WorldWideScience

Sample records for alamos nuclear accidents

  1. What has happened to the survivors of the early Los Alamos nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two nuclear accidents involving a plutonium sphere just subcritical in size occurred at the Los Alamos Laboratory, LA-1 in 1945 and LA-2 in 1946. Because remote control devices were deemed unreliable at the time, the tamper material (tungsten carbide bricks in LA-1 and beryllium hemispheres in LA-2) was added by hand with the operator standing next to the assembly. In each case the critical size of the assembly was accidentally exceeded and the resultant exponentially increasing chain reaction emitted a burst of neutrons and gamma rays. Ten persons were exposed to the radiation bursts which were largely composed of neutrons. The doses ranged from fatal in the case of the two operators, to small in the case of some survivors. The two operators died within weeks as a result of acute radiation injury. Only six of the eight survivors were available for follow-up study ten or more years after the accident. Four of these six survivors are now dead, but the two living survivors are in excellent health with no clinical or laboratory evidence of late radiation injury. Two of the deceased died of acute myelogenous leukemia, another died at age 83 of refractory anemia, and the fourth of myocardial infarction. The heart attack could have been precipitated by the myxedema assumed to have been the result of the radiation exposure

  2. Nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 27 May 1986 the Norwegian government appointed an inter-ministerial committee of senior officials to prepare a report on experiences in connection with the Chernobyl accident. The present second part of the committee's report describes proposals for measures to prevent and deal with similar accidents in the future. The committee's evaluations and proposals are grouped into four main sections: Safety and risk at nuclear power plants; the Norwegian contingency organization for dealing with nuclear accidents; compensation issues; and international cooperation

  3. Performance of the CEDS Accident Dosimetry System at the 1995 Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahan, K.L.; Schwanke, L.J.

    1996-12-01

    In July 1995, LANL hosted an accident dosimetry intercomparison. When all reactors on the Oak Ridge Reservation were idled in 1988, the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR), which had been used for 22 previous intercomparisons dating from 1965, was shut down for an indefinite period. The LANL group began characterization of two critical assemblies for dosimetry purposes. As a result, NAD-23 was conceived and 10 DOE facilities accepted invitations to participate in the intercomparison. This report is a summary of the performance of one of the participants, the Centralized External Dosimetry System (CEDS). The CEDS is a cooperative personnel dosimetry arrangement between three DOE sites in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Many successes and failures are reported herein. Generally, the TL dosimeters performed poorly and always over-reported the delivered dose. The TLD processing procedures contain efforts that would lead to large biases in the reported absorbed dose, and omit several key steps in the TLD reading process. The supralinear behavior of lithium fluoride (LiF) has not been characterized for this particular dosimeter and application (i.e., in high-dose mixed neutron/gamma fields). The use of TLD materials may also be precluded given the limitations of the LiF material itself, the TLD reading system, and the upper dose level to which accident dosimetry systems are required to perform as set forth in DOE regulations. The indium foil results confirm the expected inability of that material to predict the magnitude of the wearer`s dose reliably, although it is quite suitable as a quick-sort material. Biological sample (hair) results were above the minimum detectable activity (MDA) for only one of the tests. Several questions as to the best methods for sample handling and processing remain.

  4. Nuclear accidents and epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A consultation on epidemiology related to the Chernobyl accident was held in Copenhagen in May 1987 as a basis for concerted action. This was followed by a joint IAEA/WHO workshop in Vienna, which reviewed appropriate methodologies for possible long-term effects of radiation following nuclear accidents. The reports of these two meetings are included in this volume, and cover the subjects: 1) Epidemiology related to the Chernobyl nuclear accident. 2) Appropriate methodologies for studying possible long-term effects of radiation on individuals exposed in a nuclear accident. Figs and tabs

  5. Accidents in nuclear ships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelgaard, P.L. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)]|[Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    This report starts with a discussion of the types of nuclear vessels accidents, in particular accidents which involve the nuclear propulsion systems. Next available information on 61 reported nuclear ship events in considered. Of these 6 deals with U.S. ships, 54 with USSR ships and 1 with a French ship. The ships are in almost all cases nuclear submarines. Only events that involve the sinking of vessels, the nuclear propulsion plants, radiation exposures, fires/explosions, sea-water leaks into the submarines and sinking of vessels are considered. For each event a summary of available information is presented, and comments are added. In some cases the available information is not credible, and these events are neglected. This reduces the number of events to 5 U.S. events, 35 USSR/Russian events and 1 French event. A comparison is made between the reported Soviet accidents and information available on dumped and damaged Soviet naval reactors. It seems possible to obtain good correlation between the two types of events. An analysis is made of the accident and estimates are made of the accident probabilities which are found to be of the order of 10{sup -3} per ship reactor years. It if finally pointed out that the consequences of nuclear ship accidents are fairly local and does in no way not approach the magnitude of the Chernobyl accident. It is emphasized that some of the information on which this report is based, may not be correct. Consequently some of the results of the assessments made may not be correct. (au).

  6. Accidents in nuclear ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report starts with a discussion of the types of nuclear vessels accidents, in particular accidents which involve the nuclear propulsion systems. Next available information on 61 reported nuclear ship events in considered. Of these 6 deals with U.S. ships, 54 with USSR ships and 1 with a French ship. The ships are in almost all cases nuclear submarines. Only events that involve the sinking of vessels, the nuclear propulsion plants, radiation exposures, fires/explosions, sea-water leaks into the submarines and sinking of vessels are considered. For each event a summary of available information is presented, and comments are added. In some cases the available information is not credible, and these events are neglected. This reduces the number of events to 5 U.S. events, 35 USSR/Russian events and 1 French event. A comparison is made between the reported Soviet accidents and information available on dumped and damaged Soviet naval reactors. It seems possible to obtain good correlation between the two types of events. An analysis is made of the accident and estimates are made of the accident probabilities which are found to be of the order of 10-3 per ship reactor years. It if finally pointed out that the consequences of nuclear ship accidents are fairly local and does in no way not approach the magnitude of the Chernobyl accident. It is emphasized that some of the information on which this report is based, may not be correct. Consequently some of the results of the assessments made may not be correct. (au)

  7. The psychology of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incidents involving nuclear weapons are described, as well as the accident to the Three Mile Island-2 reactor. Methods of assessment of risks are discussed, with particular reference to subjective judgements and the possible role of human error in civil nuclear accidents. Accidents or misunderstandings in communication or human actions which might lead to nuclear war are also discussed. (U.K.)

  8. Nuclear ship accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report available information on 28 nuclear ship accident and incidents is considered. Of these 5 deals with U.S. ships and 23 with USSR ships. The ships are in almost all cases nuclear submarines. Only events that involve the nuclear propulsion plants, radiation exposures, fires/explosions and sea water leaks into the submarines are considered. Comments are made on each of the events, and at the end of the report an attempt is made to point out the weaknesses of the submarine designs which have resulted in the accidents. It is emphasized that much of the available information is of a rather dubious nature. consequently some of the assessments made may not be correct. (au)

  9. Systematic register of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Systematic Register of Nuclear Accidents is a consolidation of important accidents occurred in the world during the period 1945-1984. Important accidents can be defined as those involving high radiation doses, which require the exposed individuals to undergo medical treatment. The organization and structuring of this register rests on the necessity for the availability of a database specifically oriented to researchers interested in studying the different nuclear accidents reported. Approximately 150 accidents in that period are presented in a summary form; these accidents had been described or reported in the scientific literature or made known through informal communications of Brazilian and foreign institutions and researchers. This register can be of interest particularly to all professionals who either directly of indirectly work in the area of nuclear or radioactive installations safety. In order to facilitate analysis by the researcher, that casuistic system was divided into 3 groups: criticality accidents (table I), fall-out on Marshall Islands (table II) and external irradiation accidents (table III). It is also included an overview of accidents in that period, indicating the total number of victims, fatal cases, and number of survivors. The author offers to the reader an extensive bibliography on the accidents described. (Author)

  10. Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podlesak, David W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steiner, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burns, Carol J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; LaMont, Stephen P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-09

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities. Some conclusions are: (1) Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous defense and non-defense programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements; (2) Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material forensic characterization; (3) Actinide analytical chemistry uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met; and (4) Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  11. International aspects of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident at Chernobyl revealed that there were shortcomings and gaps in the existing international mechanisms and brought home to governments the need for stronger measures to provide better protection against the risks of severe accidents. The main thrust of international co-operation with regard to nuclear safety issues is aimed at achieving a uniformly high level of safety in nuclear power plants through continuous exchanges of research findings and feedback from reactor operating experience. The second type of problem posed in the event of an accident resulting in radioactive contamination of several countries relates to the obligation to notify details of the circumstances and nature of the accident speedily so that the countries affected can take appropriate protective measures and, if necessary, organize mutual assistance. Giving the public accurate information is also an important aspect of managing an emergency situation arising from a severe accident. Finally, the confusion resulting from the unwarranted variety of protective measures implemented after the Chernobyl accident has highlighted the need for international harmonization of the principles and scientific criteria applicable to the protection of the public in the event of an accident and for a more consistent approach to emergency plans. The international conventions on third party liability in the nuclear energy sector (Paris/Brussels Conventions and the Vienna Convention) provide for compensation for damage caused by nuclear accidents in accordance with the rules and jurisdiction that they lay down. These provisions impose obligations on the operator responsible for an accident, and the State where the nuclear facility is located, towards the victims of damage caused in another country

  12. Nuclear law and radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear activities in Brazil, and particularly the radiological accident of Goiania, are examined in the light of the environmental and nuclear laws of Brazil and the issue of responsibility. The absence of legislation covering radioactive wastes as well as the restrictions on Brazilian States to issue regulations covering nuclear activities are reviewed. The radiological accident and its consequences, including the protection and compensation of the victims, the responsibility of the shareholders of the Instituto Goiano de Radioterapia, operator of the radioactive source, the provisional storage and the final disposal at Abadia de Goias of the radioactive waste generated by the accident are reviewed. Finally, nuclear responsibility, the inapplicability of the Law 6453/77 which deals with nuclear damages, and the state liability regime are analysed in accordance with the principles of the Brazilian Federal Constitution. (author)

  13. Frequency Estimates for Aircraft Crashes into Nuclear Facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George D. Heindel

    1998-09-01

    In October 1996, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a new standard for evaluating accidental aircraft crashes into hazardous facilities. This document uses the method prescribed in the new standard to evaluate the likelihood of this type of accident occurring at Los Alamos National Laboratory's nuclear facilities.

  14. Measures against nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A select committee appointed by the Norwegian Ministry of Social Affairs put forward proposals concerning measures for the improvement of radiation protection preparedness in Norway. On the basis on an assessment of the potential radiation accident threat, the report examines the process of response, and identifies the organizational and management factors that influence that process

  15. Calculating nuclear accident probabilities from empirical frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Ha-Duong, Minh; Journé, V.

    2014-01-01

    International audience Since there is no authoritative, comprehensive and public historical record of nuclear power plant accidents, we reconstructed a nuclear accident data set from peer-reviewed and other literature. We found that, in a sample of five random years, the worldwide historical frequency of a nuclear major accident, defined as an INES level 7 event, is 14 %. The probability of at least one nuclear accident rated at level ≥4 on the INES scale is 67 %. These numbers are subject...

  16. Nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, C S

    1989-09-01

    Twenty-two nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies utilizing the fast-pulse Health Physics Research Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducted since 1965. These studies have provided a total of 62 different organizations a forum for discussion of criticality accident dosimetry, an opportunity to test their neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry systems under a variety of simulated criticality accident conditions, and the experience of comparing results with reference dose values as well as with the measured results obtained by others making measurements under identical conditions. Sixty-nine nuclear accidents (27 with unmoderated neutron energy spectra and 42 with eight different shielded spectra) have been simulated in the studies. Neutron doses were in the 0.2-8.5 Gy range and gamma doses in the 0.1-2.0 Gy range. A total of 2,289 dose measurements (1,311 neutron, 978 gamma) were made during the intercomparisons. The primary methods of neutron dosimetry were activation foils, thermoluminescent dosimeters, and blood sodium activation. The main methods of gamma dose measurement were thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiophotoluminescent glass, and film. About 68% of the neutron measurements met the accuracy guidelines (+/- 25%) and about 52% of the gamma measurements met the accuracy criterion (+/- 20%) for accident dosimetry. PMID:2777549

  17. Industrial accidents in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 12 nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany with a total of 3678 employees, 25 notifiable company personnel accidents and 46 notifiable outside personnel accidents were reported for an 18-month period. (orig./HP)

  18. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to calculate source term releases from accident scenarios manually or by computer. A major feature of the AAH is development of accident sample problems to provide input to source term analysis methods and transport computer codes. Sample problems and illustrative examples for different accident types are included in the AAH

  19. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayer, J E; Clark, A T; Loysen, P; Ballinger, M Y; Mishima, J; Owczarski, P C; Gregory, W S; Nichols, B D

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to calculate source term releases from accident scenarios manually or by computer. A major feature of the AAH is development of accident sample problems to provide input to source term analysis methods and transport computer codes. Sample problems and illustrative examples for different accident types are included in the AAH.

  20. Public health response to the nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Act on Special Measures Concerning Nuclear Emergency Preparedness was established in 2000 as a specific act within the broader Disaster Control Measures and Reactor Regulation Act which was written in response to the JCO Criticality Accident of 1999. However, this regulatory system did not address all aspects of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident. This was especially evident with public health issues. For example, radioactive screening, prophylactic use of potassium iodide, support for vulnerable people, and management of contaminated dead bodies were all requested immediately after the occurrence of the nuclear power plant accident but were not included in these regulatory acts. Recently, the regulatory system for nuclear accidents has been revised in response to this reactor accident. Herein we review the revised plan for nuclear reactor accidents in the context of public health. (author)

  1. Medical consequences of a nuclear plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report gives background information concerning radiation and the biological medical effects and damages caused by radiation. The report also discusses nuclear power plant accidents and efforts from the medical service in the case of a nuclear power plant accident. (L.F.)

  2. Multiple Myeloma in Post Nuclear Accident Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Wiwanitkit, Somsri; Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2012-01-01

    The problem of 2011 nuclear accident crisis draws attention of physicians and medical scientists around the world. The cancer induction is an important adverse effect of exposure to radionuclide. In this specific article, the multiple myeloma, an important hematological cancer, in the post nuclear accident crisis will be discussed.

  3. Nuclear accident impact on the ecological environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reviewed the eco-environmental behavior of radionuclides released into the environment by nuclear explosion and nuclear accidents, especially of several key radionuclides with biological significance, including 137Cs, 95Zr, 90Sr, 131I, 3H and 14C, in order to correctly understand the case of nuclear accidents and its pollution, maintain the social stable, and provide suitable measures for environmental protection and safety. (author)

  4. Nuclear accident and medical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described is the commentary concerning normative action of medical staff at radiation emergency and actual actions taken/to be taken for the Nuclear Power Plant Accident (NPPA) in Fukushima. The normative medical staff's action at radiation emergency is essentially based on rules defined by such international authorities as United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Basic Safety Standard (BSS) and by network in IAEA, World Health Organization (WHO) and so on. The rules stand on past atomic events like those in Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Three Mile Isl., Chernobyl, and in Japanese Tokai JCO accident. The action above is required as a medical teamwork over specialized doctors. At Fukushima NPPA, medicare flowed from the on-site first-aid station (doctors for industry and labors), then the base for patient transfer (doctors of Japanese Association of Acute Medicine and Tokyo Electric Power Comp.), to the primary hospital for acute exposure (Iwaki Kyoritsu Hos.), from which patients were further transported to the secondary (contamination detected or severe trauma, Fukushima Medical Univ.) and/or tertiary facilities (serious contamination or acute radiation injury, National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) and Hiroshima Univ.). The flow was built up by the previous lead of national official guidance and by urgent spontaneous network among medical facilities; exempli gratia (e.g.), Fukushima Medical Univ. rapidly specialized in coping with the radiation medicare by partial discontinuance of daily clinical practice. Specialists of acute radiation medicare are generally rare, for which measures for it are more desirable along with health risk communication in facilities concerned. The professional function and endowment required for medical staff at emergency are concluded to be their guts and devotion as well as medical

  5. Dutch National Plan combat nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the Dutch National Plan combat nuclear accidents (NPK). Ch. 2 discusses some important starting points which are determining for the framework and the performance of the NPK, in particular the accident typology which underlies the plan. Also the new accident-classification system for the Dutch nuclear power plants, the standardization for the measures to be taken and the staging around nuclear power plants are pursued. In ch. 3 the legal framework of the combat nuclear accidents is described. In particular the Nuclear-power law, the Accident law and the Municipality law are pursued. Also the role of province and municipality are described. Ch. 4 deals with the role of the owner/licensee of the object where the accident occurs, in the combat of accident. In ch. 5 the structure of the nuclear-accident combat at national level is outlined, subdivided in alarm phase, combat phase and the winding-up phase. In ch.'s 6-12 these phases are elaborated more in detail. In ch.'s 10-13 the measures to be taken in nuclear accidents, are described. These measures are distinguished with regard to: protection of the population and medical aspects, water economy, drinking-water supply, agriculture and food supply. Ch. 14 describes the responsibility of the burgomaster. Ch.'s 15 and 16 present an overview of the personnel, material, procedural and juridical modifications and supplements of existing structures which are necessary with regard to the new and modified parts of the structure. Ch. 17 indicates how by means of the appropriate education and exercise it can be achieved that all personnel, services and institutes concerned possess the knowledge and experience necessary for the activities from the NKP to be executed as has been described. Ch. 18 contains a survey of activities to be performed and a proposal how these can be realized. (H.W.). figs.; tabs

  6. The cost of nuclear accidents in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRSN has produced estimates for costs of possible nuclear accidents on French PWRs. This paper outlines the strong differences between severe accidents, which feature a core melt but more or less controlled radioactive releases, and major accidents implying massive releases. In the first case, crisis managers would be faced with a mainly 'economic' accident, the larger part of costs being borne in a diffused fashion by the economy at large (image costs and impacts on electricity production). In the second case, authorities would be faced with the challenges of a full-scale radiological crisis involving sizeable areas of contaminated territories and large numbers of radiological refugees. (author)

  7. Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinman, William Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Steiner, Robert Ernest [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lamont, Stephen Philip [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Nuclear forensics assists in responding to any event where nuclear material is found outside of regulatory control; a response plan is presented and a nuclear forensics program is undergoing further development so that smugglers are sufficiently deterred.

  8. Estimating the frequency of nuclear accidents

    OpenAIRE

    Raju, Suvrat

    2014-01-01

    We used Bayesian methods to compare the predictions of probabilistic risk assessment -- the theoretical tool used by the nuclear industry to predict the frequency of nuclear accidents -- with empirical data. The existing record of accidents with some simplifying assumptions regarding their probability distribution is sufficient to rule out the validity of the industry's analyses at a very high confidence level. We show that this conclusion is robust against any reasonable assumed variation of...

  9. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304... Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to... nuclear accident is possible, shall provide nuclear accident dosimetry for those individuals. (b)...

  10. The nuclear accident risk: a territorial approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How many people live in the vicinity of French nuclear power stations? Recent events - notably in Japan, but also in France - highlight the urgent need to be able to predict the possible effects of a nuclear accident on surrounding territories. Here, Ambroise Pascal identifies two key criteria for such an estimation: residential density and land use. (author)

  11. Severe accidents in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the assessment of the safety of nuclear power plants it is of great importance the analyses of severe accidents since they allow to estimate the possible failure models of the containment, and also permit knowing the magnitude and composition of the radioactive material that would be released to the environment in case of an accident upon population and the environment. This paper presents in general terms the basic principles for conducting the analysis of severe accidents, the fundamental sources in the generation of radionuclides and aerosols, the transportation and deposition processes, and also makes reference to de main codes used in the modulation of severe accidents. The final part of the paper contents information on how severe accidents are dialed with the regulatory point view in different countries

  12. National emergency plan for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The national emergency plan for nuclear accidents is a plan of action designed to provide a response to accidents involving the release or potential release of radioactive substances into the environment, which could give rise to radiation exposure to the public. The plan outlines the measures which are in place to assess and mitigate the effects of nuclear accidents which might pose a radiological hazard in ireland. It shows how accident management will operate, how technical information and monitoring data will be collected, how public information will be provided and what measures may be taken for the protection of the public in the short and long term. The plan can be integrated with the Department of Defence arrangements for wartime emergencies

  13. Responding to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article proposes a summary of the content of a report published by the OECD's NEA (Nuclear Energy Agency) in response to the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. This report outlines international efforts to strengthen nuclear regulation, safety, research and radiological protection in the post-Fukushima context. It describes work on new reactors and legal frameworks, highlights key messages and lessons learnt, shared responsibilities, human and organisational factors, defence-in-depth, stakeholders engagement, crisis communication and emergency preparedness

  14. Alternative evacuation strategies for nuclear power accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the U.S., current protective-action strategies to safeguard the public following a nuclear power accident have remained largely unchanged since their implementation in the early 1980s. In the past thirty years, new technologies have been introduced, allowing faster computations, better modeling of predicted radiological consequences, and improved accident mapping using geographic information systems (GIS). Utilizing these new technologies, we evaluate the efficacy of alternative strategies, called adaptive protective action zones (APAZs), that use site-specific and event-specific data to dynamically determine evacuation boundaries with simple heuristics in order to better inform protective action decisions (rather than relying on pre-event regulatory bright lines). Several candidate APAZs were developed and then compared to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s keyhole evacuation strategy (and full evacuation of the emergency planning zone). Two of the APAZs were better on average than existing NRC strategies at reducing either the radiological exposure, the population evacuated, or both. These APAZs are especially effective for larger radioactive plumes and at high population sites; one of them is better at reducing radiation exposure, while the other is better at reducing the size of the population evacuated. - Highlights: • Developed framework to compare nuclear power accident evacuation strategies. • Evacuation strategies were compared on basis of radiological and evacuation risk. • Current strategies are adequate for smaller scale nuclear power accidents. • New strategies reduced radiation exposure and evacuation size for larger accidents

  15. The Chernobyl nuclear accident and its consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An AAEC Task Group was set up shortly after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant to monitor and evaluate initial reports and to assess the implications for Australia. The Task Group issued a preliminary report on 9 May 1986. On 25-29 August 1986, the USSR released details of the accident and its consequences and further information has become available from the Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD and the World Health Organisation. The Task Group now presents a revised report summarising this information and commenting on the consequences from the Australian viewpoint

  16. Agricultural implications of the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Tomoko M

    2016-08-01

    More than 4 years has passed since the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. Immediately after the accident, 40 to 50 academic staff of the Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the University of Tokyo created an independent team to monitor the behavior of the radioactive materials in the field and their effects on agricultural farm lands, forests, rivers, animals, etc. When the radioactive nuclides from the nuclear power plant fell, they were instantly adsorbed at the site where they first touched; consequently, the fallout was found as scattered spots on the surface of anything that was exposed to the air at the time of the accident. The adsorption has become stronger over time, so the radioactive nuclides are now difficult to remove. The findings of our study regarding the wide range of effects on agricultural fields are summarized in this report. PMID:27538845

  17. Agricultural implications of the Fukushima nuclear accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Tomoko M.

    2016-01-01

    More than 4 years has passed since the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. Immediately after the accident, 40 to 50 academic staff of the Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the University of Tokyo created an independent team to monitor the behavior of the radioactive materials in the field and their effects on agricultural farm lands, forests, rivers, animals, etc. When the radioactive nuclides from the nuclear power plant fell, they were instantly adsorbed at the site where they first touched; consequently, the fallout was found as scattered spots on the surface of anything that was exposed to the air at the time of the accident. The adsorption has become stronger over time, so the radioactive nuclides are now difficult to remove. The findings of our study regarding the wide range of effects on agricultural fields are summarized in this report. PMID:27538845

  18. Emergency plans for nuclear power accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents an evaluation of an exercise of emergency services during a simulated accident at the nuclear power plant of Barsebaeck, Sweden. The aim of the exercise was to test Swedish and Danish organizations and various collaborative co-ordinations. Recommendations for future exercises are given. (G.B.)

  19. Truck accident involving unirradiated nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early morning of Dec. 16, 1991, a severe accident occurred when a passenger vehicle traveling in the wrong direction collided with a tractor trailer carrying 24 unirradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in 12 containers on Interstate I-91 in Springfield, Massachusetts. This paper documents the mechanical circumstances of the accident and assesses the physical environment to which the containers were exposed and the response of the containers and their contents. The accident involved four impacts where the truck was struck by the car, impacted on the center guardrail, impacted on the outer concrete barrier and came to rest against the center guardrail. The impacts were followed by a fire that began in the engine compartment, spread to the tractor and cab, and eventually spread to the trailer and payload. The fire lasted for about three hours and the packages were involved in the fire for about two hours. As a result of the fire, the tractor-trailer was completely destroyed and the packages were exposed to flames with temperatures between 1,300 F and 1,800 F. The fuel assemblies remained intact during the accident and there was no release of any radioactive material during the accident. This was a very severe accident; however, the injuries were minor and at no time was the public health and safety at risk

  20. Estimating the frequency of nuclear accidents

    CERN Document Server

    Raju, Suvrat

    2016-01-01

    We used Bayesian methods to compare the predictions of probabilistic risk assessment -- the theoretical tool used by the nuclear industry to predict the frequency of nuclear accidents -- with empirical data. The existing record of accidents with some simplifying assumptions regarding their probability distribution is sufficient to rule out the validity of the industry's analyses at a very high confidence level. We show that this conclusion is robust against any reasonable assumed variation of safety standards over time, and across regions. The debate on nuclear liability indicates that the industry has independently arrived at this conclusion. We pay special attention to the Indian situation, where we show that the existing operating experience provides insufficient data to make any reliable claims about the safety of future reactors. We briefly discuss some policy implications.

  1. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory - An Isolated Nuclear Research Establishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Norris E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meade, Roger Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-23

    Early in his twenty-five year career as the Director of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Norris Bradbury wrote at length about the atomic bomb and the many implications the bomb might have on the world. His themes were both technical and philosophical. In 1963, after nearly twenty years of leading the nation’s first nuclear weapons laboratory, Bradbury took the opportunity to broaden his writing. In a paper delivered to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s symposium on the “Criteria in the Selection of Sites for the Construction of Reactors and Nuclear Research Centers,” Bradbury took the opportunity to talk about the business of nuclear research and the human component of operating a scientific laboratory. Below is the transcript of his talk.

  2. Type A Accident Investigation Board report on the January 17, 1996, electrical accident with injury in Technical Area 21 Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    An electrical accident was investigated in which a crafts person received serious injuries as a result of coming into contact with a 13.2 kilovolt (kV) electrical cable in the basement of Building 209 in Technical Area 21 (TA-21-209) in the Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility (TSFF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In conducting its investigation, the Accident Investigation Board used various analytical techniques, including events and causal factor analysis, barrier analysis, change analysis, fault tree analysis, materials analysis, and root cause analysis. The board inspected the accident site, reviewed events surrounding the accident, conducted extensive interviews and document reviews, and performed causation analyses to determine the factors that contributed to the accident, including any management system deficiencies. Relevant management systems and factors that could have contributed to the accident were evaluated in accordance with the guiding principles of safety management identified by the Secretary of Energy in an October 1994 letter to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and subsequently to Congress.

  3. Type A Accident Investigation Board report on the January 17, 1996, electrical accident with injury in Technical Area 21 Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electrical accident was investigated in which a crafts person received serious injuries as a result of coming into contact with a 13.2 kilovolt (kV) electrical cable in the basement of Building 209 in Technical Area 21 (TA-21-209) in the Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility (TSFF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In conducting its investigation, the Accident Investigation Board used various analytical techniques, including events and causal factor analysis, barrier analysis, change analysis, fault tree analysis, materials analysis, and root cause analysis. The board inspected the accident site, reviewed events surrounding the accident, conducted extensive interviews and document reviews, and performed causation analyses to determine the factors that contributed to the accident, including any management system deficiencies. Relevant management systems and factors that could have contributed to the accident were evaluated in accordance with the guiding principles of safety management identified by the Secretary of Energy in an October 1994 letter to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and subsequently to Congress

  4. Environmental consequences of releases from nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of a four-year Nordic cooperation program in the area of consequence assessment of nuclear accidents with large releases to the environment. This program was completed in 1989. Related information from other research programs has also been described, so that many chapters of the report reflect the current status in the respective areas, in addition to containing the results of the Nordic program. (author) 179 refs

  5. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Nuclear Science Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wender, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-06-19

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facilities for Nuclear Science consist of a high-energy "white" neutron source (Target 4) with 6 flight paths, three low-energy nuclear science flight paths at the Lujan Center, and a proton reaction area. The neutron beams produced at the Target 4 complement those produced at the Lujan Center because they are of much higher energy and have shorter pulse widths. The neutron sources are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam of the LANSCE linear accelerator. With these facilities, LANSCE is able to deliver neutrons with energies ranging from a milli-electron volt to several hundreds of MeV, as well as proton beams with a wide range of energy, time and intensity characteristics. The facilities, instruments and research programs are described briefly.

  6. Research investigation report on Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was issued in February 2012 by Rebuild Japan Initiative Foundation's Independent Investigation Commission on the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident, which consisted of six members from the private sector in independent positions and with no direct interest in the business of promoting nuclear power. Commission aimed to determine the truth behind the accident by clarifying the various problems and reveal systematic problems behind these issues so as to create a new starting point by identifying clear lessons learned. Report composed of four chapters; (1) progression of Fukushima accident and resulting damage (accident management after Fukushima accident, and effects and countermeasure of radioactive materials discharged into the environment), (2) response against Fukushima accident (emergency response of cabinet office against nuclear disaster, risk communication and on-site response against nuclear disaster), (3) analysis of historical and structural factors (technical philosophy of nuclear safety, problems of nuclear safety regulation of Fukushima accident, safety regulatory governance and social background of 'Safety Myth'), (4) Global Context (implication in nuclear security, Japan in nuclear safety regime, U.S.-Japan relations for response against Fukushima accident, lessons learned from Fukushima accident - aiming at creation of resilience). Report could identify causes of Fukushima accident and factors related to resulting damages, show the realities behind failure to prevent the spread of damage, and analyze the overall structural and historical background behind the accidents. (T. Tanaka)

  7. Nuclear ship accidents, description and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report available information on 44 reported nuclear ship events is considered. Of these 6 deals with U.S. ships and 38 with USSR ships. The ships are in almost all cases nuclear submarines. Only events that involve the sinking of vessels, the nuclear propulsion plants, radiation exposures, fires/ explosions, sea-water leaks into the submarines and sinking of vessels are considered. Comments are made on each of the events, and at the end of the report an attempt is made to point out the weaknesses of the submarine designs which have resulted in the accidents. It is emphasized that some of the information of which this report is based, may be of dubious nature. Consequently some of the results of the assessments made may not be correct. (au)

  8. Estimating the cost of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimating the cost of nuclear accidents may appear as an insurmountable task. There are so many different consequences; some of these appear extremely volatile; in any case, climatic conditions play a major role. However, in the absence of such costs, no cost-benefit analysis can be envisaged in nuclear safety; furthermore, an intuitive feel for what a nuclear crisis would look like is practically impossible to develop. This paper outlines what methodology has ben used in IRSN. It insists on the need to cover all major cost components. It stresses the value of accompanying estimation figures with a 'story telling' narrative in order to describe the resulting picture in simple, accessible words. (author)

  9. Consequences of severe nuclear accidents in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Petra; Arnold, Delia; Mraz, Gabriele; Arnold, Nikolaus; Gufler, Klaus; Kromp-Kolb, Helga; Kromp, Wolfgang; Sutter, Philipp

    2013-04-01

    A first part of the presentation is devoted to the consequences of the severe accident in the 1986 Chernobyl NPP. It lead to a substantial radioactive contaminated of large parts of Europe and thus raised the awareness for off-site nuclear accident consequences. Spatial patterns of the (transient) contamination of the air and (persistent) contamination of the ground were studied by both measurements and model simulations. For a variety of reasons, ground contamination measurements have variability at a range of spatial scales. Results will be reviewed and discussed. Model simulations, including inverse modelling, have shown that the standard source term as defined in the ATMES study (1990) needs to be updated. Sensitive measurements of airborne activities still reveal the presence of low levels of airborne radiocaesium over the northern hemisphere which stems from resuspension. Over time scales of months and years, the distribution of radionuclides in the Earth system is constantly changing, for example relocated within plants, between plants and soil, in the soil, and into water bodies. Motivated by the permanent risk of transboundary impacts from potential major nuclear accidents, the multidisciplinary project flexRISK (see http://flexRISK.boku.ac.at) has been carried out from 2009 to 2012 in Austria to quantify such risks and hazards. An overview of methods and results of flexRISK is given as a second part of the presentation. For each of the 228 NPPs, severe accidents were identified together with relevant inventories, release fractions, and release frequencies. Then, Europe-wide dispersion and dose calculations were performed for 2788 cases, using the Lagrangian particle model FLEXPART. Maps of single-case results as well as various aggregated risk parameters were produced. It was found that substantial consequences (intervention measures) are possible for distances up to 500-1000 km, and occur more frequently for a distance range up to 100-300 km, which is in

  10. Nuclear industry after the Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This special dossier about the situation of nuclear industry two years after the Fukushima accident comprises 15 contributions dealing with: the nuclear industry two years after the Fukushima accident (Bernard Salha); a low-carbon electricity at a reasonable cost (Christophe Behar); nuclear engineering has to gain even more efficiency (Thomas Branche); how to dispose off the most radioactive wastes (Marie-Claude Dupuis, Thibaud Labalette); ensuring the continuation for more than 40 years onward (Denis Gasquet); developing and investing in the future (Philippe Knoche); more than just signing contracts (Dominique Lagarde); immersed power plants, an innovative concept (Bernard Planchais); R and D as a source of innovation for safety and performances (Jean-Pierre West); dismantlement, a very long term market (Jerome Stubler, Bruno Lancia); a reference industrial model (Herve Machenaud); recruiting and training (Andre Einaudi); a diversity of modern reactors and a world market in rebirth (Philippe Anglaret); an industrial revolution is necessary (Yves Brachet); contracts adapted to sensible works (Philippe Bonnave)

  11. Risks of potential accidents of nuclear power plants in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaper H; Eggink GJ; Blaauboer RO

    1993-01-01

    Over 200 nuclear power plants for commercial electricity production are presently operational in Europe. The 1986 accident with the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl has shown that severe accidents with a nuclear power plant can lead to a large scale contamination of Europe. This report is focussed

  12. Risks of potential accidents of nuclear power plants in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaper H; Eggink GJ; Blaauboer RO

    1993-01-01

    Over 200 nuclear power plants for commercial electricity production are presently operational in Europe. The 1986 accident with the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl has shown that severe accidents with a nuclear power plant can lead to a large scale contamination of Europe. This report is focussed o

  13. Nuclear power plant Severe Accident Research Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Severe Accident Research Plan (SARP) will provide technical information necessary to support regulatory decisions in the severe accident area for existing or planned nuclear power plants, and covers research for the time period of January 1982 through January 1986. SARP will develop generic bases to determine how safe the plants are and where and how their level of safety ought to be improved. The analysis to address these issues will be performed using improved probabilistic risk assessment methodology, as benchmarked to more exact data and analysis. There are thirteen program elements in the plan and the work is phased in two parts, with the first phase being completed in early 1984, at which time an assessment will be made whether or not any major changes will be recommended to the Commission for operating plants to handle severe accidents. Additionally at this time, all of the thirteen program elements in Chapter 5 will be reviewed and assessed in terms of how much additional work is necessary and where major impacts in probabilistic risk assessment might be achieved. Confirmatory research will be carried out in phase II to provide additional assurance on the appropriateness of phase I decisions. Most of this work will be concluded by early 1986

  14. Cooperation in the Event of Nuclear Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is concerned only with the action to be taken in respect of an individual directly affected by an accident and not with the more general measures relating to the population as a whole. Keeping the same sequence of ideas, the paper deals with nuclear establishments and cites criteria for classifying them; hence only the relationship between the establishment and the hospital, and between the radiation protection experts and medical personnel, is discussed. The complex organization of emergency measures, reception of the victim of the accident, and the treatment possibly required should be based on standard practice and published material, both national and international, allowance being made for the characteristics of each sector. A ''flexible'' plan of co-ordination is given as an illustration. Action must be taken in such cases at the site of the accident, inside and outside the establishment, and above all at the hospital. All categories of persons are involved in the process, i.e. fellow-workers, management, specialized services, and medical personnel, each with their own part to play. The manpower and equipment brought into service therefore vary, and depend upon the internal and external relations maintained by the establishment. The measures envisaged should provide for the transport, reception and treatment of those involved in the accident. An existing organization of this kind is described as an illustration. Finally, no action can be of value without full knowledge of the facts and thorough training of the personnel. Some clearly defined ideas on the.subject are considered under this heading. (author)

  15. Improved dose estimates for nuclear criticality accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slide rules are improved for estimating doses and dose rates resulting from nuclear criticality accidents. The original slide rules were created for highly enriched uranium solutions and metals using hand calculations along with the decades old Way-Wigner radioactive decay relationship and the inverse square law. This work uses state-of-the-art methods and better data to improve the original slide rules and also to extend the slide rule concept to three additional systems; i.e., highly enriched (93.2 wt%) uranium damp (H/235U = 10) powder (U3O8) and low-enriched (5 wt%) uranium mixtures (UO2F2) with a H/235U ratio of 200 and 500. Although the improved slide rules differ only slightly from the original slide rules, the improved slide rules and also the new slide rules can be used with greater confidence since they are based on more rigorous methods and better nuclear data

  16. Risks of potential accidents of nuclear power plants in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Slaper H; Eggink GJ; Blaauboer RO

    1993-01-01

    Over 200 nuclear power plants for commercial electricity production are presently operational in Europe. The 1986 accident with the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl has shown that severe accidents with a nuclear power plant can lead to a large scale contamination of Europe. This report is focussed on an integrated assessment of probabilistic cancer mortality risks due to possible accidental releases from the European nuclear power plants. For each of the European nuclear power plants the prob...

  17. Liability problems arising from nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of damage to health or property, it has always been approved legal tradition in all highly developed legal systems to perform compensation for damage in money. This principle also applies to damage caused by nuclear accidents. In the F.R.G., care has been taken at a very early stage to provide for appropriate liability provisions to afford financial security to the extent required by the special hazards involved in the peaceful use of atomic energy. Recent events have shown that the legal provisions available are appropriate and practicable. Citizens affected will receive fair compensation for damage. The Federal Administrative Office so far counted 30.392 applications for compensation in compliance with section 38, sub-sec. (2) Atomic Energy Act. Up to June 16, 1986, payments for compensation of losses amounted to DM 38.7 millions. By accepting the claims for compensation the State provides protection for German nationals and persons of equal rank. A limitation to DM one billion for compensation for damage caused by nuclear energy seems to be appropriate also in the light of the Chernobyl reactor accident. (orig./HP)

  18. Economic risks of nuclear power reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Models to be used for analyses of economic risks from events which occur during US LWR plant operation are developed in this study. The models include capabilities to estimate both onsite and offsite costs of LWR events ranging from routine plant forced outages to severe core-melt accidents resulting in large releases of radioactive material to the environment. The models have been developed for potential use by both the nuclear power industry and regulatory agencies in cost/benefit analyses for decision-making purposes. The new onsite cost models estimate societal losses from power production cost increases, plant capital losses, plant decontamination costs, and plant repair costs which may be incurred after LWR operational events. Early decommissioning costs, plant worker health impact costs, electric utility business costs, nuclear power industry costs, and litigation costs are also addressed. The newly developed offsite economic consequence models estimate The costs of post-accident population protective measures and public health impacts. The costs of population evacuation and temporary relocation, agricultural product disposal, land and property decontamination, and land interdiction are included in the economic models for population protective measures. Costs of health impacts and medical care costs are also included in the models

  19. Prevention of nuclear accidents - responsibility of the nuclear protection in the nuclear energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prevention of severe nuclear accidents is the best way of radiation protection of environment around nuclear power plants. The Yugoslav Radiation Protection Society should contribute to this task. (author). 6 refs

  20. The Tokaimura Nuclear Accident: A Tragedy of Human Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Michael E.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses nuclear power and the consequences of a nuclear accident. Covers issues ranging from chemical process safety to risk management of chemical industries to the ethical responsibilities of the chemical engineer. (Author/ASK)

  1. Fukushima nuclear power plant accident was preventable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoglu, Utku; Synolakis, Costas

    2015-04-01

    On 11 March 2011, the fourth largest earthquake in recorded history triggered a large tsunami, which will probably be remembered from the dramatic live pictures in a country, which is possibly the most tsunami-prepared in the world. The earthquake and tsunami caused a major nuclear power plant (NPP) accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi, owned by Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO). The accident was likely more severe than the 1979 Three Mile Island and less severe than the Chernobyl 1986 accidents. Yet, after the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami had hit the Madras Atomic Power Station there had been renewed interest in the resilience of NPPs to tsunamis. The 11 March 2011 tsunami hit the Onagawa, Fukushima Dai-ichi, Fukushima Dai-ni, and Tokai Dai-ni NPPs, all located approximately in a 230km stretch along the east coast of Honshu. The Onagawa NPP was the closest to the source and was hit by an approximately height of 13m tsunami, of the same height as the one that hit the Fukushima Dai-ichi. Even though the Onagawa site also subsided by 1m, the tsunami did not reach to the main critical facilities. As the International Atomic Energy Agency put it, the Onagawa NPP survived the event "remarkably undamaged." At Fukushima Dai-ichi, the three reactors in operation were shut down due to strong ground shaking. The earthquake damaged all offsite electric transmission facilities. Emergency diesel generators (EDGs) provided back up power and started cooling down the reactors. However, the tsunami flooded the facilities damaging 12 of its 13 EDGs and caused a blackout. Among the consequences were hydrogen explosions that released radioactive material in the environment. It is unfortunately clear that TEPCO and Japan's principal regulator Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) had failed in providing a professional hazard analysis for the plant, even though their last assessment had taken place only months before the accident. The main reasons are the following. One

  2. Effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident on goshawk reproduction

    OpenAIRE

    Murase, Kaori; Murase, Joe; Horie, Reiko; Endo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Although the influence of nuclear accidents on the reproduction of top predators has not been investigated, it is important that we identify the effects of such accidents because humans are also top predators. We conducted field observation for 22 years and analysed the reproductive performance of the goshawk (Accipiter gentilis fujiyamae), a top avian predator in the North Kanto area of Japan, before and after the accidents at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant that occurred in 2011. ...

  3. Nuclear accidents on policy: Notes on public perception

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Felix; Steenbeck, Malte; Wilhelm, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear energy is controversially discussed in many countries. Major nuclear accidents as recently in Fukushima set nuclear power plant security on top of the public agenda and increase pressure on policy makers to provide adequate reactions. Using data of the German Socio-economic Panel we analyze the effects of the accident in Fukushima and the following resolution on a nuclear phase-out plan by the German federal government on subjective perceptions using ordinary least squares and ordered...

  4. Measuring the Impacts of Nuclear Accidents on Energy Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Zsuzsanna Csereklyei

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the history of nuclear energy, safety developments of reactors and nuclear energy policy from the 1950s on. I investigate the effects of nuclear accidents on energy policy with the help of a panel dataset of 31 countries from 1965-2009, using annual data about the capacity of reactors under construction, primary energy consumption, as well as three nuclear accidents scaled INES five or higher by the International Atomic Energy Agency. After determining the extent of the ac...

  5. The Navy help in nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the author tell us historical aspects of the radiological accident in Goiania, its effects and the solicitation made to the Navy Hospital Marcilio Dias to take care of the victims. He mentions the arrival of the patients and the human resources that there was when was established the seriousness of the fact, what made a need the mobilization of medical officers specialists in related subjects to the problem and also nursing personnel of high and technical level. He also describes the effort made to gather all the necessary personnel that came from many different organizations including ships. Emphasis is made on the previous qualifications of the personnel in the area of radio protection through courses and training given by the Brazilian Navy and the role played by the nursing personnel. Very important was the integration accomplished among all the clinical departments inside Navy Hospital Marcilio Dias and civilian organizations like Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Furnas, The Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), and the precious participation of foreign specialists. The author finishes telling the reasons why a Navy Hospital was chosen to do this job, accentuating the fact that a radiological accident is event that involves high risk and demands appropriate care and an organized hierarchical structure that only can be found in military hospitals

  6. Thyroid consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, F; Vorontsova, T; Molinaro, E; Shavrova, E; Agate, L; Kuchinskaya, E; Elisei, R; Demidchik, E P; Pinchera, A

    1999-12-01

    It is well recognized that the use of external irradiation of the head and neck to treat patients with various non-thyroid disorders increases their risk of developing papillary thyroid carcinoma years after radiation exposure. An increased risk of thyroid cancer has also been reported in survivors of the atomic bombs in Japan, as well as in Marshall Island residents exposed to radiation during the testing of hydrogen bombs. More recently, exposure to radioactive fallout as a result of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident has clearly caused an enormous increase in the incidence of childhood thyroid carcinoma in Belarus, Ukraine, and, to a lesser extent, in the Russian Federation, starting in 1990. When clinical and epidemiological features of thyroid carcinomas diagnosed in Belarus after the Chernobyl accident are compared with those of naturally occurring thyroid carcinomas in patients of the same age group in Italy and France, it becomes apparent that the post-Chernobyl thyroid carcinomas were much less influenced by gender, virtually always papillary (solid and follicular variants), more aggressive at presentation and more frequently associated with thyroid autoimmunity. Gene mutations involving the RET proto-oncogene, and less frequently TRK, have been shown to be causative events specific for papillary cancer. RET activation was found in nearly 70% of the patients who developed papillary thyroid carcinomas following the Chernobyl accident. In addition to thyroid cancer, radiation-induced thyroid diseases include benign thyroid nodules, hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis, with or without thyroid insufficiency, as observed in populations after environmental exposure to radioisotopes of iodine and in the survivors of atomic bomb explosions. On this basis, the authors evaluated thyroid autoimmune phenomena in normal children exposed to radiation after the Chernobyl accident. The results demonstrated an increased prevalence of circulating thyroid

  7. Tokai Mura accident and future of nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After Chernobyl, human error once again triggered the world's worst nuclear accident at the Tokai Mura nuclear plant. Although there was only one fatal casualty, the accident could be a big blow to the nuclear industry and would scarcely help the nuclear lobby to promote nuclear energy. It would rather lead to the usual calls from nuclear opponents and anti-nuclear organisations for the world to give up nuclear power. The accident has forced Japanese authorities to cutback and to consider dropping the plants to build 16-20 nuclear power plants by March 2011. However, one should think that by year 2050, the world's energy demand will have doubled: when fossil fuels, particularly oil and gas reserves, run short, is there any other energy source that can meet this target beside replacing 442 nuclear power stations currently in operation. Environmental impacts related to the use of fossil fuels should also be not ignored. (author)

  8. Immediate medical consequences of nuclear accidents: lessons from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The immediate medical response to the nuclear accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station involved containment of the radioactivity and evacuation of the nearby population. The next step consisted of assessment of the radiation dose received by individuals, based on biological dosimetry, and treatment of those exposed. Medical care involved treatment of skin burns; measures to support bone marrow failure, gastrointestinal tract injury, and other organ damage (i.e., infection prophylaxis and transfusions) for those with lower radiation dose exposure; and bone marrow transplantation for those exposed to a high dose of radiation. At Chernobyl, two victims died immediately and 29 died of radiation or thermal injuries in the next three months. The remaining victims of the accident are currently well. A nuclear accident anywhere is a nuclear accident everywhere. Prevention and cooperation in response to these accidents are essential goals

  9. Aerosol measurements and nuclear accidents: a reconsideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within its radioactivity environmental monitoring programme, the Commission of the European Communities and in particular its Joint Research Centre wants to encourage the qualitative improvement of radioactivity monitoring. On 3 and 4 December 1987 an experts' meeting has been organized by the Ispra Joint Research Centre in collaboration with the Gesellschaft fuer Aerosolforschung, in order to discuss measuring techniques for radioactive aerosols in the environment in case of a nuclear accident. During the workshop, current practices in routine monitoring programmes in the near and far field of nuclear power plants were confronted with the latest developments in the metrology of aerosols and radioactivity. The need and feasibility of implementing advanced aerosol and radioactivity techniques in routine monitoring networks have been discussed. This publication gives the full text of 12 presentations and a report of the roundtable discussion being held afterwards. It does not intend to give a complete picture of all activities going on in the field of radioactive aerosol metrology; it rather collects a number of common statements of people who approach the problem from quite different directions

  10. Global risk of radioactive fallout after major nuclear reactor accidents

    OpenAIRE

    Lelieveld, J.; KUNKEL, D.; M. G. Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Major reactor accidents of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the cumulative, global risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents (the most severe ones on the International Nuclear Event Scale, INES 7), using particulate 137Cs and gaseous ...

  11. Nuclear Accidents and Policy: Notes on Public Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Felix; Steenbeck, Malte; Wilhelm, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Major nuclear accidents as recently in Fukushima set nuclear power plant security at the top of the public agenda. Using data of the German Socio-Economic Panel we analyze the effects of the Fukushima accident and a subsequent government decision on nuclear power phase-out on several measures of subjective perception in Germany. In the light of current political debates about the strategic orientation of this energy turnaround, such an analysis is of particular interest since non-pecuniary ga...

  12. Predicting material release during a nuclear reactor accident

    OpenAIRE

    KONINGS Rudy; Wiss, Thierry; BENES ONDREJ

    2014-01-01

    The accident in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant that happened four years ago this month, has once more drawn the attention of a broad public to the environmental impact of the release of fission products from nuclear power reactors in the event of an accident in which the reactor core is damaged. So far three such accidents have occurred in the history of civil nuclear power production. In this commentary we will review the state-of-the-art of the knowlegde of the physical and chemi...

  13. Impact of accidents on organizational aspects of nuclear utilities

    OpenAIRE

    Spurgin, A. J.; Stupples, D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper applies the Beer Viable Systems Model (VSM) approach to the study of nuclear accidents. It relates how organizational structures and rules are affected by accidents in the attempt to improve safety and reduce risk. The paper illustrates this process with reference to a number of accidents. The dynamic cybernetic aspect of the VSM approach to organizations yields a better understanding of the need for good decision-making to minimize risk and how organizations really operate.

  14. Report on the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the compilation of information obtained by various organizations regarding the accident (and the consequences of the accident) that occurred at Unit 4 of the nuclear power station at Chernobyl in the USSR on April 26, 1986. The various authors are identified in a footnote to each chapter. An overview of the report is provided. Very briefly the other chapters cover: the design of the Chernobyl nuclear station Unit 4; safety analyses for Unit 4; the accident scenario; the role of the operator; an assessment of the radioactive release, dispersion, and transport; the activities associated with emergency actions; and information on the health and environmental consequences from the accident. These subjects cover the major aspects of the accident that have the potential to present new information and lessons for the nuclear industry in general

  15. Accident evolution and barrier function and accident evolution management modeling of nuclear power plant incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Every analysis of an accident or an incident is founded on a more or less explicit model of what an accident is. On a general level, the current approach models an incident or accident in a nuclear power plant as a failure to maintain a stable state with all variables within their ranges of stability. There are two main sets of subsystems in continuous interaction making up the analyzed system, namely the human-organizational and the technical subsystems. Several different but related approaches can be chosen to model an accident. However, two important difficulties accompany such modeling: the high level of system complexity and the very infrequent occurrence of accidents. The current approach acknowledges these problems and focuses on modeling reported incidents/accidents or scenarios selected in probabilistic risk assessment analyses to be of critical importance for the safety of a plant

  16. Radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiriger, J.M.; Failor, R.A.; Marsh, K.V.; Shaw, G.E.

    1987-08-01

    This report describes the detection of fallout in the United States from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. As part of its environmental surveillance program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory maintained detectors for gamma-emitting radionuclides. Following the reactor accident, additional air filters were set out. Several uncommon isotopes were detected at the time the plume passed into the US. (TEM)

  17. Monitoring Fallout From Fukushima, Japan After Nuclear Accident

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In this work, on March 23rd, 2011, following the radioactivity releases after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan, the first arrival of the airborne fission products 131I in Heilongjiang province the northeast of China, were detected

  18. Applying Functional Modeling for Accident Management of Nuclear Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Morten; Zhang, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    The paper investigate applications of functional modeling for accident management in complex industrial plant with special reference to nuclear power production. Main applications for information sharing among decision makers and decision support are identified. An overview of Multilevel Flow...

  19. Installation for accident localization at a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The installation for accident localization at a nuclear power plant with multiloop structure of the first circuit is described. The installation represents a pressurized shell inside which the reactor with the first circuit equipment are located. The whole volume under the shell is divided into autonomous boxes for one or several circulation loops. In case of accident as capacity for condensate discharge not the whole volume under pressurized shell is used, but only one of the autonomous boxes. This circumstance decreases the accident effect zone and expenditures related to the liquidation of accident consequences

  20. Lessons of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insensitivity of radiation without measuring apparatus and health outcome observed in the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki are major sources that make people fear the possible late effects of radiation exposure attributable to nuclear power plant accident. However, the health conditions of people in the last 20 years around Chernobyl indicated the necessity to review the risk assessment suggesting that effects of radiation exposure may considerably be different between the atomic bombing and nuclear power plant accident. (author)

  1. Fukushima nuclear accident and the social responsibility of science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five months had passed since Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident occurred but still there was no knowing when the accident ended. Released radioactivity seemed to be greater than one million terra Bq and if there occurred an explosive rupture of containment vessel due to the failure of containment vent or occurrence of steam explosion, the amount of released radioactivity might amount to be at least equivalent to or surpass that of Chernobyl NPP accident. There existed still a risk that overheating and meltdown of nuclear fuels might reoccur with loss of cooling due to a possible giant aftershock. This article described total views on significant disaster that the accident brought about on many neighboring residents or wide range of people. After a general discussion about what was social responsibility of scientists, social responsibility of scientists for Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident was discussed. Responsibility of omission was also argued. (T. Tanaka)

  2. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident: Update on compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the three years since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) accident, the international community has gained perspective on the implementation of the Japanese nuclear liability regime, which reflects internationally accepted nuclear liability principles.1 Soon after the emergency, the operator of the damaged nuclear power plant, Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), and public authorities in Japan established the basic procedures required to compensate victims for damage incurred due to the accident. Since March 2011, these procedures have been adapted to allow the processing of a large number of applications for compensation within a reasonable amount of time. (author)

  3. Nuclear safety in light water reactors severe accident phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2011-01-01

    This vital reference is the only one-stop resource on how to assess, prevent, and manage severe nuclear accidents in the light water reactors (LWRs) that pose the most risk to the public. LWRs are the predominant nuclear reactor in use around the world today, and they will continue to be the most frequently utilized in the near future. Therefore, accurate determination of the safety issues associated with such reactors is central to a consideration of the risks and benefits of nuclear power. This book emphasizes the prevention and management of severe accidents to teach nuclear professionals

  4. Keeping the Momentum and Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, Robert Ernest [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dion, Heather M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dry, Donald E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kinman, William Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); LaMont, Stephen Philip [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Podlesak, David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-22

    LANL has 70 years of experience in nuclear forensics and supports the community through a wide variety of efforts and leveraged capabilities: Expanding the understanding of nuclear forensics, providing training on nuclear forensics methods, and developing bilateral relationships to expand our understanding of nuclear forensic science. LANL remains highly supportive of several key organizations tasked with carrying forth the Nuclear Security Summit messages: IAEA, GICNT, and INTERPOL. Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements. Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material and environmental forensic characterization. Los Alamos National Laboratory uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met. Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  5. Nuclear forensics of special nuclear material at Los Alamos: three recent studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gallimore, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garduon, Katherine [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keller, Russell C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kuhn, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lujan, Elmer J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Myers, Steven C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, Steve S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Porterfield, Donivan R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schwartz, Daniel S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spencer, Khalil J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Townsend, Lisa E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Xu, Ning [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear forensics of special nuclear materials is a highly specialized field because there are few analytical laboratories in the world that can safely handle nuclear materials, perform high accuracy and precision analysis using validated analytical methods. The goal of nuclear forensics is to establish an unambiguous link between illicitly trafficked nuclear material and its origin. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Materials Signatures Program has implemented a graded 'conduct of operations' type approach for determining the unique nuclear, chemical, and physical signatures needed to identify the manufacturing process, intended use, and origin of interdicted nuclear material. In our approach an analysis flow path was developed for determining key signatures necessary for attributing unknown materials to a source. This analysis flow path included both destructive (i.e., alpha spectrometry, ICP-MS, ICP-AES, TIMS, particle size distribution, density and particle fractionation) and non-destructive (i.e., gamma-ray spectrometry, optical microscopy, SEM, XRD, and x-ray fluorescence) characterization techniques. Analytical techniques and results from three recent cases characterized by this analysis flow path along with an evaluation of the usefulness of this approach will be discussed in this paper.

  6. Nuclear installations abroad the accident risks and their potential consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper endeavors to assess the threat to Ireland from severe accidents at civil nuclear installations. Among the various types of nuclear installations worldwide, reactors and reprocessing plants are considered to be the most threatening and so the paper focuses on these. The threat is assumed to be a function of the risk of severe accidents at the above types of installations and the probability of unfavourable weather conditions carrying the radioactive releases to Ireland. Although nuclear installations designed in eastern Europe and Asia are less safe than others, the greatest threat to Ireland arises from nearby installations in the UK. The difficulty of measuring the probabilities and consequences of severe nuclear accidents at nuclear installations in general is explained. In the case of the UK installations, this difficulty is overcome to some degree by using values of 'tolerable' risk adopted by the national nuclear regulator to define the radiotoxic releases from nuclear accidents. These are used as input to atmospheric dispersion models in which unfavourable weather conditions for Ireland are assumed and radiation doses are calculated to members of the Irish public. No countermeasures, such as sheltering, are assumed. In the worst cast scenario no deaths would be expected in Ireland in the immediate aftermath of the accident however, an increase in cancers over a period of 25 years or so would be expected assuming present-day models for the effect of low level radiation are valid

  7. Accident analysis in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The way the philosophy of Safety in Depth can be verified through the analysis of simulated accidents is shown. This can be achieved by verifying that the integrity of the protection barriers against the release of radioactivity to the environment is preserved even during accident conditions. The simulation of LOCA is focalized as an example, including a study about the associated environmental radiological consequences. (Author)

  8. Los Alamos National Laboratory Human and Intellectual Capital for Sustaining Nuclear Deterrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides an overview of the current human and intellectual capital at Los Alamos National Laboratory, through specific research into the statistics and demographics as well as numerous personal interviews at all levels of personnel. Based on this information, a series of recommendations are provided to assist Los Alamos National Laboratory in ensuring the future of the human and intellectual capital for the nuclear deterrence mission. While the current human and intellectual capital is strong it stands on the precipice and action must be taken to ensure Los Alamos National Laboratory maintains leadership in developing and sustaining national nuclear capabilities. These recommendations may be applicable to other areas of the nuclear enterprise, including the Air Force, after further research and study.

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory Human and Intellectual Capital for Sustaining Nuclear Deterrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAlpine, Bradley [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current human and intellectual capital at Los Alamos National Laboratory, through specific research into the statistics and demographics as well as numerous personal interviews at all levels of personnel. Based on this information, a series of recommendations are provided to assist Los Alamos National Laboratory in ensuring the future of the human and intellectual capital for the nuclear deterrence mission. While the current human and intellectual capital is strong it stands on the precipice and action must be taken to ensure Los Alamos National Laboratory maintains leadership in developing and sustaining national nuclear capabilities. These recommendations may be applicable to other areas of the nuclear enterprise, including the Air Force, after further research and study.

  10. Emergency planning and preparedness for a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on current regulations, FEMA approves each site-specific plan of state and local governments for each power reactor site after 1) formal review offsite preparedness, 2) holding a public meeting at which the preparedness status has been reviewed, and 3) a satisfactory joint exercise has been conducted with both utility and local participation. Annually, each state, within any position of the 10-mile emergency planning zone, must conduct a joint exercise with the utility to demonstrate its preparedness for a nuclear accident. While it is unlikely that these extreme measures will be needed as a result of an accident at a nuclear power station, the fact that these plans have been well thought out and implemented have already proven their benefit to society. The preparedness for a nuclear accident can be of great advantage in other types of emergencies. For example, on December 11, 1982, a non-nuclear chemical storage tank exploded at a Union Carbide plant in Louisiana shortly after midnight. More than 20,000 people were evacuated from their homes. They were evacuated under the emergency response plan formulated for use in the event of a nuclear accident at the nearby Waterford Nuclear plants. Clearly, this illustrates how a plan conceived for one purpose is appropriate to handle other types of accidents that occur in a modern industrial society

  11. Soviet medical response to the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear accident at Chernobyl was the worst in the history of nuclear power. It tested the organized medical response to mass radiation casualties. This article reviews the Soviet response as reported at the 1986 postaccident review meeting in Vienna and as determined from interviews. The Soviets used three levels of care: rescue and first aid at the plant site; emergency treatment at regional hospitals; and definitive evaluation and treatment in Moscow. Diagnosis, triage, patient disposition, attendant exposure, and preventive actions are detailed. The United States would be well advised to organize its resources definitively to cope with future nonmilitary nuclear accidents

  12. Government: Nuclear Safety in Doubt a Year after Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ember, Lois R.

    1980-01-01

    A year after the accident at Three Mile Island (TMI), the signals transmitted to the public are still confused. Industry says that nuclear power is safe and that the aftermath of TMI ushers in a new era of safety. Antinuclear activists say TMI sounded nuclear power's death knell. (Author/RE)

  13. Scientific aspects of the Tohoku earthquake and Fukushima nuclear accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koketsu, Kazuki

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, and assessments conducted beforehand for earthquake and tsunami potential in the Pacific offshore region of the Tohoku District. The results of our investigation show that all the assessments failed to foresee the earthquake and its related tsunami, which was the main cause of the accident. Therefore, the disaster caused by the earthquake, and the accident were scientifically unforeseeable at the time. However, for a zone neighboring the reactors, a 2008 assessment showed tsunamis higher than the plant height. As a lesson learned from the accident, companies operating nuclear power plants should be prepared using even such assessment results for neighboring zones.

  14. Japanese Nuclear Accident and U.S. Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U.S. Government response to the Fukushima accident: • Multi-agency task force (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Department of Energy, Department of Defense) supporting Japan recovery efforts; • President Obama directed the NRC to perform a comprehensive review of U.S. reactors; • NRC established agency task force to develop lessons learned from Fukushima Daiichi accident to provide short-term and long-term analysis of the events

  15. Nuclear Accidents Intervention Levels for Protection of the Public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of the 1986 Chernobyl accident called attention to the need to improve international harmonization of the principles and criteria for the protection of the public in the event of a nuclear accident. This report provides observations and guidance related to the harmonization of radiological protection criteria, and is intended to be of use to national authorities and international organizations examining the issue of emergency response planning and intervention levels

  16. Severe accidents in nuclear power plants. V.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Symposium on Severe Accidents in Nuclear Power Plants, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and co-sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD, was held in Sorrento, Italy, from 21 to 25 March 1988. The symposium was attended by over 300 participants from 35 Member States and 4 organizations. There were 72 oral presentations and 28 poster presentations. In addition, a special session devoted to the publication entitled Basic Safety Principles for Nuclear Power Plants was organized by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) in the form of a panel discussion. The objective of the symposium was to provide a forum for an international exchange of information on the scientific and technical aspects of severe accidents, and on the rationale and implementation of severe accident practices in participating countries. The papers provided an excellent overview of different national approaches, with the overall emphasis on preventive, mitigative and accident management measures. Every reasonable effort is being made in design and operation to prevent accidents from happening and to limit the consequences of any that might occur. However, it is also generally considered prudent to introduce design modifications and operational changes and prepare contingency plans for dealing with a possible accident. The actual measures taken vary from country to country but usually involve detailed extended or new emergency operating procedures and the use of existing and/or new systems to limit off-site releases. Containment filtering and venting, the use of mobile equipment and the utilization of external water sources were among the options presented and discussed in detail. This is volume 2 of the proceedings of a symposium. Two main scientific and technical topics are presented in this volume: accident research and development (34 papers) and accident management (24 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  17. The medical implications of nuclear power plant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the UK position regarding the potential for an accident at a nuclear power plant, the safeguards in place to prevent such an accident occurring and the emergency procedures designed to cope with the consequences should one occur. It focuses on the role of the medical services and examines previous accidents to suggest the nature and likely scale of response that may need to be provided. It is apparent that designs of UK nuclear power stations are robust and that the likelihood of a significant accident occurring is extremely remote. Emergency arrangements are, however, in place to deal with the eventuality should it arise and these incorporate sufficient flexibility to accommodate a wide range of accidents. Analysis of previous nuclear accidents at Windscale, Three Mile Island and Chernobyl provide a limited but valuable insight into the diversity and potential scale of response that may be required. It is concluded that above all, the response must be flexible to enable medical services to deal with the wide range of effects that may arise. (author)

  18. Importance of risk communication during and after a nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perko, Tanja

    2011-07-01

    Past nuclear accidents highlight communication as one of the most important challenges in emergency management. In the early phase, communication increases awareness and understanding of protective actions and improves the population response. In the medium and long term, risk communication can facilitate the remediation process and the return to normal life. Mass media play a central role in risk communication. The recent nuclear accident in Japan, as expected, induced massive media coverage. Media were employed to communicate with the public during the contamination phase, and they will play the same important role in the clean-up and recovery phases. However, media also have to fulfill the economic aspects of publishing or broadcasting, with the "bad news is good news" slogan that is a well-known phenomenon in journalism. This article addresses the main communication challenges and suggests possible risk communication approaches to adopt in the case of a nuclear accident. PMID:21612010

  19. ACCIDENTS AND UNSCHEDULED EVENTS ASSOCIATED WITH NON-NUCLEAR ENERGY RESOURCES AND TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accidents and unscheduled events associated with non-nuclear energy resources and technology are identified for each step in the energy cycle. Both natural and anthropogenic causes of accidents or unscheduled events are considered. Data concerning these accidents are summarized. ...

  20. Severe accidents in nuclear power plants. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Symposium on Severe Accidents in Nuclear Power Plants, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and co-sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD, was held in Sorrento, Italy, from 21 to 25 March 1988. The symposium was attended by over 300 participants from 35 Member States and 4 organizations. There were 72 oral presentations and 28 poster presentations. In addition, a special session devoted to the publication entitled Basic Safety Principles for Nuclear Power Plants was organized by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) in the form of a panel discussion. The objective of the symposium was to provide a forum for an international exchange of information on the scientific and technical aspects of severe accidents, and on the rationale and implementation of severe accident practices in participating countries. All the presentations were divided into three chapters: National positions and practices on severe accidents (14 papers); Accident initiation and analysis (21 papers); Non-water cooled power reactors (5 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Consequences and countermeasures in a nuclear power accident: Chernobyl experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, Vladimir A; Kirichenko, Alexander V; Werts, Day E

    2012-09-01

    Despite the tragic accidents in Fukushima and Chernobyl, the nuclear power industry will continue to contribute to the production of electric energy worldwide until there are efficient and sustainable alternative sources of energy. The Chernobyl nuclear accident, which occurred 26 years ago in the former Soviet Union, released an immense amount of radioactivity over vast territories of Belarus, Ukraine, and the Russian Federation, extending into northern Europe, and became the most severe accident in the history of the nuclear industry. This disaster was a result of numerous factors including inadequate nuclear power plant design, human errors, and violation of safety measures. The lessons learned from nuclear accidents will continue to strengthen the safety design of new reactor installations, but with more than 400 active nuclear power stations worldwide and 104 reactors in the Unites States, it is essential to reassess fundamental issues related to the Chernobyl experience as it continues to evolve. This article summarizes early and late events of the incident, the impact on thyroid health, and attempts to reduce agricultural radioactive contamination.

  2. Emergency response and nuclear risk governance. Nuclear safety at nuclear power plant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study entitled ''Emergency Response and Nuclear Risk Governance: nuclear safety at nuclear power plant accidents'' deals with issues of the protection of the population and the environment against hazardous radiation (the hazards of nuclear energy) and the harmful effects of radioactivity during nuclear power plant accidents. The aim of this study is to contribute to both the identification and remediation of shortcomings and deficits in the management of severe nuclear accidents like those that occurred at Chernobyl in 1986 and at Fukushima in 2011 as well as to the improvement and harmonization of plans and measures taken on an international level in nuclear emergency management. This thesis is divided into a theoretical part and an empirical part. The theoretical part focuses on embedding the subject in a specifically global governance concept, which includes, as far as Nuclear Risk Governance is concerned, the global governance of nuclear risks. Due to their characteristic features the following governance concepts can be assigned to these risks: Nuclear Safety Governance is related to safety, Nuclear Security Governance to security and NonProliferation Governance to safeguards. The subject of investigation of the present study is as a special case of the Nuclear Safety Governance, the Nuclear Emergency governance, which refers to off-site emergency response. The global impact of nuclear accidents and the concepts of security, safety culture and residual risk are contemplated in this context. The findings (accident sequences, their consequences and implications) from the analyses of two reactor accidents prior to Fukushima (Three Mile Iceland in 1979, Chernobyl in 1986) are examined from a historical analytical perspective and the state of the Nuclear Emergency governance and international cooperation aimed at improving nuclear safety after Chernobyl is portrayed by discussing, among other topics, examples of &apos

  3. A web-based nuclear accident illumination system based on multilevel flow model - for risk communication and nuclear safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces a new method to illuminate the nuclear accident by Multilevel Flow Model, and based on the method, a web-based nuclear accident illumination system is proposed to represent the current nuclear accident in nuclear power plant of Japan in an understandable way. The MFM is a means-end and part-whole modeling method to describe the structure and the intention of a plant process. The relationship between the MFM functions enables accident prediction for a plant process. Thus, a web-based accident illumination system based by MFM can describe the nuclear accident in the nuclear power plant clearly and be accessed by public to make the public get to know and understand the nuclear power and nuclear risk. The public can build their own confidence of the nuclear power by their understanding of the nuclear accident with this system and this is helpful to build a harmonious development environment for nuclear power. (author)

  4. Applying Functional Modeling for Accident Management of Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Morten; Zhang Xinxin [Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China)

    2014-08-15

    The paper investigate applications of functional modeling for accident management in complex industrial plant with special reference to nuclear power production. Main applications for information sharing among decision makers and decision support are identified. An overview of Multilevel Flow Modeling is given and a detailed presentation of the foundational means-end concepts is presented and the conditions for proper use in modelling accidents are identified. It is shown that Multilevel Flow Modeling can be used for modelling and reasoning about design basis accidents. Its possible role for information sharing and decision support in accidents beyond design basis is also indicated. A modelling example demonstrating the application of Multilevel Flow Modelling and reasoning for a PWR LOCA is presented.

  5. [The Fukushima nuclear accident: consequences for Japan and for us].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosche, B

    2013-04-01

    The Fukushima accident was the consequence of a preceding 2-fold natural catastrophe: the earth quake of 11 March 2011 and the subsequent tsunami. Due to favourable winds and to evacuation measures the radiation exposure to the general population in Japan as a whole and with some exceptions in the region outside the evacuation zone, too, was low. In this article the attempt is made to give an estimate of health consequences to the public. This is based upon WHO's dose estimates, knowledge of the consequences of the Chernobyl accident, of the atmospheric nuclear bomb testing in Kazakhstan and on the risk of childhood leukaemia after low dose radiation exposure. For Germany, there was no radiation threat due to the accident. Nonetheless, the events in Japan made clear that the rules and standards that were developed for the case of a reactor accident need to be revised.

  6. Should evacuation conditions after a nuclear accident be revised?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author proposes to draw lessons from the Fukushima accident, notably in the field of post-accident management. He discusses the definition of an as widely understandable as possible method of description of risks related to irradiations after a nuclear accident. As these irradiations are mainly low dose ones which have a carcinogenic effect, he proposes to assess the average life expectancy loss due to an irradiation. Then, this risk can be easily compared with other risks like air pollution, smoking and passive smoking, and so on. Then, once this risk assessment method is well defined, it is possible to associate the inhabitants of contaminated areas to the post-accident management. They could then decide to go back to their homes or not with full knowledge of the facts

  7. Report on the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the compilation of information obtained by various organizations regarding the accident (and the consequences of the accident) that occurred at Unit 4 of the nuclear power station at Chernobyl in the USSR on April 26, 1986. Each organization has independently accepted responsibility for one or more chapters. The specific responsibility of each organization is indicated. The various authors are identified in a footnote to each chapter. Very briefly the other chapters cover: the design of the Chernobyl nuclear station Unit 4; safety analyses for Unit 4; the accident scenario; the role of the operator; an assessment of the radioactive release, dispersion, and transport; the activities associated with emergency actions; and information on the health and environmental consequences from the accident. These subjects cover the major aspects of the accident that have the potential to present new information and lessons for the nuclear industry in general. The task of evaluating the information obtained in these various areas and the assessment of the potential implications has been left to each organization to pursue according to the relevance of the subject to their organization. Those findings will be issued separately by the cognizant organizations. The basic purpose of this report is to provide the information upon which such assessments can be made

  8. Environmental consequences of releases from nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents the results of a four-year Nordic cooperation project (AKTU-200). The results have impact upon many facets of accident consequence assessment, ranging from new computational tools to recommendations concerning food preparation methods to be utilized in a fallout situation. Some of the subprojects have approached areas where little or no research has been performed previously, like the project on winter conditions, the project on the physico/chemical form of radionuclides in the Chernobyl fallout, and the project on resuspension. The conclusion from the first of these projects is that the impact of an accident or fallout situation occuring during winter may be considerable smaller than in a similar situation during summer conditions. The most important conclusion from the second of these projects is that bioavailability of radiocesium in soil is significantly lower than that of radiocesium in plant material taken up via the roots. In the third project is was found that the resuspension factor is several orders of magnitude lower than the values traditionally cited, and that resuspension is a local phenomenon in a majority of weather conditions. The development of large-scale testing of mitigating actions to prevent uptake of radiocesium in animals in a fallout situation is also one of the projects where new ground has been sucessfully broken. 189 refs., 89 figs., 55 tabs

  9. Nuclear Accident Crisis and Liver Disease: A Summary on Evidences

    OpenAIRE

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2013-01-01

    The present global concern is on the adverse effect due to exposure to nuclides expelled from the disrupted nuclear power plant accident in Japan. The exposure can induce several adverse effects. In this specific brief review, the author summarizes the evidences on the effect on liver. Discussion is focused on several liver diseases.

  10. Global risk of radioactive fallout after nuclear reactor accidents

    OpenAIRE

    Lelieveld, J.; KUNKEL, D.; M. G. Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Reactor core meltdowns of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents, using particulate 137Cs and gaseous 131I as proxies for the fallout. It appears that previously the occurrence of ma...

  11. Preliminary analysis of loss-of-coolant accident in Fukushima nuclear accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su'ud, Zaki; Anshari, Rio

    2012-06-01

    Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) especially on Fukushima Nuclear Accident will be discussed in this paper. The Tohoku earthquake triggered the shutdown of nuclear power reactors at Fukushima Nuclear Power station. Though shutdown process has been completely performed, cooling process, at much smaller level than in normal operation, is needed to remove decay heat from the reactor core until the reactor reach cold-shutdown condition. If LOCA happen at this condition, it will cause the increase of reactor fuel and other core temperatures and can lead to reactor core meltdown and exposure of radioactive material to the environment such as in the Fukushima Dai Ichi nuclear accident case. In this study numerical simulation has been performed to calculate pressure composition, water level and temperature distribution on reactor during this accident. There are two coolant regulating system that operational on reactor unit 1 at this accident, Isolation Condensers (IC) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV) system. Average mass flow of steam to the IC system in this event is 10 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 3,2 hours and fully uncovered in 4,7 hours later. There are two coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 2, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) System and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of coolant that correspond this event is 20 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 73 hours and fully uncovered in 75 hours later. There are three coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 3, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) system, High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of water that correspond this event is 15 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 37 hours and fully uncovered in 40 hours later.

  12. Health effects of the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between March 28 and April 15, 1979 the collective dose resulting from the radioactivity released to the population living within a 50-mile radius of the Three Mile Island nuclear plant was about 2000 person-rems, less than 1% of the annual natural background level. The average dose to a person living within 5 miles of the nuclear plant was less than 10% of annual background radiation. The maximum estimated radiation dose received by any one individual in the general population (excluding the nuclear plant workers) during the accident was 70 mrem. The doses received by the general population as a result of the accident were so small that there will be no detectable additional cases of cancer, developmental abnormalities, or genetic ill-health. Three Three Mile Island nuclear workers received radiation doses of about 3 to 4 rem, exceeding maximum permissible quarterly dose of 3 rem. The major health effect of the accident at Three Mile Island was that of a pronounced demoralizing effect on the general population in the Three Mile Island area, including teenagers and mothers of preschool children and the nuclear plant workers. However, this effect proved transient in all groups studied except the nuclear workers

  13. Nuclear accidents and policy. Notes on public perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major nuclear accidents as recently in Fukushima set nuclear power plant security at the top of the public agenda. Using data of the German Socio-Economic Panel we analyze the effects of the Fukushima accident and a subsequent government decision on nuclear power phase-out on several measures of subjective perception in Germany. In the light of current political debates about the strategic orientation of this energy turnaround, such an analysis is of particular interest since non-pecuniary gains in measures of subjective perception might provide further aspects to be taken into consideration when evaluating the economic costs of the policy. We find that the Fukushima accident increases the probability to report greater worries about the environment. Furthermore, we find evidence for a decrease in the probability to be very worried about the security of nuclear power plants as well as for an increase in reported levels of subjective well-being following the government's resolution on nuclear phase-out. Finally we find that the probabilities of reporting very high concerns are related to the distance between the respondents' place of residence and the nearest nuclear power station.

  14. Nuclear accidents and policy. Notes on public perception

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Felix; Steenbeck, Malte; Wilhelm, Markus [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Wirtschaftspolitik

    2013-07-01

    Major nuclear accidents as recently in Fukushima set nuclear power plant security at the top of the public agenda. Using data of the German Socio-Economic Panel we analyze the effects of the Fukushima accident and a subsequent government decision on nuclear power phase-out on several measures of subjective perception in Germany. In the light of current political debates about the strategic orientation of this energy turnaround, such an analysis is of particular interest since non-pecuniary gains in measures of subjective perception might provide further aspects to be taken into consideration when evaluating the economic costs of the policy. We find that the Fukushima accident increases the probability to report greater worries about the environment. Furthermore, we find evidence for a decrease in the probability to be very worried about the security of nuclear power plants as well as for an increase in reported levels of subjective well-being following the government's resolution on nuclear phase-out. Finally we find that the probabilities of reporting very high concerns are related to the distance between the respondents' place of residence and the nearest nuclear power station.

  15. Health effects of the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-05-01

    Between March 28 and April 15, 1979 the collective dose resulting from the radioactivity released to the population living within a 50-mile radius of the Three Mile Island nuclear plant was about 2000 person-rems, less than 1% of the annual natural background level. The average dose to a person living within 5 miles of the nuclear plant was less than 10% of annual background radiation. The maximum estimated radiation dose received by any one individual in the general population (excluding the nuclear plant workers) during the accident was 70 mrem. The doses received by the general population as a result of the accident were so small that there will be no detectable additional cases of cancer, developmental abnormalities, or genetic ill-health. Three Three Mile Island nuclear workers received radiation doses of about 3 to 4 rem, exceeding maximum permissible quarterly dose of 3 rem. The major health effect of the accident at Three Mile Island was that of a pronounced demoralizing effect on the general population in the Three Mile Island area, including teenagers and mothers of preschool children and the nuclear plant workers. However, this effect proved transient in all groups studied except the nuclear workers.

  16. Medical assistance in case of nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical service is a prerequisite for work license of nuclear installation. Every nuclear installation incorporate in their safety procedure also medical emergency plan. Usually the medical emergency plan consists of several degrees of action: 1. First aid, 2. First medical treatment, 3. Treatment in regional hospital, 4. Treatment in special institution (centre for radiation medicine). This paper discusses organization and activities of Centre for Radiation Medicine and Protection - Clinical Hospital Centre Zagreb

  17. Relevance of Fukushima Nuclear Accident to India: Nuclear Radiation Risk and Interventions to Mitigate Adverse Fallout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Kapil, Varshney Neha, Aslesh OP, Karmakar MG, Pandav Chandrakant S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The environmental radiation release from Fukushima nuclear power following tsunami in Japan has once again highlighted the omnipotent risk of radiation injury in the today’s world. India is at a real risk from radiation fallout both due to nuclear power plant accidents and nuclear warfare threat. The risk from nuclear radiation accident in India is further increased by the region being endemic for iodine deficiency as adverse effects following nuclear radiation fallout like thyroid cancer is significantly higher in iodine deficient populations .There is need to institute disaster preparedness measures to mitigate the damage in case of a nuclear accident. Interventions to control adverse fallout of nuclear radiation include evacuation, sheltering and food controls as well as iodine prophylaxis

  18. Impact of Fukushima nuclear accident to China's mainland environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrestrial Environment Radiation monitoring results by environmental protection agencies of China after Fukushima Nuclear Accident were collected. Combined with the atmospheric circulation and monitoring results from IMS and CTBTO, and also through comparison with data from USA, France, Canada and etc, the monitoring data in China were analyzed and evaluated. With the approaches introduced from the Source and Effects of Ionizing Radiation-UNSCEAR 2000 Report to the General Assembly (with scientific annexes) and the Generic procedures for Assessment and Response during a Radiological Emergency, the radiation dose of Chinese population impacted from this accident was initially estimated. (authors)

  19. Radiological consequence of Chernobyl nuclear power accident in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two years have elapsed since the accident in Chernobyl nuclear power station shocked those concerned with nuclear power generation. The effect that this accident exerted on human environment has still continued directly and indirectly, and the reports on the effect have been made in various countries and by international organizations. In Japan, about the exposure dose of Japanese people due to this accident, the Nuclear Safety Commission and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute issued the reports. In this report, the available data concerning the envrionmental radioactivity level in Japan due to the Chernobyl accident are collected, and the evaluation of exposure dose which seems most appropriate from the present day scientific viewpoint was attempted by the detailed analysis in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The enormous number of the data observed in various parts of Japan were different in sampling, locality, time and measuring method, so difficulty arose frequently. The maximum concentration of I-131 in floating dust was 2.5 Bq/m3 observed in Fukui, and the same kinds of radioactive nuclides as those in Europe were detected. (Kako, I.)

  20. Nuclear energy. Danger only in case of accidents?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental impacts of nuclear energy are highly underestimated. Nuclear weapons, atomic bomb tests, and nuclear accidents are considered a danger for the environment and a human cancer risk. However, childhood leukemia is consistently elevated near nuclear power plants and the Chernobyl accident entailed elevated human birth sex ratios across Europe. We studied the annual sex ratio near nuclear facilities in Germany, France, and Switzerland at the municipality level. We will demonstrate that low doses of ionizing radiation cause effects in human beings. This is shown by strongly consistent spatial-temporal shifts in the human sex ratio trends in the vicinity of nuclear facilities. In the chosen countries complete official data on over 70 million gender specific annual births at the municipality level are available. By Lambert-93 coordinates (France) and GK3 coordinates (Germany, Switzerland) we determined the minimum distances of municipalities from major nuclear facilities. Spatial-temporal trend analyses of the annual sex ratio depending on municipalities' minimum distances from nuclear facilities were carried out. Applying ordinary linear logistic regression (jump or broken-stick functions) and non-linear logistic regression (Rayleigh functions) we demonstrate that the sex ratio at birth shows the influence of mutagenic ionizing radiation on human health. As important environmental chemical contaminants are also mutagenic, the usefulness of the sex ratio at birth as a genetic health indicator can be inferred by analogy.

  1. Nuclear energy. Danger only in case of accidents?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherb, Hagen; Voigt, Kristina; Kusmierz, Ralf [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. of Computational Biology

    2014-07-01

    The environmental impacts of nuclear energy are highly underestimated. Nuclear weapons, atomic bomb tests, and nuclear accidents are considered a danger for the environment and a human cancer risk. However, childhood leukemia is consistently elevated near nuclear power plants and the Chernobyl accident entailed elevated human birth sex ratios across Europe. We studied the annual sex ratio near nuclear facilities in Germany, France, and Switzerland at the municipality level. We will demonstrate that low doses of ionizing radiation cause effects in human beings. This is shown by strongly consistent spatial-temporal shifts in the human sex ratio trends in the vicinity of nuclear facilities. In the chosen countries complete official data on over 70 million gender specific annual births at the municipality level are available. By Lambert-93 coordinates (France) and GK3 coordinates (Germany, Switzerland) we determined the minimum distances of municipalities from major nuclear facilities. Spatial-temporal trend analyses of the annual sex ratio depending on municipalities' minimum distances from nuclear facilities were carried out. Applying ordinary linear logistic regression (jump or broken-stick functions) and non-linear logistic regression (Rayleigh functions) we demonstrate that the sex ratio at birth shows the influence of mutagenic ionizing radiation on human health. As important environmental chemical contaminants are also mutagenic, the usefulness of the sex ratio at birth as a genetic health indicator can be inferred by analogy.

  2. Root Causes and Impacts of Severe Accidents at Large Nuclear Power Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Högberg, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The root causes and impacts of three severe accidents at large civilian nuclear power plants are reviewed: the Three Mile Island accident in 1979, the Chernobyl accident in 1986, and the Fukushima Daiichi accident in 2011. Impacts include health effects, evacuation of contaminated areas as well as cost estimates and impacts on energy policies and nuclear safety work in various countries. It is concluded that essential objectives for reactor safety work must be: (1) to prevent accidents from d...

  3. Nuclear power: accident probabilities, risks, and benefits. A bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a selected listing of 396 documents pertaining to nuclear accident probability and nuclear risk. Because of the attention focused on these concepts by the recent (August 1974) publication of the draft of WASH-1400, ''Reactor Safety Study,'' it is intended that this bibliography make conveniently available the existence of relevant literature on these concepts. Such an awareness will enhance an understanding of probability and risk as applied to nuclear power plants and is essential to their further development and/or application. This bibliography includes first a listing of the selected documents with abstracts and keywords, followed by three indexes: (1) keyword, (2) author, and (3) permuted title

  4. Accidents in nuclear facilities: classification, incidence and impact; Accidentes en instalaciones nucleares: clasificacion, incidencia e impacto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galicia A, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Paredes G, L. C., E-mail: blink19871@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    A general analysis of the 146 accidents reported officially in nuclear facilities from 1945 to 2012 is presented, among them some took place in: power or research nuclear reactors, critical and subcritical nuclear assemblies, handling of nuclear materials inside laboratories belonging to institutes or universities, in radiochemistry industrial plants and nuclear fuel factories. In form graph the incidence of these accidents is illustrated classified for; category, decades, geographical localization, country classification before the OECD, failure type, and the immediate or later victims. On the other hand, the main learned lessons of the nuclear accidents of Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima are stood out, among those that highlight; the human factors, the necessity of designs more innovative and major technology for the operation, control and surveillance of the nuclear facilities, to increase the criterions of nuclear, radiological and physics safety applied to these facilities, the necessity to carry out probabilistic analysis of safety more detailed for cases of not very probable accidents and their impact, to revalue the selection criterions of the sites for nuclear locations, the methodology of post-accident sites recovery and major instrumentation for parameters evaluation and the radiological monitoring among others. (Author)

  5. To improve nuclear plant safety by learning from accident's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultimate goal of this study is to produce an expert system that enables the experience (records and information) gained from accidents to be put to use towards improving nuclear plant safety. A number of examples have been investigated, both domestic and overseas, in which experience gained from accidents was utilized by utilities in managing and operating their nuclear power stations to improve safety. The result of investigation has been used to create a general 'basic flow' to make the best use of experience. The ultimate goal is achieved by carrying out this 'basic flow' with artificial intelligence (AI). To do this, it is necessary (1) to apply language analysis to process the source information (primary data base; domestic and overseas accident's reports) into the secondary data base, and (2) to establish an expert system for selecting (screening) significant events from the secondary data base. In the processing described in item (1), a multi-lingual thesaurus for nuclear-related terms become necessary because the source information (primary data bases) itself is multi-lingual. In the work described in item (2), the utilization of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), for example, is a candidate method for judging the significance of events. Achieving the goal thus requires developing various new techniques. As the first step of the above long-term study project, this report proposes the 'basic flow' and presents the concept of how the nuclear-related AI can be used to carry out this 'basic flow'. (author)

  6. Government support for the export of nuclear power plants after Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depending on the surge of a global evaluation for the nuclear power generation, our country strengthened government support for the export of nuclear power plants. However, under the influence of a Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, the internal and external situation surrounding nuclear power has been changing. Should our country continue government support for the nuclear power plant export according to this? This report outlined the world trend around nuclear power before the Fukushima accident, surveyed merits and problems of the nuclear power plant export, and introduced what kind of export aid package the government took. And then, it showed the situation change after the Fukushima accident and the point at issue on thinking about the way of the government support. The Fukushima accident raised concern for the safety of the nuclear power plant and might have a big influence on the construction trend of the world nuclear power plant in the future. The criticism to conventional government support for the nuclear power plant export has risen, too. However, the role of government support for the nuclear power plant export was not the problem that should be discussed only by the side of safety and the economy. The nuclear power plant export carried an international contribution, reinforcement of the thickness of a technique and the talented person of the nuclear power industry, and a role such as the contribution to economic growth in medium-and-long term energy policy and nuclear energy policy until now. It may be said that we were asked how was placed nuclear power plant export again while these policies were reviewed after the Fukushima accident. (T. Tanaka)

  7. Estimated consequences from severe spent nuclear fuel transportation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RISKIND software package is used to estimate radiological consequences of severe accident scenarios involving the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. Radiological risks are estimated for both a collective population and a maximally exposed individual based on representative truck and rail cask designs described in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) modal study. The estimate of collective population risk considers all possible environmental pathways, including acute and long-term exposures, and is presented in terms of the 50-y committed effective dose equivalent. Radiological risks to a maximally exposed individual from acute exposure are estimated and presented in terms of the first year and 50-y committed effective dose equivalent. Consequences are estimated for accidents occurring in rural and urban population areas. The modeled pathways include inhalation during initial passing of the radioactive cloud, external exposure from a reduction of the cask shielding, long-term external exposure. from ground deposition, and ingestion from contaminated food (rural only). The major pathways and contributing radionuclides are identified, and the effects of possible mitigative actions are discussed. The cask accident responses and the radionuclide release fractions are modeled as described in the NRC modal study. Estimates of severe accident probabilities are presented for both truck and rail modes of transport. The assumptions made in this study tend to be conservative; however, a set of multiplicative factors are identified that can be applied to estimate more realistic conditions

  8. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs.

  9. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs

  10. Legal responsibility in case of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous laws have been elaborated in order to determine the legal responsibility in case of a nuclear accident. These laws were made necessary because of intervention of the factor 'error' in the nuclear accident. The legal definition of 'error' assumes that it results from non-respect or negligence of established norms on the part of the persons who manipulate the instruments of radioactive production. Nuclear research should not be undertaken in a country without the formal engagement of the central authorities to take the necessary dispositions to ensure the security and safety of the populations and their possessions. The world community should not admit a scientific activity in the nuclear field in the absence of guarantees for the safety and the security of man. The state that permits the production of nuclear energy is legally responsible for any failure that might result in radioactive spills. Considering the possibility of error and the dangers attached to the manipulation of radioactive material, the legislators have elaborated a series of laws, which take into consideration two principles: a)The inalienable right of man to life as conceived in the monotheistic religions and proclaimed by positive law; and b)The responsibility of the state for the safety and security of its citizens. Of course, error is human; but if man may make an error of judgement in ordinary normal life, he does not have the right to make the least miscalculation when this might lead to a nuclear disaster. (author)

  11. Assessment methods and minimization of radiological consequences of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with the program system COSYMA for assessing the radiological consequences of nuclear accidents, performed since 1997 in close co-operation with the University of Delft, NL, and the NRPB, UK, have been terminated and fully documented. Work on the real-time on-line decision support system RODOS for off-site emergency management after nuclear accidents has concentrated on the preparation of the operational version PV 4.0; it will be released by mid 2000. It has been developed and customised to the various regions of Europe in close co-operation with some 40 contract partners in East and West Europe. The operational use of the RODOS system at a central place in Germany and in emergency centres of other West and East European countries is in progress. (orig.)

  12. Assessment of off-site consequences of nuclear accidents (MARIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief report is given of a workshop held in Luxembourg in 1985 on methods for assessing the off-site radiological consequences of nuclear accidents (MARIA). The sessions included topics such as atmospheric dispersion; foodchain transfer; urban contamination; demographic and land use data; dosimetry, health effects, economic and countermeasures models; uncertainty analysis; and application of probabilistic risk assessment results as input to decision aids. (U.K.)

  13. The Fukushima major accident. Seismic, nuclear and medical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this voluminous report addresses mega-earthquakes and mega-tsunamis: scientific data, case of France (West Indies and metropolitan France), and socioeconomic aspects (governance, regulation, para-seismic protection). The second part deals with the nuclear accident at Fukushima: event sequence, situation of the nuclear industry in France after Fukushima, fuel cycle and future opportunities. The third part addresses health and environmental consequences. Each part is completed by a large number of documents in which some specific aspects are more precisely reported, commented and discussed

  14. Nuclear accidents and thyroid - a stitch in time saves nine!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thyroid is a hormone secreting gland located superficially in the neck anterior to the trachea and below the thyroid cartilage. The normal adult gland weighs 15-20 g. Thyroid needs iodine to produce hormones that regulate body's energy and metabolism. It absorbs available iodine from the bloodstream. It cannot distinguish between stable iodine and radioactive iodine. In the event of nuclear accident huge amount of radioactive iodine (Iodine-131) will be released in the atmosphere. This will contaminate soil, plants, vegetables, water bodies etc. People residing in the vicinity will get radioactive iodine by inhalation and consuming contaminated food, water and milk. This radioactive iodine will saturate the thyroid gland. In neonates, infants and young children the thyroid gland is one of the most radiosensitive parts of the body. When thyroid cells absorb too much radioactive iodine, it can cause thyroid cancer over several years after the exposure. Neonates, infants and young children are at highest risk of developing thyroid cancer at a later stage in life. Incidence of thyroid cancer goes up in the native population after the nuclear reactor accident. Most of the thyroid cancers are papillary carcinomas and usually amenable to treatment with 10 year survival rate. It is believed that post nuclear accident carcinomas are more aggressive as compared to the usual papillary ca. Thyroid gland is at greatest risk from radioactive iodine and potassium iodide can protect the gland, if given as per the recommended dose schedule. The Chernobyl reactor accident and events around that time have proven beyond doubt that potassium iodide protects the gland. Thus, its proper use in rescue workers and survivors could effectively protect thyroid gland and prevent thyroid cancer. (author)

  15. Severe Accident Simulation of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Espinosa-Paredes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA simulation in the boiling water reactor (BWR of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant (LVNPP at 105% of rated power is analyzed in this work. The LVNPP model was developed using RELAP/SCDAPSIM code. The lack of cooling water after the LOCA gets to the LVNPP to melting of the core that exceeds the design basis of the nuclear power plant (NPP sufficiently to cause failure of structures, materials, and systems that are needed to ensure proper cooling of the reactor core by normal means. Faced with a severe accident, the first response is to maintain the reactor core cooling by any means available, but in order to carry out such an attempt is necessary to understand fully the progression of core damage, since such action has effects that may be decisive in accident progression. The simulation considers a LOCA in the recirculation loop of the reactor with and without cooling water injection. During the progression of core damage, we analyze the cooling water injection at different times and the results show that there are significant differences in the level of core damage and hydrogen production, among other variables analyzed such as maximum surface temperature, fission products released, and debris bed height.

  16. Instrumentation and control developments in the Los Alamos nuclear test program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perea, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy contracts the Los Alamos National Laboratory to carry out a Nuclear Weapons Test Program in support of the national defense. The program is one of ongoing research to design, build, and test prototype nuclear devices. The goal is to determine what should ultimately be incorporated into the nation's nuclear defense stockpile. All nuclear tests are conducted underground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This paper describes the instrumentation and control techniques used by Los Alamos to carry out the tests. Specifically, the contrast between historical methods and new, computer-based technology are discussed. Previous techniques required large numbers of expensive, heavy hardwire cables extending from the surface to the diagnostics rack at the bottom of the vertical shaft. These cables, which provided singular control/monitor functions, have been replaced by a few optical fibers and power cables. This significant savings has been enabled through the adaptation of industrial process control technology using programmable computer control and distributed input/output. Finally, an ongoing process of developing and applying the most suitable instrumentation and control technology to the unique requirements of the Test Program is discussed. 2 refs.

  17. Transport of large particles released in a nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poellaenen, R.; Toivonen, H.; Lahtinen, J.; Ilander, T.

    1995-10-01

    Highly radioactive particulate material may be released in a nuclear accident or sometimes during normal operation of a nuclear power plant. However, consequence analyses related to radioactive releases are often performed neglecting the particle nature of the release. The properties of the particles have an important role in the radiological hazard. A particle deposited on the skin may cause a large and highly non-uniform skin beta dose. Skin dose limits may be exceeded although the overall activity concentration in air is below the level of countermeasures. For sheltering purposes it is crucial to find out the transport range, i.e. the travel distance of the particles. A method for estimating the transport range of large particles (aerodynamic diameter d{sub a} > 20 {mu}m) in simplified meteorological conditions is presented. A user-friendly computer code, known as TROP, is developed for fast range calculations in a nuclear emergency. (orig.) (23 refs., 13 figs.).

  18. [Initial medical management in radiological accidents and nuclear disaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, Koichi

    2012-03-01

    Major radiological emergencies include criticality in nuclear power plants or terrorist attacks using dirty bombs or nuclear device detonation. Because irradiation itself does not cause any immediate death of the victims, and there is a minimum risk of secondary irradiation to medical personnel during decontamination procedures, lifesaving treatments should be prioritized. When a major radiological accident occurs, information is scarce and/or becomes intricate. We might face with significant difficulties in determining the exact culprits of the event, i.e., radiological or chemical or others. Therefore, it is strongly recommended for the national and local governments, related organizations and hospitals to develop comprehensive systems to cope with all hazards(chemical, biological, radiation, nuclear, and explosion) under the common incident command system.

  19. The international nuclear liability and compensation regime put to the test of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: It appears that nuclear emergency plans place generally more emphasis on the nuclear safety and radiation protection aspects of the management of an accident, both inside the installation concerned and off-site, than on the particular requirements of local residents who would find themselves suddenly in such an emergency situation and of possible victims of nuclear damage. In a similar vein, studies focusing on the international nuclear third party liability regime usually take a global perspective and leave little room for the treatment of individual cases. The albeit welcome dearth of practical experience in Western countries in providing compensation for accidents of nuclear origin has, however, meant that public and local authorities are not always fully conscious of the importance of this question which should be dealt with in as practical a manner as possible. In order to cover all the legal and practical questions that could arise during the management of the consequences of a nuclear accident with regard to third party liability, insurance and compensation, the OECD/NEA held in co-operation with French authorities a workshop in November 2001. It was decided to organize this workshop according to three main stages: the alert phase, the accident phase and the post-accident phase; and to examine during these three stages the various roles played by local and national authorities, the nuclear operator and his insurer, as well as the nature and form of their respective actions. These questions were addressed both from the angle of applicable domestic legislation and of the relevant international conventions. From the analysis of different national experiences and of the information exchanged during the workshop, a striking diversity may be noted of solutions adopted or envisaged to address various aspects of civil liability, insurance and indemnification of damage in a nuclear emergency situation. This lack of uniformity should not necessarily be

  20. The Fukushima Nuclear Accident: What has been learned from it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohska, Tokio

    2014-05-01

    The ill-fated Fukushima nuclear reactors are still in a state in which Japanese are struggling to find the end of the tunnel. They are now facing with the highly contaminated radioactive water. It is polluting the world unless confined in a small space for an incredibly long time. There have been many cases such as the crude oil leak from a deep-sea oil well polluting ocean or many volcanic eruptions that had globally polluted air. Why the Fukushima nuclear accident should be treated in a different way when these radioactive materials were originally from ground and they will eventually find their way back into a soil? The reality is not as simple and a remarkable difference needs to be put into consideration: nuclear wastes are highly condensed because humans worked to make them that way so that they can be used as nuclear fuel or atomic bomb. Trouble is that one finds in nuclear waste many radioactive substances with very long half-life times that would stay hazardous for many future generations. Most ashes from big volcanic eruption find their way to the ground within several years or so. Once they landed the surface of the ground, they are no different from the soil and will become basically harmless dusts. On the contrary, for some part of nuclear waste it will take over 10,000 years to become almost harmless. In general any human being does not feel a real threat on anything that would happen far beyond his/her life span. People usually are optimistic by saying that someone in a future would come up with a perfect solution to take care of the problems associated with nuclear waste. This argument reflects a very irresponsible attitude of people working on the project involving nuclear fuel. The problems in Fukushima nuclear accidents are mainly resulting from such an irresponsible attitude. Is it ever possible to see a happy end with any nuclear power station based on such a human mentality?

  1. The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident: OECD/NEA Nuclear Safety Response and Lessons Learnt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, all NEA member countries took early action to ensure and confirm the continued safety of their nuclear power plants and the protection of the public. After these preliminary safety reviews, all countries with nuclear facilities carried out comprehensive safety reviews, often referred to as 'stress tests', which reassessed safety margins of nuclear facilities with a primary focus on challenges related to conditions experienced at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, for example extreme external events and the loss of safety functions, or capabilities to cope with severe accidents. As appropriate, improvements are being made to safety and emergency response systems to ensure that nuclear power plants are capable of withstanding events that lead to loss of electrical power and/or cooling capability. In the weeks following the accident, the NEA immediately began establishing expert groups in the nuclear safety and radiological protection areas, as well as contributing to information exchange with the Japanese authorities and other international organisations. It promptly provided a forum for high-level decision makers and regulators within the G8-G20 frameworks. The NEA actions taken at the international level in response to the accident have been carried out primarily by the three NEA standing technical committees concerned with nuclear and radiation safety issues - the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA), the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) and the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) - under the leadership of the CNRA. More than two years following the accident, the NEA continues to assist the Japanese authorities in dealing with their nuclear safety and recovery efforts as well as to facilitate international co-operation on nuclear safety and radiological protection matters. It is strongly supporting the establishment of

  2. Radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiriger, J.M.; Failor, R.A.; Marsh, K.V.; Shaw, G.E.

    1987-03-23

    Following the accident at the nuclear reactor at Chernobyl, in the Soviet Union on April 26, 1986, we performed a variety of measurements to determine the level of the radioactive fallout on the western United States. We used gamma-spectroscopy to analyze air filters from the areas around Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), California, and Barrow and Fairbanks, Alaska. Milk from California and imported vegetables were also analyzed. The levels of the various fission products detected were far below the maximum permissible concentration levels.

  3. Locations of criticality alarms and nuclear accident dosimeters at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    Hanford facilities that contain fissionable materials capable of achieving critical mass are monitored with nuclear accident dosimeters (NADS) in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.11, Chapter XI, Section 4.c. (DOE 1988). The US Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Field Office (RL) has assigned the responsibility for maintaining and evaluating the Hanford NAD system to the Instrumentation and External Dosimetry (I ED) Section of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL's) Health Physics Department. This manual provides a description of the Hanford NAD, criteria and instructions for proper NAD placement, and the locations of these dosimeters onsite.

  4. Locations of criticality alarms and nuclear accident dosimeters at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanford facilities that contain fissionable materials capable of achieving critical mass are monitored with nuclear accident dosimeters (NADS) in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.11, Chapter XI, Section 4.c. (DOE 1988). The US Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Field Office (RL) has assigned the responsibility for maintaining and evaluating the Hanford NAD system to the Instrumentation and External Dosimetry (I ampersand ED) Section of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL's) Health Physics Department. This manual provides a description of the Hanford NAD, criteria and instructions for proper NAD placement, and the locations of these dosimeters onsite

  5. Economic damage caused by a nuclear reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impacts of a nuclear reactor accident have been estimated for: the public water supply; the use of surface water for sprinkling in agriculture, for industry water supply, recreation, etc.; and fisheries. Contamination of water sources may affect the public water supply severely. In such a situation demand of water cannot always be met. Agriculture faces production losses, if demand for uncontaminated surface water cannot be met. The impacts on recreation can also be significant. The losses to other water users are less substantial. Fisheries may lose (export) markets, as people become reluctant to buy fish and fish products. 33 refs.; 3 figs.; 35 tabs

  6. Fission product chemistry in severe nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A specialist's meeting was held at JRC-Ispra from 15 to 17 January 1990 to review the current understanding of fission-product chemistry during severe accidents in light water reactors. Discussions focussed on the important chemical phenomena that could occur across the wide range of conditions of a damaged nuclear plant. Recommendations for future chemistry work were made covering the following areas: (a) fuel degradation and fission-product release, (b) transport and attenuation processes in the reactor coolant system, (c) containment chemistry (iodine behaviour and core-concrete interactions)

  7. Health hazards from radiocaesium following the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The WHO Regional Office for Europe has organized a series of meetings to assess the health impact of the Chernobyl nuclear accident. Considering the long-term importance of radiocaesium a decision was made to examine carefully the following aspects of this radionuclide in Europe: rate of deposition; environmental pathways through soil, flora and fauna to humans; absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans; estimated doses resulting from these exposures; and some consideration of the possible adverse health effects. This is a report from a working group studying the health implications of radiocaesium. Refs, figs and tabs

  8. Empirical Risk Analysis of Severe Reactor Accidents in Nuclear Power Plants after Fukushima

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Christian Kaiser

    2012-01-01

    Many countries are reexamining the risks connected with nuclear power generation after the Fukushima accidents. To provide updated information for the corresponding discussion a simple empirical approach is applied for risk quantification of severe reactor accidents with International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES) level ≥5. The analysis is based on worldwide data of commercial nuclear facilities. An empirical hazard of 21 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 4; 62) severe accidents am...

  9. Japan's compensation system for nuclear damage - As related to the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, extraordinary efforts were undertaken in Japan to implement a compensation scheme for the proper and efficient indemnification of the affected victims. This publication provides English translations of key Japanese legislative and administrative texts and other implementing guidance, as well as several commentaries by Japanese experts in the field of third party nuclear liability. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has prepared this publication in co-operation with the government of Japan to share Japan's recent experience in implementing its nuclear liability and compensation regime. The material presented in the publication should provide valuable insights for those wishing to better understand the regime applied to compensate the victims of the accident and for those working on potential improvements in national regimes and the international framework for third party nuclear liability

  10. Some nuclear chemical aspects of medical generator nuclide production at the Los Alamos hot cell facility

    CERN Document Server

    Fassbender, M; Heaton, R C; Jamriska, D J; Kitten, J J; Nortier, F M; Peterson, E J; Phillips, D R; Pitt, L R; Salazar, L L; Valdez, F O; 10.1524/ract.92.4.237.35596

    2004-01-01

    Generator nuclides constitute a convenient tool for applications in nuclear medicine. In this paper, some radiochemical aspects of generator nuclide parents regularly processed at Los Alamos are introduced. The bulk production of the parent nuclides /sup 68/Ge, /sup 82/Sr, /sup 109/Cd and /sup 88/Zr using charged particle beams is discussed. Production nuclear reactions for these radioisotopes, and chemical separation procedures are presented. Experimental processing yields correspond to 80%-98% of the theoretical thick target yield. Reaction cross sections are modeled using the code ALICE-IPPE; it is observed that the model largely disagrees with experimental values for the nuclear processes treated. Radionuclide production batches are prepared 1-6 times yearly for sales. Batch activities range from 40MBq to 75 GBq.

  11. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify, through the use of models, the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The Reactor Safety Study provided the basis for most of the earlier estimates related to these health effects. Subsequent efforts by NRC-supported groups resulted in improved health effects models that were published in the report entitled open-quotes Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Consequence Analysisclose quotes, NUREG/CR-4214, 1985 and revised further in the 1989 report NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2. The health effects models presented in the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report were developed for exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) (beta and gamma) radiation based on the best scientific information available at that time. Since the 1989 report was published, two addenda to that report have been prepared to (1) incorporate other scientific information related to low-LET health effects models and (2) extend the models to consider the possible health consequences of the addition of alpha-emitting radionuclides to the exposure source term. The first addendum report, entitled open-quotes Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, Modifications of Models Resulting from Recent Reports on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Low LET Radiation, Part 2: Scientific Bases for Health Effects Models,close quotes was published in 1991 as NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2, Addendum 1. This second addendum addresses the possibility that some fraction of the accident source term from an operating nuclear power plant comprises alpha-emitting radionuclides. Consideration of chronic high-LET exposure from alpha radiation as well as acute and chronic exposure to low-LET beta and gamma radiations is a reasonable extension of the health effects model

  12. Consideration of Command and Control Performance during Accident Management Process at the Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Nisrene M. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sok Chul [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants shifted the nuclear safety paradigm from risk management to on-site management capability during a severe accident. The kernel of on-site management capability during an accident at a nuclear power plant is situation awareness and agility of command and control. However, little consideration has been given to accident management. After the events of September 11, 2001 and the catastrophic Fukushima nuclear disaster, agility of command and control has emerged as a significant element for effective and efficient accident management, with many studies emphasizing accident management strategies, particularly man-machine interface, which is considered a key role in ensuring nuclear power plant safety during severe accident conditions. This paper proposes a conceptual model for evaluating command and control performance during the accident management process at a nuclear power plant. Communication and information processing while responding to an accident is one of the key issues needed to mitigate the accident. This model will give guidelines for accurate and fast communication response during accident conditions.

  13. Explanation of procedure on site medical emergency response for nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National occupational health standard-Procedure on Site Medical Emergency Response for Nuclear Accident has been approved and issued by the Ministry of Health. This standard is formulated according to the Emergency Response Law of the People's Republic of China, Law of the People 's Republic of China on Prevention and Control of Occupational Diseases, Regulations on Emergency Measures for Nuclear Accidents at Nuclear Power Plants, and Health Emergency Plans for Nuclear and Radiological Accidents of Ministry of Health, supporting the use of On-site Medical Emergency Planning and Preparedness for Nuclear Accidents and Off-site Medical Emergency Planning and Preparedness for Nuclear Accidents. Nuclear accident on-site medical response procedure is a part of the on-site emergency plan. The standard specifies the basic content and requirements of the nuclear accident on-site medical emergency response procedures of nuclear facilities operating units to guide and regulate the work of nuclear accident on-site medical emergency response of nuclear facilities operating units. The criteria-related contents were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  14. [Accidents of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Masaharu

    2012-01-01

    A massive earthquake of magnitude 9 terribly happened far out at sea of Tohoku area on 11 March, 2011. After this earthquake the hugest tsunami in the history came to the hundreds km of the seashore of Tohoku area. Due to this tsunami all of the four nuclear power plants of Fukushima Daiichi lost every electric power and, soon after this, loss nuclear fuels from number 1 to 3 reactors melt through their power containers. According to this phenomena, large amount of the radio-activities have been released in the air. There were some releases but major contaminations happened at the time of the two releases in the morning of 15 March, 2011. Due to this, to the direction of the northwest until the Iitate Village over 30km zone was contaminated. In this paper I explain the time course of the accidents and that how contaminated.

  15. Agricultural countermeasures in the Nordic countries after a nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brink, M. [Danish Plant Directorate (Denmark); Lauritzen, B. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark)] (eds.)

    2001-12-01

    This report by the NKSBOK-1.4 project group describes agricultural countermeasures after a nuclear accident, aiming at the reduction of radiation doses to man from the ingestion of foodstuffs. The intention has been to collect information based on common understanding that can be used as a Nordic handbook and in further developments of the national preparedness systems. The report covers two areas: the gathering and dissemination of information before and during a nuclear emergency, and the development of a countermeasures strategy. A number of factors are discussed, which will affect the choice of countermeasure(s), and as a case study, a technical cost-benefit assessment of a specific countermeasure is described. (au)

  16. Should evacuation standards be reviewed after a nuclear accident?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author comments the current practices of post-accident management of nuclear disasters. He outlines the peculiarities of nuclear evacuations with respect to other disasters. After referring to the use of life expectancy or of the reduction of life expectancy, for example for smokers, he suggests that irradiation could be expressed this way and then provide some intuitive information. He discusses the notion of linear no-threshold relationship which has been introduced by the ICRP after analysis of cancers noticed on survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. He addresses the case of Fukushima, the issue of low doses applied to large populations. He discusses the limitations of the linear no-threshold relationship. He discusses possible improvements of evacuation procedures

  17. Ruthenium behaviour in severe nuclear accident conditions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, U.; Lipponen, M.; Auvinen, A.; Jokiniemi, J.; Zilliacus, R. [VVT Processes (Finland)

    2004-08-01

    During routine nuclear reactor operations, ruthenium will accumulate in the fuel in relatively high concentrations. In a steam atmosphere, ruthenium is not volatile, and it is not likely to be released from the fuel. However, in an air ingress accident during reactor power operation or during maintenance, ruthenium may form volatile species, which may be released into the containment. Oxide forms of ruthenium are more volatile than the metallic form. Radiotoxicity of ruthenium is high both in the short and the long term. The results of this project imply that in oxidising conditions during nuclear reactor core degradation, ruthenium release increases as oxidised gaseous species Ru03 and Ru04 are formed. A significant part of the released ruthenium is then deposited on reactor coolant system piping. However, in the presence of steam and aerosol particles, a substantial amount of ruthenium may be released as gaseous Ru04 into the containment atmosphere. (au)

  18. Fukushima Nuclear Accident, the Third International Severe Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan is the world's third largest power user. Japan's last remaining nuclear reactor shutdown on Saturday 4 Th of May 2012 leaving the country entirely nuclear free. All of 50 of the nation's operable reactors (not counting for the four crippled reactors at Fukushima) are now offline. Before last year's Fukushima nuclear disaster, the country obtained 30% of its energy from nuclear plants, and had planned to produce up to 50% of its power from nuclear sources by 2030. Japan declared states of emergency for five nuclear reactors at two power plants after the units lost cooling ability in the aftermath of Friday 11 March 2011 powerful earthquake. Thousands of (14000) residents were immediately evacuated as workers struggled to get the reactors under control to prevent meltdowns. On March 11 Th, 2011, Japan experienced a sever earthquake resulting in the shutdown of multiple reactors. At Fukushima Daiichi site, the earthquake caused the loss of normal Ac power. In addition it appeals that the ensuing tsunami caused the loss of emergency Ac power at the site. Subsequent events caused damage to fuel and radiological releases offsite. The spent fuel problem is a wild card in the potentially catastrophic failure of Fukushima power plant. Since the Friday's 9.0 earthquake, the plant has been wracked by repeated explosions in three different reactors. Nuclear experts emphasized there are significant differences between the unfolding nuclear crisis at Fukushima and the events leading up to the Chernobyl disaster in 1986. The Chernobyl reactor exploded during a power surge while it was in operation and released a major cloud of radiation because the reactor had no containment structure around to. At Fukushima, each reactor has shutdown and is inside a 20 cm-thick steel pressure vessel that is designed to contain a meltdown. The pressure vessels themselves are surrounded by steel-lined, reinforced concrete shells. Chernobyl disaster was classified 7 on the International

  19. Consequences of the nuclear power plant accident at Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR), on April 26, 1986, was the first major nuclear power plant accident that resulted in a large-scale fire and subsequent explosions, immediate and delayed deaths of plant operators and emergency service workers, and the radioactive contamination of a significant land area. The release of radioactive material, over a 10-day period, resulted in millions of Soviets, and other Europeans, being exposed to measurable levels of radioactive fallout. Because of the effects of wind and rain, the radioactive nuclide fallout distribution patterns are not well defined, though they appear to be focused in three contiguous Soviet Republics: the Ukrainian SSR, the Byelorussian SSR, and the Russian Soviet Federated Socialist Republic. Further, because of the many radioactive nuclides (krypton, xenon, cesium, iodine, strontium, plutonium) released by the prolonged fires at Chernobyl, the long-term medical, psychological, social, and economic effects will require careful and prolonged study. Specifically, studies on the medical (leukemia, cancers, thyroid disease) and psychological (reactive depressions, post-traumatic stress disorders, family disorganization) consequences of continued low dose radiation exposure in the affected villages and towns need to be conducted so that a coherent, comprehensive, community-oriented plan may evolve that will not cause those already affected any additional harm and confusion

  20. Thyroid doses for evacuees from the Fukushima nuclear accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokonami, Shinji; Hosoda, Masahiro; Akiba, Suminori; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Kashiwakura, Ikuo; Balonov, Mikhail

    2012-07-01

    A primary health concern among residents and evacuees in affected areas immediately after a nuclear accident is the internal exposure of the thyroid to radioiodine, particularly I-131, and subsequent thyroid cancer risk. In Japan, the natural disasters of the earthquake and tsunami in March 2011 destroyed an important function of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F1-NPP) and a large amount of radioactive material was released to the environment. Here we report for the first time extensive measurements of the exposure to I-131 revealing I-131 activity in the thyroid of 46 out of the 62 residents and evacuees measured. The median thyroid equivalent dose was estimated to be 4.2 mSv and 3.5 mSv for children and adults, respectively, much smaller than the mean thyroid dose in the Chernobyl accident (490 mSv in evacuees). Maximum thyroid doses for children and adults were 23 mSv and 33 mSv, respectively.

  1. The development of a nuclear accident risk information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computerized system NARIS (Nuclear Accident Risk Information System) was developed in order to support the estimation of health effects and the establishment the effective risk reduction strategies. Using the system, we can analyze the distribution of health effects easily by displaying the results on the digital map of the site. Also, the thematic mapping allows the diverse analyses of the distribution of the health effects. The NARIS can be used in the emergency operation facilities in order to analyze the distribution of the health effects resulting from the severe accidents of a nuclear power plant. Also, the rapid analysis of the health effect is possible by storing the health effect results in the form of a database. Therefore, the staffs of the emergency operation facilities can establish the rapid and effective emergency response strategies. The module for the optimization of the costs and benefits and the decision making support will be added. The technical support for the establishment of the optimum and effective emergency response strategies will be possible using this system

  2. Policy elements for post-accident management in the event of nuclear accident. Document drawn up by the Steering Committee for the Management of the Post-Accident Phase of a Nuclear Accident (CODIRPA). Final version - 5 October 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pursuant to the Inter-ministerial Directive on the Action of the Public Authorities, dated 7 April 2005, in the face of an event triggering a radiological emergency, the National directorate on nuclear safety and radiation protection (DGSNR), which became the Nuclear safety authority (ASN) in 2006, was tasked with working the relevant Ministerial offices in order to set out the framework and outline, prepare and implement the provisions needed to address post-accident situations arising from a nuclear accident. In June 2005, the ASN set up a Steering committee for the management of the post-accident phase in the event of nuclear accident or a radiological emergency situation (CODIRPA), put in charge of drafting the related policy elements. To carry out its work, CODIRPA set up a number of thematic working groups from 2005 on, involving in total several hundred experts from different backgrounds (local information commissions, associations, elected officials, health agencies, expertise agencies, authorities, etc.). The working groups reports have been published by the ASN. Experiments on the policy elements under construction were carried out at the local level in 2010 across three nuclear sites and several of the neighbouring municipalities, as well as during national crisis drills conducted since 2008. These works gave rise to two international conferences organised by ASN in 2007 and 2011. The policy elements prepared by CODIRPA were drafted in regard to nuclear accidents of medium scale causing short-term radioactive release (less than 24 hours) that might occur at French nuclear facilities equipped with a special intervention plan (PPI). They also apply to actions to be carried out in the event of accidents during the transport of radioactive materials. Following definitions of each stage of a nuclear accident, this document lists the principles selected by CODIRPA to support management efforts subsequent to a nuclear accident. Then, it presents the main

  3. Mitigation of Hydrogen Hazards in Severe Accidents in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration of severe accidents in nuclear power plants is an essential component of the defence in depth approach in nuclear safety. Severe accidents have very low probabilities of occurring, but may have significant consequences resulting from the degradation of nuclear fuel. The generation of hydrogen and the risk of hydrogen combustion, as well as other phenomena leading to overpressurization of the reactor containment in case of severe accidents, represent complex safety issues in relation to accident management. The combustion of hydrogen, produced primarily as a result of heated zirconium metal reacting with steam, can create short term overpressure or detonation forces that may exceed the strength of the containment structure. An understanding of these phenomena is crucial for planning and implementing effective accident management measures. Analysis of all the issues relating to hydrogen risk is an important step for any measure that is aimed at the prevention or mitigation of hydrogen combustion in reactor containments. The main objective of this publication is to contribute to the implementation of IAEA Safety Standards, in particular, two IAEA Safety Requirements: Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. These Requirements publications discuss computational analysis of severe accidents and accident management programmes in nuclear power plants. Specifically with regard to the risk posed by hydrogen in nuclear power reactors, computational analysis of severe accidents considers hydrogen sources, hydrogen distribution, hydrogen combustion and control and mitigation measures for hydrogen, while accident management programmes are aimed at mitigating hydrogen hazards in reactor containments.

  4. Present status of research activities in severe accident evaluation for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basis for securing nuclear safety is to prevent occurrence of accidents and to mitigate propagation of abnormal events or accidents to severe accidents. In practice, a nuclear power plant is designed and constructed so that abnormal events can be detected at the early phase to cope with the events and safety features and facilities are installed to mitigate and reduce the consequences in the case of such accidents. However it is important to prepare preventive measures as well as mitigative measures to cope with severe accidents to further improve the level of safety. Research on the evaluation of severe accidents is needed to develop such measures. Severe accident research is performed in many countries including Japan and a lot of findings have been made. At JAERI, experiments are being conducted to clarify severe accident phenomena and to make quantitative evaluation of safety margin of a nuclear power plant against severe accidents. A lot of findings on the fuel damage process in the early phase of severe accidents have been obtained in the past years. However there are still large uncertainties on the fuel damage process in the late phase of accidents. In the area of accident management, there exists need for experiments and analyses. (author)

  5. Los Alamos nuclear enterprise resource and infrastructure model (LA-NERIM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this nascent global 'Nuclear Renaissance', potential shortages of human resources and supply chains have become the top concerns for the policymakers and industry leaders. A number of industry studies have examined the potential supply shortages in qualified labors for specific deployment scenarios, the general shortage in nuclear engineers, and ways to ramp up educational and training pipelines. A Los Alamos National Laboratory team has been developing a nuclear enterprise resource and infrastructure model (LA-NERIM) to provide a dynamic and versatile tool for the systematic study of resource needs and flows. LA-NERIM is built around a stock-and-flow model of the nuclear fuel cycle model using the iThinkTM software, with modules and connections describing all the front-end, reactor operation and back-end processes. It is driven by nuclear power demand growth. We are using LA-NERIM to study the human resource development (HRD) needs for a number of scenarios for US and Russia. The US study includes a comparison of three scenarios of maintaining current capacity, expansion at 500 MWe/yr and maintaining current market share. We are also examining the impact of the sharply peaked demographics of the ageing US nuclear workforce on future growth. LA-NERIM can be modularized with more detailed labor categories and customer defined boundary conditions to provide high fidelity projection of dynamic staffing needs for nuclear vendors, owner/operators and suppliers. With different kinds of inputs, LA-NERIM can be used to project needs of other resources, such as concrete, steels, capital outlays and manufacturing capacities. Coupled with data from NFCSim, another Los Alamos code that calculates the quantities and isotopic compositions in the flows of nuclear materials throughout the fuel cycles, LA-NERIM has the potential to become a powerful and versatile system tool for policymakers and industry leaders to examine and compare the feasibilities and impacts of various

  6. Guidelines for Exposure Assessment in Health Risk Studies Following a Nuclear Reactor Accident

    OpenAIRE

    Bouville, André; Linet, Martha S.; Hatch, Maureen; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Simon, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Worldwide concerns regarding health effects after the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents indicate a clear need to identify short- and long-term health impacts that might result from accidents in the future. Fundamental to addressing this problem are reliable and accurate radiation dose estimates for the affected populations. The available guidance for activities following nuclear accidents is limited with regard to strategies for dose assessment in health risk s...

  7. Review of Past Nuclear Accidents: Source Terms and Recorded Gamma-Ray Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Sanderson, D.C.W.; Cresswell, A.; Allyson, J.D.; McConville, P.

    1997-01-01

    Airborne gamma ray spectrometry using high volume scintillation detectors, optionally in conjunction with Ge detectors, has potential for making rapid environmental measurements in response to nuclear accidents. A literature search on past nuclear accidents has been conducted to define the source terms which have been experienced so far. Selected gamma ray spectra recorded after past accidents have also been collated to examine the complexity of observed behaviour.

  8. Methyl Iodide Formation Under Postulated Nuclear Reactor Accident Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of methyl iodide under conditions of postulated nuclear reactor accidents is discussed. Although thermodynamic calculations indicate the equilibrium methyl iodide concentrations would be quite low, calculations based on a simple kinetic scheme involving reaction between small hydrocarbon species and iodine indicate that concentrations higher than equilibrium can occur during the course of the reaction. Such calculations were performed over a wide range of initial species concentrations and a range of temperatures representative of some reactor accident situations. These calculations suggest that little methyl iodide would be expected within the core volume where temperatures are maximum. As the gas leaves the core volume and expands into the plenum region, it cools and the concentration of methyl iodide increases. At the intermediate temperatures which might characterize this region, the formation of methyl iodide from thermally induced reactions could reach its maximum rate. The gas continues to cool, however, and it is probable that by the time it leaves the plenum region it has cooled to the point where thermally induced reactions may be of little importance. Although the thermally induced reactions will become slower as the gas expands and cools, the radiation-induced reactions will not be slowed to the same extent. The gases leaving the core carry fission products and hence a radiation source is available to initiate reaction by a temperature-independent process. An investigation of the radiation chemical formation and decomposition of methyl iodide in the presence of steam suggests that radiation-induced methyl iodide formation will generally be rapid under the postulated accident situations. Thus, in the plenum region where thermal reactions have become slow, the radiation-induced reaction can still proceed and may well become the dominant factor. The same situation probably pertains as well to the containment region. (author)

  9. The primal application research of figure assimilation theory in the nuclear accident consequence forecast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deepgoing research of figure assimilation theory promotes many subjects' rapid development. This article outlooks the application of figure assimilation technique in the nuclear accident consequence forecast. The nuclear accident consequence forecast is a complicated system which needs rapidity and precision, so it is quiet difficult. but after the insertion of figure assimilation, it pushes on one step about the question. (authors)

  10. Energy situations in Japan before and after the Fukushima nuclear accident

    OpenAIRE

    Muraoka K.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the various effects on the public conception on nuclear energy and more generally on energy policies in Japan due to the nuclear accident that occurred on 11th March 2011 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station, which is owned and operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO). Before the accident, nuclear energy had been conceived as the main energy source of electricity in Japan for reducing CO2 emission beyond 2020. However, public opinion has turned almost...

  11. National radiological emergency response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fukushima nuclear power plant accident occurred on March 11, 2011, when two natural disasters of unprecedented strengths, an earthquake with magnitude 9 followed one hour later by a powerful tsunami struck northeastern Japan and felled the external power supply and the emergency diesel generators of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, resulting in a loss of coolant accident. There were core meltdowns in three nuclear reactors with the release of radioactivity estimated to be 1/10 of what was released to the environment during the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in April 1986. The Fukushima nuclear accident tested the capability of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) and the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) in responding to such radiological emergency as a nuclear power plant accident. The PNRI and NDRRMC activated the RADPLAN for possible radiological emergency. The emergency response was calibrated to the status of the nuclear reactors on site and the environmental monitoring undertaken around the site and off-site, including the marine environment. This orchestrated effort enabled the PNRI and the national agencies concerned to reassure the public that the nuclear accident does not have a significant impact on the Philippines, both on the health and safety of the people and on the safety of the environment. National actions taken during the accident will be presented. The role played by the International Atomic Energy Agency as the central UN agency for nuclear matters will be discussed. (author)

  12. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a revision of NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990), Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis. This revision has been made to incorporate changes to the Health Effects Models recommended in two addenda to the NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 11, 1989 report. The first of these addenda provided recommended changes to the health effects models for low-LET radiations based on recent reports from UNSCEAR, ICRP and NAS/NRC (BEIR V). The second addendum presented changes needed to incorporate alpha-emitting radionuclides into the accident exposure source term. As in the earlier version of this report, models are provided for early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating the risks of seven types of cancer in adults - leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and ''other''. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Five classes of genetic diseases -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocations, and multifactorial diseases are also considered. Data are provided that should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk

  13. Bone marrow transplantation after the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On April 26, 1986, an accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in the Soviet Union exposed about 200 people to large doses of total-body radiation. Thirteen persons exposed to estimated total-body doses of 5.6 to 13.4 Gy received bone marrow transplants. Two transplant recipients, who received estimated doses of radiation of 5.6 and 8.7 Gy, are alive more than three years after the accident. The others died of various causes, including burns (the cause of death in five), interstitial pneumonitis (three), graft-versus-host disease (two), and acute renal failure and adult respiratory distress syndrome (one). There was hematopoietic (granulocytic) recovery in nine transplant recipients who could be evaluated, six of whom had transient partial engraftment before the recovery of their own marrow. Graft-versus-host disease was diagnosed clinically in four persons and suspected in two others. Although the recovery of endogenous hematopoiesis may occur after exposure to radiation doses of 5.6 to 13.4 Gy, we do not know whether it is more likely after the transient engraftment of transplanted stem cells. Because large doses of radiation affect multiple systems, bone marrow recovery does not necessarily ensure survival. Furthermore, the risk of graft-versus-host disease must be considered when the benefits of this treatment are being weighed

  14. Nuclear power plant accident handbook: a CNSC emergency operations centre tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to the Fukushima Nuclear Emergency and the subsequent Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) response, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) Fukushima Task Force recommended that hardcopy and electronic version reference packages for all Canadian nuclear reactor sites are readily available to the Technical Support Team. CNSC staff, in a cooperative agreement with Atomic Energy of Canada Limited at Chalk River Laboratories (AECL-CRL), has begun implementing this recommendation through the development of the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Accident Handbook. The NPP Accident Handbook will provide readily available reference material for technical staff involved in EOC operations. The NPP Accident Handbook will assist technical staff in finding site-specific and accident-specific details that will help them provide expert advice to the EOC team during a nuclear power plant accident. (author)

  15. International law problems for realisation of the IAEA conventions on notification and assistance in the case of a nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, M.M.

    1993-12-31

    The Chernobyl accident underscored the need for an early warning system and international assistance plan in case of a nuclear accident. Shortly after Chernobyl, two conventions were adopted under the auspices of the IAEA. The convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident, in force since 1986, establishes an early warning system for all nuclear accidents whose effects might cross national boundaries. Under the convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear accident or radiological Emergency,in force since 1987, countries must facilitate prompt assistance in case of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, to minimize it`s consequences. Issues with the conventions are described.

  16. Nuclear criticality safety staff training and qualifications at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operations involving significant quantities of fissile material have been conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory continuously since 1943. Until the advent of the Laboratory's Nuclear Criticality Safety Committee (NCSC) in 1957, line management had sole responsibility for controlling criticality risks. From 1957 until 1961, the NCSC was the Laboratory body which promulgated policy guidance as well as some technical guidance for specific operations. In 1961 the Laboratory created the position of Nuclear Criticality Safety Office (in addition to the NCSC). In 1980, Laboratory management moved the Criticality Safety Officer (and one other LACEF staff member who, by that time, was also working nearly full-time on criticality safety issues) into the Health Division office. Later that same year the Criticality Safety Group, H-6 (at that time) was created within H-Division, and staffed by these two individuals. The training and education of these individuals in the art of criticality safety was almost entirely self-regulated, depending heavily on technical interactions between each other, as well as NCSC, LACEF, operations, other facility, and broader criticality safety community personnel. Although the Los Alamos criticality safety group has grown both in size and formality of operations since 1980, the basic philosophy that a criticality specialist must be developed through mentoring and self motivation remains the same. Formally, this philosophy has been captured in an internal policy, document ''Conduct of Business in the Nuclear Criticality Safety Group.'' There are no short cuts or substitutes in the development of a criticality safety specialist. A person must have a self-motivated personality, excellent communications skills, a thorough understanding of the principals of neutron physics, a safety-conscious and helpful attitude, a good perspective of real risk, as well as a detailed understanding of process operations and credible upsets

  17. Radiological dose assessment for bounding accident scenarios at the Critical Experiment Facility, TA-18, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer modeling code, CRIT8, was written to allow prediction of the radiological doses to workers and members of the public resulting from these postulated maximum-effect accidents. The code accounts for the relationships of the initial parent radionuclide inventory at the time of the accident to the growth of radioactive daughter products, and considers the atmospheric conditions at time of release. The code then calculates a dose at chosen receptor locations for the sum of radionuclides produced as a result of the accident. Both criticality and non-criticality accidents are examined

  18. The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident: ecotoxicological update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisler, R.

    2003-01-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl, Ukraine, nuclear reactor on 26 April 1986 released large amounts of radiocesium and other radionuclides into the environment, contaminating much of the northern hemisphere, especially Europe. In the vicinity of Chernobyl, at least 30 people died, more than 115,000 others were evacuated, and consumption of milk and other foods was banned because of radiocontamination. At least 14,000 human cancer deaths are expected in Russia, Belarus, and the Ukraine as a direct result of Chernobyl. The most sensitive local ecosystems, as judged by survival, were the soil fauna, pine forest communities, and certain populations of rodents. Elsewhere, fallout from Chernobyl significantly contaminated freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems and flesh and milk of domestic livestock; in many cases, radionuclide concentrations in biological samples exceeded current radiation protection guidelines. Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) in Scandinavia were among the most seriously afflicted by Chernobyl fallout, probably because their main food during winter (lichens) is an efficient absorber of airborne particles containing radiocesium. Some reindeer calves contaminated with 137Cs from Chernobyl showed 137Cs-dependent decreases in survival and increases in frequency of chromosomal aberrations. Although radiation levels in the biosphere are declining with time, latent effects of initial exposure--including an increased frequency of thyroid and other cancers--are now measurable. The full effect of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident on natural resources will probably not be known for at least several decades because of gaps in data on long-term genetic and reproductive effects and on radiocesium cycling and toxicokinetics.

  19. Assessment of radiation consequences of cabins in a nuclear accident of the nuclear ship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discussed about the spread routes of radioactive nuclides from reactor cabin to other cabins and their distributions in these cabins. Methods and formulas to estimate radioactivities of nuclides and doses received by crews in cabins were established. The radiation consequences of cabins in a nuclear accident was quantified and evaluated. The assessments indicates that the consequences of cabins is light and the doses to the staff will not exceed the dose limits prescribed in standards in a design basis accident, and the consequences of cabins is serious and the doses to the staff will exceed the dose limits prescribed in standards in serious accident. Some suggestions on emergency management and radiation protection were given

  20. Reinforcement of Defence-in-Depth: Modification Practice After the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident revealed the importance and demand for further reinforcement of defence in- depth. CGN (China General Nuclear Power Group) has made a complete safety assessment on CPR1000 nuclear power plants under construction in China. Dozens of modifications have been implemented based on the assessment findings and lessons learned from Fukushima nuclear accident, taking into account of PSA (Probabilistic Safety Analysis) and comparison analysis of the latest regulations and standards. These modifications help to enhance nuclear safety significantly for nuclear power plants under construction in China, and provide helpful modification guidance for nuclear power plants in operation of the same type. (author)

  1. The health impact of major nuclear accidents: the case of Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollas, J G

    1993-10-01

    An assessment of the radiological consequences that would result for the population of Greece from postulated major nuclear accidents in the Kozloduy nuclear power station in Bulgaria is performed. Kozloduy lies at a distance of 225 km from the northern borders of Greece and contains six reactors, all of the Russian WWER type. The postulated accidents that are classified as level 7 accidents on the International Nuclear Event Scale, involve significant releases of radioactive materials into the environment, and widespread health and environmental effects. The analysis is performed by the MACCS code. The estimated consequences are compared to the corresponding actual impact of the Chernobyl accident in Greece. The results of the analysis indicate that, under the conservative assumptions adopted, the radiological consequences of the most severe accidents considered would be about 1.5 orders of magnitude larger than the actual radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident. PMID:8259439

  2. Using modular neural networks to monitor accident conditions in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plants are very complex systems. The diagnoses of transients or accident conditions is very difficult because a large amount of information, which is often noisy, or intermittent, or even incomplete, need to be processed in real time. To demonstrate their potential application to nuclear power plants, neural networks axe used to monitor the accident scenarios simulated by the training simulator of TVA's Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant. A self-organization network is used to compress original data to reduce the total number of training patterns. Different accident scenarios are closely related to different key parameters which distinguish one accident scenario from another. Therefore, the accident scenarios can be monitored by a set of small size neural networks, called modular networks, each one of which monitors only one assigned accident scenario, to obtain fast training and recall. Sensitivity analysis is applied to select proper input variables for modular networks

  3. Development Process of Plant-specific Severe Accident Management Guidelines for Wolsong Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A severe accident, which occurred at the TMI in 1979 and Chernobyl in 1986, is an accident that exceeds design basis accidents and leads to significant core damage. The severe accident is the low possibility of occurrence but the high severity. To mitigate the consequences of the severe accidents, Korean Nuclear Safety Committee declared the Severe Accident Policy in 2001, which requested the development of Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs) for operating plants. SAMG is a symptom-based guidance that takes a set of actions to alleviate the outcomes of severe accidents and to get into the safe stable plant condition. The purpose of this paper is to presents the strategic development process of the PHWR SAMG. The guidelines consist of 5 categories: an emergency guide for the main control room (MCR) operators, a strategy implementing guide for the technical support center (TSC), six mitigation guides, a monitoring guide, and a termination guide

  4. Sarnet lecture notes on nuclear reactor severe accident phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Severe Accident Phenomenology Short Course' is part of the Excellence Spreading activities of the European Severe Accident Research NETwork of Excellence SARNET (project of the EURATOM 6. Framework programme). It was held at Cadarache, 9-13 January 2006. The course was divided in 14 lectures covering all aspects of severe accident phenomena that occur during a scenario. It also included lectures on PSA-2, Safety Assessment and design measures in new LWR plants for severe accident mitigation (SAM). This book presents the lecture notes of the Severe Accident Phenomenology Short Course and condenses the essential knowledge on severe accident phenomenology in 2008. (authors)

  5. Aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in March 2011 - Situation review in March 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this detailed report addresses the consequences of the accident regarding nuclear safety. It proposes a situation review of site damaged installations, of radioactive water management, and of underground water management. It presents and comments lessons learned from this accident for French nuclear installations, gives an overview of researches performed by the IRSN in the field of nuclear safety. The second part addresses health consequences of the accident. It discusses an assessment of epidemiologic studies performed on inhabitants of the Fukushima Prefecture, and comments the situation of workers involved in operations performed in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The third part addresses environmental consequences. It discusses values of radionuclide concentrations in Japanese air five years after the accident, measurements of caesium activities, assessments of contamination of Japanese food products, decontamination actions and waste management, the status of marine contamination in 2015, the evolution of evacuation areas between 2011 and 2016, the first returns and wills to return of evacuated populations, the update of knowledge related to the dispersion and depositions of atmospheric releases of the accident, and the modelling of atmospheric transport and fallouts of releases emitted during the accident. The last part proposes a comparison between the Chernobyl accident and the Fukushima accident in terms of distribution of radioactive depositions within river basins, of knowledge drawn from ecologic studies on fauna and flora performed on the long term in contaminated areas, and of management of forest environments after a nuclear accident

  6. Study on accident response robot for nuclear power plant and analysis of key technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the rapid development of nuclear power industry and improving demand for nuclear safety, the demand for developing accident response robot in nuclear power plant is increasingly urgent. Firstly, design analysis for accident response robot is taken with environmental conditions in nuclear power plant. Secondly, development for response robots after Chernobyl, JCO and Fukushima accidents are reviewed, and improvements for commercial mobile robot for use in radioactive environments are summarized. Finally, some key technologies including radiation-tolerance and system reliability are analyzed in details. (authors)

  7. Measuring Risk Aversion for Nuclear Power Plant Accident: Results of Contingent Valuation Survey in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the evaluation of the external cost of nuclear energy, the estimation of the external cost of nuclear power plant (NPP) severe accident is one of the major topics to be addressed. For the evaluation of the external cost of NPP severe accident, the effect of public risk averse behavior against the group accidents, such as NPP accident, dam failure, must be addressed. Although the equivalent fatalities from a single group accident are not common and its risk is very small compared to other accidents, people perceive the group accident more seriously. In other words, people are more concerned about low probability/high consequence events than about high probability/low consequence events having the same mean damage. One of the representative method to integrate the risk aversion in the external costs of severe nuclear reactor accidents was developed by Eeckoudt et al., and he used the risk aversion coefficient, mainly based on the analysis of financial risks in the stock markets to evaluate the external cost of nuclear severe accident. However, the use of financial risk aversion coefficient to nuclear severe accidents is not appropriate, because financial risk and nuclear severe accident risk are entirely different. In this paper, the individual-level survey was conducted to measure the risk aversion coefficient and estimate the multiplication factor to integrate the risk aversion in the external costs of NPP severe accident. This study propose an integrated framework on estimation of the external cost associated with severe accidents of NPP considering public risk aversion behavior. The theoretical framework to estimate the risk aversion coefficient/multiplication factor and to assess economic damages from a hypothetical NPP accident was constructed. Based on the theoretical framework, the risk aversion coefficient can be analyzed by conducting public survey with a carefully designed lottery questions. Compared to the previous studies on estimation of the

  8. Measuring Risk Aversion for Nuclear Power Plant Accident: Results of Contingent Valuation Survey in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hun; Kang, Hyun Gook [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Within the evaluation of the external cost of nuclear energy, the estimation of the external cost of nuclear power plant (NPP) severe accident is one of the major topics to be addressed. For the evaluation of the external cost of NPP severe accident, the effect of public risk averse behavior against the group accidents, such as NPP accident, dam failure, must be addressed. Although the equivalent fatalities from a single group accident are not common and its risk is very small compared to other accidents, people perceive the group accident more seriously. In other words, people are more concerned about low probability/high consequence events than about high probability/low consequence events having the same mean damage. One of the representative method to integrate the risk aversion in the external costs of severe nuclear reactor accidents was developed by Eeckoudt et al., and he used the risk aversion coefficient, mainly based on the analysis of financial risks in the stock markets to evaluate the external cost of nuclear severe accident. However, the use of financial risk aversion coefficient to nuclear severe accidents is not appropriate, because financial risk and nuclear severe accident risk are entirely different. In this paper, the individual-level survey was conducted to measure the risk aversion coefficient and estimate the multiplication factor to integrate the risk aversion in the external costs of NPP severe accident. This study propose an integrated framework on estimation of the external cost associated with severe accidents of NPP considering public risk aversion behavior. The theoretical framework to estimate the risk aversion coefficient/multiplication factor and to assess economic damages from a hypothetical NPP accident was constructed. Based on the theoretical framework, the risk aversion coefficient can be analyzed by conducting public survey with a carefully designed lottery questions. Compared to the previous studies on estimation of the

  9. Radiocesium distribution in bamboo shoots after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Higaki

    Full Text Available The distribution of radiocesium was examined in bamboo shoots, Phyllostachys pubescens, collected from 10 sites located some 41 to 1140 km from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Japan, in the Spring of 2012, 1 year after the Fukushima nuclear accident. Maximum activity concentrations for radiocesium ¹³⁴Cs and ¹³⁷Cs in the edible bamboo shoot parts, 41 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi plant, were in excess of 15.3 and 21.8 kBq/kg (dry weight basis; 1.34 and 1.92 kBq/kg, fresh weight, respectively. In the radiocesium-contaminated samples, the radiocesium activities were higher in the inner tip parts, including the upper edible parts and the apical culm sheath, than in the hardened culm sheath and underground basal parts. The radiocesium/potassium ratios also tended to be higher in the inner tip parts. The radiocesium activities increased with bamboo shoot length in another bamboo species, Phyllostachys bambusoides, suggesting that radiocesium accumulated in the inner tip parts during growth of the shoots.

  10. Broken Arrows: Radiological hazards from nuclear warhead accidents (the Minot USAF base nuclear weapons incident)

    CERN Document Server

    Liolios, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    According to numerous press reports, in 2007 at Minot US Air Force Base six AGM-129 Advanced Cruise Missiles mistakenly armed with W80-1 thermonuclear warheads were loaded on a B-52H heavy bomber in place of six unarmed AGM-129 missiles that were awaiting transport to Barksdale US Air Force Base for disposal. The live nuclear missiles were not reported missing, and stood unsecured and unguarded while mounted to the aircraft for a period of 36 hours. The present work investigates the radiological hazards associated with a worst-case postulated accident that would disperse the nuclear material of the six warheads in large metropolitan cities. Using computer simulations approximate estimates are derived for the ensuing cancer mortality and land contamination after the accident. Health, decontamination and evacuation costs are also estimated in the framework of the linear risk model.

  11. Comparison of the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear accidents: A review of the environmental impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinhauser, Georg, E-mail: georg.steinhauser@colostate.edu; Brandl, Alexander; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2014-02-01

    The environmental impacts of the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima are compared. In almost every respect, the consequences of the Chernobyl accident clearly exceeded those of the Fukushima accident. In both accidents, most of the radioactivity released was due to volatile radionuclides (noble gases, iodine, cesium, tellurium). However, the amount of refractory elements (including actinides) emitted in the course of the Chernobyl accident was approximately four orders of magnitude higher than during the Fukushima accident. For Chernobyl, a total release of 5300 PBq (excluding noble gases) has been established as the most cited source term. For Fukushima, we estimated a total source term of 520 (340–800) PBq. In the course of the Fukushima accident, the majority of the radionuclides (more than 80%) was transported offshore and deposited in the Pacific Ocean. Monitoring campaigns after both accidents reveal that the environmental impact of the Chernobyl accident was much greater than of the Fukushima accident. Both the highly contaminated areas and the evacuated areas are smaller around Fukushima and the projected health effects in Japan are significantly lower than after the Chernobyl accident. This is mainly due to the fact that food safety campaigns and evacuations worked quickly and efficiently after the Fukushima accident. In contrast to Chernobyl, no fatalities due to acute radiation effects occurred in Fukushima. - Highlights: • The environmental effects of Chernobyl and Fukushima are compared. • Releases of radionuclides from Chernobyl exceeded Fukushima by an order of magnitude. • Chernobyl caused more severe radiation-related health effects. • Overall, Chernobyl was a much more severe nuclear accident than Fukushima. • Psychological effects are neglected but important consequences of nuclear accidents.

  12. Effect of free media on views regarding nuclear energy after the Fukushima accident

    OpenAIRE

    YAMAMURA, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    Using cross-country data, this paper investigates how governance influenced views regarding the security of nuclear energy after the Fukushima accident in Japan. Key findings are: (1) citizens are less likely to agree that nuclear power plants are properly secured against accidents with the presence of a free media and higher levels of freedom of expression; and (2) freedom of expression and free media are positively associated with the presence of nuclear plants. These findings indicate that...

  13. Of Disasters and Dragon Kings: A Statistical Analysis of Nuclear Power Incidents & Accidents

    OpenAIRE

    Wheatley, Spencer; Sovacool, Benjamin; Sornette, Didier

    2015-01-01

    We provide, and perform a risk theoretic statistical analysis of, a dataset that is 75 percent larger than the previous best dataset on nuclear incidents and accidents, comparing three measures of severity: INES (International Nuclear Event Scale), radiation released, and damage dollar losses. The annual rate of nuclear accidents, with size above 20 Million US$, per plant, decreased from the 1950s until dropping significantly after Chernobyl (April, 1986). The rate is now roughly stable at 0....

  14. The Nuclear Emergency Assistance Team, a mobile intervention facility for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear emergency assistance team consisting of a vehicle pool and a stock of technical equipment was set up for operation in case of major reactor accidents. The equipment is kept in 6 containers which can be shipped on trucks, by rail or by helicopter or plane. Technical equipment and tasks of each container are briefly explained. Special transport vehicles for remote handling of contaminated material are described. (ORU)

  15. An analysis of evacuation options for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The threat of release of a hazardous substance into the atmosphere will sometimes require that the population at risk be evacuated. If the substance is particularly hazardous or the release is exceptionally large, then an extensive area may have to be evacuated at substantial cost. In this report we consider the threat posed by the accidental release of radionuclides from a nuclear power plant. The report's objective is to establish relationships between radiation dose and the cost of evacuation under a wide variety of conditions. The dose can almost always be reduced by evacuating the population from a larger area. However, extending the evacuation zone outward will cause evacuation costs to increase. The purpose of this analysis was to provide the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) a data base for evaluating whether implementation costs and risks averted could be used to justify evacuation at lower doses than would be required based on acceptable risk of health effects alone. The procedures used and results of these analyses are being made available as background information for use by others. In this report we develop cost/dose relationships for 54 scenarios that are based upon the severity of the reactor accident, meteorological conditions during the release of radionuclides into the environment, and the angular width of the evacuation zone. The 54 scenarios are derived from combinations of three accident severity levels, six meteorological conditions and evacuation zone widths of 70 deg, 90 deg, and 180 deg. Appendix tables are provided to allow acceptable evaluation of the cost/dose relationships for a wide variety of scenarios. Guidance and examples are provided in the text to show how these tables can be used

  16. Updated tool for nuclear criticality accident emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some 20 yr ago a hand-held slide rule was developed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to aid in the response to several postulated nuclear criticality accidents. These assumed accidents involved highly enriched uranium in either a bare metal or a uranyl nitrate system. The slide rule consisted of a sliding scale based on the total fission yield and four corresponding dose indicators: (1) a prompt radiation dose relationship as a function of distance; (2) a delayed fission product gamma dose rate relationship as a function of time and distance; (3) the total dose relationship with time and distance; and (4) the I-min integrated dose relationship with time and distance. The original slide rule was generated assuming very simplistic numerical procedures such as the inverse-square relationship of dose with distance and the Way-Wigner relationship to express the time dependence of the dose. The simple prescriptions were tied to actual dose measurements from similar systems to yield a meaningful, yet simple approach to emergency planning and response needs. This paper describes the application of an advanced procedure to the updating of the original slide rule for five critical systems. These five systems include (a) an unreflected sphere of 93.2 wt% enriched uranium metal, (b) an unreflected sphere of 93.2 wt% enriched uranyl nitrate solution with a H/235U ratio of 500, (c) an unreflected sphere of damp 93.2 wt% enriched uranium oxide with a H/235U ratio of 10, (d) an unreflected sphere of 4.95 wt% enriched uranyl fluoride solution having a H/235U ratio of 410, and (e) an unreflected sphere of damp 5 wt% enriched uranium dioxide having a H/235U ratio of 200

  17. Containers for short-term storage of nuclear materials at the Los Alamos plutonium facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Los Alamos Plutonium Facility for the past 18 yr has stored nuclear samples for archiving and in support of nuclear materials research and processing programs. In the past several years, a small number of storage containers have been found in a deteriorated condition. A failed plutonium container can cause personnel contamination exposure and expensive physical area decontamination. Containers are stored in a physically secure radiation area vault, making close inspection costly in the form of personnel radiation exposure and work time. A moderate number of these containers are used in support of plutonium processing and must withstand daily handling abuse. A 2-yr evaluation of failed containers and those that have shown no deterioration has been conducted. Based on that study, a program was established to formalize our packing methods and materials and standardize the size and shape of containers that are used for short-term use. A standardized set of containers was designed, evaluated, tested, and procured for use in the facility. This paper reviews our vault storage problems, shows some failed containers, and presents our planned solutions to provide safe and secure containment of nuclear materials

  18. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 16, Maximum hypothetical accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fault tree analysis of the maximum hypothetical accident covers the basic elements: accident initiation, phase development phases - scheme of possible accident flow. Cause of the accident initiation is the break of primary cooling pipe, heavy water system. Loss of primary coolant causes loss of pressure in the primary circuit at the coolant input in the reactor vessel. This initiates safety protection system which should automatically shutdown the reactor. Separate chapters are devoted to: after-heat removal, coolant and moderator loss; accident effects on the reactor core, effects in the reactor building, and release of radioactive wastes

  19. Severe accident risks: An assessment for five US nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes an assessment of the risks from severe accidents in five commercial nuclear power plants in the United State. These risks are measured in a number of ways, including: the estimated frequencies of core damage accidents from internally initiated accidents and externally initiated accidents for two of the plants; the performance of containment structures under severe accident loadings; the potential magnitude of radionuclide releases and offsite consequences of such accidents; and the overall risk (the product of accident frequencies and consequences). Supporting this summary report are a large number of reports written under contract to NRC that provide the detailed discussion of the methods used and results obtained in these risk studies. This report, Volume 3, contains two appendices. Appendix D summarizes comments received, and staff responses, on the first (February 1987) draft of NUREG-1150. Appendix E provides a similar summary of comments and responses, but for the second (June 1989) version of the report

  20. Severe accident risks: An assessment for five US nuclear power plants: Appendices A, B, and C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes an assessment of the risks from severe accidents in five commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. These risks are measured in a number of ways, including: the estimated frequencies of core damage accidents from internally initiated accidents and externally initiated accidents for two or the plants; the performance of containment structures under severe accident loadings; the potential magnitude of radionuclide release and offsite consequences of such accidents; and the overall risk (the product of accident frequencies and consequences). Supporting this summary report are a large number of reports written under contract to NRC that provide the detailed discussion of the methods used and results obtained in these risk studies. Volume 2 of this report contains three appendices, providing greater detail on the methods used, an example risk calculation, and more detailed discussion of particular technical issues found important in the risk studies

  1. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident final report of the AESJ investigation committee

    CERN Document Server

    Atomic Energy Society of Japan

    2015-01-01

    The Magnitude 9 Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, followed by a massive tsunami struck  TEPCO’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station and triggered an unprecedented core melt/severe accident in Units 1 – 3. The radioactivity release led to the evacuation of local residents, many of whom still have not been able to return to their homes. As a group of nuclear experts, the Atomic Energy Society of Japan established the Investigation Committee on the Nuclear Accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, to investigate and analyze the accident from scientific and technical perspectives for clarifying the underlying and fundamental causes, and to make recommendations. The results of the investigation by the AESJ Investigation Committee has been compiled herewith as the Final Report. Direct contributing factors of the catastrophic nuclear incident at Fukushima Daiichi NPP initiated by an unprecedented massive earthquake/ tsunami – inadequacies in tsunami measures, severe accident ma...

  2. Descriptions of selected accidents that have occurred at nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was prepared at the request of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island to provide the members of the Commission with some insight into the nature and significance of accidents that have occurred at nuclear reactor facilities in the past. Toward that end, this report presents a brief description of 44 accidents which have occurred throughout the world and which meet at least one of the severity criteria that were established

  3. Review of current Severe Accident Management (SAM) approaches for Nuclear Power Plants in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    HERMSMEYER Stephan; Iglesias, R.; Herranz, L; REER B.; SONNENKALB M; NOWACK H.; Stefanova, A.; Raimond, E.; CHATELARD P.; FOUCHER Laurent; BARNAK M.; MATEJOVIC P; PASCAL GHISLAIN; VELA GARCIA MONICA; SANGIORGI MARCO

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima accidents highlighted that both the in-depth understanding of such sequences and the development or improvement of adequate Severe Accident Management (SAM) measures are essential in order to further increase the safety of the nuclear power plants operated in Europe. To support this effort, the CESAM (Code for European Severe Accident Management) R&D project, coordinated by GRS, started in April 2013 for 4 years in the 7th EC Framework Programme of research and development of th...

  4. The risk of major nuclear accident: calculation and perception of probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whereas before the Fukushima accident, already eight major accidents occurred in nuclear power plants, a number which is higher than that expected by experts and rather close to that corresponding of people perception of risk, the author discusses how to understand these differences and reconcile observations, objective probability of accidents and subjective assessment of risks, why experts have been over-optimistic, whether public opinion is irrational regarding nuclear risk, and how to measure risk and its perception. Thus, he addresses and discusses the following issues: risk calculation (cost, calculated frequency of major accident, bias between the number of observed accidents and model predictions), perceived probabilities and aversion for disasters (perception biases of probability, perception biases unfavourable to nuclear), the Bayes contribution and its application (Bayes-Laplace law, statistics, choice of an a priori probability, prediction of the next event, probability of a core fusion tomorrow)

  5. Off-gas and air cleaning systems for accident conditions in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report surveys the design principles and strategies for mitigating the consequences of abnormal events in nuclear power plants by the use of air cleaning systems. Equipment intended for use in design basis accident and severe accident conditions is reviewed, with reference to designs used in IAEA Member States. 93 refs, 48 figs, 23 tabs

  6. Los Alamos neutron science center nuclear weapons stewardship and unique national scientific capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenberg, Kurt F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-15

    This presentation gives an overview of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) and its contributions to science and the nuclear weapons program. LANSCE is made of multiple experimental facilities (the Lujan Center, the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR), the Ultra-Cold Neutron facility (UCN), the proton Radiography facility (pRad) and the Isotope Production Facility (IPF)) served by the its kilometer long linear accelerator. Several research areas are supported, including materials and bioscience, nuclear science, materials dynamics, irradiation response and medical isotope production. LANSCE is a national user facility that supports researchers worldwide. The LANSCE Risk Mitigation program is currently in progress to update critical accelerator equipment to help extend the lifetime of LANSCE as a key user facility. The Associate Directorate of Business Sciences (ADBS) plays an important role in the continued success of LANSCE. This includes key procurement support, human resource support, technical writing support, and training support. LANSCE is also the foundation of the future signature facility MARIE (Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes).

  7. Analysis of the 1957-58 Soviet nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabalka, J.R.; Eyman, L.D.; Auerbach, S.I.

    1979-12-01

    The occurrence of a Soviet accident in the winter of 1957-58, involving the atmospheric release of reprocessed fission wastes (cooling time approximately 1-2 yrs.), appears to have been confirmed, primarily by an analysis of the USSR radioecology literature. Due to the high population density in the affected region (Cheliabinsk Province in the highly industrialized Urals Region) and the reported level of /sup 90/Sr contamination , the event probably resulted in the evacuation and/or resettlement of the human population from a significant area (100-1000 km/sup 2/). The resulting contamination zone is estimated to have contained approximately 10/sup 6/ Ci of /sup 90/Sr (reference radionuclide); a relatively small fraction of the total may have been dispersed as an aerosol. Although a plausible explanation for the incident exists (i.e., use of now-obsolete waste storage-/sup 137/Cs isotope separation techniques), it is not yet possible, based on the limited information presently available, to completely dismiss this phenomenon as a purely historical event. It seems imperative that we have a complete explanation of the causes and consequences of this incident. Soviet experience gained in application of corrective measures would be invaluable to the rest of the world nuclear community.

  8. Accident analyses performed for the Norwegian committee on nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the work performed for the Norwegian Government Committee on Nuclear Power, risk calculations were carried out for two examples of possible reactor sites in Norway. The calculations were performed with the computer program COMO (or CRACK), which was also used in the American reactor safety study (WASH-1400). In connection with the Norwegian calculations some modifications were made to the program, and relevant data for Norwegian conditions were introduced. The atmospheric dispersion model and meteorological data are discussed at some length. An analysi of the population distribution around both sites is presented and land usage is also discussed. Radiation dose calculations internal, and external, are summarised. Shielding factors from terrain and buildings are also given, and the effect of evacuation briefly discussed. Health effects, immediate mortalities, and delayed and genetic effects are discussed at some length. The economic consequences of an accident due to e.g. evacuation, condemnation of agricultural products, cost of decontamination, loss in property value and relocation costs are estimated. The results are presented graphically as a function of probability. (JIW)

  9. Analysis of the 1957-58 Soviet nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occurrence of a Soviet accident in the winter of 1957-58, involving the atmospheric release of reprocessed fission wastes (cooling time approximately 1-2 yrs.), appears to have been confirmed, primarily by an analysis of the USSR radioecology literature. Due to the high population density in the affected region (Cheliabinsk Province in the highly industrialized Urals Region) and the reported level of 90Sr contamination, the event probably resulted in the evacuation and/or resettlement of the human population from a significant area (100-1000 km2). The resulting contamination zone is estimated to have contained approximately 106 Ci of 90Sr (reference radionuclide); a relatively small fraction of the total may have been dispersed as an aerosol. Although a plausible explanation for the incident exists (i.e., use of now-obsolete waste storage-137Cs isotope separation techniques), it is not yet possible, based on the limited information presently available, to completely dismiss this phenomenon as a purely historical event. It seems imperative that we have a complete explanation of the causes and consequences of this incident. Soviet experience gained in application of corrective measures would be invaluable to the rest of the world nuclear community

  10. Elements of a national emergency response system for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to suggest elements for a general emergency response system, employed at a national level, to detect, evaluate and assess the consequences of a radiological atmospheric release occurring within or outside of national boundaries. These elements are focused on the total aspect of emergency response ranging from providing an initial alarm to a total assessment of the environmental and health effects. Elements of the emergency response system are described in such a way that existing resources can be directly applied if appropriate; if not, newly developed or an expansion of existing resources can be employed. The major thrust of this paper is toward a philosophical discussion and general description of resources that would be required to implementation. If the major features of this proposal system are judged desirable for implementation, then the next level of detail can be added. The philosophy underlying this paper is preparedness - preparedness through planning, awareness and the application of technology. More specifically, it is establishment of reasonable guidelines including the definition of reference and protective action levels for public exposure to accidents involving nuclear material; education of the public, government officials and the news media; and the application of models and measurements coupled to computer systems to address a series of questions related to emergency planning, response and assessment. It is the role of a proven national emergency response system to provide reliable, quality-controlled information to decision makers for the management of environmental crises

  11. Environmental contamination following a major nuclear accident. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the symposium was to review present knowledge of the extent and magnitude of environmental contamination occurring after a massive release of radioactive materials. Papers and posters covered a wide range of subjects, including: monitoring of radioactive contaminants in the environment, levels of radioactive contamination of farmland, agricultural crops and dairy products in subsequent years, and methods for minimizing contamination of feed and food. A special session on 'hot particles' drew attention to the potential risk from inhaling particles containing high levels of alpha and beta emitting radionuclides, and the importance of setting up valid descriptive radioecological models. The symposium demonstrated that on technical matters there is a clear and urgent need for international communication and co-operation concerning the harmonization of guidelines and terminology and the adoption of acceptable reference levels for radionuclides in food and feed moving in international trade. The presentations and discussions showed clearly that national authorities in affected countries had prepared for nuclear accidents and acted accordingly with protective measures in most cases based on sound technical reasoning, ranging from evacuation of people to guidelines on safer preparation of food. However, these measures in turn caused psychological stress and financial losses without proper compensation among the affected and dependent communities. Some of these consequences had been neither foreseen nor prepared for, either nationally or internationally. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Incorporation of severe accidents in the licensing of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severe accidents are the result of multiple faults that occur in nuclear power plants as a consequence from the combination of latent failures and active faults, such as equipment, procedures and operator failures, which leads to partial or total melting of the reactor core. Regardless of active and latent failures related to the plant management and maintenance, aspects of the latent failures related to the plant design still remain. The lessons learned from the TMI accident in the U.S.A., Chernobyl in the former Soviet Union and, more recently, in Fukushima, Japan, suggest that severe accidents must necessarily be part of design-basis of nuclear power plants. This paper reviews the normative basis of the licensing of nuclear power plants concerning to severe accidents in countries having nuclear power plants under construction or in operation. It was addressed not only the new designs of nuclear power plants in the world, but also the design changes in plants that are in operation for decades. Included in this list are the Brazilian nuclear power plants, Angra-1, Angra-2, and Angra-3. This paper also reviews the current status of licensing in Brazil and Brazilian standards related to severe accidents. It also discusses the impact of severe accidents in the emergency plans of nuclear power plants. (author)

  13. Incorporation of severe accidents in the licensing of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarenga, Marco Antonio Bayout; Rabello, Sidney Luiz, E-mail: bayout@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: sidney@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN) Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Severe accidents are the result of multiple faults that occur in nuclear power plants as a consequence from the combination of latent failures and active faults, such as equipment, procedures and operator failures, which leads to partial or total melting of the reactor core. Regardless of active and latent failures related to the plant management and maintenance, aspects of the latent failures related to the plant design still remain. The lessons learned from the TMI accident in the U.S.A., Chernobyl in the former Soviet Union and, more recently, in Fukushima, Japan, suggest that severe accidents must necessarily be part of design-basis of nuclear power plants. This paper reviews the normative basis of the licensing of nuclear power plants concerning to severe accidents in countries having nuclear power plants under construction or in operation. It was addressed not only the new designs of nuclear power plants in the world, but also the design changes in plants that are in operation for decades. Included in this list are the Brazilian nuclear power plants, Angra-1, Angra-2, and Angra-3. This paper also reviews the current status of licensing in Brazil and Brazilian standards related to severe accidents. It also discusses the impact of severe accidents in the emergency plans of nuclear power plants. (author)

  14. Community emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents: A selected and partially annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngen, G.

    1988-10-01

    The role of responding to emergencies at nuclear power plants is often considered the responsibility of the personnel onsite. This is true for most, if not all, of the incidents that may happen during the course of the plant`s operating lifetime. There is however, the possibility of a major accident occurring at anytime. Major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island have taught their respective countries and communities a significant lesson in local emergency preparedness and response. Through these accidents, the rest of the world can also learn a great deal about planning, preparing and responding to the emergencies unique to nuclear power. This bibliography contains books, journal articles, conference papers and government reports on emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents. It does not contain citations for ``onsite`` response or planning, nor does it cover the areas of radiation releases from transportation accidents. The compiler has attempted to bring together a sampling of the world`s collective written experience on dealing with nuclear reactor accidents on the sate, local and community levels. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, that written experience has grown enormously.

  15. Community emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents: A selected and partially annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of responding to emergencies at nuclear power plants is often considered the responsibility of the personnel onsite. This is true for most, if not all, of the incidents that may happen during the course of the plant's operating lifetime. There is however, the possibility of a major accident occurring at anytime. Major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island have taught their respective countries and communities a significant lesson in local emergency preparedness and response. Through these accidents, the rest of the world can also learn a great deal about planning, preparing and responding to the emergencies unique to nuclear power. This bibliography contains books, journal articles, conference papers and government reports on emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents. It does not contain citations for ''onsite'' response or planning, nor does it cover the areas of radiation releases from transportation accidents. The compiler has attempted to bring together a sampling of the world's collective written experience on dealing with nuclear reactor accidents on the sate, local and community levels. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, that written experience has grown enormously

  16. Analysis of simulation results of damaged nuclear fuel accidents at NPPs with shell-type nuclear reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Igor L. Kozlov

    2015-01-01

    Lessons from the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP made it necessary to reevaluate and intensificate the work on modeling and analyzing various scenarios of severe accidents with damage to the nuclear fuel in the reactor, containment and spent nuclear fuel storage pool with the expansion of the primary initiating event causes group listing. Further development of computational tools for modeling the explosion prevention criteria as to steam and gas mixtures, considering the specific therm...

  17. Why have some people changed their attitudes toward nuclear power after the accident in Fukushima?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear accident in Fukushima and the subsequent discussions about nuclear power influenced public acceptance of this technology. The aim of the present study was to examine why after the Fukushima accident some people converted from supporting nuclear power to opposing it or became undecided. Data from a longitudinal telephone survey with two measurement points were used. The first survey was conducted about 15 months before the accident in Fukushima and the second survey was conducted about 20 months after. The sample consisted of 561 respondents from the German- and French-speaking regions of Switzerland. Results suggest that changes in benefits perception were mainly responsible for people's changes in attitude toward nuclear power. People perceived somewhat more risks related to nuclear power after the accident in Fukushima. This change in risk perception did not explain the attitudinal changes of proponents into opponents of nuclear power, however. - Highlights: • Changes in benefit perception after the Fukushima accident strongly influenced acceptance of nuclear power. • Proponents changed into opponents of nuclear power when they perceived fewer benefits. • Proponents did not change into opponents of nuclear power due to higher risk perceptions

  18. ENGAGEMENT OF THE SERBIAN ARMY IN HELPING CIVILIANS IN THE EVENT OF NUCLEAR AND CHEMICAL ACCIDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    INDJIC DEJAN R.; TERZIC MIROSLAV R.; ZIGIC STEVAN V.; RUTIC SRDJAN Z.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear and chemical accidents in modern society often cause devastating consequences to people, material resources and the environment. This kind of accident requires special procedures and activities during the elimination of the consequences, because of the specific characteristics of highly toxic substances used in nuclear and chemical plants. The Serbian Army with its units and organizations can contribute significantly to the implementation of tasks of eliminating the consequences of su...

  19. FRACTAL DIMENSIONS FOR RADIOISOTOPE POLLUTION PATTERNS BY NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, K.; Ogawa, S.

    2015-01-01

    The radioisotope pollution shows two types of patterns: dry and wet deposits for nuclear power plant accidents. Two surface pollution patterns were analysed by fractal. In Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, surface pollution by wet deposits was estimated to occur. However, actually it was no rain and white crystals were observed on the surface. Then, fractal analysis was carried out for the spatial distribution patterns of radio isotopes on the surface to judge the types of depo...

  20. Effect of the Duration Time of a Nuclear Accident on Radiological Health Consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Hyojoon Jeong; Misun Park; Haesun Jeong; Wontae Hwang; Eunhan Kim; Moonhee Han

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the effect of duration time of a nuclear accident on the radiation dose of a densely populated area and the resulting acute health effects. In the case of nuclear accidents, the total emissions of radioactive materials can be classified into several categories. Therefore, the release information is very important for the assessment of risk to the public. We confirmed that when the duration time of the emissions are prolonged to 7 hours, the concentrations of radio...

  1. Collaboration within the United Nations system - General matters. Conventions concerning nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The texts of the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (CENNA) and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (CANARE) are preceded by brief remarks on their origin. The World Health Organization is bound to carry out the activities envisaged, by virtue or its constitutional responsibility for ''promoting, developing, assisting and coordinating international health work''. The Executive Board thus recommends that the WHO accede to both conventions

  2. Source term estimation during incident response to severe nuclear power plant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents a method of source term estimation that reflects the current understanding of source term behavior and that can be used during an event. The various methods of estimating radionuclide release to the environment (source terms) as a result of an accident at a nuclear power reactor are discussed. The major factors affecting potential radionuclide releases off site (source terms) as a result of nuclear power plant accidents are described. The quantification of these factors based on plant instrumentation also is discussed. A range of accident conditions from those within the design basis to the most severe accidents possible are included in the text. A method of gross estimation of accident source terms and their consequences off site is presented. 39 refs., 48 figs., 19 tabs

  3. Source term estimation during incident response to severe nuclear power plant accidents. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various methods of estimating radionuclide release to the environment (source terms) as a result of an accident at a nuclear power reactor are discussed. The major factors affecting potential radionuclide releases off site (source terms) as a result of nuclear power plant accidents are described. The quantification of these factors based on plant instrumentation also is discussed. A range of accident conditions from those within the design basis to the most severe accidents possible are included in the text. A method of gross estimation of accident source terms and their consequences off site is presented. The goal is to present a method of source term estimation that reflects the current understanding of source term behavior and that can be used during an event. (author)

  4. Thyroid side effects prophylaxis in front of nuclear power plant accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agopiantz, Mikaël; Elhanbali, Ouifak; Demore, Béatrice; Cuny, Thomas; Demarquet, Léa; Ndiaye, Cumba; Barbe, Françoise; Brunaud, Laurent; Weryha, Georges; Klein, Marc

    2016-02-01

    The better knowledge of the mechanisms of nuclear incidents and lessons learned from accidents in the recent past to improve the effectiveness of measures taken following a nuclear accident exposure to fallout of radioactive iodine isotopes. Thus, immediate, passive measures, such as containment, and stopping consumption of contaminated products are paramount. The earliest possible administration of stable iodine as potassium iodide (KI) reduces significantly (up to 90% if taken at the same time of the accident) thyroid radioactive contamination. These tablets should be given in priority to children and pregnant women. The side effects are minor. KI is not recommended for persons aged over 60 years, or for adults suffering from cardiovascular disorders.

  5. ASSESSMENT OF THE FUKUSIMA NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT CONSEQUENCES BY THE POPULATION IN THE FAR EAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Arkhangelskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the attitude of the population in the five regions of the Far East to the consequences of the accident at the Fukushimai nuclear power plant, as well as the issues of informing about the accident. The analysis of public opinion is based on the data obtained by anonymous questionnaire survey performed in November 2011. In spite of the rather active informing and objective information on the absence of the contamination, most of the population of the Russian Far East believes that radioactive contamination is presented in the areas of their residence, and the main cause of this contamination is the nuclear accident in Japan.

  6. Lessons learned from the TMI-2 accident and Chernobyl nuclear disaster for nuclear safety innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Pacific Earthquake and the Tsunami gave the serious damage to the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). The accidents occurred in Unit 1, 2, 3 and 4. It is said that the height of tsunami attacked Fukushima NPP was more than 14m. After 50 minutes from the automatic shut-down, tsunami attacked the NPPs in Fukushima Daiichi NPPs. For example, the Unit 1 lost A/C power caused the loss of water injection function; it made the core meltdown and unusual increase of PCV pressure in the midnight to March 11th to 12th morning. Though the Unit one has the Isolation Condenser Core Cooling system, it was stopped by the operator to keep the cooling rate of 55degC/h. Finally, the isolation signal was transmitted from the control room to the motor driven isolation valves when the control room's battery discharged. It was the initiation of the core meltdown. The lessons from the TMI-2 accident, human error and instrumentation and control system trouble cased the core damage. Though the NPPs in European counties have filtered venting system after the Chernobyl Nuclear disaster, there are not filtered venting system connected the containment vessel in Japanese NPPs. If the Fukushima Daiichi NPPs have filtered venting system, the venting could be much earlier and no nuclear disaster would be occurred. (author)

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory new generation standard nuclear material storage container - the SAVY4000 design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Timothy Amos [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Incidents involving release of nuclear materials stored in containers of convenience such as food pack cans, slip lid taped cans, paint cans, etc. has resulted in defense board concerns over the lack of prescriptive performance requirements for interim storage of nuclear materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has shared in these incidents and in response proactively moved into developing a performance based standard involving storage of nuclear material (RD003). This RD003 requirements document has sense been updated to reflect requirements as identified with recently issued DOE M 441.1-1 'Nuclear Material Packaging Manual'. The new packaging manual was issued at the encouragement of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board with a clear directive for protecting the worker from exposure due to loss of containment of stored materials. The Manual specifies a detailed and all inclusive approach to achieve a high level of protection; from package design & performance requirements, design life determinations of limited life components, authorized contents evaluations, and surveillance/maintenance to ensure in use package integrity over time. Materials in scope involve those stored outside an approved engineered-contamination barrier that would result in a worker exposure of in excess of 5 rem Committed Effective Does Equivalent (CEDE). Key aspects of meeting the challenge as developed around the SAVY-3000 vented storage container design will be discussed. Design performance and acceptance criteria against the manual, bounding conditions as established that the user must ensure are met to authorize contents in the package (based upon the activity of heat-source plutonium (90% Pu-238) oxide, which bounds the requirements for weapons-grade plutonium oxide), interface as a safety class system within the facility under the LANL plutonium facility DSA, design life determinations for limited life components, and a sense of design specific surveillance

  8. Accident management advisor system (AMAS): A Decision Aid for Interpreting Instrument Information and Managing Accident Conditions in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accident management can be characterized as the optimized use of all available plant resources to stop or mitigate the progression of a nuclear power plant accident sequence which may otherwise result i n reactor vessel and containment failure. It becomes important under conditions that have low probability of occurring. However, given that these conditions may lead to extremely severe financial consequences and public health effects, it is now recognized that it is important for the plant owners to develop realistic strategies and guidelines. Recent studies have classified accident management strategies as: - the use of alternative resources (i.e., air, water, power), - the use of alternative equipment (i.e., pumps, water lines, generators), the use of alternative actions (i.e., manual depressurization and injection, 'feed and bleed', etc.) The matching of these alternative actions and resources to an actual plant condition represents a decision process affected by a high degree of uncertainty in several of its fundamental inputs. This uncertainty includes the expected accident progression phenomenology (e.g., the issue of high pressure core ejection from the vessel in a PWR plant with possible 'direct containment heating'), as well as the expected availability and behavior of plant systems and of plant instrumentation. To support the accident management decision process with computer-based decision aids, one needs to develop accident progression models that can be stored in a computer knowledge based and retrieved at will for comparison with actual plant conditions, so that these conditions can be recognized and dealt with accordingly. Recent Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs) [1] show the progression of a severe accident through and beyond the core melt stages via multi-branch accident progression trees. Although these 'accident tree models' were originally intended for accident probability assessment purposes, they do provide a basis of initial information

  9. Nuclear power plant severe accident research plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subsequent to the Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident, recommendations were made by a number of review committees to consider regulatory changes which would provide better protection of the public from severe accidents. Over the past six years a major research effort has been underway by the NRC to develop an improved understanding of severe accidents and to provide a technical basis to support regulatory decisions. The purpose of this report is to describe current plans for the completion and extension of this research in support of ongoing regulatory actions in this area

  10. The risk of a major nuclear accident: calculation and perception of probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident at Fukushima Daiichi, Japan, occurred on 11 March 2011. This nuclear disaster, the third on such a scale, left a lasting mark in the minds of hundreds of millions of people. Much as Three Mile Island or Chernobyl, yet another place will be permanently associated with a nuclear power plant which went out of control. Fukushima Daiichi revived the issue of the hazards of civil nuclear power, stirring up all the associated passion and emotion. The whole of this paper is devoted to the risk of a major nuclear accident. By this we mean a failure initiating core meltdown, a situation in which the fuel rods melt and mix with the metal in their cladding. Such accidents are classified as at least level 5 on the International Nuclear Event Scale. The Three Mile Island accident, which occurred in 1979 in the United States, reached this level of severity. The explosion of reactor 4 at the Chernobyl plant in Ukraine in 1986 and the recent accident in Japan were classified as class 7, the highest grade on this logarithmic scale. The main difference between the top two levels and level 5 relates to a significant or major release of radioactive material to the environment. In the event of a level-5 accident, damage is restricted to the inside of the plant, whereas, in the case of level-7 accidents, huge areas of land, above or below the surface, and/or sea may be contaminated. Before the meltdown of reactors 1, 2 and 3 at Fukushima Daiichi, eight major accidents affecting nuclear power plants had occurred worldwide. This is a high figure compared with the one calculated by the experts. Observations in the field do not appear to fit the results of the probabilistic models of nuclear accidents produced since the 1970's. Oddly enough the number of major accidents is closer to the risk as perceived by the general public. In general we tend to overestimate any risk relating to rare, fearsome accidents. What are we to make of this divergence? How are we to reconcile

  11. Effect of the Duration Time of a Nuclear Accident on Radiological Health Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyojoon Jeong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to quantify the effect of duration time of a nuclear accident on the radiation dose of a densely populated area and the resulting acute health effects. In the case of nuclear accidents, the total emissions of radioactive materials can be classified into several categories. Therefore, the release information is very important for the assessment of risk to the public. We confirmed that when the duration time of the emissions are prolonged to 7 hours, the concentrations of radioactive substances in the ambient air are reduced by 50% compared to that when the duration time of emission is one hour. This means that the risk evaluation using only the first wind direction of an accident is very conservative, so it has to be used as a screening level for the risk assessment. Furthermore, it is judged that the proper control of the emission time of a nuclear accident can minimize the health effects on residents.

  12. Cleanup and decommissioning of a nuclear reactor after a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the development of commercial nuclear power plants has in general been associated with an excellent record of nuclear safety, the possibility of a severe accident resulting in major fuel and core damage cannot be excluded and such accidents have in fact already occurred. For over a decade, IAEA publications have provided technical guidance and recommendations for post-accident planning to be considered by appropriate authorities. Guidance and recommendations have recently been published on the management of damaged nuclear fuel, sealing of the reactor building and related safety and performance assessment aspects. The present technical report on the cleanup and decommissioning of reactors which have undergone a severe accident represents a further publication in the series. Refs, figs and tabs.

  13. Internal dose assessment for environmental monitoring in nuclear power plant accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mianji Fereidoun A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for exploiting human's internal contamination data for radioactive release estimation in nuclear power plant accidents is proposed. Nevertheless, such data is often very rough and uncertain; it is accessible even in toughest situations when most of the active and passive monitors are damaged by the accident. These data can be used in combination with other collectable data for estimating the event scale in severe nuclear power plan accidents. The rationale behind the method is that nuclear power plant accidents are often associated with internal contamination of radiation workers involved in the early stages of emergency response activities mainly due to the release of 131I in atmosphere. The proposed inverse analytical approach uses the 131I intake of contaminated workers, their working conditions, chronology of events, and applied personal safety measures during the first hours or days of the emergency response activities to estimate the magnitude of 131I concentration in the air.

  14. Cleanup of large areas contaminated as a result of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purposes of the report are to provide an overview of the methodology and technology available to clean up contaminated areas and to give preliminary guidance on matters related to the planning, implementation and management of such cleanups. This report provides an integrated overview of important aspects related to the cleanup of very large areas contaminated as a result of a serious nuclear accident, including information on methods and equipment available to: characterize the affected area and the radioactive fallout; stabilize or isolate the contamination; and clean up contaminated urban, rural and forested areas. The report also includes brief sections on planning and management considerations and the transport and disposal of the large volumes of wastes arising from such cleanups. For the purposes of this report, nuclear accidents which could result in the deposition of decontamination over large areas if the outer containment fails badly include: 1) An accident with a nuclear weapon involving detonation of the chemical high explosive but little, if any, nuclear fission. 2) A major loss of medium/high level liquid waste (HLLW) due to an explosion/fire at a storage site for such waste. 3) An accident at a nuclear power plant (NPP), for example a loss of coolant accident, which results in some core disruption and fuel melting. 4) An accident at an NPP involving an uncontrolled reactivity excursion resulting in the violent ejection of a reactor core material and rupture of the containment building. 117 refs, 32 figs, 12 tabs

  15. Effect of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the risk perception of residents near a nuclear power plant in China

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Lei; Ying ZHOU; Han, Yuting; Hammitt, James K.; Bi, Jun; Liu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the influence of the Fukushima nuclear accident (FNA) on the Chinese public’s attitude and acceptance of nuclear power plants in China. Two surveys (before and after the FNA) were administered to separate subsamples of residents near the Tianwan nuclear power plant in Lianyungang, China. A structural equation model was constructed to describe the public acceptance of nuclear power and four risk perception factors: knowledge, perceived risk, benefit, and trust. Regression analysis ...

  16. Environmental impacts of an accident with a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A maximum credible reactor accident is considered: all safety systems fail and the reactor core is not cooled anymore. This so-called meltdown accident is discussed for two different weather situations. For these cases, the effects on public health and environment is studied (radioactive clouds, inhalation and deposition of radioactive materials). The radiation doses calculated are compared with standard levels. In so doing, an estimation is made of the measures necessary to reduce unfavourable consequences. (G.J.P.)

  17. D.C. Circuit broadly extends NEPA coverage for nuclear power plant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) now requires complete evaluation of all aspects of human health affected by nuclear development, including psychological health. The Supreme Court may not agree with the circuit court's conclusion that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission must pay special attention to psychological health effects from nuclear accidents because this extension of NEPA may become a major new tool for slowing the development of nuclear energy production

  18. HOTSPOT, Field Evaluation of Radiation Release from Nuclear Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: The HOTSPOT Health Physics codes were created to provide Health Physics personnel with a fast, field-portable calculational tool for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials. HOTSPOT codes are a first-order approximation of the radiation effects associated with the atmospheric release of radioactive materials. HOTSPOT programs are reasonably accurate for a timely initial assessment. More importantly, HOTSPOT codes produce a consistent output for the same input assumptions and minimize the probability of errors associated with reading a graph incorrectly or scaling a universal nomogram during an emergency. Four general programs, PLUME, EXPLOSION, FIRE, and RESUSPENSION, calculate a downwind assessment following the release of radioactive material resulting from a continuous or puff release, explosive release, fuel fire, or an area contamination event. Other programs deal with the release of plutonium, uranium, and tritium to expedite an initial assessment of accidents involving nuclear weapons. Additional programs estimate the dose commitment from inhalation of any one of the radionuclides listed in the database of radionuclides, calibrate a radiation survey instrument for ground survey measurements, and screening of plutonium uptake in the lung. The HOTSPOT codes are fast, portable, easy to use, and fully documented. HOTSPOT supports color high resolution monitors and printers for concentration plots and contours. The codes have been extensively used by the DOS community since 1985. Version 8 allows users to add their own custom radionuclide library and to create custom radionuclide mixtures. It also includes wet deposition to approximate the enhanced plume depletion and ground deposition due to the effects of rain. Additional release geometry options for TRITIUM RELEASE and GENERAL PLUME were added, as well as several other enhancements and improvements. See info (f1) from the main HOTSPOT menu for additional

  19. Protection of the Population in the event of a Nuclear accident. A Basis for Intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the years following the Chernobyl accident in 1986, the NEA actively participated in the international effort towards the improvement and better harmonization of the international and national criteria for the protection of the public in the event of a nuclear accident. A first report on this matter, titled Nuclear Accidents: Intervention Levels for Protection of the Public was published by the NEA in 1989. Subsequently, the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health set up a small Task Group to provide additional guidance, and to take into account recent developments in other international organizations. The report outlines the status of relevant international activities in the period following the preparation of the 1989 report, discusses the intervention principles and describes both the proposed accident management system and a general scheme for its application. It is to be noted that the principles and criteria for intervention discussed in this report, although developed with specific reference to reactor accidents, apply equally well to activities and possible accidents at other nuclear facilities. The report briefly describes the transition from an accident management situation back to a normal situation and the related problem of changing criteria for the protection of the public. In addition to the traditional exposure pathways -inhalation from the cloud, external irradiation from the cloud and the ground and ingestion of food - the report acknowledges the existence of special pathways, proposing criteria for protecting workers and the public and some examples of their application

  20. ANS [American Nuclear Society] topical meeting on radiological accidents: Perspectives and emergency planning: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing use of radioactive materials and the increasing public concern about possible accidents involving these materials has led to greater emphasis on preparing for such emergencies. The ANS Topical Meeting on Radiological Accidents - Perspectives and Emergency Planning provided a review of experiences with radiological accidents. The meeting covered some of the most important aspects of radiological accidents. Papers were presented which dealt with radiological accident experience. Technical response to accidents is of primary interest to many in the nuclear community; most of the papers submitted fell into this area. So many of these papers dealt with the use of computers in response that a session on that topic was arranged. A very significant impact of most radiological accidents is the cost, especially the cost of cleanup. There were papers on what is known about costs and associated current topics, such as modification and extension of the Price-Anderson Act. At least as important as the technical response to accidents is how society attempts to deal with them. A session on institutional issues was included to discuss how governments and other organizations respond to and deal with accidents. Medical effects of accidents are of great concern to the public. Invited papers to review the effects of high doses of radiation as well as very low doses were included in that session. Although the nuclear industry has an excellent safety record, this fact often does not agree with the public perception of the industry. The final session explored the public response to and perception of radiological emergencies and accidents. This subject will ultimately determine the future use of radioactive materials in this country

  1. Regulatory requirements on accident management and emergency preparedness - concept of nuclear and radiation safety during beyond-design-basis accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actual practice the and proposals for further activities in the field of Accident Management (AM) in the member countries of the Co-operation Forum of WWER regulators and in Western countries have been assessed. Further the results of the last working group on AM , the overview of interactions of severe accident research and the regulatory positions in various countries, IAEA reports, practice in Switzerland and Finland, were taken into consideration. From this information, the working group derived recommendations on Accident Management. The general proposals correspond to the present state of the art on AM. They do not describe the whole spectra of recommendations on AM for NPPs with WWER reactors. A basis for the implementation of an AM program is given, which could be extended in a follow-up working group. The developments and research concerning AM have to be continued. The positions of various countries with regard to the 'Interactions of severe accident research and the regulatory positions' are given. On the basis of the working group proposals, the WWER regulators could set regulatory requirements and support further developments of AM strategies, making use of the benefits of common features of NPPs with WWER reactors. Concerted actions in the field of AM between the WWER regulators would bundle the development of a unified concept of recommendations and speed up the implementation of AM measures in order to minimise the risks involved in nuclear power generation

  2. Decision-making guide for management of agriculture in the case of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For several years, agricultural and nuclear professionals in France have been working on how to manage the agricultural situation in the event of a nuclear accident. This work resulted in measures at both the national (Aube nuclear safety exercises in 2003, INEX3 in 2005) and international levels (EURATOM Programmes). Following on from the European FARMING (FP5) and EURANOS (FP6) works, ACTA', IRSN and six agricultural technical institutes which are specialized in agricultural production and processing network (arable crop [especially cereals, maize, pulses, potatoes and forage crops], fruits and vegetables, vine and wine, livestock farming [cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry]), created a resource adapted to the French context: the Decision-aiding Tool for the Management of Agriculture in case of a Nuclear Accident. Devised for the Ministry of Agriculture services supporting state officials in a radiation emergency, this manual focuses on the early phase following the accident when the state of emergency would make discussion on countermeasures with a large stakeholder panel impossible. Supported by the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries and the French Nuclear Safety Authority, this project increased knowledge of post-accident management strategies and made an important contribution to the national think tank set up within the framework of the French Steering Committee for managing the post-event phase of a nuclear accident (CODIRPA). This article describes how the manual evolved throughout the project and the development of new resources

  3. Decision-making guide for management of agriculture in the case of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For several years, agricultural and nuclear professionals in France have been working on how to manage the agricultural situation in the event of a nuclear accident. This work resulted in measures at both the national (Aube nuclear safety exercises in 2003, INEX3 in 2005) and international levels (EURATOM Programmes). Following on from the European FARMING (FP5) and EURANOS (FP6) works, ACTA', IRSN and six agricultural technical institutes which are specialized in agricultural production and processing network (arable crop [especially cereals, maize, pulses, potatoes and forage crops], fruits and vegetables, vine and wine, livestock farming [cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry]), created a resource adapted to the French context: the Decision-aiding Tool for the Management of Agriculture in case of a Nuclear Accident. Devised for the Ministry of Agriculture services supporting state officials in a radiation emergency, this manual focuses on the early phase following the accident when the state of emergency would make discussion on countermeasures with a large stakeholder panel impossible. Supported by the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries and the French Nuclear Safety Authority, this project increased knowledge of post-accident management strategies and made an important contribution to the national think tank set up within the framework of the French Steering Committee for managing the post-event phase of a nuclear accident (CODIRPA). This article describes how the manual evolved throughout the project and the development of new resources. (authors)

  4. Populations protection and territories management in nuclear emergency and post-accident situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during these conference days. Twenty seven presentations out of 29 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - radiological and dosimetric consequences in nuclear accident situation: impact on the safety approach and protection stakes (E. Cogez); 2 - organisation of public authorities in case of emergency and in post-event situation (in case of nuclear accident or radiological terror attack in France and abroad), (O. Kayser); 3 - ORSEC plan and 'nuclear' particular intervention plan (PPI), (C. Guenon); 4 - thyroid protection by stable iodine ingestion: European perspective (J.R. Jourdain); 5 - preventive distribution of stable iodine: presentation of the 2009/2010 public information campaign (E. Bouchot); 6 - 2009/2010 iodine campaign: presentation and status (O. Godino); 7 - populations protection in emergency and post-accident situation in Switzerland (C. Murith); 8 - CIPR's recommendations on the management of emergency and post-accident situations (J. Lochard); 9 - nuclear exercises in France - status and perspectives (B. Verhaeghe); 10 - the accidental rejection of uranium at the Socatri plant: lessons learnt from crisis management (D. Champion); 11 - IRE's radiological accident of August 22, 2008 (C. Vandecasteele); 12 - presentation of the CEA's crisis national organisation: coordination centre in case of crisis, technical teams, intervention means (X. Pectorin); 13 - coordination and realisation of environmental radioactivity measurement programs, exploitation and presentation of results: status of IRSN's actions and perspectives (P. Dubiau); 14 - M2IRAGE - measurements management in the framework of geographically-assisted radiological interventions in the environment (O. Gerphagnon and H. Roche); 15 - post-accident management of a nuclear accident - the CODIRPA works (I. Mehl-Auget); 16 - nuclear post-accident: new challenges of crisis expertise (D. Champion); 17 - aid guidebooks

  5. Radiation Exposure and Thyroid Cancer Risk After the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident in Comparison with the Chernobyl Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, S; Takamura, N; Ohtsuru, A; Suzuki, S

    2016-09-01

    The actual implementation of the epidemiological study on human health risk from low dose and low-dose rate radiation exposure and the comprehensive long-term radiation health effects survey are important especially after radiological and nuclear accidents because of public fear and concern about the long-term health effects of low-dose radiation exposure have increased considerably. Since the Great East Japan earthquake and the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Japan, Fukushima Prefecture has started the Fukushima Health Management Survey Project for the purpose of long-term health care administration and medical early diagnosis/treatment for the prefectural residents. Especially on a basis of the lessons learned from the Chernobyl accident, both thyroid examination and mental health care are critically important irrespective of the level of radiation exposure. There are considerable differences between Chernobyl and Fukushima regarding radiation dose to the public, and it is very difficult to estimate retrospectively internal exposure dose from the short-lived radioactive iodines. Therefore, the necessity of thyroid ultrasound examination in Fukushima and the intermediate results of this survey targeting children will be reviewed and discussed in order to avoid any misunderstanding or misinterpretation of the high detection rate of childhood thyroid cancer.

  6. Accident risks in nuclear facilities (a bibliography with abstracts). Period covered: 1964--August 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bibliography presents risk analysis and hazards evaluation of the design, construction and operation of nuclear facilities including the risk and hazards of transporting radioactive materials to and from these facilities. Radiological calculations for environmental effects of nuclear accidents are included. (Contains 131 abstracts)

  7. Public risk perception after the nuclear accident Fukushima: a case with university students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a comparative study of research conducted with university students before (03 to 05/2010) and after (06 and 07/2011) the accident in nuclear plants in Fukushima, Japan, provoked by the tsunami on March 11, 2011, with regards to risk perception associated with the use of nuclear energy. (author)

  8. Public risk perception after the nuclear accident Fukushima: a case with university students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boemer, Veronica Araujo, E-mail: veronica.boemer@usp.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), SP (Brazil); Aquino, Afonso Rodrigues de; Pereira, Tatiana de Sousa, E-mail: araquino@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of research conducted with university students before (03 to 05/2010) and after (06 and 07/2011) the accident in nuclear plants in Fukushima, Japan, provoked by the tsunami on March 11, 2011, with regards to risk perception associated with the use of nuclear energy. (author)

  9. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Appendices VII, VIII, IX, and X. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the release of radioactivity in reactor accidents; physical processes in reactor meltdown accidents; safety design rationale for nuclear power plants; and design adequacy.

  10. Review of five investigation committees' reports on the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant severe accident. Focusing on accident progression and causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On March 11, 2011, the Tohoku District-off the Pacific Ocean Earthquake and the subsequent tsunami resulted in the severe core damage at TEPCO's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station Units 1-3, involving hydrogen explosions at Units 1, 3, and 4 and the large release of radioactive materials to the environment. Four independent committees were established by the Japanese government, the Diet of Japan, the Rebuild Japan Initiative Foundation, and TEPCO to investigate the accident and published their respective reports. Also, the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency carried out an analysis of accident causes to obtain the lessons learned from the accident and made its report public. This article reviews the reports and clarifies the differences in their positions, from the technological point of view, focusing on the accident progression and causes. Moreover, the undiscussed issues are identified to provide insights useful for the near-term regulatory activities including accident investigation by the Nuclear Regulation Authority. (author)

  11. Economic and social impacts of nuclear accidents on the agricultural sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economic and social impact of a major nuclear accident on the agricultural sector are reviewed. The associated costs are evaluated by more or less proper methods depending on the duration and severity of the post accident situation. Calculating such costs is necessary in order to allow farmers, farm-food enterprises, and public authorities to define the indemnification levels as well as to identify means of minimizing the accident consequences. The indemnification procedures are described in a section dedicated to liability issues and the costs due to Chernobyl accident. Concerning the limitation of accident consequences the responsibility falls upon the public authorities. In regard for decision making the existent methods vary according to the situation complexity and proposed objectives. Examples are given to point out the costs and social impact

  12. Preparing of local contingency planning for nuclear accident of nuclear submarine at port

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The presence of a nuclear submarine in port involves a radiological risk which requires to be taken into account appropriately. The implementation of radiological monitoring and prevention measures are basic requisites to assure this visit being reasonably safer. In normal condition, the radiological monitoring of some marine environmental samples are necessary to be performed before the arrival and during the staying and after the departure of the nuclear ship. In the other side, prevention measures involve the preparedness of local contingency plans to protect the people in the port in any nuclear accidental event. The plan is designed by assuming an accident where 10% of core inventory of a 30 MW(e) nuclear power reactor are released to environment. The plan basically takes into account immediate measures inside a zone of 2,5 km around the submarine - from the normal place for anchor - being some of them the clearing of the zone from ships and people and taking the damaged submarine out at sea in order to reduce the scope of possible emissions. Likewise, previsions are made for protecting people up to 10 km in the coast. All these measures are performed by an organization commanded by the Port Captain and supported by other state institutions in land. (orig.)

  13. The estimation economic impacts from severe accidents of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The severe accidents of a nuclear power plant may cause health effects in the exposed population and societal economic impacts or costs. Techniques to assess the consequences of an accident in terms of cost may be applied in studies on the design of plant safety features and in examining countermeasure options as part of emergency planning or in decision making after an accident. In this study, the costs resulting from the severe accidents of a nuclear power plant were estimated for the different combinations of source term release parameters and meteorological data. Also, the costs were estimated for the different scenarios considering seasonal characteristics of Korea. The results can be used as essential inputs in costs/benefit analysis and in developing optimum risk reduction strategies

  14. Accident management in the case of serious emergencies in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On-site emergency planning comprises all action taken in a nuclear power station to identify beyond-design base accidents at an early stage and reliably, to keep it under control and overcome it with the minimum of damage. The individual papers set out the basic terminology, the thermohydraulic processes in the cooling circuits during severe incidents, action to maintain the integrity of the containment, the potential of expert systems, simulator training and new developments for simulating accident conditions. (DG)

  15. Methodology applied by IRSN for nuclear accident cost estimations in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the methodology used by IRSN to estimate the cost of potential nuclear accidents in France. It concerns possible accidents involving pressurized water reactors leading to radioactive releases in the environment. These accidents have been grouped in two accident families called: severe accidents and major accidents. Two model scenarios have been selected to represent each of these families. The report discusses the general methodology of nuclear accident cost estimation. The crucial point is that all cost should be considered: if not, the cost is underestimated which can lead to negative consequences for the value attributed to safety and for crisis preparation. As a result, the overall cost comprises many components: the most well-known is offsite radiological costs, but there are many others. The proposed estimates have thus required using a diversity of methods which are described in this report. Figures are presented at the end of this report. Among other things, they show that purely radiological costs only represent a non-dominant part of foreseeable economic consequences

  16. Effect of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on lakes in Fukushima Prefecture and Niigata City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident happened in 12 - 15th March 2011. This accident caused to the radioactive contamination in the near area. In this work, some lake waters and the sediments were collected in Fukushima Prefecture and Niigata City to clarify the effect of the accident on the area contaminated. As to the collected lake water, an enrichment of 'the specific activity of tritium (T specific activity)' in each water collected was carried out by the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) apparatus, and the T specific activity was measured by a liquid scintillation counter. Based on the T specific activity thus measured, the influence of the accident to the environment was investigated. At the same time, specific activities of radioactive caesiums in the lake sediments were also measured. Consequently, the influence of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident to the adjacent lakes (e.g., in Fukushima Prefecture and Niigata City) was quantitatively clarified. From the above-mentioned matters, it is found that the effect of the accident on Niigata City is so small, and the accident gradually decreases in Fukushima Prefecture. (author)

  17. A highway accident involving unirradiated nuclear fuel in Springfield, Massachusetts, on December 16, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early morning of Dec. 16, 1991, a severe accident occurred when a passenger vehicle traveling in the wrong direction collided with a tractor trailer carrying 24 unirradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in 12 containers on Interstate I-91 in Springfield, Massachusetts. The purpose of this report is to document the mechanical circumstances of the severe accident, confirm the nature and quantity of the radioactive materials involved, and assess the physical environment to which the containers were exposed and the response of the containers and their contents. The report consists of five major sections. The first section describes the circumstances and conditions of the accident and the finding of facts. The second describes the containers, the unirradiated nuclear fuel assemblies, and the tie down arrangement used for the trailer. The third describes the damage sustained during the accident to the tractor, trailer, containers, and unirradiated nuclear fuel assemblies. The fourth evaluates the accident environment and its effects on the containers and their contents. The final section gives conclusions derived from the analysis and fact finding investigation. During this severe accident, only minor injuries occurred, and at no time was the public health and safety at risk

  18. The official report of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In October 2011, the Act regarding Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission was enacted to investigate the Fukushima accident with the authority to request documents and request the legislative branch to use its investigative powers to obtain any necessary documents or evidence required. In December 2011, chairman and nine other members were appointed. After a six-month investigation, Commission had concluded. 'In order to prevent future disasters, fundamental reforms must take place covering both the structure of electric power industry and the structure of related government and regulatory agencies as well as operation processes, for both normal and emergency situations'. Main parts of report consisted of overview, conclusions and recommendations, and six findings; (1) was the accident preventable?, (2) Escalation of the accident, (3) Emergency response to the accident, (4) Spread of the damage, (5) Organizational issues in accident prevention and response and (6) the legal system. Based on the above findings, Commission made seven recommendations regarding (1) Monitoring of the nuclear regulatory body by the National Diet, (2) Reform the crisis management system, (3) Government responsibility for public health and welfare, (4) Monitoring the operators, (5) Criteria for the new regulatory body, (6) Reforming laws related to nuclear energy and (7) Develop a system of independent investigation commissions. National Diet's thorough debate and deliberate on these recommendation was highly encouraged for the future. (T. Tanaka)

  19. Integration of risk aversion in the evaluation of the external cost of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: the external costs of fuel cycles used in the production of electricity are those imposed on society and environment that are not accounted for by the producers and consumers of energy. Within the evaluation of the external cost of the nuclear fuel cycle, the evaluation of a nuclear accident has to be addressed. For this purpose, the basic approach consists in calculating the expected value of various occident scenarios. the main criticism of this approach is that there is a discrepancy between the social acceptability of the risk and the average monetary value which corresponds in principle to the compensation of the consequences for each individual of the population affected by the accident. The aim of this paper is to propose a methodology for the integration of risk aversion, relying on the expected utility approach, as well as a numerical application based on the French data for the external cost of a nuclear accident. Although a huge range of values has been published for the relative risk aversion coefficient, it seems reasonable to adopt a value of 2 for the specific case of nuclear accident. This leads to an estimated multiplying coefficient approximately equal to 20 to be applied to the expected external cost of a nuclear accident corresponding to a release of about 1% of the core. In this case, the external cost of the nuclear accident is estimated to 0.046 mECU/kWh (i.e. about 50% of the total external costs of the nuclear fuel cycle estimated at 0.1 mECU/kWh with a 3% discount rate), instead of 0.0023 mECU/kWh without taking into account risk aversion. (authors)

  20. Study on actions for social acceptance of a nuclear power plant incident/accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When an incident/accident has occurred, dealing technically with it in an appropriate way is essential for social acceptance. One of the most important actions that are expected from the plant representative is to provide, without delay, each of the concerned authorities and organizations with full information concerning the incident/accident, while necessary technical measures are being implemented. While the importance of socially dealing with the incident/accident is widely recognized, up to now there have been no attempts to study previous incidents/accidents cases from the social sciences viewpoint. Therefore, in the present study is a case study of the incident/accident that occurred in 1991 at the No.2 Unit of the Mihama Nuclear Plant of Kansai Power Co., Ltd.. The data used in the present study is based on intensive interview of the staff involved in this incident/accident. The purpose of the study was to shed light on the conditions necessary for maintaining and improving the skill of the plant representative when dealing with social response in case of an incident/accident. The results of the present study has led to a fuller recognition of the importance of the following factors: On the personal level: 1) recognition of personal accountability, 2) complete disclosure of information concerning the incident/accident. On the organizational level: 1) acceptance of different approaches and viewpoints, 2) promoting risk-taking behavior, 3) top management's vision and commitment to providing a social response. (author)

  1. Recovery operations in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Much progress has been made over the last decade in the field of emergency planning and preparedness, including the development of guidance, criteria, training programmes, regulations and comprehensive plans in the support of nuclear facilities. To provide a forum for international review and discussion of actual experiences gained and lessons learned from the different aspects of recovery techniques and operations in response to serious accidents at nuclear facilities and accidents associated with radioactive materials, the IAEA organized the International Symposium on Recovery Operations in the Event of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. The symposium was held from 6 to 10 November 1989 in Vienna, Austria, and was attended by over 250 experts from 35 Member State and 7 international organizations. Although the prime focus was on on-site and off-site recovery from nuclear reactor accidents and on recovery from radiological accidents unrelated to nuclear power plants, development of emergency planning and preparedness resources was covered as well. From the experiences reported, lessons learned were identified. While further work remains to be done to improve concepts, plans, materials, communications and mechanisms to assemble quickly all the special resources needed in the event of an accident, there was general agreement that worldwide preparations to handle any possible future radiological emergencies had vastly improved. A special feature of the symposium programme was the inclusion of a full session on an accident involving a chemical explosion in a high level waste tank a a plutonium extraction plant in the Southern Urals in the USSR in 1957. Information was presented on the radioactive release, its dissemination and deposition, the resultant radiation situation, dose estimates, health effects follow-up, and the rehabilitation of contaminated land. This volume contains the full text of the 49 papers presented at the symposium together with a

  2. Review of Cytogenetic analysis of restoration workers for Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Yumiko

    2016-09-01

    Japan faced with the nuclear accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) caused by the combined disaster of the Great East Japan Earthquake and the subsequent tsunamis on 11 March 2011. National Institute of Radiological Sciences received all nuclear workers who were engaged in emergency response tasks at the NPS and suspected of being overexposed to acute radiation. Biological dosimetry by dicentric chromosome assay was helpful for medical triage and management of the workers.

  3. Guide to radiological accident considerations for siting and design of DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guide was prepared to provide the experienced safety analyst with accident analysis guidance in greater detail than is possible in Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. The guide addresses analysis of postulated serious accidents considered in the siting and selection of major design features of DOE nuclear facilities. Its scope has been limited to radiological accidents at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The analysis steps addressed in the guide lead to evaluation of radiological dose to exposed persons for comparison with siting guideline doses. Other possible consequences considered are environmental contamination, population dose, and public health effects. Choices of models and parameters leading to estimation of source terms, release fractions, reduction and removal factors, dispersion and dose factors are discussed. Although requirements for risk analysis have not been established, risk estimates are finding increased use in siting of major nuclear facilities, and are discussed in the guide. 3 figs., 9 tabs

  4. Medical emergency planning in case of severe nuclear power plant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is an attempt to discuss a three-step-plan on medical emergency planning in case of severe accidents at nuclear power plants on the basis of own experiences in the regional area as well as on the basis of recommendations of the Federal Minister of the Interior. The medical considerations take account of the severity and extension of an accident whereby the current definitions used in nuclear engineering for accident situations are taken as basis. A comparison between obligatory and actual state is made on the possibilities of medical emergency planning, taking all capacities of staff, facilities, and equipment available in the Federal Republic of Germany into account. To assure a useful and quick utilization of the existing infra-structure as well as nation-wide uniform training of physicians and medical assistants in the field of medical emergency in case of a nuclear catastrophe, a federal law for health protection is regarded urgently necessary. (orig.)

  5. The risk of accident in nuclear power plants - Quotes and questions. National debate on energy transition. Taking the risk of nuclear accident into account. Note to the 'scenarios' subgroup of the group of experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an overview of the production of electricity from nuclear energy and of its risks, the author discusses the issue of nuclear safety by distinguishing the different points of view, by describing the different levels between a severe and a major accident, and by recalling the statements made by the ASN and the IRSN on this issue. He describes the various reasons and consequences of accidents: types of accidents which could result in a core fusion, the containment failure as the major accident. He discusses the questions and comments about major issues like: strength of reactor vessels, hydrogen explosion, water vapour explosion, corium crossing the concrete sill plate, corium recovery, MOX as an aggravating situation for safety. In the last part, the author discusses the global assessment of a risk of a nuclear accident: probabilities and occurrences, significant accidents on PWRs, premonitory analysis, demonstration of nuclear safety

  6. Analysis of causes of criticality accidents at nuclear fuel processing facilities in foreign countries. Similarities to the criticality accident at JCO's uranium processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On September 30, 1999, a criticality accident occurred at the JCO's uranium processing plant, which resulted in the first nuclear accident involving a fatality, in Japan, and forced the residents in the vicinity of the site to be evacuated and be sheltered indoors. Before the JCO accident, 21 criticality accidents have been reported at nuclear fuel processing facilities in foreign countries. The present paper describes the overall trends observed in the 21 accidents and discusses the sequences and causes of the accidents analyzed in terms of similarities to the JCO accident. Almost all of them occurred with the uranium or plutonium solution and in vessels/tanks with unfavorable geometry. In some cases, the problems similar to those observed in the JCO accident were identified: violations of procedures and/or technical specifications for improving work efficiencies, procedural changes without any application to and permission from the regulatory body, lack of understanding of criticality hazards, and complacency that a criticality accident would not occur. (author)

  7. Systematic approach for assessment of accident risks in chemical and nuclear processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The industrial accidents which occurred in the last years, particularly in the 80's, contributed a significant way to draw the attention of the government, industry and the society as a whole to the mechanisms for preventing events that could affect people's safety and the environment quality. Techniques and methods extensively used the nuclear, aeronautic and war industries so far were adapted to performing analysis and evaluation of the risks associated to other industrial activities, especially in the petroleum, chemistry and petrochemical areas. The risk analysis in industrial facilities is carried out through the evaluation of the probability or frequency of the accidents and their consequences. However, no systematized methodology that could supply the tools for identifying possible accidents likely to take place in an installation is available in the literature. Neither existing are methodologies for the identification of the models for evaluation of the accidents' consequences nor for the selection of the available techniques for qualitative or quantitative analysis of the possibility of occurrence of the accident being focused. The objective of this work is to develop and implement a methodology for identification of the risks of accidents in chemical and nuclear processing facilities as well as for the evaluation of their consequences on persons. For the development of the methodology, the main possible accidents that could occur in such installations were identified and the qualitative and quantitative techniques available for the identification of the risks and for the evaluation of the consequences of each identified accidents were selected. The use of the methodology was illustrated by applying it in two case examples adapted from the literature, involving accidents with inflammable, explosives, and radioactive materials. The computer code MRA - Methodology for Risk Assessment was developed using DELPHI, version 5.0, with the purpose of systematizing

  8. Opportunities for international cooperation in nuclear accident preparedness and management: Procedural and organizational measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we address a difficult problem: How can we create and maintain preparedness for nuclear accidents? Our research has shown that this can be broken down into two questions: (1) How can we maintain the resources and expertise necessary to manage an accident once it occurs? and (2) How can we develop plans that will help in actually managing an accident once it occurs? It is apparently beyond the means of ordinary human organizations to maintain the capability to respond to a rare event. (A rare event is defined as something like an accident that only happens once every five years or so, somewhere in the world.) Other more immediate pressures tend to capture the resources that should, in a cost/benefit sense, be devoted to maintaining the capability. This paper demonstrates that some of the important factors behind that phenomenon can be mitigated by an international body that promotes and enforces preparedness. Therefore this problem provides a unique opportunity for international cooperation: an international organization promoting and enforcing preparedness could help save us from our own organizational failings. Developing useful accident management plans can be viewed as a human performance problem. It can be restated: how can we support and off-load the accident managers so that their tasks are more feasible? This question reveals the decision analytic perspective of this paper. That is, we look at the problem managing a nuclear accident by focusing on the decision makers, the accident managers: how do we create a decision frame for the accident managers to best help them manage? The decision frame is outlined and discussed. 9 refs

  9. The Role of Countermeasures in Mitigating the Radiological Consequences of Nuclear Power Plant Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the Fukushima accident the mitigation actions played an important role to decrease the consequences of the accident. The countermeasures are the actions that should be taken after the occurrence of a nuclear accident to protect the public against the associated risk. The actions may be represented by sheltering, evacuation, distribution of stable iodine tablets and/or relocation. This study represents a comprehensive probabilistic study to investigate the role of the adoption of the countermeasures in case of a hypothetical accident of type LOCA for a nuclear power plant of PWR (1000 Mw) type. This work was achieved through running of the PC COSYMA(1) code. The effective doses in different organs, short and long term health effects, and the associated risks were calculated with and without countermeasures. In addition, the overall costs of the accident and the costs of countermeasures are estimated which represent our first trials to know how much the postulated accident costs. The source term of a hypothetical accident is determined by knowing the activity of the core inventory. The meteorological conditions around the site in addition to the population distribution were utilized as input parameters. The stability conditions and the height of atmospheric boundary layers ABL of the concerned site were determined by developing a computer program utilizing Pasquill-Gifford atmospheric stability conditions. The results showed that, the area around the site requires early and late countermeasures actions after the accident especially in the downwind sectors. For late countermeasures, the duration of relocation ranged from about two to 10 years. The adoption of the countermeasures increases the costs of emergency planning by 40% but reduces the risk associated with the accident. (author)

  10. The accident at the Chernobyl' nuclear power plant and its consequences. Pt. 1. General material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains a presentation of the Chernobyl' nuclear power station and of the RBMK-1000 reactor, including its principal physical characteristics, the safety systems and a description of the site and of the surrounding region. After a chronological account of the events which led to the accident and an analysis of the accident using a mathematical model it is concluded that the prime cause of the accident was an extremely improbable combination of violations of instructions and operating rules committed by the staff of the unit. Technical and organizational measures for improving the safety of nuclear power plants with RBMK reactors have been taken. A detailed description of the actions taken to contain the accident and to alleviate its consequences is given and includes the fire fighting at the nuclear power station, the evaluation of the state of the fuel after the accident, the actions taken to limit the consequences of the accident in the core, the measures taken at units 1, 2 and 3 of the nuclear power station, the monitoring and diagnosis of the state of the damaged unit, the decontamination of the site and of the 30 km zone and the long-term entombment of the damaged unit. The measures taken for environmental radioactive contamination monitoring, starting by the assessment of the quantity, composition and dynamics of fission products release from the damaged reactor are described, including the main characteristics of the radioactive contamination of the atmosphere and of the ground, the possible ecological consequences and data on the exposure of plant and emergency service personnel and of the population in the 30 km zone around the plant. The last part of the report presents some recommendations for improving nuclear power safety, including scientific, technical and organizational aspects and international measures. Finally, an overview of the development of nuclear power in the USSR is given

  11. Consequences and effectiveness of relocation after nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive parameter studies have been performed with the program package COSYMA for probabilistic accident consequence assessments to quantify by means of PRA methods the interdependence of those quantities, which influence the extent, the duration, the efficiency and the monetary costs of relocation. As most important quantities, the amount of radionuclides released, the dose intervention levels for relocation, the (avoided) radiation doses in the population and the associated costs have been identified. Decontamination measures have also been included in the investigations, since they reduce the duration of relocation. The expression of all relevant accident consequences in monetary units allowed to investigate the applicability of cost/benefit analysis for deriving the most favourable intervention levels. It could be shown that weighting with different factors of collective doses calculated from different individual dose bands, and thus incorporating subjective judgements, significantly extends and improves the method. (orig./HP)

  12. Aerosol challenges to air cleaning systems during severe accidents in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of air cleaning systems may be operating in nuclear power plants and under severe accident conditions, these systems may be treating airborne concentrations of aerosols which are very high. Predictions of airborne aerosol concentrations in nuclear power plant containments under severe accident conditions are reviewed to provide a basis for evaluating the potential effects on the air cleaning systems. The air cleaning systems include filters, absorber beds, sprays, water pools, ice beds, and condensers. Not all of these were intended to operate as air cleaners but will in fact be good aerosol collectors. Knowledge of expected airborne concentrations will allow better evaluation of system performances

  13. Nuclear structure studies using the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document constitutes a progress report (1984 to 1985) and renewal proposal for the ongoing medium energy nuclear physics research program. The research efforts were carried out with the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The LAMPF research includes (1) p+ nucleus scattering data for a test of nonrelativistic and relativistic models of medium energy interaction; (2) data for nuclear structure information; (3) proton + nucleon data for the study of the fundamental nucleon-nucleon interaction; and (4) development of the above models. The Brookhaven work is a study of the formation and use of hypernuclei as a tool for nuclear studies. Individual reports are indexed separately

  14. Nuclear structure studies using the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research is concerned with obtaining detailed microscopic nuclear structure information (both ground state and excited state) through analyses of experimental data which have been, and which will be, obtained using the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). Five types of experimental/theoretical studies constitute the present research program: (1) those providing nucleon-nucleon (N-N) data which describe the free N-N interaction at small momentum transfer (the starting point for analyses based on the impulse approximation), (2) those providing data which determine how the nuclear medium modifies the free amplitudes (leading to effective amplitudes for analyses based on the impulse approximation), (3) those which provide data that validate fundamental ideas implicit in the formulation of the microscopic theories, (4) those which provide data to be analyzed to provide detailed nuclear structure information, and (5) those which provide critical evaluations of the formulations of the microscopic theories themselves

  15. Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies

  16. Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putman, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies.

  17. Analysis of simulation results of damaged nuclear fuel accidents at NPPs with shell-type nuclear reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor L. Kozlov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lessons from the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP made it necessary to reevaluate and intensificate the work on modeling and analyzing various scenarios of severe accidents with damage to the nuclear fuel in the reactor, containment and spent nuclear fuel storage pool with the expansion of the primary initiating event causes group listing. Further development of computational tools for modeling the explosion prevention criteria as to steam and gas mixtures, considering the specific thermal-hydrodynamic conditions and mechanisms of explosive situations arrival at different stages of a severe accident development, is substantiated. Based on the analysis of the known shell-type nuclear reactors accidents results the explosion safety thermodynamic criteria are presented, the parameters defining the steam and gas explosions conditions are found, the need to perform the further verification and validation of deterministic codes serving to simulate general accident processes behavior as well as phase-to-phase interaction calculated dependencies is established. The main parameters controlling and defining the criteria explosion safety effective regulation areas and their optimization conditions are found.

  18. Research on the status of acceptance of Fukushima nuclear power accidents and the understanding of knowledge for college students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective To investigate the connection between the understanding of basic knowledge of nuclear power and whether to accept the changes in attitude with Fukushima nuclear accidents for college students who were education in public. Methods 3000 questionnaires were distributed for college students by anonymity before and after the accident in the Fukushima nuclear power plant, respectively. Results the results of investigation showed that Fukushima nuclear accidents have influenced on the mental of college students, there significant differences between the two investigations. Conclusion college students have a little knowledge of nuclear power, it is necessary to strengthen publicity and education efforts for college students. (authors)

  19. Questionnaire survey report about the criticality accident at a nuclear fuel processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation Protection Section of the Japanese Society of Radiological Technology conducted a questionnaire survey on the criticality accident at the nuclear fuel processing facility in Tokai village on September 30, 1999 in order to identify factors related to the accident and consider countermeasures to deal with such accidents. The questionnaire was distributed to 347 members (122 facilities) of the Japanese Society of Radiological Technology who were working or living in Ibaraki Prefecture, and replies were obtained from 104 members (75 facilities). Questions to elicit the opinions of individuals were as following: method of obtaining information about the accident, knowledge about radiation, opinions about the accident, and requests directed to the Society. Questions regarding facilities concerned the following: communication after the accident, requests for dispatch to the accident site, and possession of radiometry devices. In regard to acquisition of information, 91 of the 104 members (87.5%) answered 'television or radios' followed by newspapers. Forty-five of 101 members were questioned about radiation exposure and radiation effects by the public. There were many opinions that accurate news should be provided rapidly, by the mass media. Many members (75%) felt that they lacked knowledge about radiation, reconfirming the importance of education and instruction concerning radiation. Dispatch was requested of 36 of the 75 facilities (48%), and 44 of 83 facilities (53%) owned radiometry instruments. (K.H.)

  20. Disaster Evacuation from Japan's 2011 Tsunami Disaster and the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The triple disaster that hit the Tohoku region of Japan on 11 March 2011 triggered a massive human displacement: more than 400,000 people evacuated their homes as a gigantic tsunami induced by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake engulfed the coastal areas, and the following nuclear accident in Fukushima released a large amount of radioactive materials into the atmosphere. This study analyses the disaster response, with a particular focus on evacuation of the population, and social consequences of this complex crisis, based on intensive fieldwork carried out one year after the catastrophe. It reveals that the responses of the Japanese authorities and population were significantly different between a natural disaster and an industrial (man-made) accident. Being prone to both earthquakes and tsunamis, Japan had been preparing itself against such risks for many years. A tsunami alert was immediately issued and the population knew how and where to evacuate. In contrast, the evacuation from the nuclear accident was organised in total chaos, as a severe accident or large-scale evacuation had never been envisaged -let alone exercised- before the disaster. The population was thus forced to flee with no information as to the gravity of the accident or radiation risk. In both cases, the risk perception prior to the catastrophe played a key role in determining the vulnerability of the population at the time of the crisis. While tsunami evacuees are struggling with a slow reconstruction process due to financial difficulties, nuclear evacuees are suffering from uncertainty as to their prospect of return. One year after the accident, the Japanese authorities began to encourage nuclear evacuees to return to the areas contaminated by radiation according to a newly established safety standard. This triggered a vivid controversy within the affected communities, creating a rift between those who trust the government's notion of safety and those who do not. The nuclear disaster has thus

  1. CODIR-PA: presentation of two accident scenarios affecting a French nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the CODIRPA, IRSN has to propose scenarios describing an accident affecting a French nuclear power plant (NPP). This scenario must be 'penalizing but not excessively, in particular with regard to the extent of the contaminated territory'. This technical note gathers the bases of the IRSN proposition of two scenarios describing accidents affecting a French NPP: firstly a LOCA accident leading to core FUSION, secondly a SGTR accident. The main sanitary consequences of the scenarios are the exceeding of the sheltering intervention levels within a radius of 2-3 km around the NPP (LOCA) and of stable iodine intake (SGTR). Regarding the agricultural consequences, some contamination levels in the agricultural products are beyond the CFILs until approximately 35 km for leaf vegetables and milk products, and a few kilometers for meat and cereals. (authors)

  2. Psychological and social factors influencing the choice of strategy after a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of the post-accident situation in Chernobyl provides information that focuses on social and psychological factors in the management of nuclear accidents. This paper concentrates on the short term countermeasures. It presents the main conclusions of a field survey carried out in Ukraine. The issues talked are the concern about extend of post-response in Chernobyl, the worries over health, contamination, the concern over the future and the complexity of post-accident situation. In a second part, the paper analyses and models the factors that caused the 1993 post-accident situation. Finally, several advices are given concerning the public information and behaviour focusing on the social and psychological aspect of short-term decisions (a constant effort should always be, for example, limiting the element of surprise in order to reduce the stress of population). (TEC). 3 figs

  3. Procedural and Organizational Measures to Assist Operations During an Accident in a Nuclear Power Plant in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Bull, D.; Lathrop, J.W.; Linnerooth, J.; Sinclair, C

    1980-01-01

    This paper is concerned with aspects of organization and procedure in nuclear accident management. Because all accidents can be argued to have common characteristics, a comparative approach is taken here for the discussion of emergency planning for nuclear accidents. This approach reveals several deficiencies in selected European emergency plans, the most important concerning formal and informal communication channels. The most important principle which emerges from this discussion, and which...

  4. The impact of the Fukushima nuclear accident on European energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disaster that struck the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan has reignited the international debate on the future of nuclear energy. Interestingly, the incident has been used to both justify nuclear power generation and reconsider past decisions made on established or planned nuclear power sites. Geographically removed from the radioactive fallout, Europe's response to the massive nuclear accident differed greatly among the member states. The UK and Germany stand out as examples of the wide spread of policy response to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. In the UK, policy makers remained firm on their decision to increase nuclear power generation in the near future, whereas in Germany, the federal government decided to at least temporarily shut down the old generation of nuclear reactors and re-examine the safety of all national nuclear power facilities. Furthermore, a regional voter backlash, fuelled by resentment of the Merkel government's previous commitment to nuclear power, dealt a serious blow to the ruling coalition parties. How can national policy responses to the same event be so divergent in two European countries? This article attempts to answer this question in five arguments. I argue that in contrast to the UK, the German public faced imminent elections, stronger media reporting, increasing trust in renewable technologies, a history of nuclear resistance and a feeling of close cultural proximity to the Japanese.

  5. Eighteenth nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison study: August 10-14, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Eighteenth Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted August 10-14, 1981, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Nuclear criticality accidents with three different neutron and gamma ray energy spectra were simulated by operating the Health Physics Research Reactor in the pulse mode. Participants from 13 organizations exposed dosimeters set up as area monitors and mounted on phantoms for personnel monitoring. Analysis of experimental results showed that about 56% of the reported neutron doses measured using foil activation, thermoluminescent, or sodium activation methods and about 53% of the gamma doses measured using thermoluminescent methods met nuclear accident dosimetry guidelines which suggest accuracies of +- 25% for neutron dose and +- 20% for gamma dose. The greatest difficulties in measuring accident doses occurred in radiation fields with large fractions of low energy neutrons and a high gamma component (> 40%). Results of this study indicate that continued accident dosimetry intercomparisons are necessary to test dosimetry systems and training programs are needed to improve the technical competence of evaluating personnel

  6. Empirical Risk Analysis of Severe Reactor Accidents in Nuclear Power Plants after Fukushima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Christian Kaiser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are reexamining the risks connected with nuclear power generation after the Fukushima accidents. To provide updated information for the corresponding discussion a simple empirical approach is applied for risk quantification of severe reactor accidents with International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES level ≥5. The analysis is based on worldwide data of commercial nuclear facilities. An empirical hazard of 21 (95% confidence intervals (CI 4; 62 severe accidents among the world’s reactors in 100,000 years of operation has been estimated. This result is compatible with the frequency estimate of a probabilistic safety assessment for a typical pressurised power reactor in Germany. It is used in scenario calculations concerning the development in numbers of reactors in the next twenty years. For the base scenario with constant reactor numbers the time to the next accident among the world's 441 reactors, which were connected to the grid in 2010, is estimated to 11 (95% CI 3.7; 52 years. In two other scenarios a moderate increase or decrease in reactor numbers have negligible influence on the results. The time to the next accident can be extended well above the lifetime of reactors by retiring a sizeable number of less secure ones and by safety improvements for the rest.

  7. The accident at the Chernobyl' nuclear power plant and its consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The material is taken from the conclusions of the Government Commission on the causes of the accident at the fourth unit of the Chernobyl' nuclear power plant and was prepared by a team of experts appointed by the USSR State Committee on the Utilization of Atomic Energy. It contains general material describing the accident, its causes, the action taken to contain the accident and to alleviate its consequences, the radioactive contamination and health of the population and some recommendations for improving nuclear power safety. 7 annexes are devoted to the following topics: water-graphite channel reactors and operating experience with RBMK reactors, design of the reactor plant, elimination of the consequences of the accident and decontamination, estimate of the amount, composition and dynamics of the discharge of radioactive substances from the damaged reactor, atmospheric transport and radioactive contamination of the atmosphere and of the ground, expert evaluation and prediction of the radioecological state of the environment in the area of the radiation plume from the Chernobyl' nuclear power station, medical-biological problems. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these annexes. The slides presented at the post-accident review meeting are grouped in two separate volumes

  8. The aftermath of nuclear accidents on mental health; Consequences des accidents radiologiques sur la sante mentale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirard, Ph.; Brenot, J.; Verger, P. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1998-10-01

    Technological disasters bring about psychological effects in exposed populations of various durability and intensity. This article reviews the epidemiological studies which assess psychological and psychiatric consequences of the Three Mile Island, Goieanna and Chernobyl accidents. It shows, in different accidental and cultural contexts, a statistically significant and durable increase of psychological symptoms in various exposed population groups, which points out an actual psychological distress. Diagnosed psychiatric effects are less constant, but much less studied. Most affected groups are mothers of young children, relocated persons, persons with less social support or in financial trouble. The psychological distress can further psychiatric disorders and give rise to behavioural changes towards health. More research is necessary to delineate the nature and the determinants of the observed symptoms and disorders. It implies to design better tools for the assessment of individual exposure and the diagnosis of mental health effects. (authors)

  9. Road to archiving of information relating to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce post-Great East Japan Earthquake situation of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency Library and our efforts to distribute information about the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Accident. After that, we describe our activities about the archiving of information relating to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident and its feature. (author)

  10. Thyroid side effects prophylaxis in front of nuclear power plant accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agopiantz, Mikaël; Elhanbali, Ouifak; Demore, Béatrice; Cuny, Thomas; Demarquet, Léa; Ndiaye, Cumba; Barbe, Françoise; Brunaud, Laurent; Weryha, Georges; Klein, Marc

    2016-02-01

    The better knowledge of the mechanisms of nuclear incidents and lessons learned from accidents in the recent past to improve the effectiveness of measures taken following a nuclear accident exposure to fallout of radioactive iodine isotopes. Thus, immediate, passive measures, such as containment, and stopping consumption of contaminated products are paramount. The earliest possible administration of stable iodine as potassium iodide (KI) reduces significantly (up to 90% if taken at the same time of the accident) thyroid radioactive contamination. These tablets should be given in priority to children and pregnant women. The side effects are minor. KI is not recommended for persons aged over 60 years, or for adults suffering from cardiovascular disorders. PMID:26830953

  11. Multi-physics particle method for the simulation of severe accidents in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of analysis methods for severe accidents in nuclear reactors is a key issue for nuclear safety. It is difficult to estimate the behaviors of several phenomena in reactor accidents, such as the melting and relocation of structural materials, the spreading of corium on the ground, and the molten core concrete interaction (MCCI), because they involve large changes of the geometry. In the present study, a new method was developed to simulate these phenomena by using a moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method with models for surface tension, rigid bodies, melting and freezing, heat conduction, interfacial heat transfer, and heat radiation. As benchmarks, the melting of a metal cylinder on a hot plate and the freezing of a molten metallic drop in a coolant are simulated. The characteristic behaviors in each experiment agreed well with the simulation results, which indicates that the developed method is applicable for simulation to evaluate the behavior of corium in severe reactor accidents. (author)

  12. Study on safety evaluation for nuclear fuel cycle facility under fire accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hot test at Rokkasho Reprocessing plant has been started since last year. In addition, construction of the MOX fuel fabrication facility at Rokkasho site is planning. So, the importance of safety evaluation of the nuclear fuel cycle facility is increasing. Under the fire accident, one of the serious postulated accidents in the nuclear fuel cycle facility, the equipments (glove-box, ventilation system, ventilation filters etc.) for the confinement of the radioactive materials within the facility could be damaged by a large amount of heat and smoke released from the combustion source. Therefore, the fundamental data and models calculating for the amount of heat and smoke released from the combustion source under such accident are important for the safety evaluation of the facility. In JAERI, the study focused on the evaluation of amount of heat and smoke released from the combustion source is planning. In this paper, the outline of experimental apparatus, measurement items and evaluation terms are described. (author)

  13. Assessing the consequences in a nuclear accident scenario at Cernavoda NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Having in view a possible nuclear incident, considerable planning is necessary to reduce at manageable levels the types of decisions leading to effective responses concerning the public protection. One of the most important parts of an emergency response plan is the computerized system which allows to predict the radiological impact of the accident and to provide information in a manageable and effective form for evaluating alternative countermeasure strategies in the various stages of the accident. In this paper the PC-COSYMA results for early containment failure of a CANDU reactor are presented. The deterministic health effects arising in nuclear accident situation are also presented. As source term we have used the core inventory obtained with ORIGEN computer code. The essential input parameters for PC-COSYMA computer code are also done. (authors)

  14. The ASN and the consequences of the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Power Point document first recalls the sources of exposure to radiations for the French population, the effects of radiation, and some data on the Chernobyl accident. It presents the ASN, its organisation, its means, its missions. It presents the different French nuclear sites, indicates the mean age of nuclear reactors in the World. It describes the licence renewal process, the safety re-examination process. Then, it addresses the Fukushima accident and more particularly the main challenges after the accident: to restore a safe status for the installations, to manage the contamination of the environment. It addresses the consequences for France, i.e mainly safety additional assessment process which has been launched, and the ASN opinion. It indicates the installations located in the Rhone-Alpes region to be assessed in priority, describes the ASN approach for the next months

  15. The Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident and its implications for the safety of nuclear power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, William

    2016-05-01

    Five years ago the dramatic events in Fukushima that followed the massive earthquake and subsequent tsunami that struck Japan on March 11, 2011 sharpened the focus of scientists, engineers and general public on the broad range of technical, environmental and societal issues involved in assuring the safety of the world's nuclear power complex. They also called into question the potential of nuclear power to provide a growing, sustainable resource of CO2-free energy. The issues raised by Fukushima Dai-ichi have provoked urgent concern, not only because of the potential harm that could result from severe accidents or from intentional damage to nuclear reactors or to facilities involved in the nuclear fuel cycle, but also because of the extensive economic impact of those accidents and of the measures taken to avoid them.

  16. Means of surveying contaminated areas resulting from overseas nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl accident is briefly reviewed as a useful basis to examine some of the considerations related to the design of surveys. The plans and procedures of key European and North American countries are reviewed, as well as the plans and capabilities of UK facilities and government agencies. The survey design incorporates the concepts of land use category, topography climate, etc. and discusses the spatial and temporal scale requirements. Use of a Geographic Information System is recommended to co-ordinate the data. Models address the requirement to detect an annual effective dose equivalent of 0.5 mSv to an individual in the first year following the accident. The equipment requirements are based on transit-type vans, each, preferably, with one or two gamma spectrometers, MCA's and ancillary equipment, with three teams of two men. This unit could survey about 150 km2 within a larger area in 3 days. The cost per survey team is estimated to be Pound 60,000 - Pound 80,000 in the first year, with annual costs of Pound 20-23,000. (author)

  17. Guidelines for mutual emergency assistance arrangements in connection with a nuclear accident or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document contains the recommendations of a group of experts from 22 Member States and three international organizations which met in April 1983. These recommendations may serve as guidelines for use by states for the negotiation of bilateral or regional agreements relating to emergency assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency

  18. Risk Analysis for Public Consumption: Media Coverage of the Ginna Nuclear Reactor Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunwoody, Sharon; And Others

    Researchers have determined that the lay public makes risk judgments in ways that are very different from those advocated by scientists. Noting that these differences have caused considerable concern among those who promote and regulate health and safety, a study examined media coverage of the accident at the Robert E. Ginna nuclear power plant…

  19. "What--me worry?" "Why so serious?": a personal view on the Fukushima nuclear reactor accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallucci, Raymond

    2012-09-01

    Infrequently, it seems that a significant accident precursor or, worse, an actual accident, involving a commercial nuclear power reactor occurs to remind us of the need to reexamine the safety of this important electrical power technology from a risk perspective. Twenty-five years since the major core damage accident at Chernobyl in the Ukraine, the Fukushima reactor complex in Japan experienced multiple core damages as a result of an earthquake-induced tsunami beyond either the earthquake or tsunami design basis for the site. Although the tsunami itself killed tens of thousands of people and left the area devastated and virtually uninhabitable, much concern still arose from the potential radioactive releases from the damaged reactors, even though there was little population left in the area to be affected. As a lifelong probabilistic safety analyst in nuclear engineering, even I must admit to a recurrence of the doubt regarding nuclear power safety after Fukushima that I had experienced after Three Mile Island and Chernobyl. This article is my attempt to "recover" my personal perspective on acceptable risk by examining both the domestic and worldwide history of commercial nuclear power plant accidents and attempting to quantify the risk in terms of the frequency of core damage that one might glean from a review of operational history.

  20. Radiodosimetry and preventive measures in the event of a nuclear accident. Proceedings of an international symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international symposium on Radiodosimetry and Preventive Measures in the Event of a Nuclear Accident was held in Cracow, Poland, from 26 to 28 May 1994. The symposium was organized by the Polish Society for Nuclear Medicine, and co-sponsored by the IAEA. Over 40 experts from Belarus, Latvia, Lithuania, Germany, Poland, the Russian Federation, Sweden and Switzerland participated. The aim of the Symposium was to review models of iodine kinetics used in the calculation of internal radiation doses to the thyroid after the Chernobyl accident, to discuss internal and external radiation dose to the thyroid in terms or risk of thyroid cancer, and to present data on the incidence rate of thyroid cancer in the selected iodine deficient area in Poland. A part of the symposium was dedicated to the physiological basis of iodine prophylaxis and emergency planning for a nuclear accident. Recommendations of the IAEA on preventive measures in the event of a nuclear accident were also addressed. These proceedings contain the full text of the eight invited papers presented at the symposium. Refs, figs, tabs

  1. Environmental decision support system on base of geoinformational technologies for the analysis of nuclear accident consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report deals with description of the concept and prototype of environmental decision support system (EDSS) for the analysis of late off-site consequences of severe nuclear accidents and analysis, processing and presentation of spatially distributed radioecological data. General description of the available software, use of modem achievements of geostatistics and stochastic simulations for the analysis of spatial data are presented and discussed

  2. Nineteenth nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison study, August 9-13, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nineteenth Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was held August 9 to 13, 1982, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the Health Physics Research Reactor operated in the pulse mode to simulate nuclear criticality accidents. Participants from eight organizations measured neutron and gamma doses at air stations and on phantoms for three different shielding conditions. Measured results were compared to nuclear industry guidelines for criticality accident dosimeters which suggest accuracies of +-25% for neutron dose and +-20% for gamma dose. Seventy-two percent of the neutron dose measurements using foil activation, sodium activation, hair sulfur activation, and thermoluminescent methods met the guidelines while less than 40% of the gamma dose measurements were within +-20% of reference values. The softest neutron energy spectrum (also lowest neutron/gamma dose ratio) provided the most difficulty in measuring neutron and gamma doses. Results of this study indicate the need for continued intercomparison and testing of nuclear accident dosimetry systems and for training of evaluating personnel. 14 references, 7 figures, 16 tables

  3. MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS AS A SOURCE OF PUBLIC EXPOSURE FROM THE FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Stamat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines assessments of the impact of the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident on exposure of the Russian Federation population related to the seasonal migration of game birds. Intake of artificial radionuclides with meat of migratory game birds is shown to be one of the major pathways for the population exposure in the Far Eastern region of the country.

  4. Iodine Isotopes in Precipitation: Temporal Responses to 129I Emissions from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Sheng; Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Hou, Xiaolin;

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in 2011 has released a large amount of radionuclides to the atmosphere, and the radioactive plume has been dispersed to a large area in Europe and returned to Asia. To explore long-term trend of the Fukushima-derived radioactive plume...

  5. Construction of new education system on nuclear energy and radiation after experience of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Improvement of response capability of educational fields against nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident brought about confusion in elementary and secondary educational fields due to lack of teacher's knowledge of nuclear power, radiation safety and protection, and information about regional radiation and radioactivity data. In order to improve their response capability against NPP accident to secure safety of the pupil and student, new education system on nuclear energy and radiation was constructed such as educational course of 'nuclear energy and radiation safety' for pre-service teacher training system faculty students and training course of 'radiation dose measurement and evaluation' for in-service teacher and professors. Feasibility studies were also performed to construct information network for supporting schools at NPP accident so as to provide effective information about radiation and radioactivity data for educational fields. (T. Tanaka)

  6. A Literature Review on Ruthenium Behaviour in Nuclear Power Plant Severe Accidents

    OpenAIRE

    Mun, Christian; Cantrel, Laurent; Madic, Charles

    2007-01-01

    During an hypothetical severe accident on a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), Fission-Products (FPs) are released from the nuclear fuel and may reach the reactor containment building. Among the FPs, ruthenium is of particular interest due to its ability to form volatile oxide compounds in highly oxidizing conditions. In addition, Ru is a very hazardous compound because it is chemically toxic and also because of its radiotoxicity. The topic of ruthenium is examined in terms of nuclear safety is...

  7. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Executive summary: main report. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the objectives and organization of the reactor safety study; the basic concepts of risk; the nature of nuclear power plant accidents; risk assessment methodology; reactor accident risk; and comparison of nuclear risks to other societal risks.

  8. International seminar on Post nuclear accident from May 5 and 6, 2011 - The CODIRPA progresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the seminar is the anticipation of the radiological emergency situations to limit the consequences of nuclear accidents. The Steering Committee to manage the post-accident of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (CODIRPA) was started in June 2005 by the French nuclear safety authority (ASN), and was charged with developing French policy for the management of the post-accident phase of a nuclear or radiological accident situation. An ambitious program mobilising more than 200 people was put in place, including representatives of relevant national administrations and their local representatives, utility and industrial representatives, technical service organisations, nuclear safety authorities from bordering countries to France, NGOs and local elected officials. On December 2007, the previous seminar had constructively challenged the work of CODIRPA with international experiences and analysis. The 2011 seminar, organized by ASN with the support of the Parliamentary Office for the Evaluation of Scientific Choices and Technologies (OPECST), reports on the progress of the national doctrine's construction. The National Preparedness Guide for Exiting the Emergency Phase and drawn lessons concerning its local adaptation by regional and local community governmental organizations was presented at this occasion. The parliamentary mission headed by OPECST on the safety of nuclear installations holds its first public hearing on May 5, 2011. The seminar provides an opportunity for members of the parliamentary mission to learn about crisis management and post-accident of the major nuclear accident occurred in Japan at Fukushima. This document comprises a complete FR/EN detailed synthesis of the seminar followed by the recommendations of CODIRPA (in French) and by the slides of the available presentations for each session: Opening of the meeting; Session 1: National Preparedness Guide for Exiting the Emergency Phase; Session 2: Development of the

  9. A Study for Appropriateness of National Nuclear Policy by using Economic Analysis Methodology after Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to clarify the appropriateness of national nuclear policy in BPE of Korea from an economic perspective. To do this, this paper only focus on the economic analysis methodology without any considering other conditions such as political, cultural, or historical things. In a number of countries, especially Korea, nuclear energy policy is keeping the status quo after Fukushima accident. However the nation's nuclear policy may vary depending on the choice of people. Thus, to make the right decisions, it is important to deliver accurate information and knowledge about nuclear energy to the people. As proven in this paper, the levelized cost of nuclear power is the most inexpensive among the base load units. As the reliance on nuclear power is getting stronger through the economic logic, the nuclear safety and environmental elements will be strengthened. Based on this, national nuclear policy should be promoted. In the aftermath of the Fukushima accident recognized as the world's worst nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl, there are some changes in the nuclear energy policy of various countries. Germany, for example, called a halt to operate Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) which accounts for about 7.5% of the national power generation capacity of 6.3GW. In developing countries such as China and India they conducted the safety check of the nuclear power plants again before preceding their nuclear business. Korea government announced 'The 6th Basic Plan for Long-term Electricity Supply and Demand (BPE)', considering the safety and general public acceptance of the nuclear power plants. According to BPE, they postponed a plan for additional NPP construction, except for constructions that had been already reflected in the 5th BPE. All told, the responses for nuclear energy policy of countries are different depending on their own circumstances

  10. A Study for Appropriateness of National Nuclear Policy by using Economic Analysis Methodology after Fukushima accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Jong Myoung; Roh, Myung Sub [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The aim of this paper is to clarify the appropriateness of national nuclear policy in BPE of Korea from an economic perspective. To do this, this paper only focus on the economic analysis methodology without any considering other conditions such as political, cultural, or historical things. In a number of countries, especially Korea, nuclear energy policy is keeping the status quo after Fukushima accident. However the nation's nuclear policy may vary depending on the choice of people. Thus, to make the right decisions, it is important to deliver accurate information and knowledge about nuclear energy to the people. As proven in this paper, the levelized cost of nuclear power is the most inexpensive among the base load units. As the reliance on nuclear power is getting stronger through the economic logic, the nuclear safety and environmental elements will be strengthened. Based on this, national nuclear policy should be promoted. In the aftermath of the Fukushima accident recognized as the world's worst nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl, there are some changes in the nuclear energy policy of various countries. Germany, for example, called a halt to operate Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) which accounts for about 7.5% of the national power generation capacity of 6.3GW. In developing countries such as China and India they conducted the safety check of the nuclear power plants again before preceding their nuclear business. Korea government announced 'The 6th Basic Plan for Long-term Electricity Supply and Demand (BPE)', considering the safety and general public acceptance of the nuclear power plants. According to BPE, they postponed a plan for additional NPP construction, except for constructions that had been already reflected in the 5th BPE. All told, the responses for nuclear energy policy of countries are different depending on their own circumstances.

  11. Nuclear structure studies using the High Resolution Spectrometer at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research described in this document is concerned with obtaining detailed microscopic nuclear structure information (both ground state and excited state) through analysis of experimental data which have been, and which will be, obtained using the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). Three types of experiments and related theoretical work constitute the research programs: (1) those which provide nucleon-nucleon data to determine the key amplitudes required for microscopic analysis of intermediate energy p-nucleus elastic and inelastic scattering data, (2) those which provide data that validate fundamental ideas implicit in the formulation of the microscopic theories, and (3) those which provide data to be analyzed to provide detailed nuclear structure information

  12. Insights into the behavior of nuclear power plant containments during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horschel, D.S.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Parks, M.B.; Lambert, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dameron, R.A.; Rashid, Y.R. [ANATECH Research Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1993-06-01

    The containment building surrounding a nuclear reactor offers the last barrier to the release of radioactive materials from a severe accident into the environment. The loading environment of the containment under severe accident conditions may include much greater than design pressures and temperatures. Investigations into the performance of containments subject to ultimate or failure pressure and temperature conditions have been performed over the last several years through a program administered by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These NRC sponsored investigations are subsequently discussed. Reviewed are the results of large scale experiments on reinforced concrete, prestressed concrete, and steel containment models pressurized to failure. In conjunction with these major tests, the results of separate effect testing on many of the critical containment components; that is, aged and unaged seals, a personnel air lock and electrical penetration assemblies subjected to elevated temperature and pressure have been performed. An objective of the NRC program is to gain an understanding of the behavior of typical existing and planned containment designs subject to postulated severe accident conditions. This understanding has led to the development of experimentally verified analytical tools that can be applied to accurately predict their ultimate capacities useful in developing severe accident mitigation schemes. Finally, speculation on the response of containments subjected to severe accident conditions is presented.

  13. Severe accident analysis in a two-loop PWR nuclear power plant with the ASTEC code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadek, Sinisa; Amizic, Milan; Grgic, Davor [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing

    2013-12-15

    The ASTEC/V2.0 computer code was used to simulate a hypothetical severe accident sequence in the nuclear power plant Krsko, a 2-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant. ASTEC is an integral code jointly developed by Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN, France) and Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS, Germany) to assess nuclear power plant behaviour during a severe accident. The analysis was conducted in 2 steps. First, the steady state calculation was performed in order to confirm the applicability of the plant model and to obtain correct initial conditions for the accident analysis. The second step was the calculation of the station blackout accident with a leakage of the primary coolant through degraded reactor coolant pump seals, which was a small LOCA without makeup capability. Two scenarios were analyzed: one with and one without the auxiliary feedwater (AFW). The latter scenario, without the AFW, resulted in earlier core damage. In both cases, the accident ended with a core melt and a reactor pressure vessel failure with significant release of hydrogen. In addition, results of the ASTEC calculation were compared with results of the RELAP5/SCDAPSIM calculation for the same transient scenario. The results comparison showed a good agreement between predictions of those 2 codes. (orig.)

  14. Economic consequences of major accidents in the industrial plants: The case of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These last years, newspapers head-lines have reported various accidents (Mexico City, Bhopal, Chernobyl, ...) which have drawn attention to the fact that the major technological risk is now a reality and that, undoubtedly, industrial decision-makers ought to integrate it into their preoccupations. In addition to the sometimes considerable human problems such accidents engender, their economic consequences may be such that they become significant on a national or even international scale. The aim of the present paper is to analyse these economic effects by using the particular context of a nuclear power plant. The author has deliberately limited his subject to the consequences of a major accident, that is to say a sudden event, theoretically unforeseen and beyond man's control. The qualification major means an accident of which the consequences extend far beyond the industrial plant itself. The direct and indirect economic consequences are analysed from the responsibility point of view as well as from the national and international community's point of view. A paragraph explains how the coverage of the costs can rely on the cooperation of a number of parties: responsible company, state, insurers, customers, etc. The study is broadly based on the experience resulting from the two major accidents which happened in the nuclear industry these last years (Three Mile Island in 1979 and Chernobyl in 1986) and makes use of more theoretical considerations, for example in the field of the economic evaluation of human life. (author). 58 refs, 2 figs, 12 tabs

  15. Safety and risk questions following the nuclear incidents and accidents in Japan. Summary final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the nuclear accidents in Japan, GRS has carried out in-depth investigations of the events. On the one hand, the accident sequences in the affected units have been analysed from various viewpoints. On the other hand, the transferability of the findings to German plants has been examined to possibly make recommendations for safety improvements. The accident sequences at Fukushima Daiichi have been traced with as much detail as possible based on all available information. Additional insights have been drawn from thermohydraulic analyses with the GRS code system ATHLET-CD/COCOSYS focusing on the events in units 2 and 3, e.g. with regard to core damage and the state of the containments in the first days of the accident sequence. In-depth investigations have also been carried out on topics such as natural external hazards, electrical power supply or organizational measures. In addition, methodological studies on further topics related with the accidents have been performed. Through a detailed analysis of the relevant data from the events in Japan, the basis for an in-depth examination of the transferability to German plants was created. It was found that an implementation of most of the insights gained from the investigations had already been initiated as part of the GRS information notice 2012/02. Further findings have been communicated to the federal government and introduced into other relevant bodies, e.g. the Nuclear Safety Standards Committee (KTA) or the Reactor Safety Commission (RSK).

  16. The water role in a nuclear accident - Measures to be taken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of nuclear accidents or natural disasters, the contaminated water plays a large part in the environment contamination. This is illustrated by two examples: Agadir earthquake and Chernobyl accident. In Agadir earthquake, the contamination of the water was caused by the mutiple breaking down of the water pipes, and in Chernobyl accident it was derived from: -The reactor cooling water; -The radioactive fallout; -The radioactive clouds. The water concentrates incessantly the radioactivity proceeding by the hydrological cycle: Evaporation, precipitation, flowing. The radio-activity concentration by the water and the atmosphere contamination are explained in this paper. In USSR, the radioactive contamination has affected several Ukranian rivers and the artificial lake of Kiev. The measures that have been taken in USSR and in the next countries to prevent the radioactive contamination propagation by water have been discussed. The reparation of chernobyl accident damages is estimated to three milliard $. Theoretically, every nation, using nuclear energy, has a protection system for the accidental situations but none of them has a second protection system for the accidental situations occuring in the distance. The measures to be taken for the latter situations, particularly in Morocco, have been cited. The lessons learnt from the chernobyl accident have served to broaden the inter-national cooperation fields. 15 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  17. Fuel performance under transients, and accident management using Geno-Fuzzy concept for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulation of Pressurized Water Reactor Power Plant (PWR) has been investigated by simulating all components installed in the power plant namely: the reactor core, steam generator, pressurizer, reactor coolant pumps, and turbine. All plant components have been introduced. This simulator is useful for transient analysis studies, engineering designs, safety analysis, and accident management. Accidents in Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Plant (PWR NPP) may be occurred either due to component failures or human error during maintenance or operation. The main target of accident management is to mitigate accidents if it occurs. The Geno-Fuzzy concept is the way to select some important plant state variables as a gene for the overall plant state chromosome. The selected genes are: reactor power, primary coolant pressure, steam generator water level, and onset boiling on clad surface which has direct impact on fuel behavior. Each of these genes has associated fuzzy level. The main objective of Geno-Fuzzy is turning the plant gene from abnormal states to the normal state by associated control variable using the inference wise fuzzy technique. The Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Plant simulator has been tested for a typical PWR, for normal transients, Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS), and using the proposed Geno-Fuzzy concept for accident management, which gives very good results in reactor accident mitigation. Some of these tested accidents are; reactor control rod ejection, change in turbine steam load, and loss of coolant flow, which have direct effects on fuel safety and performance. The parameters affecting the behavior of the reactor fuel integrity are analyzed to be considered in future reactor designs. (author)

  18. Remediation strategies after nuclear or radiological accidents: part 2 - accident scenarios for assessing effectiveness of cleanup procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochedo, Elaine R.R. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Instalacoes Nucleares], e-mail: erochedo@cnen.gov.br; Silva, Diogo N.G.; Wasserman, Maria A.V.; Conti, Luiz F.C. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: dneves@ird.gov.br, e-mail: angelica@ird.gov.br, e-mail: lfcconti@ird.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    The selection of protective measures and remediation strategies after an accident needs to be based on previously established criteria, to minimize unnecessary stress and the exposures involved in cleanup operations that are not effective in reducing doses to the public. In a first stage, a database describing the countermeasures has been developed including their efficiency on removing contamination from surfaces. However, to assess the effectiveness of cleanup procedures in reducing doses to members of the public, it was necessary to derive specific scenarios in order to simulate the long term behavior of the material in the environment, since the contribution of different surfaces to doses changes with time after contamination. A basic release and exposure scenario was developed to assess the dose reduction due to the mostly used procedures. Exposure scenarios were selected to fit the surroundings of the Brazilian nuclear power plants in Angra dos Reis. Simulations were performed using SIEM, the integrated system for dose assessment after contamination events, developed at IRD. The contamination of urban environments was assessed for Cs-137, as this was found to be the most relevant long term radionuclide to contribute to doses to member of the public. The effects on reducing external exposures were assessed for periods up to 50 years after the contamination. For agricultural areas, the focus was on ingestion doses from contamination with I-131 for periods up to 1 year after contamination. Results will be complemented on the database in order to support multi-criteria decision making processes after accidents. (author)

  19. Absorbed dose by thyroid in case of nuclear accidents; Dose absorvida pela tireoide em casos de acidentes nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Laelia; Attie, Marcia Regina Pereira [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Amaral, Ademir [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    Radioisotopes of iodine are produced in abundance in nuclear fission reactions, and great amounts of radioiodine may be released into the environment in case of a nuclear reactor accident. Thyroid gland is among the most radiosensitive organs due to its capacity to concentrate iodine. The aim of this work was to evaluate the importance of contributions of internally deposited iodines ({sup 131}I, {sup 132}I, {sup 133}I, {sup 134}I and {sup 135}I) to the dose absorbed to thyroid follicle and to the whole organ, after internal contamination by those isotopes. For internal dose calculation, the code of particles transport MCNP4C was employed. The results showed that, in case of nuclear accidents, the contribution of short-lived iodines for total dose is about 45% for thyroid of newborn and about 40% for thyroid of adult. Thus, these contributions should not be neglected in a prospective evaluation of risks associated to internal contamination by radioactive iodine. (author)

  20. The accident in Fukushima. Preliminary report on the accident progress in the nuclear power plants as a consequence of the earth quake on 11th March 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preliminary report on the accident progress in the nuclear power plants as a consequence of the earth quake on 11th March 2011 describes the chronologic sequence of the accident in the different units of the power plant. The measures for mitigation of the accident impact at the site of Fukushima Daiichi and Fukushima Daini included the efforts to reach and maintain stable plant conditions. The issue radiological situation includes an estimation of the air-borne radionuclide release, the contamination of the environment and the sea water, measures for protection of the public. The lessons learned following the NISA and IAEA fact finding missions and the open questions are summarized.

  1. Chernobyl nuclear accident revealed from the 7010 m Muztagata ice core record

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN LiDe; YAO TanDong; WU GuangJian; LI Zhen; XU BaiQing; LI YueFang

    2007-01-01

    The total activity variation with depth from a 41.6 m Muztagata ice core drilled at 7010 m,recorded not only the 1963 radioactive layer due to the thermonuclear test,but also clearly the radioactive peak released by the Chernobyl accident in 1986.This finding indicates that the Chernobyl nuclear accident was clearly recorded in alpine glaciers in the Pamirs of west China,and the layer can be potentially used for ice core dating in other high alpine glaciers in the surrounding regions.

  2. Analysis of Adolescent Awareness of Radiation: Marking the First Anniversary of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Bang Ju [Korean Science Reporters Association, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Marking the first anniversary of the Fukushima nuclear accident, which took place on March 11th, 2011, the level of adolescent awareness and understanding of radiation was surveyed, and the results were then compared with those for adults with the same questionnaires conducted at similar times. A qualitative survey and frequency analysis were made for the design of the study methodology. Those surveyed were limited to 3rd grade middle school students, 15 years of age, who are the future generation. The questionnaire, which is a survey tool, was directly distributed to the students and 2,217 answers were analysed. The questionnaires were composed of 40 questions, and it was found that Cronbach's coefficient was high with 'self awareness of radiation' at 0.494, 'risk of radiation' at 0.843, 'benefit of radiation' at 0.748, 'radiological safety control' at 0.692, 'information sources of radiation' at 0.819, and 'impacts of Fukushima accident'. The results of the survey analysis showed that the students' knowledge of radiation was not very high with 67.4 points (69.5 points for adults) calculated on a maximum scale of 100 points (converted points). The impacts of the Fukushima nuclear accident were found to be less significant to adolescents than adults, and the rate of answer of 'so' or ' very so' in the following questions demonstrates this well. It was also shown that the impacts of the Fukushima accident to adolescents were comparatively low with 27.0% (38.9% for adults) on the question of 'attitude changed against nuclear power due to the Fukushima accident,' 65.7%(86.6% for adults) on the question of 'the damages from the Fukushima accident was immeasurably huge,' and 65.0% (86.3% for adults) on 'the Fukushima accident contributed to raising awareness on the safety of nuclear power plants'. The adolescents had a high rate of &apos

  3. Analysis of Adolescent Awareness of Radiation: Marking the First Anniversary of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marking the first anniversary of the Fukushima nuclear accident, which took place on March 11th, 2011, the level of adolescent awareness and understanding of radiation was surveyed, and the results were then compared with those for adults with the same questionnaires conducted at similar times. A qualitative survey and frequency analysis were made for the design of the study methodology. Those surveyed were limited to 3rd grade middle school students, 15 years of age, who are the future generation. The questionnaire, which is a survey tool, was directly distributed to the students and 2,217 answers were analysed. The questionnaires were composed of 40 questions, and it was found that Cronbach's coefficient was high with 'self awareness of radiation' at 0.494, 'risk of radiation' at 0.843, 'benefit of radiation' at 0.748, 'radiological safety control' at 0.692, 'information sources of radiation' at 0.819, and 'impacts of Fukushima accident'. The results of the survey analysis showed that the students' knowledge of radiation was not very high with 67.4 points (69.5 points for adults) calculated on a maximum scale of 100 points (converted points). The impacts of the Fukushima nuclear accident were found to be less significant to adolescents than adults, and the rate of answer of 'so' or ' very so' in the following questions demonstrates this well. It was also shown that the impacts of the Fukushima accident to adolescents were comparatively low with 27.0% (38.9% for adults) on the question of 'attitude changed against nuclear power due to the Fukushima accident,' 65.7%(86.6% for adults) on the question of 'the damages from the Fukushima accident was immeasurably huge,' and 65.0% (86.3% for adults) on 'the Fukushima accident contributed to raising awareness on the safety of nuclear power plants'. The adolescents had a high rate of 'average' answers on most of the questions compared with adults, and it can be construed that this resulted from adolescent awareness of

  4. An investigation of awareness on the Fukushima nuclear accident and Radioactive contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jeong Chul; Song, Young Ju [Dept. of Consumer Safety, Korea Consumer Agency, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate Korean people's awareness about impact of the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident in Japan and radioactive contamination caused by it. The respondents of the survey were 600 adults who resided in the Seoul metropolitan area. The survey results show that the majority of respondents were concerned about impact of radiation leakage that might have an effect on our environment. They were worried about radioactive contamination of foodstuffs, particularly fishery products and preferred to acquire information through TV(49.8%) or the Internet(31.3%). Meanwhile, respondents mentioned that the information on the Fukushima nuclear accident and radioactive contamination had not been sufficient and they didn't know well about the follow-up measures of the government on the accident. Most respondents answered that information on radioactive contamination levels and safety of foods and environment was most needed. The results of this study could be useful to enhance awareness on radioactivity and improve risk communication on nuclear power plant accidents.

  5. Real time analysis for atmospheric dispersions for Fukushima nuclear accident: Mobile phone based cloud computing assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Possible nuclear accident is simulated for the atmospheric contaminations. • The simulations results give the relative importance of the fallouts. • The cloud computing of IT is performed successfully. • One can prepare for the possible damages of such a NPP accident. • Some other variables can be considered in the modeling. - Abstract: The radioactive material dispersion is investigated by the system dynamics (SD) method. The non-linear complex algorithm could give the information about the hazardous material behavior in the case of nuclear accident. The prevailing westerlies region is modeled for the dynamical consequences of the Fukushima nuclear accident. The event sequence shows the scenario from earthquake to dispersion of the radionuclides. Then, the dispersion reaches two cities in Korea. The importance of the radioactive dispersion is related to the fast and reliable data processing, which could be accomplished by cloud computing concept. The values of multiplications for the wind, plume concentrations, and cloud computing factor are obtained. The highest value is 94.13 in the 206th day for Seoul. In Pusan, the highest value is 15.48 in the 219th day. The source is obtained as dispersion of radionuclide multiplied by 100. The real time safety assessment is accomplished by mobile phone

  6. Radiation protection protocol for environmental defense using nano-scopic water spray in nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • New kind of radiation protection concept is introduced. • The shielding concept is accompanied with the water spray system. • Cheap and practical method is suggested. • The major impact is variable by the random emerging of fission products. - Abstract: The environmental defense system in the nuclear power plants (NPPs) using water spray is investigated. A new kind of radiation protection system modeling is introduced in the case of NPPs accidents. The spray system is added to the conventional radiation protection barriers for the nuclear defense in depth concept where the water is considered as nano-scopic molecular substance. The effectiveness of aqueous solution is verified in a NPPs accident. The quantitative simulation for solubility of radioactive material is performed by the Monte-Carlo method, which is produced in the nuclear fuels. The safety concept is newly modified in the multiple barriers for the post accident. The cheap and simple system is suggested for the ecological safety in the NPPs accident as the political protocol

  7. An advanced accident-protective network system for the nuclear energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an opportunity of the TMI accident formed on March, 1979, some improvements on accident-protective countermeasure of nuclear energy by government and so on have been intended. Along this planning, the Atomic Energy Safety Technical Center has practised a business on accident-protection of nuclear energy under trust of government and so on. And then, the Center expanded some business, such as intention to spread the SPEEDI (system for prediction of environmental emergency dose information) network for the Center for First-aid Countermeasure in Emergency (called Off-site Center) and so on. Here were described on present status and future development of the business on accident protection at a center of the SPEEDI network system, which was a system rapidly to predict in-air concentration of radioactive materials, exposed dose, and so on at circumferential environment under informations on their emission sources (emitted nuclides, emission, emission time, and so on), meteorological conditions and topographical data if a lot of radioactive materials were or anxious to be emitted from a nuclear power station and so on. (G.K.)

  8. Environmental radiation detected at Lin Shin hospital in Taichung during the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is the first evaluation of environmental gamma exposure rates by the Nuclear Medicine Department at Lin Shin Hospital (LSH) in Taichung with Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD-100H) during the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) accident. After the 9.0 MW strong earthquake hit northern Japan on March 11, 2011, a TLD-100H was used to monitor environmental kerma rate at Taichung (2,500 km away from northern Japan) from Mar-08 to Apr-09, 2011 and evaluated kerma rate due to global fallout of the sever FNPP accidents. Exposure rates varied widely among positions close to the PET/CT facility. Observed kerma rates of up to 4.12 ± 0.62 mSv mo-1 indicated an explicit, heavy leakage of photon through the PET/CT facility. No significant contributions were detected at Taichung, Taiwan. Hence, the health effect cause by the 'extra radiation' from FNPP accidents is negligible. As this was a rare case of environmental monitoring during a nuclear power plant accident, its findings are of considerable significance. (author)

  9. What are the consequences of the reactor accident in Fukushima for the evaluation of nuclear risk?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are historical breaks in the relation of risk analysis, risk perception and regulation policy. The year 2011 with the reactor accident in the NPP Fukushima was such a break, especially in Germany. The nuclear phase-out was reduced to ten years the energy policy turnaround received a broad societal agreement. Nuclear facilities loose public acceptance, the risk perception has changed. The Japanese evaluation results on faulty and nontransparent behavior and the lack of governance of responsible persons and authorities including a poor accident management have further decreased the public confidence. A new concept of safety culture for all nuclear facilities including the radioactive waste management is required, the communication processes between plant operator, authorities, science and the public have to be intensified.

  10. Administering of steady iodine in the case of a nuclear accident; La prise d'iode stable en cas d'accident nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    In the case of serious accidents, some nuclear installations, especially the nuclear power plants, can release in atmosphere radioactive elements such radioactive iodine. this radioisotope, will contribute to the populations irradiation and can lead to a thyroid cancer. Consequently tablets of steady iodine are distributed in prevention to the populations living in the vicinity of nuclear power plant. In the case of an alert of radioactive release, the Prefect will order to take these tablets. (N.C.)

  11. Planning for off-site response to radiation accidents in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this publication is to give guidance to those who are responsible for the protection of the public in the event of an accident occurring at a land-based nuclear facility. This guidance should assist in the advance preparation of emergency response plans and implementing procedures. Basic principles of protective measures along with their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Other principles related to emergency planning and the operational response to an emergency are outlined. Although the guidance is primarily oriented towards land-based nuclear power facilities, the guidance does have general application to other types of nuclear facility

  12. Planning for off-site response to radiation accidents in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this manual is to give guidance to those who are responsible for the protection of the public in the event of an accident occurring at a land-based nuclear facility. This guidance should assist in the advance preparation of emergency response plans and implementing procedures. Basic principles of protective measures along with their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Other principles related to emergency planning and the operational response to an emergency are outlined. Although the guidance is primarily oriented toward land-based nuclear power facilities, the guidance does have general application to other types of nuclear facilities

  13. Current state of the communications program concerning nuclear energy following the JCO accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Public trust in nuclear energy was significantly affected by a criticality accident that occurred in September 1999 at JCO's uranium re-conversion plant in Tokai-mura Village, Ibaraki Prefecture, some 120 kilometres north-east of Tokyo. An opinion survey was taken with local citizens in December that year, asking them how their views on nuclear energy changed after the accident. The survey findings indicate a grave fact that the citizens, who had lived in harmony with nuclear energy for the past 40 years, lost their confidence in this energy source because of the accident. The mishap also led to severer public opinion on nuclear energy at the nation-wide level, bringing forth a serious impediment to such projects as the siting of new nuclear power plants, the use of plutonium in light water reactors, intermediate storage of spent nuclear fuel, and the promotion of high-level radioactive waste disposal. Japan Atomic Energy Relations Organisation analysed the critical situation surrounding nuclear energy development in the country. Based on the analysis results, JAERO is now actively promoting an interactive, participatory program that meets people's needs, in an effort to regain public trust in nuclear energy. We, at JAERO, believe that greater importance should be attached to the offer of relevant information to the rising generation that will play a leading role in future society. The most typical of JAERO activities for junior and senior high school students include an Essay Content launched in 1968 in commemoration of Atomic Energy Day on October 26 every year and a Radiation Workshop established in 1978. Through more than 11,000 essays collected from junior and senior high school students across the county, this report discusses how these young people think of the JCO criticality accident and what they expect of nuclear energy development in the years ahead. Amid growing public concern with radiation following the JCO accident, the report also

  14. Practical means for decontamination 9 years after a nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roed, J.; Andersson, K.G.; Prip, H. [eds.

    1995-12-01

    Nine years after the Chernobyl accident, the contamination problems of the most severely affected areas remain unsolved. As a consequence of this, large previously inhabited areas and areas of farmland now lie deserted. An international group of scientists funded by the EU European Collaboration Programme (ECP/4) has investigated in practice a great number of feasible means to solve the current problems. The basic results of this work group are presented in this report that was prepared in a format which facilitates an intercomparison (cost-benefit analysis) of the individual examined techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in various different types of environmental scenarios. Each file containing information on a method or procedure was created by the persons and institutes responsible for the practical trial. Although the long period that has elapsed since the contamination took place has added to the difficulties in removing the radioactive matter, it could be concluded that many of the methods are still capable of reducing the dose level substantially. (au).

  15. Effect of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the risk perception of residents near a nuclear power plant in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Zhou, Ying; Han, Yuting; Hammitt, James K; Bi, Jun; Liu, Yang

    2013-12-01

    We assessed the influence of the Fukushima nuclear accident (FNA) on the Chinese public's attitude and acceptance of nuclear power plants in China. Two surveys (before and after the FNA) were administered to separate subsamples of residents near the Tianwan nuclear power plant in Lianyungang, China. A structural equation model was constructed to describe the public acceptance of nuclear power and four risk perception factors: knowledge, perceived risk, benefit, and trust. Regression analysis was conducted to estimate the relationship between acceptance of nuclear power and the risk perception factors while controlling for demographic variables. Meanwhile, we assessed the median public acceptable frequencies for three levels of nuclear events. The FNA had a significant impact on risk perception of the Chinese public, especially on the factor of perceived risk, which increased from limited risk to great risk. Public acceptance of nuclear power decreased significantly after the FNA. The most sensitive groups include females, those not in public service, those with lower income, and those living close to the Tianwan nuclear power plant. Fifty percent of the survey respondents considered it acceptable to have a nuclear anomaly no more than once in 50 y. For nuclear incidents and serious incidents, the frequencies are once in 100 y and 150 y, respectively. The change in risk perception and acceptance may be attributed to the FNA. Decreased acceptance of nuclear power after the FNA among the Chinese public creates additional obstacles to further development of nuclear power in China and require effective communication strategies.

  16. Assessment of environmental public exposure from a hypothetical nuclear accident for Unit-1 Bushehr nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, M; Ghasemi, M; Amrollahi, R; Khamooshi, C; Parsouzi, Z

    2013-05-01

    Unit-1 of the Bushehr nuclear power plant (BNPP-1) is a VVER-type reactor with 1,000-MWe power constructed near Bushehr city at the coast of the Persian Gulf, Iran. The reactor has been recently operational to near its full power. The radiological impact of nuclear power plant (NPP) accidents is of public concern, and the assessment of radiological consequences of any hypothetical nuclear accident on public exposure is vital. The hypothetical accident scenario considered in this paper is a design-basis accident, that is, a primary coolant leakage to the secondary circuit. This scenario was selected in order to compare and verify the results obtained in the present paper with those reported in the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR 2007) of the BNPP-1 and to develop a well-proven methodology that can be used to study other and more severe hypothetical accident scenarios for this reactor. In the present study, the version 2.01 of the PC COSYMA code was applied. In the early phase of the accidental releases, effective doses (from external and internal exposures) as well as individual and collective doses (due to the late phase of accidental releases) were evaluated. The surrounding area of the BNPP-1 within a radius of 80 km was subdivided into seven concentric rings and 16 sectors, and distribution of population and agricultural products was calculated for this grid. The results show that during the first year following the modeled hypothetical accident, the effective doses do not exceed the limit of 5 mSv, for the considered distances from the BNPP-1. The results obtained in this study are in good agreement with those in the FSAR-2007 report. The agreement obtained is in light of many inherent uncertainties and variables existing in the two modeling procedures applied and proves that the methodology applied here can also be used to model other severe hypothetical accident scenarios of the BNPP-1 such as a small and large break in the reactor coolant system as well

  17. Assessment of environmental public exposure from a hypothetical nuclear accident for Unit-1 Bushehr nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, M; Ghasemi, M; Amrollahi, R; Khamooshi, C; Parsouzi, Z

    2013-05-01

    Unit-1 of the Bushehr nuclear power plant (BNPP-1) is a VVER-type reactor with 1,000-MWe power constructed near Bushehr city at the coast of the Persian Gulf, Iran. The reactor has been recently operational to near its full power. The radiological impact of nuclear power plant (NPP) accidents is of public concern, and the assessment of radiological consequences of any hypothetical nuclear accident on public exposure is vital. The hypothetical accident scenario considered in this paper is a design-basis accident, that is, a primary coolant leakage to the secondary circuit. This scenario was selected in order to compare and verify the results obtained in the present paper with those reported in the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR 2007) of the BNPP-1 and to develop a well-proven methodology that can be used to study other and more severe hypothetical accident scenarios for this reactor. In the present study, the version 2.01 of the PC COSYMA code was applied. In the early phase of the accidental releases, effective doses (from external and internal exposures) as well as individual and collective doses (due to the late phase of accidental releases) were evaluated. The surrounding area of the BNPP-1 within a radius of 80 km was subdivided into seven concentric rings and 16 sectors, and distribution of population and agricultural products was calculated for this grid. The results show that during the first year following the modeled hypothetical accident, the effective doses do not exceed the limit of 5 mSv, for the considered distances from the BNPP-1. The results obtained in this study are in good agreement with those in the FSAR-2007 report. The agreement obtained is in light of many inherent uncertainties and variables existing in the two modeling procedures applied and proves that the methodology applied here can also be used to model other severe hypothetical accident scenarios of the BNPP-1 such as a small and large break in the reactor coolant system as well

  18. Environmental radiation at Izu-Oshima after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental radiation at Izu-Oshima Island was observed 6 months after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F1-NPP). A car-borne survey of the dose rate in air was conducted over the entire island and the results were compared with measurements performed in 2005 (i.e. before the accident). The activity concentrations of 134Cs and 137Cs were also measured using a germanium detector. The dose rate in air was found to be 2.9±1.2 times higher than that in 2005 and 134Cs was detected on Izu-Oshima Island. These results are attributed to the accident at the F1-NPP. (authors)

  19. Knowledge data base for severe accident management of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the safety enhancement of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), continuous efforts are very important to take in the up-to-date scientific and technical knowledge positively and to reflect them into the safety regulation. The purpose of the present study is to gather effectively the scientific and technical knowledge about the severe accident (SA) phenomena and the accident management (AM) for prevention and mitigation of SA, and to take in the experimental data by participating in the international cooperative experiments regarding the important SA phenomena and the effectiveness of AM. Based on those data and knowledge, JNES is developing and improving severe accident analysis models to maintain the SA analysis codes and the AM knowledge base for assessment of the NPPs in Japan. The activities in fiscal year 2012 are as follows; Analytical study on OECD/NEA projects such as MCCI, SERENA and SFP projects, and support in making regulation for SA. (author)

  20. Estimates of the financial consequences of nuclear-power-reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report develops preliminary techniques for estimating the financial consequences of potential nuclear power reactor accidents. Offsite cost estimates are based on CRAC2 calculations. Costs are assigned to health effects as well as property damage. Onsite costs are estimated for worker health effects, replacement power, and cleanup costs. Several classes of costs are not included, such as indirect costs, socio-economic costs, and health care costs. Present value discounting is explained and then used to calculate the life cycle cost of the risks of potential reactor accidents. Results of the financial consequence estimates for 156 reactor-site combinations are summarized, and detailed estimates are provided in an appendix. The results indicate that, in general, onsite costs dominate the consequences of potential accidents

  1. Chapter 22. Serious accidents in the A1 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter two serious reactor accidents in the A1 nuclear power plant in Jaslovske Bohunice (Slovak Republic) are described. The first accident - during replacement of the fuel assembly the fuel element went off from the reactor on January 1976. Residual power of reactor at the time of the fuel assembly outspreaded from the channel H05 (January 5, 1976, 11:55 hours) was determined at 0.63% of the nominal power of the reactor where he worked before shutdown, i. e. residual power of the reactor was about 2.9 MWt. Leakage of carbon dioxide was stopped by loading machine. Maximum temperature 565 grad C was registered by measurement of uranium temperature. As it appeared later, overheating damaged the cover of several fuel assemblies in the central zone and the inner peripheral border zone. During the accident power radiation situation grew worse in most areas of plant. Released radioactive gases caused the maximum effective dose 10-8 Sv per capita in the territory to a distance of 25 km from the plant. At that time permitted individual dose per individual of the population was 5 mSv/year. The consequences of the accident on technological equipment are analyzed. Dealing with the aftermath of the accident on the technological equipment is described. Planned replacement of spent nuclear fuel in a reactor in the technology channel C05 started on 22 February 1977 in the afternoon. The exchange was taking place in the reactor operation. The electrical power was 93 MW during refuelling. Exchange by filling machine took place normally. Launching of the fuel assembly from cool zone into the reactor core came after. In this operation, which began at about 18:13 pm fuel assembly was overheated. Consequently, the influence of high temperature induced its destruction, which caused damage of 'decompression' heavy water tube container. Big leaking was formed and heavy water began to penetrate into the gas of the primary circuit. The operator immediately stopped the reactor

  2. Capabilities of the Los Alamos National Laboratory in nuclear target technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targets are made at Los Alamos for experiments at the Ion Beam Facility (Van de Graaff), the Medium Energy Physics Facility (LAMPF), and for experiments conducted at many other accelerators in the US and Europe. Thin, isotopic targets are made by sputtering and evaporation. Versatile, large-scale facilities exist for ceramics and plastics fabrication, electroplating, powder metallurgy, fabrication by pressing, casting and rolling, chemical and physical vapor deposition and sputtering. Special developments include ultra-precision machining, cryogenic targets and shaped-foil targets. 20 references

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory case studies on decommissioning of research reactors and a small nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, M.D.

    1998-12-01

    Approximately 200 contaminated surplus structures require decommissioning at Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the last 10 years, 50 of these structures have undergone decommissioning. These facilities vary from experimental research reactors to process/research facilities contaminated with plutonium-enriched uranium, tritium, and high explosives. Three case studies are presented: (1) a filter building contaminated with transuranic radionuclides; (2) a historical water boiler that operated with a uranyl-nitrate solution; and (3) the ultra-high-temperature reactor experiment, which used enriched uranium as fuel.

  4. National plan of response to a major nuclear or radiological accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this document presents the response strategies and principles to be applied in the case of a major nuclear or radiological accident. It presents the general framework and the 8 reference situations which are used as references for the plan. It presents the general organisation of crisis management by the State (initial organisation, organisation at the national level, communication channel, international channels, case of transport of radioactive materials, responsibility of the various actors). Then, it presents the strategies of response, i.e., a global strategy and more specific strategies applicable in different sectors or fields: for the control of the concerned installation or transport, in the case of transport of radioactive materials, for the protection of the population, for the taking into care, for communication, for the continuity of social and economic life, at the European level, for the post-accidental management. The second part is a guide which contains sheets describing reactions in different situations: uncertainty, accident in an installation resulting in an either immediate and short, or immediate and long, or delayed and long release, accident in a transport of radioactive materials with potential release, accident occurring abroad which may have a more or less significant impact in France, and accident at sea

  5. Internal event analysis for Laguna Verde Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant. Accident sequence quantification and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Level 1 results of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant PRA are presented in the Internal Event Analysis for Laguna Verde Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant, CNSNS-TR 004, in five volumes. The reports are organized as follows: CNSNS-TR 004 Volume 1: Introduction and Methodology. CNSNS-TR4 Volume 2: Initiating Event and Accident Sequences. CNSNS-TR 004 Volume 3: System Analysis. CNSNS-TR 004 Volume 4: Accident Sequence Quantification and Results. CNSNS-TR 005 Volume 5: Appendices A, B and C. This volume presents the development of the dependent failure analysis, the treatment of the support system dependencies, the identification of the shared-components dependencies, and the treatment of the common cause failure. It is also presented the identification of the main human actions considered along with the possible recovery actions included. The development of the data base and the assumptions and limitations in the data base are also described in this volume. The accident sequences quantification process and the resolution of the core vulnerable sequences are presented. In this volume, the source and treatment of uncertainties associated with failure rates, component unavailabilities, initiating event frequencies, and human error probabilities are also presented. Finally, the main results and conclusions for the Internal Event Analysis for Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant are presented. The total core damage frequency calculated is 9.03x 10-5 per year for internal events. The most dominant accident sequences found are the transients involving the loss of offsite power, the station blackout accidents, and the anticipated transients without SCRAM (ATWS). (Author)

  6. Final report on the accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations of Tokyo Electric Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station (hereafter, 'Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS') and Fukushima Dai-ni Nuclear Power Station (hereafter, 'Fukushima Dai-ni NPS') of Tokyo Electric Power Company (hereafter, 'TEPCO') were damaged in the Tohoku District - off the Pacific Ocean Earthquake and the ensuing tsunami. In particular, an extremely severe accident measuring Level 7 on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES) occurred at the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS. The Investigation Committee was established on May 24, 2011 by a Cabinet decision. Its mission is to make policy recommendations, by investigating and verifying the causes of the accident and ensuing damage, on measures to prevent the further spread of damage caused by the accident and a recurrence of similar accidents in the future. The Investigation Committee inspected the accident sites including the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS and the Fukushima Dai-ni NPS, and interviewed individuals concerned, including the mayors and residents of relevant municipalities. The number of interviewees reached 772 in total. The Investigation Committee published its Interim Report on December 26, 2011 and its Final Report on July 23, 2012. The Final Report, with the Interim Report as its complementary piece, describes mainly the results of investigations after the Interim Report. This Executive Summary is a condensed version of the Final Report, mainly Chapter VI of the main text which analyzes the problems and provides recommendations. The contents of the parenthesis [ ] that follow the title indicate the relevant corresponding locations in the Final Report (Main text). Recommendations are indicated in bold. (author)

  7. Examination of some assumed severe reactor accidents at the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge and analysis methods of severe accidents at nuclear power plants and of subsequent response of primary system and containment have been developed in last few years to the extent that realistic source tems of the specified accident sequences can be calculated for the Finnish nuclear power plants. The objective of this investigation was to calculate the source terms of off-site consequences brought about by some selected severe accident sequences initiated by the total loss of on-site and off-site AC power at the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant. The results describing the estimated off-site health risks are expressed as conditional assuming that the accident has taken place, because the probabilities of the occurence of the accident sequences considered have not been analysed in this study. The range and probabilities of occurence of health detriments are considered by calculating consequences in different weeather conditions and taking into account the annual frequency of each weather condition and statistical population distribution. The calculational results indicate that the reactor building provides and additional holdup and deposition of radioactive substance (except coble gases) released from the containment. Furthermore, the release fractions of the core inventory to the environment of volatile fission products such as iodine, cesium and tellurium remain under 0.03. No early health effects are predicted for the surrounding population in case the assumed short-tem countermeasures are performed effectively. Acute health effects are extremely improbable even without any active countermeasure. By reducing the long-term exposure from contaminated agricultural products, the collective dose from natural long-term background radiation, for instance in the sector of 30 degrees towards the southern Finland up to the distance of 300 kilometers, would be expected to increase with 2-20 percent depending on the release considered

  8. Milk radioactivity in Serbia from Cernobyl nuclear disaster in 1986. to Fukushima accident in 2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitorović Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radionucleides, which are commonly released into the atmosphere after accidents on nuclear plants, by atmospheric precipitation fall onto the earth, are deposited in the soil, an consequently contaminate the environment, getting into the food chain. Considering that milk represents a kind of food that is consumed by all people, especially children, with the aim to protect the population after Cernobil accident, from then to today, constant long-term monitoring of antropogenic radionucleide (137Cs presence in milk samples has been carried out, at almost comlete teritory of Serbia. Beside that, immediately after the nuclear accidents in Fukushima power plants, during march and april 2011. laboratory for radiation hygiene at the Faculty of veterinary medicine in Belgrade, carried out a special monitoring of radioactivity (40K , 131I 137Cs in dairy cow, sheep and goat milk, at 30 localities in Serbia. The obtained results showed that the activity of 137Cs, as a consequence of Chernobyl accident, in milk at the teritory of Serbia was below limit detection. Despite a large distance between Japan and Serbia, traces of 131I and 137Cs were detected in sheep and goat milk samples in april 2011., but considering their low activity, they do not represent a radiation risk for population in Serbia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke republike Srbije, br. TR 31003 i br. TR 34013

  9. Assessment of the Impact on Ireland of the 2011 Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a summary of the events which led to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP and of the impact on Ireland of the resulting releases of radioactivity. It constitutes a comprehensive record and single point of reference for all of the data generated by the additional environmental monitoring which was performed in Ireland. Trace amounts of radioactive isotopes consistent with the Fukushima nuclear accident were detected in samples of air, rainwater and milk collected in Ireland during the period March to May 2011. The activities were at levels so low as to be only detectable with highly sensitive radio-analytical instrumentation. As such they were of no radiological significance in Ireland and no protective measures were required. The levels measured were consistent with those measured elsewhere in Europe. On the basis of the low levels of radioactivity detected, monitoring of other samples such as drinking water, other foods, grass and soils was not warranted. The accident proved a good test of Ireland's capacity to respond effectively to a nuclear emergency. It demonstrated that a comprehensive monitoring network capable of measuring even trace levels of radioactivity in the environment is in place. In addition, it showed the effectiveness of atmospheric dispersion models used by RPII as part of its technical assessment capability. However, it should be noted that for an accident closer to Ireland, a much larger monitoring response would almost certainly be required

  10. SAMPSON Parallel Computation for Sensitivity Analysis of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, M.; Bautista Gomez, L.; Maruyama, N.; Naitoh, M.; Matsuoka, S.; Cappello, F.

    2014-06-01

    On March 11th 2011 a high magnitude earthquake and consequent tsunami struck the east coast of Japan, resulting in a nuclear accident unprecedented in time and extents. After scram started at all power stations affected by the earthquake, diesel generators began operation as designed until tsunami waves reached the power plants located on the east coast. This had a catastrophic impact on the availability of plant safety systems at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi, leading to the condition of station black-out from unit 1 to 3. In this article the accident scenario is studied with the SAMPSON code. SAMPSON is a severe accident computer code composed of hierarchical modules to account for the diverse physics involved in the various phases of the accident evolution. A preliminary parallelization analysis of the code was performed using state-of-the-art tools and we demonstrate how this work can be beneficial to the nuclear safety analysis. This paper shows that inter-module parallelization can reduce the time to solution by more than 20%. Furthermore, the parallel code was applied to a sensitivity study for the alternative water injection into TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi unit 3. Results show that the core melting progression is extremely sensitive to the amount and timing of water injection, resulting in a high probability of partial core melting for unit 3.

  11. Radioactivity analyses of food and drinking water in China following the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To summarize the analytical results of radioactivity in the food and drinking water nationwide following the Fukushima nuclear accident, and to evaluate its possible contamination to the public health in China. Methods: According to the national standard methods and IAEA, FDA correlative references,the scheme was established on sampling and measurements in food and drinking water after the breakout of the accident. The quality control was requested on the sampling, analyses and data report. Results: Trace artificial radioactive isotope of 131I was measured in spinach samples on 2 April 2011 in Beijing. Subsequently 131I was found in 10 kinds of growing leaves vegetables (open field)nationwide. The maximum detectable activity of 131I in vegetables was about 3.1 Bq/kg. Since 3 May 2011, the concentration of 131I has been below the detection limits.No artificial radionuclide was detectable in all of milk, drinking water and marine products samples during March to December, 2011. Conclusions: The food and drinking water measurements in China following the Fukushima nuclear accident denoted that the minor amounts of 131I in vegetables might result in very low absorbed dose and induce no impact on human health. The maximum detectable activity of 131I in vegetables was close to that reported in European countries,and much less than that measured in China immediately after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. (authors)

  12. Error-Based Accidents and Security Incidents in Nuclear Materials Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazard and risk assessments, along with human error analysis and mitigation techniques, have long been mainstays of effective safety programs. These tools have revealed that worker errors contributing to or resulting in accidents are often the consequence of ineffective system conditions, process features, or individual employee characteristics. At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), security, safety, human error, and organizational analysts determined that the system-induced human errors that make accidents more likely also are contributing to security incidents. A similar set of system conditions has been found to underlie deliberate, non-malevolent deviations from proper security practices - termed breaches - that also can result in a security incident. In fiscal-year (FY) 2002, LANL's Security Division therefore established the ESTHER (Enhanced Security Through Human Error Reduction) program to identify and reduce the influence of the factors that underlie employee errors and breaches and, in turn, security incidents. Recognizing the potential benefits of this program and approach, in FY2004 the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Security Policy (DOE-SO) funded an expansion of ESTHER implementation to the causal assessment and reporting of security incidents at other DOE sites. This presentation will focus on three applications of error/breach assessment and mitigation techniques. One use is proactive, accomplished through the elimination of contributors to error, whereas two are reactive, implemented in response to accidents or security incidents as well as to near misses, to prevent recurrence. The human performance and safety bases of these techniques will be detailed. Associated tools - including computer-based assessment training and web-based incident reporting modules developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - will be discussed

  13. Reflections on the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident toward social-scientific literacy and engineering resilience

    CERN Document Server

    Carson, Cathryn; Jensen, Mikael; Juraku, Kohta; Nagasaki, Shinya; Tanaka, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on nuclear engineering education in the post-Fukushima era. It was edited by the organizers of the summer school held in August 2011 in University of California, Berkeley, as part of a collaborative program between the University of Tokyo and UC Berkeley. Motivated by the particular relevance and importance of social-scientific approaches to various crucial aspects of nuclear technology, special emphasis was placed on integrating nuclear science and engineering with social science. The book consists of the lectures given in 2011 summer school and additional chapters that cover developments in the past three years since the accident. It provides an arena for discussions to find and create a renewed platform for engineering practices, and thus nuclear engineering education, which are essential in the post-Fukushima era for nurturing nuclear engineers who need to be both technically competent and trusted in society.

  14. Fission products behaviour in UO2 submitted to nuclear severe accident conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, E.; Bès, R.; Martin, P.; Pontillon, Y.; Solari, P. L.; Salome, M.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this work was to study the molybdenum chemistry in UO2 based materials, known as SIMFUELS. These materials could be used as an alternative to irradiated nuclear fuels in the study of fission products behaviour during a nuclear severe accident. UO2 samples doped with 12 stable isotopes of fission products were submitted to annealing tests in conditions representative to intermediate steps of severe accidents. Samples were characterized by SEM-EDS and XAS. It was found that Mo chemistry seems to be more complex than what is normally estimated by thermodynamic calculations: XAS spectra indicate the presence of Mo species such as metallic Mo, MoO2, MoO3 and Cs2MoO4.

  15. Reactions of psychiatric patients to the Three Mile Island nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromet, E.; Schulberg, H.C.; Dunn, L.

    1982-06-01

    The reaction of patients in the community mental health system to the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island (TMI), Middletown, Pa, were assessed. The sample was composed of 151 patients from the TMI area and 64 patients from a comparison site where a similar nuclear plant is located. Mental health status was determined for the period immediately after the accident, nine to ten months later, and one year later. No significant differences were found between the TMI group and the comparison group. To isolate risk factors within the TMI group, patients who were most distressed were compared with patients with the least distress. The results showed that quality of network support and viewing TMI as dangerous were significantly associated with mental health.

  16. Pilot program: NRC severe reactor accident incident response training manual: US Nuclear Regulatory Commission response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This pilot training manual has been written to fill the need for a general text on NRC response to reactor accidents. The manual is intended to be the foundation for a course for all NRC response personnel. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Response is the fifth in a series of volumes that collectively summarize the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) emergency response during severe power reactor accidents and provide necessary background information. This volume describes NRC response modes, organizations, and official positions; roles of other federal agencies are also described briefly. Each volume serves, respectively, as the text for a course of instruction in a series of courses for NRC response personnel. These materials do not provide guidance or license requirements for NRC licensees. Each volume is accompanied by an appendix of slides that can be used to present this material. The slides are called out in the text

  17. Temporal change of radiocesium level in the school swimming pools in Kawamata after Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tremendous amount of radioactive nuclides were released into the environment due to the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. In order to understand the behavior of these radioactive nuclides, we have investigated radiocesium level in the school swimming pools in Kawamata away about 40 km from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. Water samples were collected on April 30, July 27, and November 9, 2011. These samples were absorbed to ion exchange resin and measured with a Ge semiconductor detector at ICRR, the University of Tokyo for 134Cs(2.06 y) and 137Cs(30.07 y). Change of ratio and concentration of these radiocesium few months after the accident were examined. We also examined the changes of ratio and concentration before and after the replacement of the pools water. The result of the measurements will be reported with review of relevant literatures. (author)

  18. On-site habitability in the event of an accident at a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication is intended to provide technical guidance and a methodology for regulatory bodies, designers, constructors and operators of nuclear facilities to assist them in assessing the current situation as regards on-site habitability for their specific nuclear facilities. Initially, the aim will be to ensure that the ''vital areas'' of the facility which are necessary for the safe operation and shutdown of the facility will remain habitable, in some cases continuously and in others transiently, in the event of an accident inside or outside the installation. The assessment procedure can be used not only for potential radiation accidents but also to consider the effects on habitability of those probable non-radiological events which, if not correctly and effectively countered, could lead to the development of potentially unsafe conditions in the facility itself. 30 refs, 4 figs, 8 tabs

  19. Estimation of the economic impacts of Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident had an immediate negative impact on the economy of the seven-country area which surrounds the plant site. In order to estimate the social effect of the nuclear power plant accident economically, immediate and short term economical impacts on some industrial classification have been evaluated. The economical effect to Metropolitan Edison Co., the circumstantial payment of the insurance and the lawsuit for the compensation for damages, etc. have been estimated at dollar 90 million for the manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industry, dollar 5 million for the tourist industry and dollar 50,000 for agriculture. The total loss for the state and country governments is about dollar 90,000. Metropolitan Edison Co. expended also dollar 111 million for the substitute energy and dollar 760 million for the decontamination cost. Since the lawsuit for the compensation for damages is still continuing, the total impacts cost is calculated more than a billion dollar. (author)

  20. Explanatory memorandum on European Community Document -mutual medical assistance in the case of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report lists the Commissions proposals for further action on its suggestion of mutual health assistance in the event of a nuclear accident. These include surveys and studies, further research on the medical treatment of radiation casualties and the methodology of epidemiological investigations, the promotion of contacts between experts and the attempt to assemble a handbook listing facilities and procedures for mutual assistance. The memorandum explains some of the points further under the headings, ministerial responsibility, legal and procedural issues and policy implications. The United Kingdom position is then stated. The UK government welcomes the proposals provided there is no duplication of work already covered by the IAEA Convention on Assistance in the case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. (U.K.)

  1. Introduction to the constructive idea of Guangdong command center for nuclear accident emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article introduced the constructive idea of Guangdong Command Center for Nuclear Accident briefly through the general design program and thoughts, functional demand, elements of the agency and each functional department, the network design and the requirement of system integraty. The functional requirement and actual goal of the system were also considered on the basis of the condition of the network. The command center was divided into 8 parts according to the constitutive units of Guangdong Command System for Nuclear Accident, including the Commanding Part, Chief Controlling Part, Expert Part, Evaluation Part, Communication Part, News Part, Central Computer Part and Special Group Part. We, furthermore, analyzed and designed the 3 chief systems of the direction system, that is Phonic Communication System, Video and Acoustic System and Network System. At the same time, some suggestion about the Communication System, Telephone Mediating System, Digital Conference System, Amplifying System, Network Design, Security Property and Systemic Integration have been given in this article. (authors)

  2. German offsite accident consequence model for nuclear facilities: further development and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The German Offsite Accident Consequence Model - first applied in the German Risk Study for nuclear power plants with light water reactors - has been further developed with the improvement of several important submodels in the areas of atmospheric dispersion, shielding effects of houses, and the foodchains. To aid interpretation, the presentation of results has been extended with special emphasis on the presentation of the loss of life expectancy. The accident consequence model has been further developed for application to risk assessments for other nuclear facilities, e.g., the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (SNR-300) and the high temperature gas cooled reactor. Moreover the model have been further developed in the area of optimal countermeasure strategies (sheltering, evacuation, etc.) in the case of the Central European conditions. Preliminary considerations has been performed in connection with safety goals on the basis of doses

  3. Input-output model for MACCS nuclear accident impacts estimation¹

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Outkin, Alexander V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bixler, Nathan E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vargas, Vanessa N [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-27

    Since the original economic model for MACCS was developed, better quality economic data (as well as the tools to gather and process it) and better computational capabilities have become available. The update of the economic impacts component of the MACCS legacy model will provide improved estimates of business disruptions through the use of Input-Output based economic impact estimation. This paper presents an updated MACCS model, bases on Input-Output methodology, in which economic impacts are calculated using the Regional Economic Accounting analysis tool (REAcct) created at Sandia National Laboratories. This new GDP-based model allows quick and consistent estimation of gross domestic product (GDP) losses due to nuclear power plant accidents. This paper outlines the steps taken to combine the REAcct Input-Output-based model with the MACCS code, describes the GDP loss calculation, and discusses the parameters and modeling assumptions necessary for the estimation of long-term effects of nuclear power plant accidents.

  4. Economic foundations of limited liability for nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Price-Anderson Act places private financial protection requirements higher than those of any country to ensure that government indemnification will be a last resort. The studies in this volume suggest that, given the presence of nuclear risk, a limitation on liability is the key to maintaining world-wide insurance capacity on a large scale to meet both physical and property claims. The economist finds no paradox in the risk assessments implicit in Price-Anderson, and has no problem with limiting private liability if society is willing to accept the risk. The author concludes that there is no way to rely on social institutions such as free markets or tort law to make the decisions which society must make for itself. 16 references

  5. Development of emergency plans for accidents at civil nuclear sites in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is about the management of the off-site consequences of an accident at a UK civil nuclear installation. It describes the measures that would be taken to protect the public in the vicinity of an installation after an emergency had been declared; and it sets out the respective responsibilities of the operator and the various authorities who would be involved in the emergency. (author)

  6. Radiation effects of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station accident on fishes on offshore area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic modeling of 137Cs accumulation by the fish, as reference aquatic biota species, was developed for evaluating dynamic concentration process, based on monitoring data of 137Cs concentrations in the sea water offshore and long shore after the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station. The dependence of 137Cs dynamic concentration by the fish was provided on 137Cs concentration in the water and fish age. (authors)

  7. Full-Scale Accident Testing in Support of Used Nuclear Fuel Transportation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric R.; Rechard, Rob P.; Sorenson, Ken B.

    2014-09-01

    The safe transport of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste is an important aspect of the waste management system of the United States. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently certifies spent nuclear fuel rail cask designs based primarily on numerical modeling of hypothetical accident conditions augmented with some small scale testing. However, NRC initiated a Package Performance Study (PPS) in 2001 to examine the response of full-scale rail casks in extreme transportation accidents. The objectives of PPS were to demonstrate the safety of transportation casks and to provide high-fidelity data for validating the modeling. Although work on the PPS eventually stopped, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future recommended in 2012 that the test plans be re-examined. This recommendation was in recognition of substantial public feedback calling for a full-scale severe accident test of a rail cask to verify evaluations by NRC, which find that risk from the transport of spent fuel in certified casks is extremely low. This report, which serves as the re-assessment, provides a summary of the history of the PPS planning, identifies the objectives and technical issues that drove the scope of the PPS, and presents a possible path for moving forward in planning to conduct a full-scale cask test. Because full-scale testing is expensive, the value of such testing on public perceptions and public acceptance is important. Consequently, the path forward starts with a public perception component followed by two additional components: accident simulation and first responder training. The proposed path forward presents a series of study options with several points where the package performance study could be redirected if warranted.

  8. Implementation of Defence in Depth at Nuclear Power Plants. Lessons Learnt from the Fukushima Daiichi Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defence in depth (DiD) is a concept that has been used for many years alongside tools to optimise nuclear safety in reactor design, assessment and regulation. The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident raised many questions and gave unique insight into nuclear safety issues, including DiD. In June 2013, the NEA held a Joint Workshop on Challenges and Enhancements to DiD in Light of the Fukushima Daiichi Accident (NEA, 2014), organised by the NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) and the NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA). It was noted at the time that further work would be beneficial to enhance nuclear safety worldwide, especially with regard to the implementation of DiD. Accordingly, a senior-level task group (STG) was set up to produce a regulatory guidance booklet that would assist member countries in the use of DiD, taking into account lessons learnt from the 2011 accident. This regulatory guidance booklet builds on the work of this NEA workshop, of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Western European Nuclear Regulators Association (WENRA) and of other members of the STG. It uses as its basis the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group's Defence in Depth in Nuclear Safety study (INSAG-10) (IAEA, 1996). The booklet provides insights into the implementation of DiD by regulators and emergency management authorities after the Fukushima Daiichi accident, aiming to enhance global harmonisation by providing guidance on: - the background to the DiD concept; - the need for independent effectiveness among the safety provisions for the various DiD levels, to the extent practicable; - the need for greater attention to reinforce prevention and mitigation at the various levels; - the vital importance of ensuring that common cause and common mode failures, especially external events acting in combination, do not lead to breaches of safety provisions at several DiD levels, taking note of the

  9. Emergency response and nuclear risk governance. Nuclear safety at nuclear power plant accidents; Notfallschutz und Risk Governance. Zur nuklearen Sicherheit bei Kernkraftwerksunfaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlen, Johannes

    2014-07-01

    The present study entitled ''Emergency Response and Nuclear Risk Governance: nuclear safety at nuclear power plant accidents'' deals with issues of the protection of the population and the environment against hazardous radiation (the hazards of nuclear energy) and the harmful effects of radioactivity during nuclear power plant accidents. The aim of this study is to contribute to both the identification and remediation of shortcomings and deficits in the management of severe nuclear accidents like those that occurred at Chernobyl in 1986 and at Fukushima in 2011 as well as to the improvement and harmonization of plans and measures taken on an international level in nuclear emergency management. This thesis is divided into a theoretical part and an empirical part. The theoretical part focuses on embedding the subject in a specifically global governance concept, which includes, as far as Nuclear Risk Governance is concerned, the global governance of nuclear risks. Due to their characteristic features the following governance concepts can be assigned to these risks: Nuclear Safety Governance is related to safety, Nuclear Security Governance to security and NonProliferation Governance to safeguards. The subject of investigation of the present study is as a special case of the Nuclear Safety Governance, the Nuclear Emergency governance, which refers to off-site emergency response. The global impact of nuclear accidents and the concepts of security, safety culture and residual risk are contemplated in this context. The findings (accident sequences, their consequences and implications) from the analyses of two reactor accidents prior to Fukushima (Three Mile Iceland in 1979, Chernobyl in 1986) are examined from a historical analytical perspective and the state of the Nuclear Emergency governance and international cooperation aimed at improving nuclear safety after Chernobyl is portrayed by discussing, among other topics, examples of &apos

  10. The second update of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Station accident. June 1 through August 31, 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fukushima Daiichi accident occurred on March 11, 2011. The Japanese government and Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) encountered great deal of difficulties to stabilize the nuclear power reactor. Although the maximum radiation level has decreased, it still accounts for one-fifth of the level detected as of end of August 2011. There are currently growing concerns regarding the complexities of nuclear energy that are faced by the society of Japan. Owing to the occurrence of the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the firm belief on absolute safety of Japan's nuclear power plants has suddenly collapsed. Over the past decades, people tended to trust the government and electric power companies, which assured the safety and ensured about the necessity of nuclear power. However the recent disaster that took place in Fukushima has triggered public anger and distrusts that lead to negative campaigns against nuclear energy, in addition to oppositions against the government and nuclear power companies. The harsh public criticism has forced the government to separate the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) from affiliation with the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). This action was taken since NISA had expressed contradictions with METI, which is the promoting agency for nuclear energy, The nation-wide opinion poll and surveys undertaken by Asahi Shimbun, a leading Japanese daily newspaper, has announced that 74% of respondents supported the policy to phase-out all nuclear power plants with the final goal to completely end the operation of nuclear plants. A mere 14% of the respondents disagree. There are approximately 100,000 or more residents that evacuated from the dangerous Fukushima Daiichi zone and were suffering from immediate threats such as radiation exposure, health problems, sanitary contamination, products shipment ban, business slump, groundless rumors, etc. These conditions have severely weakened their capability to completely recover and

  11. Defining criteria related to wastes for use in multi-criteria decision tool for nuclear accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Diogo N.G.; Guimaraes, Jean R.D., E-mail: dneves@biof.ufrj.br, E-mail: jeanrdg@biof.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho; Rochedo, Elaine R.R.; De Luca, Christiano, E-mail: elainerochedo@gmail.com, E-mail: christiano_luca@hotmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Rochedo, Pedro R.R., E-mail: rochedopedro@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto Alberto Luiz Coimbra de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia

    2013-07-01

    The selection of protective measures and strategies for remediation of contaminated areas after a nuclear accident must be based on previously established criteria in order to prevent stress of the population and the unnecessary exposure of workers. After a nuclear accident resulting in environmental contamination, decisions on remediation of areas is complex due to the large numbers of factors involved in decontamination processes. This work is part of a project which aims to develop a multi-criteria tool to support a decision-making process in cases of a radiological or a nuclear accident in Brazil. First, a database of remediation strategies for contaminated areas was created. In this process, the most relevant aspects for the implementation of these strategies were considered, including technical criteria regarding aspects related to the generation of wastes in a reference urban area, which are discussed in this paper. The specific objective of this study is to define criteria for the aspects of radioactive wastes, resulted by the implementation of some urban measures, in order to be incorporated in a multi-criteria decision tool. Main aspects considered were the type, the amount and the type of treatment necessary for each procedure. The decontamination procedures are then classified according to the selected criteria in order to feed the multi-criteria decision tool. This paper describes the steps for the establishment of these criteria and evaluates the potential for future applications in order to improve predictions and to support the decisions to be made. (author)

  12. Recycling and removal of radionuclides in forest soil resulting from nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of the recent nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl, a re-evaluation of the time required for removal of radionuclides from the upper soil layers has been initiated. Since the end of major atmospheric nuclear weapons testing occurred some 25 years ago, the earth surface has been labeled with the fallout tracers which are readily measurable and can serve as analogues for an actual nuclear accident. The principal objective of this study is to determine the time required for nature to ''clean up'' after a nuclear accident. A series of surface cores has been taken in the acid precipitation region of the forests of Western Pennsylvania and New York both at remote locations and nearby a potential source of radionuclides - the Shippingport and Beaver Valley, PA nuclear power reactors. The measurements for 137Cs show high deposition rates from nuclear weapons fallout at the surface (0-5 cm) section, with factors of 3 to 20 times lower at the deep (10-15 cm) section. The vegetation and topography influence the deposition amounts. Litter deposited from deciduous and coniferous forests, as well as, samples from nearby cleared land, show that the growing forest leaves and needles serve as collection surfaces for atmospheric fallout. This vegetation decomposes into the soil horizons through microbiological process over time. The radionuclide tracers become part of this ecological cycle. Such factors as the soil ion exchange capacity and the degree of complexation with humic substances determine the mobility of the radionuclides. The transport and removal of the radionuclides occurs through radioactive decay, surface runoff, infiltration, evapotranspiration and uptake in vegetation. Each of these factors is discussed with regard to movement of the man-produced radionuclides 137Cs, 90Sr, 239Pu, 240Pu, as well as, the natural radionuclides 210Pb, 238U, 232Th, 226Ra

  13. Experience of technological and natural disasters and their impact on the perceived risk of nuclear accidents after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan 2011: A cross-country analysis

    OpenAIRE

    YAMAMURA, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses cross-country data compiled immediately after the Fukushima nuclear accident to investigate how the experience of such disasters affects the perception of the risk of nuclear accidents. Estimation results show that the perceived risk of a nuclear accident is positively associated with experiencing technological disasters but not with that of natural disasters.

  14. RAPID RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES IN SUPPORT OF FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR ACCIDENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S.

    2012-11-07

    There is an increasing need to develop faster analytical methods for emergency response, including emergency soil and air filter samples. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed analyses on samples received from Japan in April, 2011 as part of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to provide assistance to the government of Japan, following the nuclear event at Fukushima Daiichi, resulting from the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Of particular concern was whether it was safe to plant rice in certain areas (prefectures) near Fukushima. The primary objectives of the sample collection, sample analysis, and data assessment teams were to evaluate personnel exposure hazards, identify the nuclear power plant radiological source term and plume deposition, and assist the government of Japan in assessing any environmental and agricultural impacts associated with the nuclear event. SRNL analyzed approximately 250 samples and reported approximately 500 analytical method determinations. Samples included soil from farmland surrounding the Fukushima reactors and air monitoring samples of national interest, including those collected at the U.S. Embassy and American military bases. Samples were analyzed for a wide range of radionuclides, including strontium-89, strontium-90, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes. Technical aspects of the rapid soil and air filter analyses will be described. The extent of radiostrontium contamination was a significant concern. For {sup 89,90}Sr analyses on soil samples, a rapid fusion technique using 1.5 gram soil aliquots to enable a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of <1 pCi {sup 89,90} Sr /g of soil was employed. This sequential technique has been published recently by this laboratory for actinides and radiostrontium in soil and vegetation. It consists of a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion, pre-concentration steps using iron hydroxide and calcium fluoride precipitations, followed

  15. Robot developments for the nuclear power accident in TEPCO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many robots had been very active at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station since March 11, 2011. Working robots consisted of existing robots such as Packbot firstly entering reactor building and newly developed robots after March 11. Deployment of existing robots required not easy processes such as contract with robot manufacturer, operation training, actual needs and necessary modifications, mockup testing, procedure manual preparation, and real application at site. This article focused on small size robot development in TEPCO, for which the author had been working as remote control technology development team. Robot development started with introduction of DOE-Talon with wired dose ratemeter, and gamma camera and radiation resistant cameras installed on the robot operation vehicle with shielding for high dose measurement around reactor building. Remote technology application committee was set up in June to discuss future needs of robot development and listed required robots corresponding to short-term issues. Development of wired Quince with improved crawler function going up or down stairs had been done with many modifications including cable handling with mockup testing and application experiences. Small size robots for basement survey had been developed for investigation around catwalk in torus room of basement (Survey Runner) and around containment penetration at first floor of unit 1 (FRIGO-MA). Small size robot for high-access survey had been developed for investigation around containment penetration at a high place of first floor of unit 2. (T. Tanaka)

  16. Health care of the sufferers from nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I was invited by Nuclear Regulation Authority, Japan, to join the working group on the health care of the public after the accident of Fukushima nuclear power station, and accepted the invitation to improve the health care for the public in Fukushima prefecture. I had set a hearing with the medical association of the evacuated region to summarize needs for the health care. In the working group, I asked the support by Japanese government for investigation of public health care by the prefectural government, and concretely requested seven matters. These requests have been included in the summary by the working group. (K.Y.)

  17. Working group on public health preparedness for nuclear accidents in the near field, Badhoevedorp, Netherlands, 11-14 October 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the conclusions and recommendations of a working group on the planning of measures to safeguard public health in the event of a nuclear accident. Treatment of irradiated and contaminated people was discussed, and countermeasures such as evacuation or sheltering and iodine prophylaxis were considered. The importance of public information was stressed, and it was recommended that public health authorities develop programmes to select ways of educating and preparing communities located close to the site of a potential nuclear accident

  18. Five Years after the Fukushima Daiichi Accident: Nuclear Safety Improvements and Lessons Learnt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Countries around the world continue to implement safety improvements and corrective actions based on lessons learnt from the 11 March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. This report provides a high-level summary and update on these activities, and outlines further lessons learnt and challenges identified for future consideration. It focuses on actions taken by NEA committees and NEA member countries, and as such is complementary to reports produced by other international organisations. It is in a spirit of openness and transparency that NEA member countries share this information to illustrate that appropriate actions are being taken to maintain and enhance the level of safety at their nuclear facilities. Nuclear power plants are safer today because of these actions. High-priority follow-on items identified by NEA committees are provided to assist countries in continuously benchmarking and improving their nuclear safety practices. (authors)

  19. Role of accident analysis in development of severe accident management guidance for multi-unit CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the role of accident analysis in support of the development of Severe Accident Management Guidance for domestic CANDU reactors. In general, analysis can identify what types of challenges can be expected during accident progression but it cannot specify when and to what degree accident phenomena will occur. SAMG overcomes these limitations by monitoring the actual values of key plant indicators that can be used directly or indirectly to infer the condition of the plant and by establishing setpoints beyond which corrective action is required. Analysis can provide a means to correlate observed post-accident plant behavior against predicted behaviour to improve the confidence in and quality of accident mitigation decisions. (author)

  20. Interim report on the accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations of Tokyo Electric Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Investigation Committee on the Accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations (the Investigation Committee) of Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) was established by the Cabinet decision on May 24, 2011. Its objectives are: to conduct investigation for finding out the causes of accidents at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station (Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS) and Fukushima Dai-ni Nuclear Power Station (Fukushima Dai-ni NPS) of TEPCO as well as the causes of accident damage; and to make policy recommendations for limiting the expansion of damage and preventing reoccurrence of similar accidents. The Investigation Committee has conducted its investigation and evaluation since its first meeting on June 7, 2011. Its activities included: site visits to the Fukushima Dai-ichi and Dai-ni NPSs, as well as to other facilities; hearing of heads of local governments around the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS; and hearing of people concerned through interviews mainly arranged by the Secretariat. As of December 16, 2011, the number of interviewees reached 456. The investigation and evaluation by the Investigation Committee are still ongoing and the Interim Report does not cover every item that the Committee aims at investigating and evaluating. Fact-finding of even some of those items discussed in the Interim Report are not yet completed. The Investigation Committee continues to conduct its investigation and evaluation and will issue its Final Report in the summer of 2012. This brief executive summary covers mainly considerations and evaluation of the issues in Chapter VII of the Interim Report, with brief reference to Chapters I to VI. The Investigation Committee recommendations are printed in bold. (author)

  1. Comprehensive Health Risk Management after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, S

    2016-04-01

    Five years have passed since the Great East Japan Earthquake and the subsequent Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on 11 March 2011. Countermeasures aimed at human protection during the emergency period, including evacuation, sheltering and control of the food chain were implemented in a timely manner by the Japanese Government. However, there is an apparent need for improvement, especially in the areas of nuclear safety and protection, and also in the management of radiation health risk during and even after the accident. Continuous monitoring and characterisation of the levels of radioactivity in the environment and foods in Fukushima are now essential for obtaining informed consent to the decisions on living in the radio-contaminated areas and also on returning back to the evacuated areas once re-entry is allowed; it is also important to carry out a realistic assessment of the radiation doses on the basis of measurements. Until now, various types of radiation health risk management projects and research have been implemented in Fukushima, among which the Fukushima Health Management Survey is the largest health monitoring project. It includes the Basic Survey for the estimation of external radiation doses received during the first 4 months after the accident and four detailed surveys: thyroid ultrasound examination, comprehensive health check-up, mental health and lifestyle survey, and survey on pregnant women and nursing mothers, with the aim to prospectively take care of the health of all the residents of Fukushima Prefecture for a long time. In particular, among evacuees of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident, concern about radiation risk is associated with psychological stresses. Here, ongoing health risk management will be reviewed, focusing on the difficult challenge of post-disaster recovery and resilience in Fukushima.

  2. Comprehensive Health Risk Management after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, S

    2016-04-01

    Five years have passed since the Great East Japan Earthquake and the subsequent Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on 11 March 2011. Countermeasures aimed at human protection during the emergency period, including evacuation, sheltering and control of the food chain were implemented in a timely manner by the Japanese Government. However, there is an apparent need for improvement, especially in the areas of nuclear safety and protection, and also in the management of radiation health risk during and even after the accident. Continuous monitoring and characterisation of the levels of radioactivity in the environment and foods in Fukushima are now essential for obtaining informed consent to the decisions on living in the radio-contaminated areas and also on returning back to the evacuated areas once re-entry is allowed; it is also important to carry out a realistic assessment of the radiation doses on the basis of measurements. Until now, various types of radiation health risk management projects and research have been implemented in Fukushima, among which the Fukushima Health Management Survey is the largest health monitoring project. It includes the Basic Survey for the estimation of external radiation doses received during the first 4 months after the accident and four detailed surveys: thyroid ultrasound examination, comprehensive health check-up, mental health and lifestyle survey, and survey on pregnant women and nursing mothers, with the aim to prospectively take care of the health of all the residents of Fukushima Prefecture for a long time. In particular, among evacuees of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident, concern about radiation risk is associated with psychological stresses. Here, ongoing health risk management will be reviewed, focusing on the difficult challenge of post-disaster recovery and resilience in Fukushima. PMID:26817782

  3. Radiological protection issues arising during and after the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the Fukushima accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) convened a task group to compile lessons learned from the nuclear reactor accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, with respect to the ICRP system of radiological protection. In this memorandum the members of the task group express their personal views on issues arising during and after the accident, without explicit endorsement of or approval by the ICRP. While the affected people were largely protected against radiation exposure and no one incurred a lethal dose of radiation (or a dose sufficiently large to cause radiation sickness), many radiological protection questions were raised. The following issues were identified: inferring radiation risks (and the misunderstanding of nominal risk coefficients); attributing radiation effects from low dose exposures; quantifying radiation exposure; assessing the importance of internal exposures; managing emergency crises; protecting rescuers and volunteers; responding with medical aid; justifying necessary but disruptive protective actions; transiting from an emergency to an existing situation; rehabilitating evacuated areas; restricting individual doses of members of the public; caring for infants and children; categorising public exposures due to an accident; considering pregnant women and their foetuses and embryos; monitoring public protection; dealing with ‘contamination’ of territories, rubble and residues and consumer products; recognising the importance of psychological consequences; and fostering the sharing of information. Relevant ICRP Recommendations were scrutinised, lessons were collected and suggestions were compiled. It was concluded that the radiological protection community has an ethical duty to learn from the lessons of Fukushima and resolve any identified challenges. Before another large accident occurs, it should be ensured that inter alia: radiation risk coefficients of

  4. Radiological protection issues arising during and after the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Abel J; Akashi, Makoto; Boice, John D; Chino, Masamichi; Homma, Toshimitsu; Ishigure, Nobuhito; Kai, Michiaki; Kusumi, Shizuyo; Lee, Jai-Ki; Menzel, Hans-Georg; Niwa, Ohtsura; Sakai, Kazuo; Weiss, Wolfgang; Yamashita, Shunichi; Yonekura, Yoshiharu

    2013-09-01

    Following the Fukushima accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) convened a task group to compile lessons learned from the nuclear reactor accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, with respect to the ICRP system of radiological protection. In this memorandum the members of the task group express their personal views on issues arising during and after the accident, without explicit endorsement of or approval by the ICRP. While the affected people were largely protected against radiation exposure and no one incurred a lethal dose of radiation (or a dose sufficiently large to cause radiation sickness), many radiological protection questions were raised. The following issues were identified: inferring radiation risks (and the misunderstanding of nominal risk coefficients); attributing radiation effects from low dose exposures; quantifying radiation exposure; assessing the importance of internal exposures; managing emergency crises; protecting rescuers and volunteers; responding with medical aid; justifying necessary but disruptive protective actions; transiting from an emergency to an existing situation; rehabilitating evacuated areas; restricting individual doses of members of the public; caring for infants and children; categorising public exposures due to an accident; considering pregnant women and their foetuses and embryos; monitoring public protection; dealing with 'contamination' of territories, rubble and residues and consumer products; recognising the importance of psychological consequences; and fostering the sharing of information. Relevant ICRP Recommendations were scrutinised, lessons were collected and suggestions were compiled. It was concluded that the radiological protection community has an ethical duty to learn from the lessons of Fukushima and resolve any identified challenges. Before another large accident occurs, it should be ensured that inter alia: radiation risk coefficients of potential

  5. Spontaneous abortions after the Three Mile Island nuclear accident: a life table analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to determine whether the incidence of spontaneous abortion was greater than expected near the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant during the months following the March 28, 1979 accident. All persons living within five miles of TMI were registered shortly after the accident, and information on pregnancy at the time of the accident was collected. After one year, all pregnancy cases were followed up and outcomes ascertained. Using the life table method, it was found that, given pregnancies after four completed weeks of gestation counting from the first day of the last menstrual period, the estimated incidence of spontaneous abortion (miscarriage before completion of 16 weeks of gestation) was 15.1 per cent for women pregnant at the time of the TMI accident. Combining spontaneous abortions and stillbirths (delivery of a dead fetus after 16 weeks of gestation), the estimated incidence was 16.1 per cent for pregnancies after four completed weeks of gestation. Both incidences are comparable to baseline studies of fetal loss

  6. Medical and psychological aspects of crisis management during a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisis handling in most kinds of disasters is affected by e.g. the information situation, prior experience and preparedness, availability of resources, efficiency of leadership and coordination, and type of disaster. A nuclear accident creates a situation which differs from many 'normal' disasters and natural catastrophes, for example with respects to the invisible nature of radiation and radioactive contamination and thus the dependence on access to specific technical equipment and expertise, and to information about the radiation situation. The scope of the accident, and the existing levels of radiation, define subsequent actions; information policies and existing channels of communication lay the foundation for public reactions. The present paper explores some examples of public reactions, and crisis handling of some previous radiation accidents on the basis of two dimensions, i.e. degree of information availability and degree of impact or 'environmental damage'. The examples include the radiation accidents in the Chelyabinsk region in the southern Urals, at Three Mile Island, USA, at Chernobyl in the Ukraine, and in Goiania, Brazil. It is concluded that public reactions differ as a function of existing expectations, and the crisis handling is more affected by the existing organizational and social structures than by needs and reactions of potential victims. Another conclusion is that pre-disaster preparedness regarding public information, and organization of countermeasures, are crucial to the outcome of a successful crisis handling and for enhancing public trust in crisis management. 39 refs, 2 figs

  7. The role of NHS hospitals in the preparedness for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are currently two National Health Service (NHS) circulars providing guidance on the measures to be taken in the event of release of radioactivity into the environment. The first of these, Health Circular HC(76)52, published in 1976, deals with national arrangements for incidents involving radioactivity, and is concerned primarily with accidents involving radioactive substances in transit, or at locations where radioactive substances are not normally found. It also gives guidance on the precautions to be taken when handling patients who may have been contaminated by low radioactivity levels. The second Health Circular, HC(85)24, describes emergency arrangements to be adopted by government departments and gives advice on plans needed by Health Authorities at the local level for dealing with accidents at civil nuclear installations. It was issued as a supplement to the Health Circular on Major Accidents (HC(77)1) (1977). The purpose of this paper is to describe the two health circulars, to bring their essential features together in one document, and to discuss them in the light of the Chernobyl accident. (author)

  8. Utilization of robot technology for accident response and decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident response and decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi required utilization of robot technology. This article described activities and history of introduction of robots and remote control devices to the accident response and future issues to be solved. Just after the accident, six special project teams (PTs) were established for disaster measures and restoration from Fukushima accident, one of which was remote control PT to discuss how to introduce robots and remote control devices for emergency response. ROBOtics Taskforce for Anti-Disaster (ROBOTAD) was established for information exchange about state of disaster response. Experimental data on radiation resistance of remote control devices and difficulties of wireless communications in buildings were published. Needs of robots and remote control devices introduction focused on reduction of radiation exposure of workers for exploration in building, sampling, setting of measuring instruments, decontamination, shielding and transport of use materials and equipment. In August 2013, International Research Institute for nuclear Decommissioning (IRID) was established for R and D management organization in the area of removal of fuel from spent fuel pools, retrieval of fuel debris and treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes including development of robots and remote control devices. Validation tests and operator training for remote control devices for retrieval of fuel debris were also planned using newly prepared mockup facility. Implementation process of disaster response robot should be also promoted. (T. Tanaka)

  9. The COLIMA experiment on aerosol retention in containment leak paths under severe nuclear accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parozzi, Flavio, E-mail: flavio.parozzi@rse-web.it [RSE, Power Generation Department, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy); Caracciolo, Eduardo D.J., E-mail: eduardo.caracciolo@rse-web.it [RSE, Power Generation Department, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy); Journeau, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.journeau@cea.fr [CEA Cadarache (France); Piluso, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.piluso@cea.fr [CEA Cadarache (France)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: ► Experiment investigating aerosol retention within concrete containment cracks under nuclear severe accident conditions. ► Provided representative conditions of the aerosols suspended inside the containment of PWRs under a severe accident. ► Prototypical aerosol particles generated with a thermite reaction and transported through the crack sample reproducing surface characteristics, temperature, pressure drop and gas leakage. ► The results indicate the significant retention due to zig-zag path. -- Abstract: CEA and RSE managed an experimental research concerning the investigation of aerosol retention within concrete containment cracks under severe accident conditions. The main experiment was carried out in November 2008 with aerosol generated from the COLIMA facility and a sample of cracked concrete with defined geometric characteristics manufactured by RSE. The facility provided representative conditions of the aerosols suspended inside the containment of PWRs under a severe accident. Prototypical aerosol particles were generated with a thermite reaction and transported through the crack sample, where surface characteristics, temperature, pressure drop and gas leakage were properly reproduced. The paper describes the approach adopted for the preparation of the cracked concrete sample and the dimensioning of the experimental apparatus, the test procedure and the measured parameters. The preliminary results, obtained from this single test, are also discussed in the light of the present knowledge about aerosol phenomena and the theoretical analyses of particle behaviour with the crack path.

  10. Medical and psychological aspects of crisis management during a nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drottz-Sjoeberg, B.M.

    1993-06-01

    Crisis handling in most kinds of disasters is affected by e.g. the information situation, prior experience and preparedness, availability of resources, efficiency of leadership and coordination, and type of disaster. A nuclear accident creates a situation which differs from many `normal` disasters and natural catastrophes, for example with respects to the invisible nature of radiation and radioactive contamination and thus the dependence on access to specific technical equipment and expertise, and to information about the radiation situation. The scope of the accident, and the existing levels of radiation, define subsequent actions; information policies and existing channels of communication lay the foundation for public reactions. The present paper explores some examples of public reactions, and crisis handling of some previous radiation accidents on the basis of two dimensions, i.e. degree of information availability and degree of impact or `environmental damage`. The examples include the radiation accidents in the Chelyabinsk region in the southern Urals, at Three Mile Island, USA, at Chernobyl in the Ukraine, and in Goiania, Brazil. It is concluded that public reactions differ as a function of existing expectations, and the crisis handling is more affected by the existing organizational and social structures than by needs and reactions of potential victims. Another conclusion is that pre-disaster preparedness regarding public information, and organization of countermeasures, are crucial to the outcome of a successful crisis handling and for enhancing public trust in crisis management. 39 refs, 2 figs.

  11. Los Alamos studies of the Nevada test site facilities for the testing of nuclear rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Michael V.

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: Nevada test site geographic location; location of NRDA facilities, area 25; assessment program plan; program goal, scope, and process -- the New Nuclear Rocket Program; nuclear rocket engine test facilities; EMAD Facility; summary of final assessment results; ETS-1 Facility; and facilities cost summary.

  12. The radiological accident of Goiania and the acceptance by the public of new nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misunderstandings on the peaceful uses and the safety of nuclear energy have been a leading cause of apprehension in Brazilian public opinion. A lack of knowledge of the characteristics and destination of radioactive wastes and negative media coverage of the use of nuclear energy have aggravated this situation. Believing that applications of nuclear energy are harmful to the population's welfare and the environment, Brazilian public opinion is opposed to the utilization of nuclear energy, and in particular to the construction of new nuclear power plants. For this reason, the Brazilian nuclear sector should promote a more intensive programme of public discussion, directed not solely at the technical and scientific communities, but also at the Brazilian public at large. Such a campaign would contribute towards a better understanding by Brazilian society of the different uses of nuclear energy and would present arguments in support of the benefits of this form of energy. Moreover, a campaign of this kind would show that negative associations about the use of electricity derived from nuclear power, which are based on the Goiania radiological accident, are not justified. (author)

  13. Studies on hydrosphere contamination from radioactive atmospheric emissions released in a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport of depositions on the earth's surface into the hydrosphere is investigated. For this purpose, the basic hydrological transport and distribution pathways are presented which are liable to lead to a contamination of the flowing waters and the aquifers of the catchment area. Some of the most important transport pathways are (1) direct deposition on the water surface, (2) retarded and instantaneous erosion of soil deposits by the erosive effect of the surface run-off of rainwater, and (3) transport of soil deposits by the groundwater pathway or by subsurface run-off. The relevant quantitative methods for the description of these transport processes are presented and discussed. On this basis, a simplified hydrological transport model is set up which meets the requirements of an analysis of the consequences of accidents. Attempts at a verification of the simplified hydrological transport model - by means of available data on fallout from nuclear weapons - make the model appear to be a suitable instrument for the assessment of accident consequences. Moreover, the model is exemplarily applied for the case of radioactive contamination of parts of the Danube catchment area by a postulated nuclear reactor accident. (orig./HP)

  14. Generalities on nuclear accidents and their short-dated and middle-dated management; Generalites sur les accidents nucleaires et leur gestion a court terme et a long terme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    All the nuclear activities present a radiation risk. The radiation exposure of the employees or the public, may occur during normal activity or during an accident. The IRSN realized a document on this radiation risk and the actions of protection. The sanitary and medical aspects of a radiation accident are detailed. The actions of the population protection during an accident and the post accident management are also discussed. (A.L.B.)

  15. Special committee review of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's severe accident risks report (NUREG--1150)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In April 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) published a draft report ''Severe Accident Risks: An Assessment for Five US Nuclear Power Plants,'' NUREG-1150. This report updated, extended and improved upon the information presented in the 1974 ''Reactor Safety Study,'' WASH-1400. Because the information in NUREG-1150 will play a significant role in implementing the NRC's Severe Accident Policy, its quality and credibility are of critical importance. Accordingly, the Commission requested that the RES conduct a peer review of NUREG-1150 to ensure that the methods, safety insights and conclusions presented are appropriate and adequately reflect the current state of knowledge with respect to reactor safety. To this end, RES formed a special committee in June of 1989 under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The Committee, composed of a group of recognized national and international experts in nuclear reactor safety, was charged with preparing a report reflecting their review of NUREG-1150 with respect to the adequacy of the methods, data, analysis and conclusions it set forth. The report which precedes reflects the results of this peer review

  16. Insights on fission products behaviour in nuclear severe accident conditions by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, E.; Bès, R.; Martin, Ph; Pontillon, Y.; Ducros, G.; Solari, P. L.

    2016-04-01

    Many research programs have been carried out aiming to understand the fission products behaviour during a Nuclear Severe Accident. Most of these programs used highly radioactive irradiated nuclear fuel, which requires complex instrumentation. Moreover, the radioactive character of samples hinders an accurate chemical characterisation. In order to overcome these difficulties, SIMFUEL stand out as an alternative to perform complementary tests. A sample made of UO2 doped with 11 fission products was submitted to an annealing test up to 1973 K in reducing atmosphere. The sample was characterized before and after the annealing test using SEM-EDS and XAS at the MARS beam-line, SOLEIL Synchrotron. It was found that the overall behaviour of several fission products (such as Mo, Ba, Pd and Ru) was similar to that observed experimentally in irradiated fuels and consistent with thermodynamic estimations. The experimental approach presented in this work has allowed obtaining information on chemical phases evolution under nuclear severe accident conditions, that are yet difficult to obtain using irradiated nuclear fuel samples.

  17. Guide to radiological accident considerations for siting and design of DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE Office of Nuclear Safety has sponsored preparation of a guidance document to aid field offices and contractors in their analyses of consequences of postulated major accidents. The guide addresses the requirements of DOE Orders 5480.1A, Chapter V, and 6430.1, including the general requirement that DOE nuclear facilities be sited, designed, and operated in accordance with standards, codes, and guides consistent with those applied to comparable licensed nuclear facilities. The guide includes both philosophical and technical information in the areas of: siting guidelines doses applied to an offsite reference person; consideration also given to an onsite reference person; physical parameters, models, and assumptions to be applied when calculating doses for comparison to siting criteria; and potential accident consequences other than radiological dose to a reference person which might affect siting and major design features of the facility, such as environmental contamination, population dose, and associated public health effects. Recommendations and/or clarifications are provided where this could be done without adding new requirements. In this regard, the guide is considered a valuable aid to the safety analyst, especially where requirements have been subject to inconsistent interpretation or where analysis methods are in transition, such as use of dose model (ICRP 2 or ICRP 30) or use of probabilistic methods of risk analysis in the siting and design of nuclear facilities

  18. Decision making process and emergency management in different phases of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EVATECH, Information Requirements and Countermeasure Evaluation Techniques in Nuclear Emergency Management, was a research project in the key action 'Nuclear Fission' of the fifth EURATOM Framework Programme (FP5). The overall objective of the project was to enhance the quality and coherence of response to nuclear emergencies in Europe by improving the decision support methods, models and processes in ways that take into account the expectations and concern of the many different parties involved - stake holders both in managing the emergency response and those who are affected by the consequences of nuclear emergencies. The project had ten partners from seven European countries. The development of the real-time online decision support system RODOS has been one of the major items in the area of radiation protection within the European Commission's Framework Programmes. The main objectives of the RODOS project have been to develop a comprehensive and integrated decision support system that is generally applicable across Europe and to provide a common framework for incorporating the best features of existing decision support systems and future developments. Furthermore the objective has been to provide greater transparency in the decision process to: improve public understanding and acceptance of off-site emergency measures, to facilitate improved communication between countries of monitoring data, predictions of consequences, etc., in the event of any future accident, and to promote, through the development and use of the system, a more coherent, consistent and harmonised response to any future accident that may affect Europe. (authors)

  19. Overview of plant specific severe accident management strategies for Kozloduy nuclear power plant, WWER-1000/320

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, M. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Tzarigradsko Shaussee 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria)], E-mail: m_andreeva@inrne.bas.bg; Pavlova, M.P. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Tzarigradsko Shaussee 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria)], E-mail: pavlova@inrne.bas.bg; Groudev, P.P. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Tzarigradsko Shaussee 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria)], E-mail: pavlinpg@inrne.bas.bg

    2008-04-15

    This paper focuses on the fourth level of the defence in depth concept in nuclear safety, including the transitions from the third level and into the fifth level. The use of the severe accident management guideline (SAMG) is required when an accident situation is not handled adequately through the use of emergency operating procedures (EOP), thus leading to a partial or a total core melt. In the EOPs, the priority is to save the fuel, whereas, in the SAMG, the priority is to save the containment. Actions recommended in the SAMG aim at limiting the risk of radiologically significant radioactive releases in the short- and mid-term (a few hours to a few days). The paper describes basic severe accident management requirements related to nuclear power plant (NPP), specified by the IAEA and in Republic of Bulgaria Nuclear Legislation. It also surveys plant specific severe accident management (SAM) strategies for the Kozloduy NPP, equipped with WWER-1000 type reactors.

  20. Review of psychological consequences of nuclear accidents and empirical study on peoples reactions to radiation protection activities in an imagined situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report consist of two parts: a review of studies on psychological consequences of nuclear and radiation accidents in population and an empirical study of peoples reactions to protection actions in an event of hypothetical accident. Review is based on research results from two nuclear reactor accidents (Three Mile Island 1979, Chernobyl 1986) and a radiation accident in Goiania, Brazil 1987. (53 refs, 2 figs.,7 tabs.)

  1. A Nordic approach to impact assessment of accidents with nuclear-propelled vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MareNuc project has identified the parameters in a graded approach to impact assessment for marine nuclear reactors. The graded approach is founded on the following elements: 1) More detailed understanding of previous accidents in nuclear-propelled vessels (initiating events, accident developments, release fractions), including release mechanisms (radionuclide retention in vessel construction); 2) Bench-marking of release scenarios using modelling tools applied in the Nordic countries, in addition to demonstration of generally accessible and free software developed by the IAEA; 3) Other systematic approaches to safety assessments of vessel port calls, and to the design and maintenance of emergency preparedness systems; More specifically, increased emphasis compared to earlier analysis after the Kursk accident is given to the engineered vessel barriers. Relevant standards from impact assessments for commercial nuclear power plants have been identified, such as from the NUREG series. The Nordic approaches to safety evaluation, impact assessments and emergency preparedness organisation was also reported as part of the project. The Canadian approach for international port calls was carefully reported and assessed as part of the project, and commended for its broad and comprehensive approach to reactor and vessel design for the nationalities involved, to the design and maintenance of emergency preparedness systems, and the well-structured and broad cooperation between civilian and military institutions. This approach goes beyond the current approach in the Nordic countries, also in the case of Norway, which experience regular port calls from allied nuclear navies. The overall result is a broader understanding in the Nordic countries for the importance of the various parameters for impact assessment of releases from marine reactors, and to the design and maintenance of an emergency preparedness organisation without detailed knowledge of the installation in question

  2. A Nordic approach to impact assessment of accidents with nuclear-propelled vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reistad, O. [Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller (Norway); Hustveit, S. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraes (Norway); Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority, Reykjavik (Iceland); Hoe, S. [Danish Emergency Management Agency, Birkeroed (Denmark); Lahtinen, J. [STUK, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-11-15

    The MareNuc project has identified the parameters in a graded approach to impact assessment for marine nuclear reactors. The graded approach is founded on the following elements: 1) More detailed understanding of previous accidents in nuclear-propelled vessels (initiating events, accident developments, release fractions), including release mechanisms (radionuclide retention in vessel construction); 2) Bench-marking of release scenarios using modelling tools applied in the Nordic countries, in addition to demonstration of generally accessible and free software developed by the IAEA; 3) Other systematic approaches to safety assessments of vessel port calls, and to the design and maintenance of emergency preparedness systems; More specifically, increased emphasis compared to earlier analysis after the Kursk accident is given to the engineered vessel barriers. Relevant standards from impact assessments for commercial nuclear power plants have been identified, such as from the NUREG series. The Nordic approaches to safety evaluation, impact assessments and emergency preparedness organisation was also reported as part of the project. The Canadian approach for international port calls was carefully reported and assessed as part of the project, and commended for its broad and comprehensive approach to reactor and vessel design for the nationalities involved, to the design and maintenance of emergency preparedness systems, and the well-structured and broad cooperation between civilian and military institutions. This approach goes beyond the current approach in the Nordic countries, also in the case of Norway, which experience regular port calls from allied nuclear navies. The overall result is a broader understanding in the Nordic countries for the importance of the various parameters for impact assessment of releases from marine reactors, and to the design and maintenance of an emergency preparedness organisation without detailed knowledge of the installation in question

  3. Radiological accidents: analysis of the information disseminated by media and public acceptance of nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, Jose Ubiratan; Tauhata, Luiz [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Garcia, Marcia Maria [Fundacao Inst. Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Virologia

    1995-12-31

    A methodology to treat quantitatively information by Media concerning a nuclear or a radiological accident is presented. It allows us to classify information according to the amount, importance and way of showing, into one indicator, named Information Equivalent. This establishes a procedure for analysis of released information and includes: number of head-lines, illustrations, printed lines, editorials, authorities quoted and so on. Interpretation becomes easier when the evolution and statistical trend of this indicator is observed. The application to evaluate the dissemination of the accident which took place in 1987 in Goiania, Brazil, was satisfactory and allowed us to purpose a model. This will aid the planning, the decision making process and it will improve relationships between technical staff and media during the emergency. (author). 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. ANSI/ANS-8.23-1997: nuclear criticality accident emergency planning and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    American National Standard ANSUANS-8.23 was developed to expand upon the basic emergency response guidance given in American National Standard, 'Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety' ANSI/ANS-8.19-1996 (Ref. 1). This standard provides guidance for minimizing risks to personnel during emergency response to a nuclear criticality accident outside reactors. This standard is intended to apply to those facilities for which a criticality accident alarm system, as specified in American National Standard, 'Criticality Accident Alarm System', ANSI/ANS-8.3-1997 (Ref. 2) is in use. The Working Group was established in 1990, with Norman L. Pruvost as chairman. The Working Group had up to twenty-three members representing a broad range of the nuclear industry, and has included members from Canada, Japan and the United Kingdom. The initial edition of ANSI/ANS-8.23 was approved by the American National Standards Institute on December 30, 1997. It provides guidance for the following topics: (1) Management and technical staff responsibilities; (2) Evaluation of a potential criticality accident; (3) Emergency plan provisions; (4) Evacuation; (5) Re-entry, rescue and stabilization; and (6) Classroom training, exercises and evacuation drills. This guidance is not for generic emergency planning issues, but is specific to nuclear criticality accidents. For example, it assumes that an Emergency Plan is already established at facilities that implement the standard. During the development of the initial edition of ANSI/ANS-8.23, each Working Group member evaluated potential use of the standard at a facility with which the member was familiar. This revealed areas where a facility could have difficulty complying with the standard. These reviews helped identify and eliminate many potential problems and ambiguities with the guidance. The Working Group has received very limited feedback from the user community since the first edition of the standard was published. Suggestions

  5. Observation of radioactive iodine ((131)I, (129)I) in cropland soil after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hideshi

    2016-10-01

    During the early stages of the Fukushima nuclear accident, the temporal variations of (131)I deposited on the ground and of (131)I accumulated in cropland soil were monitored at a fixed location in Japan. Moreover, concentrations of long-lived radioactive iodine ((129)I) in atmospheric deposits and soil were measured to examine the feasibility of retrospectively reconstructing (131)I levels from the levels of accident-derived (129)I. The exceptionally high levels of (131)I in deposits and soil were attributed to rainfall-related deposition of radionuclides. In the crop field studied, the losses of deposited (131)I and (129)I due to volatilization were small. The atomic ratio (129)I/(131)I in the topsoil corresponded to the same ratio in deposits. The (131)I concentrations measured in the topsoil were very consistent with the (131)I concentrations reconstructed from the (129)I concentrations in the soil. PMID:27320744

  6. Study, analysis and evaluation on the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computational analysis of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident was carried out. Severe accident analysis code MELCOR, which is developed by U.S. NRC and Sandia National Laboratory, was used. Chronology reported by Tokyo Electric Co. was examined and was used for calculation. Although very limited observed data were available, calculated behavior of RPV pressure and PCV pressure showed good agreement with observed data. We need further investigation to determine status of core, debris, etc. Reactor buildings of Unit 1, 3 and 4 were damaged by explosion of hydrogen, which was generated by metal-water reaction. Flow-field analysis of hydrogen in the reactor was examined by computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT. Hydrogen explosion behavior was also calculated by AUTODYN. (author)

  7. Examination of offsite radiological emergency measures for nuclear reactor accidents involving core melt. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, D.C.; McGrath, P.E.; Rasmussen, N.C.

    1978-06-01

    Evacuation, sheltering followed by population relocation, and iodine prophylaxis are evaluated as offsite public protective measures in response to nuclear reactor accidents involving core-melt. Evaluations were conducted using a modified version of the Reactor Safety Study consequence model. Models representing each measure were developed and are discussed. Potential PWR core-melt radioactive material releases are separated into two categories, ''Melt-through'' and ''Atmospheric,'' based upon the mode of containment failure. Protective measures are examined and compared for each category in terms of projected doses to the whole body and thyroid. Measures for ''Atmospheric'' accidents are also examined in terms of their influence on the occurrence of public health effects.

  8. Simulation and dose analysis of a hypothetical accident in Sanmen nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Atmospheric dispersion following a hypothetical accident in Sanmen NPP is simulated. • Japan, North Korea and Russia are slightly influenced in this accident. • In Taiwan and South Korea, population on 100% and 35% of the land should be given information about reducing dose. • In mainland China, about 284 thousand people are likely to get cancer. - Abstract: In November 2013, an AP1000 nuclear power plant (NPP) will be put into commercial operation. An atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides during a severe hypothetical accident in Sanmen NPP, Zhejiang province, China, is simulated with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART. The accident assumes that a station blackout (SBO) accident occurred on August 25, 2011, 55% core was damaged and 49 radionuclides were released into the atmosphere. Our simulation indicates that, during this dispersion, the radioactive plume will cover the mainland China, Taiwan, Japan, North Korea, South Korea and Russia. The radiation dose levels in Japan, North Korea and Russia are the lightest, usually less than 1 mSv. The influenced areas in these countries are 9901 km2, 31,736 km2 and 2,97,524 km2, respectively; dose levels in Taiwan and South Korea are moderate, no more than 20 mSv. Information about reducing dose should be given to the public. Total influenced areas in these two countries are 3621 km2 and 42,370 km2, which take up 100% of the land in Taiwan and 35% of the land in South Korea; the worst situation happens in mainland China. The total influenced area is 3 × 106 km2 and 1,40,000 km2 in this area has a dose level higher than 20 mSv. Measurement must be taken to reduce the dose. More than 284 thousand residents will face the risk of developing cancer. Furthermore, 96% of this population is mainly concentrated in Zhejiang province, where Sanmen NPP locates

  9. Questions concerning safety and risk after the nuclear accidents in Japan. Deepened accident analysis for the Fukushima Daiichi power plant; Sicherheits- und Risikofragen im Nachgang zu den nuklearen Stoer- und Unfaellen in Japan. Vertiefte Ereignisanalyse zur Anlage Fukushima-Daini

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistner, Christoph; Englert, Matthias [Oeko-Institut e.V. - Institut fuer Angewandte Oekologie, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-02-25

    The study questions concerning safety and risk in Japanese power plants following the disastrous nuclear accident covers the following issues: the nuclear facility Fukushima Daiichi, site characterization, important technical equipment, important electro-technical equipment, personal; description of the accident progression in the Fukushima nuclear power plant: impact of the earthquake, impact of the tsunami, short-term measures of the operating personnel, pressure and temperature situation in the containments, restoration of the after-heat cooling system in the units 1/2 and 4, fuel element storage pool, summarized parameters during the accident progress; comparative analysis of the accident progression at the Fukushima Daiichi site.

  10. Techniques and decision making in the assessment of off-site consequences of an accident in a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Guide is intended to complement the IAEA's existing technical guidance on emergency planning and preparedness by providing information and practical guidance related to the assessment of off-site consequences of an accident in a nuclear or radioactive materials installation and to the decision making process in implementing protective measures. This Guide contains information on emergency response philosophy, fundamental factors affecting accident consequences, principles of accident assessment, data acquisition and handling, systems, techniques and decision making principles. Many of the accident assessment concepts presented are considerably more advanced than some of those that now pertain in most countries. They could, if properly interpreted, developed and applied, significantly improve emergency response in the early and intermediate phases of an accident. Furthermore, they are considered to be applicable to a broad range of serious nuclear accidents and radiological emergencies. The extent of their application is governed by both the scale of the accident and by the availability of preplanned resources for accident assessment and emergency response. 68 refs, 28 figs, 14 tabs

  11. Penetrating radiation: applications at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Scott; Hunter, James; Morris, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    Los Alamos has used penetrating radiography extensively throughout its history dating back to the Manhattan Project where imaging dense, imploding objects was the subject of intense interest. This interest continues today as major facilities like DARHT1 have become the mainstay of the US Stockpile Stewardship Program2 and the cornerstone of nuclear weapons certification. Meanwhile, emerging threats to national security from cargo containers and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have invigorated inspection efforts using muon tomography, and compact x-ray radiography. Additionally, unusual environmental threats, like those from underwater oil spills and nuclear power plant accidents, have caused renewed interest in fielding radiography in severe operating conditions. We review the history of penetrating radiography at Los Alamos and survey technologies as presently applied to these important problems.

  12. Reclaiming Our Lives in the Wake of a Nuclear Plant Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, R

    2016-04-01

    Ryoko Ando lives and works in Iwaki-shi, which is located in the coastal area of Fukushima Prefecture. On 11 March 2011, Iwaki was hit by the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami. Then the nuclear plant accident at Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant, also located in the coastal area of Fukushima Prefecture, added to the woes of Iwaki residents. Although Iwaki-shi is outside of the ‘restricted area’ set up by the government in the 20 km radius around the nuclear power plant, some municipalities in Iwaki-shi lie within the 30 km radius zone. The residents of Iwaki were naturally concerned about the effects of radioactive contamination. On top of these, they had to confront a wide range of issues, including confusion and miscommunication, reputation risk and infrastructural constraints due to the influx of residents from the ‘restricted area’. PMID:27386587

  13. Societies' response to the nuclear power plant accident in Fukushima. Cooperation is essential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gigantic earthquake (M 9.0) and resulting tsunami hit the Japanese islands on March 11, 2011. Besides direct disaster caused by earthquake and tsunami, equally serious accident happened at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant of Tokyo Electric Power Company. By this accident, nuclear power reactors couldn't be controlled properly and eventually radioactive materials were released from the building to house nuclear power reactors and dispersed over rather wide area. Consequently, agricultural materials, drinking water and food were contaminated with radioactive nuclides. It is urgent to figure out how radioactive materials were spread not only in the area close to the nuclear reactors but also over surrounding, rather wide district. Such information must release the uneasiness for public people and objectively predict the possible influence caused by radioactive material over agricultural products for people engaging in agriculture. To grapple with this task promptly as well as effectively, scientists belonging to the Geochemical Society of Japan, the Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences and the atmospheric and oceanic section of the Japan Geoscience Union were allied and presented a proposal to MEXT for comprehensive and systematic survey of radioactive materials in the environment. In this project, samples are to be collected for atmosphere, rain, soils and underground water as systematically as possible and as wide as possible for the sampling area. As for soil samples, we decided to work together with volunteer people of nuclear physics, who also took similar actions to ours. After sampling, samples were subjected to precise measurement of radioactivity under controlled counting protocol and data thus obtained are to be opened to the governmental sector as well as public promptly. At the same time, scientific meaning and information derived from such data are to be reported openly to appropriate academic societies as well as to the public

  14. Radioactive Waste Management In The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone - 25 Years Since The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities of the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, and in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program. The brief overview of the radioactive waste issues in the ChEZ presented in this article demonstrates that management of radioactive waste resulting from a beyond-designbasis accident at a nuclear power plant becomes the most challenging and the costliest effort during the mitigation and remediation activities. The costs of these activities are so high that the provision of radioactive waste final disposal facilities compliant with existing radiation safety requirements becomes an intolerable burden for the current generation of a single country, Ukraine. The nuclear accident at the Fukushima-1 NPP strongly indicates that accidents at nuclear sites may occur in any, even in a most technologically advanced country, and the Chernobyl experience shows that the scope of the radioactive waste management activities associated with the mitigation of such accidents may exceed the capabilities of a single country. Development of a special international program for broad international cooperation in accident related radioactive waste management activities is required to handle these issues. It would also be reasonable to consider establishment of a dedicated international fund for mitigation of accidents at nuclear sites, specifically, for handling radioactive waste problems in the ChEZ. The experience of handling Chernobyl radioactive waste management issues, including large volumes of radioactive soils and complex structures

  15. RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE - 25 YEARS SINCE THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities of the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, and in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program. The brief overview of the radioactive waste issues in the ChEZ presented in this article demonstrates that management of radioactive waste resulting from a beyond-designbasis accident at a nuclear power plant becomes the most challenging and the costliest effort during the mitigation and remediation activities. The costs of these activities are so high that the provision of radioactive waste final disposal facilities compliant with existing radiation safety requirements becomes an intolerable burden for the current generation of a single country, Ukraine. The nuclear accident at the Fukushima-1 NPP strongly indicates that accidents at nuclear sites may occur in any, even in a most technologically advanced country, and the Chernobyl experience shows that the scope of the radioactive waste management activities associated with the mitigation of such accidents may exceed the capabilities of a single country. Development of a special international program for broad international cooperation in accident related radioactive waste management activities is required to handle these issues. It would also be reasonable to consider establishment of a dedicated international fund for mitigation of accidents at nuclear sites, specifically, for handling radioactive waste problems in the ChEZ. The experience of handling Chernobyl radioactive waste management issues, including large volumes of radioactive soils and complex structures

  16. Radiological consequences of accidents during disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep borehole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundfelt, Bertil [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-07-15

    In this report, an analysis of the radiological consequences of potential accidents during disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes is presented. The results presented should be seen as coarse estimates of possible radiological consequences of a canister being stuck in a borehole during disposal rather than being the results of a full safety analysis. In the concept for deep borehole disposal of spent nuclear fuel developed by Sandia National Laboratories, the fuel is assumed to be encapsulated in mild steel canisters and stacked between 3 and 5 km depth in boreholes that are cased with perforated mild steel casing tubes. The canisters are joined together by couplings to form strings of 40 canisters and lowered into the borehole. When a canister string has been emplaced in the borehole, a bridge plug is installed above the string and a 10 metres long concrete plug is cast on top of the bridge plug creating a floor for the disposal of the next sting. In total 10 canister strings, in all 400 canisters, are assumed to be disposed of at between 3 and 5 kilometres depth in one borehole. An analysis of potential accidents during the disposal operations shows that the potentially worst accident would be that a canister string is stuck above the disposal zone of a borehole and cannot be retrieved. In such a case, the borehole may have to be sealed in the best possible way and abandoned. The consequences of this could be that one or more leaking canisters are stuck in a borehole section with mobile groundwater. In the case of a leaking canister being stuck in a borehole section with mobile groundwater, the potential radiological consequences are likely to be dominated by the release of the so-called Instant Release Fraction (IRF) of the radionuclide inventory, i.e. the fraction of the radionuclides that as a consequence of the in-core conditions are present in the annulus between the fuel pellets and the cladding or on the grain boundaries of the UO{sub 2} matrix

  17. Of Disasters and Dragon Kings: A Statistical Analysis of Nuclear Power Incidents & Accidents

    CERN Document Server

    Wheatley, Spencer; Sornette, Didier

    2015-01-01

    We provide, and perform a risk theoretic statistical analysis of, a dataset that is 75 percent larger than the previous best dataset on nuclear incidents and accidents, comparing three measures of severity: INES (International Nuclear Event Scale), radiation released, and damage dollar losses. The annual rate of nuclear accidents, with size above 20 Million US$, per plant, decreased from the 1950s until dropping significantly after Chernobyl (April, 1986). The rate is now roughly stable at 0.002 to 0.003, i.e., around 1 event per year across the current fleet. The distribution of damage values changed after Three Mile Island (TMI; March, 1979), where moderate damages were suppressed but the tail became very heavy, being described by a Pareto distribution with tail index 0.55. Further, there is a runaway disaster regime, associated with the "dragon-king" phenomenon, amplifying the risk of extreme damage. In fact, the damage of the largest event (Fukushima; March, 2011) is equal to 60 percent of the total damag...

  18. LLNL Results from CALIBAN-PROSPERO Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Experiments in September 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobaugh, M. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hickman, D. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wong, C. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wysong, A. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Merritt, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Heinrichs, D. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Topper, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-21

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses thin neutron activation foils, sulfur, and threshold energy shielding to determine neutron component doses and the total dose from neutrons in the event of a nuclear criticality accident. The dosimeter also uses a DOELAP accredited Panasonic UD-810 (Panasonic Industrial Devices Sales Company of America, 2 Riverfront Plaza, Newark, NJ 07102, U.S.A.) thermoluminescent dosimetery system (TLD) for determining the gamma component of the total dose. LLNL has participated in three international intercomparisons of nuclear accident dosimeters. In October 2009, LLNL participated in an exercise at the French Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission- CEA) Research Center at Valduc utilizing the SILENE reactor (Hickman, et.al. 2010). In September 2010, LLNL participated in a second intercomparison at CEA Valduc, this time with exposures at the CALIBAN reactor (Hickman et al. 2011). This paper discusses LLNL’s results of a third intercomparison hosted by the French Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety- IRSN) with exposures at two CEA Valduc reactors (CALIBAN and PROSPERO) in September 2014. Comparison results between the three participating facilities is presented elsewhere (Chevallier 2015; Duluc 2015).

  19. Fluxes of radionuclides in the agricultural production after a nuclear accident: countermeasures and decontamination techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with the radiological consequences of a nuclear accident through the radioactive contamination of the food chain and the subsequent countermeasures for decreasing the fluxes of radionuclides and decontaminating agricultural lands. After a brief summary of the radioprotection ground and context in case of a nuclear accident, this work surveys existing data on the fluxes of radionuclides in soils and from soil to plants. The research work focuses on both the prediction of the fluxes of radionuclides and possible countermeasures: the measurement of the bioavailability of radionuclides in the soil solution, its use in a mathematical expression to quantify the soil-to-plant transfer of caesium and strontium, and the perspectives of an innovative technique of soil decontamination. The obtained results show that based on 4 coefficients, it is possible to predict crop contamination within a 3 % confidence interval: the fluid solid distribution coefficient of radionuclides kd, the amount of chemical analogues of caesium and strontium, i.e. potassium and calcium, respectively, soil pH and a constant characterising the plant species that is concerned. However, it generally appears from soil to plant transfer studies that the reduction of the fluxes of radionuclides is not a promising way of radiological exposure mitigation after a nuclear accident. The work performed shows that it is more efficient to tackle the source of the contamination, i.e. decontaminate the soil. The proposed technique of soil scraping using a turf harvester appears to be the most advantageous among the tested options, for the decontamination of peat-bog meadows. (author)

  20. Locations of criticality alarms and nuclear accident dosimeters at Hanford. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    Hanford facilities that contain fissionable materials capable of achieving critical mass are monitored with nuclear accident dosimeters (NADS) in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.11, Chapter XI, Section 4.c. (DOE 1988). The US Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Field Office (RL) has assigned the responsibility for maintaining and evaluating the Hanford NAD system to the Instrumentation and External Dosimetry (I&ED) Section of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL`s) Health Physics Department. This manual provides a description of the Hanford NAD, criteria and instructions for proper NAD placement, and the locations of these dosimeters onsite.

  1. Public dialogue on physics and related technology after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasao, Mamiko [Organization for Research Initiatives and Development, Doshisha University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident, the importance of bottom-up and two-way dialogue between scientists and the public has been recognized. In such dialogue, information provided must accurately match the public’s interest and ability regarding science and technology. We have started to investigate what people want to know about physics. Some were interested in energy security (a particular concern in Japan), but others were concerned about radioactivity in food and natural radiation background. The conversations revealed that physicists often give insufficient explanations of the biological effects of radiation and highlighted key points for physicists to make when talking with the public.

  2. Public dialogue on physics and related technology after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident, the importance of bottom-up and two-way dialogue between scientists and the public has been recognized. In such dialogue, information provided must accurately match the public’s interest and ability regarding science and technology. We have started to investigate what people want to know about physics. Some were interested in energy security (a particular concern in Japan), but others were concerned about radioactivity in food and natural radiation background. The conversations revealed that physicists often give insufficient explanations of the biological effects of radiation and highlighted key points for physicists to make when talking with the public

  3. Analysis of Public Perception on Radiation: with One Year after Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Bang Ju [Korean Science Reporters Association, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    A year has passed since the nuclear power plant accident in Fukushima on March 11, 2011, and a survey for public perception on radiation by Korean people has been made. The methodological design was based on a quantitative survey and a frequency analysis was done. The analysis objects were survey papers (n=2,754pcs) answered by random ordinary citizens chosen from all over the country. The questionnaires, and study tool, were directly distributed and collected. A total of 40 questionnaires using a coefficient of Cronbach's {alpha} per each area was 'self perception of radiation' (0.620), 'radiation risk' (0.830), 'benefit from radiation' (0.781), 'radiation controlled' (0.685), 'informative source of radiation' (0.831), 'influence degree from Fukushima accident' (0.763), showing rather high score from all areas. As the result of the questionnaires, the knowledge of radiation concept was 69.50 out of 100 points, which shows a rather significant difference from the result of 'know well about radiation' (53.7%) and 'just know about radiation' (37.40%). According to the survey, one of the main reasons why radiation seems risky was that once exposed to radiation, it may not have negative impacts presently but, the next generation could see negative impacts (66.1%). About 41% of our respondents showed a negative position against the government's report on radiation while 39.5% of respondents said that we should stop running nuclear power in light of Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. This study was done for the first time by Korean people's public perception on radiation after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. We expect this might have significant contributions to the establishment of the government's policy on radiation.

  4. WHO's public health agenda in response to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deventer, Emilie; Del Rosario Perez, Maria; Tritscher, Angelika; Fukushima, Kazuko; Carr, Zhanat

    2012-03-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has responded to the 2011 East-Japan earthquake and tsunami through the three levels of its decentralised structure. It has provided public health advice regarding a number of issues relating to protective measures, potassium iodide use, as well as safety of food and drinking water, mental health, travel, tourism, and trade. WHO is currently developing an initial health risk assessment linked to a preliminary evaluation of radiation exposure around the world from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. Lessons learned from this disaster are likely to help future emergency response to multi-faceted disasters. PMID:22395036

  5. A simplified model for calculating early offsite consequences from nuclear reactor accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madni, I.K.; Cazzoli, E.G.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1988-07-01

    A personal computer-based model, SMART, has been developed that uses an integral approach for calculating early offsite consequences from nuclear reactor accidents. The solution procedure uses simplified meteorology and involves direct analytic integration of air concentration equations over time and position. This is different from the discretization approach currently used in the CRAC2 and MACCS codes. The SMART code is fast-running, thereby providing a valuable tool for sensitivity and uncertainty studies. The code was benchmarked against both MACCS version 1.4 and CRAC2. Results of benchmarking and detailed sensitivity/uncertainty analyses using SMART are presented. 34 refs., 21 figs., 24 tabs.

  6. Public meetings on radiation and its health effects caused by the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has held public meetings on radiation and its health effects mainly for parents of students in kindergartens, elementary schools, and junior high schools in Fukushima and Ibaraki prefectures after the Fukushima nuclear accident. These meetings are held based on our experience of practicing risk communication activities for a decade in JAEA with local residents. By analyzing questionnaires collected after the meetings, we confirmed that interactive communication is effective in increasing participants' understanding and in decreasing their anxiety. Most of the participants answered that they understood the contents and that it eased their mind. (authors)

  7. Public dialogue on physics and related technology after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasao, Mamiko

    2015-12-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident, the importance of bottom-up and two-way dialogue between scientists and the public has been recognized. In such dialogue, information provided must accurately match the public's interest and ability regarding science and technology. We have started to investigate what people want to know about physics. Some were interested in energy security (a particular concern in Japan), but others were concerned about radioactivity in food and natural radiation background. The conversations revealed that physicists often give insufficient explanations of the biological effects of radiation and highlighted key points for physicists to make when talking with the public.

  8. Public meetings on radiation and its health effects caused by the Fukushima nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, K.; Ayame, J.; Takashita, H.; Yamamoto, R. [Risk Communication Study Office Japan Atomic Energy Agency 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, IBARAKI, 319-1194 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has held public meetings on radiation and its health effects mainly for parents of students in kindergartens, elementary schools, and junior high schools in Fukushima and Ibaraki prefectures after the Fukushima nuclear accident. These meetings are held based on our experience of practicing risk communication activities for a decade in JAEA with local residents. By analyzing questionnaires collected after the meetings, we confirmed that interactive communication is effective in increasing participants' understanding and in decreasing their anxiety. Most of the participants answered that they understood the contents and that it eased their mind. (authors)

  9. Safety Implementation of Hydrogen Igniters and Recombiners for Nuclear Power Plant Severe Accident Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jianjun; ZHOU Zhiwei; JING Xingqing

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen combustion in a nuclear power plant containment building may threaten the integrity of the containment. Hydrogen recombiners and igniters are two methods to reduce hydrogen levels in containment buildings during severe accidents. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the safety implementation of hydrogen igniters and recombiners. This paper analyzes the risk of deliberate hydrogen ignition and investigates three mitigation measures using igniters only, hydrogen recombiners only or a combination of recombiners and igniters. The results indicate that steam can effectively control the hydrogen flame acceleration and the deflagration-to-detonation transition.

  10. An outline of the intake event at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On March, 2000, plutonium-238 intake event occurred at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), USA. The Accident Investigation Board performed the accident investigations in accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) and released the report of the accident on July, 2000. The accident occurred while LANL worker was checking the equipment of glovebox in the Plutonium Processing and Handling Facility of LANL. The lifetime effective dose to the most affected worker was estimated to be as high as 3Sv, and corresponding dose to three other workers probably exceeded their annual exposure level. Since we have many gloveboxes similar to the ones in LANL, and we must improve worker's safety consciousness against glovebox-operation in the future, we have studied this report and compiled as a safety lecture note for the JNC employee. And we compiled to introduce this accident outline to domestic nuclear enterprises and institutes. (author)

  11. Inspection of alleged design and construction deficiencies in the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-16

    On June 8, 1994, the Office of Inspections, Office of Inspector General (OIG), Department of Energy (DOE), received a letter dated May 31, 1994, from a complainant concerning the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The complainant alleged that the NMSF, completed in 1987, was so poorly designed and constructed that it was never usable and that DOE proposed to gut the entire facility and sandblast the walls. According to the complainant, ``these errors are so gross as to constitute professional malpractice in a commercial design setting.`` The complainant further stated that ``DOE proposes to renovate this facility to store large amounts of plutonium (as much as 30 metric tons, by some accounts), and it is imperative that the public receive some assurance that this waste will not recur and that the facility will be made safe.`` The purpose of our inspection was to determine if the allegations regarding the design and construction of the NMSF were accurate, and if so, to determine if the Government could recover damages from the Architect/Engineer and/or the construction contractor. We also reviewed the Department`s proposed actions to renovate the NMSF.

  12. Atmospheric radionuclides from Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident detected in Lanzhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邬家龙王赟; 孙卫; 罗伟立; 王延俊; 张飙

    2015-01-01

    After the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident on March 11, 2011, the radioactivity released from the accident was transported around the globe by atmospheric processes. The radioactivity monitoring program on atmospheric particulate in Lanzhou, China was activated by GSCDC to detect the input radionu-clides through atmospheric transport. Several artificial radionuclides were detected and measured in aerosol samples from March 26 to May 2, 2011. The peaked activity concentrations (in mBq/m3) were: 1.194 (131I), 0.231 (137Cs), 0.173 (134Cs) and 0.008 (136Cs), detected on April 6, 2011. The average activity ratio of 131I/137Cs and 134Cs/137Cs in air were 13.5 and 0.78. The significant increase of 137Cs activity concentration, one order of magnitude higher than pre-Fukushima accident levels, in ground level aerosol was observed in 2013, as its re-suspension from soil. The back-trajectory analysis simulated by NOAA-ARL HYSPLIT shows a direct transfer of the air masses released from Fukushima to Lanzhou across the Pacific Ocean, North America and Europe at the height close to 9000 m AGL. The value of effective dose for inhalation is close to one millionth of the annual limit for the general public.

  13. Impact of the Fukushima nuclear accident on obesity of children in Japan (2008-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Eiji

    2016-05-01

    This study used prefecture-level panel data from Japan for the period 2008-2014 to investigate the influence of the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident on the body mass index (BMI) z-score and obesity rates of children over time. I adopted a difference-in-differences approach and found the following: (1) for the cohort aged 5-7 years in 2010, the BMI z-score and obesity rates in disaster-affected areas were higher than in other areas, although this was not observed for the other cohorts; (2) for the cohort aged 5-7 years in 2010, the influence of the accident persisted even after 3 years; and (3) the differences in the BMI z-score and obesity rate before and after the accident were greater for Fukushima Prefecture than for the other affected areas (Iwate and Miyagi prefectures). I infer that health-conscious parents, whose children had lower BMIs, may have moved from Fukushima, thereby increasing the BMI z-score of the child population living in Fukushima by around 0.05 for the cohort aged 5-7 years. The enforced reduction in physical activity increased the BMI z-score of children living in Fukushima by around 0.19 for that cohort.

  14. Radiation-Driven Migration: The Case of Minamisoma City, Fukushima, Japan, after the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The emigration of residents following the Fukushima nuclear accident has resulted in aging and depopulation problems in radiation-contaminated areas. The recovery of affected areas, and even those areas with low radioactive pollution levels, is still heavily affected by this problem. This slow recovery consequently affects immigration patterns. This review aims to present possible factors that have contributed to this dilemma. We first present an overview of the evacuation protocol that was administered in the study area following the Fukushima accident. We then analyze characteristics of the subsequent exodus by comparing population data for both before and after the accident. Based on the findings of existing literature, we identify three causes of emigration: (1 The health risks of living in a low radiation zone are still unknown; (2 The post-disaster psychological disturbance and distrust of government information promotes the emigration of evacuees; (3 an absence of economic vitality and of a leading industry renders the area less attractive to individuals residing outside of the city. Further research is needed on this issue, especially with respect to countermeasures for addressing this problem.

  15. Study on the establishment of retrospective dosimetry system for nuclear radiation accident(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jae Shik; Chai, Ha Seok; Lee, Jong Ok [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    This study was driven forward centering around physical techniques in retrospective dosimetry system for encountering nuclear radiation accident. The results obtained through this study are summarized as follow : the minimal facilities based on physical techniques should be assured at KINS for appropriate operation and establishment of retrospective accident dosimetry system, the necessary apparatus and man power for retrospective dose assessment by physical techniques might be operated flexibly, however, CL and TL/OSL readers should be equipped with the highest priority, a series of comparative examination of several physical techniques for retrospective dose assessment revealed that most of the irradiated materials around accident sites are usable for the dose assessment, if a priori study on the dosimetrical characteristics of those materials is preceded in accordance with the species of the collectable samples, the results of the study on the CL-dose response and radiation energy dependence of sugar and sorbitol, showed the nonlinearity in CL-dose relationship at the range of low dose(less than 5 Gy), and it led us to perform a study on the correction of the nonlinearity, and in the later study, CL output showed heavy dependence on radiation energy in the energy below around 100 keV and accordingly, a study on the correction for the energy dependence was also carried out, ve were able to obtain good results as a first attempt to carry out such corrections.

  16. Criticality accident in uranium fuel processing plant. Questionnaires from Research Committee of Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Research Committee of Nuclear Safety carried out a research on criticality accident at the JCO plant according to statement of president of the Japan Atomic Energy Society on October 8, 1999, of which results are planned to be summarized by the constitutions shown as follows, for a report on the 'Questionnaires of criticality accident in the Uranium Fuel Processing Plant of the JCO, Inc.': general criticality safety, fuel cycle and the JCO, Inc.; elucidation on progress and fact of accident; cause analysis and problem picking-up; proposals on improvement; and duty of the Society. Among them, on last two items, because of a conclusion to be required for members of the Society at discussions of the Committee, some questionnaires were send to more than 1800 of them on April 5, 2000 with name of chairman of the Committee. As results of the questionnaires contained proposals and opinions on a great numbers of fields, some key-words like words were found on a shape of repeating in most questionnaires. As they were thought to be very important nuclei in these two items, they were further largely classified to use for summarizing proposals and opinions on the questionnaires. This questionnaire had a big characteristic on the duty of the Society in comparison with those in the other organizations. (G.K.)

  17. Linear Free Energy Correlations for Fission Product Release from the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-03-03

    This paper extends the preliminary linear free energy correlations for radionuclide release performed by Schwantes, et al., following the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Through evaluations of the molar fractionations of radionuclides deposited in the soil relative to modeled radionuclide inventories, we confirm the source of the radionuclides to be from active reactors rather than the spent fuel pool. Linear correlations of the form ln χ = -α (ΔGrxn°(TC))/(RTC)+β were obtained between the deposited concentration and the reduction potential of the fission product oxide species using multiple reduction schemes to calculate ΔG°rxn(TC). These models allowed an estimate of the upper bound for the reactor temperatures of TC between 2130 K and 2220 K, providing insight into the limiting factors to vaporization and release of fission products during the reactor accident. Estimates of the release of medium-lived fission products 90Sr, 121mSn, 147Pm, 144Ce, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, 151Sm through atmospheric venting and releases during the first month following the accident were performed, and indicate large quantities of 90Sr and radioactive lanthanides were likely to remain in the damaged reactor cores.

  18. Analysis of Early Severe Accident Initiated by LBLOCA for Qinshan Phase II Nuclear Power Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Xing-Wei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to simulate an early Severe Accident (SA scenario more detail through transferring the thermal-hydraulic status of the plant predicted by RELAP5 computer code to SA Program (SAP. Based on the criterion of date extract time, the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic calculation data is extracted to form a file for SAP input card at 1477K of cladding surface. Relying on the thermal-hydraulic boundary parameters calculated by RELAP5 code, analysis of early SA initiated by the Large Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LBLOCA without mitigation measures for Qinshan Phase II Nuclear Power Plant (QSP-II performed by SAP through finding the key events of accident sequence, estimating the amount of hydrogen generation and oxidation behavior of the cladding and evaluating the relocation order of the materials collapsed in the central region of the core. The results of this study are expected to improve the SA analysis methodology more detail through analyzing early SA scenario.

  19. Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant accident: Atmospheric and oceanic impacts over the five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Katsumi

    2016-06-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant (FDNPP) accident resulted in huge environmental and socioeconomic impacts to Japan. To document the actual environmental and socioeconomic effects of the FDNPP accident, we describe here atmospheric and marine contamination due to radionuclides released from the FDNPP accident using papers published during past five years, in which temporal and spatial variations of FDNPP-derived radionuclides in air, deposition and seawater and their mapping are recorded by local, regional and global monitoring activities. High radioactivity-contaminated area in land were formed by the dispersion of the radioactive cloud and precipitation, depending on land topography and local meteorological conditions, whereas extremely high concentrations of (131)I and radiocesium in seawater occurred due to direct release of radioactivity-contaminated stagnant water in addition to atmospheric deposition. For both of atmosphere and ocean, numerical model simulations, including local, regional and global-scale modeling, were extensively employed to evaluate source terms of the FDNPP-derived radionuclides from the monitoring data. These models also provided predictions of the dispersion and high deposition areas of the FDNPP-derived radionuclides. However, there are significant differences between the observed and simulated values. Then, the monitoring data would give a good opportunity to improve numerical modeling. PMID:27032342

  20. Linear free energy correlations for fission product release from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, David G; Schwantes, Jon M

    2015-03-01

    This paper extends the preliminary linear free energy correlations for radionuclide release performed by Schwantes et al., following the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Through evaluations of the molar fractionations of radionuclides deposited in the soil relative to modeled radionuclide inventories, we confirm the initial source of the radionuclides to the environment to be from active reactors rather than the spent fuel pool. Linear correlations of the form In χ = −α ((ΔGrxn°(TC))/(RTC)) + β were obtained between the deposited concentrations, and the reduction potentials of the fission product oxide species using multiple reduction schemes to calculate ΔG°rxn (TC). These models allowed an estimate of the upper bound for the reactor temperatures of TC between 2015 and 2060 K, providing insight into the limiting factors to vaporization and release of fission products during the reactor accident. Estimates of the release of medium-lived fission products 90Sr, 121mSn, 147Pm, 144Ce, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, and 151Sm through atmospheric venting during the first month following the accident were obtained, indicating that large quantities of 90Sr and radioactive lanthanides were likely to remain in the damaged reactor cores. PMID:25675358

  1. Linear free energy correlations for fission product release from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, David G; Schwantes, Jon M

    2015-03-01

    This paper extends the preliminary linear free energy correlations for radionuclide release performed by Schwantes et al., following the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Through evaluations of the molar fractionations of radionuclides deposited in the soil relative to modeled radionuclide inventories, we confirm the initial source of the radionuclides to the environment to be from active reactors rather than the spent fuel pool. Linear correlations of the form In χ = −α ((ΔGrxn°(TC))/(RTC)) + β were obtained between the deposited concentrations, and the reduction potentials of the fission product oxide species using multiple reduction schemes to calculate ΔG°rxn (TC). These models allowed an estimate of the upper bound for the reactor temperatures of TC between 2015 and 2060 K, providing insight into the limiting factors to vaporization and release of fission products during the reactor accident. Estimates of the release of medium-lived fission products 90Sr, 121mSn, 147Pm, 144Ce, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, and 151Sm through atmospheric venting during the first month following the accident were obtained, indicating that large quantities of 90Sr and radioactive lanthanides were likely to remain in the damaged reactor cores.

  2. Evaluation of hazards from industrial activity near nuclear power plants. Study of typical accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and dimensioning of nuclear power plant structures necessitate the evaluation of risks due to industrial activity. Among these risks, those due to the storage or transport of dangerous products merit special attention. They result, inter alia, in the explosion of flammable gas clouds. Such clouds can drift before igniting and, once alight, the resulting pressure wave can cause serious damage, even at a distance. A methodology both deterministic and probabilistic enabling this risk to be quantified has therefore been developed. It is based in part on an analysis of the statistics of actual accidents that have occurred. After briefly recalling the probabilistic model, the typical accidents selected are described and for three usual cases (storage under pressure, rail tank cars and road units) the main characteristics of the rupture are explicited. The deterministic models that have been worked out to calculate the consequences of such an accident: flow rate at the bursting point, evaporation, drift and atmospheric dispersion of the cloud formed, explosion of this cloud, are then described. At the present time the overpressure wave is quantified against a TNT equivalent of the explosive mixture. Some data are given as examples for three commonly employed hydrocarbons (butane, propane, propylene)

  3. Short lived radionuclides in food and feed after the nuclear accident in Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of identification and short lived radionuclides (I-131, I(Te)-132, Cs-136, Ce-141, 144, Ru-103, 106, Ba(La)-140, Zr-95, Mo-99, Nb-95, Sb-125) mass activities evaluation in food (milk and dairies, meat, honey, fruits, vegetables) and feeds (oilseed rupe, alfalfa, fresh green mass) after the nuclear accident at Chernobyl, in 1986, are presented. The results indicate that in the first month after the accident and afterwards, in the first half of the year, the contribution of the short lived radionuclides in the total activity of the samples ranged from 2-64%, varying with food and feed, locality and time of sampling. Compared to the activity of I-131, the short lived radionuclides contributed from 1.3 to 470%, while compared to the activities of the long term radionuclides Cs-134 and Cs-137, the activity of the short lived radionuclides in the first half of the year after the accident ranged from 12% to more than 300%. The traces of Ag-110m were found in the majority of the samples, too. (1 tab.)

  4. Methodology of radionuclides dis incorporation in people related to nuclear and radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a classification of the radiological and nuclear accidents is presented, describing which the activities are, where they have occurred, their incidence and the learned lessons in these successes. The radiological accidents in which radioactive materials intervene can occur anywhere, and they are related to no controlled dangerous sources (abandoned, lost, stolen, or found sources), improper use of dangerous industrial and medical sources, exposition and contamination of people in general by an unknown origin, serious over expositions, menaces and willful misconduct, emergencies during transportation of radioactive material. A person can receive a dose of radiation from an external source, because of radioactive material placed on skin or on equipment, or because of ingestion or inhalation of radiological particles. The ingestion or the inhalation of radioactive material can cause an internal dose to the whole body or to a specific organ during a period of time. That is why a description of the processes of incorporation, the stages of incorporation and a description of the biokinetic models are also realized to understand the ingestion, transference and the excretion of the radioactive elements. In order to offer help to a victim of internal contamination, the dosimetric and medical diagnosis is very important. The most important techniques of dosimetric diagnosis are the dosimetry in vivo (cytogenetics and the counting in vivo of the whole body) and the bioassays. These techniques allow obtain data such as the radionuclide, the target organ, the absorbed dose, etc. At the same time, the doctor in charge must be attentive to the patients symptoms and their manifestation time, since they are an indicator, first, the patient suffered an irradiation, and second, of the range esteem of the received radiation dose. These are the parameters that are useful as criterion to decide if a person has to receive some treatment and select the methodologies that

  5. Radiological aspects of nuclear accident scenarios. Volume 2 the Rade-Aid system post-Chernobyl action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the event of a nuclear accident, there is a need for a rapid assessment of the resulting levels of environmental contamination in order to facilitate decisions on possible countermeasures. Volume 2 describes the RADE-AID project to develop a computer system which can be used to support the formulation of decisions on countermeasures following an accidental release of radionuclides. The system is intended as an aid following an actual accident and a tool for assistance in planning and training

  6. The environmental consequences of a major accident at a nuclear power plant: rehabilitation of soils and land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the RESSAC project are to study the technique, of and their applications to the intervention to the contaminated zones induced by a nuclear power plant accident, in order to rehabilitate the terrain surface for normal use. The short-term and long-term impacts of the accident are evaluated, and the detection and transport of radionuclides in the soil and the vegetation are investigated. (R.P.) 6 refs

  7. An Entry Point of the Emergency Response Robot for Management of Severe Accident of the Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jaiwan; Jeong, Kyungmin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In this paper, from the view point of DID (defense-in depth), we discuss the entry point of the nuclear emergency response robot to cope with a nuclear disaster. A Japanese nuclear disaster preparedness robot system was developed, after the JCO criticality accident in 1999, to cope with INES (International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale) Level 3 serious incidents. INES Level 3 means the loss of DID (defense-in-depth) functions. It also indicates that ESF (engineered safety features) and ECCS (emergency core cooling system) resources, which are used to prevent serious incidents from escalating to severe accidents (core melt-down), have been almost exhausted. In the unit 1 reactor accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, escalation from INES Level 1 (Out of Limiting Condition for Operation) to INES Level 5 (serious core melting-down) took less than two hours. Major facts are briefly described here in based on data gathered immediately after the tsunami over Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Ο 15:35 on March 11, 2nd tsunami arrived. - 15:37, SBO (station black out) Ο 15:42, Interprets as a SBO (INES Level 1) - Loss of DC power for Instrumentation (Unknown of reactor water level) Ο 16:36, Loss of ECCS function (INELS Level 5) (Entry into a BDBA status) The Moni ROBO-A robot of the Japan Nuclear Safety Technology Center (NUSTEC) was a nuclear disaster preparedness robot developed after the JCO criticality accident. It was the only robot that had been steadily maintained and was available at the time of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. However, it was not helpful in mitigating the accident because it is assumed to have arrived at J-Village after the accident had been escalated to INES Level 5 or higher. Based on the paper by S. Kawatsuma of JAEA and response data gathered immediately after the tsunami, it is estimated that the NUSTEC's Moni ROBO-A arrived at J-Village after the designed entry point for INES Level 3

  8. An Entry Point of the Emergency Response Robot for Management of Severe Accident of the Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, from the view point of DID (defense-in depth), we discuss the entry point of the nuclear emergency response robot to cope with a nuclear disaster. A Japanese nuclear disaster preparedness robot system was developed, after the JCO criticality accident in 1999, to cope with INES (International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale) Level 3 serious incidents. INES Level 3 means the loss of DID (defense-in-depth) functions. It also indicates that ESF (engineered safety features) and ECCS (emergency core cooling system) resources, which are used to prevent serious incidents from escalating to severe accidents (core melt-down), have been almost exhausted. In the unit 1 reactor accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, escalation from INES Level 1 (Out of Limiting Condition for Operation) to INES Level 5 (serious core melting-down) took less than two hours. Major facts are briefly described here in based on data gathered immediately after the tsunami over Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Ο 15:35 on March 11, 2nd tsunami arrived. - 15:37, SBO (station black out) Ο 15:42, Interprets as a SBO (INES Level 1) - Loss of DC power for Instrumentation (Unknown of reactor water level) Ο 16:36, Loss of ECCS function (INELS Level 5) (Entry into a BDBA status) The Moni ROBO-A robot of the Japan Nuclear Safety Technology Center (NUSTEC) was a nuclear disaster preparedness robot developed after the JCO criticality accident. It was the only robot that had been steadily maintained and was available at the time of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. However, it was not helpful in mitigating the accident because it is assumed to have arrived at J-Village after the accident had been escalated to INES Level 5 or higher. Based on the paper by S. Kawatsuma of JAEA and response data gathered immediately after the tsunami, it is estimated that the NUSTEC's Moni ROBO-A arrived at J-Village after the designed entry point for INES Level 3. According to

  9. Accident of the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power station. Situation two years after the event - IRSN file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two years after the Fukushima accident, this report proposes a review of the situation in Japan, and of the European and international actions aimed at preventing the occurrence of another nuclear accident and its radiological consequences. It is based on information available at the end of January or February 2013. After a recall of the situation in Japan and Europe in 2011 (recall of the accident, of the different simulation, calculation and information actions undertaken by the IRSN, launching of a program of additional safety assessments and of European stress tests), the report addresses the situation in Japan two years after the accident: evolution of the nuclear risk management governance, status of the Fukushima-Daiichi power station, health and environmental impact and management of the post-accidental phase, actions undertaken by the IRSN (dose assessment, cooperation in the field of severe accidents, participation to the Fukushima Dialogue). The next part details the contribution of the IRSN to the strengthening of safety and radiation protection at the international level (in relationship with international organizations: IAEA, UNSCEAR and WHO). Additional technical information is provided in appendix, as well as a report on the environmental impact of the accident, and a report on the post-accidental management of the accident

  10. Review of the international forum on peaceful use of nuclear energy and nuclear security. Taking the lessons learned from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident to the 2012 Seoul nuclear security summit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) held '2011 International Forum on the Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Security - Taking the lessons learned from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident to the 2012 Seoul Nuclear Security Summit-' on 8 and 9 December, 2011. It intended to articulate effective strategies and measures for strengthening nuclear security using lessons learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident. Moreover, it was expected to explore comprehensive approaches which could contribute to enhancing both nuclear safety and security in order to support sustainable and appropriate development of the peaceful use of nuclear energy. This report includes abstracts of keynote speeches, summary of panel discussions and materials of the presentations in the forum. The editors take full responsibility for the wording and content of this report, excepts presentation materials. (author)

  11. Assessment of individual radionuclide distributions from the Fukushima nuclear accident covering central-east Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Norikazu; Sueki, Keisuke; Sasa, Kimikazu; Kitagawa, Jun-ichi; Ikarashi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Tomohiro; Wong, Ying-Shee; Satou, Yukihiko; Handa, Koji; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Sato, Masanori; Yamagata, Takeyasu

    2011-12-01

    A tremendous amount of radioactivity was discharged because of the damage to cooling systems of nuclear reactors in the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant in March 2011. Fukushima and its adjacent prefectures were contaminated with fission products from the accident. Here, we show a geographical distribution of radioactive iodine, tellurium, and cesium in the surface soils of central-east Japan as determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. Especially in Fukushima prefecture, contaminated area spreads around Iitate and Naka-Dori for all the radionuclides we measured. Distributions of the radionuclides were affected by the physical state of each nuclide as well as geographical features. Considering meteorological conditions, it is concluded that the radioactive material transported on March 15 was the major contributor to contamination in Fukushima prefecture, whereas the radioactive material transported on March 21 was the major source in Ibaraki, Tochigi, Saitama, and Chiba prefectures and in Tokyo.

  12. Checking of seismic and tsunami hazard for coastal NPP of Chinese continent after Fukushima nuclear accident

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Xiangdong; Zhou Bengang; Zhao Lianda

    2013-01-01

    A checking on seismic and tsunami hazard for coastal nuclear power plant (NPP) of Chinese continent has been made after Japanese Fukushima nuclear accident caused by earthquake tsunami.The results of the checking are introduced briefly in this paper,including the evaluations of seismic and tsunami hazard in NPP siting period,checking results on seismic and tsunami hazard.Because Chinese coastal area belongs to the continental shelf and far from the boundary of plate collision,the tsunami hazard is not significant for coastal area of Chinese continent.However,the effect from tsunami still can' t be excluded absolutely since calculated result of Manila trench tsunami source although the tsunami wave is lower than water level from storm surge.The research about earthquake tsunami will continue in future.The tsunami warning system and emergency program of NPP will be established based on principle of defense in depth in China.

  13. Body surface monitor for measuring radioactive contamination of the general population after a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new body surface monitor for monitoring the surface radioactive contamination of the general population living and working around the site in the early stages of a nuclear accident has been designed. The body surface monitors will be installed in a medium-sized bus with a thyroid counter and moved to the place where measurement is required. The different characteristics needed for the body surface monitor to measure the general population from those of monitors used in nuclear power stations are discussed. The detection sensitivity of the plastic scintillator was measured under various geometric conditions and the Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) was found to be lower than 1 Bq/cm2 in a 10-second count time. Two body surface monitors can measure 2,880 persons in eight hours. (author)

  14. Health effects models for off-site radiological consequence analysis on nuclear reactor accidents (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Toshimitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Takahashi, Tomoyuki [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Yonehara, Hidenori [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)] [eds.

    2000-12-01

    This report is a revision of JAERI-M 91-005, 'Health Effects Models for Off-Site Radiological Consequence Analysis of Nuclear Reactor Accidents'. This revision provides a review of two revisions of NUREG/CR-4214 reports by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission which is the basis of the JAERI health effects models and other several recent reports that may impact the health effects models by international organizations. The major changes to the first version of the JAERI health effects models and the recommended parameters in this report are for late somatic effects. These changes reflect recent changes in cancer risk factors that have come from longer followup and revised dosimetry in major studies on the Japanese A-bomb survivors. This report also provides suggestions about future revisions of computational aspects on health effects models. (author)

  15. Health effects models for off-site radiological consequence analysis on nuclear reactor accidents (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a revision of JAERI-M 91-005, 'Health Effects Models for Off-Site Radiological Consequence Analysis of Nuclear Reactor Accidents'. This revision provides a review of two revisions of NUREG/CR-4214 reports by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission which is the basis of the JAERI health effects models and other several recent reports that may impact the health effects models by international organizations. The major changes to the first version of the JAERI health effects models and the recommended parameters in this report are for late somatic effects. These changes reflect recent changes in cancer risk factors that have come from longer followup and revised dosimetry in major studies on the Japanese A-bomb survivors. This report also provides suggestions about future revisions of computational aspects on health effects models. (author)

  16. Development of Educational and Training Simulator for Emergency Response to Chinese Nuclear Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the lessons in the emergency response category is that information on the nuclear power plants of neighboring countries should be organized and the consequence can be assessed. In addition, many reactors have been constructed and are under construction on the eastern coast of China recently. Korea might be directly affected by an accident of Chinese nuclear power plant since Korea is located in the westerly belt. performed with the PCTRAN/CPR-1000 module. The result showed that normal operation and DBA conditions were simulated swiftly with the speed of 16 times faster than real time. Thus, it would be a good source term estimation module for the educational and training simulator

  17. Analysis of scenarios of nuclear power up to 2050 in Japan based on Fukushima Daiichi accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper calculated long-term energy supply-demand outlook up to 2050 in Japan for long-term scenarios of nuclear power based on Fukushima Daiichi accidents, using integrated energy economic model combined with econometric model and MARKAL (MARKet ALlocations) model. If nuclear power was introduced continuously based on the present basic energy plan, the ratio of nuclear power to total generation increased to about 49% compared with 31% in 2005 but decreased to 42 or 16% if the introduction of nuclear power was halted in a long period and then it encouraged increased of coal-fired power plant. As a result, coal consumption increased to about 23 or 90 Mt and CO2 emission increased to about 60 or 250 Mt with no measures of CO2 emission reduction. If CO2 emission in 2050 should be reduced to about 60% of that in 2005, natural gas consumption increased to about 25 or 65 LNG equivalent Mt in case of increase of natural gas fired power plant due to the halt of nuclear power introduction. This case expanded introduction of CO2 capture and storage technology and increased cost necessary for CO2 reduction (marginal CO2 abatement cost). Measures should be more reinforced with combination of fuel conversion, introduction of renewable energy and expansion of CO2 capture and storage technology. (T. Tanaka)

  18. Simulation of a nuclear accident by an academic simulator of a VVER-1000 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is planned to simulate a scenario in which the same conditions that caused the accident at the Fukushima Daichi nuclear power plant are present, using a simulator of a nuclear power plant with VVER-1000 reactor, a different type of technology to the NPP where the accident occurred, which used BWR reactors. The software where it will take place the simulation was created and distributed by the IAEA for academic purposes, which contains the essential systems that characterize this type of NPP. The simulator has tools for the analysis of the characteristic phenomena of a VVER-1000 reactor in the different systems together and planned training tasks. This makes possible to identify the function of each component and how connects to other systems, thus facilitating the visualization of possible failures and the consequences that they have on the general behavior of the reactor. To program the conditions in the simulator, is necessary to know and synthesize a series of events occurred in Fukushima in 2011 and the realized maneuvers to reduce the effects of the system failures. Being different technologies interpretation of the changes that would suffer the VVER systems in the scenario in question will be developed. The Fukushima accident was characterized by the power loss of regular supply and emergency of the cooling systems which resulted in an increase in reactor temperature and subsequent fusion of their nuclei. Is interesting to reproduce this type of failure in a VVER, and extrapolate the lack of power supply in the systems that comprise, as well as pumping systems for cooling, has a pressure regulating system which involves more variables in the balance of the system. (Author)

  19. Emergency/disaster medical support in the restoration project for the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimura, Naoto; Asari, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Asanuma, Kazunari; Tase, Choichiro; Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Aruga, Tohru

    2013-12-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (1F) suffered a series of radiation accidents after the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011. In a situation where halting or delaying restoration work was thought to translate directly into a very serious risk for the entire country, it was of the utmost importance to strengthen the emergency and disaster medical system in addition to radiation emergency medical care for staff at the frontlines working in an environment that posed a risk of radiation exposure and a large-scale secondary disaster. The Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) launched the 'Emergency Task Force on the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident' and sent physicians to the local response headquarters. Thirty-four physicians were dispatched as disaster medical advisors, response guidelines in the event of multitudinous injury victims were created and revised and, along with execution of drills, coordination and advice was given on transport of patients. Forty-nine physicians acted as directing physicians, taking on the tasks of triage, initial treatment and decontamination. A total of 261 patients were attended to by the dispatched physicians. None of the eight patients with external contamination developed acute radiation syndrome. In an environment where the collaboration between organisations in the framework of a vertically bound government and multiple agencies and institutions was certainly not seamless, the participation of the JAAM as the medical academic organisation in the local system presented the opportunity to laterally integrate the physicians affiliated with the respective organisations from the perspective of specialisation.

  20. The development of a nuclear accident risk information system(NARIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jong Tae; Jung, Won Dea

    2001-03-01

    The computerized system, NARIS(Nuclear Accident Risk Information System) was developed in order to support the estimation of health effects and the establishment the effective risk reduction strategies. Using the system, we can analyze the distribution of health effects easily by displaying the results on the digital map of the site. Also, the thematic mapping allows the diverse analysis of the distribution of the health effects.The NARIS can be used in the emergency operation facilities in order to analyze the distribution of the health effects resulting from the severe accidents of a nuclear power plant. Also, the rapid analysis of the health effect is possible by storing the health effect results in the form of a database. Therefore, the staffs of the emergency operation facilities can establish the rapid and effective emergency response strategies. The module for the optimization of the costs and benefits and the decision making support will be added. The technical support for the establishment of the optimum and effective emergency response strategies will be possible using this system.

  1. The development of a nuclear accident risk information system(NARIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computerized system, NARIS(Nuclear Accident Risk Information System) was developed in order to support the estimation of health effects and the establishment the effective risk reduction strategies. Using the system, we can analyze the distribution of health effects easily by displaying the results on the digital map of the site. Also, the thematic mapping allows the diverse analysis of the distribution of the health effects.The NARIS can be used in the emergency operation facilities in order to analyze the distribution of the health effects resulting from the severe accidents of a nuclear power plant. Also, the rapid analysis of the health effect is possible by storing the health effect results in the form of a database. Therefore, the staffs of the emergency operation facilities can establish the rapid and effective emergency response strategies. The module for the optimization of the costs and benefits and the decision making support will be added. The technical support for the establishment of the optimum and effective emergency response strategies will be possible using this system

  2. Modified ensemble Kalman filter for nuclear accident atmospheric dispersion: prediction improved and source estimated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X L; Su, G F; Yuan, H Y; Chen, J G; Huang, Q Y

    2014-09-15

    Atmospheric dispersion models play an important role in nuclear power plant accident management. A reliable estimation of radioactive material distribution in short range (about 50 km) is in urgent need for population sheltering and evacuation planning. However, the meteorological data and the source term which greatly influence the accuracy of the atmospheric dispersion models are usually poorly known at the early phase of the emergency. In this study, a modified ensemble Kalman filter data assimilation method in conjunction with a Lagrangian puff-model is proposed to simultaneously improve the model prediction and reconstruct the source terms for short range atmospheric dispersion using the off-site environmental monitoring data. Four main uncertainty parameters are considered: source release rate, plume rise height, wind speed and wind direction. Twin experiments show that the method effectively improves the predicted concentration distribution, and the temporal profiles of source release rate and plume rise height are also successfully reconstructed. Moreover, the time lag in the response of ensemble Kalman filter is shortened. The method proposed here can be a useful tool not only in the nuclear power plant accident emergency management but also in other similar situation where hazardous material is released into the atmosphere.

  3. Reducing logistical barriers to radioactive soil remediation after the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, K.; Terakawa, A.; Matsuyama, S.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fujishiro, F.; Ishizaki, A.; Osada, N.; Arai, H.; Sugai, H.; Takahashi, H.; Nagakubo, K.; Sakurada, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Kim, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present an updated assessment of soil contamination due to the nuclear accident at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant on 11 March 2011. A safe limit for the spatial dose rate (micro-Sv/h) of gamma rays from 134,137Cs has been established in this work. Based on this value, the highly contaminated region within Fukushima Prefecture that must be decontaminated could be defined. Moreover, a conceptual model for the chemical speciation that occurred during the accident has been delineated. The compound model Cs2CO3 was found to be meaningful and practical (non-radioactive) to simulate contamination in our decontamination experiments. Finally, we explain the mechanism of action of our soil remediation technique, which effectively reduces the total volume of contaminated soil by isolating the highly Cs-adsorptive clay fraction. The adsorption of non-radioactive Cs atoms on clay particles with diameters <25 μm were analyzed using micro-particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE).

  4. Feedwater transient and small break loss of coolant accident analyses for the Bellefonte Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific sequences that may lead to core damage were analyzed for the Bellefonte nuclear plant as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Severe Accident Sequence Analysis Program. The RELAP5, SCDAP, and SCDAP/RELAP5 computer codes were used in the analyses. The two main initiating events investigated were a loss of all feedwater to the steam generators and a small cold leg break loss of coolant accident. The transients of primary interest within these categories were the TMLB' and S2D sequences. Variations on systems availability were also investigated. Possible operator actions that could prevent or delay core damage were identified, and two were investigated for a small break transient. All of the transients were analyzed until either core damage began or long-term decay heat removal was established. The analyses showed that for the sequences considered the injection flow from one high-pressure injection pump was necessary and sufficient to prevent core damage in the absence of operator actions. Operator actions were able to prevent core damage in the S2D sequence; no operator actions were available to prevent core damage in the TMLB' sequence

  5. Environmental radioactivity measurements in north-western Greece following the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of the Fukushima nuclear accident in north–western Greece was assessed through an environmental monitoring programme activated by the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Ioannina. Measurements of 131I were carried out in atmospheric particulate, ovine milk and grass samples. In daily aerosol samplings, radioiodine was first detected on March 25-26, 2011 and reached maximum levels, up to 294 μBq m-3, between April 2 and April 4, 2011. In ovine milk samples, 131I concentrations ranged from 2.0 to 2.7 Bq L-1 between April 2 and April 6, 2011, while an average activity of 2.7 Bq kg-1 was measured in grass samples on April 4, 2011. The 134,137Cs isotopes were below detection limits in all samples and could only be determined in the air, by analysis of multiple daily filters. A maximum average activity concentration of 137Cs amounting to 24 μBq m-3 was measured during the period from April 5 to April 9, 2011, with the 134Cs/137Cs activity ratio being close to unity. Activity concentrations were consistent with measurements conducted in other parts of the country and were well below those reported in May 1986 after the Chernobyl accident. The committed effective dose to the whole body and to the thyroid gland from inhalation of 131I was estimated for the adult and infant population and was found to be of no concern for the public health. (author)

  6. The impact of accident attention, ideology, and environmentalism on American attitudes toward nuclear energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besley, John C; Oh, Sang-Hwa

    2014-05-01

    This study involves the analysis of three waves of survey data about nuclear energy using a probability-based online panel of respondents in the United States. Survey waves included an initial baseline survey conducted in early 2010, a follow-up survey conducted in 2010 following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and an additional follow-up conducted just after the 2011 Fukushima, Japan, nuclear accident. The central goal is to assess the degree to which changes in public views following an accident are contingent on individual attention and respondent predispositions. Such results would provide real-world evidence of motivated reasoning. The primary analysis focuses on the impact of Fukushima and how the impact of individual attention to energy issues is moderated by both environmental views and political ideology over time. The analysis uses both mean comparisons and multivariate statistics to test key relationships. Additional variables common in the study of emerging technologies are included in the analysis, including demographics, risk and benefit perceptions, and views about the fairness of decisionmakers in both government and the private sector.

  7. Nuclear-structure studies using the high-resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains a description of the ongoing medium-energy nuclear-physics research program supported by the US Department of Energy with The University of Texas at Austin. A major part of the work is associated with research done using the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF); this research focuses on: (1) providing data which test microscopic models of the medium - energy proton + nucleus interaction; (2) providing data which are to be analyzed to provide new nuclear-structure information (both ground state and excited state); and (3) developing and improving the models themselves. Publications are listed

  8. Documents and related materials associated with the contents and the origin of the Los Alamos technical series and the national nuclear energy series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammel, E.F.

    1996-04-01

    The rationale for preparing this document arose from the fact that the author (who worked in D-Building during WWII) was asked to contribute a short article on {open_quotes}Plutonium Metallurgy at Los Alamos During the War{close_quotes} for inclusion in the 50th anniversary book, {open_quotes}Behind Tall Fences,{close_quotes} published in 1993 by the J.R. Oppenheimer Memorial Committee. I agreed, believing that all of the source material needed was readily available in the Los Alamos Technical Series, a detailed account of all of the R&D carried out at Los Alamos from 1943 to 1945. The obvious place to start was the LANL Report Library. As will be seen by the perusing the following memoranda and reports (which were assembled one at a time by following up successive leads), it finally turned out that, of all six chapters of Vol. 10, {open_quotes}Metallurgy,{close_quotes} of which Cyril S. Smith was the general editor, the only one {open_quotes}not yet issued{close_quotes} was Chapter I on {open_quotes}Plutonium Metallurgy,{close_quotes} which had been assigned to Eric R. Jette, the wartime Group Leader of the Plutonium Metallurgy Group. Jette left Los Alamos at the end of August 1956 to join the Union Carbide Research Institute in Tarrytown, New York, where he was director until June 1962 when he retired to his valley home in Pojoaque. In February 1963, he was awarded the US Atomic Energy Commission citation for meritorious contributions to the Nuclear Energy Program; shortly thereafter he died. Before accepting the fact that Chapter I did not exist, the present author undertook to find out as much as possible about the Los Alamos Technical Series, including the circumstances relating to its preparation. The related memos, etc., once retrieved, seemed worth preserving in a single report-hence this document.

  9. Measures taken to improve the safety of nuclear power plants in the USSR after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Soviet delegation to the IAEA experts' meeting (August 25-29, 1986) presented information on the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident and its consequences. Using data obtained through August 1, 1986, this information contained the results of an investigation into the causes of the accident as well as a description and preliminary analysis of the effectiveness of the immediate steps taken to limit and eliminate its consequences. Subsequent efforts were channeled in the following directions: (1) Continuing operations to eliminate the accident's consequences including: (a) completing the design and construction of a protective cover (sarcophagus) to reliably protect the environment from radioactivity and the introduction of radioactive matter from the destroyed unit; (b) further decontamination of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site and inhabited areas within the affected zone; and (c) carrying out required sanitary and medical measures to ensure the safety of the population and to protect their health. (2) Development and implementation of longitudinal studies of the long-term consequences of the accident. (3) Development of introduction of measures to increase the safety of working nuclear power stations. (4) Examination of plans for the future development of the nuclear power industry and prospects for increasing its safety level, including: conceptual development of a new generation of nuclear reactors; and expansion of scientific investigation into all aspects of safety assessment and safety assurance in the nuclear power industry. The present report examines the progress of studies along these lines and the conclusions which have been drawn

  10. Simulation of beyond design basis accidents : a contribution to risk analysis of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accident management (AM) programmes are considered to be an important stepin the defense in depth concept for nuclear power plants. By carefully analyzing possible accident conditions in advance, a nuclear power plant operator may use plant equipment outside of its foreseen functions to cope with situations beyond the design of the plant. Accident management programmes have been first introduced in NPP in the USA, but are now also widely adopted in Europe. The introduction of AM in Republics of the former Soviet Union is a rather recent development. The present work has been performed as part of a Europaid Project with the goal to support the development of AM for the VVER 1000, a pressurized water reactor used in Russia, Ukraine, Bulgaria, India, Iran, China, Czech Republic. The project was part of the nuclear TACIS programme with the aim to enhance the safety of Russian nuclear reactors. The project had several objectives. Main goal was to execute complex experiments on the PSB-VVER integral test facility. The facility is a full height, 1:300 volume and power scaled model of the VVER 1000. Twelve experiment and three additional single variant experiments have been executed. The initiating events for the experiments were small break loss of coolant accidents, primary to secondary side leaks, loss of feed water and station black out. In addition, multiple failures of the safety systems and accident management strategies like primary side and secondary side depressurization, and injection into primary and/or secondary side with non standard equipment have been assumed. The experimental database has been used to qualify the codes Relap5 and Cathare2 for simulation of beyond design basis accidents at the VVER 1000, by performing code - experiment comparisons. All experiments have been tried to predict at a pre- and post test level. Although the PSB-VVER facility is well scaled, the behavior of the real NPP will differ considerable. Therefore, the experiments serve to

  11. Suggestion from young researchers in symposium II conducted by Japan health physics society about Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Focusing on internal exposure management to relate to Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake suffered reactor core meltdown and discharged a large amount of radioactive nuclides to the air, which brought about a disorder among the public for internal exposure. Internal exposure management at the accident so as to evaluate internal exposure dose rate of personnel or the public in a quick and optimum way should be standardized with reflecting lessons learned at Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident. Three themes on internal exposure management; (1) thyroid gland screening test, (2) whole-body counters and (3) bioassay, were discussed from young researchers in symposium II conducted by Japan Health Physics Society about Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident. Progression of response to the accident and problems and proposals for each respective theme were presented in the article. (T. Tanaka)

  12. Information note on accidents which affected nuclear reactors of the Saint-Laurent-des-Eaux in 1969 and 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This note first recalls the operation characteristics of the graphite-gas nuclear reactors which have been operated in Saint-Laurent-des-Eaux, and indicates the two accidents which occurred in 1969 and 1980 without any important radiological consequence outside of the nuclear site. The nature, process, and remediation of these accidents are briefly presented (the first one was due to an error during the fuel loading procedure, and the second one to a sudden melting of irradiated uranium). The various studies undertaken after these events to assess environmental impacts and radiological consequences are briefly overviewed

  13. Transgenic plants are sensitive bioindicators of nuclear pollution caused by the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalchuk, I.; Kovalchuk, O. [Ivano-Frankivsk State Medical Academy (Ukraine)]|[Friedrich Miescher Inst., Basel (Switzerland); Arkhipov, A. [Chernobyl Scientific and Technical Center of International Research (Ukraine); Hohn, B. [Friedrich Miescher Inst., Basel (Switzerland)

    1998-11-01

    To evaluate the genetic consequences of radioactive contamination originating from the Nuclear reactor accident of Chernobyl on indigenous populations of plants and animals, it is essential to determine the rates of accumulating genetic changes in chronically irradiated populations. An increase in germline mutation rates in humans living close to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site, and a two- to tenfold increase in germline mutations in barn swallows breeding in Chernobyl have been reported. Little is known, however, about the effects of chronic irradiation on plant genomes. Ionizing radiation causes double-strand breaks in DNA, which are repaired via illegitimate or homologous recombination. The authors make use of Arabidopsis thaliana plants carrying a {beta}-glucuronidase marker gene as a recombination substrate to monitor genetic alterations in plant populations, which are caused by nuclear pollution of the environment around Chernobyl. A significant increase in somatic intrachromosomal recombination frequencies was observed at nuclear pollution levels from 0.1--900 Ci/km{sup 2}, consistent with an increase in chromosomal aberrations. This bioindicator may serve as a convenient and ethically acceptable alternative to animal systems.

  14. Follow-up studies on genome damage in children after Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucic, Aleksandra; Aghajanyan, Anna; Druzhinin, Vladimir; Minina, Varvara; Neronova, Elizaveta

    2016-09-01

    As children are more susceptible to ionizing radiation than adults, each nuclear accident demands special attention and care of this vulnerable population. The Chernobyl nuclear disaster occurred in a region populated with a large number of children, but despite all efforts and expertise of nuclear specialists, it was not possible to avoid casualties. As vast regions of Ukraine, Belarus and Russia were exposed to doses of ionizing radiation, which are known to be related with different diseases, shortly after the accident medical surveillance was launched, which also included analysis of genome damage. Child population affected by internal and external radiation consisted of subjects exposed prenatally, postnatally (both evacuated and non-evacuated), born by irradiated fathers who worked as liquidators, and parents exposed environmentally. In all groups of children during the last 30 years who were exposed to doses which were significantly higher than that recommended for general population of 1 mSv per year, increased genome damage was detected. Increased genome damage includes statistically higher frequency of dicentric and ring chromosomes, chromated and chromosome breaks, acentric fragments, translocations, and micronuclei. The presence of rogue cells confirmed internal contamination. Genome instability and radiosensitivity in children was detected both in evacuated and continuously exposed children. Today the population exposed to ionizing radiation in 1986 is in reproductive period of life and follow-up of this population and their offspring is of great importance. This review aims to give insight in results of studies, which reported genome damage in children in journals without language restrictions.

  15. NF ISO 16117 - December 2013. Nuclear criticality safety - Estimation of the number of fissions of a postulated criticality accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ISO 16117:2013 provides a methodology to estimate a reasonably maximal value of the number of fissions of a postulated criticality accident. The fission number estimate, associated with its postulated criticality accident, impacts the accident emergency planning and response because it is used for the estimation of radiation doses and of radioactive materials release. ISO 16117:2013 does apply to nuclear facilities, plants, laboratories, storage, and transportation of fissile material (but not to nuclear power reactor cores) where a credible criticality accident may occur. In most situations, there are a number of factors to be considered when estimating the radiation doses and radioactive materials that may be released. So getting the assumptions correct will affect the outcomes of the estimates. The ISO 16177 discusses two different 'routes' to estimating the number of fissions used in these models. One is the calculation tools route and one is the simplified models route (which should be considered first). Guidance is given on each of these along with a discussion of the calculation tools that are relied upon during this process. Four Annexes complete the standard: Annex A, Flow diagram of a criticality accident analysis, Annex B, Characteristics of criticality accidents that occurred during process operation, Annex C, Experimental results, and Annex D, Simplified formulae

  16. EDF FARN (fast action force in case of nuclear accident) - Focus on radiation protection of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in abstract form only. As part of the operation of its nuclear power plants, EDF set up in the 80's an emergency response organisation together with the French public authorities aimed at managing the consequences, especially radiological of any events. This is based on the setting up of emergency plans involving both the operator and the public authorities, at local and national level, with both parties assessing the consequences of a radiological accident in the environment constantly enhanced as part of the continuous improvement process. As the Fukushima accident especially highlighted the relevance of having a response system available off site, this emergency response organisation has been strengthened both with equipment and human resources so as to be able to respond to major accidents further to external hazards. These resources have been designed to factor in a high level of radiological risk. The functions and responsibilities are clearly defined for any event occurring at a nuclear power plant. The operator shall be accountable for the actions to be taken on site concerning technical plant management, worker protection and rescue of casualties. The public authorities shall be accountable for all the measures to be taken off site, especially protection of the local population and environmental monitoring. The EDF emergency response organisation is based on enhanced equipment and human resources at site and corporate level supplemented with EDF corporate and non-EDF resources. The EDF emergency plan covers the situation where all the site units are affected. The decision to set up the nuclear rapid response taskforce was taken further to the Fukushima accident in 2011 and it has been operational since 2012. Integrated in the emergency response organisation, its main aim is to be capable of responding in less than 12 hours to reinstate water, electricity and air supply at the nuclear power plant where the accident has occurred. It is

  17. Report on the preliminary fact finding mission following the accident at the nuclear fuel processing facility in Tokaimura, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the accident on 30 September 1999 at the nuclear fuel processing facility at Tokaimura, Japan, the IAEA Emergency Response Centre received numerous requests for information about the event's causes and consequences from Contact Points under the Conventions on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. Although the lack of transboundary consequences of the accident meant that action under the Early Notification Convention was not triggered, the Emergency Response Centre issued several advisories to Member States which drew on official reports received from Japan. After discussions with the Government of Japan, the IAEA dispatched a team of three experts from the Secretariat on a fact finding mission to Tokaimura from 13 to 17 October 1999. The present preliminary report by that team documents key technical information obtained during the mission. At this stage, the report can in no way provide conclusive judgements on the causes and consequences of the accident. Investigations are proceeding in Japan and more information is expected to be made available after access has been gained to the building where the accident occurred. Moreover, much of the information already made available will be revised as more accurate assessments are made, for example of the radiation doses to the three individuals who received the highest exposures. Notwithstanding the preliminary nature of this report, it is clear that the accident was not one involving widespread contamination of the environment as in the 1986 Chernobyl accident. Although there was little risk off the site once the accident had been brought under control, the authorities evacuated the population living within a few hundred metres and advised people within about 10 km of the facility to take shelter for a period of about one day. The event at Tokaimura was nevertheless a serious industrial accident. The results of the detailed

  18. Safety analysis of fusion reactors pertaining to nuclear incidents and accidents. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BfS gave the projekt partners IPP, KIT, Oeko-Institut e. V., and GRS the order to carry out a literature study on the topic of safety of fusion power plants regarding nuclear incidents and accidents. In the framework of this study the actual status of science and technology of the safety concept of fusion power plants should be determined and the applicability of the nuclear safety regulations hitherto developed for nuclear power plants checked. For future commercial fusion power plants today only conceptional designs exist. The most advanced conceptual study for a future fusion power plant is the European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS) from the year 2005, which is based on the tokamak principle. In this study also fundamental aspects of the safety concept of nuclear fusion are treated. Hereby several different conceptual approaches are discussed, which differ among others also in the lay-out approaches relevant for the safety of a facility like for instance the choice of the breeding concept or the materials for the blanket/divertor structure and the coolants. The safety concept of nuclear fusion is oriented on safety concepts for facilities with radioactive inventory. It is based on the concept of tiered safety levels. In order to check whether for the nuclear fusion a safety concept comparable with the nuclear fission at all is necessary, in a first step it was considered, which consequences are possible at a postulated release o large parts of the radioactive inventory of a fusion power plant. Such a worst-case scenario was compared with a corresponding, postulated release of large parts of the radioactive inventory of a nuclear power plant. As scale hereby served the radiological criterion, at the transgression of which in the environment of the facility an evacuation would be necessary. In a next step the transferability of the safety concept of the tiered safety levels of nuclear technology to the fusion was checked. Beside events transferable from

  19. Pilot program: NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] severe reactor accident incident response training manual: Overview and summary of major points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This pilot training manual has been written to fill the need for a general text on NRC response to reactor accidents. The manual is intended to be the foundation for a course for all NRC response personnel. Overview and Summary of Major Points is the first in a series of volumes that collectively summarize the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) emergency response during severe power reactor accidents and provide necessary background information. This volume describes elementary perspectives on severe accidents and accident assessment. Each volume serves, respectively, as the text for a course of instruction in a series of courses for NRC response personnel. These materials do not provide guidance of license requirements for NRC licensees. Each volume is accompanied by an appendix of slides that can be used to present this material. The slides are called out in the text

  20. The fourth and last update of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident. December 1, 2011 to March 11, 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article provides the fourth update on the Fukushima Daiichi accident, from December 1, 2011 to March 11, 2012. As the last update, it will close the series that constitutes the one-year historical record of the accident, focusing on the attainment of a stable shut-down cooling state at the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station (NPS), although the recovery operation will continue for many years in the future. The contents of this last undate deal particularly with the Mid-and-long-Term roadmap for debris disposal, the decontamination and decommissioning of the Fukushima Daiichi NPS, the issues of radioactive contamination and decontamination around the Fukushima Daiichi NPS, and four investigation committees' interim reports on the Fukushima Daiichi accident, published by TEPCO, the government, the National Diet and an independent body respectively. Furthermore, specific effects of the Fukushima Daiichi accident on international collaboration will be summarized at the end of this article. (author)

  1. Increases in perinatal mortality in prefectures contaminated by the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherb, Hagen Heinrich; Mori, Kuniyoshi; Hayashi, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Descriptive observational studies showed upward jumps in secular European perinatal mortality trends after Chernobyl. The question arises whether the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident entailed similar phenomena in Japan. For 47 prefectures representing 15.2 million births from 2001 to 2014, the Japanese government provides monthly statistics on 69,171 cases of perinatal death of the fetus or the newborn after 22 weeks of pregnancy to 7 days after birth. Employing change-point methodology for detecting alterations in longitudinal data, we analyzed time trends in perinatal mortality in the Japanese prefectures stratified by exposure to estimate and test potential increases in perinatal death proportions after Fukushima possibly associated with the earthquake, the tsunami, or the estimated radiation exposure. Areas with moderate to high levels of radiation were compared with less exposed and unaffected areas, as were highly contaminated areas hit versus untroubled by the earthquake and the tsunami. Ten months after the earthquake and tsunami and the subsequent nuclear accident, perinatal mortality in 6 severely contaminated prefectures jumped up from January 2012 onward: jump odds ratio 1.156; 95% confidence interval (1.061, 1.259), P-value 0.0009. There were slight increases in areas with moderate levels of contamination and no increases in the rest of Japan. In severely contaminated areas, the increases of perinatal mortality 10 months after Fukushima were essentially independent of the numbers of dead and missing due to the earthquake and the tsunami. Perinatal mortality in areas contaminated with radioactive substances started to increase 10 months after the nuclear accident relative to the prevailing and stable secular downward trend. These results are consistent with findings in Europe after Chernobyl. Since observational studies as the one presented here may suggest but cannot prove causality because of unknown and uncontrolled factors or

  2. Mental health problems after the 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The name of Fukushima has now become well-known worldwide after Hiroshima and Nagasaki as the third place exposed to radiation in Japan. This radiation pollution has severely damaged the chief industries of Fukushima Prefecture, namely agriculture, fishery, and tourist industry. It has also stimulated strong anxious feelings among parents with young children. The accident has caused a critical situation in the psychiatric and mental health services in Fukushima as well. Five hospitals with psychiatric beds within 30 km from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant were ordered to transfer their inpatients to other hospitals outside the designated 30 km-areas and to close down the hospitals immediately after the nuclear plant accident. In total, more than 800 psychiatric beds disappeared in an instant, and 1,228 persons including psychiatric inpatients and residents of elderly people nursing homes were transferred to other facilities far away. Rational explanation that low-level radiation in Fukushima will not do harm to people did not necessarily relieve existing anxiety among people. The terms 'safety' and 'relief' are usually used in combination; however, 'relief' was separated from 'safety' this time in Fukushima. People gradually began to feel 'relieved', when they themselves got involved in the cleaning work of radiation although its effect remained ambiguous. Now we have the following mental health problems after the 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident; recovery and maintenance of treatment systems for psychiatric patients in the affected areas, efforts for early detection and intervention of depression, severe stress disorder, adaptation disorder, and alcohol abuse which are expected to occur due to the earthquake and radiation pollution, prevention of suicides, relief from anxiety resulting from radiation pollution, adequate treatment of mental problems among children with long-term evacuation, prevention of fall in physical and mental

  3. Health status and follow-up of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident liquidators in Latvia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident at the Nuclear Power Plant in Chernobyl create a new problem for health professionals in Latvia due to the fact that 6475 inhabitants (mainly healthy and men of reproductive age) of Latvia took part in clear-up works in Chernobyl within the period 1986-1991. Chernobyl clear-up workers were exposed γ-radiation and they also incorporated radionuclides. The doses documented for the clear-up workers are variable; they are estimated to be between 0.01-0.5 Gy although the specialists working on the precision of received doses think that they could be even 2 or 3 times higher. The aim of this work is to evaluate the health status of liquidators investigating them on a long-term basis: to create the correct system of health status evaluation of Chernobyl clear-up workers, to improve the register of Chernobyl clear-up workers and of their children, to analyze the data about the incidence of different diseases and mortality gained from follow-ups, to evaluate health status and clinical picture within the period of time, to work out and use adequate methods of treatment. Chernobyl clear-up workers more often than the control group suffer from diseases of the nervous, the endocrine and the metabolic and immune system. They also have higher rate of incidence for diseases of digestive and respiratory system and for diseases of bones, muscles and connective tissue higher rates of accidents and suicides. Now, ten years after the accident there are Chernobyl clear-up workers who are chronically ill and their health status is expected to be worse in the next few years. Regular follow-up and medical examination of Chernobyl clear-up workers and their children should be carried out every year. Regular rehabilitation of Chernobyl clear-up workers should be provided by the government

  4. A comparison of the dose from natural radionuclides and artificial radionuclides after the Fukushima nuclear accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Masahiro; Tokonami, Shinji; Omori, Yasutaka; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Iwaoka, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Due to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, the evacuees from Namie Town still cannot reside in the town, and some continue to live in temporary housing units. In this study, the radon activity concentrations were measured at temporary housing facilities, apartments and detached houses in Fukushima Prefecture in order to estimate the annual internal exposure dose of residents. A passive radon–thoron monitor (using a CR-39) and a pulse-type ionization chamber were used to evaluate the radon activity concentration. The average radon activity concentrations at temporary housing units, including a medical clinic, apartments and detached houses, were 5, 7 and 9 Bq m−3, respectively. Assuming the residents lived in these facilities for one year, the average annual effective doses due to indoor radon in each housing type were evaluated as 0.18, 0.22 and 0.29 mSv, respectively. The average effective doses to all residents in Fukushima Prefecture due to natural and artificial sources were estimated using the results of the indoor radon measurements and published data. The average effective dose due to natural sources for the evacuees from Namie Town was estimated to be 1.9 mSv. In comparison, for the first year after the FDNPP accident, the average effective dose for the evacuees due to artificial sources from the accident was 5.0 mSv. Although residents' internal and external exposures due to natural radionuclides cannot be avoided, it might be possible to lower external exposure due to the artificial radionuclides by changing some behaviors of residents. PMID:26838130

  5. A comparison of the dose from natural radionuclides and artificial radionuclides after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Masahiro; Tokonami, Shinji; Omori, Yasutaka; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Iwaoka, Kazuki

    2016-07-01

    Due to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, the evacuees from Namie Town still cannot reside in the town, and some continue to live in temporary housing units. In this study, the radon activity concentrations were measured at temporary housing facilities, apartments and detached houses in Fukushima Prefecture in order to estimate the annual internal exposure dose of residents. A passive radon-thoron monitor (using a CR-39) and a pulse-type ionization chamber were used to evaluate the radon activity concentration. The average radon activity concentrations at temporary housing units, including a medical clinic, apartments and detached houses, were 5, 7 and 9 Bq m(-3), respectively. Assuming the residents lived in these facilities for one year, the average annual effective doses due to indoor radon in each housing type were evaluated as 0.18, 0.22 and 0.29 mSv, respectively. The average effective doses to all residents in Fukushima Prefecture due to natural and artificial sources were estimated using the results of the indoor radon measurements and published data. The average effective dose due to natural sources for the evacuees from Namie Town was estimated to be 1.9 mSv. In comparison, for the first year after the FDNPP accident, the average effective dose for the evacuees due to artificial sources from the accident was 5.0 mSv. Although residents' internal and external exposures due to natural radionuclides cannot be avoided, it might be possible to lower external exposure due to the artificial radionuclides by changing some behaviors of residents.

  6. Qualitative analysis for reactivity accidents due to the boron dilution of the Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. K.; Park, J. H.; Lim, H. K.; Han, S. J.; Kim, T. W

    2003-03-01

    Researches for reactivity accidents due to local or rapid boron dilution in the reactor core have been recently performed in France, United States of America and Germany. As the result, core damage probability due to boron dilution is relatively high when nuclear power plants are in the low power or shutdown conditions. Nevertheless, few research activities to reveal reactivity accidents originated from local or rapid boron dilution have been performed in Korea. Thus, in order to identify possible boron dilution scenarios that can result in reactivity accidents and to suggest alternatives or remedies that can enhance the safety of a nuclear power plant, this study is carried out. As the results, it was revealed that YGN 5 and 6 have been designed and maintained so as to minimize the possibility of boron dilution accident. However, in the case of boron dilution scenarios that result from human error, not only various types of human error should be considered but also detailed human error probabilities are insufficient. Thus, in-depth researches for the human-induced boron dilution accidents could be performed to get more meaningful results. Nevertheless, characteristics of each boron dilution scenarios that are addressed from this report will be helpful for the safety enhancement of nuclear power plants, if they are supplementally added to plant operating procedures including normal, abnormal and emergency operating procedures.

  7. Comparison of different estimation methods of accident atmospheric dispersion factors for a representative inland nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability of atmospheric diffusion models in complex terrains and low wind speed conditions was discussed in this paper. The accident atmospheric dispersion factors (ATFs) of Taohuajiang nuclear power plant were calculated by using two methods: the probabilistic method recommended by the U.S. Nuclear regulatory Commission (NRC) and the three dimensional objective diagnostic wind field model coupled with Lagrangian trajectory puff model to simulate the 8760 hourly emissions of radioactive nuclides. The results indicate that the maximum hourly accident ATFs calculated by the probabilistic method are conservative in exclusion area boundary (EAB). However, in some directions, accident ATFs calculated using probabilistic method is smaller than that using Lagrangian puff model, as well as some accident ATFs in remote sectors are larger than those in close sectors. Moreover, results calculated by probabilistic method are smaller in long-term release situation. Therefore, accident ATFs obtained according to the regulatory guides may not conservative in some cases, and atmospheric diffusion model should be selected carefully when a nuclear plant is located at a site with complex environmental conditions. (authors)

  8. Systematic approach for assessment of accident risks in chemical and nuclear processing; Abordagem sistematica para avaliacao de riscos de acidentes em instalacoes de processamento quimico e nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senne Junior, Murillo

    2003-07-15

    The industrial accidents which occurred in the last years, particularly in the 80's, contributed a significant way to draw the attention of the government, industry and the society as a whole to the mechanisms for preventing events that could affect people's safety and the environment quality. Techniques and methods extensively used the nuclear, aeronautic and war industries so far were adapted to performing analysis and evaluation of the risks associated to other industrial activities, especially in the petroleum, chemistry and petrochemical areas. The risk analysis in industrial facilities is carried out through the evaluation of the probability or frequency of the accidents and their consequences. However, no systematized methodology that could supply the tools for identifying possible accidents likely to take place in an installation is available in the literature. Neither existing are methodologies for the identification of the models for evaluation of the accidents' consequences nor for the selection of the available techniques for qualitative or quantitative analysis of the possibility of occurrence of the accident being focused. The objective of this work is to develop and implement a methodology for identification of the risks of accidents in chemical and nuclear processing facilities as well as for the evaluation of their consequences on persons. For the development of the methodology, the main possible accidents that could occur in such installations were identified and the qualitative and quantitative techniques available for the identification of the risks and for the evaluation of the consequences of each identified accidents were selected. The use of the methodology was illustrated by applying it in two case examples adapted from the literature, involving accidents with inflammable, explosives, and radioactive materials. The computer code MRA - Methodology for Risk Assessment was developed using DELPHI, version 5.0, with the purpose of

  9. Simulation of rod ejection accident in a WWER-1000 Nuclear Reactor by using PARCS code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • REA in WWER-1000 Nuclear Reactor was simulated. • PARCS v2.7 and WIMSD-5B codes were used. • PARCS was validated for steady-state and transient processes. • Temperature reactivity coefficient was calculated. • TH block of PARCS v2.7 code was used. - Abstract: The rod ejection accident is defined as the postulated rupture of a control rod drive mechanism housing that results in the complete ejection of a rod cluster control assembly from the reactor core. The consequences of the mechanical failure are a rapid positive reactivity insertion and an increase in the local power peaking with high local energy deposition in the fuel assembly, accompanied by an initial pressure increase in the reactor cooling system. In this study, the REA has been simulated in a WWER-1000 reactor by using WIMSD-5B and PARCS v2.7 codes. First, macroscopic cross-sections have been calculated for various types of fuel assemblies using WIMSD-5B. Results have been fed as input to PARCS v2.7 code. Steady-state, transient and specially thermal–hydraulic feedback blocks of PARCS code have been handled in this simulation. Finally, results have been compared with Final Safety Analysis Report of WWER-1000 reactor. The results show a great similarity and confirm the ability of PARCS code in simulation of transient accidents

  10. Study on generic intervention levels for protecting the public in a nuclear accident or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, several social and economical factors shall be considered for the actions to protect the public and to recover the environment. The application of the radiological protection principles on practices in intervention situations may lead to adoption of protective measures disproportional to the involved risk, compromising the resources available to more effective actions. This causes a negative impact on the population and may conduct to discredit about the protective measures and the lost of confidence on the authorities. In this context, the principles of radiological protection for interventions should be studied and analyzed for being adequately applied in accident situations or radiological emergencies that involves the country. These principles are constantly improved and the concept of generic intervention level plays an important role in the decision-making to protect the public. The costs involved to the protective measures for the public in Brazil were studied and cost benefit analysis techniques were applied to estimate the generic intervention levels for public protection applicable in the country. These results were compared to those values internationally recommended, as well to values obtained in a similar study accomplished for Japan. It was also performed a sensibility analysis of the results regarding a value and a simple analysis of the results considering the costs of the several protective measures. (author)

  11. Early mortality estimates for different nuclear accidents. Final Phase I report, October 1977-April 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several studies have previously been made of the number of early deaths which might be expected in a population exposed to a cloud of radionuclides which could result from a nuclear accident. These analyses, however, have been limited to one accident scenario or to exposures involving limited numbers of radionuclides. The purpose of this Phase I study was to examine the existing data on the early health effects of inhaled radioactive materials and determined what, if any, new studies were needed to make reasonable estimates of early mortality after exposure of a population to a cloud of radionuclides of any type. The approach used in the Phase I project was to analyze the data bases available on the health effects of inhaled radioactive materials and document those which were adequate and useful. Using these data, a computer based simulation model was developed depicting exposure to a radioactive aerosol, the dose to an individual exposed to the aerosol and the probability of dying from early effects

  12. The European Research on Severe Accidents in Generation-II and -III Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Van Dorsselaere

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty-three organisations from 22 countries network their capacities of research in SARNET (Severe Accident Research NETwork of excellence to resolve the most important remaining uncertainties and safety issues on severe accidents in existing and future water-cooled nuclear power plants (NPP. After a first project in the 6th Framework Programme (FP6 of the European Commission, the SARNET2 project, coordinated by IRSN, started in April 2009 for 4 years in the FP7 frame. After 2,5 years, some main outcomes of joint research (modelling and experiments by the network members on the highest priority issues are presented: in-vessel degraded core coolability, molten-corium-concrete-interaction, containment phenomena (water spray, hydrogen combustion…, source term issues (mainly iodine behaviour. The ASTEC integral computer code, jointly developed by IRSN and GRS to predict the NPP SA behaviour, capitalizes in terms of models the knowledge produced in the network: a few validation results are presented. For dissemination of knowledge, an educational 1-week course was organized for young researchers or students in January 2011, and a two-day course is planned mid-2012 for senior staff. Mobility of young researchers or students between the European partners is being promoted. The ERMSAR conference is becoming the major worldwide conference on SA research.

  13. Geo-Space observation of atmospheric environmental effects associated with 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulinets, Sergey; Ouzounov, Dimitar; Hernandez-Pajares, Manuel; Hattori, Katsumi; Garcia-Rigo, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Our approach of using multiple geo-space observation is based on the LAIC (Lithosphere- Atmosphere- Ionosphere Coupling) model and the gained experience during similar analysis of Three-Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents. We do collect a unique dataset of geophysical data for the period around the time of the most active phase of Fukushima explosions (from 12 March till 31 March, 71-90 DOY). We analyzed following data sets: (i) ground temperature and relative humidity data from the JMA network of Japan, (ii) satellite meteorological data and assimilative models to obtain the integrated water vapor chemical potential; (iii) the infrared emission on the top of atmosphere measured by NOAA and GEOS satellites estimated as Outgoing Longwave Radiation; and (iv) multiple ionospheric measurements , including ground based ionosondes, GPS vTEC from GEONET network, COSMIC/FORMOSAT constellation occultation data, JASON satellite TEC measurements, and tomography reconstruction technique to obtain 3D distribution of electron concentration around the Fukushima power plant. As a result we were able to detect the anomalies in different geophysical parameters representing the dynamics of the Fukushima nuclear accident development and the effects on the atmospheric environment. Their temporal evolution demonstrates the synergy in different atmospheric anomalies development what implies the existence of the common physical mechanism described by the LAIC model.

  14. Basic principles and criteria for public health protection in the event of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decision making criteria for population protection in nuclear accidents are discussed, and in particular the three basic principles: 1) excluding the appearance of nonstostochastic effects that occur in the case of high individual doses; 2) weighing the risks of radiation damage if such measures are not taken; 3) optimization based on comparison of benefit and costs, using the same measures for costs of health injury to affected populations and of the protected measures to be taken. The decision making criteria developed in Bulgaria are based on international recommendations with lowered upper limit of the range for evacuation and specified doses for vulnerable groups, children and pregnant women. The organization and the specific problems of the following individual types of protective measures are described: sheltering; protection of respiratory organs; iodine prophylaxis; evacuation of the public. One major condition for ensuring protection is to provide the public with timely information on the actual situation and the necessary countermeasures. Such information should be released in a manner that allows for understanding the expediency and significance of actions to be taken. An important aspect of emergency planning consists in taking into consideration the conditions actually prevailing in the country. This is well illustrated in the principle designated as 'national level of challenge' taking into account a country's capabilities for introducing intervention levels and permissible dose levels. In the case of Bulgaria this still remains to be done in protective planning for accidents. (author)

  15. Simultaneous sampling of indoor and outdoor airborne radioactivity after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Arae, Hideki; Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Janik, Miroslaw; Hosoda, Masahiro; Tokonami, Shinji

    2014-02-18

    Several studies have estimated inhalation doses for the public because of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Most of them were based on measurement of radioactivity in outdoor air and included the assumption that people stayed outdoors all day. Although this assumption gives a conservative estimate, it is not realistic. The "air decontamination factor" (ratio of indoor to outdoor air radionuclide concentrations) was estimated from simultaneous sampling of radioactivity in both inside and outside air of one building. The building was a workplace and located at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Chiba Prefecture, Japan. Aerosol-associated radioactive materials in air were collected onto filters, and the filters were analyzed by γ spectrometry at NIRS. The filter sampling was started on March 15, 2011 and was continued for more than 1 year. Several radionuclides, such as (131)I, (134)Cs, and (137)Cs were found by measuring the filters with a germanium detector. The air decontamination factor was around 0.64 for particulate (131)I and 0.58 for (137)Cs. These values could give implications for the ratio of indoor to outdoor radionuclide concentrations after the FDNPP accident for a similar type of building.

  16. Nuclear waste shipping container response to severe accident conditions, A brief critique of the modal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audin, L.

    1990-12-01

    The Modal Study (NUREG/CR-4829) attempts to upgrade the analysis of spent nuclear fuel transportation accidents, and to verify the validity of the present regulatory scheme of cask performance standards as a means to minimize risk. While an improvement over many prior efforts in this area (such as NUREG-0170), it unfortunately fails to create a realistic simulation either of a shipping cask, the severe conditions to which it could be subjected, or the potential damage to the spent fuel cargo during an accident. There are too many deficiencies in its analysis to allow acceptance of its results for the presumed cask design, and many pending changes in new containers, cargoes and shipping patterns will limit applicability of the Modal Study to future shipments. In essence, the Modal Study is a good start, but is too simplistic, incomplete, outdated and open to serious question to be used as the basis for any present-day environmental or risk assessment of spent fuel transportation. It needs to be redone, with peer review during its production and experimental verification of its assumptions, before it has any relevance to the shipments planned to Yucca Mountain. Finally, it must be expanded into a full risk assessment by inputing its radiological release fractions and probabilities into a valid dispersal simulation to properly determine the impact of its results. 51 refs.

  17. Doctrinal elements for the post-accidental management of a nuclear accident - Final version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report examines and defines the objectives, principles and main actions for the post-accidental management of a nuclear accident. It defines the emergency phase and the post-accidental phase, three basic objectives (to protect the population against the hazards of ionizing radiations, to support populations affected by the accident consequences, to restore affected territories), management principles, key issues for post-accidental management. It defines actions to be undertaken: post-accidental zoning, monitoring of deposited radioactivity, early actions for the protection and taking charge of population, information. It addresses the different aspects of post-accidental management planning in a period of transition: reception of population, reduction of population exposure to deposited radioactivity, treatment of public health problems, improvement of the knowledge on the radiological situation of the environment, improvement of the radiological quality of the different environments, dealing with wastes, empowerment of stakeholders through an adequate governance, support and redeployment of economic activity, help and compensation, information. Appendices more deeply discuss actions to be undertaken just after the emergency phase, for the management of the transition period, and for the management of the long-term period

  18. Compendium of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory's research projects related to the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear reactor power station in the USSR on April 26, 1986, the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) initiated a number of research projects as follows: (1) selected sites in both the Deposition and Surface Air networks were alerted and their sampling protocols adjusted to accommodate the anticipated arrival times and activity concentrations of the Chernobyl debris; (2) a number of cooperative programs involving field work, sampling, analysis and data interpretation were set up with institutions and scientists in other countries; (3) EML's Regional Baseline Station at Chester, NJ, as well as the roof of the Laboratory in New York City, provided bases for sampling and measurements to study the radionuclide concentrations, radiation levels, physical characteristics and potential biological implications of the Chernobyl fallout on the northeastern United States; and (4) the resulting fallout from the Chernobyl accident provided an 'experiment of opportunity' in that it enabled us to study fresh fission product deposition using collection systems resurrected from the 1950's and 1960's for comparison with current state-of-the-art methodology. The 13 reports of this volume have been entered separately into the data base

  19. Early mortality estimates for different nuclear accidents. Final Phase I report, October 1977-April 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, F.F.

    1979-08-01

    Several studies have previously been made of the number of early deaths which might be expected in a population exposed to a cloud of radionuclides which could result from a nuclear accident. These analyses, however, have been limited to one accident scenario or to exposures involving limited numbers of radionuclides. The purpose of this Phase I study was to examine the existing data on the early health effects of inhaled radioactive materials and determined what, if any, new studies were needed to make reasonable estimates of early mortality after exposure of a population to a cloud of radionuclides of any type. The approach used in the Phase I project was to analyze the data bases available on the health effects of inhaled radioactive materials and document those which were adequate and useful. Using these data, a computer based simulation model was developed depicting exposure to a radioactive aerosol, the dose to an individual exposed to the aerosol and the probability of dying from early effects.

  20. The study of steam explosions in nuclear systems. Advanced Reactor Severe Accident Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an overview of the steam explosion issue in nuclear reactor safety and our approach to assessing it. Key physics, models, and computational tools are described, and illustrative results are presented for ex-vessel steam explosions in an open pool geometry. An extensive set of appendices facilitate access to previously reported work that is an integral part of this effort. These appendices include key developments in our approach, key advances in our understanding from physical and numerical experiments, and details of the most advanced computational results presented in this report. Of major significance are the following features: A consistent two-dimensional treatment for both premixing and propagation which in practical settings are ostensibly at least two-dimensional phenomena; experimental demonstration of voiding and microinteractions which represent key behaviors in premixing and propagation respectively; demonstration of the explosion venting phenomena in open pool geometries which, therefore, can be counted on as a very important mitigative feature; and introduction of the idea of penetration cutoff as a key mechanism prohibiting large-scale premixing in usual ex-vessel situations involving high pour velocities and subcooled pools. This report is intended as an overview and is to be followed by code manuals for PM-ALPHA and ESPROSE.m, respective verification reports, and application documents for reactor-specific applications. The applications will employ the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM) to address the safety importance of potential steam explosions phenomena in evaluated severe accidents for passive Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs)