward mutational response of gene loci in Aspergillus conidia which is dependent upon whether γ-irradiation in aqueous suspension was carried out in the presence of oxygen or nitrogen: this effect is independent of the dose of radiation exposure. The specificity for mutation is altered by the presence of the self-inhibitor of germination for the anoxic treatment but not the oxic irradiation. The implication of different oxygen enhancement ratios for mutation induction in different classes or genes for the mechanism and type of damage induced by the two radiation conditions are discussed

  18. 46 CFR 130.450 - Machinery alarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Machinery alarms. 130.450 Section 130.450 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS VESSEL CONTROL, AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.450 Machinery alarms....

  19. Intelligent alarm-processing system for NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on developing the intelligent alarm-processing system for NPPs with BWR reactors, which makes it possible to reduce the information load for the operators through the information volume optimization, related to identification of failures in the NPP operation, is presented. Calculational principles and methodological constituents for processing alarm signals are considered. Description of the system and simulation check results are presented

  20. The CANDU alarm analysis tool (CAAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL undertook the development of a software tool to assist alarm system designers and maintainers based on feedback from several utilities and design groups. The software application is called the CANDU Alarm Analysis Tool (CAAT) and is being developed to: Reduce by one half the effort required to initially implement and commission alarm system improvements; improve the operational relevance, consistency and accuracy of station alarm information; record the basis for alarm-related decisions; provide printed reports of the current alarm configuration; and, make day-to-day maintenance of the alarm database less tedious and more cost-effective. The CAAT assists users in accessing, sorting and recording relevant information, design rules, decisions, and provides reports in support of alarm system maintenance, analysis of design changes, or regulatory inquiry. The paper discusses the need for such a tool, outlines the application objectives and principles used to guide tool development, describes the how specific tool features support user design and maintenance tasks, and relates the lessons learned from early application experience. (author). 4 refs, 2 figs

  1. Textile Moisture Sensor for Enuresis Alarm System

    OpenAIRE

    Kašurina, I; Vališevskis, A; Ziemele, I; Viļumsone, A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research is to develop an enuresis alarm system with textile moisture sensor (electrode), which is more suitable for textile garments. Authors propose to design sensor by embroidery using conductive yarn. Conductive yarns are a preferable material for enuresis alarm sensors, since they blend with the textile structure of underwear and bedding sheet, inducing less stress on the treated person.

  2. Knowledge Discovery from Communication Network Alarm Databases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The technique of Knowledge Discovery in Databases(KDD) to learn valuable knowledge hidden in network alarm databases is introduced. To get such knowledge, we propose an efficient method based on sliding windows (named as Slidwin) to discover different episode rules from time sequential alarm data. The experimental results show that given different thresholds parameters, large amount of different rules could be discovered quickly.

  3. Effect on the K/sub m/ for radiosensitization at 00C of thiol depletion by diethylmaleate pretreatment: quantitative differences found using the radiation sensitizing agent misonidazole or oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretreatment of V79-WNRE cells with 150 μM diethylmaleate for 1 hr at 370C caused a decrease in intracellular glutathione levels to approximately 10-15% of control levels. The cells could be washed free of diethylmaleate and held at 00C for several hours without toxicity and with no increase in glutathione concentration, although the glutathione concentration rapidly increased to normal levels at higher temperatures. Glutathione depletion itself caused a small but consistent radiosensitization of hypoxic cells (dose enhancement ratio of 1.2). However glutathione depletion caused a profound change in the radiosensitizing efficiency of misonidazole, with a decrease in K/sub m/ of about sevenfold from 0.6 to 0.09 mM. In contrast, only a 2.5-fold decrease was found in the K/sub m/ for radiosensitization by oxygen with diethylmaleate pretreatment. These results suggest a fundamental problem with the conventional theory of radiosensitivity whereby one considers a first-order competition for reaction with target radicals between radical-fixing versus radical-repairing species. It also suggests difficulties in the interpretation of glutathione as the only endogenous protective species

  4. Oxygen-Dependent Growth of the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio oxyclinae in Coculture with Marinobacter sp. Strain MB in an Aerated Sulfate-Depleted Chemostat

    OpenAIRE

    Sigalevich, Pavel; Cohen, Yehuda

    2000-01-01

    A chemostat coculture of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio oxyclinae and the facultatively aerobic heterotroph Marinobacter sp. strain MB was grown for 1 week under anaerobic conditions at a dilution rate of 0.05 h−1. It was then exposed to an oxygen flux of 223 μmol min−1 by gassing the growth vessel with 5% O2. Sulfate reduction persisted under these conditions, though the amount of sulfate reduced decreased by 45% compared to the amount reduced during the initial anaerobic mode....

  5. Estimation of the patient monitor alarm rate for a quantitative analysis of new alarm settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waele, Stijn; Nielsen, Larry; Frassica, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In many critical care units, default patient monitor alarm settings are not fine-tuned to the vital signs of the patient population. As a consequence there are many alarms. A large fraction of the alarms are not clinically actionable, thus contributing to alarm fatigue. Recent attention to this phenomenon has resulted in attempts in many institutions to decrease the overall alarm load of clinicians by altering the trigger thresholds for monitored parameters. Typically, new alarm settings are defined based on clinical knowledge and patient population norms and tried empirically on new patients without quantitative knowledge about the potential impact of these new settings. We introduce alarm regeneration as a method to estimate the alarm rate of new alarm settings using recorded patient monitor data. This method enables evaluation of several alarm setting scenarios prior to using these settings in the clinical setting. An expression for the alarm rate variance is derived for the calculation of statistical confidence intervals on the results. PMID:25571296

  6. Seasonal, sub-seasonal and spatial fluctuations in oxygen-depleted bottom waters in an embayment of an eastern boundary upwelling system: St Helena Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, G. C.; Probyn, T. A.

    2015-08-01

    The considerable impact of oxygen deficient waters on marine resources in St Helena Bay has generated interest in exploring the vulnerability of South Africa's largest and most productive bay to further deoxygenation in response to climate change. Seasonal, sub-seasonal and spatial fluctuations in bottom dissolved oxygen (DO) are examined in St Helena Bay to facilitate better interpretation of historical data. DO measurements in relation to physical, chemical and biological variables were made between November 2013 and November 2014. Alongshore bay characteristics were assessed through comparison of variables along the 50 m depth contour. A mean coefficient of variation of 0.35 provided a measure of the relative variability of near-bottom DO concentrations along this contour. Across-shelf transects captured the seasonal development of hypoxia in relation to the distribution of phytoplankton biomass. DO was lowest in autumn in the south of the bay prior to winter ventilation of the bottom waters. Exceptional dinoflagellate blooms forming extensive subsurface thin layers preceded the autumn DO minima. The development of hypoxia at inner and central stations prior to expansion beyond the boundaries of the bay provided evidence of local drawdown. Coincident with the seasonal decline of DO within the bay was an increase in macronutrient concentrations which tended to mirror DO concentrations. Indication of denitrification in the suboxic waters in the south of the bay was provided through evidence of a nitrate deficit in autumn supported by elevated nitrite concentrations. Superimposed on the seasonal decline of DO concentrations in the bottom waters were sub-seasonal events of hypoxia and anoxia linked to episodic deposition of organic matter as indicated by increases in bottom Chl a concentrations.

  7. Reactor alarm system development and application issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new hardware and software technologies, and the need in research reactors for assistance systems in operation and maintenance, have given an appropriate background to develop a computer based system named ''Reactor Alarm System'' (RAS). RAS is a software package, user oriented, with emphasis on production, experiments and maintenance goals. It is designed to run on distributed systems conformed with microcomputers under QNX operating system. RAS main features are: a) Alarm Panel Display; b) Alarm Page; c) Alarm Masking and Inhibition; d) Alarms Color and Attributes; e) Condition Classification; and f) Arrangement Presentation. RAS design allows it to be installed as a part of a computer based Supervision and Control System in new installations or retrofit existing reactor instrumentation systems. The analysis of human factors during development stage and successive user feedback from different applications, brought out several RAS improvements: a) Multiple-copy alarm summaries; b) Improved alarm handling; c) Extended dictionary; and d) Enhanced hardware availability. It has proved successful in providing new capabilities for operators, and also has shown the continuous increase of user-demands, reflecting the expectations placed today on computer-based systems. (author). 6 figs, 1 tabs

  8. Wallac automatic alarm dosimeter type RAD21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Automatic Alarm Dosimeter type RAD 21 is a batterypowered personal dosemeter and exposure rate alarm monitor, designed to be worn on the body, covering an exposure range from 0.1 to 999.9 mR and has an audible alarm which can be pre-set over the range 1 mR h-1 to 250 mR h-1. The instrument is designed to measure x- and γ radiation over the energy range 50 keV to 3 MeV. The facilities and controls, the radiation, electrical, environmental and mechanical characteristics, and the manual, have been evaluated. (U.K.)

  9. A Selection of Data Structure for SMART Alarm System Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A design goal of SMART Alarm System is providing intelligence alarm information to operator in main control room. To achive this, we should apply advanced alarm process logics and manage alarm data sets for advanced alarm logic. SMART Alarm System must analyze a lot of alarm by the cycle to determines alarms. For this, performance optimization of database is essential. Especially, high performance of search function is required. In this paper, we propose most a suitable search method to database by compare several search methods

  10. An expert system for alarm diagnosis and filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an alarm processing system being developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for implementation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. The purpose of the system is to perform two related functions, alarm diagnosis and filtering, to aid nuclear plant operators in responding to the large number of alarms typically activated during a major plant transient. The alarm diagnostician determines the root cause of a pattern or sequence of alarms and generates an explanation of the events leading to the alarm sequence. The alarm filter identifies and deemphasize those alarms which are either irrelevant to the current plant condition or contribute no significant new information

  11. 46 CFR 63.15-7 - Alarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... periodically unattended machinery space, the auxiliary boiler trip alarm required by 46 CFR 62.35-50, Table 62... reset. (c) For steam boilers, operation of the lower low water cutoff must automatically sound...

  12. Recommendations for the LHC safety alarm system

    CERN Document Server

    Laeger, H

    1999-01-01

    A working group was set up to define the LHC safety alarm system, also known as Alarm-of-Level-3-System (AL3S). The mandate asked for recommendations to be elaborated on four items: the overall concept of the AL3S for machine and experiments, the transmission and display of safety alarms, the AL3S during civil engineering construction, and the transition from the present LEP to the final LHC safety alarm system. The members of the working group represented a wide range of interest and experience including the CERN Fire Brigade, safety officers from experiments and machines, and specialists for safety and control systems. The recommendations highlight the need for a clear definition of responsibilities and procedures, well-engineered homogeneous systems across CERN, and they point to several important issues outside the mandate of the working group. These recommendations were presented, discussed and accepted by several CERN and LHC committees.

  13. Hazardous gases and oxygen depletion in a wet paddy pile: an experimental study in a simulating underground rice mill pit, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenjai, Pornthip; Chaiear, Naesinee; Charerntanyarak, Lertchai; Boonmee, Mallika

    2012-01-01

    During the rice harvesting season in Thailand, large amounts of fresh paddy are sent to rice mills immediately after harvesting due to a lack of proper farm storage space. At certain levels of moisture content, rice grains may generate hazardous gases, which can replace oxygen (O(2)) in the confined spaces of underground rice mill pits. This phenomenon has been observed in a fatal accident in Thailand. Our study aimed to investigate the type of gases and their air concentrations emitted from the paddy piles at different levels of moisture content and duration of piling time. Four levels of moisture content in the paddy piles were investigated, including dry paddy group (concrete pits 80 × 80 cm wide by 60 cm high. Gases emitted were measured with an infrared spectrophotometer and a multi-gas detector every 12 h for 5 days throughout the experiment. The results revealed high levels of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) (range 5,864-8,419 ppm) in all wet paddy groups, which gradually increased over time. The concentration of carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH(4)), nitromethane (CH(3)NO(2)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) in all wet paddy groups increased with piling time and with moisture content, with ranges of 11-289; 2-8; 36-374; and 4-26 ppm, respectively. The highest levels of moisture content in the paddy piles were in the range 28-30%wb. Nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) concentrations were low in all paddy groups. The percentage of O(2) in the wet paddy groups decreased with piling time and moisture content (from 18.7% to 4.1%). This study suggested that hazardous gases could be emitted in moist paddy piles, and their concentrations could increase with increasing moisture content and piling time period. PMID:23047081

  14. Addressing the alarm analysis barrier - a tool for improving alarm systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a software application tool for the initial specification and maintenance of the thousands of alarms in nuclear and other process control plants. The software program is used by system designers and maintainers to analyze, characterize, record and maintain the alarm information and configuration decisions for an alarm system. The tool provides a comprehensive design and information handling environment for: the existing alarm functions in current CANDU plants; the new alarm processing and presentation concepts developed under CANDU Owners Group (COG) sponsorship that are available to be applied to existing CANDU plants on a retrofit basis; and, the alarm functions to be implemented in new CANDU plants. (author). 3 refs., 1 fig

  15. Principal alarms in multivariate statistical process control

    OpenAIRE

    González, Isabel; Sánchez, Ismael

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for the simulation of multivariate out of control situations using in-control data. The method is based on finding the independent factors of the variability of the process, and shifting these factors one by one. These shifts are then translated in terms of the observed variables. The shifts provoked by the most important factors are called principal alarms. The principal alarms are plotted, visualizing the main deviations of the process. Also, a resampling ...

  16. Sensor fusion for intelligent alarm analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of an intelligent alarm analysis system is to provide complete and manageable information to a central alarm station operator by applying alarm processing and fusion techniques to sensor information. This paper discusses the sensor fusion approach taken to perform intelligent alarm analysis for the Advanced Exterior Sensor (AES). The AES is an intrusion detection and assessment system designed for wide-area coverage, quick deployment, low false/nuisance alarm operation, and immediate visual assessment. It combines three sensor technologies (visible, infrared, and millimeter wave radar) collocated on a compact and portable remote sensor module. The remote sensor module rotates at a rate of 1 revolution per second to detect and track motion and provide assessment in a continuous 360 degree field-of-regard. Sensor fusion techniques are used to correlate and integrate the track data from these three sensors into a single track for operator observation. Additional inputs to the fusion process include environmental data, knowledge of sensor performance under certain weather conditions, sensor priority, and recent operator feedback. A confidence value is assigned to the track as a result of the fusion process. This helps to reduce nuisance alarms and to increase operator confidence in the system while reducing the workload of the operator

  17. Lake acidification and oxygen depletion may synergistically enhance nitrous oxide (N2O) production by nitrifier denitrification in a subalpine lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, C. H.; Goepfert, T. J.; Rollog, M.; Lehmann, M. F.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms are an important source of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). They produce N2O through two mechanisms: by the decomposition of an intermediate in the ammonia (NH3) oxidation reaction, and by nitrifier denitrification, which is the enzymatic reduction of nitrite (NO2-). We investigated the impact of water pH and oxygen (O2) concentrations on rates of N2O production by these two mechanisms in the water column of Lake Lugano, a subalpine lake between Switzerland and Italy. Acidification of natural waters is known to reduce the rate of ammonia oxidation by forcing the equilibrium NH4+ ←→ NH3 + H+ away from NH3, the form that is preferentially taken up by ammonia oxidizers. In turn, this reduces the rate of N2O production by decomposition of the reaction intermediate during ammonia oxidation. However, using 15NH4+ and 15NO2- tracer additions during lake water incubations, we showed that reducing the pH from in situ values of 7.5 to 8 down to 6 to 7 actually increased the rate of N2O production by nitrifier denitrification. Hypoxia is thought to enhance N2O production by nitrifier denitrification. We did not observe nitrifier denitrification in incubations that were fully oxic (partial pressure of O2 = 20.9%) or had reduced O2 (partial pressure = 12%). However, when the incubation pH was lowered and the O2 reduced to 12%, N2O production by nitrifier denitrification was much greater than it was in incubations where only the pH was reduced or only the O2 concentration was reduced. Water for these experiments was drawn from depths just below the epilimnion of the monomictic south basin of Lugano, an environment whose pH, O2, and nutrient concentrations fluctuate throughout the water column on a seasonal basis and change in the shallower depths on a daily basis. We discuss the implications of these changes for the flux of shallow N2O into the atmosphere and a possible mechanism that explains the synergistic influence of O2 and pH on

  18. 46 CFR 97.37-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 97.37-9 Section 97.37-9 Shipping... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE...

  19. 46 CFR 78.47-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 78.47-9 Section 78.47-9 Shipping... and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED.” (b)...

  20. 46 CFR 196.37-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 196.37-9 Section 196.37-9 Shipping... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE...

  1. 46 CFR 108.627 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 108.627 Section 108.627 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.627 Carbon dioxide alarm. Each carbon dioxide alarm must be identified by marking: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED” next...

  2. 46 CFR 169.732 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 169.732 Section 169.732 Shipping... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.732 Carbon dioxide alarm. Each carbon dioxide alarm must be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED.”...

  3. SMS-baserat alarm med positionering : GPS based alarm with positioning

    OpenAIRE

    Nors, Niclas; Rehnström, Tom

    2008-01-01

    The study investigates how to design a low-cost, versatile event messaging system using SMS. A typical use case is a fire alarm or intrusion detector when equipped with appropriate sensors. With a GPS receiver connected, the actual position is included in the message, allowing for use as theft alarm in e.g. a car or in mobile home.

  4. Pre-alarm closed circuit television verification to reduce false alarm impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Closed circuit television (CCTV) plays an important role in modern security systems for protection of nuclear material. The functions of video are for detection and to assist in classification or assessment of alarms from other sensors. A nuclear facility with an extensive security system can experience a very high alarm rate, including false, nuisance and alarms occurring as part of routine operations. Video systems which include the Pre-Alarm Image Recall feature continuously capture and store a number of images from each camera. The images leading up to, at the instant of, and immediately after an alarm, can be displayed as a very valuable aid in assessment. The technology and operation of this feature is described, together with actual operating experience and a summary of the benefits which have been obtained from its use. (author)

  5. System for alarms analysis and optimization in petrochemicals plants; Sistema para analise e otimizacao de alarmes em plantas petroquimicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Gustavo; Pifer, Aderson; Guedes, Luiz Affonso [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Saito, Kaku; Aquino, Leonardo [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    The present work presents a group of algorithms, techniques and functionalities on alarms management which can be used efficiently on the treatment of 'disturbances' caused by the informal management of the alarm systems. Among the disturbances handled by these techniques, there is the recognition of intermittent alarms and false alarms, location of alarm floods and correlation between alarms, aiming the identification of communal root causes. The results will be presented through a case study on petrochemical alarm plants. At last, the results obtained by the utilization of such functionalities will be presented and discussed. (author)

  6. Behavioral alarm treatment for nocturnal enuresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo F. Pereira

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSES: To investigate the efficacy of alarm treatment in a sample of Brazilian children and adolescents with nocturnal enuresis and relate treatment success to age and type of clinical support. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During 32 weeks, 84 children and adolescents received alarm treatment together with weekly psychological support sessions for individual families or groups of 5 to 10 families. RESULTS: 71% of the participants achieved success, defined as 14 consecutive dry nights. The result was similar for children and adolescents and for individual or group support. The time until success was shorter for participants missing fewer support sessions. CONCLUSIONS: Alarm treatment was effective for the present sample, regardless of age or type of support. Missing a higher number of support sessions, which may reflect low motivation for treatment, increased the risk of failure.

  7. An evaluation approach for alarm processing improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In light of the need to improve MMIS of NPPs, the advanced I and C research team of KAERI has embarked on developing an Alarm and Diagnosis-Integrated Operator Support System, called ADIOS, to filter or suppress unnecessary or nuisance alarms and diagnose abnormality of the plant process. ADIOS has been built in an object-oriented AI environment of G-2 expert system software tool, as presented in a companion paper. ADIOS then is evaluated according to the plan in three steps; (1) preliminary tests to refine the knowledge base and inference structure of ADIOS in such a dynamic environment, and also to evaluate the appropriateness of alarm-processing algorithms; (2) to ensure correctness, consistency, and completeness in the knowledge base using COKEP (Checker Of Knowledge base using Extended Petri net); and (3) the cognitive performance evaluation using the Simulation Analyzer with a Cognitive Operator Model (SACOM) in the KAERI's Integrated Test Facility (ITF). (author). 5 figs, 1 tab

  8. Decision-making and response strategies in interaction with alarms: the impact of alarm reliability, availability of alarm validity information and workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzey, Dietrich; Gérard, Nina; Wiczorek, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Responding to alarm systems which usually commit a number of false alarms and/or misses involves decision-making under uncertainty. Four laboratory experiments including a total of 256 participants were conducted to gain comprehensive insight into humans' dealing with this uncertainty. Specifically, it was investigated how responses to alarms/non-alarms are affected by the predictive validities of these events, and to what extent response strategies depend on whether or not the validity of alarms/non-alarms can be cross-checked against other data. Among others, the results suggest that, without cross-check possibility (experiment 1), low levels of predictive validity of alarms ( ≤ 0.5) led most participants to use one of two different strategies which both involved non-responding to a significant number of alarms (cry-wolf effect). Yet, providing access to alarm validity information reduced this effect dramatically (experiment 2). This latter result emerged independent of the effort needed for cross-checkings of alarms (experiment 3), but was affected by the workload imposed by concurrent tasks (experiment 4). Theoretical and practical consequences of these results for decision-making and response selection in interaction with alarm systems, as well as the design of effective alarm systems, are discussed. PMID:25224606

  9. Alarm handling systems and techniques developed to match operator tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper covers alarm handling methods and techniques explored at the Halden Project, and describes current status on the research activities on alarm systems. Alarm systems are often designed by application of a bottom-up strategy, generating alarms at component level. If no structuring of the alarms is applied, this may result in alarm avalanches in major plant disturbances, causing cognitive overload of the operator. An alarm structuring module should be designed using a top-down approach, analysing operator's tasks, plant states, events and disturbances. One of the operator's main tasks during plant disturbances is status identification, including determination of plant status and detection of plant anomalies. The main support of this is provided through the alarm systems, the process formats, the trends and possible diagnosis systems. The alarm system should both physically and conceptually be integrated with all these systems. 9 refs, 5 figs

  10. Development of the newly advanced alarm system for APWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been developing AMCB (Advanced Main Control Board) for APWR consisting of a large overview display and on operator console. We have adopted the alarm prioritizing functions, which are already in use in the existing Japanese PWR plants, for easier identification of the high priority alarms. Moreover, we have developed an alarm system with a large overview display, which presents alarms on the plant process flow diagram. This enhances the location aids and pattern recognition in the alarm identification process. This time, we made further improvement and studies for better and various functions combining a large overview display with a CRT display. We determined the alarm system specification as follows, taking account of flexible alarm recognition processes. (1) The high priority alarms can be identified upon the LOD (large overview display). On the display, the alarms are described on the plant flow diagram, and the alarm status is shown on the fixed position of process or equipment symbols. (2) Other alarms are identified on large overview display and on CRTs using a hierarchical process. (3) The alarm messages are divided into 4 different groups according to the plant systems, thus enabling to undertake the countermeasure operations, using only the CRT. Moreover, we integrated a computerized ARPs (Alarm Response Procedures) into the alarm system. (author). 4 figs, 5 tabs

  11. An Undergraduate Experiment in Alarm System Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, R. A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes an experiment involving data acquisition by a computer, digital signal transmission from the computer to a digital logic circuit and signal interpretation by this circuit. The system is being used at the Illinois Institute of Technology. Discusses the fundamental concepts involved. Demonstrates the alarm experiment as it is used in…

  12. DEPLETED URANIUM TECHNICAL WORK

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Depleted Uranium Technical Work is designed to convey available information and knowledge about depleted uranium to EPA Remedial Project Managers, On-Scene Coordinators, contractors, and other Agency managers involved with the remediation of sites contaminated with this mater...

  13. Nuclear power plant alarm systems: Problems and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the incorporation of advanced technology into nuclear power plant alarm systems, human factors problems remain. This paper identifies to be addressed in order to allow advanced technology to be used effectively in the design of nuclear power plant alarm systems. The operator's use and processing of alarm system information will be considered. Based upon a review of alarm system research, issues related to general system design, alarm processing, display and control are discussed. It is concluded that the design of effective alarm systems depends on an understanding of the information processing capabilities and limitations of the operator. 39 refs

  14. Perspectives on use of personal alarms by older fallers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie Johnston

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Kylie Johnston1, Karen Grimmer-Somers1, Michele Sutherland21International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide; 2Falls Prevention Unit, Department of Health, Government of South Australia, Adelaide, AustraliaBackground: Personal alarms are proposed as a reliable mechanism for older people to obtain assistance after falling. However, little is known about how older people feel about owning and using personal alarms.Aim: This paper reports on experiences of independently living older people, who have recently fallen, regarding alarm use and their independence.Method: Volunteers older than 65 years who had sustained a fall in the previous six months were sought via community invitations. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted to gain information about their fall and their perspectives on personal alarm use. Interviews were content-analyzed to identify key concepts and themes.Results: Thirty-one interviews were conducted. Twenty callers owned personal alarms. Four subgroups of older fallers were identified; the first group used personal alarms effectively and were advocates for their benefits, the second group owned an alarm but did not use it effectively, the third group did not own alarms mostly because of cost, although were receptive to an alarm should one be provided, and the fourth group did not have an alarm and would not use it even if it was provided.Discussion: Personal alarms produce positive experiences when used effectively by the right people. The cost of personal alarms prohibits some older fallers from being effective alarm users. However, other elderly fallers remain unwilling to consider alarm use even if one was provided. In view of their cost, personal alarms should be targeted to people who will benefit most. ­Alternative strategies should be considered when alarms are unlikely to be used appropriately.Keywords: personal alarm devices, falls, older people, patient perspective

  15. Clinical Alarms in intensive care: implications of alarm fatigue for the safety of patients1

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Carla Bridi; Thiago Quinellato Louro; Roberto Carlos Lyra da Silva

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to identify the number of electro-medical pieces of equipment in a coronary care unit, characterize their types, and analyze implications for the safety of patients from the perspective of alarm fatigue. METHOD: this quantitative, observational, descriptive, non-participatory study was conducted in a coronary care unit of a cardiology hospital with 170 beds. RESULTS: a total of 426 alarms were recorded in 40 hours of observation: 227 were triggered by multi-parametric monitors and...

  16. Panic, Suffocation False Alarms, Separation Anxiety and Endogenous Opioids

    OpenAIRE

    Preter, Maurice; KLEIN, DONALD F.

    2007-01-01

    This review paper presents an amplification of the suffocation false alarm theory (SFA) of spontaneous panic (Klein, 1993). SFA postulates the existence of an evolved physiologic suffocation alarm system that monitors information about potential suffocation. Panic attacks maladaptively occur when the alarm is erroneously triggered. That panic is distinct from Cannon’s emergency fear response and Selye’s General Alarm Syndrome is shown by the prominence of intense air hunger during these attac...

  17. Reducing False Intracranial Pressure Alarms using Morphological Waveform Features

    OpenAIRE

    Scalzo, Fabien; Liebeskind, David; Hu, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    False alarms produced by patient monitoring systems in intensive care units (ICU) are a major issue that causes alarm fatigue, waste of human resources, and increased patient risks. While alarms are typically triggered by manually adjusted thresholds, the trend and patterns observed prior to threshold crossing are generally not used by current systems. This study introduces and evaluates a smart alarm detection system for intracranial pressure signal (ICP) that is based on advanced pattern re...

  18. Male monkeys remember which group members have given alarm calls

    OpenAIRE

    Wich, Serge A.; Vries, Han de

    2005-01-01

    Primates give alarm calls in response to the presence of predators. In some species, such as the Thomas langur (Presbytis thomasi), males only emit alarm calls if there is an audience. An unanswered question is whether the audience's behaviour influences how long the male will continue his alarm calling. We tested three hypotheses that might explain the alarm calling duration of male Thomas langurs: the fatigue, group size and group member behaviour hypotheses. Fatigue and group size did not ...

  19. Automated Information System (AIS) Alarm System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Automated Information Alarm System is a joint effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory to demonstrate and implement, on a small-to-medium sized local area network, an automated system that detects and automatically responds to attacks that use readily available tools and methodologies. The Alarm System will sense or detect, assess, and respond to suspicious activities that may be detrimental to information on the network or to continued operation of the network. The responses will allow stopping, isolating, or ejecting the suspicious activities. The number of sensors, the sensitivity of the sensors, the assessment criteria, and the desired responses may be set by the using organization to meet their local security policies

  20. Integrated taut wire sensor alarm monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years mechanical taut wire intrusion detection systems have played a key role in protecting high risk facilities. The taut wire sensor has the advantage that it combines a physical barrier with an intrusion sensor, a useful feature where no fence is installed or planned. However, mechanical taut wire sensors have proven to have several major disadvantages, including: no sensitivity adjustment, no sensor self-test feature, no remote control capability, and inflexible mounting constraints. This paper deals with a new generation of solid state taut wire sensor which overcomes the deficiencies of the aging mechanical design. The new sensor uses a microprocessor to filter out sources of nuisance alarms, yet maintains exceptional sensitivity to intrusion and tamper attempts. Being solid sate, the new sensor can be mounted in any orientation, even upside down. Moreover, when combined with a new, advanced alarm monitoring system, the solid state taut wire fence will support remote sensitivity adjustment and remote sensor self-test control

  1. Analyse fonctionnelle d’une alarme incendie

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob Dominique; Lagonotte Patrick

    2011-01-01

    L’enseignement de l’électricité dans les départements Hygiène Sécurité Environnement (HSE) des I.U.T. ne comprend qu’un faible nombre d’heures en première et en deuxième année. Il est cependant intéressant d’utiliser ce peu de temps à la présentation d’applications de l’électricité liées à la sécurité. Les alarmes incendie sont installées dans de très nombreux bâtiments recevant du public ou des travailleurs. Une alarme incendie est en général discrète et personne ne s’en préoccupe jusqu’au j...

  2. Automated Information System (AIS) Alarm System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunteman, W.

    1997-05-01

    The Automated Information Alarm System is a joint effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory to demonstrate and implement, on a small-to-medium sized local area network, an automated system that detects and automatically responds to attacks that use readily available tools and methodologies. The Alarm System will sense or detect, assess, and respond to suspicious activities that may be detrimental to information on the network or to continued operation of the network. The responses will allow stopping, isolating, or ejecting the suspicious activities. The number of sensors, the sensitivity of the sensors, the assessment criteria, and the desired responses may be set by the using organization to meet their local security policies.

  3. Optimal alarm system applied in coffee rust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Resende Gonçalves

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Alarm systems have very great utility in detecting and warning of catastrophes. This methodology was applied via TARSO model with Bayesian estimation, serving as a forecasting mechanism for coffee rust disease. The coffee culture is very susceptible to this disease causing several records of incidence in most cultivated crops. Researches involving this limiting factor for production are intense and frequent, indicating environmental factors as responsible for the epidemics spread, which does not occur if these factors are not favorable. The fitting type used by the a posteriori probability, allows the system to be updated each time point. The methodology was applied to the rust index series in the presence of the average temperature series. Thus, it is possible to verify the alarm resulted or in a high catastrophe detection in points at which the catastrophe has not occurred, or in the low detections if the point was already in the catastrophe state.

  4. 30 CFR 57.4360 - Underground alarm systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underground alarm systems. 57.4360 Section 57... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 57.4360 Underground alarm systems. (a) Fire...

  5. 46 CFR 130.460 - Placement of machinery alarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Placement of machinery alarms. 130.460 Section 130.460..., AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Automation of Unattended Machinery Spaces § 130.460 Placement of machinery alarms. (a) Visible and audible alarms must be installed at the pilothouse to...

  6. 21 CFR 870.1100 - Blood pressure alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood pressure alarm. 870.1100 Section 870.1100...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1100 Blood pressure alarm. (a) Identification. A blood pressure alarm is a device that accepts the signal from a blood...

  7. Alarm fatigue: a roadmap for mitigating the cacophony of beeps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purbaugh, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon known as alarm fatigue is the direct result of excessive alarms in hospitals. This article highlights the effects of alarm fatigue and reviews current clinical recommendations and guidelines to raise nurse awareness and provide tools to combat the problem. PMID:24310707

  8. Research and implementation of intelligent alarm transceiver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haobo long; XiaolingTian

    2015-01-01

    To design and implement a inteligent alarm transceiver, the sensor, such as temperature, voltage, video check. is used in transceiver. Then it analyses real-time acquisition data of sensor, if the transceiver is not working normaly, and the results are sent to the host computer. And the latter send fault information to user by mobile phone. During this period, without artificial participation, to achieve the purpose of inteligent warning. it can improve the maintenance efficiency of transceiver.

  9. Parental alarm calls suppress nestling vocalization.

    OpenAIRE

    Platzen, Dirk; Magrath, Robert D.

    2004-01-01

    Evolutionary models suggest that the cost of a signal can ensure its honesty. Empirical studies of nestling begging imply that predator attraction can impose such a cost. However, parents might reduce or abolish this cost by warning young of the presence of danger. We tested, in a controlled field playback experiment, whether alarm calls cause 5-, 8- and 11-day-old nestlings of the white-browed scrubwren, Sericornis frontalis, to suppress vocalization. In this species, nestlings vocalize when...

  10. APLIKASI SENSOR CAHAYA UNTUK ALARM ANTI PENCURI

    OpenAIRE

    Asita Shoman Muzaki; Arief Hendra Saptadi; Wahyu Pamungkas

    2013-01-01

    Kasus pencurian di rumah kosong yang ditinggal pergi oleh pemiliknya belakangan ini marak terjadi. Berangkat dari pemikiran ini penulis mencoba merancang alarm yang dapat mendeteksi pergerakan seseorang saat rumah dalam kondisi kosong, ditinggalkan oleh pemiliknya. Alat ini mempunyai prinsip kerja yaitu mendeteksi bayangan seseorang yang melewati titik tertentu. Perancangan dan pembuatan perangkat ini menggunakan sensor cahaya berupa LASER dan LDR yang dirangkai dengan transistor sebagai sakl...

  11. Science communication and the Swedish acrylamide "alarm".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofstedt, Ragnar E

    2003-01-01

    On April 24, 2002 the Swedish National Food Administration along with a group of researchers at the University of Stockholm raised an alarm regarding potential health risks associated with eating fried and baked foods such as potatoes and bread. Scientists had found high levels of acrylamide (up to 500 times more acrylamide than that allowed in drinking water by the World Health Organisation), a substance widely believed to cause cancer, in cooked high starch foods. The outcomes of this "alarm" were immediate. In Sweden sales of chips fell by 30-50 percent over a 3-day period following the press conference, and share prices among several fried food manufacturers fell substantially, as stock analysts were fearful that consumption of fried foods would decrease significantly. Four days after the press conference, however, consumers began eating fried food as normal and a number of researchers and journalists in Sweden and elsewhere took the view that the alarm had been both exaggerated and ill placed. In this study, I evaluate the science communication process associated with the scare, based on a content analysis of a select group of Swedish broad sheets from just previous to the April 2002 press conference to the present time (December 2002). In addition, the study is based on interviews with the various Swedish regulators involved in the process itself (in particular at the Swedish National Food Administration) as well as with the scientists responsible for the study at Stockholm University and relevant journalists and politicians. PMID:14530144

  12. Depleted Uranium Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper considers radiological and toxic impact of the depleted uranium on the human health. Radiological influence of depleted uranium is less for 60 % than natural uranium due to the decreasing of short-lived isotopes uranium-234 and uranium-235 after enrichment. The formation of radioactive aerosols and their impact on the human are mentioned. Use of the depleted uranium weapons has also a chemical effect on intake due to possible carcinogenic influence on kidney. Uranium-236 in the substance of the depleted uranium is determined. The fact of beta-radiation formation in the uranium-238 decay is regarded. This effect practically is the same for both depleted and natural uranium. Importance of toxicity of depleted uranium, as the heavier chemical substance, has a considerable contribution to the population health. The paper analyzes risks regarding the use of the depleted uranium weapons. There is international opposition against using weapons with depleted uranium. Resolution on effects of the use of armaments and ammunitions containing depleted uranium was five times supported by the United Nations (USA, United Kingdom, France and Israel did not support). The decision for banning of depleted uranium weapons was supported by the European Parliament

  13. Recommendations to alarm systems and lessons learned on alarm system implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alarm systems have been of major concern within complex industrial processes for many years. Within the nuclear community, the TMI accident in 1979 was the first really serious event that showed also the importance of the man-machine aspects of the systems in general, and the alarm system in particular. The OECD Halden Reactor Project has been working with alarm systems since 1974. This report is an attempt to gather some of the knowledge that has been accumulated during the years in Halden, both in research and also in bilateral projects. Bilateral projects within this field have provided a practical basis of knowledge.A major part of this report consists of a set of recommendations, which reflect HRP's current understanding of how an alarm system should work. There are also recommendations on design methods. But also other issues are included, as system development and implementation experience, and experimental knowledge on the performance of alarm systems. Some open issues are also discussed. (Author). 54 refs., 15 figs

  14. Clinical Alarms in intensive care: implications of alarm fatigue for the safety of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Carla Bridi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to identify the number of electro-medical pieces of equipment in a coronary care unit, characterize their types, and analyze implications for the safety of patients from the perspective of alarm fatigue.METHOD: this quantitative, observational, descriptive, non-participatory study was conducted in a coronary care unit of a cardiology hospital with 170 beds.RESULTS: a total of 426 alarms were recorded in 40 hours of observation: 227 were triggered by multi-parametric monitors and 199 were triggered by other equipment (infusion pumps, dialysis pumps, mechanical ventilators, and intra-aortic balloons; that is an average of 10.6 alarms per hour.CONCLUSION: the results reinforce the importance of properly configuring physiological variables, the volume and parameters of alarms of multi-parametric monitors within the routine of intensive care units. The alarms of equipment intended to protect patients have increased noise within the unit, the level of distraction and interruptions in the workflow, leading to a false sense of security.

  15. Changes in Default Alarm Settings and Standard In-Service are Insufficient to Improve Alarm Fatigue in an Intensive Care Unit: A Pilot Project

    OpenAIRE

    Sowan, Azizeh Khaled; Gomez, Tiffany Michelle; Tarriela, Albert Fajardo; Reed, Charles Calhoun; Paper, Bruce Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical alarm systems safety is a national concern, specifically in intensive care units (ICUs) where alarm rates are known to be the highest. Interventional projects that examined the effect of changing default alarm settings on overall alarm rate and on clinicians’ attitudes and practices toward clinical alarms and alarm fatigue are scarce. Objective To examine if (1) a change in default alarm settings of the cardiac monitors and (2) in-service nursing education on cardiac monit...

  16. A Study on Performance Requirements for Advanced Alarm System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A design goals of advanced alarm system is providing advanced alarm information to operator in main control room. To achive this, we applied computer based system to Alarm System. Because, It should apply data management and advanced alarm processing(ie. Data Base Mangegment System and S/W module for alarm processing). These are not impossible in analog based alarm system. And, preexitance research examples are made on digital computer. We have digital systems for test of advanced alarm system table and have tested and studied using by test equipment in the view point of the system performance, stability and security. In this paper, we discribed about general software architecture of preexitance research examples. Also, CPU performance and requirements of system software that served to accommodate it, stability and security

  17. The implications of probability matching for clinician response to vital sign alarms: a theoretical study of alarm fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, James M

    2015-01-01

    Alarm fatigue has been recognised as a significant health technology safety risk. 'Probability matching', in which clinicians respond to the alarm at a rate identical to the perceived reliability of the alarm, has been postulated as a model to explain alarm fatigue. In this article, we quantitatively explore the implications of probability matching for systolic blood pressure alarms. We find that probability matching could have a profound effect on clinician response to the alarm, with a response rate of only 8.6% when the alarm threshold is 90 mm Hg and the optimal threshold for a systolic blood pressure alarm would only be 77 mm Hg. We use the mathematical framework to assess a mitigation strategy when clinicians have a limit to the capacity to respond. We find that a tiered alarm in which clinicians receive information on the severity of vital sign perturbation significantly improves the opportunity to rescue patients. Practitioner Summary: Using a theoretical model, we predict that probability matching, a postulated model of clinician behaviour, can result in a profound decrease in clinician response to alarms for decreased blood pressure. A mitigating strategy is to create alarms that convey information on the degree of vital sign perturbation. PMID:25849772

  18. Depleted uranium in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, depleted uranium ammunition is regarded as nuclear weapons and meets with fierce opposition. The fact that US Marines mistakenly fired bullets containing depleted uranium on an island off Okinawa during training exercises in December 1995 and January 1996, also contributes. The overall situation in this area in Japan is outlined. (P.A.)

  19. Management of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large stocks of depleted uranium have arisen as a result of enrichment operations, especially in the United States and the Russian Federation. Countries with depleted uranium stocks are interested in assessing strategies for the use and management of depleted uranium. The choice of strategy depends on several factors, including government and business policy, alternative uses available, the economic value of the material, regulatory aspects and disposal options, and international market developments in the nuclear fuel cycle. This report presents the results of a depleted uranium study conducted by an expert group organised jointly by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It contains information on current inventories of depleted uranium, potential future arisings, long term management alternatives, peaceful use options and country programmes. In addition, it explores ideas for international collaboration and identifies key issues for governments and policy makers to consider. (authors)

  20. Water Depletion Threatens Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauman, K. A.; Richter, B. D.; Postel, S.; Floerke, M.; Malsy, M.

    2014-12-01

    Irrigated agriculture is the human activity that has by far the largest impact on water, constituting 85% of global water consumption and 67% of global water withdrawals. Much of this water use occurs in places where water depletion, the ratio of water consumption to water availability, exceeds 75% for at least one month of the year. Although only 17% of global watershed area experiences depletion at this level or more, nearly 30% of total cropland and 60% of irrigated cropland are found in these depleted watersheds. Staple crops are particularly at risk, with 75% of global irrigated wheat production and 65% of irrigated maize production found in watersheds that are at least seasonally depleted. Of importance to textile production, 75% of cotton production occurs in the same watersheds. For crop production in depleted watersheds, we find that one half to two-thirds of production occurs in watersheds that have not just seasonal but annual water shortages, suggesting that re-distributing water supply over the course of the year cannot be an effective solution to shortage. We explore the degree to which irrigated production in depleted watersheds reflects limitations in supply, a byproduct of the need for irrigation in perennially or seasonally dry landscapes, and identify heavy irrigation consumption that leads to watershed depletion in more humid climates. For watersheds that are not depleted, we evaluate the potential impact of an increase in irrigated production. Finally, we evaluate the benefits of irrigated agriculture in depleted and non-depleted watersheds, quantifying the fraction of irrigated production going to food production, animal feed, and biofuels.

  1. JOYO operation support system 'JOYCAT' based on intelligent alarm handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An operation support system for the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' was developed based on an intelligent alarm-handling. A specific feature of this system, called JOYCAT (JOYO Consulting and Analyzing Tool), is in its sequential processing structure that a uniform treatment by using design knowledge base is firstly applied for all activated alarms, and an exceptional treatment by using heuristic knowledge base is then applied only for the former results. This enables us to achieve real-time and flexible alarm-handling. The first alarm-handling determines the candidates of causal alarms, important alarms with which the operator should firstly cope, through identifying the cause-consequence relations among alarms based on the design knowledge base in which importance and activating conditions are described for each of 640 alarms in a frame format. The second alarm-handling makes the final judgement with the candidates by using the heuristic knowledge base described as production rules. Then, operation manuals concerning the most important alarms are displayed to operators. JOYCAT has been in commission since September of 1990, after a wide scope of validation tests by using an on-site full-scope training simulator. (author)

  2. Alarm management in gas pipeline plant: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Juliano; Lima, Marcelo; Leitao, Gustavo; Guedes, Luiz Affonso [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Branco, Nicolau; Coelho, Robson; Elias, Gustavo Passos; Nunes, Marcelo [Transportadora Brasileira Gasoduto Bolivia-Brasil (TBG), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    In order to improve the requirements of industrial processes, many decision support systems have been introduced in recent years. In this context, the alarm management systems have great relevance. On the other hand, the informatics revolution allowed a great increase of information concerning the operation of the industrial processes. Currently, process operators handle an excessive number of about 1.500 alarms per day. Thus, this overdose of information implies in the discredit of alarms. Then, in order to improve the operation activities of industrial processes, it is mandatory to incorporate procedures to evaluate and rationalize alarms. Since the EMMUA191 Standard is the reference guide to alarm management, but it does not specify how to execute an alarm management procedure, in this paper, a systematic procedure to evaluate alarms configurations in industrial processes is proposed. This procedure is in line with EMMUA191 and is composed by the following steps: to use statistics analyses to identify problematic alarms, such as occurrence, intermittency, correlation, and flooding calculation; to indicate problematic alarm group; and to propose a set of actions to be implemented. To validate our proposal, we present a case study in a gas pipeline plant using the BR-AlarmExpert software. (author)

  3. APLIKASI SENSOR CAHAYA UNTUK ALARM ANTI PENCURI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asita Shoman Muzaki

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Kasus pencurian di rumah kosong yang ditinggal pergi oleh pemiliknya belakangan ini marak terjadi. Berangkat dari pemikiran ini penulis mencoba merancang alarm yang dapat mendeteksi pergerakan seseorang saat rumah dalam kondisi kosong, ditinggalkan oleh pemiliknya. Alat ini mempunyai prinsip kerja yaitu mendeteksi bayangan seseorang yang melewati titik tertentu. Perancangan dan pembuatan perangkat ini menggunakan sensor cahaya berupa LASER dan LDR yang dirangkai dengan transistor sebagai saklar otomatis serta LED dan telepon rumah untuk melakukan panggilan kepada nomor telepon pemilik rumah. Komponen yang dipakai dalam pembuatan perangkat ini antara lain IC LM7805, LASER pointer, resistor, transistor BC108, LED, relay dan telepon rumah. Perancangan dan pembuatan alat menggunakan software multisim 10.1 sebagai simulator rangkaian, dan software eagle 5.1.1 untuk mendesain jalur rangkaian pada papan PCB. Saat cahaya LASER tidak sampai ke LDR karena terhalang oleh sesuatu, maka rangkaian output yang berupa indikator LED dan panggilan dari telepon rumah akan aktif. Kata kunci: alarm, sensor cahaya, saklar otomatis, relay.

  4. Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

    2014-06-17

    An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

  5. General methods for alarm reduction; Larmsanering med generella metoder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahnlund, Jonas; Bergquist, Tord; Raaberg, Martin [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Information Technology

    2003-10-01

    The information in the control rooms has increased due to the technological advances in process control. Large industries produce large data quantities, where some information is unnecessary or even incorrect. The operator needs support from an advanced and well-adjusted alarm system to be able to separate a real event from a minor disturbance. The alarms must be of assistance and not a nuisance. An enhanced alarm situation qualifies an increased efficiency with fewer production disturbances and an improved safety. Yet, it is still unusual that actions are taken to improve the situation. An alarm cleanup with general methods can shortly be described as taking advantage of the control systems built-in functions, the possibility to modify or create function blocks and fine-tune the settings in the alarm system. In this project, we make use of an intelligent software, Alarm Cleanup Toolbox, that simulate different signal processing methods and tries to find improved settings on all the signals in the process. This is a fast and cost-efficient way to improve the overall alarm situation, and lays a foundation for more advanced alarm systems. An alarm cleanup has been carried out at Flintraennan district heating plant in Malmoe, where various signal processing methods has been implemented in a parallel alarm system. This made it possible to compare the two systems under the same conditions. The result is very promising, and shows that a lot of improvements can be achieved with very little effort. An analysis of the alarm system at Vattenreningen (the water purification process) at Heleneholmsverket in Malmoe has been carried out. Alarm Cleanup Toolbox has, besides suggesting improved settings, also found logical errors in the alarm system. Here, no implementation was carried out and therefore the results are analytical, but they validate the efficiency of the general methods. The project has shown that an alarm cleanup with general methods is cost-efficient, and that the

  6. Classification of alarm processing techniques and human performance issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human factors reviews indicate that conventional alarm systems based on the one sensor, one alarm approach, have many human engineering deficiencies, a paramount example being too many alarms during major disturbances. As an effort to resolve these deficiencies, various alarm processing systems have been developed using different techniques. To ensure their contribution to operational safety, the impacts of those systems on operating crew performance should be carefully evaluated. This paper briefly reviews some of the human factors research issues associated with alarm processing techniques and then discusses a framework with which to classify the techniques. The dimensions of this framework can be used to explore the effects of alarm processing systems on human performance

  7. Experimental evaluation of human-system interaction on alarm design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluates the practicability of automatic reset alarm system in Fourth Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) of Taiwan. The features of auto-reset alarm system include dynamic prioritization of all alarm signals and fast system reset. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of automatic/manual reset on operation time, situational awareness (SA), task load index (TLX), and subjective ratings. All participants, including Experts and Novices, took part in the experiment on the alarm system simulator with Load Rejection procedure. The experimental results imply that the auto-reset alarm system may be applied in an advanced control room under Load Rejection procedure, because all participants' operation time were reduced as well as Novice's SA were raised up. Nevertheless, to ensure operating safety in FNPP, the effects of the auto-reset alarm system in other procedures/special situations still need to be tested in the near future

  8. Uses of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The depleted uranium is that in which percentage of uranium-235 fission executable is less than 0.2% or 0.3%. It is usually caused by the process of reprocessing the nuclear fuel burning, and also mixed with some other radioactive elements such as uranium 236, 238 and plutonium 239. The good features of the depleted uranium are its high density, low price and easily mined. So, the specifications for depleted uranium make it one of the best materials in case you need to have objects small in size, but quite heavy regarding its size. Uses of deplet ed uranium were relatively increased in domestic industrial uses as well as some uses in nuclear industry in the last few years. So it has increased uses in many areas of military and peaceful means such as: in balancing the giant air crafts, ships and missiles and in the manufacture of some types of concrete with severe hardness. (author)

  9. Operator Performance Comparison of two VDT-based Alarm Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is carried out to investigate performance differences between two alarm presentation methods from the viewpoint of human factors and to provide items to be improved. One of the alarm display methods considered in this study displays alarm lists on VDT combined with hardwired alarm panels. The other method displays alarms on plant mimic diagrams of VDT. This alarm display method has other features for operator aid with which operator can get detailed information on the activated alarm in the mimic diagrams, and the capability for alarm processing such as alarm reduction and prioritization. To compare the two display methods, a human factor experiment was performed with a plant simulator in the ITF (Integrated Test Facility) that plant operators run for 4 event scenarios. During the experiment, physiological measurements, system and operator action log, and audio/video recordings were collected. Operators subjective opinion was collected as well after the experiment. Time, error rate and situation awareness were major human factor criteria used for the comparison during the analysis stage of the experiment. No statistical significance was found in the results of our statistical comparison analysis. Several findings were identified, however, through the analysis of subjective opinions. (authors)

  10. Contribution of computerization to alarm processing: A French safety view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the TMI accident and according to the requirement of the French safety authority, very important studies were performed by the French utility, Electricite de France (EDF), and assessed by the Institute for Nuclear Safety and Protection (IPSN) on reactor operation in conventional control rooms, particularly on alarm processing. These studies dealt with the man-machine interface, as well as design and exploitation requirements, presentation and management of alarm signals, and associated operating documents. The conclusions of these studies have led to improvements in French conventional control rooms. The current state of these control rooms and links between alarm sets and operating documents will be shortly presented in the first part of the paper. More recently, the computerized means implemented in the PWR 1400 MWe control rooms (N4) profoundly modified reactor operation. In particular, major advances concern alarm processing in comparison with conventional control rooms. The N4 plants provide a more rigorous approach in processing and presentation of alarms than in the past. Indeed, EDF wanted to have less alarms switched on during plant upsets and to make them more characteristic of a specific situation of the process. For example, computerization makes it easier to validate or inhibit alarms according to the situation, to allow the operator to manage alarm presentation and to propose on-line alarm sheets to the operator etc. This approach in comparison with conventional control rooms, and the IPSN assessment will be presented in the second part of this paper. (author)

  11. AI-based alarm processing for a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A real-time expert system is implemented using artificial intelligence and object-oriented technology for alarm processing and presentation in a nuclear power plant. The knowledge base is constructed based on some schemes to process and display alarms to the plant operators. The activated alarms are dynamically prioritized by the reasoning rules, and then, presented on the process mimic overview and by some other means. To demonstrate the proposed system, the alarm processing and presentation is carried out in a simulated environment of the TMI-2 accident

  12. Correlating data from different sensors to increase the positive predictive value of alarms: an empiric assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Yuval Bitan; O’Connor, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Alarm fatigue from high false alarm rate is a well described phenomenon in the intensive care unit (ICU). Progress to further reduce false alarms must employ a new strategy. Highly sensitive alarms invariably have a very high false alarm rate. Clinically useful alarms have a high Positive-Predictive Value. Our goal is to demonstrate one approach to suppressing false alarms using an algorithm that correlates information across sensors and replicates the ways that human evaluators d...

  13. Lung capillaries raise the hypoxia alarm

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2012-01-01

    When ventilation is blocked, the lung can protect against the loss of blood oxygenation by activating localized arterial vasoconstriction, reducing blood flow to underventilated regions, and redirecting flow to better-ventilated alveoli. This phenomenon, hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV), preserves the overall efficiency of blood oxygenation, but the mechanism by which the hypoxic signal is transmitted to the smooth muscle that contracts the arterioles has remained largely a mystery. I...

  14. 24 CFR 3280.208 - Smoke alarm requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... locations: (i) To protect both the living area and kitchen space. Manufacturers are encouraged to locate the alarm in the living area remote from the kitchen and cooking appliances. A smoke alarm located within 20... other equipment discharging conditioned air through a ceiling grille into the living space; and (ii)...

  15. Successful use of the nocturnal urine alarm for diurnal enuresis.

    OpenAIRE

    Friman, P C; Vollmer, D.

    1995-01-01

    We report the effects of using a urine alarm, typically employed for nocturnal enuresis, to treat chronic diurnal enuresis in a 15-year-old female resident at Boys' Town. The results of an ABAB reversal design indicate that the alarm eliminated wetting in both treatment phases and that continence was maintained at 3- and 6-month follow-up.

  16. Successful Use of the Nocturnal Urine Alarm for Diurnal Enuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friman, Patrick C.; Vollmer, Dennis

    1995-01-01

    A urine alarm, typically used to treat nocturnal enuresis, was effectively used to treat diurnal enuresis in a 15-year-old female with depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and conduct disorder. The study indicated that the alarm eliminated wetting in both treatment phases and that continence was maintained at three-month and…

  17. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory long-range alarm system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) Long-Range Alarm System is described. The last few years have brought significant changes in the Department of Energy regulations for protection of classified documents and special nuclear material. These changes in regulations have forced a complete redesign of the LASL security alarm system. LASL covers many square miles of varying terrain and consists of separate technical areas connected by public roads and communications. A design study over a period of 2 years produced functional specifications for a distributed intelligence, expandable alarm system that will handle 30,000 alarm points from hundreds of data concentrators spread over a 250-km2 area. Emphasis in the design was on nonstop operation, data security, data communication, and upward expandability to incorporate fire alarms and the computer-aided dispatching of security and fire vehicles. All aspects of the alarm system were to be fault tolerant from the central computer system down to but not including the individual data concentrators. Redundant communications lines travel over public domain from the alarmed area to the central alarm station

  18. 33 CFR 401.16 - Propeller direction alarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Propeller direction alarms. 401.16 Section 401.16 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Condition of Vessels § 401.16 Propeller direction alarms. Every vessel of 1600...

  19. Alarm systems a guide to design, management and procurement

    CERN Document Server

    Engineering Equipment and Materials Users' Association. London

    2013-01-01

    Alarm systems form an essential part of the operator interfaces to large modern industrial facilities. They provide vital support to the operators by warning them of situations that need their attention and have an important role in preventing, controlling and mitigating the effects of abnormal situations. Since it was first published in 1999, EEMUA 191 has become the globally accepted and leading guide to good practice for all aspects of alarm systems. The guide, developed by users of alarm systems with input from the GB Health and Safety Executive, gives comprehensive guidance on designing, managing and procuring an effective alarm system. The new Third Edition has been comprehensively updated and includes guidance on implementing the alarm management philosophy in practice; applications in geographically distributed processes; and performance metrics and KPIs.

  20. Reliability enhancement of criticality alarm system in CORAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the challenges encountered in the Criticality Alarm System (CAS) installed in CORAL plant and explains the requirement and ways to make the system rugged, reliable and eliminate any false criticality alarms. To improve the reliability of the system the following improvements are required to be carried out viz. the power supply connections to the CAS, changes in wiring in the existing CASs, provision for electronic testing of the CAS remotely from control panel, connection of the criticality alarms to annunicator panel, design of common plant CAS alarm circuit with redundant DC power supplies, provision of alarm for mains and DC power supply failures, provision for transferring the CAS dose rate signals to the Radiation Data Acquisition Systems (RDAS) for event log and remote display and surveillance of CAS. (author)

  1. Antarctic ozone depletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antarctic ozone depletion is most severe during the southern hemisphere spring, when the local reduction in the column amount may be as much as 50 percent. The extent to which this ozone poor air contributes to the observed global ozone loss is a matter of debate, but there is some evidence that fragments of the 'ozone hole' can reach lower latitudes following its breakup in summer. Satellite data show the seasonal evolution of the ozone hole. A new dimension has been added to Antarctic ozone depletion with the advent of large volcanic eruptions such as that from Mount Pinatubo in 1991. (author). 5 refs., 1 fig

  2. From alarm systems to smart houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaskamp, F J

    1992-01-01

    The percentage of senior citizens in the Netherlands will rise in coming years. The expected percentage for the year 2010 of persons over age 65 in the total population is 15%. More persons over age 65 than ever before will continue to live in their own environment. Emergency response systems (ERS) can support independent living. The most common type of organization distributing ERS is a small, partly subsidized local alarm organization run by a social welfare office for the elderly. Government subsidy has been reduced in recent years which has motivated small organizations to join together into larger regional organizations in order to get a more solid financial base. On the other hand new semi-commercial and commercial organizations have come into being. These developments are part of the growing importance of home care, leading to more medical applications of ERS. User satisfaction with ERS is high. Portable triggers can enhance the effectiveness of the system. However, many users do not wear the portable trigger when feeling well. Future technical developments will result in multifunctionality of ERS-devices. In the long term the hardware of today will be integrated in a multimedia home terminal replacing the telephone. The portable trigger will remain the only specific hardware at home for ERS. PMID:10126436

  3. Willpower depletion and framing effects

    OpenAIRE

    de Haan, Thomas; van Veldhuizen, Roel

    2013-01-01

    We investigate whether depleting people's cognitive resources (or willpower) affects the degree to which they are susceptible to framing effects. Recent research in social psychology and economics has suggested that willpower is a resource that can be temporarily depleted and that a depleted level of willpower is associated with self-control problems in a variety of contexts. In this study, we extend the willpower depletion paradigm to framing effects and argue that willpower depletion should...

  4. Pattern discovery in critical alarms originating from neonates under intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Rohan; van Pul, Carola; Atallah, Louis; Feijs, Loe; Van Huffel, Sabine; Andriessen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Patient monitoring generates a large number of alarms, the vast majority of which are false. Excessive non-actionable medical alarms lead to alarm fatigue, a well-recognized patient safety issue. While multiple approaches to reduce alarm fatigue have been explored, patterns in alarming and inter-alarm relationships, as they manifest in the clinical workspace, are largely a black-box and hamper research efforts towards reducing alarms. The aim of this study is to detect opportunities to safely reduce alarm pressure, by developing techniques to identify, capture and visualize patterns in alarms. Nearly 500 000 critical medical alarms were acquired from a neonatal intensive care unit over a 20 month period. Heuristic techniques were developed to extract the inter-alarm relationships. These included identifying the presence of alarm clusters, patterns of transition from one alarm category to another, temporal associations amongst alarms and determination of prevalent sequences in which alarms manifest. Desaturation, bradycardia and apnea constituted 86% of all alarms and demonstrated distinctive periodic increases in the number of alarms that were synchronized with nursing care and enteral feeding. By inhibiting further alarms of a category for a short duration of time (30 s/60 s), non-actionable physiological alarms could be reduced by 20%. The patterns of transition from one alarm category to another and the time duration between such transitions revealed the presence of close temporal associations and multiparametric derangement. Examination of the prevalent alarm sequences reveals that while many sequences comprised of multiple alarms, nearly 65% of the sequences were isolated instances of alarms and are potentially irreducible. Patterns in alarming, as they manifest in the clinical workspace were identified and visualized. This information can be exploited to investigate strategies for reducing alarms. PMID:27027383

  5. Development of portable memory type radiation alarm monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation alarm monitor has been developed and manufactured in order to protect radiation workers from over-exposure. A visual and audible alarm system has been attached to initiate evacuation when accident occurs such as an unexpected change of radiation level or an over-exposure. The radiation alarm monitor installed with microprocessor can record the information of radiation field change between 90 min. before the alarm and 30 min. after the alarm and also provide the data to an IBM compatible computer to analyze the accidents and to set a counter plan. It features a wide detection range of radiation field(10 mR/h-100 R/h), radiation field data storage, portability, high precision (±5%) due to self-calibration function, and adaption of a powerful alarm system. According to ANSI N42.17A, the most stringent test standards, performance tests were carried out under various conditions of temperature, humidity, vibration, and electromagnetic wave hindrance at Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science(KRISS). As a result, the Radiation Alarm Monitor passed all tests

  6. DTR, Taut Wire System: An alarm barrier with experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Taut Wire Fence Alarm System concept was developed and introduced more that fifteen years ago in Israel. A sudden expansion of the nations's border lines, the difficulty to monitor intrusions along those elongated lines and the need for timely as well as accurate armed response to an intrusion attempt dictated the need for an alarming barrier. Traditionally, protection of perimeters was accomplished by the installation of a fence or other type obstacles (man made or natural) and surveillance by manned patrols, fixed observation posts, and/or electronic devices. Defense planners recognized therefore the need for an alarming barrier. A concentrated effort by scientists solved the problem by developing the first Taut Wire Fence Alarm System in a configuration of an alarm barrier. The system was specified to have an extremely low false alarm rate (FAR/NAR), high probability of detection, the capability to follow various terrains, operability in a wide range of environmental conditions, a capability to delay an intruder, ease of installation by unskilled labor, and low maintenance requirements. The authors try here to explain the various constraints and considerations given during the design stages of the Taut Wire Alarm System so as to bring the present magnitude of users to a better understanding of the system's operation

  7. Computational Human Performance Modeling For Alarm System Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques Hugo

    2012-07-01

    The introduction of new technologies like adaptive automation systems and advanced alarms processing and presentation techniques in nuclear power plants is already having an impact on the safety and effectiveness of plant operations and also the role of the control room operator. This impact is expected to escalate dramatically as more and more nuclear power utilities embark on upgrade projects in order to extend the lifetime of their plants. One of the most visible impacts in control rooms will be the need to replace aging alarm systems. Because most of these alarm systems use obsolete technologies, the methods, techniques and tools that were used to design the previous generation of alarm system designs are no longer effective and need to be updated. The same applies to the need to analyze and redefine operators’ alarm handling tasks. In the past, methods for analyzing human tasks and workload have relied on crude, paper-based methods that often lacked traceability. New approaches are needed to allow analysts to model and represent the new concepts of alarm operation and human-system interaction. State-of-the-art task simulation tools are now available that offer a cost-effective and efficient method for examining the effect of operator performance in different conditions and operational scenarios. A discrete event simulation system was used by human factors researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop a generic alarm handling model to examine the effect of operator performance with simulated modern alarm system. It allowed analysts to evaluate alarm generation patterns as well as critical task times and human workload predicted by the system.

  8. Design of SMART alarm system using main memory database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To achieve design goal of SMART alarm system, first of all we have to decide on how to handle and manage alarm information and how to use database. So this paper analyses concepts and deficiencies of main memory database applied in real time system. And this paper sets up structure and processing principles of main memory database using nonvolatile memory such as flash memory and develops recovery strategy and process board structures using these. Therefore this paper shows design of SMART alarm system is suited functions and requirements

  9. Intrinsic Depletion or Not

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen, Beate; Bruun, Sara; Hansen, Søren;

    in between he polymer cushion and bulk water the layer was attributed to water of reduced density and was called "depletion layer".  Impurities or preparative artefacts were excluded as its origin. Later on, the formation of nanobubbles from this vapour-like water phase was initiated by tipping the......  The presence of a depletion layer of water along extended hydrophobic interfaces, and a possibly related formation of nanobubbles, is an ongoing discussion. The phenomenon was initially reported when we, years ago, chose thick films (~300-400Å) of polystyrene as cushions between a crystalline...... carrier and biomimetic membranes deposited thereupon and exposed to bulk water. While monitoring the sequential build-up of the sandwiched composite structure by continuous neutron reflectivity experiments the formation of an unexpected additional layer was detected (1). Located at the polystyrene surface...

  10. Depletion of intense fields

    CERN Document Server

    Seipt, D; Marklund, M; Bulanov, S S

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of charged particles and photons with intense electromagnetic fields gives rise to multi-photon Compton and Breit-Wheeler processes. These are usually described in the framework of the external field approximation, where the electromagnetic field is assumed to have infinite energy. However, the multi-photon nature of these processes implies the absorption of a significant number of photons, which scales as the external field amplitude cubed. As a result, the interaction of a highly charged electron bunch with an intense laser pulse can lead to significant depletion of the laser pulse energy, thus rendering the external field approximation invalid. We provide relevant estimates for this depletion and find it to become important in the interaction between fields of amplitude $a_0 \\sim 10^3$ and electron bunches with charges of the order of nC.

  11. Ozone depletion by hydrofluorocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Fleming, Eric L.; Newman, Paul A.; Li, Feng; Mlawer, Eli; Cady-Pereira, Karen; Bailey, Roshelle

    2015-10-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are projected to increase considerably in the coming decades. Chemistry climate model simulations forced by current projections show that HFCs will impact the global atmosphere increasingly through 2050. As strong radiative forcers, HFCs increase tropospheric and stratospheric temperatures, thereby enhancing ozone-destroying catalytic cycles and modifying the atmospheric circulation. These changes lead to a weak depletion of stratospheric ozone. Simulations with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center 2-D model show that HFC-125 is the most important contributor to HFC-related atmospheric change in 2050; its effects are comparable to the combined impacts of HFC-23, HFC-32, HFC-134a, and HFC-143a. Incorporating the interactions between chemistry, radiation, and dynamics, ozone depletion potentials (ODPs) for HFCs range from 0.39 × 10-3 to 30.0 × 10-3, approximately 100 times larger than previous ODP estimates which were based solely on chemical effects.

  12. Capital expenditure and depletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the future, the increase in oil demand will be covered for the most part by non conventional oils, but conventional sources will continue to represent a preponderant share of the world oil supply. Their depletion represents a complex challenge involving technological, economic and political factors. At the same time, there is reason for concern about the decrease in exploration budgets at the major oil companies. (author)

  13. rf duress alarms: market survey and preliminary characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report represents the first phase of the duress alarm studies. Presented here are the results of an extensive market survey and some preliminary observations on the effectiveness of many system components

  14. A weighted dissimilarity index to isolate faults during alarm floods

    CERN Document Server

    Charbonnier, S; Gayet, P

    2015-01-01

    A fault-isolation method based on pattern matching using the alarm lists raised by the SCADA system during an alarm flood is proposed. A training set composed of faults is used to create fault templates. Alarm vectors generated by unknown faults are classified by comparing them with the fault templates using an original weighted dissimilarity index that increases the influence of the few alarms relevant to diagnose the fault. Different decision strategies are proposed to support the operator in his decision making. The performances are evaluated on two sets of data: an artificial set and a set obtained from a highly realistic simulator of the CERN Large Hadron Collider process connected to the real CERN SCADA system.

  15. Changes in 900 MW PWR alarm processing policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a brief description of the current 900 MW PWR alarm processing system, this document presents the feasibility study carried out within the scope of the Instrumentation and Control Refurbishment project (R2C). (author). 4 figs, tabs

  16. Measurement of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant criticality accident alarm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant's nuclear criticality accident radiation alarm signal response time, sound wave frequency, and sound volume levels were made to demonstrate compliance with ANSI/ANS-8.3-1986. A steady-state alarm signal is produced within one-half second of obtaining a two-out-of-three detector trip. The fundamental alarm sound wave frequency is 440 hertz. The sound volume levels are greater than 10 decibels above background and ranged from 100 to 125 A-weighted decibels. The requirements of the standard were met; however the recommended maximum sound volume level of 115 dBA was exceeded. Emergency procedures require immediate evacuation upon initiation of a facility's radiation alarm. Comparison with standards for allowable time of exposure at different noise levels indicate that the elevated noise level at this location does not represent an occupational injury hazard. 8 refs., 5 figs

  17. rf duress alarms: market survey and preliminary characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draper, B.L.

    1979-05-01

    This report represents the first phase of the duress alarm studies. Presented here are the results of an extensive market survey and some preliminary observations on the effectiveness of many system components.

  18. ARC Code TI: Optimal Alarm System Design and Implementation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An optimal alarm system can robustly predict a level-crossing event that is specified over a fixed prediction horizon. The code contained in this packages provides...

  19. Chimpanzee Alarm Call Production Meets Key Criteria for Intentionality

    OpenAIRE

    Schel, Anne Marijke; Simon W Townsend; Machanda, Zarin; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Slocombe, Katie E.

    2013-01-01

    Determining the intentionality of primate communication is critical to understanding the evolution of human language. Although intentional signalling has been claimed for some great ape gestural signals, comparable evidence is currently lacking for their vocal signals. We presented wild chimpanzees with a python model and found that two of three alarm call types exhibited characteristics previously used to argue for intentionality in gestural communication. These alarm calls were: (i) sociall...

  20. Chimpanzee alarm call production meets key criteria for intentionality

    OpenAIRE

    Schel, Anne M.; Simon W Townsend; Machanda, Zarin; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Slocombe, Katie E.

    2013-01-01

    Determining the intentionality of primate communication is critical to understanding the evolution of human language. Although intentional signalling has been claimed for some great ape gestural signals, comparable evidence is currently lacking for their vocal signals. We presented wild chimpanzees with a python model and found that two of three alarm call types exhibited characteristics previously used to argue for intentionality in gestural communication. These alarm calls were: (i) sociall...

  1. Heterospecific alarm call recognition in a non-vocal reptile

    OpenAIRE

    Vitousek, Maren N; Adelman, James S; Gregory, Nathan C; Clair, James J. H. St

    2007-01-01

    The ability to recognize and respond to the alarm calls of heterospecifics has previously been described only in species with vocal communication. Here we provide evidence that a non-vocal reptile, the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus), can eavesdrop on the alarm call of the Galápagos mockingbird (Nesomimus parvulus) and respond with anti-predator behaviour. Eavesdropping on complex heterospecific communications demonstrates a remarkable degree of auditory discrimination in a ...

  2. A study of reset mode in advanced alarm system simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automation function has been widely applied in main control room of nuclear power plants. That leads to a new issue of human-automation interaction, which considers human operational performance in automated systems. In this research is the automation alarm reset in the advanced alarm system (AAS) of Advanced Nuclear Power Plant in Taiwan. Since alarms are very crucial for the understanding of the status of the plant as well as the reset function of alarm system will be changed from fully manual to fully automatic, it is very important to test and evaluate the performance and the effect of reset modes in AAS. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of the auto-reset alarm system on the plant performance and on operators' preference and task load. To develop a dynamic simulator as an AAS was conducted to compare manual and automatic reset function of alarm system on task performance and subjective ratings of task workload, comprehension, and preference. The simulation includes PCTRAN model and alarm software processing. The final results revealed that, using the auto-reset mode, participants had lower task load index (TLX) on effort in the first test trial and was more satisfied in multiple tasks condition. In contrast, using manual reset mode, participants were more satisfied on alarm handling, monitoring, and decision making. In other words, either reset mode in the study has unique features to assist operator, but is insufficient. The reset function in AAS therefore should be very flexible. Additionally, the experimental results also pointed out that the user interfaces need to be improved. Those experiences will be helpful for human factors verification and validation in the near future. (authors)

  3. ALARM SYSTEM FOR A BOILER SYSTEM CONTROL ON ENERGY ENTERPRISE

    OpenAIRE

    Lueder, Arndt; Ryshentseva, Daria

    2014-01-01

    As the problem of good qualified functioning of a boiler every year is taking place, there is an interest to create an advanced error alarm system, which, as its mission, has the timely notification of the controlled object functioning errors. Thus, in this paper the improved model of the alarm system object control is proposed, the question of an error-free object functioning problem solving is raised. The proposed model includes such approaches to solve this problem as artificial intelligen...

  4. Frog Swarms: Earthquake Precursors or False Alarms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Rachel A; Conlan, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    In short-term earthquake risk forecasting, the avoidance of false alarms is of utmost importance to preclude the possibility of unnecessary panic among populations in seismic hazard areas. Unusual animal behaviour prior to earthquakes has been reported for millennia but has rarely been scientifically documented. Recently large migrations or unusual behaviour of amphibians have been linked to large earthquakes, and media reports of large frog and toad migrations in areas of high seismic risk such as Greece and China have led to fears of a subsequent large earthquake. However, at certain times of year large migrations are part of the normal behavioural repertoire of amphibians. News reports of "frog swarms" from 1850 to the present day were examined for evidence that this behaviour is a precursor to large earthquakes. It was found that only two of 28 reported frog swarms preceded large earthquakes (Sichuan province, China in 2008 and 2010). All of the reported mass migrations of amphibians occurred in late spring, summer and autumn and appeared to relate to small juvenile anurans (frogs and toads). It was concluded that most reported "frog swarms" are actually normal behaviour, probably caused by juvenile animals migrating away from their breeding pond, after a fruitful reproductive season. As amphibian populations undergo large fluctuations in numbers from year to year, this phenomenon will not occur on a yearly basis but will depend on successful reproduction, which is related to numerous climatic and geophysical factors. Hence, most large swarms of amphibians, particularly those involving very small frogs and occurring in late spring or summer, are not unusual and should not be considered earthquake precursors. In addition, it is likely that reports of several mass migration of small toads prior to the Great Sichuan Earthquake in 2008 were not linked to the subsequent M = 7.9 event (some occurred at a great distance from the epicentre), and were probably co

  5. Bromide does not bind to the Mn4Ca complex in its S1 state in Cl(-)-depleted and Br(-)-reconstituted oxygen-evolving photosystem II: evidence from X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Br K-edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haumann, Michael; Barra, Marcos; Loja, Paola; Löscher, Simone; Krivanek, Roland; Grundmeier, Alexander; Andreasson, Lars-Erik; Dau, Holger

    2006-10-31

    Chloride is an important cofactor in photosynthetic water oxidation. It can be replaced by bromide with retention of the oxygen-evolving activity of photosystem II (PSII). Binding of bromide to the Mn(4)Ca complex of PSII in its dark-stable S(1) state was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Br K-edge in Cl(-)-depleted and Br(-)-substituted PSII membrane particles from spinach. The XAS spectra exclude the presence of metal ions in the first and second coordination spheres of Br(-). EXAFS analysis provided tentative evidence of at least one metal ion, which may be manganese or calcium, at a distance of approximately 5 A to Br(-). The native Cl(-) ion may bind at a similar distance. Accordingly, water oxidation may not require binding of a halide directly to the metal ions of the Mn complex in its S(1) state. PMID:17059227

  6. False-alarm characterization in hyperspectral gas-detection applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPietro, Robert S.; Truslow, Eric; Manolakis, Dimitris G.; Golowich, Steven E.; Lockwood, Ronald B.

    2012-09-01

    Chemical cloud detection using long-wave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral-imaging sensors has many civilian and military applications, including chemical warfare threat mitigation, environmental monitoring, and emergency response. Current capabilities are limited by variation in background clutter as opposed to the physics of photon detection, and this makes the statistical characterization of clutter and clutter-induced false alarms essential to the design of practical systems. In this exploratory work, we use hyperspectral data collected both on the ground and in the air to spectrally and spatially characterize false alarms. Focusing on two widely-used detectors, the matched filter (MF) and the adaptive cosine estimator (ACE), we compare empirical false-alarm rates to their theoretical counterparts - detector output under Gaussian, t and t-mixture distributed data - and show that these models often underestimate false-alarm rates. Next, we threshold real detection maps and show that true detections and false alarms often exhibit very different spatial behavior. To exploit this difference and understand how spatial processing affects performance, the spatial behavior of false alarms must be understood. We take a first step in this direction by showing that, although the behavior may `look' quite random, it is not well captured by the complete-spatial-randomness model. Finally, we describe how our findings impact the design of real detection systems.

  7. Perimeter security alarm system based on fiber Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cui; Wang, Lixin

    2010-11-01

    With the development of the society and economy and the improvement of living standards, people need more and more pressing security. Perimeter security alarm system is widely regarded as the first line of defense. A highly sensitive Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) vibration sensor based on the theory of the string vibration, combined with neural network adaptive dynamic programming algorithm for the perimeter security alarm system make the detection intelligently. Intelligent information processing unit identify the true cause of the vibration of the invasion or the natural environment by analyzing the frequency of vibration signals, energy, amplitude and duration. Compared with traditional perimeter security alarm systems, such as infrared perimeter security system and electric fence system, FBG perimeter security alarm system takes outdoor passive structures, free of electromagnetic interference, transmission distance through optical fiber can be as long as 20 km It is able to detect the location of event within short period of time (high-speed response, less than 3 second).This system can locate the fiber cable's breaking sites and alarm automatically if the cable were be cut. And the system can prevent effectively the false alarm from small animals, birds, strong wind, scattering things, snowfalls and vibration of sensor line itself. It can also be integrated into other security systems. This system can be widely used in variety fields such as military bases, nuclear sites, airports, warehouses, prisons, residence community etc. It will be a new force of perimeter security technology.

  8. Ozone-depleting Substances (ODS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This site includes all of the ozone-depleting substances (ODS) recognized by the Montreal Protocol. The data include ozone depletion potentials (ODP), global...

  9. Mineralized water depleted in deuterium and production technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineralized water depleted in deuterium is similar to natural water but has an isotopic content of 30-120 ppm D/(D+H). One can obtain mineralized water depleted in deuterium both in continuous and in discontinuous way by mixing deuterium depleted water with strong mineralized water obtained by vacuum distillation at atmospheric pressure of natural water. The mixture is saturated with oxygen by bubbling dry air into it at ambient temperature. This invention allows obtaining a product depleted in deuterium similar to natural water with biostimulating properties that can be used as developing medium for living organisms or for human use. The invention has the following qualities: allows the production of deuterium depleted water with chemical composition similar to natural water; allows the precise control of deuterium content in the product. (authors)

  10. An alarm processing system for a nuclear power plant using artificial intelligence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on an alarm processing system (APS) developed that uses artificial intelligence techniques to help operators to make decisions. Alarms in nuclear power plants are classified into generalized and special alarms. Generalized alarms are further classified into global and local alarms. For each type of alarm, the specific processing rules are applied to filter and suppress unnecessary and potentially misleading alarms. The processing for the generalized alarms is based on model-based reasoning. The special alarms are processed by the cause-consequence check rules. The priorities of alarms are determined according to both the plant state and the consistencies among the alarms. This APS is built on a workstation using the Prolog language

  11. Walter Russell's concepts as the basis for an alternative view on radioactivity induced oxygen-ozone depletion and food chain pollution; and as the basis for alternative fuels, materials, energy production, and radioactive waste cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics with supporting data will be presented: The transmutation of atmospheric nitrogen into carbon 14 and tritium via radioactivity as a source of omnipresent food and water pollution, and the possible correlation of oxygen transmutation into carbon 14 and tritium by the same mechanisms as well as into sulfur. Walter Russell's four pole field dual polarity control as a basis for transmutation will be discussed with reference to past and contemporary results of experimentation on this basis. Extension of the concepts into free hydrogen energy fuel, nitrogen fertilizers, other materials production,and transmutation of radioactive wastes into non radioactive elements will be discussed

  12. Impaired behavioural response to alarm substance in rainbow trout exposed to copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Copper nanoparticles impaired the behavioural response of trout to alarm substance. • This effect appeared to be greater than in trout exposed to copper sulphate. • Toxicity was mediated by interaction of materials at external surfaces of fish. • Copper nanoparticles did not affect the morphology of the olfactory rosette. • Copper nanoparticles caused a change in glutathione status in brains of fish. - Abstract: To date, studies of the toxicity of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in fish have not fully considered effects on olfactory-mediated behaviours, despite their ecological importance. In this study the effects of copper NPs (Cu NPs) on the anti-predator behavioural responses of juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to trout alarm substance was investigated. Individual fish were exposed for 12 h to a control (no added Cu), 50 μg l−1 of Cu as Cu NPs, or 50 μg l−1 Cu as CuSO4, after which fish behaviours were analyzed in 10 min periods before and after the addition of the alarm substance stimulus. The response of control fish to deionised water (negative control, no alarm substance stimulus) was also analyzed. The alarm substance elicited a behavioural response in the control fish characterized by an immediate freeze response and the slower resumption of swimming activity compared to negative controls exposed to the sham deionised water stimuli. In fish exposed to Cu NPs, the behavioural response to alarm substance was eliminated, with no significant difference in behaviours compared to negative controls. In comparison, exposure to 50 μg l−1 Cu as CuSO4 decreased, but did not eliminate the response of fish to alarm substance, which indicated a significantly greater effect of Cu NPs on olfactory mediated behaviours than of the equivalent concentration of Cu as CuSO4. Measurement of total Cu concentrations in the tissues of fish demonstrated no significant accumulation of Cu from any treatment in gill, liver or brain

  13. Impaired behavioural response to alarm substance in rainbow trout exposed to copper nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovová, Tereza [Ecotoxicology Research and Innovation Centre, School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, Plymouth University, Devon (United Kingdom); Department of Environmental Chemistry, Faculty of Environmental Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Boyle, David, E-mail: david.boyle@ualberta.ca [Ecotoxicology Research and Innovation Centre, School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, Plymouth University, Devon (United Kingdom); Sloman, Katherine A. [School of Science, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley (United Kingdom); Vanegas Pérez, Cecilia [Ecotoxicology Research and Innovation Centre, School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, Plymouth University, Devon (United Kingdom); Laboratory of Animal Ecophysiology and Aquatic Ecotoxicology, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Handy, Richard D. [Ecotoxicology Research and Innovation Centre, School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, Plymouth University, Devon (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Copper nanoparticles impaired the behavioural response of trout to alarm substance. • This effect appeared to be greater than in trout exposed to copper sulphate. • Toxicity was mediated by interaction of materials at external surfaces of fish. • Copper nanoparticles did not affect the morphology of the olfactory rosette. • Copper nanoparticles caused a change in glutathione status in brains of fish. - Abstract: To date, studies of the toxicity of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in fish have not fully considered effects on olfactory-mediated behaviours, despite their ecological importance. In this study the effects of copper NPs (Cu NPs) on the anti-predator behavioural responses of juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to trout alarm substance was investigated. Individual fish were exposed for 12 h to a control (no added Cu), 50 μg l⁻¹ of Cu as Cu NPs, or 50 μg l⁻¹ Cu as CuSO₄, after which fish behaviours were analyzed in 10 min periods before and after the addition of the alarm substance stimulus. The response of control fish to deionised water (negative control, no alarm substance stimulus) was also analyzed. The alarm substance elicited a behavioural response in the control fish characterized by an immediate freeze response and the slower resumption of swimming activity compared to negative controls exposed to the sham deionised water stimuli. In fish exposed to Cu NPs, the behavioural response to alarm substance was eliminated, with no significant difference in behaviours compared to negative controls. In comparison, exposure to 50 μg l⁻¹ Cu as CuSO₄ decreased, but did not eliminate the response of fish to alarm substance, which indicated a significantly greater effect of Cu NPs on olfactory mediated behaviours than of the equivalent concentration of Cu as CuSO₄. Measurement of total Cu concentrations in the tissues of fish demonstrated no significant accumulation of Cu from any treatment in gill, liver or brain

  14. Organic-Carbon Burial and Oxygen Depletion Along the Margin of Western North America During the Past 60,000 Years: Teleconnections With Greenland Ice and the Cariaco Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, W. E.

    2007-12-01

    During Oxygen Isotope Stage 3 (OIS3; 60-24 cal ka),), the Bolling/Allerod warm interval (B/A; 15-13 cal ka), and the Holocene, bottom-water oxygen levels were much lower, and organic carbon (Corg) burial was much higher on all margins of the Californias (Alta and Baja) than during the last glacial interval (LGI; 24-15 cal ka) and the Younger Dryas cold interval (YD; 13-11.6 cal ka). Burial of Corg during the LGI-B/A-Holocene transition in the Cariaco Basin on the margin of northern Venezuela is remarkably similar to that on the California margin. Correlation between Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) cycles in Greenland ice with gray-scale measurements in varved sediments in the Cariaco Basin, and cycles of Corg burial on the Baja California margin are well established. Synchronous climate-driven changes as recorded in the sediments on the margins of the Californias, sediments from the Cariaco Basin, and in the GISP-2 Greenland ice core support the hypothesis that changes in atmospheric dynamics played a major role in abrupt climate change during the last 60 ky.

  15. SuperAlarm: System and Methods to Predict In-Hospital Patient Deterioration and Alleviate Alarm Fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Yong

    2016-01-01

    A diverse array of continuous, multi-parameter and alarm-equipped physiologic monitoring devices have been deployed in modern intensive care units (ICUs) and other critical care settings to detect changes in a patient's status. Alarm signals activated by the monitors are intended to alert caregivers to either abnormalities in a patient's normal state or device malfunctions in order to prevent adverse events, and hence improve quality of care and patient safety. The majority of patients who ev...

  16. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process

  17. Stratospheric ozone depletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amount of stratospheric ozone and the reduction of the ozone layer vary according to seasons and latitudes. At present total and vertical ozone is monitored over all Austria. The mean monthly ozone levels between 1994 and 2000 are presented. Data on stratospheric ozone and UV-B radiation are published daily on the home page http: www.lebesministerium.at. The use of ozone depleting substances such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) is provided. Besides, the national measures taken to reduce their use. Figs. 2, Tables 2. (nevyjel)

  18. Alarm pheromone processing in the ant brain: an evolutionary perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Mizunami

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Social insects exhibit sophisticated communication by means of pheromones, one example of which is the use of alarm pheromones to alert nestmates for colony defense. We review recent advances in the understanding of the processing of alarm pheromone information in the ant brain. We found that information about formic acid and n-undecane, alarm pheromone components, is processed in a set of specific glomeruli in the antennal lobe of the ant Camponotus obscuripes. Alarm pheromone information is then transmitted, via projection neurons, to the lateral horn and the calyces of the mushroom body of the protocerebrum. In the lateral horn, we found a specific area where terminal boutons of alarm pheromone-sensitive projection neurons are more densely distributed than in the rest of the lateral horn. Some neurons in the protocerebrum responded specifically to formic acid or n-undecane and they may participate in the control of behavioral responses to each pheromone component. Other neurons, especially those originating from the mushroom body lobe, responded also to non-pheromonal odors and may play roles in integration of pheromonal and non-pheromonal signals. We found that a class of neurons receive inputs in the lateral horn and the mushroom body lobe and terminate in a variety of premotor areas. These neurons may participate in the control of aggressive behavior, which is sensitized by alarm pheromones and is triggered by non-pheromonal sensory stimuli associated with a potential enemy. We propose that the alarm pheromone processing system has evolved by differentiation of a part of general odor processing system.

  19. Alarm reduction with correlation analysis; Larmsanering genom korrelationsanalys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergquist, Tord; Ahnlund, Jonas; Johansson, Bjoern; Gaardman, Lennart; Raaberg, Martin [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Information Technology

    2004-09-01

    This project's main interest is to improve the overall alarm situation in the control rooms. By doing so, the operators working environment is less overstrained, which simplifies the decision-making. According to a study of the British refinery industry, the operators make wrong decisions in four times out of ten due to badly tuned alarm systems, with heavy expenses as a result. Furthermore, a more efficiently alarm handling is estimated to decrease the production loss with between three and eight percent. This sounds, according to Swedish standards, maybe a bit extreme, but there is no doubt about the benefits of having a well-tuned alarm system. This project can be seen as an extension of 'General Methods for Alarm Reduction' (VARMEFORSK--835), where the process improvements were the result of suggestions tailored for every signal. Here, instead causal dependences in the process are examined. A method for this, specially designed to fit process signals, has been developed. It is called MLPC (Multiple Local Property Correlation) and could be seen as an unprejudiced way of increase the information value in the process. There are a number of ways to make use of the additional process understanding a correlation analysis provides. In the report some are mentioned, foremost aiming to improve the alarm situation for operators. Signals from two heating plants have been analyzed with MLPC. In simulations, with the use of the result from these analyses as a base, a large number of alarms have been successfully suppressed. The results have been studied by personal with process knowledge, and they are very positive to the use of MLPC and they express many benefits by the clarification of process relations. It was established in 'General Methods for Alarm Reduction' that low pass filter are superior to mean value filter and time delay when trying to suppress alarms. As a result, a module for signal processing has been developed. The main purpose is

  20. Reducing SCADA System Nuisance Alarms in the Water Industry in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Nigel; Phillips, Debra H; Nicell, Ciaran

    2015-08-01

    The advancement of telemetry control for the water industry has increased the difficulty of managing large volumes of nuisance alarms (i.e., alarms that do not require a response). The aim of this study was to identify and reduce the number of nuisance alarms that occur for Northern Ireland (NI) Water by carrying out alarm duration analysis to determine the appropriate length of persistence (an advanced alarm management tool) that could be applied. All data were extracted from TelemWeb (NI Water's telemetry monitoring system) and analyzed in Excel. Over a 6-week period, an average of 40 000 alarms occurred per week. The alarm duration analysis, which has never been implemented before by NI Water, found that an average of 57% of NI Water alarms had a duration of <5 minutes. Applying 5-minute persistence, therefore, could prevent an average 26 816 nuisance alarms per week. Most of these alarms were from wastewater assets. PMID:26237691

  1. FAULT DIAGNOSIS WITH MULTI-STATE ALARMS IN A NUCLEAR POWER CONTROL SIMULATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin Ragsdale; Roger Lew; Brian P. Dyre; Ronald L. Boring

    2012-10-01

    This research addresses how alarm systems can increase operator performance within nuclear power plant operations. The experiment examined the effect of two types of alarm systems (two-state and three-state alarms) on alarm compliance and diagnosis for two types of faults differing in complexity. We hypothesized three-state alarms would improve performance in alarm recognition and fault diagnoses over that of two-state alarms. We used sensitivity and criterion based on Signal Detection Theory to measure performance. We further hypothesized that operator trust would be highest when using three-state alarms. The findings from this research showed participants performed better and had more trust in three-state alarms compared to two-state alarms. Furthermore, these findings have significant theoretical implications and practical applications as they apply to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear power plant operations.

  2. Fault Diagnosis with Multi-State Alarms in a Nuclear Power Control Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart A. Ragsdale; Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring

    2014-09-01

    This research addresses how alarm systems can increase operator performance within nuclear power plant operations. The experiment examined the effects of two types of alarm systems (two-state and three-state alarms) on alarm compliance and diagnosis for two types of faults differing in complexity. We hypothesized the use of three-state alarms would improve performance in alarm recognition and fault diagnoses over that of two-state alarms. Sensitivity and criterion based on the Signal Detection Theory were used to measure performance. We further hypothesized that operator trust would be highest when using three-state alarms. The findings from this research showed participants performed better and had more trust in three-state alarms compared to two-state alarms. Furthermore, these findings have significant theoretical implications and practical applications as they apply to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear power plant operations.

  3. Nuclear-power-plant perimeter-intrusion alarm systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timely intercept of an intruder requires the examination of perimeter barriers and sensors in terms of reliable detection, immediate assessment and prompt response provisions. Perimeter security equipment and operations must at the same time meet the requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 73.55 with some attention to the performance and testing figures of Nuclear Regulatory Guide 5.44, Revision 2, May 1980. A baseline system is defined which recommends a general approach to implementing perimeter security elements: barriers, lighting, intrusion detection, alarm assessment. The baseline approach emphasizes cost/effectiveness achieved by detector layering and logic processing of alarm signals to produce reliable alarms and low nuisance alarm rates. A cost benefit of layering along with video assessment is reduction in operating expense. The concept of layering is also shown to minimize testing costs where detectability performance as suggested by Regulatory Guide 5.44 is to be performed. Synthesis of the perimeter intrusion alarm system and limited testing of CCTV and Video Motion Detectors (VMD), were performed at E-Systems, Greenville Division, Greenville, Texas during 1981

  4. Nuclear-power-plant perimeter-intrusion alarm systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsey, D.J.

    1982-04-01

    Timely intercept of an intruder requires the examination of perimeter barriers and sensors in terms of reliable detection, immediate assessment and prompt response provisions. Perimeter security equipment and operations must at the same time meet the requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 73.55 with some attention to the performance and testing figures of Nuclear Regulatory Guide 5.44, Revision 2, May 1980. A baseline system is defined which recommends a general approach to implementing perimeter security elements: barriers, lighting, intrusion detection, alarm assessment. The baseline approach emphasizes cost/effectiveness achieved by detector layering and logic processing of alarm signals to produce reliable alarms and low nuisance alarm rates. A cost benefit of layering along with video assessment is reduction in operating expense. The concept of layering is also shown to minimize testing costs where detectability performance as suggested by Regulatory Guide 5.44 is to be performed. Synthesis of the perimeter intrusion alarm system and limited testing of CCTV and Video Motion Detectors (VMD), were performed at E-Systems, Greenville Division, Greenville, Texas during 1981.

  5. Depleted uranium: Metabolic disruptor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of uranium in the environment can lead to long-term contamination of the food chain and of water intended for human consumption and thus raises many questions about the scientific and societal consequences of this exposure on population health. Although the biological effects of chronic low-level exposure are poorly understood, results of various recent studies show that contamination by depleted uranium (DU) induces subtle but significant biological effects at the molecular level in organs including the brain, liver, kidneys and testicles. For the first time, it has been demonstrated that DU induces effects on several metabolic pathways, including those metabolizing vitamin D, cholesterol, steroid hormones, acetylcholine and xenobiotics. This evidence strongly suggests that DU might well interfere with many metabolic pathways. It might thus contribute, together with other man-made substances in the environment, to increased health risks in some regions. (authors)

  6. Riddle of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depleted Uranium (DU) is the waste product of uranium enrichment from the manufacturing of fuel rods for nuclear reactors in nuclear power plants and nuclear power ships. DU may also results from the reprocessing of spent nuclear reactor fuel. Potentially DU has both chemical and radiological toxicity with two important targets organs being the kidney and the lungs. DU is made into a metal and, due to its availability, low price, high specific weight, density and melting point as well as its pyrophoricity; it has a wide range of civilian and military applications. Due to the use of DU over the recent years, there appeared in some press on health hazards that are alleged to be due to DU. In these paper properties, applications, potential environmental and health effects of DU are briefly reviewed

  7. Implementation of alarm system for vibration monitoring of KOMAC facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For operating 100 MeV linac, Devices have to be operated in certain order. Thus malfunction of a device cause damage to linac and related devices. To protect linac, machine protect system (MPS) has been developed. The MPS protects the components by monitoring hardwired signals. When values of operating parameters go beyond or below limit, alarm will be generated and interlock system which stops related devices in certain sequence will run. Other factor, giving damage to linac is disaster. A strong vibration such as earthquake causes malfunction of devices and damage to linac. Against disaster, the monitoring system based on Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) was implemented. Configuration and Implementation of the monitoring system are presented and some preliminary results are reported. KOMAC implemented alarm system for a strong vibration and fire. Alarm is generated in unusual situation. Coping rapidly with situation, damages for Linac and related devices can be reduced

  8. Development of a criticality monitoring and alarm system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we are presenting the development of a Criticality Monitor and Alarm System (SIMAC). It monitors the burst of radiation produced during such an accident and triggers an alarm for evacuation in case the radiation exceeds a pre-established threshold. It consists of two subsystems, one for gamma rays and the other for neutrons. Each subsystem has three independent detectors modules. Each module is composed of an ion chamber plus its associated electronics, feeding a logic module that in turn would trigger the evacuation alarm. An additional feature is a PC interface for data acquisition. The radiation detectors are ion chambers working in current mode. The electronics associated to each detector can manage a wide signal range using a logarithmic converter. (author)

  9. Field response of tadpoles to conspecific and heterospecific alarm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M.J.; Claeson, S.

    1998-01-01

    Many organisms use chemical cues from a variety of sources to mediate predator avoidance. Response to heterospecific alarm cues has been demonstrated for tadpoles within but not among taxa and alarm response behavior has seldom been examined under field conditions. This study examined the response of three sympatric amphibian larvae and predaceous larval Dytiscus sp. (diving beetle) to damage-release signals in natural ponds by using capture rates from treated funnel traps as an index of larval behavior. Hyla regilla (Pacific tree frog) tadpoles avoided traps treated with either crushed conspecifics or with Rana aurora (red-legged frog) tadpoles but the larger ranids and Arabystoma macrodactylum (long-toed salamander) did not respond to either treatment. H. regilla tadpoles were likely susceptible to any potential predators of ranid tadpoles in these ponds and this result is consistent with the hypothesis that a response to heterospecific alarm occurs in sympatric prey with shared predators.

  10. Statistical Study of False Alarms of Geomagnetic Storms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Kristoffer; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Veronig, A.;

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are known to cause geomagnetic storms on Earth. However, not all CMEs will trigger geomagnetic storms, even if they are heading towards the Earth. In this study, front side halo CMEs with speed larger than 500 km/s have been identified from the SOHO LASCO catalogue....... A subset of these halo CMEs did not cause a geomagnetic storm the following four days and have therefore been considered as false alarms. The properties of these events are investigated and discussed here. Their statistics are compared to the geo-effective CMEs. The ability to identify potential false...... alarms is considered as an important factor when forecasting geomagnetic storms. It would therefore be very helpful if there were a signature in the solar data that could indicate that a CME is a false alarm. The strength and position of associated flares have been considered as possible candidates...

  11. PROLOG language application for alarm system realization in accelerator control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Such PROLOG features as backtracking, matching and recursive data representation are powerful tools for ALARM system realization. Although the main idea is the possibility to describe some technical system in recursive form, backtracking and matching are ideal for processing recursive data structures. This paper represents a technique which would allow PROLOG language application for ALARM system realization using an example of the KEK LINAC magnet system. The technique is based on an object-oriented internal data representation in terms of objects, properties, relations and knowledge conception. In addition, each property value is characterized by a typical 'time life'. (author)

  12. Emotional responses to the experience of cancer 'alarm' symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Whitaker, KL; Cromme, S; Winstanley, K.; Renzi, C.; Wardle, J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To qualitatively explore associations between emotional responses to experience of cancer ‘alarm’ symptoms and help‐seeking in a community sample of adults. Method Interviewees (n = 62) were recruited from a community sample (n = 2042) of adults aged ≥50 years, who had completed a health survey that included a list of cancer alarm symptoms. Participants who had reported an alarm symptom both at baseline and 3‐month follow‐up (n = 271), and who had consented to contact (n = ...

  13. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Wayne Briner

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a c...

  14. Depleted zinc: Properties, application, production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The addition of ZnO, depleted in the Zn-64 isotope, to the water of boiling water nuclear reactors lessens the accumulation of Co-60 on the reactor interior surfaces, reduces radioactive wastes and increases the reactor service-life because of the inhibitory action of zinc on inter-granular stress corrosion cracking. To the same effect depleted zinc in the form of acetate dihydrate is used in pressurized water reactors. Gas centrifuge isotope separation method is applied for production of depleted zinc on the industrial scale. More than 20 years of depleted zinc application history demonstrates its benefits for reduction of NPP personnel radiation exposure and combating construction materials corrosion.

  15. Design of alarm systems in Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research within the area of improving alarm system design and performance has mainly focused on new alarm systems. However, smaller modernisations of legacy systems are more common in the Swedish nuclear industry than design of totally new systems. This imposes problems when the new system should function together with the old system. This project deals with the special concerns raised by modernisation projects. The objective of the project has been to increase the understanding of the relationship between the operator's performance and the design of the alarm system. Of major concern has been to consider the cognitive abilities of the operator, different operator roles and work situations, and varying need of information. The aim of the project has been to complement existing alarm design guidance and to develop user-centred alarm design concepts. Different case studies have been performed in several industry sectors (nuclear, oil refining, pulp and paper, aviation and medical care) to identify best practice. Several empirical studies have been performed within the nuclear area to investigate the operator's need of information, performance and workload in different operating modes. The aspect of teamwork has also been considered. The analyses show that the operator has different roles in different work situations which affect both the type of information needed and how the information is processed. In full power operation, the interaction between the operator and the alarm system is driven by internal factors and the operator tries to maintain high situation awareness by actively searching for information. The operator wants to optimise the process and need detailed information with possibilities to follow-up and get historical data. In disturbance management, the operator is more dependent on external information presented by the alarm system. The new compilation of alarm guidance is based on the operator's varying needs in different working situations and is

  16. Logic Alarm Cause Tracking System(LogACTs) for Wolsong 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAERI I and C. HF Research team has developed an alarm root cause tracking system (ACTs), an alarm and diagnosis-integrated operator support system (ADIOS), and a dynamic alarm system (DAS). An alarm processing and presentation system, LogACTs(Logic Alarm Cause Tracking system) of their researches is developed and installed into the main control room(MCR) of the Wolsong nuclear power plant(NPP) unit 3. The system is integrated with tracking the logics of an alarm, finding the causes of an alarm, displaying the highlighted alarm procedure related to the causes, and suppressing and filtering nuisance alarms due to the physical or logical connections between components or systems in an abnormal state

  17. Development experience and strategy for the combined algorithm on the alarm processing and diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, I presented the development experience on the alarm processing and fault diagnosis which has been achieved from early 1988 to late 1995. The scope covered is the prototype stage, the development stage of on-line operator-aid system, and an intelligent human-machine interface system. In the second part, I proposed a new method (APEXS) of multi-alarm processing to select the causal alarm(s) among occurred alarms by using the time information of each occurred alarm and alarm tree knowledge and the corresponding diagnosis method based on the selected causal alarm(s) by using the prescribed qualitative model. With more knowledge base about the plant and some modification suitable for real environment, APEXS will be able to adapt to a real steam power plant. (author). 18 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  18. Detection of false arrhythmia alarms with emphasis on ventricular tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rui; Couto, Paula

    2016-08-01

    Our approach to detecting false arrhythmia alarms in the intensive care unit breaks down into several tasks. It involves beat detection on different signals: electrocardiogram, photoplethysmogram and arterial blood pressure. The quality of each channel has to be estimated in order to evaluate the reliability of obtained beat detections. The information about the heart rate from the different channels must be integrated in order to find a final conclusion. Some alarm types require particular detectors as is the case of ventricular fibrillation. To identify false ventricular tachycardia alarms we needed to classify heart beats as normal/ventricular. For that purpose we introduce a new feature, QRS polarity type. This feature was important in order to reduce misclassification of ventricular beats: there was an improvement in the ventricular tachycardia alarm true positive rate from 69% to 81%. However, the true negative rate was reduced from 95% to 69% and our global challenge score (real-time event) dropped from 79.02 to 74.28. Our challenge algorithm achieved the third best score in the 2015 PhysioNet/CinC challenge event 1 (real time). PMID:27454934

  19. False alarms in fault-tolerant dominating sets in graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Nikodem

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop the problem of fault-tolerant dominating sets (liar's dominating sets in graphs. Namely, we consider a new kind of fault - a false alarm. Characterization of such fault-tolerant dominating sets in three different cases (dependent on the classification of the types of the faults are presented.

  20. Integrated alarm annunciation and entry control systems -- Survey results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clever, J.J.; Arakaki, L.H.; Monaco, F.M.; Juarros, L.E.; Quintana, G.R.

    1993-10-01

    This report provides the results and analyses of a detailed survey undertaken in Summer 1993 to address integrated intrusion detection alarm annunciation and entry control system issues. This survey was undertaken as a first attempt toward beginning to answer questions about integrated systems and commercial capabilities to meet or partially meet US Department of Energy (DOE) site needs.

  1. An object-oriented alarm-filtering system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses an alarm-filtering system (AFS) being developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc. for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The ultimate goal of this project is to place AFS into ATR's reactor control room to act as an aid during major plant transients. In addition, methods of alarm analysis are investigated based on functional relationships rather than on a historical approach utilizing cause-consequence trees. Artificial intelligence techniques, including object-oriented programming, are also demonstrated as useful in analyzing alarms and alarm sequences. After a brief description of the problem AFS addresses, this paper discusses the design constraints and human factors that influenced the development of the system. The reader is then presented with operational and architectural descriptions of the system as well as what directions the future development of AFS may take. The fact that AFS is being considered as a partial solution to the problems discussed in the next section demonstrates the viability of its underlying technology and approach

  2. 29 CFR 1910.165 - Employee alarm systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Fire Protection Other Fire Protection Systems § 1910.165 Employee... communication system also serves as the employee alarm system, all emergency messages shall have priority...

  3. Cost-Effective School Alarm Systems. Security Topics Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufer, Steve

    This document outlines considerations in the selection of a cost-effective school-alarm system. Steps in the planning process include: conducting a district needs assessment; gathering input from all staff levels; consulting technical expertise; and selecting a security system that can be integrated with other site needs. It further describes the…

  4. Chemical alarm in the termite Termitogeton planus (Rhinotermitidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dolejšová, Klára; Krasulová, Jana; Kutalová, K.; Hanus, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 40, 11/12 (2014), s. 1269-1276. ISSN 0098-0331 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/10/1570 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : termites * soldiers * frontal gland * alarm pheromone * Rhinotermitidae * Termitogeton Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.747, year: 2014

  5. Integrated alarm annunciation and entry control systems -- Survey results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the results and analyses of a detailed survey undertaken in Summer 1993 to address integrated intrusion detection alarm annunciation and entry control system issues. This survey was undertaken as a first attempt toward beginning to answer questions about integrated systems and commercial capabilities to meet or partially meet US Department of Energy (DOE) site needs

  6. 46 CFR 120.550 - General alarm systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General alarm systems. 120.550 Section 120.550 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION...

  7. False Alarm Probability Estimation for Compressive Sensing Radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper false alarm probability (FAP) estimation of a radar using Compressive Sensing (CS) in the frequency domain is investigated. Compressive Sensing is a recently proposed technique which allows reconstruction of sparse signal from sub-Nyquist rate measurements. The estimation of the FAP is

  8. SGLT-2 inhibition and glucagon: Cause for alarm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibbey, Richard G

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies raised the alarm that the inhibition of sodium-coupled glucose transporter type-2 in humans increases endogenous glucose production rates by an unclear mechanism. Surprisingly, a potential explanation may be linked directly to the alpha-cell. Is this a mechanistic spoiler or an added benefit? PMID:26059706

  9. 46 CFR 162.050-35 - Bilge alarm: Approval tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... concentration of iron oxide. Any change in the bilge alarm reading during the 5 minutes is recorded. (3) Repeat steps in paragraphs (c)(1) and (2) of this section using iron oxide concentrations of 50 ppm and 100 ppm... performed using test fluids described in § 162.050-20. (3) The oil content of each sample must be...

  10. Depletable resources and the economy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijman, W.J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the depletion of scarce resources. The main question to be answered is how to avoid future resource crises. After dealing with the complex relation between nature and economics, three important concepts in relation with resource depletion are discussed: steady state, ti

  11. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Briner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Depleted uranium (DU is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a clear and defined set of symptoms. Chronic low-dose, or subacute, exposure to depleted uranium alters the appearance of milestones in developing organisms. Adult animals that were exposed to depleted uranium during development display persistent alterations in behavior, even after cessation of depleted uranium exposure. Adult animals exposed to depleted uranium demonstrate altered behaviors and a variety of alterations to brain chemistry. Despite its reduced level of radioactivity evidence continues to accumulate that depleted uranium, if ingested, may pose a radiologic hazard. The current state of knowledge concerning DU is discussed.

  12. Stratospheric ozone depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, F Sherwood

    2006-05-29

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290-320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime-the 'Antarctic ozone hole'. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  13. Oxygen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  14. Retrofitting alarm prioritization at Bruce A: strategy development and implementation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prioritization strategy for computer-displayed control room alarms has been developed for Bruce A to better assist operations staff in visually identifying key alarms and judging the relative importance of alarms. The strategy consists of assigning each alarm indicative of a problem to be addressed to one of five priority categories. Each alarm is assigned to an alarm category based on an off-line analysis of the consequence and response characteristics applicable to the alarm for three plant operating contexts. The colour of the alarm message is used to convey the priority category of each alarm in computer-based alarm displays. In addition, alarms indicative of non-problematic changes in the state of plant equipment and processes are given a separate colour assignment to visually differentiate them from alarms indicative of problems. This paper outlines the user-based approach employed in the prioritization strategy development, describes the key features of the prioritization strategy adopted, and discusses the initial experience in systematically determining the priority assignments for all 6000 computer-based alarms associated with each generating unit. (author)

  15. Testing fully depleted CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Ricard; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castander, Francisco J.; Jiménez, Jorge; de Vicente, Juan

    2014-08-01

    The focal plane of the PAU camera is composed of eighteen 2K x 4K CCDs. These devices, plus four spares, were provided by the Japanese company Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. with type no. S10892-04(X). These detectors are 200 μm thick fully depleted and back illuminated with an n-type silicon base. They have been built with a specific coating to be sensitive in the range from 300 to 1,100 nm. Their square pixel size is 15 μm. The read-out system consists of a Monsoon controller (NOAO) and the panVIEW software package. The deafualt CCD read-out speed is 133 kpixel/s. This is the value used in the calibration process. Before installing these devices in the camera focal plane, they were characterized using the facilities of the ICE (CSIC- IEEC) and IFAE in the UAB Campus in Bellaterra (Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain). The basic tests performed for all CCDs were to obtain the photon transfer curve (PTC), the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) using X-rays and the EPER method, linearity, read-out noise, dark current, persistence, cosmetics and quantum efficiency. The X-rays images were also used for the analysis of the charge diffusion for different substrate voltages (VSUB). Regarding the cosmetics, and in addition to white and dark pixels, some patterns were also found. The first one, which appears in all devices, is the presence of half circles in the external edges. The origin of this pattern can be related to the assembly process. A second one appears in the dark images, and shows bright arcs connecting corners along the vertical axis of the CCD. This feature appears in all CCDs exactly in the same position so our guess is that the pattern is due to electrical fields. Finally, and just in two devices, there is a spot with wavelength dependence whose origin could be the result of a defectous coating process.

  16. Referral to the accident and emergency department following the use of community alarms

    OpenAIRE

    Youssef, G.; Underhill, T; Tovey, C

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—To assess the degree of appropriate referral to the accident and emergency (A&E) department following the use of a community alarm where a mobile warden works in conjunction with the community alarm control centre.

  17. Integrating monitor alarms with laboratory test results to enhance patient deterioration prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yong; Do, Duc H; Harris, Patricia Rae Eileen; Schindler, Daniel; Boyle, Noel G; Drew, Barbara J; Hu, Xiao

    2015-02-01

    Patient monitors in modern hospitals have become ubiquitous but they generate an excessive number of false alarms causing alarm fatigue. Our previous work showed that combinations of frequently co-occurring monitor alarms, called SuperAlarm patterns, were capable of predicting in-hospital code blue events at a lower alarm frequency. In the present study, we extend the conceptual domain of a SuperAlarm to incorporate laboratory test results along with monitor alarms so as to build an integrated data set to mine SuperAlarm patterns. We propose two approaches to integrate monitor alarms with laboratory test results and use a maximal frequent itemsets mining algorithm to find SuperAlarm patterns. Under an acceptable false positive rate FPRmax, optimal parameters including the minimum support threshold and the length of time window for the algorithm to find the combinations of monitor alarms and laboratory test results are determined based on a 10-fold cross-validation set. SuperAlarm candidates are generated under these optimal parameters. The final SuperAlarm patterns are obtained by further removing the candidates with false positive rate>FPRmax. The performance of SuperAlarm patterns are assessed using an independent test data set. First, we calculate the sensitivity with respect to prediction window and the sensitivity with respect to lead time. Second, we calculate the false SuperAlarm ratio (ratio of the hourly number of SuperAlarm triggers for control patients to that of the monitor alarms, or that of regular monitor alarms plus laboratory test results if the SuperAlarm patterns contain laboratory test results) and the work-up to detection ratio, WDR (ratio of the number of patients triggering any SuperAlarm patterns to that of code blue patients triggering any SuperAlarm patterns). The experiment results demonstrate that when varying FPRmax between 0.02 and 0.15, the SuperAlarm patterns composed of monitor alarms along with the last two laboratory test results

  18. "Turn it off!": diabetes device alarm fatigue considerations for the present and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivers, Joseph P; Mackowiak, Linda; Anhalt, Henry; Zisser, Howard

    2013-05-01

    Safe and widespread use of diabetes technology is constrained by alarm fatigue: when someone receives so many alarms that he or she becomes less likely to respond appropriately. Alarm fatigue and related usability issues deserve consideration at every stage of alarm system design, especially as new technologies expand the potential number and complexity of alarms. The guiding principle should be patient wellbeing, while taking into consideration the regulatory and liability issues that sometimes contribute to building excessive alarms. With examples from diabetes devices, we illustrate two complementary frameworks for alarm design: a "patient safety first" perspective and a focus on human factors. We also describe opportunities and challenges that will come with new technologies such as remote monitoring, adaptive alarms, and ever-closer integration of glucose sensing with insulin delivery. PMID:23759412

  19. Oxygen-Partial-Pressure Sensor for Aircraft Oxygen Mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Mark; Pettit, Donald

    2003-01-01

    A device that generates an alarm when the partial pressure of oxygen decreases to less than a preset level has been developed to help prevent hypoxia in a pilot or other crewmember of a military or other high-performance aircraft. Loss of oxygen partial pressure can be caused by poor fit of the mask or failure of a hose or other component of an oxygen distribution system. The deleterious physical and mental effects of hypoxia cause the loss of a military aircraft and crew every few years. The device is installed in the crewmember s oxygen mask and is powered via communication wiring already present in all such oxygen masks. The device (see figure) includes an electrochemical sensor, the output potential of which is proportional to the partial pressure of oxygen. The output of the sensor is amplified and fed to the input of a comparator circuit. A reference potential that corresponds to the amplified sensor output at the alarm oxygen-partial-pressure level is fed to the second input of the comparator. When the sensed partial pressure of oxygen falls below the minimum acceptable level, the output of the comparator goes from the low state (a few millivolts) to the high state (near the supply potential, which is typically 6.8 V for microphone power). The switching of the comparator output to the high state triggers a tactile alarm in the form of a vibration in the mask, generated by a small 1.3-Vdc pager motor spinning an eccentric mass at a rate between 8,000 and 10,000 rpm. The sensation of the mask vibrating against the crewmember s nose is very effective at alerting the crewmember, who may already be groggy from hypoxia and is immersed in an environment that is saturated with visual cues and sounds. Indeed, the sensation is one of rudeness, but such rudeness could be what is needed to stimulate the crewmember to take corrective action in a life-threatening situation.

  20. Chimpanzee alarm call production meets key criteria for intentionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schel, Anne Marijke; Townsend, Simon W; Machanda, Zarin; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Slocombe, Katie E

    2013-01-01

    Determining the intentionality of primate communication is critical to understanding the evolution of human language. Although intentional signalling has been claimed for some great ape gestural signals, comparable evidence is currently lacking for their vocal signals. We presented wild chimpanzees with a python model and found that two of three alarm call types exhibited characteristics previously used to argue for intentionality in gestural communication. These alarm calls were: (i) socially directed and given to the arrival of friends, (ii) associated with visual monitoring of the audience and gaze alternations, and (iii) goal directed, as calling only stopped when recipients were safe from the predator. Our results demonstrate that certain vocalisations of our closest living relatives qualify as intentional signals, in a directly comparable way to many great ape gestures. We conclude that our results undermine a central argument of gestural theories of language evolution and instead support a multimodal origin of human language. PMID:24146908

  1. Chimpanzee alarm call production meets key criteria for intentionality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marijke Schel

    Full Text Available Determining the intentionality of primate communication is critical to understanding the evolution of human language. Although intentional signalling has been claimed for some great ape gestural signals, comparable evidence is currently lacking for their vocal signals. We presented wild chimpanzees with a python model and found that two of three alarm call types exhibited characteristics previously used to argue for intentionality in gestural communication. These alarm calls were: (i socially directed and given to the arrival of friends, (ii associated with visual monitoring of the audience and gaze alternations, and (iii goal directed, as calling only stopped when recipients were safe from the predator. Our results demonstrate that certain vocalisations of our closest living relatives qualify as intentional signals, in a directly comparable way to many great ape gestures. We conclude that our results undermine a central argument of gestural theories of language evolution and instead support a multimodal origin of human language.

  2. Fault tolerant microcomputer based alarm annunciator for Dhruva reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dhruva alarm annunciator displays the status of 624 alarm points on an array of display windows using the standard ringback sequence. Recognizing the need for a very high availability, the system is implemented as a fault tolerant configuration. The annunciator is partitioned into three identical units; each unit is implemented using two microcomputers wired in a hot standby mode. In the event of one computer malfunctioning, the standby computer takes over control in a bouncefree transfer. The use of microprocessors has helped built-in flexibility in the system. The system also provides built-in capability to resolve the sequence of occurrence of events and conveys this information to another system for display on a CRT. This report describes the system features, fault tolerant organisation used and the hardware and software developed for the annunciation function. (author). 8 figs

  3. Advanced Monitoring Is Associated with Fewer Alarm Events During Planned Moderate Procedure-Related Sedation: A 2-Part Pilot Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenart, John; Malkin, Mathew; Meineke, Minhthy N.; Qoshlli, Silvana; Neumann, Monica; Jacobson, J. Paul; Kruger, Alison; Ching, Jeffrey; Hassanian, Mohammad; Um, Michael

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diagnostic and interventional procedures are often facilitated by moderate procedure-related sedation. Many studies support the overall safety of this sedation; however, adverse cardiovascular and respiratory events are reported in up to 70% of these procedures, more frequently in very young, very old, or sicker patients. Monitoring with pulse oximetry may underreport hypoventilation during sedation, particularly if supplemental oxygen is provided. Capnometry may result in false alarms during sedation when patients mouth breathe or displace sampling devices. Advanced monitor use during sedation may allow event detection before complications develop. This 2-part pilot study used advanced monitors during planned moderate sedation to (1) determine incidences of desaturation, low respiratory rate, and deeper than intended sedation alarm events; and (2) determine whether advanced monitor use is associated with fewer alarm events. METHODS: Adult patients undergoing scheduled gastroenterology or interventional radiology procedures with planned moderate sedation given by dedicated sedation nurses under the direction of procedural physicians (procedural sedation team) were monitored per standard protocols (electrocardiography blood pressure, pulse oximetry, and capnometry) and advanced monitors (acoustic respiratory monitoring and processed electroencephalograpy). Data were collected to computers for analysis. Advanced monitor parameters were not visible to teams in part 1 (standard) but were visible to teams in part 2 (advanced). Alarm events were defined as desaturation—Spo2 ≤92%; respiratory depression, acoustic respiratory rate ≤8 breaths per minute, and deeper than intended sedation, indicated by processed electroencephalograpy. The number of alarm events was compared. RESULTS: Of 100 patients enrolled, 10 were excluded for data collection computer malfunction or consent withdrawal. Data were analyzed from 90 patients (44 standard and 46 advanced

  4. Development of the effectiveness measure for an advanced alarm system using signal detection theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since many alarms which are activated during major process deviations or accidents in nuclear power plants can result in negative effects for operators, various types of advanced alarm systems that can select important alarms for the identification of process deviation have been developed to reduce the operator's workload. However, the irrelevant selection of important alarms could distract the operator from correct identification of process deviation. Therefore, to evaluate the effectiveness of the advanced alarm system, a tradeoff between the alarm reduction rate (how many alarms are reduced?) and informativeness (how many important alarms that are conducive to identifying process deviation are provided?) of an advanced alarm system should be considered. In this paper, a new measure is proposed to evaluate the effectiveness of an advanced alarm system with regard to the identification of process deviation. Here, the effectiveness measure is the combination of informativeness measure and reduction rate, and the informativeness measure means the information processing capability performed by the advanced alarm system including wrong rejection and wrong acceptance, and it can be calculated using the signal detection theory (SDT). The effectiveness of the prototype alarm system was evaluated using the loss of coolant accident (LOCA) scenario, and the validity of the effectiveness measure was investigated from two types of the operator response, such as the identification accuracy and the operator's preference for the identification of LOCA

  5. Preventing Charlie's in a chocolate factory: a human factors perspective of alarm handling in confectionary manufacture

    OpenAIRE

    Stanton, Neville A.

    1991-01-01

    The article analyses the results of a survey of a small population of Control Desk Engineers at a UK manufacturing plant. Specific objectives were to elicit the engineers' definition of the term `alarm', to examine their alarm handling activities, and to get information on problems with the alarm system

  6. 46 CFR 153.438 - Cargo pressure or temperature alarms required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo pressure or temperature alarms required. 153.438... Equipment Cargo Temperature Control Systems § 153.438 Cargo pressure or temperature alarms required. (a... vapor pressure described in § 153.371(b); or (2) An alarm that operates when the cargo's...

  7. Seismic alarm system for Ignalina nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A seismic alarm system will be installed at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) in Lithuania. There are two reactors, both RMBK 1500 MW units. Each reactor is a water cooled, graphite moderated, channel type reactor. INPP has the most advanced version of the RMBK reactor design series. The first and second units of INPP went into service at the end of 1983 and in August 1987 respectively. Their design lifetime is approx. 30 years. The various buildings and plant have been designed for two earthquake levels, that is the design earthquake and the maximum possible earthquake with peak ground accelerations ranging from 1.2% to 10% of the acceleration due to gravity. Certain parts of the buildings and some of the equipment of the first and second units do not comply with Western seismic standards. As seismic strengthening of the existing buildings and equipment is not feasible economically, a reactor protection system based on an earthquake early warning system was recommended. This system essentially consists of six seismic stations encircling INPP at a radial distance of approx. 30 km and a seventh station at INPP. Each station includes three seismic substations each 500 m apart. The ground motion at each station is measured continuously by three accelerometers and one seismometer. Data is transmitted via telemetry to the control centre at INPP. Early warning alarms are generated if a seismic threshold is exceeded. This paper discusses the characteristics of INPP, the seismic alarm system presently under construction and the experience with other early warning and seismic alarm systems. (author)

  8. Chimpanzee alarm call production meets key criteria for intentionality

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Marijke Schel; Simon W Townsend; Zarin Machanda; Klaus Zuberbühler; Slocombe, Katie E.

    2013-01-01

    BBSRC-funded, but difficult to identify the specific grant. Determining the intentionality of primate communication is critical to understanding the evolution of human language. Although intentional signalling has been claimed for some great ape gestural signals, comparable evidence is currently lacking for their vocal signals. We presented wild chimpanzees with a python model and found that two of three alarm call types exhibited characteristics previously used to argue for intentionality...

  9. The double slit experiment and the time reversed fire alarm

    OpenAIRE

    Halabi, Tarek

    2009-01-01

    When both slits of the double slit experiment are open, closing one paradoxically increases the detection rate at some points on the detection screen. Feynman famously warned that temptation to "understand" such a puzzling feature only draws us into blind alleys. Nevertheless, we gain insight into this feature by drawing an analogy between the double slit experiment and a time reversed fire alarm. Much as closing the slit increases probability of a future detection, ruling out fire drill scen...

  10. Design of Textile Moisture Sensor for Enuresis Alarm System

    OpenAIRE

    Kašurina, I; Vališevskis, A; Briedis, U; Viļumsone, A

    2012-01-01

    To improve the comfort properties of nocturnal enuresis alarm system, a modular humidity sensor should be replaced with a textile sensor. During research, two-electrode textile moisture sensor has been developed to study its electrical properties. To define the optimal type of a sensor, several sensor samples have been made using different configurations of sensor electrodes, yarn type and distance between parallel seams. Samples of sensor have been tested in terms of sig...

  11. Depletable resources and the economy.

    OpenAIRE

    Heijman, W. J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the depletion of scarce resources. The main question to be answered is how to avoid future resource crises. After dealing with the complex relation between nature and economics, three important concepts in relation with resource depletion are discussed: steady state, time preference and efficiency.For the steady state, three variants are distinguished; the stationary state, the physical steady state and the state of steady growth. It is concluded that the so-call...

  12. Nurses' Perceptions and Practices Toward Clinical Alarms in a Transplant Cardiac Intensive Care Unit: Exploring Key Issues Leading to Alarm Fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    Sowan, Azizeh Khaled; Tarriela, Albert Fajardo; Gomez, Tiffany Michelle; Reed, Charles Calhoun; Rapp, Kami Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background Intensive care units (ICUs) are complex work environments where false alarms occur more frequently than on non-critical care units. The Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal .06.01.01 targeted improving the safety of clinical alarm systems and required health care facilities to establish alarm systems safety as a hospital priority by July 2014. An important initial step toward this requirement is identifying ICU nurses’ perceptions and common clinical practices toward clini...

  13. Alarm handling for health monitoring: operator strategies used in an electrical control room of a rail network

    OpenAIRE

    Dadashi, Nastaran; Wilson, John R; Golightly, David; Sharples, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Alarm management is a key component of the successful operation of a prognostic or health-monitoring technology. Although alarms can alert the operator to critical information, false alarms and alarm flooding can cause major difficulties for successfully diagnosing and acting upon infrastructure faults. Human factors approaches seek to design more-effective alarm systems through a deep understanding of the contextual factors that influence alarm response, including strategies and heuristics u...

  14. Masters Thesis- Criticality Alarm System Design Guide with Accompanying Alarm System Development for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory in Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenfield, Bryce A. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2009-12-01

    A detailed instructional manual was created to guide criticality safety engineers through the process of designing a criticality alarm system (CAS) for Department of Energy (DOE) hazard class 1 and 2 facilities. Regulatory and technical requirements were both addressed. A list of design tasks and technical subtasks are thoroughly analyzed to provide concise direction for how to complete the analysis. An example of the application of the design methodology, the Criticality Alarm System developed for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory (RPL) of Richland, Washington is also included. The analysis for RPL utilizes the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 for establishing detector coverage in the facility. Significant improvements to the existing CAS were made that increase the reliability, transparency, and coverage of the system.

  15. Vacancy Formation Enthalpy in Polycrystalline Depleted Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, K. R.; Lynn, K. G.; Weber, M. H.; Okuniewski, M. A.

    2013-06-01

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy was performed as a function of temperature and beam energy on polycrystalline depleted uranium (DU) foil. Samples were run with varying heat profiles all starting at room temperature. While collecting Doppler-Broadening data, the temperature of the sample was cycled several times. The first heat cycle shows an increasing S-parameter near temperatures of 400K to 500K much lower than the first phase transition of 941K indicating increasing vacancies possibly due to oxygen diffusion from the bulk to the surface. Vacancy formation enthalpies were calculated fitting a model to the data to be 1.6± 0.16 eV. Results are compared to previous work [3,4].

  16. Synthesis gas production using oxygen storage materials as oxygen carrier over circulating fluidized bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Xiaoping; YU Changchun; LI Ranjia; WU Qiong; HAO Zhengping

    2008-01-01

    A novel process for synthesis gas production over Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) using oxygen storage materials as oxygen carrier was reported. First, oxygen in the air was chemically fixed and converted to lattice oxygen of oxygen storage materials over regenerator, and then methane was selectively oxidized to synthesis gas with lattice oxygen of oxygen storage materials over riser reactor. The results from simulation reaction of CFB by sequential redox reaction on a fixed bed reactor using lanthanum-based perovskite LaFeO3 and La0.8Sr0.2Fe0.9Co0.1O3 oxides prepared by sol-gel, suggested that the depleted oxygen species could be regenerated, and methane could be oxidized to synthesis gas by lattice oxygen with high selectivity. The partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas over CFB using lattice oxygen of the oxygen storage materials instead of gaseous oxygen should be possibly applicable.

  17. Equatorial airglow depletions induced by thermospheric winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meriwether J.W. Jr.; Biondi, M.A.; Anderson, D.N.

    1985-08-01

    Interferometric observations of the 630.0 nm nightglow brightness at the equatorial station of Arequipa. Peru (16.2/sup 0/S, 71.4/sup 0/W geographic, 3.2/sup 0/S dip latitude) have revealed widespread areas of airglow depletion, with reductions in intensity as large as factors of 3 or 4. These depletions correlated closely with large increases of the equatorward (northward) wind and the 630.0 nm kinetic temperature. On occasion, the usually small meridonal wind reached a velocity of 100 m/s near 22/sup h/ LT lasting for 1 or 2 hours. The temperature increases of 10 K or more existed only in the poleward (southward) direction. Comparisons with modeling calculations suggest that this effect results from an upward movement of the ionosphere along the inclined magnetic field lines, driven by the equatorward neutral wind. The airglow column integrated emission rate is consequently decreased by the slower rate of formation and subsequent dissociative recombination of molecular oxygen ions within the higher F-layer. We conclude that the transient period of equatorward wind is a result of the passage of the midnight pressure bulge.

  18. Equatorial airglow depletions induced by thermospheric winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meriwether, J.W.; Biondi, M.A.; Anderson, D.N.

    1985-08-01

    Interferometric observations on the 630.0 nm nightglow brightness at the equatorial station at Arequipa, Peru (16.2 S, 71.4 W geographic, 3.2 S dip latitude) have revealed widespread areas of airglow depletion, with reductions in intensity as large as factors of 3 or 4. These depletions correlated closely with large increases of the equatorward (northward) wind and the 630.0 nm kinetic temperature. On occasion, the usually small meridional wind reached a velocity of 100 m/s near 22h LT lasting for 1 to 2 hours. The temperature increases of 100K or more existed only in the poleware (southward) direction. Comparisons with modeling calculations suggest that this effect results from an upward movement of the ionosphere along the inclined magnetic field lines, driven by the equatorward neutral wind. The airglow column integrated emission rate is consequently decreased by the slower rate of formation and subsequent dissociative recombination of molecular oxygen ions within the higher F-layer. We conclude that the transient period of equatorward wind is a result of the passage of the midnight pressure bulge. (Author)

  19. Reducing SCADA System Nuisance Alarms in the Water Industry in Northern Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    O'Donoghue, Nigel; Phillips, Debra H.; Nicell, Ciaran

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of telemetry control for the water industry has increased the difficulty of 14 managing large volumes of nuisance alarms (i.e. alarms that do not require a response). The aim 15 of this study was to identify and reduce the number of nuisance alarms that occur for Northern 16 Ireland (NI) Water by carrying-out alarm duration analysis to determine the appropriate length of 17 persistence (an advanced alarm management tool) that could be applied. All data was extracted 18 from Te...

  20. Supplemental Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Lookup > COPD > Diagnosing and Treating COPD Supplemental Oxygen Sometimes with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung ... in people with severe lung disease Three Ways Oxygen Therapy Is Supplied Compressed oxygen gas and liquid ...

  1. A High-confidence Cyber-Physical Alarm System: Design and Implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Longhua; Xia, Feng; Xu, Ming; Yao, Jun; Shao, Meng

    2010-01-01

    Most traditional alarm systems cannot address security threats in a satisfactory manner. To alleviate this problem, we developed a high-confidence cyber-physical alarm system (CPAS), a new kind of alarm systems. This system establishes the connection of the Internet (i.e. TCP/IP) through GPRS/CDMA/3G. It achieves mutual communication control among terminal equipments, human machine interfaces and users by using the existing mobile communication network. The CPAS will enable the transformation in alarm mode from traditional one-way alarm to two-way alarm. The system has been successfully applied in practice. The results show that the CPAS could avoid false alarms and satisfy residents' security needs.

  2. Human factors engineering guidance for the review of advanced alarm systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S.; Higgins, J.C.; Stubler, W.F. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-09-01

    This report provides guidance to support the review of the human factors aspects of advanced alarm system designs in nuclear power plants. The report is organized into three major sections. The first section describes the methodology and criteria that were used to develop the design review guidelines. Also included is a description of the scope, organization, and format of the guidelines. The second section provides a systematic review procedure in which important characteristics of the alarm system are identified, described, and evaluated. The third section provides the detailed review guidelines. The review guidelines are organized according to important characteristics of the alarm system including: alarm definition; alarm processing and reduction; alarm prioritization and availability; display; control; automated; dynamic, and modifiable characteristics; reliability, test, maintenance, and failure indication; alarm response procedures; and control-display integration and layout.

  3. Human factors engineering guidance for the review of advanced alarm systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides guidance to support the review of the human factors aspects of advanced alarm system designs in nuclear power plants. The report is organized into three major sections. The first section describes the methodology and criteria that were used to develop the design review guidelines. Also included is a description of the scope, organization, and format of the guidelines. The second section provides a systematic review procedure in which important characteristics of the alarm system are identified, described, and evaluated. The third section provides the detailed review guidelines. The review guidelines are organized according to important characteristics of the alarm system including: alarm definition; alarm processing and reduction; alarm prioritization and availability; display; control; automated; dynamic, and modifiable characteristics; reliability, test, maintenance, and failure indication; alarm response procedures; and control-display integration and layout

  4. An experimental investigation of the effects of alarm processing and display on operator performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Hara, J.; Brown, W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Advanced Technology; Hallbert, B.; Skraaning, G. [Halden Reactor Project (Norway); Wachtel, J.; Persensky, J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    1998-03-01

    This paper describes a research program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to address the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of nuclear power plant alarm systems. The overall objective of the program is to develop HFE review guidance for advanced alarm systems. As part of this program, guidance has been developed based on a broad base of technical and research literature. In the course of guidance development, aspects of alarm system design for which the technical basis was insufficient to support complete guidance development were identified. The primary purpose of the research reported in this paper was to evaluate the effects of three of these alarm system design characteristics on operator performance in order to contribute to the understanding of potential safety issues and to provide data to support the development of design review guidance in these areas. Three alarm system design characteristics studied were (1) alarm processing (degree of alarm reduction), (2) alarm availability (dynamic prioritization and suppression), and (3) alarm display (a dedicated tile format, a mixed tile and message list format, and a format in which alarm information is integrated into the process displays). A secondary purpose was to provide confirmatory evidence of selected alarm system guidance developed in an earlier phase of the project. The alarm characteristics were combined into eight separate experimental conditions. Six, two-person crews of professional nuclear power plant operators participated in the study. Following training, each crew completed 16 test trials which consisted of two trials in each of the eight experimental conditions (one with a low-complexity scenario and one with a high-complexity scenario). Measures of process performance, operator task performance, situation awareness, and workload were obtained. In addition, operator opinions and evaluations of the alarm processing and display conditions were collected. No deficient

  5. Semi-supervised detection of intracranial pressure alarms using waveform dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patient monitoring systems in intensive care units (ICU) are usually set to trigger alarms when abnormal values are detected. Alarms are generated by threshold-crossing rules that lead to high false alarm rates. This is a recognized issue that causes alarm fatigue, waste of human resources, and increased patient risks. Recently developed smart alarm models require alarms to be validated by experts during the training phase. The manual annotation process involved is time-consuming and virtually impossible to achieve for the thousands of alarms recorded in the ICU every week. To tackle this problem, we investigate in this study if the use of semi-supervised learning methods, that can naturally integrate unlabeled data samples in the model, can be used to improve the accuracy of the alarm detection. As a proof of concept, the detection system is evaluated on intracranial pressure (ICP) signal alarms. Specific morphological and trending features are extracted from the ICP signal waveform to capture the dynamic of the signal prior to alarms. This study is based on a comprehensive dataset of 4791 manually labeled alarms recorded from 108 neurosurgical patients. A comparative analysis is provided between kernel spectral regression (SR-KDA) and support vector machine (SVM) both modified for the semi-supervised setting. Results obtained during the experimental evaluations indicate that the two models can significantly reduce false alarms using unlabeled samples; especially in the presence of a restrained number of labeled examples. At a true alarm recognition rate of 99%, the false alarm reduction rates improved from 9% (supervised) to 27% (semi-supervised) for SR-KDA, and from 3% (supervised) to 16% (semi-supervised) for SVM. (paper)

  6. Initial PVO Evidence of Electron Depletion Signatures Downstream of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Hartle, R. E.; Perez-de-Tejada, H.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    This first analysis of Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) plasma analyzer electron measurements obtained in early 1992 during the PVO entry phase of the mission indicates the presence downstream from the terminator of a depletion or "bite out" of energetic ionosheath electrons similar to that observed on Mariner 10. There is more than one possible explanation for this energetic electron depletion. If it is due to atmospheric scattering, the electrons traveling along draped magnetic flux tubes that thread through the Venus neutral atmosphere would lose energy from impact ionization with oxygen. The cross-section for such electron impact ionization of oxygen has a peak near 100 eV, and it remains high above this energy, so atmospheric loss could provide a natural process for electrons at these energies to be selectively removed. In this case, our results are consistent with the Kar et al. (1994) study of PVO atmospheric entry ion mass spectrometer data which indicates that electron impact plays a significant role in maintaining the nightside ionosphere. Although it is appealing to interpret the energetic electron depletion in terms of direct atmospheric scattering, alternatively it could result from strong draping which connects the depletion region magnetically to the weak downstream bow shock and thereby reduces the electron source strength.

  7. Nonlinear lower hybrid wave depletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two numerical ray tracing codes with focusing are used to compute lower hybrid daughter wave amplification by quasi-mode parametric decay. The first code, LHPUMP provides a numerical pump model on a grid. This model is used by a second code, LHFQM which computes daughter wave amplification inside the pump extent and follows the rays until their energy is absorbed by the plasma. An analytic model is then used to estimate pump depletion based on the numerical results. Results for PLT indicate strong pump depletion at the plasma edge at high density operation for the 800 Mhz wave frequency, but weak depletion for the 2.45 Ghz experiment. This is proposed to be the mechanism responsible for the high density limit for current drive as well as for the difficulty to heat ions

  8. Krohne Flow Indicator and High Flow Alarm - Local Indicator and High Flow Alarm of Helium Flow from the SCHe Purge Lines C and D to the Process Vent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow Indicators/alarms FI/FSH-5*52 and -5*72 are located in the process vent lines connected to the 2 psig SCHe purge lines C and D. They monitor the flow from the 2 psig SCHe purge going to the process vent. The switch/alarm is non-safety class GS

  9. Krohne Flow Indicator and High Flow Alarm Local Indicator and High Flow Alarm of Helium Flow from the SCHe Purge Lines C and D to the Process Vent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-09-03

    Flow Indicators/alarms FI/FSH-5*52 and -5*72 are located in the process vent lines connected to the 2 psig SCHe purge lines C and D. They monitor the flow from the 2 psig SCHe purge going to the process vent. The switch/alarm is non-safety class GS.

  10. Mitochondrial Toxicity of Depleted Uranium: Protection by Beta-Glucan

    OpenAIRE

    Shaki, Fatemeh; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2013-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the toxicity of uranyl acetate (UA), a soluble salt of depleted uranium (DU). We examined the ability of the two antioxidants, beta-glucan and butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT), to prevent UA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction using rat-isolated kidney mitochondria. Beta-glucan (150 nM) and BHT (20 nM) attenuated UA-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lipid peroxidation and glutathione oxidat...

  11. TPLC-32 based alarm annunciation system for Dhruva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Control and Instrumentation (C and I) Systems of Dhruva Research Reactor have been designed in late seventies and are facing not only obsolescence but have limited diagnostic features. Since the expected life of C and I systems is typically twenty years, it was considered appropriate to upgrade some of the major systems including Alarm Annunciation System (AAS). The AAS of Dhruva is a Safety Class IB system that is used for processing alarm inputs and alerting the Main Control Room operator by driving LED based windows and audio annunciation in the Main Control Room. The AAS is also used for sequencing and logging of alarms on Operator Console. AAS is designed using qualified configurable platform Trombay Programmable Logic Controller-32 (TPLC-32) indigenously developed in BARC. The platform based design provides complete configurability, such that it can be used to build different systems for diverse applications. The AAS for Dhruva is first TPLC-32 based system to be deployed in any Indian Nuclear Reactor. The entire cycle involved conceptualization of system, making system requirement specifications, detailing the concept, design, fabrication, creation of test facilities, testing, validation of system performance, preparation of various documents for the regulatory safety clearances, installation and commissioning of the systems. This upgrade of AAS has helped enhancing safety, mitigates obsolescence and provided improved O and M features. Executing this upgrade in operating reactor posed additional constraints such as high level of safety, limited down time etc and this could be addressed through long term planning and implementation strategies based on innovative ideas and previous experience in installation and commissioning. Being an in-house product, long-term support for maintenance mitigating the obsolescence and technology up gradation is ensured. This paper provides technical information on AAS system design, its important features, the testing

  12. Alarm coding of a model-based display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses and illustrates alarm coding of a model based display. The model based display synthesizes the heat engine cycle within a light water reactor. A digital computer uses measured process variables to form an icon of the heat engine cycle. The Rankine Cycle, a heat engine cycle, serves to structure the data in terms of the temperature and entropy properties of water. The iconic display serves as a visual knowledge base of the plant process for the operator, thereby reducing the operator's mental workload in evaluating the process

  13. Detecting outliers in multivariate data while controlling false alarm rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Achim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Outlier identification often implies inspecting each z-transformed variable and adding a Mahalanobis D^2. Multiple outliers may mask each other by increasing variance estimates. Caroni and Prescott (1992 proposed a multivariate extension of Rosner’s (1983 technique to circumvent masking, taking sample size into account to keep the false alarm risk below, say, alpha = .05. Simulations studies here compare the single multivariate approach to "multiple-univariate plus multivariate" tests, each at a Bonferroni corrected alpha level, in terms of power at detecting outliers. Results suggest the former is better only up to about 12 variables. Macros in an Excel spreadsheet implement these techniques.

  14. DOPAMINE DEPLETION SLOWS RETINAL TRANSMISSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    In male hooded rats, depletion of norepinephrine and dopamine by a-methyl-paratyrosine (AMT) significantly increased the latencies of early peaks in flash-evoked potentials recorded from the visual cortex, lateral geniculate nucleus, and optic tract. These effects were not produc...

  15. Changes are detected - cameras and video systems are monitoring the plant site, only rarely giving false alarm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of automatic data acquisition and processing for monitoring goals is to relieve the security personnel from monotonous observation tasks. The novel video systems can be programmed to detect moving target alarm signals, or accept alarm-suppressing image changes. This allows an intelligent alarm evaluation for physical protection in industry, differentiating between real and false alarm signals. (orig.)

  16. Concatenation of 'alert' and 'identity' segments in dingoes' alarm calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déaux, Eloïse C; Allen, Andrew P; Clarke, Jennifer A; Charrier, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Multicomponent signals can be formed by the uninterrupted concatenation of multiple call types. One such signal is found in dingoes, Canis familiaris dingo. This stereotyped, multicomponent 'bark-howl' vocalisation is formed by the concatenation of a noisy bark segment and a tonal howl segment. Both segments are structurally similar to bark and howl vocalisations produced independently in other contexts (e.g. intra- and inter-pack communication). Bark-howls are mainly uttered in response to human presence and were hypothesized to serve as alarm calls. We investigated the function of bark-howls and the respective roles of the bark and howl segments. We found that dingoes could discriminate between familiar and unfamiliar howl segments, after having only heard familiar howl vocalisations (i.e. different calls). We propose that howl segments could function as 'identity signals' and allow receivers to modulate their responses according to the caller's characteristics. The bark segment increased receivers' attention levels, providing support for earlier observational claims that barks have an 'alerting' function. Lastly, dingoes were more likely to display vigilance behaviours upon hearing bark-howl vocalisations, lending support to the alarm function hypothesis. Canid vocalisations, such as the dingo bark-howl, may provide a model system to investigate the selective pressures shaping complex communication systems. PMID:27460289

  17. A NEW INVENTION OF ALARM REMINDER LOCKING (ARL SECURITY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S.M. Effendi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Alarm Reminder Locking (ARL Security System mainly focuses on a door security system, which can install in the door area to increase the security level for home, office room, hostel or other places. This system used Arduino Controller and Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM technology, which is the cheapest source to embed the security system to transmit the Short Message Service (SMS alert data. This device integrates three functions that are alarming, reminder and locked for a purpose of safety and connecting via mobile phone to remind the users through SMS. This device has a 3 modes of operation which is the system will be functional when the door is not improperly closed for the first reminder with the buzzer alert. The second mode is automated locked will be activated when users closed the door, but did not lock manually. Intrusion mode will activate while auto locked modes are interrupted without proper access. All this integrated system will provide high security access against intrusion occurrence. This security device will bring a new benefit to the user to consider about the userfriendly application, low power consumption and reasonable cost to install.

  18. Pocket dosimeter with alarm 'REM-Master-S'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pocket dosimeters with alarm presently used in nuclear power stations, laboratories, hospitals and so on are mainly of GM counter type, and have such problems as short service life and large characteristic fluctuation. Fuji Electric developed a new type of the dosimeters with alarm ''REM MASTER-S'', which adopted semiconductor detectors and has such features as the measuring range is wider than conventional type, the service life is long, and the size is small and convenient to carry. It is provided with data transmitting and reading functions by opto-electronic communication method so that the exposure dose of individuals can be efficiently controlled. For the development of this new type of dosimeters, Fuji Electric used its technology and experience accumulated in the manufacture of radiation monitors for years. The specifications are as follows. Type: NRS, sensor: silicon semiconductor detector, type S 104S, kind of radiation: X-ray and gamma-ray from 100 keV to 3 MeV, energy dependence: within +-20% from 100 keV to Co-60 (1.3 MeV), integrated calibration accuracy: within +-10% at 100 mR/h with Cs-137 source, linearity of dosage ratio: within +-15% from 10 mR/h to 10 R/h with Cs-137 source, display: 4-digit digital indicator from 0 to 9999 mR, and so on. The application range is shown. (Kako, I.)

  19. Using oxygen at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxygen - home use; COPD - home oxygen; Chronic obstructive airways disease - home oxygen; Chronic obstructive lung disease - home oxygen; Chronic bronchitis - home oxygen; Emphysema - home oxygen; Chronic respiratory ...

  20. “Turn It Off!”: Diabetes Device Alarm Fatigue Considerations for the Present and the Future

    OpenAIRE

    Shivers, Joseph P.; Mackowiak, Linda; Anhalt, Henry; Zisser, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Safe and widespread use of diabetes technology is constrained by alarm fatigue: when someone receives so many alarms that he or she becomes less likely to respond appropriately. Alarm fatigue and related usability issues deserve consideration at every stage of alarm system design, especially as new technologies expand the potential number and complexity of alarms. The guiding principle should be patient wellbeing, while taking into consideration the regulatory and liability issues that someti...

  1. Nitric Acid Revamp and Upgrading of the Alarm & Protection Safety System at Petrokemija, Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Hoško, I.; Zečević, N.; Pavlaković, S.

    2012-01-01

    Every industrial production, particularly chemical processing, demands special attention in conducting the technological process with regard to the security requirements. For this reason, production processes should be continuously monitored by means of control and alarm safety instrumented systems. In the production of nitric acid at Petrokemija d. d., the original alarm safety system was designed as a combination of an electrical relay safety system and transistorized alarm module system. I...

  2. Intelligent alarms detection for the analysis of system fault impact on business

    OpenAIRE

    Pace, C.; Russo, I; Fernández, V.; Britos, Paola Verónica; Rossi, Bibiana D.; García Martínez, Ramón

    1998-01-01

    The tools for fault impact analysis are important for the deployment of critical mission systems. These tools can be also used as a development phase aid. We introduce several concepts related to "business alarms". Business alarms are an approximation to the company's business conceptual scheme driven by the business rules from systems conceptual schemes. In order to specify them we propose the utilization of Knowledge Engineering typical techniques. The object of alarm detection for impa...

  3. Fast-Response Oxygen-Monitoring and Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Puster, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Oxygen sensor is Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 ceramic disk maintained at 843 degrees C. Overall system response time reduced to about 0.2 second, equal to or less than 1 percent of tunnel run time. When test gas oxygen concentration differs from normal air concentration by 25 percent or more, alarm sounds, and emergency tunnel shutdown signal operates. New ZrO2 sensors intended for hypersonic-vehicle testing.

  4. A Smart Cyber-physical Alarm System and its Application for Assisted Living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe-Ming Lu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Security issues are increasingly obvious. An automated real-time online alarm system to ensure the safety of property and personality while considering numerous smart Terminal Equipments (TE becomes a major challenge. At the same time, this is representative of novel and emerging alarm system for assisted living in the daily life. Two problems of current alarm system are identified. A smart Cyber-Physical Alarm System (CPAS based approach is proposed to address these problems. A prototype system installed in a house to assist living has been running stably and shows quite promising performance.

  5. Accident alarm equipment for steam generator, especially liquid sodium heated steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alarm equipment consists of a system of sensors mounted onto the steam generator and its accessories. Each of the sensors is used for a different accident characteristic, such as the flow of sodium, the acoustic spectrum, the concentration of hydrogen in sodium. The system of sensors is connected to the common accident alarm system. The equipment will not issue the alarm signal if it receives a message from only one sensor, only when the message is confirmed from other sensors. This excludes false alarm. (M.D.)

  6. Advanced alarm system design and human performance: Guidance development and current research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a research program sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to address the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of nuclear power plant alarm systems. The overall objective of the program is to develop HFE review guidance for advanced alarm systems. Guidance has been developed based on a broad base of technical and research literature. As part of the development effort, aspects of alarm system design for which the technical basis was insufficient to support guidance development were identified and prioritized. Research is currently underway to address the highest priority topics: alarm processing and display characteristics. (author). 29 refs, 2 figs

  7. Civil use of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the civilian exploitation of depleted uranium is briefly reviewed. Different scenarios relevant to its use are discussed in terms of radiation exposure for workers and the general public. The case of the aircraft accident which occurred in Amsterdam in 1992 involving a fire, is discussed in terms of the radiological exposure to bystanders. All information given has been obtained on the basis of an extensive literature search and are not based on measurements performed at the Institute for Transuranium Elements

  8. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrels, N; Jackman, C H; Cannizzo, J K; Mattson, B J; Chen, W; Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan

    2003-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time, improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma-ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma-rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion roughly to double the ``biologically active'' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova mu...

  9. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  10. Oxygen analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  11. Development of semiconductor radiation sensors for portable alarm-dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. K.; Moon, B. S.; Chung, C. E.; Hong, S. B.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Han, S. H.; Lee, W. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-01-01

    We studied Semiconductor Radiation Sensors for Portable Alarm-Dosimeter. We calculated response functions for gamma energy 0.021, 0.122, 0.662, 0.835, 1.2 MeV using EGS4 codes. When we measured at various distance from source to detector, the detection efficiency of Si semiconductor detector was better than that of GM tube. The linear absorption coefficients of steel and aluminum plate were measured. These experimental results of the response of detector for intensity of radiation field coincide to the theoretical expectation. The count value of Si detector was changed with changing thickness of steel as changing threshold voltage of discriminator, and the linear absorption coefficient increased with increasing threshold voltage. Radiation detection efficiency shows difference at each threshold voltage condition. This results coincided to the theoretical simulation. 33 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  12. False alarm recognition in hyperspectral gas plume identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conger, James L. (San Ramon, CA); Lawson, Janice K. (Tracy, CA); Aimonetti, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-03-29

    According to one embodiment, a method for analyzing hyperspectral data includes collecting first hyperspectral data of a scene using a hyperspectral imager during a no-gas period and analyzing the first hyperspectral data using one or more gas plume detection logics. The gas plume detection logic is executed using a low detection threshold, and detects each occurrence of an observed hyperspectral signature. The method also includes generating a histogram for all occurrences of each observed hyperspectral signature which is detected using the gas plume detection logic, and determining a probability of false alarm (PFA) for all occurrences of each observed hyperspectral signature based on the histogram. Possibly at some other time, the method includes collecting second hyperspectral data, and analyzing the second hyperspectral data using the one or more gas plume detection logics and the PFA to determine if any gas is present. Other systems and methods are also included.

  13. A methodology of alarm filtering using dynamic fault tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents a new approach for filtering the faults, thanks to the defined dynamic fault tree (DFT). The proposed methodology includes the dependencies between fault events in the models. Two problems must thus be solved: they relate to the filtering of false alarms, and the reduction of the size of the ambiguity of fault isolation related to the occurrence of a failure. In response to the expressed need for diagnosis, as well as for the need for filtering and localization of the failures, it is necessary to introduce new dynamic gates, making it possible to translate new dependencies, relationships. Based on previous techniques, the approach presented in this paper is based on four peculiar powerful features. First, the concept of the precedence between events is taken into account in order to resort to an adapted configuration for the fault isolation. Second, another relevant data to establish a diagnosis is to take into account the concepts of redundancies between various sets. The appearance of the same phenomenon on various sets can make it possible to refine the fault isolation. The knowledge of the character of the failures is a third important concept; indeed according to the character of the identified breakdowns, one will be able for example to refine the localization or to filter certain events considered non-representative of the character of the breakdown. Fourth, the time duration of the alarm is a more interesting resource to be exploited. The proposed DFT model can be modularized and each module translated into a High Level Petri Net (HLPN). Translation of DFT modules into HLPN has proved to be very flexible and various kinds of new dependencies can be easily accommodated. In order to exploit this flexibility a new representation, called the event diagram, is introduced.

  14. Incorporation of copper ions into crystals of T2 copper-depleted laccase from Botrytis aclada

    OpenAIRE

    Osipov, E. M.; Polyakov, K. M.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Kittl, R.; Dorovatovskii, P.V.; Shleev, S. V.; Popov, V. O.; Ludwig, R

    2015-01-01

    Laccases belong to the class of multicopper oxidases catalyzing the oxidation of phenols accompanied by the reduction of molecular oxygen to water without the formation of hydrogen peroxide. The activity of laccases depends on the number of Cu atoms per enzyme molecule. The structure of type 2 copper-depleted laccase from Botrytis aclada has been solved previously. With the aim of obtaining the structure of the native form of the enzyme, crystals of the depleted laccase were soaked in Cu+- an...

  15. Issues in Stratospheric Ozone Depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Steven Andrew

    Following the announcement of the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985 there have arisen a multitude of questions pertaining to the nature and consequences of polar ozone depletion. This thesis addresses several of these specific questions, using both computer models of chemical kinetics and the Earth's radiation field as well as laboratory kinetic experiments. A coupled chemical kinetic-radiative numerical model was developed to assist in the analysis of in situ field measurements of several radical and neutral species in the polar and mid-latitude lower stratosphere. Modeling was used in the analysis of enhanced polar ClO, mid-latitude diurnal variation of ClO, and simultaneous measurements of OH, HO_2, H_2 O and O_3. Most importantly, such modeling was instrumental in establishing the link between the observed ClO and BrO concentrations in the Antarctic polar vortex and the observed rate of ozone depletion. The principal medical concern of stratospheric ozone depletion is that ozone loss will lead to the enhancement of ground-level UV-B radiation. Global ozone climatology (40^circS to 50^ circN latitude) was incorporated into a radiation field model to calculate the biologically accumulated dosage (BAD) of UV-B radiation, integrated over days, months, and years. The slope of the annual BAD as a function of latitude was found to correspond to epidemiological data for non-melanoma skin cancers for 30^circ -50^circN. Various ozone loss scenarios were investigated. It was found that a small ozone loss in the tropics can provide as much additional biologically effective UV-B as a much larger ozone loss at higher latitudes. Also, for ozone depletions of > 5%, the BAD of UV-B increases exponentially with decreasing ozone levels. An important key player in determining whether polar ozone depletion can propagate into the populated mid-latitudes is chlorine nitrate, ClONO_2 . As yet this molecule is only indirectly accounted for in computer models and field

  16. Alteration of bleomycin cytotoxicity by glutathione depletion or elevation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In part, some of the cytotoxicity of bleomycin may be lessened or enhanced by modulation of glutathione (GSH) concentrations. Enhancement of bleomycin cytotoxicity was observed when GSH levels were low and protection was observed when GSH levels were elevated. Since H2O2 is one of the reactive species produced by bleomycin catalyzed oxygen activation, the authors studied the effects of H2O2 exposure after GSH depletion. H2O2, like bleomycin, shows enhanced cytotoxicity in GSH depleted cells. It has been proposed that bleomycin cytotoxicity requires reducing equivalents from non-protein bound thiols (such as GSH) to activate the bleomycin-metal complex, which in turn reacts with oxygen to generate free radicals and peroxides. The data suggest that either GSH is not required to cycle reducing equivalents to the oxidized bleomycin-metal complex, or the low levels of depleted GSH attained (less than 5% of control) were still sufficient to effect reduction. Further, the data shows that GSH in fact provides a means of protection and detoxification from the cytotoxic effects of bleomycin

  17. The helpful or hindering effects of in-hospital patient monitor alarms on nurses: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varpio, Lara; Kuziemsky, Craig; MacDonald, Charlotte; King, W James

    2012-04-01

    Patient monitors generate alarms to signal changes in vital signs. Some research suggests these alarms can improve patient safety. Other reports caution that these systems generate false alarms and create nursing workflow interruptions. These findings require contextualization by qualitatively investigating the lived experiences of nurses working with these monitors. Research into the dynamics involved in nursing responses to alarms can provide insights for monitor development and implementation. This study's purposes were (1) to describe the frequency of alarms generated by patient monitors and nursing responses and (2) to report nurses' explanations of the impact of alarms on workflow and strategies for responding to alarms. Forty-nine hours of observations and 14 interviews were conducted at a Canadian medical center. Four hundred forty-six monitor alarms (1 every 6.59 minutes) were observed. Of these, 70% had no immediate response from nurses. Furthermore, 34 red alarms (potential life-threatening) were observed, with 41% having no immediate response. Nurses reported feeling overloaded by alarm frequency. They described learning to interpret alarm data and developing workaround strategies (eg, ignoring alarms). Paradoxically, alarms prompted nurses to regularly consider and interpret patient information. We suggest the interpretive work associated with workarounds may hold benefits mitigating the potential harms of ignoring alarms. PMID:22156767

  18. The Case of Ozone Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambright, W. Henry

    2005-01-01

    While the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is widely perceived as a space agency, since its inception NASA has had a mission dedicated to the home planet. Initially, this mission involved using space to better observe and predict weather and to enable worldwide communication. Meteorological and communication satellites showed the value of space for earthly endeavors in the 1960s. In 1972, NASA launched Landsat, and the era of earth-resource monitoring began. At the same time, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the environmental movement swept throughout the United States and most industrialized countries. The first Earth Day event took place in 1970, and the government generally began to pay much more attention to issues of environmental quality. Mitigating pollution became an overriding objective for many agencies. NASA's existing mission to observe planet Earth was augmented in these years and directed more toward environmental quality. In the 1980s, NASA sought to plan and establish a new environmental effort that eventuated in the 1990s with the Earth Observing System (EOS). The Agency was able to make its initial mark via atmospheric monitoring, specifically ozone depletion. An important policy stimulus in many respects, ozone depletion spawned the Montreal Protocol of 1987 (the most significant international environmental treaty then in existence). It also was an issue critical to NASA's history that served as a bridge linking NASA's weather and land-resource satellites to NASA s concern for the global changes affecting the home planet. Significantly, as a global environmental problem, ozone depletion underscored the importance of NASA's ability to observe Earth from space. Moreover, the NASA management team's ability to apply large-scale research efforts and mobilize the talents of other agencies and the private sector illuminated its role as a lead agency capable of crossing organizational boundaries as well as the science-policy divide.

  19. Differences in alarm events between disposable and reusable electrocardiography lead wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Nancy M.; Murray, Terri; Bena, James F.; Slifcak, Ellen; Roach, Joel D.; Spence, Jackie; Burkle, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    < .001; superiority P = .03) and monitoring (artifact) alarms were significantly noninferior (adjusted relative risk [95% CI]: 0.88, [0.62-1.24], P = .02; superiority P = .44). No between-group differences existed in false or true crisis alarms. Disposable ECG-LWs were noninferior to reusable ECG-LWs for...

  20. 76 FR 76327 - Installation of Radiation Alarms for Rooms Housing Neutron Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 73 Installation of Radiation Alarms for Rooms Housing Neutron Sources AGENCY: Nuclear... radiation alarms in rooms housing neutron sources. DATES: Submit comments by February 21, 2012. Comments..., Radiation Safety for Research. Mr. Hamawy is concerned about the security of neutron sources. III....

  1. 47 CFR 80.307 - Compulsory use of radiotelegraph auto alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compulsory use of radiotelegraph auto alarm. 80.307 Section 80.307 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... Safety Watches § 80.307 Compulsory use of radiotelegraph auto alarm. The radiotelegraph auto...

  2. 30 CFR 75.352 - Actions in response to AMS malfunction, alert, or alarm signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions in response to AMS malfunction, alert... § 75.352 Actions in response to AMS malfunction, alert, or alarm signals. (a) When a malfunction, alert... of a malfunction, alert, or alarm signal, appropriate personnel must promptly initiate...

  3. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  4. Optimal oxygen saturation in premature infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meayoung Chang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a delicate balance between too little and too much supplemental oxygen exposure in premature infants. Since underuse and overuse of supplemental oxygen can harm premature infants, oxygen saturation levels must be monitored and kept at less than 95% to prevent reactive oxygen species-related diseases, such as retinopathy of prematurity and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. At the same time, desaturation below 80 to 85% must be avoided to prevent adverse consequences, such as cerebral palsy. It is still unclear what range of oxygen saturation is appropriate for premature infants; however, until the results of further studies are available, a reasonable target for pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2 is 90 to 93% with an intermittent review of the correlation between SpO2 and the partial pressure of arterial oxygen tension (PaO2. Because optimal oxygenation depends on individuals at the bedside making ongoing adjustments, each unit must define an optimal target range and set alarm limits according to their own equipment or conditions. All staff must be aware of these values and adjust the concentration of supplemental oxygen frequently.

  5. ED accreditation update. Hospitals put on notice: alarm management is a top priority for 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Establishing alarm management as a new National Patient Safety Goal (NPSG), The Joint Commission (TJC) is calling on hospitals to make the issue a safety priority, and to begin establishing policies and procedures designed to minimize alarm fatigue among clinical staff. Beginning on January 1,2014, hospitals need to begin identifying the most important alarm signals to manage based on input from staff as well as factors such as patient risk, and the potential for harm as demonstrated by the device's history. By January 1,2016, hospitals need to have policies and procedures in place for managing alarms identified in the first phase of the NPSG's requirements. Also, staff and independent licensed practitioners need to be educated about the purpose and proper operation of alarm systems that they are responsible for. PMID:24058949

  6. ALARM-B2: a computer program for analysis of large break LOCA of BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer program ALARM-B2 is a modified version of ALARM-B1 and is a tool to analyse thermo-hydraulic phenomena of BWR during a postulated large break LOCA. The major improvement is to provide one dimensional heat conduction equation, heat transfer correlation package, and point reactor kinetics equation to analyse the heat transfer phenomenon in the core region during a LOCA. Analytical models of the fluid conservation and state equations are the same as in ALARM-B1 code; namely ALARM-B2 solves one-dimensional integral forms of the fluid conservation and state equations under the assumptions common to conventional node-junction type models. The main purpose of this report is to explain the frame-work of ALARM-B2 together with the requirements of input data. The validity of models newly incorporated into the present code is now being examined. (author)

  7. The use of simulation in the development of human factors guidelines for alarm systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a research program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to address the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of nuclear power plant alarm systems. The overall objective of the program is to develop HFE review guidance for advanced alarm systems. As part of this program, guidance was developed based on a broad review and analysis of technical and research literature. In the course of guidance development, aspects of alarm system design for which the technical basis was insufficient to support guidance developed were identified. Experimental research is currently underway to address the highest priority topics: alarm processing and display characteristics. This paper provides an overview of the approach to guidance development and discusses the role of simulation in the development approach. Finally, the current simulator-based experiment is described to illustrate how the alarm system design features are being studied

  8. "When the going gets tough, who keeps going?" : Depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmon, Stefanie J.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; De Vet, Emely; Fennis, Bob M.; De Ridder, Denise T. D.

    2014-01-01

    Self-control relies on a limited resource that can get depleted, a phenomenon that has been labeled ego-depletion. We argue that individuals may differ in their sensitivity to depleting tasks, and that consequently some people deplete their self-control resource at a faster rate than others. In thre

  9. The measurement and analysis of the dynamic response of alarm units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alarm units are used to monitor some measured parameter (e.g., flux, pressure), and actuate an alarm and, if necessary, channel or reactor trips when abnormal values occur. If the measured parameter is above (or below for low alarms) the alarm setpoint, the output relay of the alarm unit opens. Alarm units are not simple comparators, they contain some type of internal amplifier driving a comparator, and the output relay has an inductive coil whose current cannot change instantly. It takes some time, called 'response time', after the input signal passes the setpoint before the relay opens. In reactor safety analysis, it is important to allow for the dynamic response time of the instrumentation, including that of the alarm units. The ISA standard S67.06 defines methodologies which may be used to measure response times of the various components in the nuclear safety channel. The most popular tests are ramp tests and steps tests. This report reviews the theory of operation of alarm units and shows how to apply ramp tests and step tests to an alarm unit to obtain ramp response time, time constant and fixed delay. This report also discusses how the time constant and fixed delay derived from step tests can be cross-checked against the ramp response time and how a first-order approximation to a higher order system should be made. Finally, the ramp and step response time measurement methods are applied to a test circuit representing a stand-alone alarm unit having known time constants and fixed delays. The results of these tests are evaluated as a means of assessing the practicality and accuracy of the test methods. (author)

  10. Biomedical consequences of ozone depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coohill, Thomas P.

    1994-07-01

    It is widely agreed that a portion of the earth's protective stratospheric ozone layer is being depleted. The major effect of this ozone loss will be an increase in the amount of ultraviolet radiation (UV reaching the biosphere. This increase will be completely contained within the UVB (290nm - 320nm). It is imperative that assessments be made of the effects of this additional UVB on living organisms. This requires a detailed knowledge of the UVB photobiology of these life forms. One analytical technique to aid in the approximations is the construction of UV action spectra for such important biological end-points as human skin cancer, cataracts, immune suppression; plant photosynthesis and crop yields; and aquatic organism responses to UVB, especially the phytoplankton. Combining these action spectra with the known solar spectrum (and estimates for various ozone depletion scenarios) can give rise to a series of effectiveness spectra for these parameters. This manuscript gives a first approximation, rough estimate, for the effectiveness spectra for some of these bioresponses, and a series of crude temporary values for how a 10% ozone loss would affect the above end-points. These are not intended to masquerade as final answers, but rather, to serve as beginning attempts for a process which should be continually refined. It is hoped that these estimates will be of some limited use to agencies, such as government and industry, that have to plan now for changes in human activities that might alter future atmospheric chemistry in a beneficial manner.

  11. The 1988 Antarctic ozone depletion - Comparison with previous year depletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Krueger, Arlin J.

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 spring Antarctic ozone depletion was observed by TOMS to be substantially smaller than in recent years. The minimum polar total ozone values declined only 15 percent during September 1988, compared to nearly 50 percent during September 1987. At southern midlatitudes, exceptionally high total ozone values were recorded beginning in July 1988. The total integrated southern hemispheric ozone increased rapidly during the Austral spring, approaching 1980 levels during October. The high midlatitude total ozone values were associated with a substantial increase in eddy activity as indicated by the standard deviation in total ozone in the zonal band 30-60 deg S. Mechanisms through which the increased midlatitude eddy activity could disrupt the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole are briefly discussed.

  12. Development of Digital Boron Dilution Alarm System (DBDAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is imperative that a reactor which has been shutdown remain subcritical and not inadvertently return to power. Such an event could occur for instance through failure of a component in the complex control system or inadvertent action taken by the operator. In any case, during such an event the reactor approaches criticality exponentially with respect to time thus making it more difficult for the operator to detect the event and take appropriate action before the reactor goes to criticality [Ref. 1]. This paper is prepared for the development of the Digital Boron Dilution Alarm System (DBDAS) to improve the sub-criticality monitoring of Advanced Power Reactor 1400 Standard Nuclear Power Plant (APR1400). This system is designed to provide operators with useful information about an inadvertent boron dilution event occurring with the plant in Modes 3, 4, 5, and 6 before the reactor coolant system is diluted sufficiently to result in a total loss of shutdown margin. The acceptance criteria of APR1400 for an unplanned boron (moderator) dilution specify at least 30 minutes in all operational modes. The main features of DBAS are the use of digital information from the startup neutron monitoring channels and a boronometer

  13. Development of Digital Boron Dilution Alarm System (DBDAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ho Cheol; Lee, Hwan Soo; Moon, Chan Kook [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    It is imperative that a reactor which has been shutdown remain subcritical and not inadvertently return to power. Such an event could occur for instance through failure of a component in the complex control system or inadvertent action taken by the operator. In any case, during such an event the reactor approaches criticality exponentially with respect to time thus making it more difficult for the operator to detect the event and take appropriate action before the reactor goes to criticality [Ref. 1]. This paper is prepared for the development of the Digital Boron Dilution Alarm System (DBDAS) to improve the sub-criticality monitoring of Advanced Power Reactor 1400 Standard Nuclear Power Plant (APR1400). This system is designed to provide operators with useful information about an inadvertent boron dilution event occurring with the plant in Modes 3, 4, 5, and 6 before the reactor coolant system is diluted sufficiently to result in a total loss of shutdown margin. The acceptance criteria of APR1400 for an unplanned boron (moderator) dilution specify at least 30 minutes in all operational modes. The main features of DBAS are the use of digital information from the startup neutron monitoring channels and a boronometer

  14. Simulator testing of the Westinghouse aware alarm management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last year, Westinghouse engineers and operators from the Beznau nuclear power station (KKB), owned by the Nordostschweizerische Krafwerke AG of Baden, Switzerland, have been installing and testing the Westinghouse AWARE Alarm Management System in Beznau/SNUPPS operator training simulator, owned and operated by the Westinghouse Electric Corp., in Waltz Mill, PA, USA. The testing has focused primarily on validating the trigger logic data base and on familiarizing the utility's training department with the operation of the system in a real-time environment. Some of the tests have included plant process scenarios in which the computerized Emergency Procedures were available and used through the COMPRO (COMputerized PROcedures) System in conjunction with the AWARE System. While the results to date are qualitative from the perspective of system performance and improvement in message presentation, the tests have generally confirmed the expectations of the design. There is a large reduction in the number of messages that the control room staff must deal with during major process abnormalities, yet at times of relative minor disturbances, some additional messages are available which add clarification, e.g., ''Pump Trouble'' messages. The ''flow'' of an abnormality as it progresses from one part of the plant's processes to another is quite visible. Timing of the messages and the lack of message avalanching is proving to give the operators additional time to respond to messages. Generally, the anxiety level to ''do something'' immediately upon a reactor trip appears to be reduced. (author). 8 refs

  15. Early warnings and missed alarms for abrupt monsoon transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Palaeo-records from China (Cheng et al., 2009; Wang et al., 2008, 2001 demonstrate the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM is dominated by abrupt and large magnitude monsoon shifts on millennial timescales, switching between periods of high and weak monsoon rains. It has been hypothesised that over these timescales, the EASM exhibits two stable states with bifurcation-type tipping points between them (Schewe et al., 2012. Here we test this hypothesis by looking for early warning signals of past bifurcations in speleothem records from Sanbao Cave and Hulu Cave, China (Wang et al., 2008, 2001, spanning the penultimate glacial cycle, and in multiple model simulations derived from the data. We find hysteresis behaviour in our model simulations with transitions directly forced by solar insolation. We detect critical slowing down prior to an abrupt monsoon shift during the penultimate deglaciation consistent with long-term orbital forcing. However, such signals are only detectable when the change in system stability is sufficiently slow to be detected by the sampling resolution of the dataset, raising the possibility that the alarm was missed and a similar forcing drove earlier EASM shifts.

  16. An Application of a Logic Alarm Cause Tracking System(LogACTs) to Wolsong 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the TMI accident, many alarm reduction systems and diagnostic systems have been studied to reduce nuisance alarms and to detect the causes of an abnormal state. In this paper, an operator-aid system is proposed for tracking the logics of an alarm, finding the causes of an alarm, displaying the highlighted alarm procedure related to the causes, and suppressing and filtering nuisance alarms due to the physical or logical connections between components or systems in an abnormal state. The system can be used by an operator to identify the detailed causes of an alarm without checking all the causes of the candidates by alarms. The proposed system will be applied to a nuclear power plant of a CANDU type, Wolsong 3 and 4 Nuclear Power Plant

  17. Depleted Argon from Underground Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however 39Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in 39Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO2 well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO2. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N2, and He mixture, from the CO2 through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N2 and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO2 facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

  18. Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ''waste,'' but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity

  19. Depleted uranium. Nuclear related problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depleted uranium (DU) has found a military application in Golf War, in Bosnia and in Yugoslavia (Kosovo). In military sense it was very efficient. But the fact that some parts of that ammunition are manufactured from depleted uranium, low level radioactive waste, implies other aspects of this application like radiological, ecological, jurist, ethical and psychological. The subject of this paper is just physical aspect. There are several problems concerning this aspect: production of DU, total amount of DU in the world, 235U/238U relation, radioactivity of DU, measurements, and presence of other radionuclides like plutonium. DU is by product of nuclear technology and represents low-level nuclear waste. Therefore it should be stored. Total amount of DU in the world is about one million tons with an annual increase of 30 000 t. The content of 235U in DU can vary in the range 0.16-0.3%. The total radioactivity of DU is a consequence of 7 radionuclides and amounts 39.42 Bq/mg. This include alpha, beta and gamma radioactivity. Because of characteristics of this radioactivity it is difficult to prospect the terrain except at the site of action. During the impact of DU rods four types of DU particles could be produced: whole penetrators, penetrator parts, big aerosols (>10 μm) and small aerosols (<10 μm). Most of these particles fall locally, although some of them could be find several tens of kilometers away. All these problems have been discussed in this paper. (author)

  20. SRP scientific meeting: depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting was organised by the SRP to review current research and discuss the use, dispersion into the environment and radiological impact of depleted uranium (DU) by the UK and US in recent military conflicts. In addition to other presentations, there were two short presentations by T Cabianca and P Danesi of the IAEA concerning investigations into the DU legacy in Kuwait and the IAEA contribution to environmental contamination assessments of DU in Kosovo. In Kuwait the on-going study is limited to an assessment of the potential radiological consequences of DU residues in three types of site: open desert where DU was fired, farmland where DU was fired and DU storage facilities. The Kuwaiti government has also requested the IAEA to formulate a structured approach to deal with remediating such sites and disposing of the resulting material. In Kosovo the study investigated sand and soil samples from areas where DU had been fired. DU particulates were found in sizes up to 40 μm, but generally much smaller, typically about 5 μm, with 5% less than 1.5 μm in size. These particles were found to contain 90% DU and 1% Ti. Plutonium was also detected, but this was attributed to the 1960s bomb testing programme. This was an informative, well attended meeting that stimulated varied debate between delegates. It revealed that there is still much to learn concerning the effects of depleted uranium in the human body and highlighted the limitations of conventional dose estimates made using ICRP models. A balance must be struck between the operational requirements of the armed forces and acceptable levels of environmental contamination arising from any conflict they are involved in. Most importantly, as a scientific consensus is developed, a clear and consistent approach to providing key information to the public should be adopted, to build confidence in the radiation protection profession

  1. The evolution of urgency-based and functionally referential alarm calls in ground-dwelling species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrer, Roman D; Manser, Marta B

    2009-03-01

    A major evolutionary force driving functionally referential alarm calls is the need for different strategies to escape various predator types in complex structured habitats. In contrast, a single escape strategy appears to be sufficient in less-structured open habitats, and under such conditions urgency-dependent alarm calls may be favored. Nevertheless, some species, such as meerkats (Suricata suricatta), have evolved functionally referential alarm calls despite living in open areas, using only bolt-holes for retreat. To understand the evolution of different alarm call systems, we investigated the calls of sympatric Cape ground squirrels (Xerus inauris) and compared their antipredator and foraging behavior with that of meerkats. Cape ground squirrels emitted urgency-dependent alarm calls and responded to playbacks depending on urgency, not predator type. Vigilance behavior and habitat use differed between the two species. Meerkats roam widely to find prey and for efficient foraging depend on coordinated predator vigilance and escape behavior. As herbivores with smaller territories, Cape ground squirrels depend less on coordinated antipredator behavior, and urgency-dependent alarm calls encode all essential information. We conclude that habitat complexity does not explain the evolution of functionally referential alarm calls in all species, and other constraints, such as the need to coordinate group movements to maintain foraging efficiency, could be more relevant. PMID:19199527

  2. Appreciating Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic flora and microfauna utilize light from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen. While these carbohydrates and their derivative hydrocarbons are generally considered to be fuels, it is the thermodynamically energetic oxygen molecule that traps, stores, and provides almost all of the energy that…

  3. 40 CFR 267.34 - When must personnel have access to communication equipment or an alarm system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to an internal alarm or emergency communication device, either directly or through visual or voice... communication equipment or an alarm system? 267.34 Section 267.34 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... have access to communication equipment or an alarm system? (a) Whenever hazardous waste is being...

  4. Use of urine alarms in toilet training children with intellectual and developmental disabilities: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levato, Lynne E; Aponte, Courtney A; Wilkins, Jonathan; Travis, Rebekah; Aiello, Rachel; Zanibbi, Katherine; Loring, Whitney A; Butter, Eric; Smith, Tristram; Mruzek, Daniel W

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe and evaluate the existing research on the use of urine alarms in the daytime toilet training of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). A systematic literature search yielded 12 studies, many of which were published over a decade ago. The findings suggest that interventions that incorporate the use of urine alarms are promising in the treatment of daytime enuresis for children with IDD; however, more carefully controlled research is needed to confirm these findings and elucidate the precise role urine alarms may play in toileting interventions. Methodological strengths and limitations of the body of research are discussed. PMID:26942703

  5. A basic design of alarm system for the future nuclear power plants in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of an advanced alarm system is under way to apply to the new MMIS for the future nuclear power plants in Korea. Based on the alarm system design bases we established the design requirements and are now refining them with the results of evaluation through the prototype. To realize the advanced system new algorithms for alarm processing and display are implemented and various new devices are examined. The evaluation for the design is performed in accordance with the verification and validation plans and through the prototype. (author). 7 refs, 2 figs

  6. Clodronate treatment significantly depletes macrophages in chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Kameka, Amber M.; Haddadi, Siamak; Jamaldeen, Fathima Jesreen; Moinul, Prima; He, Xiao T.; Nawazdeen, Fathima Hafsa P.; Bonfield, Stephan; Sharif, Shayan; van Rooijen, Nico; Abdul-Careem, Mohamed Faizal

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages function as phagocytes and antigen-presenting cells in the body. As has been demonstrated in mammals, administration of clodronate [dichloromethylene bisphosphonate (Cl2MBP)] encapsulated liposomes results in depletion of macrophages. Although this compound has been used in chickens, its effectiveness in depleting macrophages has yet to be fully determined. Here, we show that a single administration of clodronate liposomes to chickens results in a significant depletion of macropha...

  7. Repulsive depletion interactions in colloid polymer mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Rudhardt, Daniel; Bechinger, Clemens; Leiderer, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Depletion forces in colloidal systems are known to be entirely attractive, as long as the background of macromolecules is small enough that an ideal gas approach is valid. At higher densities, however, structural correlation effects of the macromolecules which lead to additional repulsive parts in the depletion interaction, have to be taken into account. We have measured the depletion interaction between a single polystyrene sphere and a wall in the presence of non-ionic polymer coils. Althou...

  8. Assessment of the depletion capability in MPACT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the paper is to develop and demonstrate the depletion capability with pin resolved transport using the MPACT code. The first section of the paper provides a description of the depletion methodology and the algorithm used to solve the depletion equations in MPACT. A separate depletion library for MPACT is used based on the ORIGEN-S library to provide the basic decay constants and fission yields, as well as the 3-group cross-sections which are used for the isotopes not contained in the MPACT multi-group library. The cross sections for the depletion transmutation matrix were collapsed using the transport flux solution in MPACT based on either the 47 group HELIOS library based on ENDF-VI or a 56 group ORNL library based on ENDF-VII. The second section of this paper then describes the numerical verification of the depletion algorithm using two sets of benchmarks. The first is the JAERI LWR lattice benchmark which had participants from most of the lattice depletion codes currently used in the international nuclear community and the second benchmark is based on data from spent fuel of the Takahama-3 reactor. The results show that MPACT is generally in good agreement with the results of the other benchmark participants as well as the experimental data. Finally, a full core 2D model of CASL AMA benchmark was depleted based on the central plane of the Watts Bar reactor core which demonstrates the whole core depletion capability of MPACT. (author)

  9. Depletions of Elements from the Gas Phase: A Guide on Dust Compositions

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Edward B

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of stars recorded by orbiting observatories since the 1970's have revealed absorption features produced by atoms in their favored ionization stages in the neutral ISM of our Galaxy. Most elements show abundances relative to hydrogen that are below their values in stars, indicating their removal by condensation into solid form. The relative amounts of these depletions vary from one location to the next, and different elements show varying degrees of depletion. In a study of abundances along 243 different sight lines reported in more than 100 papers, Jenkins (2009) characterized the systematic patterns for the depletions of 17 different elements, and these results in turn were used to help us understand the compositions of dust grains. Since the conclusions are based on differential depletions along different sightlines, they are insensitive to errors in the adopted values for the total element abundances. Some of the more remarkable conclusions to emerge from this study are that (1) oxygen ...

  10. Intelligent buildings, automatic fire alarm and fire-protection control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes in brief the intelligent buildings, and the automatic fire alarm and fire-protection control system. On the basis of the four-bus, three-bus and two-bus, a new transfer technique was developed

  11. Nuisance alarm suppression techniques for fibre-optic intrusion detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Seedahmed S.; Visagathilagar, Yuvaraja; Katsifolis, Jim

    2012-02-01

    The suppression of nuisance alarms without degrading sensitivity in fibre-optic intrusion detection systems is important for maintaining acceptable performance. Signal processing algorithms that maintain the POD and minimize nuisance alarms are crucial for achieving this. A level crossings algorithm is presented for suppressing torrential rain-induced nuisance alarms in a fibre-optic fence-based perimeter intrusion detection system. Results show that rain-induced nuisance alarms can be suppressed for rainfall rates in excess of 100 mm/hr, and intrusion events can be detected simultaneously during rain periods. The use of a level crossing based detection and novel classification algorithm is also presented demonstrating the suppression of nuisance events and discrimination of nuisance and intrusion events in a buried pipeline fibre-optic intrusion detection system. The sensor employed for both types of systems is a distributed bidirectional fibre-optic Mach Zehnder interferometer.

  12. Advances in software development for intelligent interfaces for alarm and emergency management consoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in technology allow features like voice synthesis, voice and speech recognition, image understanding, and intelligent data base management to be incorporated in computer driven alarm and emergency management information systems. New software development environments make it possible to do rapid prototyping of custom applications. Three examples using these technologies are discussed. 1) Maximum use is made of high-speed graphics and voice synthesis to implement a state-of-the-art alarm processing and display system with features that make the operator-machine interface efficient and accurate. 2) An application generator which has the capability of ''building'' a specific alarm processing and display application in a matter of a few hours, using the site definition developed in the security planning phase to produce the custom application. 3) A software tool, is described which permits rapid prototyping of human-machine interfaces for a variety of applications including emergency management, alarm display and process information display

  13. A blowdown analysis on LPWR LOCA by ALARM-P1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented in this report is the results of an LPWR LOCA blowdown analysis by the ALARM-P1 and their comparisons with the RELAP4-EM. Up to the present, the ALARM-P1 code has been improved and refined by solving a various type of calculational exercises given as the CSNI Standard Problems. As a result, confidence of the analytical models in it was proved to be sufficient through the international comparison. Based on such experiences accumulated, therefore, the analysis of a typical PWR plant was attempted here. The results of two codes agreed fairly well, thus showing that the ALARM-P1 could be applicable to actual power plants. With the capabilities as successfully demonstrated herein, this report concludes the development work of the ALARM-P1. (author)

  14. Beneficial Uses of Depleted Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naturally occurring uranium contains 0.71 wt% 235U. In order for the uranium to be useful in most fission reactors, it must be enriched the concentration of the fissile isotope 235U must be increased. Depleted uranium (DU) is a co-product of the processing of natural uranium to produce enriched uranium, and DU has a 235U concentration of less than 0.71 wt%. In the United States, essentially all of the DU inventory is in the chemical form of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and is stored in large cylinders above ground. If this co-product material were to be declared surplus, converted to a stable oxide form, and disposed, the costs are estimated to be several billion dollars. Only small amounts of DU have at this time been beneficially reused. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has begun the Beneficial Uses of DU Project to identify large-scale uses of DU and encourage its reuse for the primary purpose of potentially reducing the cost and expediting the disposition of the DU inventory. This paper discusses the inventory of DU and its rate of increase; DU disposition options; beneficial use options; a preliminary cost analysis; and major technical, institutional, and regulatory issues to be resolved

  15. Ozone depletion potentials of halocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of ozone depletion potential (ODP) is widely used in the evaluation of numerous halocarbons and of their replacements for effects on ozone, but the methods, model assumptions and conditions of ODP calculation have not been analyzed adequately. In this paper, a model study of effects on ozone after the instantaneous releases of various amounts of CH3CCl3 and of CHF2Cl(HCFC-22) in the several conditions of the background atmosphere are presented, aimed to understand the main connections of ODP values with the methods of their calculations. To facilitate the ODP computation in numerous versions for long after the releases, the above rather short-lived gases have been used. The variation of released gas global mass from 1 Mt to 1 Gt leads to ODP value increase atmosphere. The same variations are analyzed for the CFC-free atmosphere of 1960s conditions for the anthropogenically loaded atmosphere in the 21st century according to the known IPCC- A scenario (business as usual). Recommendations of proper ways of ODP calculations are proposed for practically important cases

  16. Plutonium in depleted uranium penetrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depleted Uranium (DU) penetrators used in the recent Balkan conflicts have been found to be contaminated with trace amounts of transuranic materials such as plutonium. This contamination is usually a consequence of DU fabrication being carried out in facilities also using uranium recycled from spent military and civilian nuclear reactor fuel. Specific activities of 239+240 Plutonium generally in the range 1 to 12 Bq/kg have been found to be present in DU penetrators recovered from the attack sites of the 1999 NATO bombardment of Kosovo. A DU penetrator recovered from a May 1999 attack site at Bratoselce in southern Serbia and analysed by University College Dublin was found to contain 43.7 +/- 1.9 Bq/kg of 239+240 Plutonium. This analysis is described. An account is also given of the general population radiation dose implications arising from both the DU itself and from the presence of plutonium in the penetrators. According to current dosimetric models, in all scenarios considered likely ,the dose from the plutonium is estimated to be much smaller than that due to the uranium isotopes present in the penetrators. (author)

  17. Ozone Depletion, UVB and Atmospheric Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    The primary constituents of the Earth's atmosphere are molecular nitrogen and molecular oxygen. Ozone is created when ultraviolet light from the sun photodissociates molecular oxygen into two oxygen atoms. The oxygen atoms undergo many collisions but eventually combine with a molecular oxygen to form ozone (O3). The ozone molecules absorb ultraviolet solar radiation, primarily in the wavelength region between 200 and 300 nanometers, resulting in the dissociation of ozone back into atomic oxygen and molecular oxygen. The oxygen atom reattaches to an O2 molecule, reforming ozone which can then absorb another ultraviolet photon. This sequence goes back and forth between atomic oxygen and ozone, each time absorbing a uv photon, until the oxygen atom collides with and ozone molecule to reform two oxygen molecules.

  18. Development of TJ-Ⅲ type dose rate alarm detector of X, γ ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Base on MSP430 microcontroller, a set of TJ-Ⅲ type dose rate alarm detector of X, γ ray with advanced, reliable and stable performance is presented. It focuses on the power, man-machine interface, communication ports and alarm output unit circuits design and the main program, initialization program and interrupt service routine modules development, and finally points out main technical specifications and performance testing. (authors)

  19. Time-Memory Trade-Offs: False Alarm Detection Using Checkpoints, Extended Version

    OpenAIRE

    Avoine, Gildas; Junod, Pascal; Oechslin, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Since the original publication of Martin Hellman's cryptanalytic time-memory trade-off, a few improvements on the method have been suggested. In all these variants, the cryptanalysis time decreases with the square of the available memory. However, a large amount of work is wasted during the cryptanalysis process due to so-called "false alarms". In this paper we present a method of detection of false alarms which can significantly reduce the cryptanalysis time while using a minute amount of me...

  20. ESTIMATING THE PROBABILITY OF FALSE ALARM FOR A ZERO-BIT WATERMARKING TECHNIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    Furon, Teddy; Jégourel, Cyrille; Guyader, Arnaud; Cérou, Frédéric

    2009-01-01

    Assessing that a probability of false alarm is below a given significance level is a crucial issue in watermarking. We pro- pose an iterative and self-adapting algorithm which estimates very low probabilities of error. Some experimental investiga- tions validates its performance for a rare detection scenario where there exists a close form formula of the probability of false alarm. Our algorithm appears to be much quicker and more accurate than a classical Monte Carlo estimator. It even allow...

  1. Referential alarm calling behaviour in New World primates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristiane C(A)SAR; Klaus ZUBERB(U)HLER

    2012-01-01

    There is relatively good evidence that non-human primates can communicate about objects and events in their environment in ways that allow recipients to draw inferences about the nature of the event experienced by the signaller.In some species,there is also evidence that the basic semantic units are not individual calls,but call sequences and the combinations generated by them.These two findings are relevant to theories pertaining to the origins of human language because of the resemblances of these phenomena with linguistic reference and syntactic organisation.Until recently,however,most research efforts on the primate origins of human language have involved Old Word species with comparatively few systematic studies on New World monkeys,which has prevented insights into the deeper phylogenetic roots and evolutionary origins of language-relevant capacities.To address this,we review the older primate literature and very recent evidence for functionally referential communication and call combinations in New World primates.Within the existing literature there is ample evidence in both Callitrichids and Cebids for acoustically distinct call variants given to external disturbances that are accompanied by distinct behavioural responses.A general pattern is that one call type is typically produced in response to a wide range of general disturbances,often on the ground but also including inter-group encounters,while another call type is produced in response to a much narrower range of aerial threats.This pattern is already described for Old World monkeys and Prosimians,suggesting an early evolutionary origin.Second,recent work with black-fronted titi monkeys has produced evidence for different alarm call sequences consisting of acoustically distinct call types.These sequences appear to encode several aspects of the predation event simultaneously,notably predator type and location.Since meaningful call sequences have already been described in Old Word primates,we suggest

  2. Cutaneous factitia in elderly patients: alarm signal for psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiriac A

    2014-03-01

    choose the proper therapy is mandatory for all these cases. Dermatologists and all physicians who take care of old patients must recognize the disorder in order to provide optimum care for this chronic condition. We emphasize therefore the importance of psychiatric evaluation and treatment to avoid the major risk of suicide. Skin lesions must be regarded as an alarm signal in critical cases, especially in senior people. Keywords: pathomimia, elderly, psychiatric disorders

  3. Alarm pheromone is detected by the vomeronasal organ in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Kodama, Yuka; Kubota, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2013-10-01

    It is widely known that a stressed animal releases specific pheromones, possibly for alarming nearby conspecifics. We previously investigated an alarm pheromone in male rats and found that this alarm pheromone evokes several responses, including increases in the defensive and risk assessment behaviors in a modified open-field test, and enhancement of the acoustic startle reflex. However, the role of the vomeronasal organ in these pheromone effects remains unclear. To clarify this point, vomeronasal organ-excising or sham surgeries were performed in male rats for use in 2 experimental models, after which they were exposed to alarm pheromone. We found that the vomeronasal organ-excising surgery blocked the effects of this alarm pheromone in both the modified open-field test and acoustic startle reflex test. In addition, the results of habituation/dishabituation test and soybean agglutinin binding to the accessory olfactory bulb suggested that the vomeronasal organ-excising surgery completely ablated the vomeronasal organ while preserving the functioning of the main olfactory system. From the above results, we showed that the vomeronasal organ plays an important role in alarm pheromone effects in the modified open-field test and acoustic startle reflex test. PMID:23821727

  4. False Alarm Reduction in BSN-Based Cardiac Monitoring Using Signal Quality and Activity Type Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanatorn Tanantong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available False alarms in cardiac monitoring affect the quality of medical care, impacting on both patients and healthcare providers. In continuous cardiac monitoring using wireless Body Sensor Networks (BSNs, the quality of ECG signals can be deteriorated owing to several factors, e.g., noises, low battery power, and network transmission problems, often resulting in high false alarm rates. In addition, body movements occurring from activities of daily living (ADLs can also create false alarms. This paper presents a two-phase framework for false arrhythmia alarm reduction in continuous cardiac monitoring, using signals from an ECG sensor and a 3D accelerometer. In the first phase, classification models constructed using machine learning algorithms are used for labeling input signals. ECG signals are labeled with heartbeat types and signal quality levels, while 3D acceleration signals are labeled with ADL types. In the second phase, a rule-based expert system is used for combining classification results in order to determine whether arrhythmia alarms should be accepted or suppressed. The proposed framework was validated on datasets acquired using BSNs and the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. For the BSN dataset, acceleration and ECG signals were collected from 10 young and 10 elderly subjects while they were performing ADLs. The framework reduced the false alarm rate from 9.58% to 1.43% in our experimental study, showing that it can potentially assist physicians in diagnosing a vast amount of data acquired from wireless sensors and enhance the performance of continuous cardiac monitoring.

  5. The Chemistry and Toxicology of Depleted Uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney A. Katz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural uranium is comprised of three radioactive isotopes: 238U, 235U, and 234U. Depleted uranium (DU is a byproduct of the processes for the enrichment of the naturally occurring 235U isotope. The world wide stock pile contains some 1½ million tons of depleted uranium. Some of it has been used to dilute weapons grade uranium (~90% 235U down to reactor grade uranium (~5% 235U, and some of it has been used for heavy tank armor and for the fabrication of armor-piercing bullets and missiles. Such weapons were used by the military in the Persian Gulf, the Balkans and elsewhere. The testing of depleted uranium weapons and their use in combat has resulted in environmental contamination and human exposure. Although the chemical and the toxicological behaviors of depleted uranium are essentially the same as those of natural uranium, the respective chemical forms and isotopic compositions in which they usually occur are different. The chemical and radiological toxicity of depleted uranium can injure biological systems. Normal functioning of the kidney, liver, lung, and heart can be adversely affected by depleted uranium intoxication. The focus of this review is on the chemical and toxicological properties of depleted and natural uranium and some of the possible consequences from long term, low dose exposure to depleted uranium in the environment.

  6. Depletion sensitivity predicts unhealthy snack purchases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmon, Stefanie J.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; Fennis, Bob M.; De Vet, Emely; De Ridder, Denise T D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to examine the relation between depletion sensitivity - a novel construct referring to the speed or ease by which one's self-control resources are drained - and snack purchase behavior. In addition, interactions between depletion sensitivity and the goal to lose we

  7. Depletion sensitivity predicts unhealthy snack purchases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmon, Stefanie J.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; Fennis, Bob M.; Vet, De Emely; Ridder, De Denise T.D.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to examine the relation between depletion sensitivity - a novel construct referring to the speed or ease by which one's self-control resources are drained - and snack purchase behavior. In addition, interactions between depletion sensitivity and the goal to lose

  8. Tritium transport vessel using depleted uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heung, L.K.

    1995-01-01

    A tritium transport vessel using depleted uranium was tested in the laboratory using deuterium and protium. The vessel contains 0.5 kg of depleted uranium and can hold up to 18 grams of tritium. The conditions for activation, tritium loading and tritium unloading were defined. The safety aspects that included air-ingress, tritium diffusion, temperature and pressure potentials were evaluated.

  9. Oil depletion and terms of trade

    OpenAIRE

    Irimia-Vladu, Marina; Thompson, Henry

    2007-01-01

    A model of the international oil market model with optimal depletion and offer curves suggests importers face a backward bending offer curve. An oil tariff would then raise oil imports and lower the price of oil including the tariff. Simulations of price and extraction paths for the coming century provide insight into the future of oil depletion and terms of trade.

  10. Deuterium - depleted water. Achievements and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium - depleted water represents water that has an isotopic content lower than 145 ppm D/(D+H) which is the natural isotopic content of water. The research conducted at ICSI Ramnicu Valcea, regarding deuterium - depleted water were completed by the following patents: - technique and installation for deuterium - depleted water production; - distilled water with low deuterium content; - technique and installation for the production of distilled water with low deuterium content; - mineralized water with low deuterium content and technique to produce it. The gold and silver medals won at international salons for inventions confirmed the novelty of these inventions. Knowing that deuterium content of water has a big influence on living organisms, beginning with 1996, the ICSI Ramnicu Valcea, deuterium - depleted water producer, co-operated with Romanian specialized institutes for biological effects' evaluation of deuterium - depleted water. The role of natural deuterium in living organisms was examined by using deuterium - depleted water instead of natural water. These investigations led to the following conclusions: 1. deuterium - depleted water caused a tendency towards the increase of the basal tone, accompanied by the intensification of the vasoconstrictor effects of phenylefrine, noradrenaline and angiotensin; the increase of the basal tone and vascular reactivity produced by the deuterium - depleted water persists after the removal of the vascular endothelium; -2. animals treated with deuterium - depleted water showed an increase of the resistance both to sublethal and to lethal gamma radiation doses, suggesting a radioprotective action by the stimulation of non-specific immune defence mechanism; 3, deuterium - depleted water stimulates immune defence reactions, represented by the opsonic, bactericidal and phagocyte capacity of the immune system, together with increase in the numbers of polymorphonuclear neutrophils; 4. investigations regarding artificial

  11. Specification for the VERA Depletion Benchmark Suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-17

    CASL-X-2015-1014-000 iii Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The CASL neutronics simulator MPACT is under development for the neutronics and T-H coupled simulation for the pressurized water reactor. MPACT includes the ORIGEN-API and internal depletion module to perform depletion calculations based upon neutron-material reaction and radioactive decay. It is a challenge to validate the depletion capability because of the insufficient measured data. One of the detoured methods to validate it is to perform a code-to-code comparison for benchmark problems. In this study a depletion benchmark suite has been developed and a detailed guideline has been provided to obtain meaningful computational outcomes which can be used in the validation of the MPACT depletion capability.

  12. Oxygen isotope correlation of cetacean bone phosphate with environmental water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Naohiro; Miyazaki, Nobuyuki

    1991-01-01

    The variation with time in the oxygen isotope ratio of the oceans is of prime interest in a variety of research fields. An excellent correlation between oxygen isotope ratios of cetacean (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) bone phosphate and their environmental water is found in this study. Bone phosphate samples of dolphins living in fresh waters are more depleted in oxygen 18 than those of cetaceans living in the oceans, reflecting the clear difference in the isotope composition of water. Cetaceans distributed in the higher latitudes in the oceans are more depleted in oxygen 18 than those distributed in the lower latitudes where seawater is slightly enriched in oxygen 18 relative to that in the higher latitudes. The present results provide a promising tool for estimating the oxygen isotope ratio of the oceanic water of the past without assuming water temperature.

  13. Nitric Acid Revamp and Upgrading of the Alarm & Protection Safety System at Petrokemija, Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoško, I.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Every industrial production, particularly chemical processing, demands special attention in conducting the technological process with regard to the security requirements. For this reason, production processes should be continuously monitored by means of control and alarm safety instrumented systems. In the production of nitric acid at Petrokemija d. d., the original alarm safety system was designed as a combination of an electrical relay safety system and transistorized alarm module system. In order to increase safety requirements and modernize the technological process of nitric acid production, revamping and upgrading of the existing alarm safety system was initiated with a new microprocessor system. The newly derived alarm safety system, Simatic PCS 7, links the function of "classically" distributed control (DCS and logical systems in a common hardware and software platform with integrated engineering tools and operator interface to meet the minimum safety standards with safety integrity level 2 (SIL2 up to level 3 (SIL3, according to IEC 61508 and IEC 61511. This professional paper demonstrates the methodology of upgrading the logic of the alarm safety system in the production of nitric acid in the form of a logical diagram, which was the basis for a further step in its design and construction. Based on the mentioned logical diagram and defined security requirements, the project was implemented in three phases: analysis and testing, installation of the safety equipment and system, and commissioning. Developed also was a verification system of all safety conditions, which could be applied to other facilities for production of nitric acid. With the revamped and upgraded interlock alarm safety system, a new and improved safety boundary in the production of nitric acid was set, which created the foundation for further improvement of the production process in terms of improved analysis.

  14. A technical approach for determining the importance of information in computerized alarm systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortney, D.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Lim, J.J. [Lim and Orzechowski Associates, Alamo, CA (United States)

    1994-06-10

    Computerized alarm and access control systems must be treated as special entities rather than as generic automated information systems. This distinction arises due to the real-time control and monitoring functions performed by these systems at classified facilities and the degree of centralization of a site`s safeguards system information in the associated databases. As an added requirement for these systems, DOE safeguards and security classification policy is to protect information whose dissemination has the potential for significantly increasing the probability of successful adversary action against the facility, or lowering adversary resources needed for a successful attack. Thus at issue is just how valuable would specific alarm system information be to an adversary with a higher order objective. We have developed and applied a technical approach for determining the importance of information contained in computerized alarm and access control systems. The methodology is based on vulnerability assessment rather than blanket classification rules. This method uses a system architecture diagram to guide the analysis and to develop adversary defeat methods for each node and link. These defeat methods are evaluated with respect to required adversary resources, technical difficulty, and detection capability. Then they are incorporated into site vulnerability assessments to determine the significance of alarm system information in the context of a facility attack. This methodology was successfully applied to the Argus alarm, access control, and assessment system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Lab. Argus is software-driven, contains interrelated databases, shares host computers, and communicates with field processors and alarms through a common network. The evaluation results provided insights into the importance of alarm system information while the methodology itself provided a framework for addressing associated information protection issues.

  15. Reduction of false arrhythmia alarms using signal selection and machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eerikäinen, Linda M; Vanschoren, Joaquin; Rooijakkers, Michael J; Vullings, Rik; Aarts, Ronald M

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm that classifies whether a generated cardiac arrhythmia alarm is true or false. The large number of false alarms in intensive care is a severe issue. The noise peaks caused by alarms can be high and in a noisy environment nurses can experience stress and fatigue. In addition, patient safety is compromised because reaction time of the caregivers to true alarms is reduced. The data for the algorithm development consisted of records of electrocardiogram (ECG), arterial blood pressure, and photoplethysmogram signals in which an alarm for either asystole, extreme bradycardia, extreme tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation or flutter, or ventricular tachycardia occurs. First, heart beats are extracted from every signal. Next, the algorithm selects the most reliable signal pair from the available signals by comparing how well the detected beats match between different signals based on [Formula: see text]-score and selecting the best match. From the selected signal pair, arrhythmia specific features, such as heart rate features and signal purity index are computed for the alarm classification. The classification is performed with five separate Random Forest models. In addition, information on the local noise level of the selected ECG lead is added to the classification. The algorithm was trained and evaluated with the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2015 data set. In the test set the overall true positive rates were 93 and 95% and true negative rates 80 and 83%, respectively for events with no information and events with information after the alarm. The overall challenge scores were 77.39 and 81.58. PMID:27454128

  16. Interspecific semantic alarm call recognition in the solitary Sahamalaza sportive lemur, Lepilemur sahamalazensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Seiler

    Full Text Available As alarm calls indicate the presence of predators, the correct interpretation of alarm calls, including those of other species, is essential for predator avoidance. Conversely, communication calls of other species might indicate the perceived absence of a predator and hence allow a reduction in vigilance. This "eavesdropping" was demonstrated in birds and mammals, including lemur species. Interspecific communication between taxonomic groups has so far been reported in some reptiles and mammals, including three primate species. So far, neither semantic nor interspecific communication has been tested in a solitary and nocturnal lemur species. The aim of this study was to investigate if the nocturnal and solitary Sahamalaza sportive lemur, Lepilemur sahamalazensis, is able to access semantic information of sympatric species. During the day, this species faces the risk of falling prey to aerial and terrestrial predators and therefore shows high levels of vigilance. We presented alarm calls of the crested coua, the Madagascar magpie-robin and aerial, terrestrial and agitation alarm calls of the blue-eyed black lemur to 19 individual Sahamalaza sportive lemurs resting in tree holes. Songs of both bird species' and contact calls of the blue-eyed black lemur were used as a control. After alarm calls of crested coua, Madagascar magpie-robin and aerial alarm of the blue-eyed black lemur, the lemurs scanned up and their vigilance increased significantly. After presentation of terrestrial alarm and agitation calls of the blue-eyed black lemur, the animals did not show significant changes in scanning direction or in the duration of vigilance. Sportive lemur vigilance decreased after playbacks of songs of the bird species and contact calls of blue-eyed black lemurs. Our results indicate that the Sahamalaza sportive lemur is capable of using information on predator presence as well as predator type of different sympatric species, using their referential

  17. A new diagnosis method using alarm annunciation for FBR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the methodology diversity for diagnosis reasoning in autonomous operation system, and propose a new diagnosis method using alarm annunciation system. The methodology diversity is assured by preparing plural agents, each of which is based on its own different methodology, therefore, it is expected for the reliability in diagnosis to be improved. Meanwhile, the combination of annunciated alarms is expected to be peculiar to the anomalous phenomenon or accident. Moreover, as the state of affairs is developing, each appearance of the pattern is changing with time peculiarly to each anomaly or accident. The matter is utilized for the new diagnosis method. The patterns of annunciated alarms with progress of the events are prepared in advance under the condition of the anomalies or accidents by use of plant simulatory. The diagnostic reasoning can be done by comparing the obtained combination of annunciated alarms with the reference templates, pattern matching method. On the other hand, we have another method, called as COBWEB used for conceptual classification in cognitive science, to reason for diagnosis. We have carried out the experiments using the loop type LMFBR plant simulator to obtain the various combinations of annunciated alarms with progress of the events under the conditions of anomalies and accidents. The examined cases were related to the anomalies and accidents in the water/steam system of the LMFBR power plant. We have obtained the conclusions that it is effective to reason the causes of anomalies using the annunciated alarms. We are going to apply the pattern matching technique or COBWEB method into the diagnostic reasoning to confirm the performance of the proposed diagnosis method based on the alarm annunciation. (author). 5 refs, 14 figs

  18. Reducing false alarms in the ICU by quantifying self-similarity of multimodal biosignals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antink, Christoph Hoog; Leonhardt, Steffen; Walter, Marian

    2016-08-01

    False arrhythmia alarms pose a major threat to the quality of care in today's ICU. Thus, the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2015 aimed at reducing false alarms by exploiting multimodal cardiac signals recorded by a patient monitor. False alarms for asystole, extreme bradycardia, extreme tachycardia, ventricular flutter/fibrillation as well as ventricular tachycardia were to be reduced using two electrocardiogram channels, up to two cardiac signals of mechanical origin as well as a respiratory signal. In this paper, an approach combining multimodal rhythmicity estimation and machine learning is presented. Using standard short-time autocorrelation and robust beat-to-beat interval estimation, the signal's self-similarity is analyzed. In particular, beat intervals as well as quality measures are derived which are further quantified using basic mathematical operations (min, mean, max, etc). Moreover, methods from the realm of image processing, 2D Fourier transformation combined with principal component analysis, are employed for dimensionality reduction. Several machine learning approaches are evaluated including linear discriminant analysis and random forest. Using an alarm-independent reduction strategy, an overall false alarm reduction with a score of 65.52 in terms of the real-time scoring system of the challenge is achieved on a hidden dataset. Employing an alarm-specific strategy, an overall real-time score of 78.20 at a true positive rate of 95% and a true negative rate of 78% is achieved. While the results for some categories still need improvement, false alarms for extreme tachycardia are suppressed with 100% sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27454256

  19. The nature of alarm communication in Constrictotermes cyphergaster (Blattodea: Termitoidea: Termitidae: the integration of chemical and vibroacoustic signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo F. Cristaldo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Alarm signalling is of paramount importance to communication in all social insects. In termites, vibroacoustic and chemical alarm signalling are bound to operate synergistically but have never been studied simultaneously in a single species. Here, we inspected the functional significance of both communication channels in Constrictotermes cyphergaster (Termitidae: Nasutitermitinae, confirming the hypothesis that these are not exclusive, but rather complementary processes. In natural situations, the alarm predominantly attracts soldiers, which actively search for the source of a disturbance. Laboratory testing revealed that the frontal gland of soldiers produces a rich mixture of terpenoid compounds including an alarm pheromone. Extensive testing led to identification of the alarm pheromone being composed of abundant monoterpene hydrocarbons (1S-α-pinene and myrcene, along with a minor component, (E-β-ocimene. The vibratory alarm signalling consists of vibratory movements evidenced as bursts; a series of beats produced predominantly by soldiers. Exposing termite groups to various mixtures containing the alarm pheromone (crushed soldier heads, frontal gland extracts, mixture of all monoterpenes, and the alarm pheromone mixture made of standards resulted in significantly higher activity in the tested groups and also increased intensity of the vibratory alarm communication, with the responses clearly dose-dependent. Lower doses of the pheromone provoked higher numbers of vibratory signals compared to higher doses. Higher doses induced long-term running of all termites without stops necessary to perform vibratory behaviour. Surprisingly, even crushed worker heads led to low (but significant increases in the alarm responses, suggesting that other unknown compound in the worker's head is perceived and answered by termites. Our results demonstrate the existence of different alarm levels in termites, with lower levels being communicated through

  20. Possible ozone depletions following nuclear explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, R. C.; Borucki, W. J.; Turco, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    The degree of depletion of the ozone layer ensuing after delivery of strategic nuclear warheads (5000 and 10,000 Mton) due to production of nitrogen oxides is theoretically assessed. Strong depletions are calculated for 16-km and 26-km altitudes, peaking 1-2 months after detonation and lasting for three years, while a significant depletion at 36 km would peak after one year. Assuming the explosions occur between 30 and 70 deg N, these effects should be much more pronounced in this region than over the Northern Hemisphere as a whole. It is concluded that Hampson's concern on this matter (1974) is well-founded.-

  1. A LFP-tree based method for association rules mining in telecommunication alarm correlation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The mining of association rules is one of the primary methods used in telecommunication alarm correlation analysis,of which the alarm databases are very large.The efficiency of the algorithms plays an important role in tackling with large datasets. The classical frequent pattern growth(FP-growth) algorithm can produce a large number of conditional pattern trees which made it difficult to mine association rules in are telecommunication environment.In this paper,an algorithm based on layered frequent pattern tree(LFP-tree) is proposed for mining frequent patterns. Efficiency of this alagorithm is achieved with following techniques:1) All the frequent patterns are condensed into a layered structure,which can save memory time but also be very useful for updating the alarm databases.2) Each alarm item can be viewed as a triple,in which t is a Boolean vaviable that shows the item frequent or not.3) Deleting infrequent items with dynamic pruning can avoid produce conditional pattern sets. Simulation and analysis of algorithm show that it is a valid method with better time and space efficiency,which is adapted to mine association rules in telecommunication alarm correlation analysis.

  2. ALARM-P1: a computer program for pressurized water reactor blowdown analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer program ALARM-P1 written in FORTRAN-IV for FACOM 230-75 is a part of the code series for evaluation of performance of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) in pressurized water reactors according to the safety evaluation guidelines provided by the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan. ALARM-P1 is for analyzing the thermo-hydraulic phenomena during blowdown following a large break in the primary coolant system. ALARM-P1 models the PWR system fluid conditions including flow, pressure, mass inventory, fluid quality and heat transfer. It solves integral forms of fluid conservation and state equations for user-defined volumes treated as one-dimensional homogeneous, thermal-equilibrium elements with interconnecting flow paths and also finite difference forms of the one-dimensional heat conduction equations describing temperature profiles within solid material and the fluid-solid interface conditions. In addition, the ALARM-P1 provides the initial conditions for analysis of the last portion of the LOCA transient, a reflood phase, and the information for core heat-up analysis during the whole LOCA. This report describes the state-of-art methods and models of ALARM-P1 in June 1978 and gives information for users. (author)

  3. Bees eavesdrop upon informative and persistent signal compounds in alarm pheromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengwei; Wen, Ping; Qu, Yufeng; Dong, Shihao; Li, Jianjun; Tan, Ken; Nieh, James C

    2016-01-01

    Pollinators such as bees provide a critical ecosystem service that can be impaired by information about predation. We provide the first evidence for olfactory eavesdropping and avoidance of heterospecific alarm signals, alarm pheromones, at food sources in bees. We predicted that foragers could eavesdrop upon heterospecific alarm pheromones, and would detect and avoid conspicuous individual pheromone compounds, defined by abundance and their ability to persist. We show that Apis cerana foragers avoid the distinctive alarm pheromones of A. dorsata and A. mellifera, species that share the same floral resources and predators. We next examined responses to individual alarm pheromone compounds. Apis cerana foragers avoided isopentyl acetate (IPA), which is found in all three species and is the most abundant and volatile of the tested compounds. Interestingly, A. cerana also avoided an odor component, gamma-octanoic lactone (GOL), which is >150-fold less volatile than IPA. Chemical analyses confirmed that GOL is only present in A. dorsata, not in A. cerana. Electroantennogram (EAG) recordings revealed that A. cerana antennae are 10-fold more sensitive to GOL than to other tested compounds. Thus, the eavesdropping strategy is shaped by signal conspicuousness (abundance and commonality) and signal persistence (volatility). PMID:27157595

  4. The sound of danger: threat sensitivity to predator vocalizations, alarm calls, and novelty in gulls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A MacLean

    Full Text Available The threat sensitivity hypothesis predicts that organisms will evaluate the relative danger of and respond differentially to varying degrees of predation threat. Doing so allows potential prey to balance the costs and benefits of anti-predator behaviors. Threat sensitivity has undergone limited testing in the auditory modality, and the relative threat level of auditory cues from different sources is difficult to infer across populations when variables such as background risk and experience are not properly controlled. We experimentally exposed a single population of two sympatric gull species to auditory stimuli representing a range of potential threats in order to compare the relative threat of heterospecific alarm calls, conspecific alarms calls, predator vocalizations, and novel auditory cues. Gulls were able to discriminate among a diverse set of threat indicators and respond in a graded manner commensurate with the level of threat. Vocalizations of two potential predators, the human voice and bald eagle call, differed in their threat level compared to each other and to alarm calls. Conspecific alarm calls were more threatening than heterospecfic alarm calls to the larger great black-backed gull, but the smaller herring gull weighed both equally. A novel cue elicited a response intermediate between known threats and a known non-threat in herring gulls, but not great black-backed gulls. Our results show that the relative threat level of auditory cues from different sources is highly species-dependent, and that caution should be exercised when comparing graded and threshold threat sensitive responses.

  5. Rating of the efficiency of alarm systems in reactor accident emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience made with alarm systems designed to alert the population in the Federal Republik of Germany and in the US is discussed. German law on a national and regional level does not deal with alerting the population to the same degree as with alerting the disaster control agency, voluntary services and their members. The local disaster control agencies have to decide for themselves which alarm systems are to be used in an emergency caused by a nuclear accident. In order to clarify fundamentals for decision-making, the efficiency of existing alarm systems was analyzed. It was valuated according to six criteria. It became apparent that the system 'sirens/radio/TV' included in alarm plans so far can not ensure alerting of the population in an emergency caused by a nuclear accident, whereas the system using laudspeaker vans needs further inquiry and testing to determine its efficiency. Suggestions are made to improve the above alarm systems, and an alternative to existing systems is shown. (orig./HP)

  6. Embedded alarm unit for reactor protection and other safety critical applications in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliability of Reactor Protection Systems (RPS) in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) depends on performance of the sensors, transmitters, alarm units, voting logic applied, the design basis followed (i.e redundancy, diversity used) and on-line surveillance on these signals, instruments and logic. Measurement of neutron power, reactor period and various process parameters like temperature, pressure, flow level, is important for NPP safety and monitoring and processing of these parameters is done continuously for automatic actuation of Shutdown Systems (SDS) whenever these parameters exceed respective Limiting Safety System Settings. A high speed microcontroller based alarm module is planned for each neutronic parameter in each channel. The implementation of voting logic and final redundant control is based on relay logic and are external to these alarm units. The proposed alarm modules use onboard DC-DC power supply complying MIL/STD/461C/D to provide ground isolation from sensor to logic circuit for each parameter. It has self diagnostic features and provides watchdog timer for online monitoring of health of the microcontroller and forces outputs to trip state/fail-safe state, when it fails. The embedded software used in the alarm module is simple and modular with no code optimization used. (author)

  7. Advances in software development for intelligent interfaces for alarm and emergency management consoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in technology allow features like voice synthesis, voice and speech recognition, image understanding, and intelligent data base management to be incorporated in computer driven alarm and emergency management information systems. New software development environments make it possible to do rapid prototyping of custom applications. Three examples using these technologies are discussed. (1) Maximum use is made of high-speed graphics and voice synthesis to implement a state-of-the-art alarm processing and display system with features that make the operator-machine interface efficient and accurate. Although very functional, this system is not portable or flexible; the software would have to be substantially rewritten for other applications. (2) An application generator which has the capability of ''building'' a specific alarm processing and display application in a matter of a few hours, using the site definition developed in the security planning phase to produce the custom application. This package is based on a standardized choice of hardware, within which it is capable of building a system to order, automatically constructing graphics, data tables, alarm prioritization rules, and interfaces to peripherals. (3) A software tool, the User Interface Management System (UIMS), is described which permits rapid prototyping of human-machine interfaces for a variety of applications including emergency management, alarm display and process information display. The object-oriented software of the UIMS achieves rapid prototyping of a new interface by standardizing to a class library of software objects instead of hardware objects

  8. Real depletion in nodal diffusion codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel depletion is described by more than one hundred fuel isotopes in the advanced lattice codes like HELIOS, but only a few fuel isotopes are accounted for even in the advanced steady-state diffusion codes. The general assumption that the number densities of the majority of the fuel isotopes depend only on the fuel burnup is seriously in error if high burnup is considered. The real depletion conditions in the reactor core differ from the asymptotic ones at the stage of lattice depletion calculations. This study reveals which fuel isotopes should be explicitly accounted for in the diffusion codes in order to predict adequately the real depletion effects in the core. A somewhat strange conclusion is that if the real number densities of the main fissionable isotopes are not explicitly accounted for in the diffusion code, then Sm-149 should not be accounted for either, because the net error in k-inf is smaller (Authors)

  9. Fully Depleted Charge-Coupled Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed fully depleted, back-illuminated CCDs that build upon earlier research and development efforts directed towards technology development of silicon-strip detectors used in high-energy-physics experiments. The CCDs are fabricated on the same type of high-resistivity, float-zone-refined silicon that is used for strip detectors. The use of high-resistivity substrates allows for thick depletion regions, on the order of 200-300 um, with corresponding high detection efficiency for near-infrared and soft x-ray photons. We compare the fully depleted CCD to the p-i-n diode upon which it is based, and describe the use of fully depleted CCDs in astronomical and x-ray imaging applications

  10. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  11. Depleted UF6 programmatic environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy has developed a program for long-term management and use of depleted uranium hexafluoride, a product of the uranium enrichment process. As part of this effort, DOE is preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for the depleted UF6 management program. This report duplicates the information available at the web site (http://www.ead.anl.gov/web/newduf6) set up as a repository for the PEIS. Options for the web site include: reviewing recent additions or changes to the web site; learning more about depleted UF6 and the PEIS; browsing the PEIS and related documents, or submitting official comments on the PEIS; downloading all or part of the PEIS documents; and adding or deleting one's name from the depleted UF6 mailing list

  12. Ecological considerations of natural and depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depleted 238U is a major by-product of the nuclear fuel cycle for which increasing use is being made in counterweights, radiation shielding, and ordnance applications. This paper (1) summarizes the pertinent literature on natural and depleted uranium in the environment, (2) integrates results of a series of ecological studies conducted at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in New Mexico where 70,000 kg of depleted and natural uranium has been expended to the environment over the past 34 years, and (3) synthesizes the information into an assessment of the ecological consequences of natural and depleted uranium released to the environment by various means. Results of studies of soil, plant, and animal communities exposed to this radiation and chemical environment over a third of a century provide a means of evaluating the behavior and effects of uranium in many contexts

  13. Depleted Uranium and Its Effects on Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Hon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes contemporary scientific knowledge of depleted uranium effects on human health due to its use in military conflicts. The discussion covers cases of minimal risk due to external irradiation resulting from the storage and handling of depleted uranium ammunition and, in contrast, important toxicological and radio-toxicological risks of late effects resulting from the inhalation and ingestion of dust particles produced by the burning of the core of the anti-tank ammunition.

  14. Depleted Uranium and Its Effects on Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Zdeněk Hon; Jan Österreicher; Leoš Navrátil

    2015-01-01

    The article summarizes contemporary scientific knowledge of depleted uranium effects on human health due to its use in military conflicts. The discussion covers cases of minimal risk due to external irradiation resulting from the storage and handling of depleted uranium ammunition and, in contrast, important toxicological and radio-toxicological risks of late effects resulting from the inhalation and ingestion of dust particles produced by the burning of the core of the anti-tank ammunition.

  15. Depleted Bulk Heterojunction Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Barkhouse, D. Aaron R.

    2011-05-26

    The first solution-processed depleted bulk heterojunction colloidal quantum dot solar cells are presented. The architecture allows for high absorption with full depletion, thereby breaking the photon absorption/carrier extraction compromise inherent in planar devices. A record power conversion of 5.5% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions is reported. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Microfluidic dissolved oxygen gradient generator biochip as a useful tool in bacterial biofilm studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skolimowski, Maciej; Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Emnéus, Jenny;

    2010-01-01

    A microfluidic chip for generation of gradients of dissolved oxygen was designed, fabricated and tested. The novel way of active oxygen depletion through a gas permeable membrane was applied. Numerical simulations for generation of O-2 gradients were correlated with measured oxygen concentrations...

  17. Radiative characteristics of depleted uranium bomb and it is protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the developing process of depleted uranium bombs described in the first part, the radiative characteristics and mechanism of depleted uranium bombs are analyzed emphatically. The deeper discussion on protection of depleted uranium bombs is proceeded

  18. Constant false alarm rate algorithm for the dim-small target detection based on the distribution characteristics of target coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xiao-Liang; Ren, Kan; Qian, Wei-xian; Wang, Peng-cheng

    2015-10-01

    CFAR (Constant False Alarm Rate) is a key technology in Infrared dim-small target detection system. Because the traditional constant false alarm rate detection algorithm gets the probability density distribution which is based on the pixel information of each area in the whole image and calculates the target segmentation threshold of each area by formula of Constant false alarm rate, the problems including the difficulty of probability distribution statistics and large amount of algorithm calculation and long delay time are existing. In order to solve the above problems effectively, a formula of Constant false alarm rate based on target coordinates distribution is presented. Firstly, this paper proposes a new formula of Constant false alarm rate by improving the traditional formula of Constant false alarm rate based on the single grayscale distribution which objective statistical distribution features are introduced. So the control of false alarm according to the target distribution information is implemented more accurately and the problem of high false alarm that is caused of the complex background in local area as the cloud reflection and the ground clutter interference is solved. At the same time, in order to reduce the amount of algorithm calculation and improve the real-time characteristics of algorithm, this paper divides the constant false-alarm statistical area through two-dimensional probability density distribution of target number adaptively which is different from the general identifying methods of constant false-alarm statistical area. Finally, the target segmentation threshold of next frame is calculated by iteration based on the function of target distribution probability density in image sequence which can achieve the purpose of controlling the false alarm until the false alarm is down to the upper limit. The experiment results show that the proposed method can significantly improve the operation time and meet the real-time requirements on

  19. Recognition of false alarms of loose parts monitoring system using neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Loose Part Monitoring System (LPMS) has been designed to detect, locate and evaluated detached or loosened parts and foreign objects in the reactor coolant system. In the existing LPMS, due to the high sensitivity of acoustic monitoring, the detection potential for impact occurrences is comparatively high. But, too frequent false or unnecessary alarms can reduce the confidence to LPMS. To reduce false alarm occurrence rate, this paper presents an application of the back propagation neural network. At the preprocessing step, the moving window average filter is adoped to reject the low frequency background noise components. And then, extracting the acoustic signature such as starting point of impact signal, Rising time, Half period, and Global time, they are used as the inputs to neural network. Applying the neural network to the practical false data during startup and impact test signal at nuclear power plant, the false alarms are reduced to one fourth level

  20. Associations between reporting of cancer alarm symptoms and socioeconomic and demographic determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Rikke Pilsgaard; Paulsen, Maja S; Larsen, Pia V;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Reporting of symptoms which may signal cancer is the first step in the diagnostic pathway of cancer diseases. Cancer alarm symptoms are common in the general population. Public awareness and knowledge of cancer symptoms are sparse, however, and many people do not seek medical...... help when having possible cancer symptoms. As social inequality is associated with cancer knowledge, cancer awareness, and information-seeking, our hypothesis is that social inequality may also exist in the general population with respect to reporting of cancer alarm symptoms. The aim of this study was...... to investigate possible associations between socioeconomic and demographic determinants and reporting of common cancer alarm symptoms. METHODS: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed based on a stratified sample of the Danish general population. A total of 13 777 randomly selected...

  1. Les phéromones d'alarme dans le règne animal

    OpenAIRE

    Verheggen, François; Haubruge, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Beaucoup d'animaux répondent à la menace de la prédation en produisant des signaux d'alarme qui avertissent les autres individus de la présence de danger ou qui réduisent le succès de prédateurs. Alors que les signaux d'alarme peuvent être de nature visuelle, auditive ou chimique, les phéromones d'alarme sont fréquentes, surtout chez les insectes et les organismes aquatiques. Les plantes aussi émettent des signaux chimiques en réponse à l'attaque par les insectes herbivores qui recrutent les ...

  2. Sequence and batch language programs and alarm related C Programs for the 242-A MCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, J.F.

    1996-04-15

    A Distributive Process Control system was purchased by Project B-534, 242-A Evaporator/Crystallizer Upgrades. This control system, called the Monitor and Control system (MCS), was installed in the 242-A evaporator located in the 200 East Area. The purpose of the MCS is to monitor and control the Evaporator and monitor a number of alarms and other signals from various Tank Farm facilities. Applications software for the MCS was developed by the Waste Treatment Systems Engineering (WTSE) group of Westinghouse. The standard displays and alarm scheme provide for control and monitoring, but do not directly indicate the signal location or depict the overall process. To do this, WTSE developed a second alarm scheme.

  3. An embedded telecommunication cable auto-locating system of guard against theft and alarm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Li, Jun; Jin, Tian-Bo; Zhang, Li-yong

    2005-12-01

    This system adopted two-level structure that was composed of Cable Monitoring And Controlling Device (CMCD) and Cable Monitoring Center (CMC). CMC receives the alarm data via the MODEM and the telephone net. In this way, the functions of typing the fault point's map, alarming and the cable management can be picked up. CMCD takes the processor chip Atemega128 as the center of the system that adopted the alternating current and direct current on-line switching electricity-supply mode. Also, the system includes four groups of independent power, the relay and the optical isolation to separate the system from the monitoring cable and the telephone net. CMCD accomplishes the cable real-time monitoring, malfunctions auto-locating, telephone voice alarming, long-distance parameters modification, data up-loading, error verifying and the telecommunication room's environment monitoring and so on. The longest distance of monitoring cable is 20 km, and the precision is 1%.

  4. Groundwater Depletion in Dhaka City, Bangladesh: A Spatio-temporal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerin, T.; Ishtiaque, A.

    2015-12-01

    Dhaka city, having a population of more than fifteen million, exclusively depends on groundwater as a source of quality drinking water. In recent decades the city is encountering groundwater diminution and the declining scenario is dissimilar in different parts of the city. This paper aims to discuss the groundwater depletion in different parts of Dhaka city from 1990 to 2012 along with the causes and consequences. Groundwater level data of different locations of Dhaka city were collected from Bangladesh Water Development Board (BWDB). The data were processed and analyzed using SPSS and Excel Worksheet; a contour map was generated using ArcGIS 10.0 to outline the contemporary groundwater scenario of Dhaka city and the spatial analyst tool, Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) was used to prepare the map. In addition, experts' opinions were collected using an in-depth interview strategy in order to provide a better understanding of the causes and consequences of groundwater depletion. The research results show that groundwater in Dhaka city is depleting at an alarming rate; the central part has the worst situation followed by the south-western part. In contrast, northern part has relatively better groundwater condition. Moreover, the peripheral zone exhibits a better condition because of the existence of rivers and wetlands. The interviews reveal that population density and overexploitation are mainly responsible for groundwater depletion; however, various other factors such as the deliberate establishment of deep tube wells, reduction of recharge capacity due to rapid growth of urban structures altogether results in huge drop of water level throughout the city. Rapid decline in groundwater augments the city's exposure towards multiple risks including land subsidence, groundwater pollution and most importantly, paucity of available fresh water that might ultimately results into an urban disaster. Potential solutions to ameliorate this situation include urban greening

  5. An alarm filtering system for an automated process: a multiple-agent approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays, the supervision process of industrial installations is more and more complex involving the automation of their control. A malfunction generates an avalanche of alarms. The operator, in charge of the supervision, must face the incident and execute right actions to recover a normal situation. Generally, he is drowned under the great number of alarms. Our aim, in the frame of our researches, is to perform an alarm filtering system for an automated metro line, to help the operator finding the main alarm responsible for the malfunction. Our works are divided into two parts, both dealing with study and development of an alarm filtering system but using two different approaches. The first part is developed in the frame of the SARA project (an operator assistance system for an automated metro line) which is an expert system prototype helping the operators of a command center. In this part, a centralized approach has been used representing the events with a single event graph and using a global procedure to perform diagnosis. This approach has itself shown its limits. In the second part of our works, we have considered the distributed artificial intelligence (DAI) techniques, and more especially the multi-agent approach. The multi-agent approach has been motivated by the natural distribution of the metro line equipment and by the fact that each equipment has its own local control and knowledge. Thus, each equipment has been considered as an autonomous agent. Through agents cooperation, the system is able to determine the main alarm and the faulty equipment responsible for the incident. A prototype, written in SPIRAL (a tool for knowledge-based system) is running on a workstation. This prototype has allowed the concretization and the validation of our multi-agent approach. (author)

  6. Verification of criticality accident alarm system detector locations for the X-326 process cell floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criticality Accident Alarm System (CAAS) detectors on the cell floor of the X-326 process building at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) are located at a height of 5 m above the cell floor. It has been suggested that this height be lowered to I m to alleviate accelerated system failures caused by the elevated temperatures at 5 m and to reduce the frequency of injury to maintenance personnel lifting the approximately 90-lb units into position. Work has been performed which analyzed the effect of relocating the CAAS detectors on the process floors of the X-333 and X-330 buildings from their current height to a height of 1 m1. This earlier work was based on criticality accidents occurring in low enriched material (5% 235U) and was limited to the X-333 and X-330 buildings and the low enriched areas of X-326. It did not consider the residual higher enriched material in the X-326 building. This report analyzes the effect on criticality alarm coverage of lowering the CAAS detectors. This analysis is based on criticality accidents resulting from higher enriched material which may be present as ''hold-up'' in the process equipment within the X-326 building. The criticality accident alarm detectors at the PORTS facility are set to alarm at a neutron absorbed dose rate of 5 mrad/hr. The calculated absorbed dose rates presented in this report show that the detectors examined that produce an alarm for the given criticality event at their current height will also produce an alarm if located at a height of 1 meter. Therefore, lowering the detectors will not result in a loss of coverage within the building

  7. Mitochondria, cellular stress resistance, somatic cell depletion and lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Ellen L; Page, Melissa M; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2009-03-01

    The causes of aging and determinants of maximum lifespan in animal species are multifaceted and complex. However, a wealth of experimental data suggests that mitochondria are involved both in the aging process and in regulating lifespan. Here we outline a somatic cell depletion (SCD) model to account for correlations between: (1) mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and lifespan; (2) mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes and lifespan; (3) mitochondrial DNA mutation and lifespan and (4) cellular stress resistance and lifespan. We examine the available data from within the framework of the SCD model, in which mitochondrial dysfunction leading to cell death and gradual loss of essential somatic cells eventually contributes to the decline in physiological performance that limits lifespan. This model is useful in explaining many of the mitochondrial manipulations that alter maximum lifespan in a variety of animal species; however, there are a number of caveats and critical experiments outstanding, and these are outlined in this review. PMID:20021396

  8. Alarm Reduction Processing of Advanced Nuclear Power Plant Using Data Mining and Active Database Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Advanced Alarm Processing (AAP) is to extract only the most important and the most relevant data out of large amount of available information. It should be noted that the integrity of the knowledge base is the most critical in developing a reliable AAP. This paper proposes a new approach to an AAP by using Event-Condition-Action(ECA) rules that can be automatically triggered by an active database. Also this paper proposed a knowledge acquisition method using data mining techniques to obtain the integrity of the alarm knowledge

  9. Cystamine induces AIF-mediated apoptosis through glutathione depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Yup; Lee, Jin-Haeng; Ju, Mi-kyeong; Jeong, Eui Man; Kim, Hyo-Jun; Lim, Jisun; Lee, Seungun; Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Park, Hyun Ho; Choi, Kihang; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Kim, In-Gyu

    2015-03-01

    Cystamine and its reduced form cysteamine showed protective effects in various models of neurodegenerative disease, including Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease. Other lines of evidence demonstrated the cytotoxic effect of cysteamine on duodenal mucosa leading to ulcer development. However, the mechanism for cystamine cytotoxicity remains poorly understood. Here, we report a new pathway in which cystamine induces apoptosis by targeting apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). By screening of various cell lines, we observed that cystamine and cysteamine induce cell death in a cell type-specific manner. Comparison between cystamine-sensitive and cystamine-resistant cell lines revealed that cystamine cytotoxicity is not associated with unfolded protein response, reactive oxygen species generation and transglutaminase or caspase activity; rather, it is associated with the ability of cystamine to trigger AIF nuclear translocation. In cystamine-sensitive cells, cystamine suppresses the levels of intracellular glutathione by inhibiting γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase expression that triggers AIF translocation. Conversely, glutathione supplementation completely prevents cystamine-induced AIF translocation and apoptosis. In rats, cysteamine administration induces glutathione depletion and AIF translocation leading to apoptosis of duodenal epithelium. These results indicate that AIF translocation through glutathione depletion is the molecular mechanism of cystamine toxicity, and provide important implications for cystamine in the neurodegenerative disease therapeutics as well as in the regulation of AIF-mediated cell death. PMID:25549939

  10. EPRI depletion benchmark calculations using PARAGON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • PARAGON depletion calculations are benchmarked against the EPRI reactivity decrement experiments. • Benchmarks cover a wide range of enrichments, burnups, cooling times, and burnable absorbers, and different depletion and storage conditions. • Results from PARAGON-SCALE scheme are more conservative relative to the benchmark data. • ENDF/B-VII based data reduces the excess conservatism and brings the predictions closer to benchmark reactivity decrement values. - Abstract: In order to conservatively apply burnup credit in spent fuel pool criticality analyses, code validation for both fresh and used fuel is required. Fresh fuel validation is typically done by modeling experiments from the “International Handbook.” A depletion validation can determine a bias and bias uncertainty for the worth of the isotopes not found in the fresh fuel critical experiments. Westinghouse’s burnup credit methodology uses PARAGON™ (Westinghouse 2-D lattice physics code) and its 70-group cross-section library, which have been benchmarked, qualified, and licensed both as a standalone transport code and as a nuclear data source for core design simulations. A bias and bias uncertainty for the worth of depletion isotopes, however, are not available for PARAGON. Instead, the 5% decrement approach for depletion uncertainty is used, as set forth in the Kopp memo. Recently, EPRI developed a set of benchmarks based on a large set of power distribution measurements to ascertain reactivity biases. The depletion reactivity has been used to create 11 benchmark cases for 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 GWd/MTU and 3 cooling times 100 h, 5 years, and 15 years. These benchmark cases are analyzed with PARAGON and the SCALE package and sensitivity studies are performed using different cross-section libraries based on ENDF/B-VI.3 and ENDF/B-VII data to assess that the 5% decrement approach is conservative for determining depletion uncertainty

  11. Incorporation of copper ions into crystals of T2 copper-depleted laccase from Botrytis aclada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, E M; Polyakov, K M; Tikhonova, T V; Kittl, R; Dorovatovskii, P V; Shleev, S V; Popov, V O; Ludwig, R

    2015-12-01

    Laccases belong to the class of multicopper oxidases catalyzing the oxidation of phenols accompanied by the reduction of molecular oxygen to water without the formation of hydrogen peroxide. The activity of laccases depends on the number of Cu atoms per enzyme molecule. The structure of type 2 copper-depleted laccase from Botrytis aclada has been solved previously. With the aim of obtaining the structure of the native form of the enzyme, crystals of the depleted laccase were soaked in Cu(+)- and Cu(2+)-containing solutions. Copper ions were found to be incorporated into the active site only when Cu(+) was used. A comparative analysis of the native and depleted forms of the enzymes was performed. PMID:26625287

  12. Role of Melanin in Melanocyte Dysregulation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Noah C.; Douglas Grossman

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported a potential alternative tumor suppressor function for p16 relating to its capacity to regulate oxidative stress and observed that oxidative dysregulation in p16-depleted cells was most profound in melanocytes, compared to keratinocytes or fibroblasts. Moreover, in the absence of p16 depletion or exogenous oxidative insult, melanocytes exhibited significantly higher basal levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) than these other epidermal cell types. Given the role of ...

  13. Design of alarm systems in Swedish nuclear power plants; Utformning av larmsystem i svenska kaernkraftverk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thunberg, Anna; Osvalder, Anna-Lisa (Dept. of Product and Production Development, Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2008-04-15

    Research within the area of improving alarm system design and performance has mainly focused on new alarm systems. However, smaller modernisations of legacy systems are more common in the Swedish nuclear industry than design of totally new systems. This imposes problems when the new system should function together with the old system. This project deals with the special concerns raised by modernisation projects. The objective of the project has been to increase the understanding of the relationship between the operator's performance and the design of the alarm system. Of major concern has been to consider the cognitive abilities of the operator, different operator roles and work situations, and varying need of information. The aim of the project has been to complement existing alarm design guidance and to develop user-centred alarm design concepts. Different case studies have been performed in several industry sectors (nuclear, oil refining, pulp and paper, aviation and medical care) to identify best practice. Several empirical studies have been performed within the nuclear area to investigate the operator's need of information, performance and workload in different operating modes. The aspect of teamwork has also been considered. The analyses show that the operator has different roles in different work situations which affect both the type of information needed and how the information is processed. In full power operation, the interaction between the operator and the alarm system is driven by internal factors and the operator tries to maintain high situation awareness by actively searching for information. The operator wants to optimise the process and need detailed information with possibilities to follow-up and get historical data. In disturbance management, the operator is more dependent on external information presented by the alarm system. The new compilation of alarm guidance is based on the operator's varying needs in different working

  14. Depletion sensitivity predicts unhealthy snack purchases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Stefanie J; Adriaanse, Marieke A; Fennis, Bob M; De Vet, Emely; De Ridder, Denise T D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to examine the relation between depletion sensitivity - a novel construct referring to the speed or ease by which one's self-control resources are drained - and snack purchase behavior. In addition, interactions between depletion sensitivity and the goal to lose weight on snack purchase behavior were explored. Participants included in the study were instructed to report every snack they bought over the course of one week. The dependent variables were the number of healthy and unhealthy snacks purchased. The results of the present study demonstrate that depletion sensitivity predicts the amount of unhealthy (but not healthy) snacks bought. The more sensitive people are to depletion, the more unhealthy snacks they buy. Moreover, there was some tentative evidence that this relation is more pronounced for people with a weak as opposed to a strong goal to lose weight, suggesting that a strong goal to lose weight may function as a motivational buffer against self-control failures. All in all, these findings provide evidence for the external validity of depletion sensitivity and the relevance of this construct in the domain of eating behavior. PMID:26321417

  15. The New MCNP6 Depletion Capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fensin, Michael Lorne [Los Alamos National Laboratory; James, Michael R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hendricks, John S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology.

  16. The modality effect of ego depletion: Auditory task modality reduces ego depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiong; Wang, Zhenhong

    2016-08-01

    An initial act of self-control that impairs subsequent acts of self-control is called ego depletion. The ego depletion phenomenon has been observed consistently. The modality effect refers to the effect of the presentation modality on the processing of stimuli. The modality effect was also robustly found in a large body of research. However, no study to date has examined the modality effects of ego depletion. This issue was addressed in the current study. In Experiment 1, after all participants completed a handgrip task, one group's participants completed a visual attention regulation task and the other group's participants completed an auditory attention regulation task, and then all participants again completed a handgrip task. The ego depletion phenomenon was observed in both the visual and the auditory attention regulation task. Moreover, participants who completed the visual task performed worse on the handgrip task than participants who completed the auditory task, which indicated that there was high ego depletion in the visual task condition. In Experiment 2, participants completed an initial task that either did or did not deplete self-control resources, and then they completed a second visual or auditory attention control task. The results indicated that depleted participants performed better on the auditory attention control task than the visual attention control task. These findings suggest that altering task modality may reduce ego depletion. PMID:27241617

  17. Depletion of the nuclear Fermi sea

    CERN Document Server

    Rios, A; Dickhoff, W H

    2009-01-01

    The short-range and tensor components of the bare nucleon-nucleon interaction induce a sizeable depletion of low momenta in the ground state of a nuclear many-body system. The self-consistent Green's function method within the ladder approximation provides an \\textit{ab-initio} description of correlated nuclear systems that accounts properly for these effects. The momentum distribution predicted by this approach is analyzed in detail, with emphasis on the depletion of the lowest momentum state. The temperature, density, and nucleon asymmetry (isospin) dependence of the depletion of the Fermi sea is clarified. A connection is established between the momentum distribution and the time-ordered components of the self-energy, which allows for an improved interpretation of the results. The dependence on the underlying nucleon-nucleon interaction provides quantitative estimates of the importance of short-range and tensor correlations in nuclear systems.

  18. Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Bao-Guo; Gu, Ji-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The supercritical, reactor core melting and nuclear fuel leaking accidents have troubled fission reactors for decades, and greatly limit their extensive applications. Now these troubles are still open. Here we first show a possible perfect reactor, Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor which is no above accident trouble. We found this reactor could be realized in practical applications in terms of all of the scientific principle, principle of operation, technology, and engineering. Our results demonstrate how these reactors can possess and realize extraordinary excellent characteristics, no prompt critical, long-term safe and stable operation with negative feedback, closed uranium-plutonium cycle chain within the vessel, normal operation only with depleted-uranium, and depleted-uranium high burnup in reality, to realize with fission nuclear energy sufficiently satisfying humanity long-term energy resource needs, as well as thoroughly solve the challenges of nuclear criticality safety, uranium resource insuffic...

  19. Depleted uranium and the Gulf War syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some military personnel involved in the 1991Gulf War have complained of continuing stress-like symptoms for which no obvious cause has been found. These symptoms have at times been attributed to the use of depleted uranium (DU) in shell casings which are believed to have caused toxic effects. Depleted uranium is natural uranium which is depleted in the rarer U-235 isotope. It is a heavy metal and in common with other heavy metals is chemically toxic. It is also slightly radioactive and could give rise to a radiological hazard if dispersed in finely divided form so that it was inhaled. In response to concerns, the possible effects of DU have been extensively studied along with other possible contributors to Gulf War sickness. This article looks at the results of some of the research that has been done on DU. (author)

  20. Ozone depletion and chlorine loading potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, John A.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Solomon, Susan; Zvenigorodsky, Sergei; Connell, Peter; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Fisher, Donald A.; Stordal, Frode; Weisenstein, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The recognition of the roles of chlorine and bromine compounds in ozone depletion has led to the regulation or their source gases. Some source gases are expected to be more damaging to the ozone layer than others, so that scientific guidance regarding their relative impacts is needed for regulatory purposes. Parameters used for this purpose include the steady-state and time-dependent chlorine loading potential (CLP) and the ozone depletion potential (ODP). Chlorine loading potentials depend upon the estimated value and accuracy of atmospheric lifetimes and are subject to significant (approximately 20-50 percent) uncertainties for many gases. Ozone depletion potentials depend on the same factors, as well as the evaluation of the release of reactive chlorine and bromine from each source gas and corresponding ozone destruction within the stratosphere.

  1. Depleted uranium speciation in the Bratoselce soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the air strikes in 1999, about thirteen hundred projectiles with depleted uranium were fired into the Bratoselce, South Serbia. A study providing insight into physical chemical behaviour of depleted uranium originated from dissolved 'material' of projectile penetrators in the contaminated soil have been conducted. Samples were treated according to Tarriers modified procedure of five-step sequential extraction. Suitable choice of solvents for sequential extraction simulated the real conditions in the environment. Fractions are further analysed by alpha spectrometry and atomic absorption spectrometry methods to determine the uranium isotopes and trace or major elements. The results indicated potential substrates for depleted uranium compounds in the investigated environment, with specific soil composition that is essential for prediction of its mobility and bioavailability in certain conditions. (author)

  2. Department of Energy depleted uranium recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With its strategic supply of depleted uranium, the Department of Energy is studying reuse of the material in nuclear radiation shields, military hardware, and commercial applications. the study is expected to warrant a more detailed uranium recycle plan which would include consideration of a demonstration program and a program implementation decision. Such a program, if implemented, would become the largest nuclear material recycle program in the history of the Department of Energy. The bulk of the current inventory of depleted uranium is stored in 14-ton cylinders in the form of solid uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The radioactive 235U content has been reduced to a concentration of 0.2% to 0.4%. Present estimates indicate there are about 55,000 UF6-filled cylinders in inventory and planned operations will provide another 2,500 cylinders of depleted uranium each year. The United States government, under the auspices of the Department of Energy, considers the depleted uranium a highly-refined strategic resource of significant value. A possible utilization of a large portion of the depleted uranium inventory is as radiation shielding for spent reactor fuels and high-level radioactive waste. To this end, the Department of Energy study to-date has included a preliminary technical review to ascertain DOE chemical forms useful for commercial products. The presentation summarized the information including preliminary cost estimates. The status of commercial uranium processing is discussed. With a shrinking market, the number of chemical conversion and fabrication plants is reduced; however, the commercial capability does exist for chemical conversion of the UF6 to the metal form and for the fabrication of uranium radiation shields and other uranium products. Department of Energy facilities no longer possess a capability for depleted uranium chemical conversion

  3. Gammaspectrometric determination of depleted uranium in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Three years of monitoring the content of natural radionuclides as well as radionuclides of artificial origin in all samples in the south part of the Republic of Serbia and Montenegro indicated that there was widespread, low-level contamination by depleted uranium at this region. High activity of depleted uranium was found in the soil samples taken at the points where the penetrators were found. We used high resolution gamma spectrometry measurements, because of their simplicity and accuracy. Aims of the control were to asses the increase of radioactivity above the natural levels in the immediate and near vicinity of the bomb craters, to asses the corresponding effect of changed natural radioactivity on the health of the population living in these places and finding unexploded depleted uranium bullets. The collected soil samples were cleaned of plants and stones, dried at 105 deg. C - 110 deg. C till constant weight for 24-48 h. After this, the samples were ground, sieved, and measure in cylindrical geometry. Gamma activity was determined by gamma spectrometry measurements using HP Ge detector (ORTEC), with relative efficiency of 25% and energy resolution of 1.85 keV (1332.5 keV 60Co). The analyser system conducts a peak search, energy assignment, quantification and nuclide identification in acquired spectra. Time of measurement varied from 60000 s to 250000 s. Depleted uranium was found in the soil samples from Vranje region and cape Arza (Montenegro). There are four fenced areas in Vranje region (Pljackovica, Bratoselce, Borovac and Reljan) and one in the Montenegro (cape Arza) where we have found depleted uranium penetrators. The 238U and 235U specific activities and their isotopic composition correspond to depleted uranium (238U/235U ratio from 35 to 77). (author)

  4. 78 FR 21567 - Installation of Radiation Alarms for Rooms Housing Neutron Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... December 7, 2011, the NRC published a notice of receipt and request for comment (76 FR 76327) of a PRM... investigation. On March 19, 2013, the NRC published the final rule (78 FR 16922) that establishes the security...; ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 73 Installation of Radiation Alarms for Rooms Housing...

  5. Evaluation of coverage of enriched UF6 cylinder storage lots by existing criticality accident alarms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is leased from the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), a government corporation formed in 1993. PORTS is in transition from regulation by DOE to regulation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). One regulation is 10 CFR Part 76.89, which requires that criticality alarm systems be provided for the site. PORTS originally installed criticality accident alarm systems in all building for which nuclear criticality accidents were credible. Currently, however, alarm systems are not installed in the enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinder storage lots. This report analyzes and documents the extent to which enriched UF6 cylinder storage lots at PORTS are covered by criticality detectors and alarms currently installed in adjacent buildings. Monte Carlo calculations are performed on simplified models of the cylinder storage lots and adjacent buildings. The storage lots modelled are X-745B, X-745C, X745D, X-745E, and X-745F. The criticality detectors modelled are located in building X-343, the building X-344A/X-342A complex, and portions of building X-330 (see Figures 1 and 2). These criticality detectors are those located closest to the cylinder storage lots. Results of this analysis indicate that the existing criticality detectors currently installed at PORTS are largely ineffective in detecting neutron radiation from criticality accidents in most of the cylinder storage lots at PORTS, except sometimes along portions of their peripheries

  6.   Combination treatment of monosymptomatic enuresis nocturna with alarm and desmopressin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamperis, Konstantinos; Hagstrøm, Søren; Rittig, Søren; Djurhuus, Jens Christian

    2006-01-01

    children had completed the diagnostic procedures of our center comprising 2-week home recordings, desmopressin titration, uroflowmetry and urinalysis. The latest ICCS standardization was used for characterizations. All children were treated with the enuresis alarm alone or in combination with desmopressin...

  7. Proposed Support Decision Making System for the Remote Monitoring of Commercial and Residencial Central Alarm Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Luiz de Sousa; André Bittencourt Leal; Ricardo Ferreira Martins; Claudio Cesar de Sá

    2011-01-01

    This article proposes a system to support decision making for the remote monitoring of commercial and residencial central alarm systems. The basis of the system is modeled with deterministic finite automata and the support for decision-making uses of induction of decision trees and case-based reasoning. A prototype system was developed for validation and testing.

  8. Examination of dynamic response of detectors for criticality accident alarm systems at Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokai reprocessing plant is so designed as to prevent the occurrence of any criticality accident during the operation including the handling, storage and transport of fissile materials in the plant. High reliable alarm systems against criticality accidents are urgently necessary to enable workers to evacuate immediately from the plant in a rare accident. The present systems were manufactured by SEIN Corp. in France, and the quality was guaranteed by CEA. The installation and maintenance of the systems have been performed by Toshiba Corp. The systems consist of 12 detectors which can detect gamma or neutron radiation resulting from critical excursion, a 623 BJ data processing module, an evacuation alarm sender and the warning equipment of 65 flash light boxes and 18 horn blowers. One area is monitored with a set of three criticality detectors of the same type, and alarm sounds when two out of three detectors detect the signals exceeding the threshold limit within the coincidence time of 500 msec. The configuration of gamma detectors, the test on dose rate linearity, alarm output characteristics and in-pile performance, and the results are reported. The time constant of the detectors was determined, and the detectors satisfactorily worked in the exposure test. (Kako, I.)

  9. Correcting the Enuresis of a Hearing-Impaired, Developmentally Disabled Adolescent Using an Auditory Enuresis Alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Ronald H.

    1983-01-01

    The enuresis of a hearing-impaired, developmentally disabled adolescent was corrected through the use of an auditory alarm and specific training procedures. The young man progressed from wetting the bed every night to being consistently dry after five weeks of treatment. He has remaind dry for over two years. (Author/CL)

  10. CSER 95-003: Exemption from Criticality Alarm System requirement for 232-Z building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This CSER establishes an exemption for 232-Z from the requirement for a Criticality Alarm System, because the formation of a critical configuration is not a credible event for any circumstance involving the cleaning out and removal of the Burning Hood and associated equipment

  11. An alarm pheromone modulates appetitive olfactory learning in the honeybee (Apis mellifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Urlacher

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In honeybees, associative learning is embedded in a social context as bees possess a highly complex social organization in which communication among individuals is mediated by dance behavior informing about food sources, and by a high variety of pheromones that maintain the social links between individuals of a hive. Proboscis extension response (PER conditioning is a case of appetitive learning, in which harnessed bees learn to associate odor stimuli with sucrose reward in the laboratory. Despite its recurrent use as a tool for uncovering the behavioral, cellular and molecular bases underlying associative learning, the question of whether social signals (pheromones affect appetitive learning has not been addressed in this experimental framework. This situation contrasts with reports underlining that foraging activity of bees is modulated by alarm pheromones released in the presence of a potential danger. Here, we show that appetitive learning is impaired by the sting alarm pheromone (SAP which, when released by guards, recruits foragers to defend the hive. This effect is mimicked by the main component of SAP, isopentyl acetate (IPA, is dose-dependent and lasts up to 24h. Learning impairment is specific to alarm signal exposure and is independent of the odorant used for conditioning. Our results suggest that learning impairment may be a response to the biological significance of SAP as an alarm signal, which would detract bees from responding to any appetitive stimuli in a situation in which such responses would be of secondary importance.

  12. Proposed Support Decision Making System for the Remote Monitoring of Commercial and Residencial Central Alarm Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Luiz de Sousa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a system to support decision making for the remote monitoring of commercial and residencial central alarm systems. The basis of the system is modeled with deterministic finite automata and the support for decision-making uses of induction of decision trees and case-based reasoning. A prototype system was developed for validation and testing.

  13. Honey Bees Modulate Their Olfactory Learning in the Presence of Hornet Predators and Alarm Component.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwei Wang

    Full Text Available In Southeast Asia the native honey bee species Apis cerana is often attacked by hornets (Vespa velutina, mainly in the period from April to November. During the co-evolution of these two species honey bees have developed several strategies to defend themselves such as learning the odors of hornets and releasing alarm components to inform other mates. However, so far little is known about whether and how honey bees modulate their olfactory learning in the presence of the hornet predator and alarm components of honey bee itself. In the present study, we test for associative olfactory learning of A. cerana in the presence of predator odors, the alarm pheromone component isopentyl acetate (IPA, or a floral odor (hexanal as a control. The results show that bees can detect live hornet odors, that there is almost no association between the innately aversive hornet odor and the appetitive stimulus sucrose, and that IPA is less well associated with an appetitive stimulus when compared with a floral odor. In order to imitate natural conditions, e.g. when bees are foraging on flowers and a predator shows up, or alarm pheromone is released by a captured mate, we tested combinations of the hornet odor and floral odor, or IPA and floral odor. Both of these combinations led to reduced learning scores. This study aims to contribute to a better understanding of the prey-predator system between A. cerana and V. velutina.

  14. AN APPROACH TO ALLEVIATE THE FALSE ALARM IN BUILDING CHANGE DETECTION FROM URBAN VHR IMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Building change detection from very-high-resolution (VHR urban remote sensing image frequently encounter the challenge of serious false alarm caused by different illumination or viewing angles in bi-temporal images. An approach to alleviate the false alarm in urban building change detection is proposed in this paper. Firstly, as shadows casted by urban buildings are of distinct spectral and shape feature, it adopts a supervised object-based classification technique to extract them in this paper. Secondly, on the opposite direction of sunlight illumination, a straight line is drawn along the principal orientation of building in every extracted shadow region. Starting from the straight line and moving toward the sunlight direction, a rectangular area is constructed to cover partial shadow and rooftop of each building. Thirdly, an algebra and geometry invariant based method is used to abstract the spatial topological relationship of the potential unchanged buildings from all central points of the rectangular area. Finally, based on an oriented texture curvature descriptor, an index is established to determine the actual false alarm in building change detection result. The experiment results validate that the proposed method can be used as an effective framework to alleviate the false alarm in building change detection from urban VHR image.

  15. Monitoring oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severinghaus, John W

    2011-06-01

    Cyanosis was used for a century after dentists began pulling teeth under 100% N(2)O in 1844 because brief (2 min) severe hypoxia is harmless. Deaths came with curare and potent anesthetic respiratory arrest. Leland Clark's invention of a polarographic blood oxygen tension electrode (1954) was introduced for transcutaneous PO2 monitoring to adjust PEEP and CPAP PO2 to prevent premature infant blindness from excess O2 (1972). Oximetry for warning military aviators was tried after WW II but not used for routine monitoring until Takuo Aoyagi (1973) discovered an equation to measure SaO2 by the ratio of ratios of red and IR light transmitted through tissue as it changed with arterial pulses. Pulse oximetry (1982) depended on simultaneous technology improvements of light emitting red and IR diodes, tiny cheap solid state sensors and micro-chip computers. Continuous monitoring of airway anesthetic concentration and oxygen also became very common after 1980. Death from anesthesia fell 10 fold between 1985 and 2000 as pulse oximetry became universally used, but no proof of a causative relationship to pulse oximetry exists. It is now assumed that all anesthesiologist became much more aware of the dangers of prolonged hypoxia, perhaps by using the pulse oximeters. PMID:21717228

  16. The Chemistry and Toxicology of Depleted Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, Sidney A.

    2014-01-01

    Natural uranium is comprised of three radioactive isotopes: 238U, 235U, and 234U. Depleted uranium (DU) is a byproduct of the processes for the enrichment of the naturally occurring 235U isotope. The world wide stock pile contains some 1½ million tons of depleted uranium. Some of it has been used to dilute weapons grade uranium (~90% 235U) down to reactor grade uranium (~5% 235U), and some of it has been used for heavy tank armor and for the fabrication of armor-piercing bullets and missiles....

  17. Toxicological issues after depleted uranium weapons attacked

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depleted Uranium (DU) is a byproduct of the uranium enrichment for producing nuclear reactor or nuclear weapon. DU is used in the military as an armor-piercing projectile due to its hardness, strength, and density. A lot of DU weapons were fired in the Gulf War, and bring about critical environmental and internal contamination. Therefore, DU becomes suddenly a hot issue. Some toxicological problems after DU weapons attacked have been reviewed, which include features of internal DU contamination. Hazard of wound contamination and inhalation with insoluble uranium, and other urgent toxicological issues. The healthy effects of implanted with depleted uranium pellets were illustrated in particular

  18. Sequence and batch language programs and alarm-related ``C`` programs for the 242-A MCS. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, J.F.

    1995-03-01

    A Distributive Process Control system was purchased by Project B-534, ``242-A Evaporator/Crystallizer Upgrades``. This control system, called the Monitor and Control System (MCS), was installed in the 242-A Evaporator located in the 200 East Area. The purpose of the MCS is to monitor and control the Evaporator and monitor a number of alarms and other signals from various Tank Farm facilities. Applications software for the MCS was developed by the Waste Treatment Systems Engineering (WTSE) group of Westinghouse. The standard displays and alarm scheme provide for control and monitoring, but do not directly indicate the signal location or depict the overall process. To do this, WTSE developed a second alarm scheme which uses special programs, annunciator keys, and process graphics. The special programs are written in two languages; Sequence and Batch Language (SABL), and ``C`` language. The WTSE-developed alarm scheme works as described below: SABL relates signals and alarms to the annunciator keys, called SKID keys. When an alarm occurs, a SABL program causes a SKID key to flash, and if the alarm is of yellow or white priority then a ``C`` program turns on an audible horn (the D/3 system uses a different audible horn for the red priority alarms). The horn and flashing key draws the attention of the operator.

  19. Sequence and batch language programs and alarm-related ''C'' programs for the 242-A MCS. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Distributive Process Control system was purchased by Project B-534, ''242-A Evaporator/Crystallizer Upgrades''. This control system, called the Monitor and Control System (MCS), was installed in the 242-A Evaporator located in the 200 East Area. The purpose of the MCS is to monitor and control the Evaporator and monitor a number of alarms and other signals from various Tank Farm facilities. Applications software for the MCS was developed by the Waste Treatment Systems Engineering (WTSE) group of Westinghouse. The standard displays and alarm scheme provide for control and monitoring, but do not directly indicate the signal location or depict the overall process. To do this, WTSE developed a second alarm scheme which uses special programs, annunciator keys, and process graphics. The special programs are written in two languages; Sequence and Batch Language (SABL), and ''C'' language. The WTSE-developed alarm scheme works as described below: SABL relates signals and alarms to the annunciator keys, called SKID keys. When an alarm occurs, a SABL program causes a SKID key to flash, and if the alarm is of yellow or white priority then a ''C'' program turns on an audible horn (the D/3 system uses a different audible horn for the red priority alarms). The horn and flashing key draws the attention of the operator

  20. The nature of alarm communication in Constrictotermes cyphergaster (Blattodea: Termitoidea: Termitidae): the integration of chemical and vibroacoustic signals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cristaldo, P. F.; Jandák, V.; Kutalová, Kateřina; Rodrigues, V. B.; Brothánek, M.; Jiříček, O.; DeSouza, O.; Šobotník, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 12 (2015), s. 1649-1659. ISSN 2046-6390 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : alarm communication * alarm pheromone * defence * Isoptera * Nasutitermitinae * vibroacoustic communication Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.416, year: 2014 http://bio.biologists.org/content/biolopen/4/12/1649.full.pdf

  1. The influence of three acoustic alarms on the behaviour of harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) in a floating pen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastelein, R.A.; Haan, de D.; Vaughan, N.; Staal, C.; Schooneman, N.M.

    2001-01-01

    Harbour porpoise bycatch may be reduced by deterring porpoises from nets acoustically. In this study, two harbour porpoises were subjected to three acoustic alarms. The effect of each alarm was judged by comparing the animals' position and respiration rate during a test period with that during a bas

  2. Development of an algorithm to discriminate between valid and false alarms in a loose-parts monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We developed a gun to generate impact signals to validate field experiment. • We developed an algorithm to discriminate against false alarms in a LPMS. • We proved that the algorithm minimized the false alarm rate in the LPMS. • We identified the signal patterns causing false alarms by thermal shock and friction. - Abstract: Loose-parts monitoring system (LPMS) monitors loosened or detached parts and foreign parts inside the pressure boundary of a reactor coolant system. If any object is detected, the LPMS identifies the object's characteristics, and can contribute to improving plant safety, since it can identify loosened metal objects, which have a potential to cause severe damage to internal components of the steam generator chamber. The most significant problem of a traditional LPMS is the high false alarm rate. The most developed systems used more sophisticated methods for event identification. With these sophisticated systems, the false alarm rate could be reduced to below 1%. Even though the LPMS resulted in a false alarm rate of less than 1%, there is still a high false alarm rate when the unit increases or decreases power. As the unit increases power, the coolant starts to heat the metal structure, which causes false alarms. Plant operators should continuously identify all alarms, including false alarms, until the metal structure reaches thermal balance. It is difficult to discriminate between valid and false alarms, since the signal pattern by thermal shocks and structure friction is similar to that by loose metal impacts. The false alarm rate can be reduced to almost 0% by applying an algorithm to discriminate between the false and valid alarms. In this paper, an efficient algorithm is proposed to discriminate against signatures which are not related to loose-parts events, especially when the unit increases or decreases power. The algorithm can discriminate the signal pattern by the impact of loose parts against the signal

  3. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes consume oxygen in sputum from chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, M; Hansen, C R; Bjarnsholt, T;

    2010-01-01

    accumulating evidence for depletion of molecular oxygen (O(2)) in the mucus in infected CF bronchi, it was hypothesised that the O(2) depletion in the mucus in infected CF bronchi may be accelerated by the respiratory burst of the PMNs due to the reduction of O(2) to the superoxide anion (O(-)(2)) by the...

  4. Associations between health care seeking and socioeconomic and demographic determinants among people reporting alarm symptoms of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Rikke P; Jarbol, Dorte E; Larsen, Pia V; Støvring, Henrik; Hansen, Bjarne L; Soendergaard, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Late diagnosis of cancer may partly be explained by the fact that some patients do not seek health care promptly when experiencing an alarm symptom. Socioeconomic and demographic differences exist concerning knowledge and awareness of cancer alarm symptoms in the general population and socioecono......Late diagnosis of cancer may partly be explained by the fact that some patients do not seek health care promptly when experiencing an alarm symptom. Socioeconomic and demographic differences exist concerning knowledge and awareness of cancer alarm symptoms in the general population and...... socioeconomic differences are found in cancer incidence and survival. We therefore hypothesise that socioeconomic and demographic differences in health care-seeking behaviour are present among people with alarm symptoms....

  5. Depletion of Butyrate-Producing Clostridia from the Gut Microbiota Drives an Aerobic Luminal Expansion of Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Chávez, Fabian; Zhang, Lillian F; Faber, Franziska; Lopez, Christopher A; Byndloss, Mariana X; Olsan, Erin E; Xu, Gege; Velazquez, Eric M; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Winter, Sebastian E; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2016-04-13

    The mammalian intestine is host to a microbial community that prevents pathogen expansion through unknown mechanisms, while antibiotic treatment can increase susceptibility to enteric pathogens. Here we show that streptomycin treatment depleted commensal, butyrate-producing Clostridia from the mouse intestinal lumen, leading to decreased butyrate levels, increased epithelial oxygenation, and aerobic expansion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Epithelial hypoxia and Salmonella restriction could be restored by tributyrin treatment. Clostridia depletion and aerobic Salmonella expansion were also observed in the absence of streptomycin treatment in genetically resistant mice but proceeded with slower kinetics and required the presence of functional Salmonella type III secretion systems. The Salmonella cytochrome bd-II oxidase synergized with nitrate reductases to drive luminal expansion, and both were required for fecal-oral transmission. We conclude that Salmonella virulence factors and antibiotic treatment promote pathogen expansion through the same mechanism: depletion of butyrate-producing Clostridia to elevate epithelial oxygenation, allowing aerobic Salmonella growth. PMID:27078066

  6. Application of backtracking algorithm to depletion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the theory of linear chain method for analytical depletion calculations, the burn-up matrix is decoupled by the divide and conquer strategy and the linear chain with Markov characteristic is formed. The density, activity and decay heat of every nuclide in the chain can be calculated by analytical solutions. Every possible reaction path of the nuclide must be considered during the linear chain establishment process. To confirm the calculation precision and efficiency, the algorithm which can cover all the reaction paths of the nuclide and search the paths automatically according to to problem description and precision restrictions should be sought. Through analysis and comparison of several kinds of searching algorithms, the backtracking algorithm was selected to search and calculate the linear chains using Depth First Search (DFS) method. The depletion program can solve the depletion problem adaptively and with high fidelity. The solution space and time complexity of the program were analyzed. The new developed depletion program was coupled with Monte Carlo program MCMG-II to calculate the benchmark burn-up problem of the first core of China Experimental Fast Reactor (CEFR). The initial verification and validation of the program was performed by the calculation. (author)

  7. Global Warming: Lessons from Ozone Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Art

    2010-01-01

    My teaching and textbook have always covered many physics-related social issues, including stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. The ozone saga is an inspiring good-news story that's instructive for solving the similar but bigger problem of global warming. Thus, as soon as students in my physics literacy course at the University of…

  8. Application of backtracking algorithm to depletion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the theory of linear chain method for analytical depletion calculations, the burnup matrix is decoupled by the divide and conquer strategy and the linear chain with Markov characteristic is formed. The density, activity and decay heat of every nuclide in the chain then can be calculated by analytical solutions. Every possible reaction path of the nuclide must be considered during the linear chain establishment process. To confirm the calculation precision and efficiency, the algorithm which can cover all the reaction paths and search the paths automatically according to the problem description and precision restrictions should be found. Through analysis and comparison of several kinds of searching algorithms, the backtracking algorithm was selected to establish and calculate the linear chains in searching process using depth first search (DFS) method, forming an algorithm which can solve the depletion problem adaptively and with high fidelity. The complexity of the solution space and time was analyzed by taking into account depletion process and the characteristics of the backtracking algorithm. The newly developed depletion program was coupled with Monte Carlo program MCMG-Ⅱ to calculate the benchmark burnup problem of the first core of China Experimental Fast Reactor (CEFR) and the preliminary verification and validation of the program were performed. (authors)

  9. Multiple-Parameter, Low-False-Alarm Fire-Detection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Greensburg, Paul; McKnight, Robert; Xu, Jennifer C.; Liu, C. C.; Dutta, Prabir; Makel, Darby; Blake, D.; Sue-Antillio, Jill

    2007-01-01

    Fire-detection systems incorporating multiple sensors that measure multiple parameters are being developed for use in storage depots, cargo bays of ships and aircraft, and other locations not amenable to frequent, direct visual inspection. These systems are intended to improve upon conventional smoke detectors, now used in such locations, that reliably detect fires but also frequently generate false alarms: for example, conventional smoke detectors based on the blockage of light by smoke particles are also affected by dust particles and water droplets and, thus, are often susceptible to false alarms. In contrast, by utilizing multiple parameters associated with fires, i.e. not only obscuration by smoke particles but also concentrations of multiple chemical species that are commonly generated in combustion, false alarms can be significantly decreased while still detecting fires as reliably as older smoke-detector systems do. The present development includes fabrication of sensors that have, variously, micrometer- or nanometer-sized features so that such multiple sensors can be integrated into arrays that have sizes, weights, and power demands smaller than those of older macroscopic sensors. The sensors include resistors, electrochemical cells, and Schottky diodes that exhibit different sensitivities to the various airborne chemicals of interest. In a system of this type, the sensor readings are digitized and processed by advanced signal-processing hardware and software to extract such chemical indications of fires as abnormally high concentrations of CO and CO2, possibly in combination with H2 and/or hydrocarbons. The system also includes a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)-based particle detector and classifier device to increase the reliability of measurements of chemical species and particulates. In parallel research, software for modeling the evolution of a fire within an aircraft cargo bay has been developed. The model implemented in the software can

  10. A worldwide view of groundwater depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, L. P.; Wada, Y.; van Kempen, C.; Reckman, J. W.; Vasak, S.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2010-12-01

    During the last decades, global water demand has increased two-fold due to increasing population, expanding irrigated area and economic development. Globally such demand can be met by surface water availability (i.e., water in rivers, lakes and reservoirs) but regional variations are large and the absence of sufficient rainfall and run-off increasingly encourages the use of groundwater resources, particularly in the (semi-)arid regions of the world. Excessive abstraction for irrigation frequently leads to overexploitation, i.e. if groundwater abstraction exceeds the natural groundwater recharge over extensive areas and prolonged times, persistent groundwater depletion may occur. Observations and various regional studies have revealed that groundwater depletion is a substantial issue in regions such as Northwest India, Northeast Pakistan, Central USA, Northeast China and Iran. Here we provide a global overview of groundwater depletion from the year 1960 to 2000 at a spatial resolution of 0.5 degree by assessing groundwater recharge with the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB and subtracting estimates of groundwater abstraction obtained from IGRAC-GGIS database. PCR-GLOBWB was forced by the CRU climate dataset downscaled to daily time steps using ERA40 re-analysis data. PCR-GLOBWB simulates daily global groundwater recharge (0.5 degree) while considering sub-grid variability of each grid cell (e.g., short and tall vegetation, different soil types, fraction of saturated soil). Country statistics of groundwater abstraction were downscaled to 0.5 degree by using water demand (i.e., agriculture, industry and domestic) as a proxy. To limit problems related to increased capture of discharge and increased recharge due to groundwater pumping, we restricted our analysis to sub-humid to arid areas. The uncertainty in the resulting estimates was assessed by a Monte Carlo analysis of 100 realizations of groundwater recharge and 100 realizations of groundwater abstraction

  11. Health and environmental impact of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depleted Uranium (DU) is 'nuclear waste' produced from the enrichment process and is mostly made up of 238U and is depleted in the fissionable isotope 235U compared to natural uranium (NU). Depleted uranium has about 60% of the radioactivity of natural uranium. Depleted uranium and natural uranium are identical in terms of the chemical toxicity. Uranium's high density gives depleted uranium shells increased range and penetrative power. This density, combined with uranium's pyrophoric nature, results in a high-energy kinetic weapon that can punch and burn through armour plating. Striking a hard target, depleted uranium munitions create extremely high temperatures. The uranium immediately burns and vaporizes into an aerosol, which is easily diffused in the environment. People can inhale the micro-particles of uranium oxide in an aerosol and absorb them mainly from lung. Depleted uranium has both aspects of radiological toxicity and chemical toxicity. The possible synergistic effect of both kinds of toxicities is also pointed out. Animal and cellular studies have been reported the carcinogenic, neurotoxic, immuno-toxic and some other effects of depleted uranium including the damage on reproductive system and foetus. In addition, the health effects of micro/ nano-particles, similar in size of depleted uranium aerosols produced by uranium weapons, have been reported. Aerosolized DU dust can easily spread over the battlefield spreading over civilian areas, sometimes even crossing international borders. Therefore, not only the military personnel but also the civilians can be exposed. The contamination continues after the cessation of hostilities. Taking these aspects into account, DU weapon is illegal under international humanitarian laws and is considered as one of the inhumane weapons of 'indiscriminate destruction'. The international society is now discussing the prohibition of DU weapons based on 'precautionary principle'. The 1991 Gulf War is reportedly the first

  12. The song remains the same: Juvenile Richardson's ground squirrels do not respond differentially to mother's or colony member's alarm calls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F. HARE, Kurtis J. WARKENTIN

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Alarm calls are emitted by Richardson's ground squirrels Urocitellus richardsonii in response to avian and terrestrial predators. Conspecifics detecting these calls respond with increased vigilance, promoting predator detection and evasion, but in doing so, lose time from foraging. That loss can be minimized if alarm call recipients discriminate among signalers, and weight their response accordingly. For juvenile ground squirrels, we predicted that the trade-off between foraging and vigilance could be optimized via selective response to alarm calls emitted by their own dam, and/or neighboring colony members over calls broadcast by less familiar conspecifics. Alarm calls of adult female Richardson's ground squirrels were elicited in the field using a predator model and recorded on digital audio tape. Free-living focal juveniles were subjected to playbacks of a call of their mother, and on a separate occasion a call from either another adult female from their own colony, or an adult female from another colony. Neither immediate postural responses and escape behavior, nor the duration of vigilance manifested by juveniles differed with exposure to alarm calls of the three adult female signaler types. Thus, juveniles did not respond preferentially to alarm calls emitted by their mothers or colony members, likely reflecting the high cost of ignoring alarm signals where receivers have had limited opportunity to establish past signaler reliability [Current Zoology 58 (5: 773–780, 2012].

  13. The song remains the same: Juvenile Richardson's ground squirrels do not respond differentially to mother's or colony member's alarm calls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James F.HARE; Kurtis J.WARKENTIN

    2012-01-01

    Alarm calls are emitted by Richardson's ground squirrels Urocitellus richardsonii in response to avian and terrestrial predators.Conspecifics detecting these calls respond with increased vigilance,promoting predator detection and evasion,but in doing so,lose time from foraging.That loss can be minimized if alarm call recipients discriminate among signalers,and weight their response accordingly.For juvenile ground squirrels,we predicted that the trade-off between foraging and vigilance could be optimized via selective response to alarm calls emitted by their own dam,and/or neighboring colony members over calls broadcast by less familiar conspecifics.Alarm calls of adult female Richardson's ground squirrels were elicited in the field using a predator model and recorded on digital audio tape.Free-living focal juveniles were subjected to playbacks of a call of their mother,and on a separate occasion a call from either another adult female from their own colony,or an adult female from another colony.Neither immediate postural responses and escape behavior,nor the duration of vigilance manifested by juveniles differed with exposure to alarm calls of the three adult female signaler types.Thus,juveniles did not respond preferentially to alarm calls emitted by their mothers or colony members,likely reflecting the high cost of ignoring alarm signals where receivers have had limited opportunity to establish past signaler reliability.

  14. Application control chart concepts of designing a pre-alarm system in the nuclear power plant control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study applied the concepts of the Shewhart control chart to design a pre-alarm system for the nuclear power plant control room. As a support in detecting faults, the pre-alarm system reminded the operators of a change in the system state in its early stages. Two pre-alarm types were designed to compare with the original system, and all participants were requested to monitor each simulated system under both normal and abnormal states. The tasks for the participants included shutting down the reactor, searching for procedures, monitoring system parameters and executing secondary tasks. In each trial, the task performance, mental workload and situation awareness (SA) of the participants were measured. Results indicated that participants had lower mental workload, but equal SA, when monitoring the system with either type of pre-alarm designs, and lower alarm frequency and higher secondary task performance were obtained with the pre-alarm design. Therefore, the pre-alarm system effectively assisted the operators in monitoring tasks

  15. Boron PLA for oxygen sensing & hypoxia imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra L. Fraser

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen is essential for many forms of life and its depletion in the body and the environment can lead to deleterious effects. Low oxygen conditions, even anoxia, are associated with eutrophication of lakes and rivers, wherein an over abundance of nutrients often caused by pollution result in excessive plant growth and decay, threatening water quality, ecosystem balance, and aquatic life. In the body, low oxygen conditions or hypoxia may be generalized, as can occur at high altitude or during strenuous exercise, or localized in particular tissues, when there is a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand. Hypoxia is present in many important diseases as well. Low oxygen levels in tumors are often associated with biochemical changes, increased invasiveness, cancer progression, and resistance to radiation and chemotherapies. Vascular blockage in strokes, heart attacks, and peripheral artery disease, which is common in diabetes, are other situations where oxygen levels can drop precipitously and cause great damage to affected tissues. Clearly, innovative sensing technologies that provide new insight into these many oxygen dependent processes can impact global society in significant ways.

  16. A Search for O_2 in CO-depleted Molecular Cloud Cores with Herschel

    CERN Document Server

    Wirström, Eva S; Cordiner, Martin A; Ceccarelli, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    The general lack of molecular oxygen in molecular clouds is an outstanding problem in astrochemistry. Extensive searches with SWAS, Odin and Herschel have only produced two detections; upper limits to the O_2 abundance in the remaining sources observed are about 1000 times lower than predicted by chemical models. Previous atomic oxygen observations and inferences from observations of other molecules indicated that high abundances of O atoms might be present in dense cores exhibiting large amounts of CO depletion. Theoretical arguments concerning the oxygen gas-grain interaction in cold dense cores suggested that, if O atoms could survive in the gas after most of the rest of the heavy molecular material has frozen out on to dust, then O_2 could be formed efficiently in the gas. Using Herschel HIFI we searched a small sample of four depletion cores - L1544, L694-2, L429, Oph D - for emission in the low excitation O_2 N_J=3_3-1_2 line at 487.249 GHz. Molecular oxygen was not detected and we derive upper limits t...

  17. Elemental depletions in the Magellanic Clouds and the evolution of depletions with metallicity

    CERN Document Server

    Tchernyshyov, Kirill; Seale, Jonathan; Fox, Andrew; Friedman, Scott D; Dwek, Eli; Galliano, Frédéric; Sembach, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of the composition of gas and dust in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, together -- the MCs) as measured by UV absorption spectroscopy. We have measured P II and Fe II along 85 sightlines toward the MCs using archival FUSE observations. For 16 of those sightlines, we have measured Si II, Cr II, and Zn II from new HST COS observations. We have combined these measurements with H I and H$_2$ column densities and reference stellar abundances from the literature to derive gas-phase abundances, depletions, and gas-to-dust ratios (GDRs). 80 of our 84 P measurements and 13 of our 16 Zn measurements are depleted by more than 0.1 decades, suggesting that P and Zn abundances are not accurate metallicity indicators at and above the metallicity of the SMC. The maximum P and Zn depletions are the same in the MW, LMC, and SMC. Si, Cr, and Fe are systematically less depleted in the SMC than in the MW or LMC. The minimum Si depletion in the SMC is consistent with zero. Our depletion-derive...

  18. Monitoring techniques and alarm procedures for CMS services and sites in WLCG

    CERN Document Server

    Molina-Perez, Jorge Amando

    2012-01-01

    The CMS offline computing system is composed of roughly 80 sites (including most experienced T3s) and a number of central services to distribute, process and analyze data worldwide. A high level of stability and reliability is required from the underlying infrastructure and services, partially covered by local or automated monitoring and alarming systems such as Lemon and SLS; the former collects metrics from sensors installed on computing nodes and triggers alarms when values are out of range, the latter measures the quality of service and warns managers when service is affected. CMS has established computing shift procedures with personnel operating worldwide from remote Computing Centers, under the supervision of the Computing Run Coordinator on duty at CERN. This dedicated 24/7 computing shift personnel is contributing to detect and react timely on any unexpected error and hence ensure that CMS workflows are carried out efficiently and in a sustained manner. Synergy among all the involved actors is explo...

  19. Design and development of a personal alarm monitor for use by first responders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehntholt, Daniel J.; Louie, Alan S.; Marenchic, Ingrid G.; Forni, Ronald J.

    2004-03-01

    This paper describes the design and development of a small, portable alarm device that can be used by first responders to an emergency event to warn of the presence of low levels of a toxic nerve gas. The device consists of a rigid reusable portion and a consumable packet that is sensitive to the presence of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as the nerve gases Sarin or Soman. The sensitivity level of the alarm is set to be at initial physiological response at the meiosis level, orders of magnitude below lethal concentrations. The AChE enzyme used is specific for nerve-type toxins. A color development reaction is used to demonstrate continued activity of the enzyme over its twelve-hour operational cycle.

  20. Analysis of false alarm for imaging space-based laser warning system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Hong-jun; ZHOU Zhong-liang; HUANG Fu-yu

    2012-01-01

    In view of the problem of false alarm in imaging space-based laser warning system,the effects of sunlight and lightning on the threaten laser detection and attack event determination are studied by analyzing and calculating the radiant energy density and space-time feature of imaging spot,respectively.The results show that the main false alarm resourses of spacebased laser warning system are sunlight and lightning.The sunlight should exposure the detector directly in one ninth of the satillite orbital period,and the imaging spot of sun is similar to the attack laser.The lightning imaging spot is similar to the illumination laser.About 1.4 lightning events can occur in the field of view (FOV) of the warning system per second.It could not discriminate spots of sun,lightning and threaten laser by the frame subtraction technology.

  1. Design of DroDeASys (Drowsy Detection and Alarming System)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvale, Hrishikesh B.; Mahajan, Anant S.; Bhagwat, Ashwin A.; Badiger, Vishal T.; Bhutkar, Ganesh D.; Dhabe, Priyadarshan S.; Dhore, Manikrao L.

    The paper discusses the Drowsy Detection & Alarming System that has been developed, using a non-intrusive approach. The system is basically developed to detect drivers dozing at the wheel at night time driving. The system uses a small infra-red night vision camera that points directly towards the driver`s face and monitors the driver`s eyes in order to detect fatigue. In such a case when fatigue is detected, a warning signal is issued to alert the driver. This paper discusses the algorithms that have been used to detect drowsiness. The decision whether the driver is dozing or not is taken depending on whether the eyes are open for a specific number of frames. If the eyes are found to be closed for a certain number of consecutive frames then the driver is alerted with an alarm.

  2. Copenhagen delegates advance phaseout of ozone depleters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As expected, delegates at the United Nations Ozone Layer Conference in Copenhagen sped up ozone depleter phaseouts from the 1987 Montreal Protocol and the 1990 London amendments. The changes bring the worldwide production phaseout of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other ozone depleters in developed countries in line with U.S. and European plans announced earlier this year. Adjustments to the protocol, which are binding on the signatories, change the phaseout for CFC, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform production and consumption to January 1, 1996 from 2000. The 75% reduction of 1986 levels from CFCs by January 1, 1994 is a compromise between European pressure for an 85% cut and the US goal of 70%. Halon production is to end January 1, 1994, as anticipated. Developing countries continue to have a 10-year grace period. Friends of the Earth ozone campaign director Liz Cook counters that the phaseout dates were scheduled with concern for the chemical industry, not for the ozone layer

  3. Depleted uranium hexafluoride: Waste or resource?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwertz, N.; Zoller, J.; Rosen, R.; Patton, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bradley, C. [USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, Technology, Washington, DC (United States); Murray, A. [SAIC (United States)

    1995-07-01

    the US Department of Energy is evaluating technologies for the storage, disposal, or re-use of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). This paper discusses the following options, and provides a technology assessment for each one: (1) conversion to UO{sub 2} for use as mixed oxide duel, (2) conversion to UO{sub 2} to make DUCRETE for a multi-purpose storage container, (3) conversion to depleted uranium metal for use as shielding, (4) conversion to uranium carbide for use as high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel. In addition, conversion to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} as an option for long-term storage is discussed.

  4. Reactor fuel depletion benchmark of TINDER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A reactor burnup benchmark of TINDER, coupling MCNP6 to CINDER2008, was performed. • TINDER is a poor candidate for fuel depletion calculations using its current libraries. • Data library modification is necessary if fuel depletion is desired from TINDER. - Abstract: Accurate burnup calculations are key to proper nuclear reactor design, fuel cycle modeling, and disposal estimations. The TINDER code, originally designed for activation analyses, has been modified to handle full burnup calculations, including the widely used predictor–corrector feature. In order to properly characterize the performance of TINDER for this application, a benchmark calculation was performed. Although the results followed the trends of past benchmarked codes for a UO2 PWR fuel sample from the Takahama-3 reactor, there were obvious deficiencies in the final result, likely in the nuclear data library that was used. Isotopic comparisons versus experiment and past code benchmarks are given, as well as hypothesized areas of deficiency and future work

  5. Improvements in EBR-2 core depletion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for accurate core depletion calculations in Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-2) is discussed. Because of the unique physics characteristics of EBR-2, it is difficult to obtain accurate and computationally efficient multigroup flux predictions. This paper describes the effect of various conventional and higher order schemes for group constant generation and for flux computations; results indicate that higher-order methods are required, particularly in the outer regions (i.e. the radial blanket). A methodology based on Nodal Equivalence Theory (N.E.T.) is developed which allows retention of the accuracy of a higher order solution with the computational efficiency of a few group nodal diffusion solution. The application of this methodology to three-dimensional EBR-2 flux predictions is demonstrated; this improved methodology allows accurate core depletion calculations at reasonable cost. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  6. The depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protection of the Earth's ozone layer is of the highest importance to mankind. The dangers of its destruction are by now well known. The depletion of that layer has reached record levels. The Antarctic ozone hole covered this year a record area. The ozone layer is predicted to begin recovery in the next one or two decades and should be restored to pre-1980 levels by 2050. This is the achievement of the regime established by the 1985 Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the 1987 Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. The regime established by these two agreements has been revised, and made more effective in London (1990), Copenhagen (1992), Vienna (1995), and Beijing (1999)

  7. Technical aspects of the sigma factor alarm method in alpha CAMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some test must be applied to the low-level count data from alpha continuous air monitors (CAMs) to determine if the count is statistically significant (i.e., different from background). The test should also automatically account for different levels of background (i.e., ambient radon progeny concentrations). The method should, in other words, be as sensitive as possible, automatically desensitize when required, but in such a manner as to not exceed a previously-chosen acceptable false-alarm rate.

  8. Principal Alarms in Multivariate Statistical Process Control using Independent Component Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Isabel; Sanchez, Ismael

    2008-01-01

    Abstract This article proposes a methodology that helps to predict the main mean shifts, denoted as principal alarms, in a non-normal multivariate process using the available in-control data. The analysis is based on the transformation of the observed correlated variables into independent factors using independent component analysis. These independent components allow us to simulate shifts preserving the covariance structure. The graphical representations of those simulated shifts ...

  9. A design pattern language to assist the design of alarm visualizations for operating control systems

    OpenAIRE

    Romero Gómez, Rosa María

    2015-01-01

    Mención Internacional en el título de doctor With the growing emphasis on visualization as a mechanism for analysing and exploring large and complex data sets, visualization research has recognized the need of reusing prior design knowledge instead of starting from scratch. This fact is especially relevant in designing control systems in which alarm visualizations are key artefacts for human operators to maintain an awareness of the state of the process under control. In this context, desi...

  10. Safety Bulletin 2013-1: When the alarm rings, you must leave!

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    The HSE Unit just released the Safety Bulletin 2013-1 entitled “When the alarm rings, you must leave!”. The Bulletin is available on EDMS under the following number: 1307611. Be reminded  that HSE Safety Bulletins are published in English and French and share feedbacks of incidents/near miss/accidents that happened on the CERN site with the aim to improve prevention.

  11. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) of nuclear weapons and its significance for the operational safety of alarm systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following some short remarks on the generation of the EMP (fireball, γ initial radiation) and an estimation of the upper limits for the EMP values, the existing uncertainties in our knowledge of the EMP are pointed out, and suggestions are made for further considerations and research with regard to civil defense, for the protective measures for alarm systems must be designed to assure proper warning of the population. (HP)

  12. Connection of input adapter for alarm signal analysis at liquid metal steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the experimental finding that the sensor indicating leakage of the medium changes its resistance and capacitance in dependence on the speed and amount of penetrating medium a connection is designed of the input adapter for the analysis of accident alarm signals. The penetrating medium is easy to distinguish because water and steam pressure differ considerably from the pressure of liquid metal. (J.P.)

  13. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemons, T.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

  14. Educational software on the ozone layer Depletion

    OpenAIRE

    Psomiadis, Ploutarchos; Chalkidis, Anthimos; Saridaki, Anna; Tampakis, Constantine (Konstantinos); Skordoulis, Constantine

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the design and the formative evaluation of educational software concerning the ‘Depletion of the Ozone Layer’ designed for the students of the Faculty of Primary Education (pre-service teachers) of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. The selection of the topic was based on: i) environmental criteria (importance of the phenomenon, complexity of the phenomenon), ii) societal criteria (local interest, human activities effects), iii) pedagogical cr...

  15. Effects of Streambed Conductance on Stream Depletion

    OpenAIRE

    Greg Lackey; Roseanna M. Neupauer; John Pitlick

    2015-01-01

    Stream depletion, which is the reduction in flow rate of a stream or river due to the extraction of groundwater in a hydraulically connected stream-aquifer system, is often estimated using numerical models. The accuracy of these models depends on the appropriate parameterization of aquifer and streambed hydraulic properties. Streambed conductance is a parameter that relates the head difference between the stream and aquifer to flow across the stream channel. It is a function of streambed hydr...

  16. Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Bao-Guo; Dong, Pei; Gu, Ji-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The supercritical, reactor core melting and nuclear fuel leaking accidents have troubled fission reactors for decades, and greatly limit their extensive applications. Now these troubles are still open. Here we first show a possible perfect reactor, Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor which is no above accident trouble. We found this reactor could be realized in practical applications in terms of all of the scientific principle, principle of operation, technology, and engineering. Our results...

  17. Ecological and corrosion behavior of depleted uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanović Mirjana D.; Lačnjevac Časlav M.; Mihajlović Marija L.; Petrović Marija V.; Šoštarić Tanja D.; Petrović Jelena T.; Lopičić Zorica R.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental pollution with radionuclides, particularly uranium and its decay products is a serious global problem. The current scientific studies estimated that the contamination originating from TENORM, caused by nuclear and non-nuclear technologies, has significantly increased natural level of radioactivity in the last thirty years. During the last decades all the more were talking about the "new pollutant" - depleted uranium (DU), which has been used i...

  18. Depleted uranium during the Kosovo war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the depleted uranium (DU) in the war and civil aims is considered. There are characterized the head parts of projectiles (drifts) from DU, used during Balkan wars, are described. The uranium isotope activity and exposure dose rates from β, γ and photon radiation of the drifts are investigated. The content of uranium and plutonium isotopes in the soil samples are measured. It is concluded that DU cannot exercise the acute influence on the health of military man and civil population

  19. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    Significant amounts of the depleted uranium (DU) created by past uranium enrichment activities have been sold, disposed of commercially, or utilized by defense programs. In recent years, however, the demand for DU has become quite small compared to quantities available, and within the US Department of Energy (DOE) there is concern for any risks and/or cost liabilities that might be associated with the ever-growing inventory of this material. As a result, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), was asked to review options and to develop a comprehensive plan for inventory management and the ultimate disposition of DU accumulated at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs). An Energy Systems task team, under the chairmanship of T. R. Lemons, was formed in late 1989 to provide advice and guidance for this task. This report reviews options and recommends actions and objectives in the management of working inventories of partially depleted feed (PDF) materials and for the ultimate disposition of fully depleted uranium (FDU). Actions that should be considered are as follows. (1) Inspect UF{sub 6} cylinders on a semiannual basis. (2) Upgrade cylinder maintenance and storage yards. (3) Convert FDU to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for long-term storage or disposal. This will include provisions for partial recovery of costs to offset those associated with DU inventory management and the ultimate disposal of FDU. Another recommendation is to drop the term tails'' in favor of depleted uranium'' or DU'' because the tails'' label implies that it is waste.'' 13 refs.

  20. Depletion modeling of liquid dominated geothermal reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, G.

    1984-06-01

    Depletion models for liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs are derived and presented. The depletion models are divided into two categories: confined and unconfined. For both cases depletion models with no recharge (or influx), and depletion models including recharge, are used to match field data from the Svartsengi high temperature geothermal field in Iceland. The influx models included with the mass and energy balances are adopted from the petroleum engineering literature. The match to production data from Svartsengi is improved when influx was included. The Schilthuis steady-state influx gives a satisfactory match. The finite aquifer method of Fetkovitch, and the unsteady state method of Hurst gave reasonable answers, but not as good. The best match is obtained using Hurst simplified solution when lambda = 1.3 x 10{sup -4} m{sup -1}. From the match the cross-sectional area of the aquifer was calculated as 3.6 km{sup 2}. The drawdown was predicted using the Hurst simplified method, and compared with predicted drawdown from a boiling model and an empirical log-log model. A large difference between the models was obtained. The predicted drawdown using the Hurst simplified method falls between the other two. Injection has been considered by defining the net rate as being the production rate minus the injection rate. No thermal of transient effects were taken into account. Prediction using three different net rates shows that the pressure can be maintained using the Hurst simplified method if there is significant fluid reinjection. 32 refs., 44 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Ecological and corrosion behavior of depleted uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Mirjana D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution with radionuclides, particularly uranium and its decay products is a serious global problem. The current scientific studies estimated that the contamination originating from TENORM, caused by nuclear and non-nuclear technologies, has significantly increased natural level of radioactivity in the last thirty years. During the last decades all the more were talking about the "new pollutant" - depleted uranium (DU, which has been used in anti-tank penetrators because of its high density, penetration and pyrophoric properties. It is estimated that during the Gulf War, the war in Bosnia and Yugoslavia and during the invasion of Iraq, 1.4 million missiles with depleted uranium was fired. During the NATO aggression against the ex Yugoslavia in 1999., 112 locations in Kosovo and Metohija, 12 locations in southern Serbia and two locations in Montenegro were bombed. On this occasion, approximately 10 tons of depleted uranium were entered into the environment, mainly on land, where the degree of contamination ranged from 200 Bq / kg to 235 000 Bq/kg, which is up to 1000 times higher than the natural level. Fourteen years ago there was very little information about the behavior of ecological systems damaged by DU penetrators fired. Today, unfortunately, we are increasingly faced with the ―invisible threat" of depleted uranium, which has a strong radioactive and hemotoxic impact on human health. Present paper provides a detailed overview of the current understanding of corrosion and corrosion behavior of DU and environmental factors that control corrosion, together with indicators of environmental impact in order to highlight areas that need further attention in developing remediation programs.

  2. Optical assessment of phytoplankton nutrient depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heath, M.R.; Richardson, Katherine; Kiørboe, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    The ratio of light absorption at 480 and 665 nm by 90% acetone extracts of marine phytoplankton pigments has been examined as a potential indicator of phytoplankton nutritional status in both laboratory and field studies. The laboratory studies demonstrated a clear relationship between nutritional......-replete and nutrient-depleted cells. The field data suggest that the absorption ratio may be a useful indicator of nutritional status of natural phytoplankton populations, and can be used to augment the interpretation of other data....

  3. GENDER PARTICULAR FEATURES OF PSYCHIC STATE OF ALARMNESS OF ADOPTED CHILDREN FROM NEI «CHILDREN’S VILLAGE-SOS»

    OpenAIRE

    ИВАНОВА С.П.; Е. В. Ковалевская

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – to discover gender particular features of psy-chic state of alarmness of adopted children from «Childrens’ village-SOS».Methodology – empirical research of gender particular features of psychic state of alarmness of adopted children with the help of testing.Results – girls’ level of psychic state of alarmness has more high level in comparison with boys from «Children’s village-SOS». It reflects their fears of self-manifestation and of problems and interaction with teachers.Practical...

  4. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al2O3 source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values

  5. Understanding the haling power depletion (HPD) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pennsylvania State Univ. (PSU) is using the university version of the Studsvik Scandpower Code System (CMS) for research and education purposes. Preparations have been made to incorporate the CMS into the PSU Nuclear Engineering graduate class 'Nuclear Fuel Management' course. The information presented in this paper was developed during the preparation of the material for the course. The Haling Power Depletion (HPD) was presented in the course for the first time. The HPD method has been criticized as not valid by many in the field even though it has been successfully applied at PSU for the past 20 years. It was noticed that the radial power distribution (RPD) for low leakage cores during depletion remained similar to that of the HPD during most of the cycle. Thus, the Haling Power Depletion (HPD) may be used conveniently mainly for low leakage cores. Studies were then made to better understand the HPD and the results are presented in this paper. Many different core configurations can be computed quickly with the HPD without using Burnable Poisons (BP) to produce several excellent low leakage core configurations that are viable for power production. Once the HPD core configuration is chosen for further analysis, techniques are available for establishing the BP design to prevent violating any of the safety constraints in such HPD calculated cores. In summary, in this paper it has been shown that the HPD method can be used for guiding the design for the low leakage core. (authors)

  6. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polk, James E., E-mail: james.e.polk@jpl.nasa.gov; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Capece, Angela M. [Graduate Aerospace Laboratories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  7. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Capece, Angela M.; Katz, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al2O3 source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  8. A Fault Alarm and Diagnosis Method Based on Sensitive Parameters and Support Vector Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinjie; Yao, Ziyun; Lv, Zhiquan; Zhu, Qunxiong; Xu, Fengtian; Jiang, Zhinong

    2015-08-01

    Study on the extraction of fault feature and the diagnostic technique of reciprocating compressor is one of the hot research topics in the field of reciprocating machinery fault diagnosis at present. A large number of feature extraction and classification methods have been widely applied in the related research, but the practical fault alarm and the accuracy of diagnosis have not been effectively improved. Developing feature extraction and classification methods to meet the requirements of typical fault alarm and automatic diagnosis in practical engineering is urgent task. The typical mechanical faults of reciprocating compressor are presented in the paper, and the existing data of online monitoring system is used to extract fault feature parameters within 15 types in total; the inner sensitive connection between faults and the feature parameters has been made clear by using the distance evaluation technique, also sensitive characteristic parameters of different faults have been obtained. On this basis, a method based on fault feature parameters and support vector machine (SVM) is developed, which will be applied to practical fault diagnosis. A better ability of early fault warning has been proved by the experiment and the practical fault cases. Automatic classification by using the SVM to the data of fault alarm has obtained better diagnostic accuracy.

  9. The Performance of Earthworm Based Earthquake Alarm Reporting System in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ta-Yi; Hsiao, Nai-Chi; Wu, Yih-Min

    2016-04-01

    The Central Weather Bureau of Taiwan has operated an earthquake early warning (EEW) system and issued warnings to schools and government agencies since 2014. Because the real-time seismic data streams are integrated by the Earthworm software, some EEW modules were created under the Earthworm platform. The system is named Earthworm Based Earthquake Alarm Reporting (eBEAR) system, which is currently operating. The eBEAR system consists of new Earthworm modules for managing P-wave phase picking, trigger associations, hypocenter locations, magnitude estimations, and alert filtering prior to broadcasting. Here, we outline the methodology and performance of the eBEAR system. The online performance of the eBEAR system indicated that the average reporting times afforded by the system are approximately 15 and 26 s for inland and offshore earthquakes, respectively. Comparing to the earthquake catalog, the difference of the epicenters are less than 10 km for inland earthquakes; the difference of the magnitude are about 0.3. No false alarms generated by the system, but there were three false alarms issued by human. Due to the wrong operations, the EEW information created by off-line test were sent. However, we have learned from it and improved the standard operation procedure in the EEW system.

  10. Approaching Behaviour Monitor and Vibration Indication in Developing a General Moving Object Alarm System (GMOAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiwei Dong

    2013-07-01

    this boundary a fan‐shape grid is constructed to obtain an evenly distributed spatial partitioning of the data. These partitions are efficiently clustered into continuous objects which are then tracked through time using an object association algorithm based on updating a deviation matrix that represents angle, distance and size variations of the objects. The speed of the tracked objects is monitored throughout the algorithm. When the speed of an approaching object surpasses the safety threshold, the alarm necklace is triggered indicating the approaching direction of the fast moving object. The alarm necklace is equipped with three motors that can indicate five directions with respect to the user: left, back, right, left‐ back and right‐back. We performed three types of outdoor experiments (object passing, approaching and crossing that empirically verified the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. Furthermore, we analyzed the time and direction response based on neck vibrations. The statistical analysis (including hypothesis test suggests that the chosen alarm necklace can provide a rapid indication for a quick human response.

  11. Reducing false arrhythmia alarms in the ICU using multimodal signals and robust QRS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Nadi; Huvanandana, Jacqueline; Nguyen, Doan Trang; Kalra, Chandan; McEwan, Alistair; de Chazal, Philip

    2016-08-01

    This study developed algorithms to decrease the arrhythmia false alarms in the ICU by processing multimodal signals of photoplethysmography (PPG), arterial blood pressure (ABP), and two ECG signals. The goal was to detect the five critical arrhythmias comprising asystole (ASY), extreme bradycardia (EBR), extreme tachycardia (ETC), ventricular tachycardia (VTA), and ventricular flutter or fibrillation (VFB). The different characteristics of the arrhythmias suggested the application of individual signal processing for each alarm and the combination of the algorithms to enhance false alarm detection. Thus, different features and signal processing techniques were used for each arrhythmia type. The ECG signals were first processed to reduce the signal interference. Then, a Hilbert-transform based QRS detector algorithm was utilized to identify the QRS complexes, which were then processed to determine the instantaneous heart rate. The pulsatile signals (PPG and ABP) were processed to discover the pulse onset of beats which were then employed to measure the heart rate. The signal quality index (SQI) of the signals was implemented to verify the integrity of the heart rate information. The overall score obtained by our algorithms in the 2015 Computing in Cardiology Challenge was a score of 74.03% for retrospective and 69.92% for real-time analysis. PMID:27455121

  12. Human gender differences in the perception of conspecific alarm chemosensory cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca R Radulescu

    Full Text Available It has previously been established that, in threatening situations, animals use alarm pheromones to communicate danger. There is emerging evidence of analogous chemosensory "stress" cues in humans. For this study, we collected alarm and exercise sweat from "donors," extracted it, pooled it and presented it to 16 unrelated "detector" subjects undergoing fMRI. The fMRI protocol consisted of four stimulus runs, with each combination of stimulus condition and donor gender represented four times. Because olfactory stimuli do not follow the canonical hemodynamic response, we used a model-free approach. We performed minimal preprocessing and worked directly with block-average time series and step-function estimates. We found that, while male stress sweat produced a comparably strong emotional response in both detector genders, female stress sweat produced a markedly stronger arousal in female than in male detectors. Our statistical tests pinpointed this gender-specificity to the right amygdala (strongest in the superficial nuclei. When comparing the olfactory bulb responses to the corresponding stimuli, we found no significant differences between male and female detectors. These imaging results complement existing behavioral evidence, by identifying whether gender differences in response to alarm chemosignals are initiated at the perceptual versus emotional level. Since we found no significant differences in the olfactory bulb (primary processing site for chemosensory signals in mammals, we infer that the specificity in responding to female fear is likely based on processing meaning, rather than strength, of chemosensory cues from each gender.

  13. A WSN-Based Intrusion Alarm System to Improve Safety in Road Work Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic accidents are one of the main causes of death and disability worldwide. Workers responsible for maintaining and repairing roadways are especially prone to suffer these events, given their exceptional exposure to traffic. Since these actuations usually coexist with regular traffic, an errant driver can easily intrude the work area and provoke a collision. Some authors have proposed mechanisms aimed at detecting breaches in the work zone perimeter and alerting workers, which are collectively called intrusion alarm systems. However, they have several limitations and have not yet fulfilled the necessities of these scenarios. In this paper, we propose a new intrusion alarm system based on a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN. Our system is comprised of two main elements: vehicle detectors that form a virtual barrier and detect perimeter breaches by means of an ultrasonic beam and individual warning devices that transmit alerts to the workers. All these elements have a wireless communication interface and form a network that covers the whole work area. This network is in charge of transmitting and routing the alarms and coordinates the behavior of the system. We have tested our solution under real conditions with satisfactory results.

  14. Estimating Alarm Thresholds for Process Monitoring Data under Different Assumptions about the Data Generating Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Burr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Process monitoring (PM for nuclear safeguards sometimes requires estimation of thresholds corresponding to small false alarm rates. Threshold estimation dates to the 1920s with the Shewhart control chart; however, because possible new roles for PM are being evaluated in nuclear safeguards, it is timely to consider modern model selection options in the context of threshold estimation. One of the possible new PM roles involves PM residuals, where a residual is defined as residual = data − prediction. This paper reviews alarm threshold estimation, introduces model selection options, and considers a range of assumptions regarding the data-generating mechanism for PM residuals. Two PM examples from nuclear safeguards are included to motivate the need for alarm threshold estimation. The first example involves mixtures of probability distributions that arise in solution monitoring, which is a common type of PM. The second example involves periodic partial cleanout of in-process inventory, leading to challenging structure in the time series of PM residuals.

  15. An analysis of CSNI Standard Problem No.6 by ALARM-B1 computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented in this report are the results of a computer simulation of the CSNI International Standard Problem No.6 (ISP6) by the ALARM-B1 code. The aim of this standard problem is particularly to examine the capability of analytical models relating to the two-phase mixture level and the discharge mass flow rate using the individual participants' computer codes. The theoretical predictions were performed to explore the separate effects during the initial three seconds attended with a non-equilibrium physical phenomenon. The ISP6, which is based on the Battelle Frankfurt experiment duplicating a BWR steam line break accident, might not be appropriate as a bench mark problem of the ALARM-B1 program (version 2), because it contains an unreasonable demand treating a thermal non-equilibrium process with an equilibrium model. Apart from the pressure history arising from the non-equilibrium feature, the transient steam-water interface in the vessel was tracked sufficiently by using the bubble-rise-model incorporated in the ALARM-B1 code. In addition, the calculated mass flow rate at the exit plane during the steam phase blowdown was correct within the 15% experimental error bands. (author)

  16. An engineering approach to knowledge-based systems, the alarm processing and diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of alarms that may be initiated during transients or accidents in nuclear-generating control rooms may temporarily exceed an operator's ability to assimilate and respond. This phenomenon is characterized as Cognitive Overload. The Alarm Processing and Diagnostic System (APDS) was designed to deal with this problem through a unique and operationally sensitive method of alarm prioritization and filtration. The approach taken attempts to parallel the operator's situation assessment methodology when dealing with transient conditions. A strong criteria for the development methodology employed was its ultimate acceptance by parties engaged in the operation of nuclear power facilities. As such, the methodology used had to be easily understood and consistent with the acceptance standards of nuclear power. This necessitated the verifiable practices found in engineering design. While APDS remains rooted in artificial intelligence or expert systems, it goes beyond the paradigm of rules and inferencing to an object-oriented structure that allows traditional and well-documented engineering-based decision methods to be applied. These features have important consequences when considering final acceptance, implementation, and maintenance. 3 refs., 1 tab

  17. Aphid alarm pheromone as a cue for ants to locate aphid partners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François J Verheggen

    Full Text Available The mutualistic relationships that occur between myrmecophilous aphids and ants are based on the rich food supply that honeydew represents for ants and on the protection they provide against aphid natural enemies. While aphid predators and parasitoids actively forage for oviposition sites by using aphid semiochemicals, scouts of aphid-tending ant species would also benefit from locating honeydew resources by orienting toward aphid pheromone sources. The present study aims to provide additional information on the use of Aphis fabae alarm pheromone, i.e. (E-β-farnesene (EβF, by ant scouts. The perception and behavioral impact of EβF on Lasius niger were investigated using electroantennography and two bio-assays measuring their attraction and orientation towards aphid semiochemicals. Pronounced electrical depolarizations were observed from L. niger scout antennae to stimulations of A. fabae alarm pheromone, while other sesquiterpenes elicited weak or no responses. L. niger scouts were significantly attracted toward EβF in a four-arm olfactometer, as well as in an two-choice bioassay. These laboratory results suggest for the first time that low amounts of aphid alarm pheromone can be used by L. niger scouts as a cue indicating the presence of aphid colonies and could therefore mediate the aphid-ant partnership in the field.

  18. Improvement of alarm algorithms for SMART-P critical function monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMART-P is an integral reactor where major components such as main coolant pumps and steam generators are located inside of reactor vessel. It also have several different design features for the safety grade and non-safety grade systems relative to existing plants. Due to these unique features of SMART-P, new design requirements of the Critical Function Monitoring System (CFMS) are needed. Ten SMART-P CFMS critical function items were improved to satisfy the critical function required by NUREG-0696. - Core Reactivity Control - Core Heat Removal - RCS Inventory Control - RCS Pressure Control - RCS Heat Removal - Reactor Building Pressure/Temperature Control - Reactor Building Isolation - Radioactive Emissions Control - Combustible Gas Control - Maintenance of Vital Auxiliaries When we improve alarm algorithms for critical function, several SMART-P design features were reflected. In connection with the RCS inventory control, SMART-P POSRV did not release steam/water mixture but nitrogen gas in most cases so POSRV leakage alarm branch is moved to RCS Pressure Control item. In connection with the RCS pressure control, SMART-P pressurizer regulates the system pressure by nitrogen gas and steam partial pressure naturally without any active operation of spray or heater so alarm branch for pressure change rate were deleted

  19. Impurity migration and effects on vacancy formation enthalpy in polycrystalline depleted uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, K. R.; Lynn, K. G.; Weber, M. H.; Macchi, C.; Somoza, A.; Juan, A.; Okuniewski, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    We have used Doppler-broadening of the positron-electron annihilation radiation technique and VASP calculations to verify the previously reported vacancy formation enthalpy Hvf in polycrystalline depleted uranium. Experimentally we have confirmed a Hvf of (1.6 ± 0.2) eV. VASP calculations using GGA and LDA approximations gave vacancy formation enthalpies values of 1.98 eV and 2.22 eV respectively. We found residual oxygen in the sample diminished these values by 50% or more. Our new experimental and theoretical data supports the notion that oxygen impurities in the sample are responsible for lower values of vacancy formation enthalpies. Measured and calculated vacancy formation enthalpies, as well as the obtained oxygen migration enthalpy of (0.6 ± 0.1) eV, are compared and discussed with values reported in the literature.

  20. Alarm analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esp, D.G.; Warwick, K.

    1997-12-31

    The electrical power distribution network in the UK is a distributed grid of high power components. The grid is controlled hierarchically with, at the lower level, proximal components being grouped around substations which contain not only protection elements but also sequencing and timing logic. At the next level up the substations feed to a control centre which, for historical reasons, can be viewed in terms of a number of different geographical areas, each area control containing its own regional substations. When a fault occurs on the transmission network, automatic protection and isolation occurs at a number of substations, opening switches to ensure that power is no longer fed to the faulty line, and that the disturbance on the remainder of the grid is effectively minimised. Details on which of the switches have operated are passed on to the control centre which continually polls round the different substations to see what switchgear information each has. No direct information is obtained on what type of fault has occurred and where, but rather information is obtained in the control centre which indicates whch switches and automatic protection devices have operated in response to the fault. (Author)