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Sample records for airway narrowing responses

  1. Effect of montelukast on excessive airway narrowing response to methacholine in adult asthmatic patients not on controller therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Diamant, Zuzana

    2009-01-01

    Excessive airway narrowing is an important determinant of fatal asthma. This pathophysiological feature is characterized by the absence of a dose-response plateau to methacholine (Mtc). We investigated if the leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) montelukast (Mont) can induce a dose-response pla......Excessive airway narrowing is an important determinant of fatal asthma. This pathophysiological feature is characterized by the absence of a dose-response plateau to methacholine (Mtc). We investigated if the leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) montelukast (Mont) can induce a dose...

  2. Tracheal granulation as a cause of unrecognized airway narrowing

    OpenAIRE

    Gaurav Bhatia; Valsamma Abraham; Linjo Louis

    2012-01-01

    Tracheostomy is one of the most common elective surgical procedures performed in critically ill patients. The most frequent late complication after tracheostomy is the development of granulation tissue, a complication that may cause airway occlusion or result in airway stenosis. We report the successful management of a patient with tracheal granulation presenting as an unrecognised cause of difficulty breathing.

  3. Airway Inflammation and Structural Changes in Airway Hyper-Responsiveness and Asthma: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Louis-Philippe Boulet; Jamila Chakir; Jean Dubé; Catherine Laprise; Michel Boutet; Michel Laviolette

    1998-01-01

    Asthma treatment has moved from bronchodilator therapy to an emphasis on anti-inflammatory therapy. Airway inflammation is believed to induce airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) through the release of mediators that increase the airway response to agonists. However, the exact contribution of airway inflammation in the physiology of airway hyper-responsiveness remains undefined. Structural modifications in airways resulting from inflammation may contribute to the development and persistence of A...

  4. Effects of montelukast on airway narrowing from eucapnic voluntary hyperventilation and cold air exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Rundell, K; Spiering, B.; Baumann, J.; Evans, T.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Exercise induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is common in elite athletes. Eucapnic voluntary hyperventilation (EVH) is a laboratory test recommended for the identification of EIB in athletes, secondary to a field exercise challenge. Montelukast attenuates EIB, but its protective effect against airway narrowing from EVH has not been investigated.

  5. Prolonged ozone exposure in an allergic airway disease model: Adaptation of airway responsiveness and airway remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Chang-Soo

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short-term exposure to high concentrations of ozone has been shown to increase airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR. Because the changes in AHR and airway inflammation and structure after chronic ozone exposure need to be determined, the goal of this study was to investigate these effects in a murine model of allergic airway disease. Methods We exposed BALB/c mice to 2 ppm ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks. We measured the enhanced pause (Penh to methacholine and performed cell differentials in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. We quantified the levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ in the supernatants of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids using enzyme immunoassays, and examined the airway architecture under light and electron microscopy. Results The groups exposed to ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks demonstrated decreased Penh at methacholine concentrations of 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/ml, with a dose-response curve to the right of that for the filtered-air group. Neutrophils and eosinophils increased in the group exposed to ozone for 4 weeks compared to those in the filtered-air group. The ratio of IL-4 to INF-γ increased significantly after exposure to ozone for 8 and 12 weeks compared to the ratio for the filtered-air group. The numbers of goblet cells, myofibroblasts, and smooth muscle cells showed time-dependent increases in lung tissue sections from the groups exposed to ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the increase in AHR associated with the allergic airway does not persist during chronic ozone exposure, indicating that airway remodeling and adaptation following repeated exposure to air pollutants can provide protection against AHR.

  6. Airway, responsiveness and inflammation in adolescent elite swimmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lise; Lund, T.K.; Barnes, P.J.;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Whereas increased airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation are well documented in adult elite athletes, it remains uncertain whether the same airway changes are present in adolescents involved in elite sport. Objective: To investigate airway responsiveness and airway...... inflammation in adolescent elite swimmers. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study on adolescent elite swimmers (n = 33) and 2 control groups: unselected adolescents (n = 35) and adolescents with asthma (n = 212). The following tests were performed: questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), spirometry...... years of intense training and competition. This leads us to believe that elite swimmers do not have particularly susceptible airways when they take up competitive swimming when young, but that they develop respiratory symptoms, airway inflammation, and AHR during their swimming careers Udgivelsesdato...

  7. Nitrogen Dioxide Exposure and Airway Responsiveness in Individuals with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Controlled human exposure studies evaluating the effect of inhaled NO2 on the inherent responsiveness of the airways to challenge by bronchoconstricting agents have had mixed results. In general, existing meta-analyses show statistically significant effects of NO2 on the airway r...

  8. Small Airway Dysfunction and Abnormal Exercise Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsonk, Edward L.; Stansbury, Robert C.; Beeckman-Wagner, Lu-Ann; Long, Joshua L.; Wang, Mei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Coal mine dust exposure can cause symptoms and loss of lung function from multiple mechanisms, but the roles of each disease process are not fully understood. Objectives We investigated the implications of small airway dysfunction for exercise physiology among a group of workers exposed to coal mine dust. Methods Twenty coal miners performed spirometry, first breathing air and then helium-oxygen, single-breath diffusing capacity, and computerized chest tomography, and then completed cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Measurements and Main Results Six participants meeting criteria for small airway dysfunction were compared with 14 coal miners who did not. At submaximal workload, miners with small airway dysfunction used a higher proportion of their maximum voluntary ventilation and had higher ventilatory equivalents for both O2 and CO2. Regression modeling indicated that inefficient ventilation was significantly related to small airway dysfunction but not to FEV1 or diffusing capacity. At the end of exercise, miners with small airway dysfunction had 27% lower O2 consumption. Conclusions Small airway abnormalities may be associated with important inefficiency of exercise ventilation. In dust-exposed individuals with only mild abnormalities on resting lung function tests or chest radiographs, cardiopulmonary exercise testing may be important in defining causes of exercise intolerance. PMID:27073987

  9. Seasonal Fluctuations in Airway Responsiveness in Elite Endurance Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Howard B Hemingson; Davis, Beth E.; Cockcroft, Donald W

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that exposure to winter training conditions (irritants in indoor facilities and/or cold, dry air in the outdoors) can increase airway responsiveness in elite endurance athletes.OBJECTIVES: It has yet to be elucidated whether elite endurance athletes experience seasonal fluctuations in their airway responsiveness.METHODS: Eighteen members of a varsity cross-country running team underwent screening procedures and five members were enrolled in the study. Each at...

  10. NEUROTROPHIN MEDIATION OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS RESPONSES TO INHALED DIESEL PARTICLES IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airway hyper-responsiveness. Diesel exhaust particulates (DEP) associated with the combustion of diesel fuel exacerbate many of these allergic airways respons...

  11. Postnatal exposure history and airways: oxidant stress responses in airway explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Shannon R; Schelegle, Edward S; Edwards, Patricia C; Miller, Lisa A; Hyde, Dallas M; Van Winkle, Laura S

    2012-12-01

    Postnatally, the lung continues to grow and differentiate while interacting with the environment. Exposure to ozone (O(3)) and allergens during postnatal lung development alters structural elements of conducting airways, including innervation and neurokinin abundance. These changes have been linked with development of asthma in a rhesus monkey model. We hypothesized that O(3) exposure resets the ability of the airways to respond to oxidant stress and that this is mediated by changes in the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). Infant rhesus monkeys received episodic exposure to O(3) biweekly with or without house dust mite antigen (HDMA) from 6 to 12 months of age. Age-matched monkeys were exposed to filtered air (FA). Microdissected airway explants from midlevel airways (intrapulmonary generations 5-8) for four to six animals in each of four groups (FA, O(3), HDMA, and HDMA+O(3)) were tested for NK-1R gene responses to acute oxidant stress using exposure to hydrogen peroxide (1.2 mM), a lipid ozonide (10 μM), or sham treatment for 4 hours in vitro. Airway responses were measured using real-time quantitative RT-PCR of NK-1R and IL-8 gene expression. Basal NK-1R gene expression levels were not different between the exposure groups. Treatment with ozonide or hydrogen peroxide did not change NK-1R gene expression in animals exposed to FA, HDMA, or HDMA+O(3). However, treatment in vitro with lipid ozonide significantly increased NK-1R gene expression in explants from O(3)-exposed animals. We conclude that a history of prior O(3) exposure resets the steady state of the airways to increase the NK-1R response to subsequent acute oxidant stresses. PMID:22962062

  12. BLUNTING AIRWAYS EOSINOPHILIC INFLAMMATION RESULTS IN A DECREASED AIRWAY NEUTROPHIL RESPONSE TO INHALED LPS IN ATOPIC ASTHMATICS A ROLE FOR CD-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent data demonstrate that atopic inflammation might enhance airway responses to inhaled LPS in individuals with atopic asthma by increasing CD14 expression on airway macrophages. We sought to determine whether blunting airway eosinophilic inflammation decreases CD14 expressio...

  13. Mechanisms of airway responses to esophageal acidification in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Ivan M; Haworth, Steven T; Medda, Bidyut K; Forster, Hubert; Shaker, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Acid in the esophagus causes airway constriction, tracheobronchial mucous secretion, and a decrease in tracheal mucociliary transport rate. This study was designed to investigate the neuropharmacological mechanisms controlling these responses. In chloralose-anesthetized cats (n = 72), we investigated the effects of vagotomy or atropine (100 μg·kg(-1)·30 min(-1) iv) on airway responses to esophageal infusion of 0.1 M PBS or 0.1 N HCl at 1 ml/min. We quantified 1) diameter of the bronchi, 2) tracheobronchial mucociliary transport rate, 3) tracheobronchial mucous secretion, and 4) mucous content of the tracheal epithelium and submucosa. We found that vagotomy or atropine blocked the airway constriction response but only atropine blocked the increase in mucous output and decrease in mucociliary transport rate caused by esophageal acidification. The mucous cells of the mucosa produced more Alcian blue- than periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-stained mucosubstances, and the mucous cells of the submucosa produced more PAS- than Alcian blue-stained mucosubstances. Selective perfusion of the different segments of esophagus with HCl or PBS resulted in significantly greater production of PAS-stained mucus in the submucosa of the trachea adjacent to the HCl-perfused esophagus than in that adjacent to the PBS-perfused esophagus. In conclusion, airway constriction caused by esophageal acidification is mediated by a vagal cholinergic pathway, and the tracheobronchial transport response is mediated by cholinergic receptors. Acid perfusion of the esophagus selectively increases production of neutral mucosubstances of the apocrine glands by a local mechanism. We hypothesize that the airway responses to esophageal acid exposure are part of the innate, rather than acute emergency, airway defense system. PMID:26846551

  14. Airway responses to NO2 and allergen in asthmatics

    OpenAIRE

    Barck, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (N02), a gas produced by combustion, is a common environmental air pollutant. Individuals with asthma are more sensitive to N02 exposure than healthy subjects, according to results from controlled human-exposure studies. N02 can enhance the asthmatic response to inhaled allergen. The mechanisms for N02's enhancing effect on the asthmatic reaction to allergen appear to be related to an increased inflammatory reaction in the airways. The general aim of the ...

  15. Effects of nitrogen dioxide on airway responsiveness in allergic asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Strand, Victoria

    1998-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in the industrialized world and its prevalence is increasing. Clinical symptoms of airway obstruction and bronchial hyper responsiveness can be induced by specific agents, such as allergens and non-specific stimuli, such as cold air and irritants. In order to avoid exacerbation it is important to identify these stimuli and to study how they interact with each other and amplify inflammation in asthma. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is...

  16. Nasal airway responses to nasal continuous positive airway pressure breathing: An in-vivo pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David E; Bartley, Jim; Shakeel, Muhammad; Nates, Roy J; Hankin, Robin K S

    2016-06-14

    The nasal cycle, through variation in nasal airflow partitioning, allows the upper airway to accommodate the contrasting demands of air conditioning and removal of entrapped air contaminants. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) breathing has on both nasal airflow partitioning and nasal geometry. Using a custom-made nasal mask, twenty healthy participants had the airflow in each naris measured during normal nasal breathing followed by nCPAP breathing. Eight participants also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasal region during spontaneous nasal breathing, and then nCPAP breathing over a range of air pressures. During nCPAP breathing, a simultaneous reduction in airflow through the patent airway together with a corresponding increase in airway flow within the congested nasal airway were observed in sixteen of the twenty participants. Nasal airflow resistance is inversely proportional to airway cross-sectional area. MRI data analysis during nCPAP breathing confirmed airway cross-sectional area reduced along the patent airway while the congested airway experienced an increase in this parameter. During awake breathing, nCPAP disturbs the normal inter-nasal airflow partitioning. This could partially explain the adverse nasal drying symptoms frequently reported by many users of this therapy. PMID:27173595

  17. Transnasal tracheobronchial stenting for malignant airway narrowing under local anesthesia: Our experience of treating three cases using this technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanta Medhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the technical feasibility of tracheobronchial stenting via transnasal route under bronchoscopy and fluoroscopic guidance in severe malignant airway strictures using self-expandable nitinol stents. Materials and Methods: We describe three patients with malignant airway strictures, treated entirely via transnasal route under local anesthesia using bronchoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance. Nasal route allowed convenient access to the airway for the bronchoscope across the stricture and a guidewire was introduced through its working channel. The 18F tracheal stent and the 6F bronchial stent assembly could be easily introduced and deployed under bronchoscopic (reintroduced through the other nostril and fluoroscopic guidance. Results: We achieved technical success in all the three patients with immediate relief of dyspnea. Conclusion: Transnasal airway stenting with self-expandable nitinol stent using bronchoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance under local anesthesia is a safe and effective method with minimal patient discomfort.

  18. Depletion of OX-8 lymphocytes from the blood and airways using monoclonal antibodies enhances the late airway response in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Olivenstein, R.; Renzi, P M; Yang, J P; P. Rossi; Laberge, S.; Waserman, S; Martin, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a role for T lymphocytes in allergic airway responses. We hypothesized that reducing blood T suppressor cells (Ts) might increase the late airway response (LR). Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were sensitized with ovalbumin (OA). On days 8, 10, and 12, post-sensitization test SD (n = 14) received monoclonal antibody intravenously (OX-8; 1 mg) specific to rat Ts. Controls received saline (n = 7) or mouse ascites IgG (n = 7). On day 14, animals were challenged with OA aerosol ...

  19. Airway response to inhaled salbutamol in hyperthyroid and hypothyroid patients before and after treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, R N; Tattersfield, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    For many years the development of thyrotoxicosis has been known to cause a deterioration in asthma but the mechanism is unknown. We have studied the effect of thyroid function on airway beta adrenergic responsiveness in 10 hyperthyroid and six hypothyroid subjects before and after treatment of their thyroid disease. Airway adrenergic responsiveness was assessed by measuring specific airway conductance (sGaw) after increasing doses of inhaled salbutamol (10-410 micrograms). After treatment the...

  20. AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RESPONSE TO HUMAN METAPNEUMOVIRUS INFECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    X, Bao; T, Liu; L, Spetch; D, Kolli; R.P, Garofalo; A, Casola

    2007-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants, elderly and immunocompromised patients. In this study, we show that hMPV can infect in a similar manner epithelial cells representative of different tracts of the airways. hMPV-induced expression of chemokines IL-8 and RANTES in primary small alveolar epithelial cells (SAE) and in a human alveolar type II-like epithelial cell line (A549) was similar, suggesting that A549 cells can be used as a model to study lower airway epithelial cell responses to hMPV infection. A549 secreted a variety of CXC and CC chemokines, cytokines and type I interferons, following hMPV infection. hMPV was also a strong inducer of transcription factors belonging to nuclear factor (NF)-κB, interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) families, which are known to orchestrate the expression of inflammatory and immuno-modulatory mediators. PMID:17655903

  1. Plasticity of airway epithelial cell transcriptome in response to flagellin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan G Clark

    Full Text Available Airway epithelial cells (AEC are critical components of the inflammatory and immune response during exposure to pathogens. AECs in monolayer culture and differentiated epithelial cells in air-liquid interface (ALI represent two distinct and commonly used in vitro models, yet differences in their response to pathogens have not been investigated. In this study, we compared the transcriptional effects of flagellin on AECs in monolayer culture versus ALI culture using whole-genome microarrays and RNA sequencing. We exposed monolayer and ALI AEC cultures to flagellin in vitro and analyzed the transcriptional response by microarray and RNA-sequencing. ELISA and RT-PCR were used to validate changes in select candidates. We found that AECs cultured in monolayer and ALI have strikingly different transcriptional states at baseline. When challenged with flagellin, monolayer AEC cultures greatly increased transcription of numerous genes mapping to wounding response, immunity and inflammatory response. In contrast, AECs in ALI culture had an unexpectedly muted response to flagellin, both in number of genes expressed and relative enrichment of inflammatory and immune pathways. We conclude that in vitro culturing methods have a dramatic effect on the transcriptional profile of AECs at baseline and after stimulation with flagellin. These differences suggest that epithelial responses to pathogen challenges are distinctly different in culture models of intact and injured epithelium.

  2. Plasticity of airway epithelial cell transcriptome in response to flagellin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Joan G; Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Basom, Ryan S; Gharib, Sina A

    2015-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AEC) are critical components of the inflammatory and immune response during exposure to pathogens. AECs in monolayer culture and differentiated epithelial cells in air-liquid interface (ALI) represent two distinct and commonly used in vitro models, yet differences in their response to pathogens have not been investigated. In this study, we compared the transcriptional effects of flagellin on AECs in monolayer culture versus ALI culture using whole-genome microarrays and RNA sequencing. We exposed monolayer and ALI AEC cultures to flagellin in vitro and analyzed the transcriptional response by microarray and RNA-sequencing. ELISA and RT-PCR were used to validate changes in select candidates. We found that AECs cultured in monolayer and ALI have strikingly different transcriptional states at baseline. When challenged with flagellin, monolayer AEC cultures greatly increased transcription of numerous genes mapping to wounding response, immunity and inflammatory response. In contrast, AECs in ALI culture had an unexpectedly muted response to flagellin, both in number of genes expressed and relative enrichment of inflammatory and immune pathways. We conclude that in vitro culturing methods have a dramatic effect on the transcriptional profile of AECs at baseline and after stimulation with flagellin. These differences suggest that epithelial responses to pathogen challenges are distinctly different in culture models of intact and injured epithelium. PMID:25668187

  3. Postnatal Exposure History and Airways: Oxidant Stress Responses in Airway Explants

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Shannon R.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Edwards, Patricia C.; Lisa A. Miller; Hyde, Dallas M.; Van Winkle, Laura S.

    2012-01-01

    Postnatally, the lung continues to grow and differentiate while interacting with the environment. Exposure to ozone (O3) and allergens during postnatal lung development alters structural elements of conducting airways, including innervation and neurokinin abundance. These changes have been linked with development of asthma in a rhesus monkey model. We hypothesized that O3 exposure resets the ability of the airways to respond to oxidant stress and that this is mediated by changes in the neurok...

  4. Distinct effects of endogenous interleukin-23 on eosinophilic airway inflammation in response to different antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Rika Ogawa; Yusuke Suzuki; Shizuko Kagawa; Katsunori Masaki; Koichi Fukunaga; Akihiko Yoshimura; Seitaro Fujishima; Takeshi Terashima; Tomoko Betsuyaku; Koichiro Asano

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of interleukin (IL)-23 in asthma pathophysiology is still controversial. We examined its role in allergic airway inflammation in response to two distinct antigens using IL-23-deficient mice. Methods: Allergic airway inflammation was evaluated in wild-type and IL-23p19−/− mice. Mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) or house dust mite (HDM) by intraperitoneal injection of antigen and their airways were then exposed to the same antigen. Levels of antigen-specific immuno...

  5. Compensatory responses to upper airway obstruction in obese apneic men and women

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Chien-Hung; Kirkness, Jason P.; Patil, Susheel P.; McGinley, Brian M.; Smith, Philip L.; Schwartz, Alan R.; Schneider, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    Defective structural and neural upper airway properties both play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea. A more favorable structural upper airway property [pharyngeal critical pressure under hypotonic conditions (passive Pcrit)] has been documented for women. However, the role of sex-related modulation in compensatory responses to upper airway obstruction (UAO), independent of the passive Pcrit, remains unclear. Obese apneic men and women underwent a standard polysomno...

  6. Th17 Responses in Chronic Allergic Airway Inflammation Abrogate Regulatory T cell-mediated Tolerance and Contribute to Airway Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jingyue; Lloyd, Clare M.; Noble, Alistair

    2012-01-01

    The role of Th17 responses in airway remodeling in asthma is currently unknown. We demonstrate that both parenteral and mucosal allergen sensitization followed by allergen inhalation leads to Th17-biased lung immune responses. Unlike Th17 cells generated in vitro, lung Th17 cells did not produce TNF-α or IL-22. Eosinophilia predominated in acute inflammation while neutrophilia and IL-17 increased in chronic disease. Allergen-induced tolerance involved Foxp3, Helios and GARP expressing regulat...

  7. Hemodynamic responses and upper airway morbidity following tracheal intubation in patients with hypertension: Conventional laryngoscopy versus an intubating laryngeal mask airway

    OpenAIRE

    Elif Bengi Sener; Emre Ustun; Burcu Ustun; Binnur Sarihasan

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We compared hemodynamic responses and upper airway morbidity following tracheal intubation via conventional laryngoscopy or intubating laryngeal mask airway in hypertensive patients. METHODS: Forty-two hypertensive patients received a conventional laryngoscopy or were intubated with a intubating laryngeal mask airway. Anesthesia was induced with propofol, fentanyl, and cis-atracurium. Measurements of systolic and diastolic blood pressures, heart rate, rate pressure product, and ST...

  8. Repeated allergen exposure reduce early phase airway response and leukotriene release despite upregulation of 5-lipoxygenase pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Zhi-Hua

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergen induced early phase airway response and airway plasma exudation are predominantly mediated by inflammatory mast cell mediators including histamine, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs and thromboxane A2 (TXA2. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether repeated allergen exposure affects early phase airway response to allergen challenge. Methods A trimellitic anhydride (TMA sensitized guinea pig model was used to investigate the effects of low dose repeated allergen exposure on cholinergic airway responsiveness, early phase airway response and plasma exudation, as well as local airway production of mast cell derived cysteinyl leukotrienes and thromboxane B2 (TXB2 after allergen challenge. Results Repeated low dose allergen exposure increased cholinergic airway responsiveness. In contrast, early phase airway response and plasma exudation in response to a high-dose allergen challenge were strongly attenuated after repeated low dose allergen exposure. Inhibition of the airway response was unspecific to exposed allergen and independent of histamine receptor blocking. Furthermore, a significant reduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2 was found in the airways of animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen. However, in vitro stimulation of airway tissue from animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen with arachidonic acid and calcium ionophore (A23187 induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2, suggesting enhanced activity of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. Conclusions The inhibition of the early phase airway response, cysteinyl leukotriene and TXB2 production after repeated allergen exposure may result from unresponsive effector cells.

  9. Comparison of airway responses in sheep of different age in precision-cut lung slices (PCLS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena A Lambermont

    Full Text Available Animal models should display important characteristics of the human disease. Sheep have been considered particularly useful to study allergic airway responses to common natural antigens causing human asthma. A rationale of this study was to establish a model of ovine precision-cut lung slices (PCLS for the in vitro measurement of airway responses in newborn and adult animals. We hypothesized that differences in airway reactivity in sheep are present at different ages.Lambs were delivered spontaneously at term (147d and adult sheep lived till 18 months. Viability of PCLS was confirmed by the MTT-test. To study airway provocations cumulative concentration-response curves were performed with different allergic response mediators and biogenic amines. In addition, electric field stimulation, passive sensitization with house dust mite (HDM and mast cells staining were evaluated.PCLS from sheep were viable for at least three days. PCLS of newborn and adult sheep responded equally strong to methacholine and endothelin-1. The responses to serotonin, leukotriene D4 and U46619 differed with age. No airway contraction was evoked by histamine, except after cimetidine pretreatment. In response to EFS, airways in PCLS from adult and newborn sheep strongly contracted and these contractions were atropine sensitive. Passive sensitization with HDM evoked a weak early allergic response in PCLS from adult and newborn sheep, which notably was prolonged in airways from adult sheep. Only few mast cells were found in the lungs of non-sensitized sheep at both ages.PCLS from sheep lungs represent a useful tool to study pharmacological airway responses for at least three days. Sheep seem well suited to study mechanisms of cholinergic airway contraction. The notable differences between newborn and adult sheep demonstrate the importance of age in such studies.

  10. Siblings Promote a Type 1/Type 17-oriented immune response in the airways of asymptomatic neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Helene Mygind; Chawes, Bo L.; Følsgaard, Nilofar V.;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Siblings have been shown to reduce the risk of later asthma and allergy, but the mechanism driving this association is unknown. The objective was to study whether siblings affect the airway immune response in healthy neonates. We hypothesized that siblings exert immune modulatory...... effects on neonates mirrored in the airway mucosa. METHODS: We measured 20 immune-mediators related to the Type 1, Type 2, Type 17 or regulatory immune pathways in the airway mucosa of 571 one-month-old asymptomatic neonates from the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood2010 birth......-cohort (COPSAC2010). The association between airway mediator levels and presence of siblings was investigated using conventional statistics and principle component analyses (PCA). RESULTS: Neonates with siblings had an up-regulated level of airway immune-mediators, with predominance of Type 1- and Type 17...

  11. A PAF receptor antagonist inhibits acute airway inflammation and late-phase responses but not chronic airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in a primate model of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Gundel

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the effects of a PAF receptor antagonist, WEB 2170, on several indices of acute and chronic airway inflammation and associated changes in lung function in a primate model of allergic asthma. A single oral administration WEB 2170 provided dose related inhibition of the release of leukotriene C4 (LTC4 and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2 recovered and quantified in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid obtained during the acute phase response to inhaled antigen. In addition, oral WEB 2170 treatment in dual responder primates blocked the acute influx of neutrophils into the airways as well as the associated late-phase airway obstruction occurring 6 h after antigen inhalation. In contrast, a multiple dosing regime with WEB 2170 (once a day for 7 consecutive days failed to reduce the chronic airway inflammation (eosinophilic and associated airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled methacholine that is characteristic of dual responder monkeys. Thus, we conclude that the generation of PAF following antigen inhalation contributes to the development of lipid mediators, acute airway inflammation and associated late-phase airway obstruction in dual responder primates; however, PAF does not play a significant role in the maintenance of chronic airway inflammation and associated airway hyperresponsiveness in this primate model.

  12. TRPM8 mechanism of autonomic nerve response to cold in respiratory airway

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    Wang Cong-Yi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Breathing cold air without proper temperature exchange can induce strong respiratory autonomic responses including cough, airway constriction and mucosal secretion, and can exacerbate existing asthma conditions and even directly trigger an asthma attack. Vagal afferent fiber is thought to be involved in the cold-induced respiratory responses through autonomic nerve reflex. However, molecular mechanisms by which vagal afferent fibers are excited by cold remain unknown. Using retrograde labeling, immunostaining, calcium imaging, and electrophysiological recordings, here we show that a subpopulation of airway vagal afferent nerves express TRPM8 receptors and that activation of TRPM8 receptors by cold excites these airway autonomic nerves. Thus activation of TRPM8 receptors may provoke autonomic nerve reflex to increase airway resistance. This putative autonomic response may be associated with cold-induced exacerbation of asthma and other pulmonary disorders, making TRPM8 receptors a possible target for prevention of cold-associated respiratory disorders.

  13. Measurement of airway responsiveness to methacholine: relative importance of the precision of drug delivery and the method of assessing response.

    OpenAIRE

    Beach, J. R.; Young, C L; Avery, A J; Stenton, S C; Dennis, J H; Walters, E. H.; Hendrick, D J

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The value of measuring airway responsiveness in asthma research is currently limited by the number of different methods used by different investigators, by the lack of a standardised method of expressing precision, and by an inability to equate the results of one method with those of another. METHODS: Two pairs of measurements of airway responsiveness to methacholine were performed in 20 asthmatic subjects, one pair using a dosimeter method (AR-D) and one pair using the convention...

  14. Cough sensitivity and extrathoracic airway responsiveness to inhaled capsaicin in chronic cough patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, You Sook; Lee, Chang-Keun; Yoo, Bin; Moon, Hee-Bom

    2002-01-01

    Enhanced cough response has been frequently observed in chronic cough. Recently, extrathoracic airway constriction to inhaled histamine was demonstrated in some chronic cough patients. However, relation between extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness (EAHR) and cough sensitivity determined by capsaicin inhalation is unclear in each etiological entity of chronic cough. Seventy-seven patients, with dry cough persisting for 3 or more weeks, normal spirometry and chest radiography, and 15 contro...

  15. Differential inflammatory response to inhaled lipopolysaccharide targeted either to the airways or the alveoli in man.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winfried Möller

    Full Text Available Endotoxin (Lipopolysaccharide, LPS is a potent inducer of inflammation and there is various LPS contamination in the environment, being a trigger of lung diseases and exacerbation. The objective of this study was to assess the time course of inflammation and the sensitivities of the airways and alveoli to targeted LPS inhalation in order to understand the role of LPS challenge in airway disease.In healthy volunteers without any bronchial hyperresponsiveness we targeted sequentially 1, 5 and 20 µg LPS to the airways and 5 µg LPS to the alveoli using controlled aerosol bolus inhalation. Inflammatory parameters were assessed during a 72 h time period. LPS deposited in the airways induced dose dependent systemic responses with increases of blood neutrophils (peaking at 6 h, Interleukin-6 (peaking at 6 h, body temperature (peaking at 12 h, and CRP (peaking at 24 h. 5 µg LPS targeted to the alveoli caused significantly stronger effects compared to 5 µg airway LPS deposition. Local responses were studied by measuring lung function (FEV(1 and reactive oxygen production, assessed by hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 in fractionated exhaled breath condensate (EBC. FEV(1 showed a dose dependent decline, with lowest values at 12 h post LPS challenge. There was a significant 2-fold H(2O(2 induction in airway-EBC at 2 h post LPS inhalation. Alveolar LPS targeting resulted in the induction of very low levels of EBC-H(2O(2.Targeting LPS to the alveoli leads to stronger systemic responses compared to airway LPS targeting. Targeted LPS inhalation may provide a novel model of airway inflammation for studying the role of LPS contamination of air pollution in lung diseases, exacerbation and anti-inflammatory drugs.

  16. Phase and Amplitude Responses of Narrow-Band Optical Filter Measured by Microwave Network Analyzer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hsi-Cheng; Ho, Keang-Po

    2006-01-01

    The phase and amplitude responses of a narrow-band optical filter are measured simultaneously using a microwave network analyzer. The measurement is based on an interferometric arrangement to split light into two paths and then combine them. In one of the two paths, a Mach-Zehnder modulator generates two tones without carrier and the narrow-band optical filter just passes through one of the tones. The temperature and environmental variations are removed by separated phase and amplitude averag...

  17. Assessing mucus and airway morphology in response to a segmental allergen challenge using OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David C.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Hariri, Lida P.; Harris, R. Scott; Cho, Jocelyn L.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Asthma affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide, and the prevalence of the disease appears to be increasing. One of the most important aspects of asthma is the excessive bronchoconstriction that results in many of the symptoms experienced by asthma sufferers, but the relationship between bronchoconstriction and airway morphology is not clearly established. We present the imaging results of a study involving a segmental allergen challenge given to both allergic asthmatic (n = 12) and allergic non-asthmatic (n = 19) human volunteers. Using OCT, we have imaged and assessed baseline morphology in a right upper lobe (RUL) airway, serving as the control, and a right middle lobe (RML) airway, in which the allergen was to be administered. After a period of 24 hours had elapsed following the administration of the allergen, both airways were again imaged and the response morphology assessed. A number of airway parameters were measured and compared, including epithelial thickness, mucosal thickness and buckling, lumen area, and mucus content. We found that at baseline epithelial thickness, mucosal thickness, and mucosal buckling were greater in AAs than ANAs. We also observed statistically significant increases in these values 24 hours after the allergen had been administered for both the ANA and AA sets. In comparison, the control airway which received a diluent showed no statistically significant change.

  18. Hemodynamic responses and upper airway morbidity following tracheal intubation in patients with hypertension: conventional laryngoscopy versus an intubating laryngeal mask airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Bengi Sener

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We compared hemodynamic responses and upper airway morbidity following tracheal intubation via conventional laryngoscopy or intubating laryngeal mask airway in hypertensive patients. METHODS: Forty-two hypertensive patients received a conventional laryngoscopy or were intubated with a intubating laryngeal mask airway. Anesthesia was induced with propofol, fentanyl, and cis-atracurium. Measurements of systolic and diastolic blood pressures, heart rate, rate pressure product, and ST segment changes were made at baseline, preintubation, and every minute for the first 5 min following intubation. The number of intubation attempts, the duration of intubation, and airway complications were recorded. RESULTS: The intubation time was shorter in the conventional laryngoscopy group than in the intubating laryngeal mask airway group (16.33 ± 10.8 vs. 43.04±19.8 s, respectively (p<0.001. The systolic and diastolic blood pressures in the intubating laryngeal mask airway group were higher than those in the conventional laryngoscopy group at 1 and 2 min following intubation (p<0.05. The rate pressure product values (heart rate x systolic blood pressure at 1 and 2 min following intubation in the intubating laryngeal mask airway group (15970.90 ± 3750 and 13936.76 ± 2729, respectively were higher than those in the conventional laryngoscopy group (13237.61 ± 3413 and 11937.52 ± 3160, respectively (p<0.05. There were no differences in ST depression or elevation between the groups. The maximum ST changes compared with baseline values were not significant between the groups (conventional laryngoscopy group: 0.328 mm versus intubating laryngeal mask airway group: 0.357 mm; p = 0.754. The number and type of airway complications were similar between the groups. CONCLUSION: The intense and repeated oropharyngeal and tracheal stimulation resulting from intubating laryngeal mask airway induces greater pressor responses than does stimulation resulting from

  19. Airway responses to methacholine and exercise at high altitude in healthy lowlanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Riccardo; Pompilio, Pasquale; Quaranta, Marco; Aliverti, Andrea; Kayser, Bengt; Miserocchi, Giuseppe; Fasano, Valter; Cogo, Annalisa; Milanese, Manlio; Cornara, Giuseppe; Brusasco, Vito; Dellacà, Raffaele

    2010-02-01

    Peribronchial edema has been proposed as a mechanism enhancing airway responses to constrictor stimuli. Acute exposure to altitude in nonacclimatized lowlanders leads to subclinical interstitial pulmonary edema that lasts for several days after ascent, as suggested by changes in lung mechanics. We, therefore, investigated whether changes in lung mechanics consistent with fluid accumulation at high altitude within the lungs are associated with changes in airway responses to methacholine or exercise. Fourteen healthy subjects were studied at 4,559 and at 120 m above sea level. At high altitude, both static and dynamic lung compliances and respiratory reactance at 5 Hz significantly decreased, suggestive of interstitial pulmonary edema. Resting minute ventilation significantly increased by approximately 30%. Compared with sea level, inhalation of methacholine at high altitude caused a similar reduction of partial forced expiratory flow but less reduction of maximal forced expiratory flow, less increments of pulmonary resistance and respiratory resistance at 5 Hz, and similar effects of deep breath on pulmonary and respiratory resistance. During maximal incremental exercise at high altitude, partial forced expiratory flow gradually increased with the increase in minute ventilation similarly to sea level but both achieved higher values at peak exercise. In conclusion, airway responsiveness to methacholine at high altitude is well preserved despite the occurrence of interstitial pulmonary edema. We suggest that this may be the result of the increase in resting minute ventilation opposing the effects and/or the development of airway smooth muscle force, reduced gas density, and well preserved airway-to-parenchyma interdependence. PMID:19940099

  20. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in a mouse model of secondary allergen challenge: neutrophil elastase inhibition attenuates allergic airway responses

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    Koga Hikari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic asthma is often associated with neutrophilic infiltration in the airways. Neutrophils contain elastase, a potent secretagogue in the airways, nonetheless the role for neutrophil elastase as well as neutrophilic inflammation in allergen-induced airway responses is not well defined. In this study, we have investigated the impact of neutrophil elastase inhibition on the development of allergic airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR in previously sensitized and challenged mice. Methods BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged (primary with ovalbumin (OVA. Six weeks later, a single OVA aerosol (secondary challenge was delivered and airway inflammation and airway responses were monitored 6 and 48 hrs later. An inhibitor of neutrophil elastase was administered prior to secondary challenge. Results Mice developed a two-phase airway inflammatory response after secondary allergen challenge, one neutrophilic at 6 hr and the other eosinophilic, at 48 hr. PAR-2 expression in the lung tissues was enhanced following secondary challenge, and that PAR-2 intracellular expression on peribronchial lymph node (PBLN T cells was also increased following allergen challenge of sensitized mice. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase significantly attenuated AHR, goblet cell metaplasia, and inflammatory cell accumulation in the airways following secondary OVA challenge. Levels of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13, and eotaxin in BAL fluid 6 hr after secondary allergen challenge were significantly suppressed by the treatment. At 48 hr, treatment with the neutrophil elastase inhibitor significantly reduced the levels of IL-13 and TGF-β1 in the BAL fluid. In parallel, in vitro IL-13 production was significantly inhibited in spleen cells from sensitized mice. Conclusion These data indicate that neutrophil elastase plays an important role in the development of allergic airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, and would suggest that the

  1. Distinct effects of endogenous interleukin-23 on eosinophilic airway inflammation in response to different antigens

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    Rika Ogawa

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Different antigens induced IL-23 at different part of the body in our similar asthma models. Endogenous IL-23 production at the site of antigen sensitization facilitates type-2 immune responses, whereas IL-23 production and subsequent IL-17A synthesis in the airways suppresses allergic inflammation.

  2. Secretory response induced by essential oils on airway surface fluid: a pharmacological MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolato, Elena; Boschi, Federico; Marzola, Pasquina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2009-07-30

    Using pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging, we have performed an in vivo evaluation of the secretory response induced by essential oils in the rat airway. Aim of the work was to establish a computerized method to assess the efficacy of volatile compounds in spatially localized areas without the bias derived by subjective evaluation. Magnetic resonance experiments were carried out using a 4.7 T horizontal magnet. In the trachea, airway surface fluid was easily identified for its high intensity signal. The tracheal glands were also easily visible. The oesophageal lumen was usually collapsed and was identifiable only in the presence of intraluminal liquid. Scotch pine essential oil inhalation significantly increased the surface fluid in the middle portion of the trachea and the increase was visible at both 5 and 10 min. A lesser secretory response was detected after rosemary essential oil inhalation even though the response was significant with respect to the control in particular at 10 min. No secretory response was detected after peppermint essential oil inhalation both at 5 and 10 min. The data obtained in the present work demonstrate a chemically induced airway secretion. The availability of a pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging approach opens new perspectives to test the action of volatile compounds on the airway. PMID:19422906

  3. Response of airway epithelial cells to double-stranded RNA in an allergic environment

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert, Cristan; Zeng, Qing-Xiang; Shanmugasundaram, Ramesh; Garthwaite, Linda; Oliver, Brian G.; Kumar, Rakesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Respiratory viral infections are the most common trigger of acute exacerbations in patients with allergic asthma. The anti-viral response of airway epithelial cells (AEC) may be impaired in asthmatics, while cytokines produced by AEC may drive the inflammatory response. We investigated whether AEC cultured in the presence of Th2 cytokines associated with an allergic environment exhibited altered responses to double-stranded RNA, a virus-like stimulus. Methods We undertook prelimina...

  4. Preexposure to ozone blocks the antigen-induced late asthmatic response of the canine peripheral airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, C.R.; Kleeberger, S.R.; Spannhake, E.W. (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The influence of exposure of the airways to ozone on acute allergic responsiveness has been investigated in several species. Little is known, however, about the effect of this environmental pollutant on the late asthmatic response (LAR) in animals in which it is exhibited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this effect in the canine peripheral airways and to assess the potential role of mast cells in modulating the effect. A series of experiments on seven mongrel dogs demonstrated that the numbers of mast cells at the base of the epithelial region of small subsegmental airways exposed to 1 ppm ozone for 5 min were significantly (p less than .01) increased 3 h following exposure compared to air exposed or nonexposed control airways. In a second series of experiments performed on eight additional mongrel dogs with inherent sensitivity to Ascaris suum antigen, antigen aerosol was administered to the sublobar segment 3 h following ozone preexposure when mast cell numbers were presumed to be increased. These experiments were performed to determine whether ozone preexposure could enhance the late-phase response to antigen by virtue of acutely increasing the number of mast cells available to bind the antigen. Four of the eight dogs tested displayed a late-phase response to antigen following air-sham preexposure. In these four dogs, simultaneous ozone preexposure of a contralateral lobe completely blocked the late-phase response to antigen. These results indicate that the consequences of a single exposure to ozone persist beyond its effects on acute antigen-induced bronchoconstriction and extend to the complex processes involved with the late response. This attenuating effect of ozone is seen under conditions where mast-cell numbers in the airways are increased above baseline levels.

  5. Arsenic alters ATP-dependent Ca²+ signaling in human airway epithelial cell wound response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Cara L; Lantz, R Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L; Boitano, Scott

    2011-05-01

    Arsenic is a natural metalloid toxicant that is associated with occupational inhalation injury and contaminates drinking water worldwide. Both inhalation of arsenic and consumption of arsenic-tainted water are correlated with malignant and nonmalignant lung diseases. Despite strong links between arsenic and respiratory illness, underlying cell responses to arsenic remain unclear. We hypothesized that arsenic may elicit some of its detrimental effects on the airway through limitation of innate immune function and, specifically, through alteration of paracrine ATP (purinergic) Ca²+ signaling in the airway epithelium. We examined the effects of acute (24 h) exposure with environmentally relevant levels of arsenic (i.e., immune functions (e.g., ciliary beat, salt and water transport, bactericide production, and wound repair). Arsenic-induced compromise of such airway defense mechanisms may be an underlying contributor to chronic lung disease. PMID:21357385

  6. Onset of obesity in carboxypeptidase E-deficient mice and effect on airway responsiveness and pulmonary responses to ozone

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Richard A.; Zhu, Ming; Hernandez, Christopher B.; Williams, Erin S.; Shore, Stephanie A.

    2010-01-01

    When compared with lean, wild-type mice, obese Cpefat mice, 14 wk of age and older, manifest innate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to intravenous methacholine and enhanced pulmonary inflammation following acute exposure to ozone (O3). The purpose of this study was to examine the onset of these augmented pulmonary responses during the onset of obesity. Thus airway responsiveness and O3-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury were examined in 7- and 10-wk-old Cpefat and age-matched, wild-ty...

  7. Airway responsiveness to mannitol in asthma is associated with chymase-positive mast cells and eosinophilic airway inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrild, Asger; Bergqvist, Anders; Baines, Katherine J;

    2016-01-01

    tissue. We compared the number and phenotype of mast cells, mRNA expression of mast cell-associated genes and number of eosinophils in airway tissue of subjects with asthma and healthy controls in relation to AHR to mannitol. METHODS: Airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled mannitol was measured in 23 non......BACKGROUND: Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to inhaled mannitol is associated with indirect markers of mast cell activation and eosinophilic airway inflammation. It is unknown how AHR to mannitol relates to mast cell phenotype, mast cell function and measures of eosinophilic inflammation in airway......-smoking, corticosteroid-free asthmatic individuals and 10 healthy controls. Mast cells and eosinophils were identified in mucosal biopsies from all participants. Mast cells were divided into phenotypes based on the presence of chymase. mRNA expression of mast cell-associated genes was measured by real-time PCR. RESULTS...

  8. Response of a Shape Memory Alloy Beam Model under Narrow Band Noise Excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Gen Ge

    2014-01-01

    To describe the hysteretic nonlinear characteristic of the strain-stress relation of shape memory alloy (SMA), a Van-der-Pol hysteretic cycle is applied to simulate the hysteretic loops. Then, the model of a simply supported SMA beam subject to transverse narrow band noise excitation with nonlinear damping was proposed. The deterministic and the stochastic responses are studied, respectively, applying the multiple scale method. The stability of the steady state responses is analyzed by Floque...

  9. Role of SHIP-1 in the adaptive immune responses to aeroallergen in the airway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukit Roongapinun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Th2-dominated inflammatory response in the airway is an integral component in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. Accumulating evidence supports the notion that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K pathway is involved in the process. We previously reported that SHIP-1, a negative regulator of the PI3K pathway, is essential in maintaining lung immunohomeostasis, potentially through regulation of innate immune cells. However, the function of SHIP-1 in adaptive immune response in the lung has not been defined. We sought to determine the role of SHIP-1 in adaptive immunity in response to aeroallergen stimulation in the airway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: SHIP-1 knockout (SHIP-1-/- mice on BALB/c background were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA plus aluminum hydroxide, a strong Th2-inducing immunization, and challenged with OVA. Airway and lung inflammation, immunoglobulin response, Th2 cytokine production and lymphocyte response were analyzed and compared with wild type mice. Even though there was mild spontaneous inflammation in the lung at baseline, SHIP-1-/- mice showed altered responses, including less cell infiltration around the airways but more in the parenchyma, less mucus production, decreased Th2 cytokine production, and diminished serum OVA-specific IgE, IgG1, but not IgG2a. Naïve and OVA sensitized SHIP-1-/- T cells produced a lower amount of IL-4. In vitro differentiated SHIP-1-/- Th2 cells produced less IL-4 compared to wild type Th2 cells upon T cell receptor stimulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings indicate that, in contrast to its role as a negative regulator in the innate immune cells, SHIP-1 acts as a positive regulator in Th2 cells in the adaptive immune response to aeroallergen. Thus any potential manipulation of SHIP-1 activity should be adjusted according to the specific immune response.

  10. TRPM8 mechanism of autonomic nerve response to cold in respiratory airway

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Cong-Yi; Tominaga Makoto; Johnson Richard D; Chen Meng; Ling Jennifer X; Xing Hong; Gu Jianguo

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Breathing cold air without proper temperature exchange can induce strong respiratory autonomic responses including cough, airway constriction and mucosal secretion, and can exacerbate existing asthma conditions and even directly trigger an asthma attack. Vagal afferent fiber is thought to be involved in the cold-induced respiratory responses through autonomic nerve reflex. However, molecular mechanisms by which vagal afferent fibers are excited by cold remain unknown. Using retrograd...

  11. Airway Responsiveness: Role of Inflammation, Epithelium Damage and Smooth Muscle Tension

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    K. I. Gourgoulianis

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was the effect of epithelium damage on mechanical responses of airway smooth muscles under different resting tension. We performed acetylcholine (ACh (10-5M-induced contraction on tracheal strips from 30 rabbits in five groups (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 g before and after epithelium removal. At low resting tension (0.5-1.5g, the epithelium removal decreased the ACh-induced contractions. At 2g resting tension, the epithelium removal increased the ACh-induced contractions of airways with intact epithelium about 20%. At 2.5 g resting tension, the elevation of contraction is about 25% (p<0.01. Consequently, after epithelium loss, the resting tension determines the airway smooth muscles responsiveness. In asthma, mediators such as ACh act on already contracted inflammatory airways, which results in additional increase of contraction. In contrast, low resting tension, a condition that simulates normal tidal breathing, protects from bronchoconstriction even when the epithelium is damaged.

  12. Exposure of neonates to Respiratory Syncytial Virus is critical in determining subsequent airway response in adults

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    Daly Melissa

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common cause of acute bronchiolitis in infants and the elderly. Furthermore, epidemiological data suggest that RSV infection during infancy is a potent trigger of subsequent wheeze and asthma development. However, the mechanism by which RSV contributes to asthma is complex and remains largely unknown. A recent study indicates that the age of initial RSV infection is a key factor in determining airway response to RSV rechallenge. We hypothesized that severe RSV infection during neonatal development significantly alters lung structure and the pulmonary immune micro-environment; and thus, neonatal RSV infection is crucial in the development of or predisposition to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Methods To investigate this hypothesis the present study was conducted in a neonatal mouse model of RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation and airway dysfunction. Seven-day-old mice were infected with RSV (2 × 105 TCID50/g body weight and allowed to mature to adulthood. To determine if neonatal RSV infection predisposed adult animals to enhanced pathophysiological responses to allergens, these mice were then sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Various endpoints including lung function, histopathology, cytokine production, and cellularity in bronchoalveolar lavage were examined. Results RSV infection in neonates alone led to inflammatory airway disease characterized by airway hyperreactivity, peribronchial and perivascular inflammation, and subepithelial fibrosis in adults. If early RSV infection was followed by allergen exposure, this pulmonary phenotype was exacerbated. The initial response to neonatal RSV infection resulted in increased TNF-α levels in bronchoalveolar lavage. Interestingly, increased levels of IL-13 and mucus hyperproduction were observed almost three months after the initial infection with RSV. Conclusion Neonatal RSV exposure results in long term

  13. Surfactant and allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Carla; Hohlfeld, Jens M

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of unique proteins and lipids that covers the airway lumen. Surfactant prevents alveolar collapse and maintains airway patency by reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Furthermore, it provides a defence against antigen uptake by binding foreign particles and enhancing cellular immune responses. Allergic asthma is associated with chronic airway inflammation and presents with episodes of airway narrowing. The pulmonary inflammation and bronchoconstriction can be triggered by exposure to allergens or pathogens present in the inhaled air. Pulmonary surfactant has the potential to interact with various immune cells which orchestrate allergen- or pathogen-driven episodes of airway inflammation. The complex nature of surfactant allows multiple sites of interaction, but also makes it susceptible to external alterations, which potentially impair its function. This duality of modulating airway physiology and immunology during inflammatory conditions, while at the same time being prone to alterations accompanied by restricted function, has stimulated numerous studies in recent decades, which are reviewed in this article. PMID:23896983

  14. Numerical simulations of dynamic response of narrow conical structures due to ice actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalane, O.; Loset, S. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Xu, N.; Yue, Q. [Dalian Univ. of Technology, Dalian (China); Tuomo, K. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)]|[Karna Research and Consulting, Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    The design of an offshore drilling platform in the Bohai Bay of North China was recently modified in an effort to reduce vibrations resulting from ice action. This paper presented a theoretical example where a conical structure was exposed to sheet ice action. The dynamic analysis for the structure was based on a narrow cone where rubble build-up does not influence the ice action. Both field data and recent theoretical studies showed that the time-varying ice action and the structural response constitute a narrow-band random process under these conditions. According to structural dynamic studies, the time of exposure can be a significant parameter if the response has a narrow-band character. The numerical simulation is influenced by such ice action since there is a possibility that the real response will be underestimated if the time of a numerical simulation is not sufficiently long. This paper addressed this problem by using a numerical method based on data obtained from full-scale structures deployed in the Bohai Bay. The purpose was to determine the time required to reach a maximum response while the key parameters of the load model vary randomly. The simulation results were compared with a similar analysis performed on full-scale data. 21 refs., 11 figs.

  15. Chronic exposure to a beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist increases the airway response to methacholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt-Enderby, P A; Yamamura, H I; Halonen, M; Palmer, J D; Bloom, J W

    1993-09-01

    Scheduled chronic administration of beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist bronchodilators in patients with asthma recently has been reported to be associated with a worsening of symptoms and an increase in bronchial responsiveness. We wanted to determine whether a 28-day in vivo exposure to albuterol (beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist) altered the response of rabbit airways to the cholinergic agonist methacholine. We found, using in vitro tissue bath techniques, that in mainstem bronchi from rabbits given a 28-day exposure to albuterol, maximum contraction to methacholine was increased in the albuterol-treated group (control group = 1.10 +/- 0.11 g vs. treated group = 1.50 +/- 0.13 g, P airway smooth muscle to methacholine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7901034

  16. Surfactant Protein D modulates allergen particle uptake and inflammatory response in a human epithelial airway model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schleh Carsten

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergen-containing subpollen particles (SPP are released from whole plant pollen upon contact with water or even high humidity. Because of their size SPP can preferentially reach the lower airways where they come into contact with surfactant protein (SP-D. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of SP-D in a complex three-dimensional human epithelial airway model, which simulates the most important barrier functions of the epithelial airway. The uptake of SPP as well as the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines was investigated. Methods SPP were isolated from timothy grass and subsequently fluorescently labeled. A human epithelial airway model was built by using human Type II-pneumocyte like cells (A549 cells, human monocyte derived macrophages as well as human monocyte derived dendritic cells. The epithelial cell model was incubated with SPP in the presence and absence of surfactant protein D. Particle uptake was evaluated by confocal microscopy and advanced computer-controlled analysis. Finally, human primary CD4+ T-Cells were added to the epithelial airway model and soluble mediators were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay or bead array. Results SPP were taken up by epithelial cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. This uptake coincided with secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. SP-D modulated the uptake of SPP in a cell type specific way (e.g. increased number of macrophages and epithelial cells, which participated in allergen particle uptake and led to a decreased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conclusion These results display a possible mechanism of how SP-D can modulate the inflammatory response to inhaled allergen.

  17. Inflammatory responses of airway smooth muscle cells and effects of endothelin receptor antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Lin, Yingfeng; Konradi, Jürgen; Jungck, David; Behr, Juergen; Strauch, Justus; Stoelben, Erich; Koch, Andrea

    2013-07-01

    Endothelin receptor antagonists (ETRAs), authorized for pulmonary hypertension, have failed to prove their utility in chronic lung diseases with corticosteroid-resistant airway inflammation when applied at late disease stages with emphysema/fibrosis. Earlier administration might prove effective by targeting the interaction between airway inflammation and tissue remodeling. We hypothesized that human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) participate in linking inflammation with remodeling and that associated genes become differentially suppressed by ambrisentan (A-receptor selective ETRA) and bosentan (nonselective/dual ETRA). Inflammatory responses of ex vivo-cultivated HASMCs to TNF-α were investigated by whole-genome microarray analyses. qRT-PCR and ELISA were used to test inflammatory and remodeling genes for sensitivity to bosentan and ambrisentan and to investigate differential sensitivities mechanistically. ETRA and corticosteroid effects were compared in HASMCs from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. TNF-α induced the expression of 18 cytokines/chemokines and five tissue remodeling genes involved in severe, corticosteroid-insensitive asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and/or pulmonary hypertension. Thirteen cytokines/chemokines, MMP13, and WISP1 were suppressed by ETRAs. Eight genes had differential sensitivity to bosentan and ambrisentan depending on the endothelin-B receptor impact on transcriptional regulation and mRNA stabilization. Chemokine (C-C motif) ligands 2 and 5, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and MMP13 had increased sensitivity to bosentan or bosentan/dexamethasone combination versus dexamethasone alone. Suppression of cytokine and remodeling gene expression by ETRAs was confirmed in TNF-α-activated human bronchial epithelial cells. HASMCs and human bronchial epithelial cells participate in the interaction of inflammation and tissue remodeling. This interaction is

  18. Treating asthma means treating airway smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuyderduyn, S; Sukkar, M B; Fust, A; Dhaliwal, S; Burgess, J K

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is characterised by airway hyperresponsiveness, airway inflammation and airway remodelling. Airway smooth muscle cells are known to be the main effector cells of airway narrowing. In the present paper, studies will be discussed that have led to a novel view of the role of airway smooth muscle

  19. Susceptibility to Lower Respiratory Infections in Childhood is Associated with Perturbation of the Cytokine Response to Pathogenic Airway Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, Nadja Hawwa; Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neonatal colonization of the airways with respiratory pathogens is associated with increased risk of lower respiratory infections (LRI) in early childhood. Therefore, we hypothesized that children developing LRI have an aberrant immune response to pathogenic bacteria in infancy. OBJEC...

  20. Lymphocyte Gene Expression Characteristic of Immediate Airway Responses (IAR) and Methacholine (MCH) Hyperresponsiveness in Mice Sensitized and Challenged with Isocyanates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to isocyanates has been associated with occupational airway diseases, including asthma. Previously we reported on respiratory and immune responses following dermal sensitization and intranasal challenge of BALB/c mice with 6 different isocyanates. The purpose of this st...

  1. Chitin-Induced Airway Epithelial Cell Innate Immune Responses Are Inhibited by Carvacrol/Thymol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erle, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is produced in large amounts by fungi, insects, and other organisms and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. Airway epithelial cells are in direct contact with environmental particles and serve as the first line of defense against inhaled allergens and pathogens. The potential contributions of airway epithelial cells to chitin-induced asthma remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that chitin directly stimulates airway epithelial cells to release cytokines that promote type 2 immune responses and to induce expression of molecules which are important in innate immune responses. We found that chitin exposure rapidly induced the expression of three key type 2-promoting cytokines, IL-25, IL-33 and TSLP, in BEAS-2B transformed human bronchial epithelial cells and in A549 and H292 lung carcinoma cells. Chitin also induced the expression of the key pattern recognition receptors TLR2 and TLR4. Chitin induced the expression of miR-155, miR-146a and miR-21, each of which is known to up-regulate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Also the expression of SOCS1 and SHIP1 which are known targets of miR-155 was repressed by chitin treatment. The monoterpene phenol carvacrol (Car) and its isomer thymol (Thy) are found in herbal essential oils and have been shown to inhibit allergic inflammation in asthma models. We found that Car/Thy inhibited the effects of chitin on type 2-promoting cytokine release and on the expression of TLRs, SOCS1, SHIP1, and miRNAs. Car/Thy could also efficiently reduce the protein levels of TLR4, inhibit the increase in TLR2 protein levels in chitin plus Car/Thy-treated cells and increase the protein levels of SHIP1 and SOCS1, which are negative regulators of TLR-mediated inflammatory responses. We conclude that direct effects of chitin on airway epithelial cells are likely to contribute to allergic airway diseases like asthma, and that Car/Thy directly inhibits epithelial cell pro-inflammatory responses to chitin. PMID

  2. Upper airway radiographs in infants with upper airway insufficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, S L; Davis, S.L.; Gunn, T R

    1994-01-01

    Upper airway measurements in nine infants considered to be at risk of upper airway insufficiency, six of whom presented after an apnoeic episode, were compared with measurements taken in two age groups of healthy infants. Paired, inspiratory and expiratory, lateral upper airway radiographs were obtained while the infants were awake and breathing quietly. The radiographs of all nine infants demonstrated narrowing in the oropharyngeal portion of the airway during inspiration and in six infants ...

  3. Neurturin influences inflammatory responses and airway remodeling in different mouse asthma models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauffray, Marion; Domingues, Olivia; Hentges, François; Zimmer, Jacques; Hanau, Daniel; Michel, Tatiana

    2015-02-15

    Neurturin (NTN) was previously described for its neuronal activities, but recently, we have shown that this factor is also involved in asthma physiopathology. However, the underlying mechanisms of NTN are unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate NTN involvement in acute bronchial Th2 responses, to analyze its interaction with airway structural cells, and to study its implication in remodeling during acute and chronic bronchial inflammation in C57BL/6 mice. We analyzed the features of allergic airway inflammation in wild-type and NTN(-/-) mice after sensitization with two different allergens, OVA and house dust mite. We showed that NTN(-/-) dendritic cells and T cells had a stronger tendency to activate the Th2 pathway in vitro than similar wild-type cells. Furthermore, NTN(-/-) mice had significantly increased markers of airway remodeling like collagen deposition. NTN(-/-) lung tissues showed higher levels of neutrophils, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant, matrix metalloproteinase 9, TNF-α, and IL-6. Finally, NTN had the capacity to decrease IL-6 and TNF-α production by immune and epithelial cells, showing a direct anti-inflammatory activity on these cells. Our findings support the hypothesis that NTN could modulate the allergic inflammation in different mouse asthma models. PMID:25595789

  4. Selective response of human airway epithelia to luminal but not serosal solution hypertonicity. Possible role for proximal airway epithelia as an osmolality transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, Niels J.; Davis, C.W.; Boucher, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    The response of cultured human nasal epithelia to hypertonic bathing solutions was tested using ion-selective microelectrode and quantitative microscopy. Raised luminal, but not serosal, osmolality (+/- 150 mM mannitol) decreased Na+ absorption but did not induce Cl- secretion. Raised luminal osm...... induce Cl- secretion; and (d) cell volume loss increases the resistance of the paracellular path. We speculate that these properties configure human nasal epithelium to behave as an osmotic sensor, transducing information about luminal solutions to the airway wall....

  5. Social Stress Enhances Allergen-Induced Airway Inflammation in Mice and Inhibits Corticosteroid Responsiveness of Cytokine Production

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, Michael; Kierstein, Sonja; Sharma, Satish; Spaits, Matthew; Kinsey, Steven G.; Tliba, Omar; Amrani, Yassine; John F Sheridan; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Haczku, Angela

    2009-01-01

    Chronic psychosocial stress exacerbates asthma but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that psychosocial stress aggravates allergic airway inflammation by altering innate immune cell function. The effects of stress on airway inflammation, lung function and glucocorticoid responsiveness were studied in a novel in vivo murine model of combined social disruption stress and allergic sensitization. The effects of corticosterone were assessed on cytokine profile and ...

  6. Distribution of radioactive aerosol in the airways of children and adolescents with bronchial hyper-responsiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the pulmonary distribution of inhaled radioaerosol, bronchial responsiveness, and lung function in children and adolescents. The participating subjects were divided into three groups: (1) 14 asthmatics with bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR), (2) five non-asthmatic subjects with BHR, and (3) 20 controls without BHR. Pulmonary distribution of [99Tcm] albumin radioaerosol, maximal expiratory flow when 25% of forced vital capacity remain to be exhaled (MEF25), and bronchial responsiveness to inhaled histamine were measured. Twenty subjects (52%) has irregular central distribution and 19 subjects (48%) had regular distribution of radioaerosol in their lungs. No difference in distribution of radioaerosol was found between the three groups of children. The median MEF25 among non-asthmatic subjects (80% predicted) was lower than that found in controls (92% predicted) but higher than that found in asthmatic subjects (55% predicted). A relationship was found between reduced flow at the peripheral airways, as indicated by MEF25 and the degree of central distribution of radioaerosol. Furthermore, subjects with irregular central distribution of radioaerosol had an increase degree of bronchial responsiveness. In conclusion, children and adolescents who have flow rates in the peripheral airways or increased degree of bronchial responsiveness tend to have abnormal distribution of radioaerosols. (author)

  7. Inhibition of allergic airway responses by heparin derived oligosaccharides: identification of a tetrasaccharide sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Tahir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed that heparin's anti-allergic activity is molecular weight dependent and resides in oligosaccharide fractions of Objective To investigate the structural sequence of heparin's anti-allergic domain, we used nitrous acid depolymerization of porcine heparin to prepare an oligosaccharide, and then fractionated it into disaccharide, tetrasaccharide, hexasaccharide, and octasaccharide fractions. The anti-allergic activity of each oligosaccharide fraction was tested in allergic sheep. Methods Allergic sheep without (acute responder and with late airway responses (LAR; dual responder were challenged with Ascaris suum antigen with and without inhaled oligosaccharide pretreatment and the effects on specific lung resistance and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR to carbachol determined. Additional inflammatory cell recruitment studies were performed in immunized ovalbumin-challenged BALB/C mice with and without treatment. Results The inhaled tetrasaccharide fraction was the minimal effective chain length to show anti-allergic activity. This fraction showed activity in both groups of sheep; it was also effective in inhibiting LAR and AHR, when administered after the antigen challenge. Tetrasaccharide failed to modify the bronchoconstrictor responses to airway smooth muscle agonists (histamine, carbachol and LTD4, and had no effect on antigen-induced histamine release in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in sheep. In mice, inhaled tetrasaccharide also attenuated the ovalbumin-induced peribronchial inflammatory response and eosinophil influx in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Chemical analysis identified the active structure to be a pentasulfated tetrasaccharide ([IdoU2S (1→4GlcNS6S (1→4 IdoU2S (1→4 AMan-6S] which lacked anti-coagulant activity. Conclusions These results demonstrate that heparin tetrasaccharide possesses potent anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory properties, and that the domains responsible for anti

  8. Morin Attenuates Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation by Modulating Oxidative Stress-Responsive MAPK Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuan; Ge, Ai; Zhu, Wen; Liu, Ya-Nan; Ji, Ning-Fei; Zha, Wang-Jian; Zhang, Jia-Xiang; Zeng, Xiao-Ning; Huang, Mao

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common inflammatory diseases characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling. Morin, an active ingredient obtained from Moraceae plants, has been demonstrated to have promising anti-inflammatory activities in a range of disorders. However, its impacts on pulmonary diseases, particularly on asthma, have not been clarified. This study was designed to investigate whether morin alleviates airway inflammation in chronic asthma with an emphasis on oxidative stress modulation. In vivo, ovalbumin- (OVA-) sensitized mice were administered with morin or dexamethasone before challenge. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were obtained to perform cell counts, histological analysis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In vitro, human bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) were challenged by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The supernatant was collected for the detection of the proinflammatory proteins, and the cells were collected for reactive oxygen species (ROS)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) evaluations. Severe inflammatory responses and remodeling were observed in the airways of the OVA-sensitized mice. Treatment with morin dramatically attenuated the extensive trafficking of inflammatory cells into the BALF and inhibited their infiltration around the respiratory tracts and vessels. Morin administration also significantly suppressed goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition/fibrosis and dose-dependently inhibited the OVA-induced increases in IgE, TNF-α, interleukin- (IL-) 4, IL-13, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and malondialdehyde. In human BECs challenged by TNF-α, the levels of proteins such as eotaxin-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-8 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, were consistently significantly decreased by morin. Western blotting and the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein assay revealed that the increases in intracellular ROS and MAPK phosphorylation were abolished by morin

  9. Morin Attenuates Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation by Modulating Oxidative Stress-Responsive MAPK Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the most common inflammatory diseases characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling. Morin, an active ingredient obtained from Moraceae plants, has been demonstrated to have promising anti-inflammatory activities in a range of disorders. However, its impacts on pulmonary diseases, particularly on asthma, have not been clarified. This study was designed to investigate whether morin alleviates airway inflammation in chronic asthma with an emphasis on oxidative stress modulation. In vivo, ovalbumin- (OVA- sensitized mice were administered with morin or dexamethasone before challenge. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and lung tissues were obtained to perform cell counts, histological analysis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In vitro, human bronchial epithelial cells (BECs were challenged by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. The supernatant was collected for the detection of the proinflammatory proteins, and the cells were collected for reactive oxygen species (ROS/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK evaluations. Severe inflammatory responses and remodeling were observed in the airways of the OVA-sensitized mice. Treatment with morin dramatically attenuated the extensive trafficking of inflammatory cells into the BALF and inhibited their infiltration around the respiratory tracts and vessels. Morin administration also significantly suppressed goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition/fibrosis and dose-dependently inhibited the OVA-induced increases in IgE, TNF-α, interleukin- (IL- 4, IL-13, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and malondialdehyde. In human BECs challenged by TNF-α, the levels of proteins such as eotaxin-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-8 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, were consistently significantly decreased by morin. Western blotting and the 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein assay revealed that the increases in intracellular ROS and MAPK phosphorylation were

  10. Comparison of dexmedetomidine and lignocaine on attenuation of airway and pressor responses during tracheal extubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Bharti Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Haemodynamic stability and rapid emergence after general anaesthesia used in spinal surgery is a common practice, the goal of which is to permit early neurological motor and sensory examination. Extubation is almost always associated with hypertension, increased airway response and arrhythmias. We have compared the effects of the α-2 agonist Dexmedetomidine and Lignocaine given at the end of the procedure on attenuation of airway and pressor responses following tracheal extubation. This study is a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study. Materials and Methods: Sixty ASA I-III patients, aged 18-70 years, scheduled to undergo spinal surgery at the level of thoracic, lumbar or sacral region were randomly divided into three groups. Balanced general anaesthesia comprising standard procedures and drugs were used for monitoring, induction and maintenance. At the last skin suture, inhalation anaesthetic was discontinued. After turning the patient supine and return of spontaneous efforts, in Group D Dexmedetomidine 0.5 μg/kg, in Group L Lignocaine 1.5 mg/kg and in Group P normal saline (10 ml were administered as bolus intravenously over 60 seconds. Systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures and heart rate were recorded before intravenous administration and also every minute for 3 minutes, at 5, 10 and 15 minutes post-extubation. Duration of emergence and extubation were noted and attenuation of airway response and quality of extubation was evaluated on cough grading. Results: Mean arterial pressures and heart rate were higher in Group L and Group P than in Group D but not statistically significant. The duration of emergence, extubation and recovery were comparable in all the groups (P > 0.05. Extubation Quality Scores was 1 in 80%, 2 in 20% in Group D; in Group L, the quality scores were 1 for 55%, 2 for 45% and I Group P 1 for 35%, 2 for 45% and 3 for 20% of the patients. The requirement of rescue analgesia was also less

  11. Absence of inflammatory response from upper airway epithelial cells after X irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, R; Deutschle, T; Wiegel, T; Riechelmann, H; Bartkowiak, D

    2009-03-01

    Radiotherapy of head and neck tumors causes adverse reactions in normal tissue, especially mucositis. The dose- and time-dependent response of upper airway cells to X radiation should be analyzed in terms of the pro-inflammatory potential. Immortalized BEAS-2B lung epithelial cells were treated with 2, 5 and 8 Gy. Out of 1232 genes, those that were transcribed differentially after 2, 6 and 24 h were assigned to biological themes according to the Gene Ontology Consortium. Enrichment of differentially regulated gene clusters was determined with GOTree ( http://bioinfo.vanderbilt.edu/gotm ). Eleven cytokines were measured in culture supernatants. The cell cycle response up to 24 h and induction of apoptosis up to 4 days after exposure were determined by flow cytometry. A significant dose- and time-dependent gene activation was observed for the categories response to DNA damage, oxidative stress, cell cycle arrest and cell death/apoptosis but not for immune/inflammatory response. This correlated with functional G(2) arrest and apoptosis. Pro-inflammatory cytokines accumulated in supernatants of control cells but not of X-irradiated cells. The complex gene expression pattern of X-irradiated airway epithelial cells is accompanied by cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. In vivo, this may impair the epithelial barrier. mRNA and protein expression suggest at most an indirect contribution of epithelial cells to early radiogenic mucositis. PMID:19267554

  12. Small airway dysfunction and flow and volume bronchodilator responsiveness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisi, Roberta; Aiello, Marina; Zanini, Andrea; Tzani, Panagiota; Paleari, Davide; Marangio, Emilio; Spanevello, Antonio; Nicolini, Gabriele; Chetta, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated whether a relationship between small airways dysfunction and bronchodilator responsiveness exists in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods We studied 100 (20 female; mean age: 68±10 years) patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]: 55% pred ±21%; FEV1/forced vital capacity [FVC]: 53%±10%) by impulse oscillometry system. Resistance at 5 Hz and 20 Hz (R5 and R20, in kPa·s·L−1) and the fall in resistance from 5 Hz to 20 Hz (R5 – R20) were used as indices of total, proximal, and peripheral airway resistance; reactance at 5 Hz (X5, in kPa·s·L−1) was also measured. Significant response to bronchodilator (salbutamol 400 μg) was expressed as absolute (≥0.2 L) and percentage (≥12%) change relative to the prebronchodilator value of FEV1 (flow responders, FRs) and FVC (volume responders, VRs). Results Eighty out of 100 participants had R5 – R20 >0.03 kPa·s·L−1 (> upper normal limit) and, compared to patients with R5 – R20 ≤0.030 kPa·s·L−1, showed a poorer health status, lower values of FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, and X5, along with higher values of residual volume/total lung capacity and R5 (Preactance, worse spirometry results, more severe lung hyperinflation, and poorer health status. Small airway dysfunction was also associated with the bronchodilator responsiveness in terms of FVC, but not in terms of FEV1. PMID:26150710

  13. The effects of inhaled corticosteroids on intrinsic responsiveness and histology of airways from infant monkeys exposed to house dust mite allergen and ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are recommended to treat infants with asthma, some with intermittent asthma. We previously showed that exposing infant monkeys to allergen/ozone resulted in asthma-like characteristics of their airways. We evaluated the effects of ICS on histology and intrinsic responsiveness of allergen/ozone-exposed and normal infant primate airways. Infant monkeys were exposed by inhalation to (1) filtered air and saline, (2) house dust mite allergen (HDMA) + ozone and saline, (3) filtered air and ICS (budesonide) or (4) HDMA + ozone and ICS. Allergen/ozone exposures started at 1 month and ICS at 3 months of age. At 6 months of age, methacholine-induced changes in luminal area of airways in proximal and distal lung slices were determined using videomicrometry, followed by histology of the same slices. Proximal airway responsiveness was increased by allergen/ozone and by ICS. Eosinophil profiles were increased by allergen/ozone in both proximal and distal airways, an effect that was decreased by ICS in distal airways. In both allergen/ozone- and air-exposed monkeys, ICS increased the number of alveolar attachments in distal airways, decreased mucin in proximal airways and decreased epithelial volume in both airways. ICS increased smooth muscle in air-exposed animals while decreasing it in allergen/ozone-exposed animals in both airways. In proximal airways, there was a small but significant positive correlation between smooth muscle and airway responsiveness, as well as between alveolar attachments and responsiveness. ICS change morphology and function in normal airways as well as allergen/ozone-exposed airways, suggesting that they should be reserved for infants with active symptoms

  14. Response of cultured human airway epithelial cells to X-rays and energetic α-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon and its progeny, which emit α-particles during decay, may play an important role in inducing human lung cancer. To gain a better understanding of the biological effects of α-particles in human lung we studied the response of cultured human airway epithelial cells to X-rays and monoenergetic helium ions. Experimental results indicated that the radiation response of primary cultures was similar to that for airway epithelial cells that were transformed with a plasmid containing an origin-defective SV40 virus. The RBE for cell inactivation determined by the ratio of D0 for X-rays to that for 8 MeV helium ions was 1.8-2.2. The cross-section for helium ions, calculated from the D0 value, was about 24 μm2 for cells of the primary culture. This cross-section is significantly smaller than the average geometric nuclear area (∼ 180 μm2), suggesting that an average of 7.5 α-particles (8 MeV helium ions) per cell nucleus are needed to induce a lethal lesion. (author)

  15. Effect of reproterol either alone or combined with disodium cromoglycate on airway responsiveness to methacholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanniess, Frank; Jörres, Rudolf A; Magnussen, Helgo

    2005-01-01

    Regular use of inhaled beta2-agonists might lead to tolerance as reflected in a loss of bronchoprotection. In vitro-data suggest that this might be prevented by disodium cromoglycate (DSCG). Therefore, we studied the effect of the beta2-agonist reproterol in combination with DSCG. In a cross-over design, 19 subjects with airway hyperresponsiveness inhaled either placebo, 1mg reproterol, 2 mg DSCG, or 1mg reproterol plus 2 mg DSCG 4x daily over 2 weeks. Treatment periods were separated by > or = 7 days. Before and at the end of periods, lung function and methacholine responsiveness were determined in the morning, and 6h later the bronchodilator effect and the protection against methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. Reproterol or DSCG or their combination did not exert detrimental effects on lung function, airway responsiveness, or bronchodilator capacity. However, bronchoprotection was significantly reduced (p DSCG, the respective changes being 0.59, 0.96 and 1.37 doubling concentrations. All changes were small as compared to intraindividual variability. In this model all treatments except with DSCG caused a significant but small loss of protection against methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. Thus, tolerance was not prevented by 2 weeks of additional treatment with DSCG, in contrast to in vitro findings. PMID:15939309

  16. Airway hyperresponsiveness; smooth muscle as the principal actor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Martin, James G

    2016-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is a defining characteristic of asthma that refers to the capacity of the airways to undergo exaggerated narrowing in response to stimuli that do not result in comparable degrees of airway narrowing in healthy subjects. Airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction mediates airway narrowing, but it remains uncertain as to whether the smooth muscle is intrinsically altered in asthmatic subjects or is responding abnormally as a result of the milieu in which it sits. ASM in the trachea or major bronchi does not differ in its contractile characteristics in asthmatics, but the more pertinent peripheral airways await complete exploration. The mass of ASM is increased in many but not all asthmatics and therefore cannot be a unifying hypothesis for AHR, although when increased in mass it may contribute to AHR. The inability of a deep breath to reverse or prevent bronchial narrowing in asthma may reflect an intrinsic difference in the mechanisms that lead to softening of contracted ASM when subjected to stretch. Cytokines such as interleukin-13 and tumor necrosis factor-α promote a more contractile ASM phenotype. The composition and increased stiffness of the matrix in which ASM is embedded promotes a more proliferative and pro-inflammatory ASM phenotype, but the expected dedifferentiation and loss of contractility have not been shown. Airway epithelium may drive ASM proliferation and/or molecular remodeling in ways that may lead to AHR. In conclusion, AHR is likely multifactorial in origin, reflecting the plasticity of ASM properties in the inflammatory environment of the asthmatic airway. PMID:26998246

  17. Small airway dysfunction and flow and volume bronchodilator responsiveness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pisi R

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Roberta Pisi,1 Marina Aiello,1 Andrea Zanini,2 Panagiota Tzani,1 Davide Paleari,3 Emilio Marangio,1 Antonio Spanevello,2,4 Gabriele Nicolini,5 Alfredo Chetta1 1Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma, 2Division of Pneumology, IRCCS Rehabilitation Institute of Tradate, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, Tradate, 3Medical Department, Chiesi Farmaceutici SpA, Parma, 4Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Insubria, Varese, 5Corporate Clinical Development, Chiesi Farmaceutici SpA, Parma, Italy Background: We investigated whether a relationship between small airways dysfunction and bronchodilator responsiveness exists in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.Methods: We studied 100 (20 female; mean age: 68±10 years patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]: 55% pred ±21%; FEV1/forced vital capacity [FVC]: 53%±10% by impulse oscillometry system. Resistance at 5 Hz and 20 Hz (R5 and R20, in kPa·s·L-1 and the fall in resistance from 5 Hz to 20 Hz (R5 – R20 were used as indices of total, proximal, and peripheral airway resistance; reactance at 5 Hz (X5, in kPa·s·L-1 was also measured. Significant response to bronchodilator (salbutamol 400 µg was expressed as absolute (≥0.2 L and percentage (≥12% change relative to the prebronchodilator value of FEV1 (flow responders, FRs and FVC (volume responders, VRs.Results: Eighty out of 100 participants had R5 – R20 >0.03 kPa·s·L-1 (> upper normal limit and, compared to patients with R5 – R20 ≤0.030 kPa·s·L-1, showed a poorer health status, lower values of FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, and X5, along with higher values of residual volume/total lung capacity and R5 (P<0.05 for all comparisons. Compared to the 69 nonresponders and the 8 FRs, the 16 VRs had significantly higher R5 and R5 – R20 values (P<0.05, lower X5 values (P<0.05, and greater airflow obstruction and lung

  18. B cells play key roles in th2-type airway immune responses in mice exposed to natural airborne allergens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yin Drake

    Full Text Available Humans are frequently exposed to various airborne allergens. In addition to producing antibodies, B cells participate in immune responses via various mechanisms. The roles of B cells in allergic airway inflammation and asthma have been controversial. We examined the functional importance of B cells in a mouse model of asthma, in which mice were exposed repeatedly to common airborne allergens. Naïve wild-type BALB/c mice or B cell-deficient JH-/- mice were exposed intranasally to a cocktail of allergen extracts, including Alternaria, Aspergillus, and house dust mite, every other day for two weeks. Ovalbumin was included in the cocktail to monitor the T cell immune response. Airway inflammation, lung pathology, and airway reactivity were analyzed. The airway exposure of naïve wild type mice to airborne allergens induced robust eosinophilic airway inflammation, increased the levels of Th2 cytokines and chemokines in the lung, and increased the reactivity to inhaled methacholine. These pathological changes and immune responses were attenuated in B cell-deficient JH-/- mice. The allergen-induced expansion of CD4+ T cells was impaired in the lungs and draining lymph nodes of JH-/- mice. Furthermore, lymphocytes from JH-/- mice failed to produce Th2 cytokines in response to ovalbumin re-stimulation in vitro. Our results suggest that B cells are required for the optimal development of Th2-type immune responses and airway inflammation when exposed to common airborne allergens. The therapeutic targeting of B cells may be beneficial to treat asthma in certain patients.

  19. [Cardiovascular responses during laryngeal mask airway insertion in normotensive, hypertensive and chronic renal failure patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, M; Igarashi, M; Tsunoda, K; Edanaga, M; Suzuki, H; Tohdoh, Y; Namiki, A

    1999-08-01

    The hemodynamic response to the insertion of the laryngeal mask airway (LM) following induction with propofol 2 mg.kg-1 was assessed and compared in normotensive (Normal), hypertensive (HT) and chronic renal failure (CRF) patients (n = 23 in each group). Before induction, in HT and CRF groups blood pressure and rate pressure products (RPP) were higher than in Normal group (P < 0.05). Although blood pressure and RPP were decreased in every patient by induction with propofol, no patients needed vasopressor drugs. The decreases of blood pressure and RPP were larger in HT and CRF groups than in Normal group (P < 0.05). There were no differences between groups in heart rate and rate of successful LM insertion. We concluded that LM insertion with propofol 2 mg.kg-1 was an effective induction method preventing the adverse circulatory responses in normotensive, hypertensive and chronic renal failure patients. PMID:10481421

  20. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Departamento de Fisiologia e Patologia, UFPB, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Moraes de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid [Laboratório de Inflamação, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Silva Mendes, Diego da [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Melo, Christianne Bandeira [Laboratório de Inflamação, Instituto Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Martins, Marco Aurélio [Laboratório de Inflamação, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Silva Dias, Celidarque da [Laboratório de Fitoquímica, Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, UFPB, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Piuvezam, Márcia Regina, E-mail: mrpiuvezam@ltf.ufpb.br [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Departamento de Fisiologia e Patologia, UFPB, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); and others

    2013-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca{sup ++} influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. - Highlights: • Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Chondrodendron platyphyllum. • Curine inhibits eosinophil influx and activation and airway hyper-responsiveness. • Curine

  1. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca++ influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. - Highlights: • Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Chondrodendron platyphyllum. • Curine inhibits eosinophil influx and activation and airway hyper-responsiveness. • Curine

  2. Response Properties of a Newly Identified Tristratified Narrow Field Amacrine Cell in the Mouse Retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Newkirk

    Full Text Available Amacrine cells were targeted for whole cell recording using two-photon fluorescence microscopy in a transgenic mouse line in which the promoter for dopamine receptor 2 drove expression of green fluorescent protein in a narrow field tristratified amacrine cell (TNAC that had not been studied previously. Light evoked a multiphasic response that was the sum of hyperpolarizing and depolarization synaptic inputs consistent with distinct dendritic ramifications in the off and on sublamina of the inner plexiform layer. The amplitude and waveform of the response, which consisted of an initial brief hyperpolarization at light onset followed by recovery to a plateau potential close to dark resting potential and a hyperpolarizing response at the light offset varied little over an intensity range from 0.4 to ~10^6 Rh*/rod/s. This suggests that the cell functions as a differentiator that generates an output signal (a transient reduction in inhibitory input to downstream retina neurons that is proportional to the derivative of light input independent of its intensity. The underlying circuitry appears to consist of rod and cone driven on and off bipolar cells that provide direct excitatory input to the cell as well as to GABAergic amacrine cells that are synaptically coupled to TNAC. Canonical reagents that blocked excitatory (glutamatergic and inhibitory (GABA and glycine synaptic transmission had effects on responses to scotopic stimuli consistent with the rod driven component of the proposed circuit. However, responses evoked by photopic stimuli were paradoxical and could not be interpreted on the basis of conventional thinking about the neuropharmacology of synaptic interactions in the retina.

  3. Morning-evening changes in airway responsiveness to methacholine in normal and asthmatic subjects: analysis using partial flow-volume curves.

    OpenAIRE

    Heaton, R W; Gillett, M K; Snashall, P. D.

    1988-01-01

    In eight normal and eight asthmatic subjects airway responsiveness to methacholine was measured by means of partial flow-volume loops at 0800 and 1800 hours on the same day. Airway responsiveness was lower in the evening in both normal and asthmatic subjects.

  4. Exposure to 1 ppm ozone attenuates the immediate antigenic response of canine peripheral airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleeberger, S.R.; Kolbe, J.; Turner, C.; Spannhake, E.W. (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The effect of oxidant exposure on the immediate airway response to immunologic challenge is controversial. We investigated the response of canine peripheral airways to antigen aerosol, 1-3 h and 24 h after a 5-min exposure to 1 ppm ozone. In dogs that were natively sensitive to Ascaris suum antigen, resistance to flow through the collateral system (Rcs) was measured using the wedged bronchoscope technique. In eight dogs, four sublobar segments of each lung were wedged: two were exposed to ozone for 5 min and two (control) received air with 5% CO2. Ozone caused a mean ( +/- SE) increase in Rcs of 75 +/- 15%, which returned to baseline after 1-3 h. The increase in Rcs elicited by subsequent administration of antigen aerosol (25 microliters, 0.27 mg protein/ml) to the ozone-exposed segments (312.0 +/- 70.6%) was attenuated by 22% compared to controls (398.9 +/- 83.0%; p less than .05). In another series of experiments (n = 5), segments were exposed to ozone or air and challenged with antigen 24 h later and a significant attenuation (38%) of the antigen-induced increase in Rcs was detected compared to controls (178.5 +/- 57.9 vs 289.0 +/- 62.2; p less than .05). Cellular influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) was not detected by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) 1-3 h after ozone, but was found after 24 h (19.8 vs. 4.7%; p less than .01). A significant increase in PMNs was detected in exposed subepithelial tissues 1-3 h after ozone compared to unexposed tissues. Tissue PMNs were not significantly different from unexposed tissues after 24 h, but a shift toward degranulation of mast cells was detected in ozone-exposed tissues at this time. These data suggest that the Rcs response to antigen is attenuated 1-3 h and 24 h after acute (5 min) exposure to 1 ppm ozone, and this effect occurs independently of PMNs in the airways.

  5. Recruited alveolar macrophages, in response to airway epithelial-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein 1/CCl2, regulate airway inflammation and remodeling in allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Gyu; Jeong, Jong Jin; Nyenhuis, Sharmilee; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Chung, Sangwoon; Ranjan, Ravi; Karpurapu, Manjula; Deng, Jing; Qian, Feng; Kelly, Elizabeth A B; Jarjour, Nizar N; Ackerman, Steven J; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Christman, John W; Park, Gye Young

    2015-06-01

    Although alveolar macrophages (AMs) from patients with asthma are known to be functionally different from those of healthy individuals, the mechanism by which this transformation occurs has not been fully elucidated in asthma. The goal of this study was to define the mechanisms that control AM phenotypic and functional transformation in response to acute allergic airway inflammation. The phenotype and functional characteristics of AMs obtained from human subjects with asthma after subsegmental bronchoprovocation with allergen was studied. Using macrophage-depleted mice, the role and trafficking of AM populations was determined using an acute allergic lung inflammation model. We observed that depletion of AMs in a mouse allergic asthma model attenuates Th2-type allergic lung inflammation and its consequent airway remodeling. In both human and mouse, endobronchial challenge with allergen induced a marked increase in monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCPs) in bronchoalveolar fluid, concomitant with the rapid appearance of a monocyte-derived population of AMs. Furthermore, airway allergen challenge of allergic subjects with mild asthma skewed the pattern of AM gene expression toward high levels of the receptor for MCP1 (CCR2/MCP1R) and expression of M2 phenotypic proteins, whereas most proinflammatory genes were highly suppressed. CCL2/MCP-1 gene expression was prominent in bronchial epithelial cells in a mouse allergic asthma model, and in vitro studies indicate that bronchial epithelial cells produced abundant MCP-1 in response to house dust mite allergen. Thus, our study indicates that bronchial allergen challenge induces the recruitment of blood monocytes along a chemotactic gradient generated by allergen-exposed bronchial epithelial cells. PMID:25360868

  6. K+-induced alterations in airway muscle responsiveness to electrical field stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated possible pre- and postsynaptic effects of K+-induced depolarization on ferret tracheal smooth muscle (TSM) responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation. To assess electromechanical activity, cell membrane potential (Em) and tension (Tm) were simultaneously recorded in buffer containing 6, 12, 18, or 24 mM K+ before and after electrical field stimulation (EFS) or exogenous acetylcholine (ACh). In 6 mM K+, Em was -58.1 +/- 1.0 mV (mean +/- SE). In 12 mM K+, Em was depolarized to -52.3 +/- 0.9 mV, basal Tm did not change, and both excitatory junctional potentials and contractile responses to EFS at short stimulus duration were larger than in 6 mM K+. No such potentiation occurred at a higher K+, although resting Em and Tm increased progressively above 12 mM K+. The sensitivity of ferret TSM to exogenous ACh appeared unaffected by K+. To determine whether the hyperresponsiveness in 12 mM K+ was due, in part, to augmented ACh release from intramural airway nerves, experiments were done using TSM preparations incubated with [3H]choline to measure [3H]ACh release at rest and during EFS. Although resting [3H]ACh release increased progressively in higher K+, release evoked by EFS was maximal in 12 mM K+ and declined in higher concentrations. We conclude that small elevations in the extracellular K+ concentration augment responsiveness of the airways, by increasing the release of ACh both at rest and during EFS from intramural cholinergic nerve terminals. Larger increases in K+ appear to be inhibitory, possibly due to voltage-dependent effects that occur both pre- and postsynaptically

  7. K+-induced alterations in airway muscle responsiveness to electrical field stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors investigated possible pre- and postsynaptic effects of K+-induced depolarization on ferret tracheal smooth muscle (TSM) responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation. To assess electromechanical activity, cell membrane potential (E/sub m/) and tension (T/sub m/) were simultaneously recorded in buffer containing 6, 12, 18, or 24 mM K+ before and after electrical field stimulation (EFS) or exogenous acetylcholine (ACh). In 6 mM K+ E/sub m/ was -58.1 +/- 1.0 m V (mean +/- SE). In 12 mM K+, E/sub m/ was depolarized to -52.3 +/- 0.9 mV, basal T/sub m/ did not change, and both excitatory junctional potentials and contractile responses to EFS at short stimulus duration were larger than in 6 mM K+. No such potentiation occurred at a higher K+, although resting E/sub m/ and T/sub m/ increased progressively above 12 mM K+. The sensitivity of ferret TSM to exogenous ACh appeared unaffected by K+. To determine whether the hyperresponsiveness in 12 mM K+ was due, in part, to augmented ACh release from intramural airway nerves, experiments were done using TSM preparations incubated with [3H]choline to measure [3H]ACh release at rest and during EFS. Although resting [3H]ACh release increased progressively in higher K+, release evoked by EFS was maximal in 12 mM K+ and declined in higher concentrations. They conclude that small elevations in the extracellular K+ concentration augment responsiveness of the airways, by increasing the release of ACh both at rest and during EFS from intramural cholinergic nerve terminals. Larger increases in K+ appear to be inhibitory, possibly due to voltage-dependent effects that occur both pre- and postsynaptically

  8. Airway Epithelial Orchestration of Innate Immune Function in Response to Virus Infection. A Focus on Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Andrew I; Jackson, David J; Edwards, Michael R; Johnston, Sebastian L

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a very common respiratory condition with a worldwide prevalence predicted to increase. There are significant differences in airway epithelial responses in asthma that are of particular interest during exacerbations. Preventing exacerbations is a primary aim when treating asthma because they often necessitate unscheduled healthcare visits and hospitalizations and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of asthma exacerbations is a respiratory virus infection, of which the most likely type is rhinovirus infection. This article focuses on the role played by the epithelium in orchestrating the innate immune responses to respiratory virus infection. Recent studies show impaired bronchial epithelial cell innate antiviral immune responses, as well as augmentation of a pro-Th2 response characterized by the epithelial-derived cytokines IL-25 and IL-33, crucial in maintaining the Th2 cytokine response to virus infection in asthma. A better understanding of the mechanisms of these abnormal immune responses has the potential to lead to the development of novel therapeutic targets for virus-induced exacerbations. The aim of this article is to highlight current knowledge regarding the role of viruses and immune modulation in the asthmatic epithelium and to discuss exciting areas for future research and novel treatments. PMID:27027954

  9. Role of M2 Muscarinic Receptor in the Airway Response to Methacholine of Mice Selected for Minimal or Maximal Acute Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juciane Maria de Andrade Castro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway smooth muscle constriction induced by cholinergic agonists such as methacholine (MCh, which is typically increased in asthmatic patients, is regulated mainly by muscle muscarinic M3 receptors and negatively by vagal muscarinic M2 receptors. Here we evaluated basal (intrinsic and allergen-induced (extrinsic airway responses to MCh. We used two mouse lines selected to respond maximally (AIRmax or minimally (AIRmin to innate inflammatory stimuli. We found that in basal condition AIRmin mice responded more vigorously to MCh than AIRmax. Treatment with a specific M2 antagonist increased airway response of AIRmax but not of AIRmin mice. The expression of M2 receptors in the lung was significantly lower in AIRmin compared to AIRmax animals. AIRmax mice developed a more intense allergic inflammation than AIRmin, and both allergic mouse lines increased airway responses to MCh. However, gallamine treatment of allergic groups did not affect the responses to MCh. Our results confirm that low or dysfunctional M2 receptor activity is associated with increased airway responsiveness to MCh and that this trait was inherited during the selective breeding of AIRmin mice and was acquired by AIRmax mice during allergic lung inflammation.

  10. Deficiency of FHL2 attenuates airway inflammation in mice and genetic variation associates with human bronchial hyper-responsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurakula, K.; Vos, M.; Logiantara, A.; Roelofs, J. J. T. H.; Nieuwenhuis, M. A.; Koppelman, G. H.; Postma, D. S.; Brandsma, C. A.; Sin, D. D.; Bosse, Y.; Nickle, D. C.; van Rijt, L. S.; de Vries, C. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Asthma is an inflammatory disease that involves airway hyper-responsiveness and mucus hypersecretion. The LIM-only protein FHL2 is a crucial modulator of multiple signal transduction pathways and functions as a scaffold in specific protein protein interactions. Objective: We sought to in

  11. Remodeling of the pulmonary circulation - a novel response to allergic airway inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Rydell-Törmänen, Kristina

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is characterized, not only by inflammation but also by airway and vascular remodeling. Airway remodeling is established early in disease, structural alterations have been found in children, and is thought to contribute to asthma symptoms. Unfortunately, airway remodeling is considered difficult to reverse and it seldom resolves completely. Studies of vascular involvement in asthma have mainly focused on the tracheal and bronchial microcirculation, as these vessels are relatively easy t...

  12. The response of cat airways to histamine in vivo and in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Blaber, L. C.; Fryer, A D

    1985-01-01

    The effects of histamine have been examined in anaesthetized cats and on cat cat isolated lung parenchyma strip. Histamine infused intravenously for 2 min produced a small and inconsistent effect on central airways and a small but consistent constriction of peripheral airways. Histamine bronchoconstriction of the central airways was unmasked by non-selective and beta 2-adrenoceptor blockade but not by beta 1-adrenoceptor blockade. This bronchoconstriction was antagonized by atropine but not b...

  13. Electrokinetically induced alterations in dynamic response of viscoelastic fluids in narrow confinements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2012-05-01

    We investigate a dynamical interplay between interfacial electrokinetics and a combined dissipative and elastic behavior of flow through narrow confinements, in analogy with spatiotemporal hydrodynamics of porous media. In particular, we investigate the effects of streaming potential on the pertinent dynamic responses, by choosing a Maxwell fluid model for representing the consequent electro-hydrodynamic characteristics. We transform the pertinent governing equation to the frequency domain, so that a dynamic generalization of Darcy's law in the presence of streaming potential effects can be effectively realized. We show that the frequencies corresponding to local maxima in the dynamic permeability also correspond to local maxima in the induced streaming potential. We also bring out the effects of Stern layer conductivity on the dynamic permeability. Our analytical estimates do reveal that serious overestimations in the commonly portrayed notion of massive amplifications of dynamic permeability at resonating frequencies may be possible, if interactions between spontaneous electrochemical interfacial phenomena and pulsating pressure-gradient-driven viscoelastic transport are trivially ignored.

  14. Response surface optimization of enzymatic hydrolysis of narrow-leaf cattail for bioethanol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The cellulose of pretreated sample was higher than untreated sample. • Lower hemicellulose and lignin were enhanced of hydrolyzed cellulose to sugar. • The predicted result of enzymatic hydrolysis process was fitted by quadratic model. • Predicted data was good agreement with the experimental data; with 95% confidence. - Abstract: Narrow-leaf cattail was employed as lignocellulosic biomass substrate for the investigation of the hydrolysis process of lignocellulosic ethanol. Cellulose saccharification into a high yield of fermentable sugar is an important step in ethanol production. Response surface methodology was utilized in the study of variables affecting enzymatic hydrolysis on the released glucose and xylose. Five levels (−2, −1, 0, +1, +2) of independent variable factors; cellulase (5–25 FPU/g substrate), β-glucosidase (0–20 U/g substrate), hydrolysis temperature (30–50 °C), and hydrolysis time (24–96 h), were randomly setup by using the Design of Experiment program. The significance of the regression model was high; with 95% confidence interval (less than 5% error). The predicted result after optimization was also in good agreement with the experimental data. An optimal condition; 13.50 FPU/g substrate, 16.50 U/g substrate, 50 °C and 24 h, was obtained, yielding a released glucose of 552.9 mg/g substrate (75.6% saccharification) and a released xylose of 74.0 mg/g substrate (45.6% saccharification)

  15. T lymphocytes promote the antiviral and inflammatory responses of airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Jornot

    Full Text Available HYPOTHESIS: T cells modulate the antiviral and inflammatory responses of airway epithelial cells to human rhinoviruses (HRV. METHODS: Differentiated primary human nasal epithelial cells (HNEC grown on collagen-coated filters were exposed apically to HRV14 for 6 h, washed thoroughly and co-cultured with anti-CD3/CD28 activated T cells added in the basolateral compartment for 40 h. RESULTS: HRV14 did not induce IFNγ, NOS2, CXCL8 and IL-6 in HNEC, but enhanced expression of the T cell attractant CXCL10. On the other hand, HNEC co-cultured with activated T cells produced CXCL10 at a level several orders of magnitude higher than that induced by HRV14. Albeit to a much lower degree, activated T cells also induced CXCL8, IL-6 and NOS2. Anti-IFNγ antibodies and TNF soluble receptor completely blocked CXCL10 upregulation. Furthermore, a significant correlation was observed between epithelial CXCL10 mRNA expression and the amounts of IFNγ and TNF secreted by T cells. Likewise, increasing numbers of T cells to a constant number of HNEC in co-cultures resulted in increasing epithelial CXCL10 production, attaining a plateau at high IFNγ and TNF levels. Hence, HNEC activation by T cells is induced mainly by IFNγ and/or TNF. Activated T cells also markedly inhibited viral replication in HNEC, partially through activation of the nitric oxide pathway. CONCLUSION: Cross-talk between T cells and HNEC results in activation of the latter and increases their contribution to airway inflammation and virus clearance.

  16. Effect of different bronchodilators on airway smooth muscle responsiveness to contractile agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, B; Persson, C G

    1991-05-01

    "Functional antagonism" is often used to describe the general relaxant effect of beta 2 agonists and xanthines and their ability to protect the airways against bronchoconstrictor stimuli. This study in guinea pig isolated trachea addresses the question of whether the capacity of these drugs to protect against constrictor stimuli is related to smooth muscle relaxation. Three antimuscarinic drugs were also examined to determine whether antagonism of mediators other than muscarinic agonists might contribute to bronchodilatation by these antimuscarinic drugs. Terbutaline (1.1 x 10(-7), 2.2 x 10(-7) M), theophylline (2.2 x 10(-4), 4.4 x 10(-4) M), and enprofylline (5.2 x 10(-5), 1.0 x 10(-4) M) relaxed the tracheal tension that remained after indomethacin treatment. They did not, however, alter the carbachol concentration-response curve significantly. In addition, neither theophylline (2.2 x 10(-4) M) nor terbutaline (1.1 x 10(-7) M) altered histamine induced contraction. Atropine sulphate, glycopyrrolate, and ipratropium bromide had EC50 values of 10(-9) - 10(-8) M for relaxation of carbachol induced contractions, whereas concentrations of 10(-6) - 10(-3) M or greater were required to relax contractions induced by allergen and nine other non-muscarinic mediators. It is suggested that bronchodilatation by antimuscarinic drugs in vivo is due to inhibition of acetylcholine induced bronchoconstriction alone and that beta 2 agonists and xanthines have poor ability to protect airway smooth muscle against constrictor stimuli. Hence mechanisms other than bronchodilatation and "functional antagonism" should be considered to explain the protection against constrictor stimuli in asthma seen with beta 2 agonists and xanthines. PMID:2068693

  17. MicroRNA Mediated Chemokine Responses in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythili Dileepan

    Full Text Available Airway smooth muscle (ASM cells play a critical role in the pathophysiology of asthma due to their hypercontractility and their ability to proliferate and secrete inflammatory mediators. microRNAs (miRNAs are gene regulators that control many signaling pathways and thus serve as potential therapeutic alternatives for many diseases. We have previously shown that miR-708 and miR-140-3p regulate the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in human ASM (HASM cells following TNF-α exposure. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effect of these miRNAs on other asthma-related genes. Microarray analysis using the Illumina platform was performed with total RNA extracted from miR-708 (or control miR-transfected HASM cells. Inhibition of candidate inflammation-associated gene expression was further validated by qPCR and ELISA. The most significant biologic functions for the differentially expressed gene set included decreased inflammatory response, cytokine expression and signaling. qPCR revealed inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL10, CCL2 and CXCL8, while the release of CCL11 was inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. Transfection of cells with miR-140-3p resulted in inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL12, CXCL10, CCL5 and CXCL8 and of TNF-α-induced CXCL12 release. In addition, expression of RARRES2, CD44 and ADAM33, genes known to contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma, were found to be inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. These results demonstrate that miR-708 and miR-140-3p exert distinct effects on inflammation-associated gene expression and biological function of ASM cells. Targeting these miRNA networks may provide a novel therapeutic mechanism to down-regulate airway inflammation and ASM proliferation in asthma.

  18. MicroRNA Mediated Chemokine Responses in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileepan, Mythili; Sarver, Anne E; Rao, Savita P; Panettieri, Reynold A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S

    2016-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells play a critical role in the pathophysiology of asthma due to their hypercontractility and their ability to proliferate and secrete inflammatory mediators. microRNAs (miRNAs) are gene regulators that control many signaling pathways and thus serve as potential therapeutic alternatives for many diseases. We have previously shown that miR-708 and miR-140-3p regulate the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in human ASM (HASM) cells following TNF-α exposure. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effect of these miRNAs on other asthma-related genes. Microarray analysis using the Illumina platform was performed with total RNA extracted from miR-708 (or control miR)-transfected HASM cells. Inhibition of candidate inflammation-associated gene expression was further validated by qPCR and ELISA. The most significant biologic functions for the differentially expressed gene set included decreased inflammatory response, cytokine expression and signaling. qPCR revealed inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL10, CCL2 and CXCL8, while the release of CCL11 was inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. Transfection of cells with miR-140-3p resulted in inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL12, CXCL10, CCL5 and CXCL8 and of TNF-α-induced CXCL12 release. In addition, expression of RARRES2, CD44 and ADAM33, genes known to contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma, were found to be inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. These results demonstrate that miR-708 and miR-140-3p exert distinct effects on inflammation-associated gene expression and biological function of ASM cells. Targeting these miRNA networks may provide a novel therapeutic mechanism to down-regulate airway inflammation and ASM proliferation in asthma. PMID:26998837

  19. Exhaled nitric oxide predicts airway hyper-responsiveness to hypertonic saline in children that wheeze

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meer, G; van Amsterdam, JGC; Janssen, NAH; Meijer, E; Brunekreef, B; STEERENBERG, PA

    2005-01-01

    Background: Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) has shown good validity for the assessment of airway inflammation in asthmatic children. In large-scale epidemiological studies, this method would be preferred above airway challenge tests, because it is a quick and easy applicable tool. Objective: In this stud

  20. A GM-CSF/IL-33 Pathway Facilitates Allergic Airway Responses to Sub-Threshold House Dust Mite Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Alba Llop-Guevara; Chu, Derek K.; Walker, Tina D; Susanna Goncharova; Ramzi Fattouh; Silver, Jonathan S.; Cheryl Lynn Moore; Xie, Juliana L.; Paul M O'Byrne; Anthony J. Coyle; Roland Kolbeck; Humbles, Alison A.; Martin R Stämpfli; Manel Jordana

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic immune-inflammatory disease of the airways. Despite aeroallergen exposure being universal, allergic asthma affects only a fraction of individuals. This is likely related, at least in part, to the extent of allergen exposure. Regarding house dust mite (HDM), we previously identified the threshold required to elicit allergic responses in BALB/c mice. Here, we investigated the impact of an initial immune perturbation on the response to sub-threshold HDM exposure. We ...

  1. Analysis of airways in computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is major cause of death and disability world-wide. It affects lung function through destruction of lung tissue known as emphysema and inflammation of airways, leading to thickened airway walls and narrowed airway lumen. Computed Tomography (CT) imaging...

  2. Airway Smooth Muscle Growth in Asthma: Proliferation, Hypertrophy, and Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Bentley, J. Kelley; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2008-01-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle mass is present in fatal and non-fatal asthma. However, little information is available regarding the cellular mechanism (i.e., hyperplasia vs. hypertrophy). Even less information exists regarding the functional consequences of airway smooth muscle remodeling. It would appear that increased airway smooth muscle mass would tend to increase airway narrowing and airflow obstruction. However, the precise effects of increased airway smooth muscle mass on airway narro...

  3. Response of Differentiated Human Airway Epithelia to Alcohol Exposure and Klebsiella pneumoniae Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammeta V. Raju

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse has been associated with increased susceptibility to pulmonary infection. It is not fully defined how alcohol contributes to the host defense compromise. Here primary human airway epithelial cells were cultured at an air-liquid interface to form a differentiated and polarized epithelium. This unique culture model allowed us to closely mimic lung infection in the context of alcohol abuse by basolateral alcohol exposure and apical live bacterial challenge. Application of clinically relevant concentrations of alcohol for 24 h did not significantly alter epithelial integrity or barrier function. When apically challenged with viable Klebsiella pneumoniae, the cultured epithelia had an enhanced tightness which was unaffected by alcohol. Further, alcohol enhanced apical bacterial growth, but not bacterial binding to the cells. The cultured epithelium in the absence of any treatment or stimulation had a base-level IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. Apical bacterial challenge significantly elevated the basolateral secretion of inflammatory cytokines including IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and TNF-α. However, alcohol suppressed the observed cytokine burst in response to infection. Addition of adenosine receptor agonists negated the suppression of IL-6 and TNF-α. Thus, acute alcohol alters the epithelial cytokine response to infection, which can be partially mitigated by adenosine receptor agonists.

  4. A GM-CSF/IL-33 pathway facilitates allergic airway responses to sub-threshold house dust mite exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llop-Guevara, Alba; Chu, Derek K; Walker, Tina D; Goncharova, Susanna; Fattouh, Ramzi; Silver, Jonathan S; Moore, Cheryl Lynn; Xie, Juliana L; O'Byrne, Paul M; Coyle, Anthony J; Kolbeck, Roland; Humbles, Alison A; Stämpfli, Martin R; Jordana, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic immune-inflammatory disease of the airways. Despite aeroallergen exposure being universal, allergic asthma affects only a fraction of individuals. This is likely related, at least in part, to the extent of allergen exposure. Regarding house dust mite (HDM), we previously identified the threshold required to elicit allergic responses in BALB/c mice. Here, we investigated the impact of an initial immune perturbation on the response to sub-threshold HDM exposure. We show that transient GM-CSF expression in the lung facilitated robust eosinophilic inflammation, long-lasting antigen-specific Th2 responses, mucus production and airway hyperresponsiveness. This was associated with increased IL-33 levels and activated CD11b(+) DCs expressing OX40L. GM-CSF-driven allergic responses were significantly blunted in IL-33-deficient mice. IL-33 was localized on alveolar type II cells and in vitro stimulation of human epithelial cells with GM-CSF enhanced intracellular IL-33 independently of IL-1α. Likewise, GM-CSF administration in vivo resulted in increased levels of IL-33 but not IL-1α. These findings suggest that exposures to environmental agents associated with GM-CSF production, including airway infections and pollutants, may decrease the threshold of allergen responsiveness and, hence, increase the susceptibility to develop allergic asthma through a GM-CSF/IL-33/OX40L pathway. PMID:24551140

  5. A GM-CSF/IL-33 pathway facilitates allergic airway responses to sub-threshold house dust mite exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Llop-Guevara

    Full Text Available Allergic asthma is a chronic immune-inflammatory disease of the airways. Despite aeroallergen exposure being universal, allergic asthma affects only a fraction of individuals. This is likely related, at least in part, to the extent of allergen exposure. Regarding house dust mite (HDM, we previously identified the threshold required to elicit allergic responses in BALB/c mice. Here, we investigated the impact of an initial immune perturbation on the response to sub-threshold HDM exposure. We show that transient GM-CSF expression in the lung facilitated robust eosinophilic inflammation, long-lasting antigen-specific Th2 responses, mucus production and airway hyperresponsiveness. This was associated with increased IL-33 levels and activated CD11b(+ DCs expressing OX40L. GM-CSF-driven allergic responses were significantly blunted in IL-33-deficient mice. IL-33 was localized on alveolar type II cells and in vitro stimulation of human epithelial cells with GM-CSF enhanced intracellular IL-33 independently of IL-1α. Likewise, GM-CSF administration in vivo resulted in increased levels of IL-33 but not IL-1α. These findings suggest that exposures to environmental agents associated with GM-CSF production, including airway infections and pollutants, may decrease the threshold of allergen responsiveness and, hence, increase the susceptibility to develop allergic asthma through a GM-CSF/IL-33/OX40L pathway.

  6. Airway inflammatory response to ozone in subjects with different asthma severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagaggini, B.; Carnevali, S.; Macchioni, P. [Univ. of Pisa, Cardio-Thoracic Dept., Respiratory patho-physiology (IT)] (and others)

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ozone exposure induces a similar airway inflammatory response in subjects with different degrees of asthma severity. Two groups of asthmatic subjects were studied: seven with intermittent mild asthma not requiring regular treatment (group A); and seven with persistent mild asthma requiring regular treatment with inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting {beta}{sub 2}-agonists (group B). All subjects were exposed, in a randomized cross-over design, to air or O{sub 3} (0.26 parts per million (ppm) for 2 h with intermittent exercise); subjects in group B withdrew from regular treatment 72 h before each exposure. Before the exposure, and 1 and 2 h after the beginning of the exposure they performed a pulmonary function test, and a questionnaire was completed to obtain a total symptom score (TSS). Six hours after the end of the exposure, hypertonic saline (HS) sputum induction was conducted. Sputum cell percentages, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and interleukin (IL)-8 concentrations in the sputum supernatant were measured. TSS significantly increased and forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) significantly decreased after O{sub 3} exposure in comparison with air exposure in group A, whereas no changes were observed in group B except for a significant decrement of FEV1 2 h after the beginning of O{sub 3} exposure. Sputum neutrophil percentage was significantly higher after O{sub 3} exposure than after air exposure in both groups (Group A: 70.2% (28-87) versus 26.6% (8.6-73.2); Group B: 62.1% (25-82.4) versus 27.9% (14.4-54)). IL-8 was higher in sputum supernatant collected 6 h after O{sub 3} exposure than after air, only in group A. No change due to O{sub 3} has been found in sputum eosinophil percentage and ECP concentration in both groups. In conclusion, the degree of airway response to a short-term exposure to ozone is different in subjects with asthma of different severity. The

  7. Comparative study of hemodynamic responses to orotracheal intubation with intubating laryngeal mask airway and direct laryngoscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guo-hua; XUE Fu-shan; SUN Hai-yan; LI Cheng-wen; SUN Hai-tao; LI Ping; LIU Kun-peng

    2006-01-01

    Background Intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) offers a new approach for orotracheal intubation and is expected to produce less cardiovascular stress responses. However, the available studies provide inconsistent results. The purpose of this study was to identify whether there is a clinically relevant difference in hemodynamic responses to orotracheal intubation by using ILMA and direct laryngoscope (DLS).Methods A total of 53 adult patients, ASA physical status Ⅰ-Ⅱ, scheduled for elective plastic surgery under general anesthesia requiring the orotracheal intubation, were randomly allocated to either DLS or ILMA groups.After a standard intravenous anesthesia induction, orotracheal intubation was performed. Noninvasive blood pressure and heart rate were recorded before (baseline values) and after anesthesia induction (post-induction values), at intubation and every minute for the first 5 minutes after intubation. The data were analyzed using Chisquare test, paired and unpaired Student's t test, and repeated-measures analysis of variance as appropriate.Results The mean intubation time in the ILMA group was longer than that in the DLS group (P<0.05). The blood pressure and heart rate increased significantly after intubation in the two groups compared to the postinduction values (P<0.05), but the maximum value of blood pressure during the observation did not exceed the baseline value, while the maximum value of heart rate was higher than the baseline (P<0.05). During the observation, there were no significant differences in blood pressure and heart rate among each time point and in the maximum values between the two groups.Conclusions Orotracheal intubations by using ILMA and DLS produce similar hemodynamic response. ILMA has no advantage in attenuating the hemodynamic responses to orotracheal intubation compared with DLS.

  8. Conquering the difficult airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandy, William E

    2008-01-01

    Every medic should practice regularly for the inevitable difficult airway case. Practice should include review of the causes of difficult airways, as well as skill practice. Having a preassembled airway kit can make your response to an unexpected difficult situation easier. Of all the devices mentioned, the bougie is the airway practitioner's best friend. Using the BURP technique, if not contraindicated, together with the bougie will enable you to intubate many difficult patients with confidence. Remember, "If your patient cannot breathe, nothing else matters. PMID:18251307

  9. Invasive versus noninvasive measurement of allergic and cholinergic airway responsiveness in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hohlfeld Jens M

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study seeks to compare the ability of repeatable invasive and noninvasive lung function methods to assess allergen-specific and cholinergic airway responsiveness (AR in intact, spontaneously breathing BALB/c mice. Methods Using noninvasive head-out body plethysmography and the decrease in tidal midexpiratory flow (EF50, we determined early AR (EAR to inhaled Aspergillus fumigatus antigens in conscious mice. These measurements were paralleled by invasive determination of pulmonary conductance (GL, dynamic compliance (Cdyn and EF50 in another group of anesthetized, orotracheally intubated mice. Results With both methods, allergic mice, sensitized and boosted with A. fumigatus, elicited allergen-specific EAR to A. fumigatus (p Conclusion We conclude that invasive and noninvasive pulmonary function tests are capable of detecting both allergen-specific and cholinergic AR in intact, allergic mice. The invasive determination of GL and Cdyn is superior in sensitivity, whereas the noninvasive EF50 method is particularly appropriate for quick and repeatable screening of respiratory function in large numbers of conscious mice.

  10. Differential Inflammatory Response to Inhaled Lipopolysaccharide Targeted Either to the Airways or the Alveoli in Man

    OpenAIRE

    Möller, Winfried; Heimbeck, Irene; Hofer, Thomas P J; Khadem Saba, Gülnaz; Neiswirth, Margot; Frankenberger, Marion; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Löms

    2012-01-01

    Endotoxin (Lipopolysaccharide, LPS) is a potent inducer of inflammation and there is various LPS contamination in the environment, being a trigger of lung diseases and exacerbation. The objective of this study was to assess the time course of inflammation and the sensitivities of the airways and alveoli to targeted LPS inhalation in order to understand the role of LPS challenge in airway disease. In healthy volunteers without any bronchial hyperresponsiveness we targeted sequentially 1, 5 and...

  11. The Pentax airway scope versus the Macintosh laryngoscope: Comparison of hemodynamic responses and concentrations of plasma norepinephrine to tracheal intubation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Heeseung

    2013-01-01

    Background The Pentax Airway Scope (AWS) is a video laryngoscope designed to facilitate tracheal intubation with a high-resolution image. The Pentax AWS has been reported to cause less hemodynamic stress than the Macintosh laryngoscope. The aims of this study are to investigate the differences in hemodynamic responses and norepinephrine concentrations to tracheal intubation between procedures using he Pentax AWS and the Macintosh laryngoscope. Methods Forty patients (American Society of Anest...

  12. Nonadrenergic, noncholinergic responses stabilize smooth muscle tone, with and without parasympathetic activation, in guinea-pig isolated airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindén, A; Löfdahl, C G; Ullman, A; Skoogh, B E

    1993-03-01

    In guinea-pig isolated airways, nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) neural responses converge towards a similar level of smooth muscle tone, via a contraction when the tone is low prior to stimulation, and via a relaxation when the tone is high prior to stimulation. We wanted to assess the effect of simultaneous parasympathetic activation on these converging NANC responses, with and without the addition of sympathetic activation. In guinea-pig isolated airways, the spontaneous airway tone was initially abolished by indomethacin (10 microM). In one series, adrenergic depletion by guanethidine (10 microM) was then established, with and without cholinergic blockade by atropine (1 microM). In another series, either cholinergic blockade by atropine (1 microM) or no blockade was utilized. Responses to electrical field stimulation (1,200 mA, 0.5 ms, 3 Hz for 240 s) were studied with no induced tone, at a moderate (0.3 microM) and at a near-maximum (6 microM), histamine-induced tone. The mean level of the tonus equilibrium (% of maximum tone) was higher with the simultaneous NANC and parasympathetic activation than with NANC activation alone (75% compared with 44%, in the main bronchus, n = 8). The level of the tonus equilibrium was also higher with the simultaneous NANC, sympathetic and parasympathetic activation than with NANC and sympathetic activation only (49% compared with 21%, in the main bronchus, n = 8). The pattern was similar in the distal trachea. In conclusion, NANC neural responses can stabilize smooth muscle tone, and this stabilizing effect can be modulated by both parasympathetic and sympathetic activation, in guinea-pig isolated airways. PMID:8472834

  13. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by cAMP response element and mRNA stability in a human airway epithelial cell line exposed to zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. Cyclooxygenase 2-derived eicosanoids are important modulators of airway inflammation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional...

  14. Behavioral inhibition in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta is related to the airways response, but not immune measures, commonly associated with asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Chun

    Full Text Available Behavioral inhibition reflects a disposition to react warily to novel situations, and has been associated with atopic diseases such as asthma. Retrospective work established the relationship between behavioral inhibition in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta and airway hyperresponsiveness, but not atopy, and the suggestion was made that behavioral inhibition might index components of asthma that are not immune-related. In the present study, we prospectively examined the relationship between behavioral inhibition and airway hyperresponsiveness, and whether hormonal and immune measures often associated with asthma were associated with behavioral inhibition and/or airway hyperresponsiveness. In a sample of 49 yearling rhesus monkeys (mean=1.25 years, n=24 behaviorally inhibited animals, we measured in vitro cytokine levels (IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, IFN-γ in response to stimulation, as well as peripheral blood cell percentages, cortisol levels, and percentage of regulatory T-cells (CD3+CD4+CD25+FOXP3+. Airway reactivity was assessed using an inhaled methacholine challenge. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and the proportion of immune cells was determined. Behaviorally inhibited monkeys had airway hyperresponsiveness as indicated by the methacholine challenge (p=0.031, confirming our earlier retrospective result. Airway hyperresponsiveness was also associated with lower lymphocyte percentages in lavage fluid and marginally lower plasma cortisol concentrations. However, none of the tested measures was significantly related to both behavioral inhibition and airway hyperresponsiveness, and so could not mediate their relationship. Airway hyperresponsiveness is common to atopic and non-atopic asthma and behavioral inhibition has been related to altered autonomic activity in other studies. Our results suggest that behavioral inhibition might index an autonomically mediated reactive airway phenotype, and that a variety of stimuli (including inflammation within

  15. Acute response of airway muscle to extreme temperature includes disruption of actin-myosin interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrda, Peter; Tazzeo, Tracy; DoHarris, Lindsay; Nilius, Berndt; Roman, Horia Nicolae; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Aziz, Tariq; Lukic, Dusan; Janssen, Luke J

    2011-02-01

    Despite the emerging use of bronchial thermoplasty in asthma therapy, the response of airway smooth muscle (ASM) to extreme temperatures is unknown. We investigated the immediate effects of exposing ASM to supraphysiologic temperatures. Isometric contractions were studied in bovine ASM before and after exposure to various thermal loads and/or pharmacologic interventions. Actin-myosin interactions were investigated using a standard in vitro motility assay. We found steep thermal sensitivity for isometric contractions evoked by acetylcholine, with threshold and complete inhibition at less than 50°C and greater than 55°C, respectively. Contractile responses to serotonin or KCl were similarly affected, whereas isometric relaxations evoked by the nitric oxide donor S-nitrosyl-N-acetylpenicillamine or the β-agonist isoproterenol were unaffected. This thermal sensitivity developed within 15 minutes, but did not evolve further over the course of several days (such a rapid time-course rules out heat shock proteins, apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis). Although heat-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRPV2) channels and the calmodulin-dependent (Cam) kinase-II-induced inactivation of myosin light chain kinase are both acutely thermally sensitive, with a temperature producing half-maximal effect (T(1/2)) of 52.5°C, the phenomenon we describe was not prevented by blockers of TRPV2 channels (e.g., ruthenium red, gadolinium, zero-Ca(2+) or zero-Na(+)/zero-Ca(2+) media, and cromakalim) or of Cam kinase-II (e.g., W7, trifluoperazine, and KN-93). However, direct measurements of actin-myosin interactions showed the same steep thermal profile. The functional changes preceded any histologic evidence of necrosis or apoptosis. We conclude that extreme temperatures (such as those used in bronchial thermoplasty) directly disrupt actin-myosin interactions, likely through a denaturation of the motor protein, leading to an immediate loss of ASM cell function. PMID:20395634

  16. Curcumin regulates airway epithelial cell cytokine responses to the pollutant cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennolds, Jessica; Malireddy, Smitha; Hassan, Fatemat; Tridandapani, Susheela; Parinandi, Narasimham [Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Boyaka, Prosper N. [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle, E-mail: Estelle.boyaka@osumc.edu [Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium induces secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 by two distinct pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium increases NAPDH oxidase activity leading to Erk activation and IL-8 secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Curcumin prevents cadmium-induced secretion of both IL-6 and IL-8 by airway cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Curcumin could be use to suppress lung inflammation due to cadmium inhalation. -- Abstract: Cadmium is a toxic metal present in the environment and its inhalation can lead to pulmonary disease such as lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These lung diseases are characterized by chronic inflammation. Here we show that exposure of human airway epithelial cells to cadmium promotes a polarized apical secretion of IL-6 and IL-8, two pivotal pro-inflammatory cytokines known to play an important role in pulmonary inflammation. We also determined that two distinct pathways controlled secretion of these proinflammatory cytokines by human airway epithelial cells as cadmium-induced IL-6 secretion occurs via an NF-{kappa}B dependent pathway, whereas IL-8 secretion involves the Erk1/2 signaling pathway. Interestingly, the natural antioxidant curcumin could prevent both cadmium-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by human airway epithelial cells. In conclusion, curcumin could be used to prevent airway inflammation due to cadmium inhalation.

  17. Curcumin regulates airway epithelial cell cytokine responses to the pollutant cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Cadmium induces secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 by two distinct pathways. ► Cadmium increases NAPDH oxidase activity leading to Erk activation and IL-8 secretion. ► Curcumin prevents cadmium-induced secretion of both IL-6 and IL-8 by airway cells. ► Curcumin could be use to suppress lung inflammation due to cadmium inhalation. -- Abstract: Cadmium is a toxic metal present in the environment and its inhalation can lead to pulmonary disease such as lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These lung diseases are characterized by chronic inflammation. Here we show that exposure of human airway epithelial cells to cadmium promotes a polarized apical secretion of IL-6 and IL-8, two pivotal pro-inflammatory cytokines known to play an important role in pulmonary inflammation. We also determined that two distinct pathways controlled secretion of these proinflammatory cytokines by human airway epithelial cells as cadmium-induced IL-6 secretion occurs via an NF-κB dependent pathway, whereas IL-8 secretion involves the Erk1/2 signaling pathway. Interestingly, the natural antioxidant curcumin could prevent both cadmium-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by human airway epithelial cells. In conclusion, curcumin could be used to prevent airway inflammation due to cadmium inhalation.

  18. Using optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging in the evaluation of airway dynamics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabari, Margit V.; Kelly, Vanessa J.; Applegate, Matthew B.; Chee, Chunmin; Tan, Khay M.; Hariri, Lida P.; Harris, R. Scott; Winkler, Tilo; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease resulting in periodic attacks of coughing and wheezing due to temporarily constricted and clogged airways. The pathophysiology of asthma and the process of airway narrowing are not completely understood. Appropriate in vivo imaging modality with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to dynamically assess the behavior of airways is missing. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables real-time evaluation of the airways during dynamic and static breathing maneuvers. Our aim was to visualize the structure and function of airways in healthy and Methacholine (MCh) challenged lung. Sheep (n=3) were anesthetized, mechanically ventilated and imaged with OCT in 4 dependent and 4 independent airways both pre- and post-MCh administration. The OCT system employed a 2.4 Fr (0.8 mm diameter) catheter and acquired circumferential cross-sectional images in excess of 100 frames per second during dynamic tidal breathing, 20 second static breath-holds at end-inspiration and expiration pressure, and in a response to a single deep inhalation. Markedly different airway behavior was found in dependent versus non-dependent airway segments before and after MCh injection. OCT is a non-ionizing light-based imaging modality, which may provide valuable insight into the complex dynamic behavior of airway structure and function in the normal and asthmatic lung.

  19. Relationship between airway pathophysiology and airway inflammation in older asthmatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, Celeste M; Gibson, Peter G; Pretto, Jeffrey J;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Asthma-related morbidity is greater in older compared with younger asthmatics. Airway closure is also greater in older asthmatics, an observation that may be explained by differences in airway inflammation. We hypothesized that in older adult patients with asthma......, neutrophil airway inflammation increases airway closure during bronchoconstriction, while eosinophil airway inflammation increases airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). METHODS: Asthmatic subjects (n = 26), aged ≥55 years (68% female), were studied, and AHR to 4.5% saline challenge was measured by the response......-dose ratio (%fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 )/mg saline). Airway closure was assessed during bronchoconstriction percent change in forced vital capacity (FVC)/percent change in FEV1 (i.e. Closing Index). Airway inflammation was assessed by induced sputum and exhaled nitric oxide (eNO). RESULTS...

  20. A-kinase-anchoring proteins coordinate inflammatory responses to cigarette smoke in airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, Wilfred J; Heijink, Irene H; Holtzer, Laura J; Skroblin, Philipp; Klussmann, Enno; Halayko, Andrew J; Timens, Wim; Maarsingh, Harm; Schmidt, Martina

    2015-04-15

    β2-Agonist inhibitors can relieve chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) symptoms by stimulating cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling. A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) compartmentalize cAMP signaling by establishing protein complexes. We previously reported that the β2-agonist fenoterol, direct activation of protein kinase A (PKA), and exchange factor directly activated by cAMP decrease cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced release of neutrophil attractant interleukin-8 (IL-8) from human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. In the present study, we tested the role of AKAPs in CSE-induced IL-8 release from ASM cells and assessed the effect of CSE on the expression levels of different AKAPs. We also studied mRNA and protein expression of AKAPs in lung tissue from patients with COPD. Our data show that CSE exposure of ASM cells decreases AKAP5 and AKAP12, both capable of interacting with β2-adrenoceptors. In lung tissue of patients with COPD, mRNA levels of AKAP5 and AKAP12 were decreased compared with lung tissue from controls. Using immunohistochemistry, we detected less AKAP5 protein in ASM of patients with COPD Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage II compared with control subjects. St-Ht31, which disrupts AKAP-PKA interactions, augmented CSE-induced IL-8 release from ASM cells and diminished its suppression by fenoterol, an effect mediated by disturbed ERK signaling. The modulatory role of AKAP-PKA interactions in the anti-inflammatory effects of fenoterol in ASM cells and the decrease in expression of AKAP5 and AKAP12 in response to cigarette smoke and in lungs of patients with COPD suggest that cigarette smoke-induced changes in AKAP5 and AKAP12 in patients with COPD may affect efficacy of pharmacotherapy. PMID:25637608

  1. Noninvasive assessment of pulmonary vascular and airway response to physiologic stimuli with high-resolution CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on reactivity of pulmonary vasculature under various stimuli studied invasively with perfused isolated lung models. We used high- resolution CT (HRCT) to demonstrate noninvasively the effects of hypoxia and volume variation on pulmonary circulation and airways. Five anesthetized and ventilated pigs were examined with HRCT (10 contiguous 2-mm sections through the lower lobes) during varying oxygen tensions and intravascular volume states. Blood pressures, pulmonary artery pressures, blood gas levels, and cardiac indexes (thermodilution) were measured. HRCT scans were digitized, and vessel and airway areas were determined with use of a computer edging process

  2. Airway hyperresponsiveness; smooth muscle as the principal actor [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie Lauzon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR is a defining characteristic of asthma that refers to the capacity of the airways to undergo exaggerated narrowing in response to stimuli that do not result in comparable degrees of airway narrowing in healthy subjects. Airway smooth muscle (ASM contraction mediates airway narrowing, but it remains uncertain as to whether the smooth muscle is intrinsically altered in asthmatic subjects or is responding abnormally as a result of the milieu in which it sits. ASM in the trachea or major bronchi does not differ in its contractile characteristics in asthmatics, but the more pertinent peripheral airways await complete exploration. The mass of ASM is increased in many but not all asthmatics and therefore cannot be a unifying hypothesis for AHR, although when increased in mass it may contribute to AHR. The inability of a deep breath to reverse or prevent bronchial narrowing in asthma may reflect an intrinsic difference in the mechanisms that lead to softening of contracted ASM when subjected to stretch. Cytokines such as interleukin-13 and tumor necrosis factor-α promote a more contractile ASM phenotype. The composition and increased stiffness of the matrix in which ASM is embedded promotes a more proliferative and pro-inflammatory ASM phenotype, but the expected dedifferentiation and loss of contractility have not been shown. Airway epithelium may drive ASM proliferation and/or molecular remodeling in ways that may lead to AHR. In conclusion, AHR is likely multifactorial in origin, reflecting the plasticity of ASM properties in the inflammatory environment of the asthmatic airway.

  3. Effects of Corni fructus on ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Seung-Hyung; Kim Bok-Kyu; Lee Young-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease that is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to allergens, airway oedema, increased mucus secretion, excess production of T helper-2 (Th2) cytokines, and eosinophil accumulation in the lungs. Corni fructus (CF) is a fruit of Cornus officinalis Sieb. Et. Zucc. (Cornaceae) and has been used in traditional Korean medicine as an anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and diuretic agent. To investigate the anti-asthmati...

  4. A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL OF COMPARISON OF PRESSOR RESPONSE DURING AND AFTER TRACHIAL EXTUBATION AND LMA (LARYNGEAL MASK AIRWAY REMOVAL IN CONTROLLED HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Rao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : The primary goal of an anaesthesiologist is to maintain a patent airway during general anaesthesia. Endotracheal intubation is considered as gold standard for securing an unobstructed airway. Endotracheal intubation and extubation cause reflex cardiovascul ar responses due to mechanical stimulation of the upper respiratory tract. Several methods have been used for attenuating these cardiovascular responses. Each method or drug that is used for attenuating these pressor responses has its own associated sequel ae or disadvantages. Most certain method of avoiding adrenergic responses would be to avoid both laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. Use of laryngeal mask airway has also shown lesser haemodynamic response as no laryngoscopy is required for its place ment. AIM : To compare the haemodynamic responses associated with laryngeal mask airway removal and endotracheal extubation in controlled hypertensive patients undergoing elective surgical procedures. DESIGN : A prospective randomized comparative study. METH ODS : The study was conducted in eighty - controlled hypertensive patients in the age group 35 - 65 years belongs to ASA grade 1&2 scheduled for elective surgical procedure. Patients were allocated in a randomized manner by the envelop method, into two groups o ne undergoing endotracheal tube intubation (Group T and other group undergoing laryngeal mask airway insertion (Group L. At the end of the procedure. Endotracheal extubation and laryngeal mask airway removal was carried out when patient was completely co nscious and responded to verbal commands. Pulse rate and blood pressure were recorded for the study at the following intervals; A. Pre induction., B. Just before extubation or laryngeal mask removal (Baseline value, C. 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10 minutes after e xtubation., Rate pressure product and mean arterial pressure at those intervals were calculated. RESULTS : After airway instrumentation, in patients of group T, mean

  5. TLR-2 is involved in airway epithelial cell response to air pollution particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary cultures of normal human airway epithelial cells (NHBE) respond to ambient air pollution particulate matter (PM) by increased production of the cytokine IL-8, and the induction of several oxidant stress response genes. Components of ambient air PM responsible for stimulating epithelial cells have not been conclusively identified, although metal contaminants, benzo[a]pyrene and biological matter have been implicated. Stimulation of IL-8 release from NHBE with coarse (PM2.5-10), fine (PM2.5), and UF particle fractions has shown that the coarse particle fraction has the greatest effect on the epithelial cells as well as alveolar macrophages (AM). Since this fraction concentrates fugitive dusts and particle-associated microbial matter, it was hypothesized that NHBE may recognize PM through microbial pattern recognition receptors TLR2 and TLR4, as has been previously shown with AM. NHBE were shown to release IL-8 when exposed to a Gram-positive environmental isolate of Staphylococcus lentus, and lower levels when exposed to Gram-negative Pseudomonas spp. Comparison of TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA expression in NHBE and AM showed that NHBE express similar levels of TLR2 mRNA as the AM, but expressed very low levels of TLR4. When NHBE were stimulated with PM2.5-10, PM2.5, and UF PM, in the presence or absence of inhibitors of TLR2 and TLR4 activation, a blocking antibody to TLR2 inhibited production of IL-8, while TLR4 antagonist E5531 or the LPS inhibitor Polymixin B had no effect. Furthermore, effects on expression of TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA, as well as the stress protein HSP70 was assessed in NHBE exposed to PM. TLR4 expression was increased in these cells while TLR2 mRNA levels were unchanged. Hsp70 was increased by PM2.5-10 > PM2.5 > UF PM suggesting the possibility of indirect activation of TLR pathway by this endogenous TLR2/4 agonist

  6. Changes in the response of guinea-pig airways in vivo and in vitro to cimetidine and propranolol during development.

    OpenAIRE

    Brink, C.; Douglas, J S; Duncan, P G

    1982-01-01

    1 Airway responses were examined in isolated tissues and in whole animal preparation of female albino guinea-pigs of known age. 2 Tone induced with acetylcholine in tracheal and bronchial tissues from young and old female guinea-pigs was not reduced by dimaprit or 4-methyl histamine even in tissues pretreated with mepyramine maleate. 3 Antagonism of H2-receptors with cimetidine did not affect the potency or efficacy of histamine in tracheal tissues from animals of either age group. 4 After ci...

  7. Effects of Corni fructus on ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Seung-Hyung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease that is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR to allergens, airway oedema, increased mucus secretion, excess production of T helper-2 (Th2 cytokines, and eosinophil accumulation in the lungs. Corni fructus (CF is a fruit of Cornus officinalis Sieb. Et. Zucc. (Cornaceae and has been used in traditional Korean medicine as an anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and diuretic agent. To investigate the anti-asthmatic effects of CF and their underlying mechanism, we examined the influence of CF on the development of pulmonary eosinophilic inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma. Methods In this study, BALB/c mice were systemically sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA by intraperitoneal (i.p., intratracheal (i.t. injections and intranasal (i.n. inhalation of OVA. We investigated the effect of CF on airway hyperresponsiveness, pulmonary eosinophilic infiltration, various immune cell phenotypes, Th2 cytokine production, and OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE production. Results The CF-treated groups showed suppressed eosinophil infiltration, allergic airway inflammation, and AHR via reduced production of interleuin (IL -5, IL-13, and OVA-specific IgE. Conclusions Our data suggest that the therapeutic effects of CF in asthma are mediated by reduced production of Th2 cytokines (IL-5, eotaxin, and OVA-specific IgE and reduced eosinophil infiltration.

  8. Basophil-associated OX40 ligand participates in the initiation of Th2 responses during airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Caixia; Lin, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Yanjie; Zhong, Wenwei; Yuan, Yufan; Zhou, Tong; Liu, Junling; Xia, Zhenwei

    2015-05-15

    Asthma is characterized by increased airway submucosal infiltration of T helper (Th) cells and myeloid cells that co-conspire to sustain a chronic inflammation. While recent studies have demonstrated that the myeloid basophils promote Th2 cells in response to various types of allergens, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we found for the first time that in a mouse model of allergic asthma basophils highly expressed OX40 ligand (OX40L) after activation. Interestingly, blockade of OX40-OX40L interaction suppressed basophils-primed Th2 cell differentiation in vitro and ameliorated ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic eosinophilic inflammation mediated by Th2 activation. In accordance, the adoptive transfer of basophils derived from mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN) of OVA-immunized mice triggered a robust Th2 response and eosinophilic inflammation in wild-type mice but largely muted in OX40(-/-) mice and mice receiving OX40L-blocked basophils. Taken together, our results reveal a critical role of OX40L presented by the activated basophils to initiate Th2 responses in an allergic asthma model, implicating OX40-OX40L signaling as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of allergic airway inflammation. PMID:25839234

  9. Basophil-associated OX40 Ligand Participates in the Initiation of Th2 Responses during Airway Inflammation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Caixia; Lin, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Yanjie; Zhong, Wenwei; Yuan, Yufan; Zhou, Tong; Liu, Junling; Xia, Zhenwei

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by increased airway submucosal infiltration of T helper (Th) cells and myeloid cells that co-conspire to sustain a chronic inflammation. While recent studies have demonstrated that the myeloid basophils promote Th2 cells in response to various types of allergens, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we found for the first time that in a mouse model of allergic asthma basophils highly expressed OX40 ligand (OX40L) after activation. Interestingly, blockade of OX40-OX40L interaction suppressed basophils-primed Th2 cell differentiation in vitro and ameliorated ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic eosinophilic inflammation mediated by Th2 activation. In accordance, the adoptive transfer of basophils derived from mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN) of OVA-immunized mice triggered a robust Th2 response and eosinophilic inflammation in wild-type mice but largely muted in OX40−/− mice and mice receiving OX40L-blocked basophils. Taken together, our results reveal a critical role of OX40L presented by the activated basophils to initiate Th2 responses in an allergic asthma model, implicating OX40-OX40L signaling as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of allergic airway inflammation. PMID:25839234

  10. Training modifies the innate immune response both in the airways and in blood in horses

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Frellstedt; Philippe Gosset; Christophe Jean Desmet; Ingrid Waldschmidt

    2013-01-01

    Lower airway diseases are common problems in sports and racing horses. In humans, exercise has been associated with upper respiratory tract infections due to down-regulated expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), costimulatory and antigen-presenting molecules on monocytes. The objectives of this study were 1) to examine the expression of TLRs in equine bronchial epithelial cells (EBEC) and blood monocytes in untrained and trained horses; 2) to stimulate EBEC and monocytes in vitro with TLR ...

  11. Host Defense and the Airway Epithelium: Frontline Responses That Protect against Bacterial Invasion and Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas A. Eisele; Anderson, Deborah M.

    2011-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells are the first line of defense against invading microbes, and they protect themselves through the production of carbohydrate and protein matrices concentrated with antimicrobial products. In addition, they act as sentinels, expressing pattern recognition receptors that become activated upon sensing bacterial products and stimulate downstream recruitment and activation of immune cells which clear invading microbes. Bacterial pathogens that successfully colonize the lungs...

  12. Mechanical effects of obesity on airway responsiveness in otherwise healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchio, Roberto; Gobbi, Alessandro; Gulotta, Carlo; Dellacà, Raffaele; Tinivella, Marco; Hyatt, Robert E; Brusasco, Vito; Pellegrino, Riccardo

    2009-08-01

    We investigated whether obesity is associated with airway hyperresponsiveness in otherwise healthy humans and, if so, whether this correlates with a restrictive lung function pattern or a decreased number of sighs at rest and/or during walking. Lung function was studied before and after inhaling methacholine (MCh) in 41 healthy subjects with body mass index ranging from 20 to 56. Breathing pattern was assessed during a 60-min rest period and a 30-min walk. The dose of MCh that produced a 50% decrease in the maximum expiratory flow measured in a body plethysmograph (PD50MCh) was inversely correlated with body mass index (r2=0.32, Preactance (r2=0.40, P<0.001) measured at 5 Hz. PD50MCh was also positively correlated with functional residual capacity (r2=0.56, P<0.001) and total lung capacity (r2=0.59, P<0.001) in men, but not in women. Neither PD50MCh nor body mass index correlated with number of sighs, average tidal volume, ventilation, or breathing frequency. In this study, airway hyperresponsiveness was significantly associated with obesity in otherwise healthy subjects. In obese men, but not in women, airway hyperresponsiveness was associated with the decreases in lung volumes. PMID:19541741

  13. Airway responsiveness to leukotriene C4 (LTC4), leukotriene E4 (LTE4) and histamine in aspirin-sensitive asthmatic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, P E; Schmitz-Schumann, M; Spur, B W; Lee, T H

    1993-11-01

    We wanted to determine whether the airway response to inhaled leukotriene C4 (LTC4) is similar to inhaled leukotriene E4 (LTE4) in aspirin-sensitive asthma and, therefore, determined airway responsiveness to histamine, LTC4 and LTE4 in seven aspirin-sensitive subjects and 13 control asthmatic subjects, who were tolerant of aspirin. The concentration of inhaled lysine-aspirin which produced a 15% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (PC15) was determined in aspirin-sensitive asthmatic subjects. The dose of histamine, LTC4 and LTE4 which produced a 35% fall in specific airways conductance (PD35sGaw) was determined by linear interpolation from the log dose response curve. There was no correlation between the PC15 for lysine-aspirin and the airway reactivity to inhaled LTC4 or LTE4. There was no difference in airway response to histamine and LTC4 between any of the groups of asthmatic subjects. There was a rank order of potency LTC4 > LTE4 > histamine in both groups, with LTC4 approximately 1,000 fold more potent than histamine in both groups. Aspirin-sensitive asthmatic subjects were significantly more responsive to LTE4 (p = 0.02) than aspirin-tolerant asthmatic subjects. The relative responsiveness of LTE4 to histamine (PD35 histamine/PD35 LTE4) was significantly greater in aspirin-sensitive asthmatic subjects compared to aspirin-tolerant asthmatic subjects (p = 0.05). There was no difference in relative responsiveness of LTC4 to histamine between aspirin-sensitive or aspirin-tolerant asthmatic subjects. We conclude that the airways of aspirin-sensitive asthmatic subjects demonstrate a selective hyperresponsiveness to LTE4, which is not observed for LTC4. PMID:8112440

  14. Activation of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in airway smooth muscle: a potential pathway that modulates bronchial hyper-responsiveness in asthma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panettieri Reynold A

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cellular and molecular mechanisms that are involved in airway hyper-responsiveness are unclear. Current studies suggest that tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, a cytokine that is produced in considerable quantities in asthmatic airways, may potentially be involved in the development of bronchial hyper-responsiveness by directly altering the contractile properties of the airway smooth muscle (ASM. The underlying mechanisms are not known, but growing evidence now suggests that most of the biologic effects of TNF-α on ASM are mediated by the p55 receptor or tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR1. In addition, activation of TNFR1 coupled to the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF2-nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB pathway alters calcium homeostasis in ASM, which appears to be a new potential mechanism underlying ASM hyper-responsiveness.

  15. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond b...

  16. Comparison of hemodynamic and metabolic stress responses caused by endotracheal tube and Proseal laryngeal mask airway in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan Güleç

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We aimed to compare hemodynamic and endocrine alterations caused by stress response due to Proseal laryngeal mask airway and endotracheal tube usage in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods: Sixty-three ASA I-II patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included in the study. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups of endotracheal tube and Proseal laryngeal mask airway. Standard general anaesthesia was performed in both groups with the same drugs in induction and maintenance of anaesthesia. After anaesthesia induction and 20 minutes after CO 2 insufflations, venous blood samples were obtained for measuring adrenalin, noradrenalin, dopamine and cortisol levels. Hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were recorded at the 1 st , 5 th , 15 th , 30 th and 45 th minutes after the insertion of airway devices. Results: No statistically significant differences in age, body mass index, gender, ASA physical status, and operation time were found between the groups (p > 0.05. Changes in hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were not statistically significant when compared between and within groups (p > 0.05. Although no statistically significant differences were observed between and within groups when adrenalin, noradrenalin and dopamine values were compared, serum cortisol levels after CO 2 insufflation in PLMA group were significantly lower than the ETT group (p = 0.024. When serum cortisol levels were compared within groups, cortisol levels 20 minutes after CO 2 insufflation were significantly higher (46.1 (9.5-175.7 and 27.0 (8.3-119.4 in the ETT and PLMA groups, respectively than cortisol levels after anaesthesia induction (11.3 (2.8-92.5 and 16.6 (4.4-45.4 in the ETT and PLMA groups, respectively in both groups (p = 0.001. Conclusion: PLMA usage is a suitable, effective and safe alternative to ETT in laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients with lower metabolic stress.

  17. Low-frequency ionospheric sounding with Narrow Bipolar Event lightning radio emissions: regular variabilities and solar-X-ray responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Jacobson

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We present refinements of a method of ionospheric D-region sounding that makes opportunistic use of powerful (109–1011 W broadband lightning radio emissions in the low-frequency (LF; 30–300 kHz band. Such emissions are from "Narrow Bipolar Event" (NBE lightning, and they are characterized by a narrow (10-μs, simple emission waveform. These pulses can be used to perform time-delay reflectometry (or "sounding" of the D-region underside, at an effective LF radiated power exceeding by orders-of-magnitude that from man-made sounders. We use this opportunistic sounder to retrieve instantaneous LF ionospheric-reflection height whenever a suitable lightning radio pulse from a located NBE is recorded. We show how to correct for three sources of "regular" variability, namely solar zenith angle, radio-propagation range, and radio-propagation azimuth. The residual median magnitude of the noise in reflection height, after applying the regression corrections for the three regular variabilities, is on the order of 1 km. This noise level allows us to retrieve the D-region-reflector-height variation with solar X-ray flux density for intensity levels at and above an M-1 flare. The instantaneous time response is limited by the occurrence rate of NBEs, and the noise level in the height determination is typically in the range ±1 km.

  18. Non-linear response of ac conductivity in narrow YBCO film strips at the superconducting transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of higher harmonics of the ac voltage response in YBCO thin film strips under low amplitude and low frequency harmonic excitation, as a function of temperature, show a non linear response of the conductivity in the superconducting transition interval. The third and fifth harmonics of the local voltage as a function of T exhibit a peak near Tc and their amplitudes seem to be closely related to the T-derivative of the first harmonic. The peaks are linearly dependent on the current amplitude and do not depend on frequency. The observed data are partially interpreted in terms of ac current induced thermal modulation of the sample temperature added to strong thermally activated fluctuations in the transition region. The fit of the model to the data gives information of some sample properties such as zero temperature critical current, zero onset resistance and thermal boundary conductance

  19. Myeloid dendritic cells induce Th2 responses to inhaled antigen, leading to eosinophilic airway inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    LAMBRECHT, Bart; Veerman, M De; Coyle, Anthony; Gutierrez-Ramos, J C; Thielemans, Kris; Pauwels, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this study was to investigate whether dendritic cells (DCs) can induce sensitization to aeroallergen in a mouse model of allergic asthma. Ovalbumin-pulsed (OVA-pulsed) or unpulsed myeloid DCs that were injected into the airways of naive mice migrated into the mediastinal lymph nodes. When challenged 2 weeks later with an aerosol of OVA, activated CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, eosinophils, and neutrophils were recruited to the lungs of actively immunized mice. These CD4(+) ly...

  20. Directional secretory response of double stranded RNA-induced thymic stromal lymphopoetin (TSLP and CCL11/eotaxin-1 in human asthmatic airways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Nino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thymic stromal lymphoproetin (TSLP is a cytokine secreted by the airway epithelium in response to respiratory viruses and it is known to promote allergic Th2 responses in asthma. This study investigated whether virally-induced secretion of TSLP is directional in nature (apical vs. basolateral and/or if there are TSLP-mediated effects occurring at both sides of the bronchial epithelial barrier in the asthmatic state. METHODS: Primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC from control (n = 3 and asthmatic (n = 3 donors were differentiated into polarized respiratory tract epithelium under air-liquid interface (ALI conditions and treated apically with dsRNA (viral surrogate or TSLP. Sub-epithelial effects of TSLP were examined in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMC from normal (n = 3 and asthmatic (n = 3 donors. Clinical experiments examined nasal airway secretions obtained from asthmatic children during naturally occurring rhinovirus-induced exacerbations (n = 20 vs. non-asthmatic uninfected controls (n = 20. Protein levels of TSLP, CCL11/eotaxin-1, CCL17/TARC, CCL22/MDC, TNF-α and CXCL8 were determined with a multiplex magnetic bead assay. RESULTS: Our data demonstrate that: 1 Asthmatic HBEC exhibit an exaggerated apical, but not basal, secretion of TSLP after dsRNA exposure; 2 TSLP exposure induces unidirectional (apical secretion of CCL11/eotaxin-1 in asthmatic HBEC and enhanced CCL11/eotaxin-1 secretion in asthmatic HASMC; 3 Rhinovirus-induced asthma exacerbations in children are associated with in vivo airway secretion of TSLP and CCL11/eotaxin-1. CONCLUSIONS: There are virally-induced TSLP-driven secretory immune responses at both sides of the bronchial epithelial barrier characterized by enhanced CCL11/eotaxin-1 secretion in asthmatic airways. These results suggest a new model of TSLP-mediated eosinophilic responses in the asthmatic airway during viral-induced exacerbations.

  1. Relationship between airway responsiveness to mannitol and to methacholine and markers of airway inflammation, peak flow variability and quality of life in asthma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, C.; Brannan, J.D.; Anderson, S.D.;

    2008-01-01

    -three adult non-smoking asthmatics (28 females, 18-56 years) who were not taking inhaled steroids were challenged with mannitol (up to 635 mg) and methacholine (up to 8 mu mol). Induced sputum eosinophils, exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), peak flow variation and clinical severity of asthma according to the Global...... AHR to mannitol, and in 88% of asthma patients with AHR to methacholine, the eNO level was > 20 p.p.b. Sputum% eosinophils >1% was measured in 70% of asthma patients with AHR to mannitol and in 77% of asthma patients with AHR to methacholine. In asthma patients without AHR, 15% had an eNO level >20p......Background Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to stimuli that cause bronchial smooth muscle (BSM) contraction indirectly through the release of endogenous mediators is thought to reflect air-way inflammation more closely compared with AHR measured by stimuli that act directly on BSM. Methods Fifty...

  2. Eosinophilic airway inflammation in COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Shironjit; Brightling, Christopher E.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a common condition and a major cause of mortality. COPD is characterized by irreversible airflow obstruction. The physiological abnormalities observed in COPD are due to a combination of emphysema and obliteration of the small airways in association with airway inflammation. The predominant cells involved in this inflammatory response are CD8+ lymphocytes, neutrophils, and macrophages. Although eosinophilic airway inflammation is usually considered a f...

  3. S-nitrosothiols regulate cell-surface pH buffering by airway epithelial cells during the human immune response to rhinovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Silvia; Doherty, Joseph; Zaman, Khalequz; Gainov, Iain; Turner, Ronald; Vaughan, John; Hunt, John F; Márquez, Javier; Gaston, Benjamin

    2006-05-01

    Human rhinovirus infection is a common trigger for asthma exacerbations. Asthma exacerbations and rhinovirus infections are both associated with markedly decreased pH and ammonium levels in exhaled breath condensates. This observation is thought to be related, in part, to decreased activity of airway epithelial glutaminase. We studied whether direct rhinovirus infection and/or the host immune response to the infection decreased airway epithelial cell surface pH in vitro. Interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, but not direct rhinovirus infection, decreased pH, an effect partly associated with decreased ammonium concentrations. This effect was 1) prevented by nitric oxide synthase inhibition; 2) independent of cyclic GMP; 3) associated with an increase in endogenous airway epithelial cell S-nitrosothiol concentration; 4) mimicked by the exogenous S-nitrosothiol, S-nitroso-N-acetyl cysteine; and 5) independent of glutaminase expression and activity. We then confirmed that decreased epithelial pH inhibits human rhinovirus replication in airway epithelial cells. These data suggest that a nitric oxide synthase-dependent host response to viral infection mediated by S-nitrosothiols, rather than direct infection itself, plays a role in decreased airway surface pH during human rhinovirus infection. This host immune response may serve to protect the lower airways from direct infection in the normal host. In patients with asthma, however, this fall in pH could be associated with the increased mucus production, augmented inflammatory cell degranulation, bronchoconstriction, and cough characteristic of an asthma exacerbation. PMID:16603595

  4. Role of Inhaled Steroids in Vascular Airway Remodelling in Asthma and COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Chetta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In chronic obstructive airway diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, changes in bronchial microvasculature are present in response to inflammatory stimuli. Vascular changes may significantly contribute to airway wall remodelling. Angiogenesis and vascular leakage are prevalent in asthma, while vasodilation and vascular leakage dominate in COPD. An endothelial dysfunction may be present both in asthma and in COPD. Vascular changes may occur simultaneously with the thickening of the airway wall and the narrowing of the bronchial lumen. Consequently, pharmacological control of bronchial vascular remodelling may be crucial for symptom control in asthma and COPD. In asthmatic airways, inhaled steroids can downregulate vascular remodelling by acting on proangiogenic factors. Additionally, studies on combination therapy with long-acting β2-agonists and inhaled steroids have provided evidence of a possible synergistic action on components of vascular remodelling in asthma. In COPD, there is less experimental evidence on the effect of inhaled steroids on airway microvascular changes. Importantly, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, the most specific growth factor for vascular endothelium, is crucially involved in the pathophysiology of airway vascular remodelling, both in asthma and COPD. The inhibition of VEGF and its receptor may be useful in the treatment of the vascular changes in the airway wall.

  5. IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-13 modulate responsiveness of human airway smooth muscle cells to IL-13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michoud Marie-Claire

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IL-13 is a critical mediator of allergic asthma and associated airway hyperresponsiveness. IL-13 acts through a receptor complex comprised of IL-13Rα1 and IL-4Rα subunits with subsequent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6. The IL-13Rα2 receptor may act as a decoy receptor. In human airway smooth muscle (HASM cells, IL-13 enhances cellular proliferation, calcium responses to agonists and induces eotaxin production. We investigated the effects of pre-treatment with IL-4, IL-13 and IFN-γ on the responses of HASM cells to IL-13. Methods Cultured HASM were examined for expression of IL-13 receptor subunits using polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Effects of cytokine pre-treatment on IL-13-induced cell responses were assessed by looking at STAT6 phosphorylation using Western blot, eotaxin secretion and calcium responses to histamine. Results IL-13Rα1, IL-4Rα and IL-13Rα2 subunits were expressed on HASM cells. IL-13 induced phosphorylation of STAT6 which reached a maximum by 30 minutes. Pre-treatment with IL-4, IL-13 and, to a lesser degree, IFN-γ reduced peak STAT6 phosphorylation in response to IL-13. IL-13, but not IFN-γ, pre-treatment abrogated IL-13-induced eotaxin secretion. Pre-treatment with IL-4 or IL-13 abrogated IL-13-induced augmentation of the calcium transient evoked by histamine. Cytokine pre-treatment did not affect expression of IL-13Rα1 and IL-4Rα but increased expression of IL-13Rα2. An anti-IL-13Rα2 neutralizing antibody did not prevent the cytokine pre-treatment effects on STAT6 phosphorylation. Cytokine pre-treatment increased SOCS-1, but not SOCS-3, mRNA expression which was not associated with significant increases in protein expression. Conclusion Pre-treatment with IL-4 and IL-13, but not IFN-γ, induced desensitization of the HASM cells to IL-13 as measured by eotaxin secretion and calcium transients to histamine

  6. Airway responses and inflammation in subjects with asthma after four days of repeated high-single-dose allergen challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulze Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both standard and low-dose allergen provocations are an established tool in asthma research to improve our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanism of allergic asthma. However, clinical symptoms are less likely to be induced. Therefore, we designed a protocol for repetitive high-dose bronchial allergen challenges to generate clinical symptoms and airway inflammation. Methods A total of 27 patients aged 18 to 40 years with positive skin-prick tests and mild asthma underwent repetitive high-dose allergen challenges with household dust mites for four consecutive days. Pulmonary function and exhaled NO were measured at every visit. Induced sputum was analysed before and after the allergen challenges for cell counts, ECP, IL-5, INF-γ, IL-8, and the transcription factor Foxp3. Results We found a significant decrease in pulmonary function, an increased use of salbutamol and the development of a late asthmatic response and bronchial hyperresponsiveness, as well as a significant induction of eNO, eosinophils, and Th-2 cytokines. Repeated provocation was feasible in the majority of patients. Two subjects had severe adverse events requiring prednisolone to cope with nocturnal asthma symptoms. Conclusions Repeated high-dose bronchial allergen challenges resulted in severe asthma symptoms and marked Th-2-mediated allergic airway inflammation. The high-dose challenge model is suitable only in an attenuated form in diseased volunteers for proof-of-concept studies and in clinical settings to reduce the risk of severe asthma exacerbations. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.govNCT00677209

  7. 18F-FDG Uptake Rate Is a Biomarker of Eosinophilic Inflammation and Airway Response in Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, R. Scott; Venegas, José G.; Wongviriyawong, Chanikarn; Winkler, Tilo; Kone, Mamary; Musch, Guido; Vidal Melo, Marcos F.; De Prost, Nicolas; Daniel L Hamilos; Afshar, Roshi; Cho, Josalyn; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.

    2011-01-01

    In asthma, the relationship among airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and lung function is poorly understood. Methods to noninvasively assess these relationships in human subjects are needed. We sought to determine whether 18F-FDG uptake rate (Ki, min−1) could serve as a biomarker of eosinophilic inflammation and local lung function.

  8. Directional Secretory Response of Double Stranded RNA-Induced Thymic Stromal Lymphopoetin (TSLP) and CCL11/Eotaxin-1 in Human Asthmatic Airways

    OpenAIRE

    Nino, Gustavo; Huseni, Shehlanoor; Perez, Geovanny F; Pancham, Krishna; Mubeen, Humaira; Abbasi, Aleeza; Wang, Justin; Eng, Stephen; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M.; Pillai, Dinesh K; Rose, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Thymic stromal lymphoproetin (TSLP) is a cytokine secreted by the airway epithelium in response to respiratory viruses and it is known to promote allergic Th2 responses in asthma. This study investigated whether virally-induced secretion of TSLP is directional in nature (apical vs. basolateral) and/or if there are TSLP-mediated effects occurring at both sides of the bronchial epithelial barrier in the asthmatic state. Methods Primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) from con...

  9. Zerumbone enhances the Th1 response and ameliorates ovalbumin-induced Th2 responses and airway inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Ying-Hua; Huang, Huei-Mei; Wang, Ching-Chiung; Lee, Chen-Chen; Fan, Chia-Kwung; Lee, Yueh-Lun

    2015-02-01

    Zerumbone is a sesquiterpene compound isolated from the rhizome of wild ginger, Zingiber zerumbet Smith. The rhizomes of the plant are used as a spice and traditional medicine. Zerumbone was shown to possess anticarcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. However, the antiallergic activity and the underlying mechanism of zerumbone have not been reported. Herein, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of zerumbone on antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro and its potential therapeutic effects against ovalbumin (OVA)-induced T helper 2 (Th2)-mediated asthma in mice. In the presence of zerumbone, lipopolysaccharide-activated bone marrow-derived DCs enhanced T cell proliferation and Th1 cell polarization in an allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. In animal experiments, mice were sensitized and challenged with OVA, and were orally treated with different doses of zerumbone after sensitization. Circulating titers of OVA-specific antibodies, airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, histological changes in lung tissues, the cell composition and cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and cytokine profiles of spleen cells were assessed. Compared to OVA-induced hallmarks of asthma, oral administration of zerumbone induced lower OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) and higher IgG2a antibody production, attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness, prevented eosinophilic pulmonary infiltration, and ameliorated mucus hypersecretion. Zerumbone treatment also reduced the production of eotaxin, keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13, and promoted Th1 cytokine interferon (IFN)-γ production in asthmatic mice. Taken together, these results suggest that zerumbone exhibits an antiallergic effect via modulation of Th1/Th2 cytokines in an asthmatic mouse model. PMID:25573403

  10. Mean airway pressure and response to inhaled nitric oxide in neonatal and pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, George M; Nelin, Leif D

    2005-01-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) can improve oxygenation and ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) matching by reduction of shunt (Qs/Qt) in patients with hypoxemic lung disease. Because the improvement in V/Q matching must occur by redistribution of pulmonary blood flow, and because high airway pressure (Paw) increases physiologic dead space (Vd/Vt), we hypothesized that high Paw may limit the improvement in V/Q matching during iNO treatment. iNO 0-50 ppm was administered during mechanical ventilation. Mechanical ventilator settings were at the discretion of the attending physician. Qs/Qt and Vd/Vt were derived from a tripartite lung model with correction for shunt-induced dead space. Data from 62 patients during 153 trials were analyzed for effects of Paw and iNO on Qs/Qt and Vd/Vt. Baseline Qs/Qt was slightly increased at Paw 16-23 cmH2O (p < 0.05), while Vd/Vt increased progressively with higher Paw (p < 0.002). Therapy with iNO significantly reduced Qs/Qt (p < 0.001) at all levels of mean Paw, reaching a maximum reduction at 16-23 cmH2O (p < 0.05), such that Qs/Qt during iNO treatment was similar at all levels of Paw. During iNO treatment, a reduction in Vd/Vt occurred only at Paw of 8-15 cmH2O (p < 0.05), and the positive relationship between Vd/Vt and Paw was maintained. These differential effects on Qs/Qt and Vd/Vt suggest that both high and low Paw may limit improvement in gas exchange with iNO. Analysis of gas exchange using this corrected tripartite lung model may help optimize ventilatory strategies during iNO therapy. PMID:16465603

  11. Effect of vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor KDR on human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU hui; XU Yong-jian; ZHANG Zhen-xiang

    2005-01-01

    @@ Airway remodeling with inflammatory cell infiltration, epithelial shedding, basement membrane thickening and increased mass of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is an important determinant of bronchial obstruction and hyperresponsiveness in asthma.1,2 Increased ASM mass is by far the most important abnormality responsible for excessive airway narrowing and compliance of the airway wall in asthma.1-3 ASM growth and proliferation in asthma is a complex phenomenon of which the underlying mechanisms are difficult to investigate in vivo. The increased amount of ASM in asthmatics is an indication of abnormal cell proliferation and growth, but little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms and factors that regulate ASM cell proliferation and growth in asthma.

  12. Airways Disease: Phenotyping Heterogeneity Using Measures of Airway Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui Salman

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease being widely regarded as heterogeneous diseases, a consensus for an accurate system of classification has not been agreed. Recent studies have suggested that the recognition of subphenotypes of airway disease based on the pattern of airway inflammation may be particularly useful in increasing our understanding of the disease. The use of non-invasive markers of airway inflammation has suggested the presence of four distinct phenotypes: eosinophilic, neutrophilic, mixed inflammatory and paucigranulocytic asthma. Recent studies suggest that these subgroups may differ in their etiology, immunopathology and response to treatment. Importantly, novel treatment approaches targeted at specific patterns of airway inflammation are emerging, making an appreciation of subphenotypes particularly relevant. New developments in phenotyping inflammation and other facets of airway disease mean that we are entering an era where careful phenotyping will lead to targeted therapy.

  13. Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induce Both the Unfolded Protein and Integrated Stress Responses in Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily F A van 't Wout

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection can be disastrous in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Its toxic effects are largely mediated by secreted virulence factors including pyocyanin, elastase and alkaline protease (AprA. Efficient functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER is crucial for cell survival and appropriate immune responses, while an excess of unfolded proteins within the ER leads to "ER stress" and activation of the "unfolded protein response" (UPR. Bacterial infection and Toll-like receptor activation trigger the UPR most likely due to the increased demand for protein folding of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we show that cell-free conditioned medium of the PAO1 strain of P. aeruginosa, containing secreted virulence factors, induces ER stress in primary bronchial epithelial cells as evidenced by splicing of XBP1 mRNA and induction of CHOP, GRP78 and GADD34 expression. Most aspects of the ER stress response were dependent on TAK1 and p38 MAPK, except for the induction of GADD34 mRNA. Using various mutant strains and purified virulence factors, we identified pyocyanin and AprA as inducers of ER stress. However, the induction of GADD34 was mediated by an ER stress-independent integrated stress response (ISR which was at least partly dependent on the iron-sensing eIF2α kinase HRI. Our data strongly suggest that this increased GADD34 expression served to protect against Pseudomonas-induced, iron-sensitive cell cytotoxicity. In summary, virulence factors from P. aeruginosa induce ER stress in airway epithelial cells and also trigger the ISR to improve cell survival of the host.

  14. Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induce Both the Unfolded Protein and Integrated Stress Responses in Airway Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van 't Wout, Emily F A; van Schadewijk, Annemarie; van Boxtel, Ria; Dalton, Lucy E; Clarke, Hanna J; Tommassen, Jan; Marciniak, Stefan J; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2015-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection can be disastrous in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Its toxic effects are largely mediated by secreted virulence factors including pyocyanin, elastase and alkaline protease (AprA). Efficient functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for cell survival and appropriate immune responses, while an excess of unfolded proteins within the ER leads to "ER stress" and activation of the "unfolded protein response" (UPR). Bacterial infection and Toll-like receptor activation trigger the UPR most likely due to the increased demand for protein folding of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we show that cell-free conditioned medium of the PAO1 strain of P. aeruginosa, containing secreted virulence factors, induces ER stress in primary bronchial epithelial cells as evidenced by splicing of XBP1 mRNA and induction of CHOP, GRP78 and GADD34 expression. Most aspects of the ER stress response were dependent on TAK1 and p38 MAPK, except for the induction of GADD34 mRNA. Using various mutant strains and purified virulence factors, we identified pyocyanin and AprA as inducers of ER stress. However, the induction of GADD34 was mediated by an ER stress-independent integrated stress response (ISR) which was at least partly dependent on the iron-sensing eIF2α kinase HRI. Our data strongly suggest that this increased GADD34 expression served to protect against Pseudomonas-induced, iron-sensitive cell cytotoxicity. In summary, virulence factors from P. aeruginosa induce ER stress in airway epithelial cells and also trigger the ISR to improve cell survival of the host. PMID:26083346

  15. Children with asthma by school age display aberrant immune responses to pathogenic airway bacteria as infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Thysen, Anna Hammerich;

    2014-01-01

    (P = .001), and IL-10 (P = .028), whereas there were no differences in T-cell activation or peripheral T-cell composition. ConclusionsChildren with asthma by school age exhibited an aberrant immune response to pathogenic bacteria in infancy. We propose that an abnormal immune response to pathogenic...... Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood birth cohort was followed prospectively, and asthma was diagnosed at age 7 years. The immune response to H influenzae, M catarrhalis, and S pneumoniae was analyzed in 292 infants using PBMCs isolated and stored since the age of 6 months. The immune response was...... assessed based on the pattern of cytokines produced and T-cell activation. ResultsThe immune response to pathogenic bacteria was different in infants with asthma by 7 years of age (P = .0007). In particular, prospective asthmatic subjects had aberrant production of IL-5 (P = .008), IL-13 (P = .057), IL-17...

  16. Translocation of particles and inflammatory responses after exposure to fine particles and nanoparticles in an epithelial airway model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musso Claudia

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental studies provide evidence that inhaled nanoparticles may translocate over the airspace epithelium and cause increased cellular inflammation. Little is known, however, about the dependence of particle size or material on translocation characteristics, inflammatory response and intracellular localization. Results Using a triple cell co-culture model of the human airway wall composed of epithelial cells, macrophages and dendritic cells we quantified the entering of fine (1 μm and nano-sized (0.078 μm polystyrene particles by laser scanning microscopy. The number distribution of particles within the cell types was significantly different between fine and nano-sized particles suggesting different translocation characteristics. Analysis of the intracellular localization of gold (0.025 μm and titanium dioxide (0.02–0.03 μm nanoparticles by energy filtering transmission electron microscopy showed differences in intracellular localization depending on particle composition. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles were detected as single particles without membranes as well as in membrane-bound agglomerations. Gold nanoparticles were found inside the cells as free particles only. The potential of the different particle types (different sizes and different materials to induce a cellular response was determined by measurements of the tumour necrosis factor-α in the supernatants. We measured a 2–3 fold increase of tumour necrosis factor-α in the supernatants after applying 1 μm polystyrene particles, gold nanoparticles, but not with polystyrene and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Conclusion Quantitative laser scanning microscopy provided evidence that the translocation and entering characteristics of particles are size-dependent. Energy filtering transmission electron microscopy showed that the intracellular localization of nanoparticles depends on the particle material. Both particle size and material affect the cellular

  17. Interpretation of bronchodilator response in patients with obstructive airways disease. The Dutch Chronic Non-Specific Lung Disease (CNSLD) Study Group.

    OpenAIRE

    Brand, P L; Quanjer, P. H.; Postma, D. S.; Kerstjens, H.A.; Koëter, G. H.; Dekhuijzen, P. N.; Sluiter, H J

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no agreement on how a bronchodilator response should be expressed. Ideally, the index used should be able to distinguish asthma from chronic obstructive lung disease and be independent of initial FEV1. METHODS: Two hundred and seventy four adults (aged 18-60 years) outpatients with obstructive airways disease were studied. Patients were divided into syndrome groups on the basis of a standardised history: asthma (n = 99), asthmatic bronchitis (n = 88), and chronic obstruct...

  18. Tracheal and airway collapse in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, Ann Della

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal and airway collapse (bronchomalacia) are common causes of chronic cough in middle-aged to older dogs where weakening of cartilage within the respiratory system leads to narrowing of airways, coughing, wheezing, and other secondary effects. Successful treatment involves correct identification of the problem, recognition of concurrent problems, and appropriate medical therapy. Surgical and noninvasive treatment options are becoming readily available, and it is important to understand indications for such procedures. PMID:24268337

  19. CT demonstration of pharyngeal narrowing in adult obstructive sleep apnea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sleep apnea is a major cause of daytime hypersomnolence. Among the proposed etiologies, focal obstruction of the airways at the level of the pharynx has been suggested but not proven. Using computed tomography, the cross-sectional area of the airway can be readily assessed. Thirty-three adults with clinically proven sleep apnea and 12 normal adults underwent systematic computed tomography of the neck. Significant airway narrowing was demonstrated in all the patients with obstructive sleep apnea, whereas no such narrowing was seen in the controls. In 11, the narrowing was at a single level, whereas in 22 patients two or more levels were affected. This study has shown that a structurally abnormal airway may serve as an anatomic substrate for the development of sleep apnea. On the basis of this evidence, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty has been performed in two patients with relief of symptoms in one

  20. Airway responses to eucapnic hyperpnea, exercise, and methacholine in elite swimmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lise; Winther, S.; Backer, V.;

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The International Olympic Committee Medical Commission (IOC-MC) requires athletes to provide the result of an objective test to support a diagnosis of asthma or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) if they want to inhale a beta-2-agonist. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the......) test, a field-based exercise test (FBT), a laboratory-based exercise test (LBT), and a methacholine challenge. The criteria suggested by the IOC-MC were used to define a positive response to the challenges (EVH, field test, and laboratory test: minimum 10% decrease in FBT; methacholine: PD20 <= 2 mu...... cutoff for methacholine (PD20 <= 8 mu mol). Conclusions: The EVH test is the test that diagnoses most swimmers with an abnormal response to hyperpnea, but not all cases of EIB are identified with the EVH test. Performing a methacholine test using IOC-MC's cutoff value does not improve the chances of...

  1. Aerobic Exercise Attenuates Airway Inflammatory Responses in a Mouse Model of Atopic Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Pastva, Amy; Estell, Kim; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Atkinson, T. Prescott; Schwiebert, Lisa M

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that aerobic exercise improves the overall physical fitness and health of asthmatic patients. The specific exercise-induced improvements in the pathology of asthma and the mechanisms by which these improvements occur, however, are ill-defined; thus, the therapeutic potential of exercise in the treatment of asthma remains unappreciated. Using an OVA-driven mouse model, we examined the role of aerobic exercise in modulating inflammatory responses associated with atopic a...

  2. Induction of Tachykinin Production in Airway Epithelia in Response to Viral Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, James P.; Kipar, Anja; Cox, Helen; Payne, Catherine; Vasiliou, Sylvia; Quinn, John P

    2008-01-01

    Background The tachykinins are implicated in neurogenic inflammation and the neuropeptide substance P in particular has been shown to be a proinflammatory mediator. A role for the tachykinins in host response to lung challenge has been previously demonstrated but has been focused predominantly on the release of the tachykinins from nerves innervating the lung. We have previously demonstrated the most dramatic phenotype described for the substance P encoding gene preprotachykinin-A (PPT-A) to ...

  3. Measures of reversibility in response to bronchodilators in chronic airflow obstruction: relation to airway calibre.

    OpenAIRE

    Weir, D C; Sherwood Burge, P

    1991-01-01

    A study was carried out to examine the independence from starting prebronchodilator FEV1 of four indices commonly used to express airflow (FEV1) reversibility in response to bronchodilators. In 121 patients with chronic airflow obstruction with a mean prebronchodilator FEV1 of 1.81 (43.9% of predicted values) the change in FEV1 expressed as a percentage of the patient's predicted FEV1 was the least dependent on starting FEV1. Reversibility, expressed as a percentage of the prebronchodilator v...

  4. Chronic continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) reduces airway reactivity in vivo in an allergen-induced rabbit model of asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Z.; Yu, Y.; Gao, H.; Gunst, S.J.; Tepper, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that chronic mechanical strain produced by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) reduces in vivo airway reactivity in rabbits and ferrets. For CPAP to potentially have a therapeutic benefit for asthmatic subjects, the reduction in airway responsiveness would need to persist for 12–24 h after its discontinuation, require application for only part of the day, and be effective in the presence of atopic airway inflammation. In the present study, airway resp...

  5. Time- and concentration-dependent genomic responses of the rat airway to inhaled nickel subsulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To provide insights into the mode of action for Ni3S2 lung carcinogenicity by examining gene expression changes in target cells after inhalation exposure. Methods: Gene expression changes were determined in micro-dissected lung broncho-alveolar cells from Fischer 344 rats following inhalation of Ni3S2 at 0.0, 0.04, 0.08, 0.15, and 0.60 mg/m3 (0.03, 0.06, 0.11, and 0.44 mg Ni/m3) for one and four weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). Results: Broncho-alveolar lavage fluid evaluation and lung histopathology provided evidence of inflammation only at the two highest concentrations, which were similar to those tested in the 2-year bioassay. The number of statistically significant up- and down-regulated genes decreased markedly from one to four weeks of exposure, suggesting adaptation. Cell signal pathway enrichment at both time-points primarily reflected responses to toxicity, including inflammatory and proliferative signaling. While proliferative signaling was up-regulated at both time points, some inflammatory signaling reversed from down-regulation at 1 week to up-regulation at 4 weeks. Conclusions: These results support a mode of action for Ni3S2 carcinogenicity driven by chronic toxicity, inflammation and proliferation, leading to mis-replication, rather than by direct genotoxicity. Benchmark dose (BMD) analysis identified the lowest pathway transcriptional BMD exposure concentration as 0.026 mg Ni/m3, for apoptosis/survival signaling. When conducted on the basis of lung Ni concentration the lowest pathway BMD was 0.64 μg Ni/g lung, for immune/inflammatory signaling. Implications: These highly conservative BMDs could be used to derive a point of departure in a nonlinear risk assessment for Ni3S2 toxicity and carcinogenicity. - Highlights: • The mode of action for lung carcinogenicity of inhaled Ni3S2 was investigated in rats. • Gene expression changes were determined in micro-dissected lung tissue at 1–4 weeks. • A non-genotoxic mode of action (toxicity

  6. Biomarkers in Airway Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M Leung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inherent limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted clinicians and scientists to search for surrogate markers of airway diseases. Although few biomarkers have been widely accepted into the clinical armamentarium, the authors explore three sources of biomarkers that have shown promise as indicators of disease severity and treatment response. In asthma, exhaled nitric oxide measurements can predict steroid responsiveness and sputum eosinophil counts have been used to titrate anti-inflammatory therapies. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory plasma biomarkers, such as fibrinogen, club cell secretory protein-16 and surfactant protein D, can denote greater severity and predict the risk of exacerbations. While the multitude of disease phenotypes in respiratory medicine make biomarker development especially challenging, these three may soon play key roles in the diagnosis and management of airway diseases.

  7. Bronchial responsiveness to adenosine 5 '-monophosphate (AMP) and methacholine differ in their relationship with airway allergy and baseline FEV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Meer, G; Heederik, D; Postma, DS

    2002-01-01

    Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and inflammation are central hallmarks of asthma. Studies in patients with asthma suggest that BHR to adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) is a better marker of bronchial inflammation than BHR to methacholine. The association between markers of airway inflammation and

  8. Children developing asthma by school-age display aberrant immune responses to pathogenic airway bacteria as infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Thysen, Anna Hammerich;

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a highly prevalent chronic lung disease that commonly originates in early childhood. Colonisation of neonatal airways with the pathogenic bacterial strains H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis and S. pneumoniae is associated with increased risk of later childhood asthma. We hypothesized that c...

  9. Emergency airway puncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emergency airway puncture is the placement of a hollow needle through the throat into the airway. It ... Emergency airway puncture is done in an emergency situation, when someone is choking and all other efforts ...

  10. Resonance response of a single-degree-of-freedom nonlinear vibro-impact system to a narrow-band random parametric excitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Min-Bang; Rong Hai-Wu

    2011-01-01

    The resonant response of a single-degree-of-freedom nonlinear vibro-impact oscillator with a one-sided barrier to a narrow-band random parametric excitation is investigated. The narrow-band random excitation used here is a bounded random noise. The analysis is based on a special Zhuravlev transformation, which reduces the system to one without impacts, thereby permitting the applications of random averaging over "fast" variables. The averaged equations are solved exactly and an algebraic equation of the amplitude of the response is obtained for the case without random disorder. The methods of linearization and moment are used to obtain the formula of the mean-square amplitude approximately for the case with random disorder. The effects of damping, detuning, restitution factor, nonlinear intensity, frequency and magnitude of random excitations are analysed. The theoretical analyses are verified by numerical results. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations show that the peak response amplitudes will reduce at large damping or large nonlinear intensity and will increase with large amplitude or frequency of the random excitations. The phenomenon of stochastic jump is observed, that is, the steady-state response of the system will jump from a trivial solution to a large non-trivial one when the amplitude of the random excitation exceeds some threshold value,or will jump from a large non-trivial solution to a trivial one when the intensity of the random disorder of the random excitation exceeds some threshold value.

  11. Mainstream cigarette smoke exposure attenuates airway immune inflammatory responses to surrogate and common environmental allergens in mice, despite evidence of increased systemic sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Clinton S; Pouladi, Mahmoud A; Fattouh, Ramzi; Dawe, David E; Vujicic, Neda; Richards, Carl D; Jordana, Manel; Inman, Mark D; Stampfli, Martin R

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of mainstream cigarette smoke exposure (MTS) on allergic sensitization and the development of allergic inflammatory processes. Using two different experimental murine models of allergic airways inflammation, we present evidence that MTS increased cytokine production by splenocytes in response to OVA and ragweed challenge. Paradoxically, MTS exposure resulted in an overall attenuation of the immune inflammatory response, including a dramatic reduction in the number of eosinophils and activated (CD69+) and Th2-associated (T1ST2+) CD4 T lymphocytes in the lung. Although MTS did not impact circulating levels of OVA-specific IgE and IgG1, we observed a striking reduction in OVA-specific IgG2a production and significantly diminished airway hyperresponsiveness. MTS, therefore, plays a disparate role in the development of allergic responses, inducing a heightened state of allergen-specific sensitization, but dampening local immune inflammatory processes in the lung. PMID:16116169

  12. Studies of human airways in vitro: A review of the methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Hulsmann, Anthon; de Jongste, Johan

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe pathophysiology of human airway narrowing is only partly understood. In order to gain more insight in the mechanisms of human lung diseases and potential beneficial therapeutic agents, adequate models are needed. Animal airway models are of limited value since lung diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are unique to humans and because the mechanisms of airway narrowing differ between species. Therefore, it is important to perform studies on h...

  13. Airway responses and inflammation in subjects with asthma after four days of repeated high-single-dose allergen challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Schulze Johannes; Voss Sandra; Zissler Ulrich; Rose Markus A; Zielen Stefan; Schubert Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Both standard and low-dose allergen provocations are an established tool in asthma research to improve our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanism of allergic asthma. However, clinical symptoms are less likely to be induced. Therefore, we designed a protocol for repetitive high-dose bronchial allergen challenges to generate clinical symptoms and airway inflammation. Methods A total of 27 patients aged 18 to 40 years with positive skin-prick tests and mild asthma ...

  14. Airway management in a patient with bullous pemphigoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airway management in patients with pemphigoid lesions has anaesthetic implications. We report a case of a 23 years old female with bullous pemphigoid who presented with laryngeal stenosis and critical airway narrowing. The airway was initially managed with jet ventilation. Anaesthesia was maintained with propofol infusion and ventilation was performed by introducing a size 10 French gauge suction catheter through the stenotic laryngeal orifice. Thirty minutes into anaesthesia, she developed subcutaneous emphysema and decreased air entry on right side of the chest but remained hemodynamically stable. The airway was further managed by tracheostomy. This case report highlights complications that can occur during the anaesthetic management of such cases. (author)

  15. Yield response of an erect, narrow and thick-leaved rice mutant and the derived strain to different planting densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was designed to investigate the possibility of mutation induction concerning leaf photosynthesis and canopy type, and to examine the yield performance of such a mutant at different planting densities. A semidwarf strain, G31, with narrow, erect and thick leaves, was selected after chronic γ-irradiation and hybridization. Net photosynthetic and transpiration rates per leaf area of this strain were found to be 1.5 times as high as the best available cultivar. In direct sowing of rice seeds, G31 had the highest grain yield in all levels of nitrogen top dressing, compared with the yields of the best available cultivars. Out of the progeny, after maize DNA treatment, of the G31 seeds a strain, L99, with a unique plant type was isolated. The tillering is less, the culms are taller and thicker, and the panicles are larger, compared with the parent G31. The agronomic performance of the L99 strain was tested with heavy nitrogen top dressing at different planting densities, along with other varieties. The yielding abilities were about the same in the best available cultivar when evaluated against the yield per day during their growth period. (author)

  16. Differential Gene Expression Profiles and Selected Cytokine Protein Analysis of Mediastinal Lymph Nodes of Horses with Chronic Recurrent Airway Obstruction (RAO Support an Interleukin-17 Immune Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Korn

    Full Text Available Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO is a pulmonary inflammatory condition that afflicts certain mature horses exposed to organic dust particulates in hay. Its clinical and pathological features, manifested by reversible bronchoconstriction, excessive mucus production and airway neutrophilia, resemble the pulmonary alterations that occur in agricultural workers with occupational asthma. The immunological basis of RAO remains uncertain although its chronicity, its localization to a mucosal surface and its domination by a neutrophilic, non-septic inflammatory response, suggest involvement of Interleukin-17 (IL-17. We examined global gene expression profiles in mediastinal (pulmonary-draining lymph nodes isolated from RAO-affected and control horses. Differential expression of > 200 genes, coupled with network analysis, supports an IL-17 response centered about NF-κB. Immunohistochemical analysis of mediastinal lymph node sections demonstrated increased IL-17 staining intensity in diseased horses. This result, along with the finding of increased IL-17 concentrations in lymph node homogenates from RAO-affected horses (P = 0.1 and a down-regulation of IL-4 gene and protein expression, provides additional evidence of the involvement of IL-17 in the chronic stages of RAO. Additional investigations are needed to ascertain the cellular source of IL-17 in this equine model of occupational asthma. Understanding the immunopathogenesis of this disorder likely will enhance the development of therapeutic interventions beneficial to human and animal pulmonary health.

  17. Airway management in trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid M Khan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma has assumed epidemic proportion. 10% of global road accident deaths occur in India. Hypoxia and airway mismanagement are known to contribute up to 34% of pre-hospital deaths in these patients. A high degree of suspicion for actual or impending airway obstruction should be assumed in all trauma patients. Objective signs of airway compromise include agitation, obtundation, cyanosis, abnormal breath sound and deviated trachea. If time permits, one should carry out a brief airway assessment prior to undertaking definitive airway management in these patients. Simple techniques for establishing and maintaining airway patency include jaw thrust maneuver and/or use of oro- and nas-opharyngeal airways. All attempts must be made to perform definitive airway management whenever airway is compromised that is not amenable to simple strategies. The selection of airway device and route- oral or -nasal, for tracheal intubation should be based on nature of patient injury, experience and skill level.

  18. Straight but Not Narrow; Within-Gender Variation in the Gender-Specificity of Women’s Sexual Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, Meredith L.; Bouchard, Katrina N.; Timmers, Amanda D.

    2015-01-01

    Gender differences in the specificity of sexual response have been a primary focus in sexual psychophysiology research, however, within-gender variability suggests sexual orientation moderates category-specific responding among women; only heterosexual women show gender-nonspecific genital responses to sexual stimuli depicting men and women. But heterosexually-identified or “straight” women are heterogeneous in their sexual attractions and include women who are exclusively androphilic (sexually attracted to men) and women who are predominantly androphilic with concurrent gynephilia (sexually attracted to women). It is therefore unclear if gender-nonspecific responding is found in both exclusively and predominantly androphilic women. The current studies investigated within-gender variability in the gender-specificity of women’s sexual response. Two samples of women reporting concurrent andro/gynephilia viewed (Study 1, n = 29) or listened (Study 2, n = 30) to erotic stimuli varying by gender of sexual partner depicted while their genital and subjective sexual responses were assessed. Data were combined with larger datasets of predominantly gyne- and androphilic women (total N = 78 for both studies). In both studies, women reporting any degree of gynephilia, including those who self-identified as heterosexual, showed significantly greater genital response to female stimuli, similar to predominantly gynephilic women; gender-nonspecific genital response was observed for exclusively androphilic women only. Subjective sexual arousal patterns were more variable with respect to sexual attractions, likely reflecting stimulus intensity effects. Heterosexually-identified women are therefore not a homogenous group with respect to sexual responses to gender cues. Implications for within-gender variation in women’s sexual orientation and sexual responses are discussed. PMID:26629910

  19. Vanilloid receptor activation by 2- and 10-μm particles induces responses leading to apoptosis in human airway epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. It has been previously shown that PMs and synthetic particles (PC10 and PC2) that have similar characteristics to PMs induced depolarizing currents and increases in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) in capsaicin- and acid-sensitive sensory neurons and in TRPV1-expressing HEK 293 cells. To determine whether such mechanisms also underlie PM-induced toxicity in epithelial cells lining the human airways, we tested the responses of PCs on BEAS-2B (immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells), NHBE (normal human bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells), and SAEC (normal human small airway epithelial cells from the distal airways). RT-PCR revealed that all these cell types expressed TRPV1 (VR1), ASIC1a, and ASIC3 subunits of proton-gated ion channels. Calcium imaging studies revealed that in all three cell types ∼30% were activated by both capsaicin and acid. In these cells, PCs induced an increase in [Ca2+]i that was inhibited by capsazepine, a TRPV1 antagonist, and/or by amiloride, an ASIC antagonist. The capsazepine-sensitive contribution to PC-induced increases in [Ca2+]i was ∼70%. Measurements of apoptosis revealed that exposure to PCs induced a time-dependent increase in the number of apoptotic cells. After incubation for 24 (PC10) or 48 h (PC2) ∼60% of these cells were apoptotic. Pretreatment with capsazepine as well as removal of external calcium completely (∼100%) prevented PC-induced apoptosis. These data suggest that pharmacological inhibition of calcium-permeable vanilloid receptors could be used to prevent some of the pathological actions of PMs

  20. Picornavirus-Induced Airway Mucosa Immune Profile in Asymptomatic Neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Helene M.; Følsgaard, Nilofar V.; Birch, Sune;

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial airway colonization is known to alter the airway mucosa immune response in neonates whereas the impact of viruses is unknown. The objective was therefore to examine the effect of respiratory viruses on the immune signature in the airways of asymptomatic neonates. Nasal aspirates from 57...

  1. Research on airway inflammation: present status in Mainland China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zeng-li

    2005-01-01

    @@ Airway inflammation involving activated eosinophils, mast cells and T lymphocytes is an established feature of asthma and has been the key target to treatment. Airway structural changes that occur in patients with asthma in response to persistent inflammation are termed airway remodeling.

  2. Allergic airways disease develops after an increase in allergen capture and processing in the airway mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Garnier, Christophe; Wikstrom, Matthew E; Zosky, Graeme; Turner, Debra J; Sly, Peter D; Smith, Miranda; Thomas, Jennifer A; Judd, Samantha R; Strickland, Deborah H; Holt, Patrick G; Stumbles, Philip A

    2007-11-01

    Airway mucosal dendritic cells (AMDC) and other airway APCs continuously sample inhaled Ags and regulate the nature of any resulting T cell-mediated immune response. Although immunity develops to harmful pathogens, tolerance arises to nonpathogenic Ags in healthy individuals. This homeostasis is thought to be disrupted in allergic respiratory disorders such as allergic asthma, such that a potentially damaging Th2-biased, CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory response develops against intrinsically nonpathogenic allergens. Using a mouse model of experimental allergic airways disease (EAAD), we have investigated the functional changes occurring in AMDC and other airway APC populations during disease onset. Onset of EAAD was characterized by early and transient activation of airway CD4(+) T cells coinciding with up-regulation of CD40 expression exclusively on CD11b(-) AMDC. Concurrent enhanced allergen uptake and processing occurred within all airway APC populations, including B cells, macrophages, and both CD11b(+) and CD11b(-) AMDC subsets. Immune serum transfer into naive animals recapitulated the enhanced allergen uptake observed in airway APC populations and mediated activation of naive allergen-specific, airway CD4(+) T cells following inhaled allergen challenge. These data suggest that the onset of EAAD is initiated by enhanced allergen capture and processing by a number of airway APC populations and that allergen-specific Igs play a role in the conversion of normally quiescent AMDC subsets into those capable of inducing airway CD4(+) T cell activation. PMID:17947647

  3. Limiting Student Speech: A Narrow Path toward Success. A Response to "Challenging the Common Guidelines in Social Justice Education"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnick, Marissa C. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this response, Minnick asserts that unequal representation of students' voices, an idea presented in Sensoy and DiAngelo's "Challenging the Common Guidelines in Social Justice Education," presents multiple negative classroom implications. Foremost, Minnick argues that Sensoy and DiAngelo's lack of clarity regarding when a teacher…

  4. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  5. Airway vascular damage in elite swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, André; Palmares, Carmo; Lopes, Cristina; Delgado, Luís

    2011-11-01

    We postulated that high level swimming can promote airway inflammation and thus asthma by enhancing local vascular permeability. We aimed to test this hypothesis by a cross-sectional study comparing swimmers (n = 13, 17 ± 3 years, competing 7 ± 4 years, training 18 ± 3 h per week), asthmatic-swimmers (n = 6, 17 ± 2 years, competing 8 ± 3 years, training 16 ± 4 h per week), and asthmatics (n = 19, 14 ± 3 years). Subjects performed induced sputum and had exhaled nitric oxide, lung volumes, and airway responsiveness determined. Airway vascular permeability index was defined as the ratio of albumin in sputum and serum. Results from the multiple linear regression showed each unit change in airway vascular permeability index was associated with an increase of 0.97% (95%CI: 0.02 to 1.92; p = 0.047) in sputum eosinophilis, and of 2.64% (95%CI:0.96 to 4.31; p = 0.006) in sputum neutrophils after adjustment for confounders. In a general linear model no significant differences between airway vascular permeability between index study groups existed, after controlling for sputum eosinophilis and neutrophils. In conclusion, competitive swimmers training in chlorine-rich pools have similar levels of airway vascular permeability than asthmatics. Although competitive swimming has been associated with asthma, airway inflammation and airway hyperesponsiveness do not seem to be dependent on increased airway vascular permeability. PMID:21669516

  6. Reversal of airway hyperresponsiveness by induction of airway mucosal CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Deborah H Strickland; Stumbles, Philip A.; Zosky, Graeme R.; Subrata, Lily S.; Thomas, Jenny A.; Turner, Debra J.; Sly, Peter D.; Holt, Patrick G.

    2006-01-01

    An important feature of atopic asthma is the T cell–driven late phase reaction involving transient bronchoconstriction followed by development of airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Using a unique rat asthma model we recently showed that the onset and duration of the aeroallergen-induced airway mucosal T cell activation response in sensitized rats is determined by the kinetics of functional maturation of resident airway mucosal dendritic cells (AMDCs) mediated by cognate interactions with CD4+...

  7. What's in a name? Expiratory tracheal narrowing in adults explained

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracheomalacia, tracheobronchomalacia, and excessive dynamic airway collapse are all terms used to describe tracheal narrowing in expiration. The first two describe luminal reduction from cartilage softening and the latter refers to luminal reduction from exaggerated posterior membrane movement. Expiratory tracheal narrowing is a frequent occurrence that can cause symptoms of airway obstruction, such as dyspnoea, wheeze, and exercise intolerance. The accurate diagnosis and quantification of expiratory tracheal narrowing has important aetiological, therapeutic, and prognostic implications. The reference standard for diagnosis has traditionally been bronchoscopy; however, this method has significant limitations. Expiratory tracheal disorders are readily detected by four-dimensional dynamic volume multidetector computed tomography (4D-CT), an emerging, non-invasive method that will potentially enable detection and quantification of these conditions. This review discusses the morphological forms of expiratory tracheal narrowing and demonstrates the utility of 4D-CT in the diagnosis, quantification, and treatment of these important conditions

  8. Pharmacogenetics, pharmacogenomics and airway disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Ian P

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The availability of a draft sequence for the human genome will revolutionise research into airway disease. This review deals with two of the most important areas impinging on the treatment of patients: pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics. Considerable inter-individual variation exists at the DNA level in targets for medication, and variability in response to treatment may, in part, be determined by this genetic variation. Increased knowledge about the human genome might also permit the identification of novel therapeutic targets by expression profiling at the RNA (genomics or protein (proteomics level. This review describes recent advances in pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics with regard to airway disease.

  9. Airway Measurement for Airway Remodeling Defined by Post-Bronchodilator FEV1/FVC in Asthma: Investigation Using Inspiration-Expiration Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Chae, Eun Jin; Kim, Tae-Bum; Cho, You Sook; Park, Chan-Sun; Seo, Joon Beom; Kim, Namkug; Moon, Hee-Bom

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Airway remodeling may be responsible for irreversible airway obstruction in asthma, and a low post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio can be used as a noninvasive marker of airway remodeling. We investigated correlations between airway wall indices on computed tomography (CT) and various clinical indices, including post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio, in patients with asthma. Methods Volumetric CT was performed on 22 stable asthma patients who were taking inhaled corticosteroids. Airway dim...

  10. Airway Gland Structure and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdicombe, Jonathan H; Wine, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    Submucosal glands contribute to airway surface liquid (ASL), a film that protects all airway surfaces. Glandular mucus comprises electrolytes, water, the gel-forming mucin MUC5B, and hundreds of different proteins with diverse protective functions. Gland volume per unit area of mucosal surface correlates positively with impaction rate of inhaled particles. In human main bronchi, the volume of the glands is ∼ 50 times that of surface goblet cells, but the glands diminish in size and frequency distally. ASL and its trapped particles are removed from the airways by mucociliary transport. Airway glands have a tubuloacinar structure, with a single terminal duct, a nonciliated collecting duct, then branching secretory tubules lined with mucous cells and ending in serous acini. They allow for a massive increase in numbers of mucus-producing cells without replacing surface ciliated cells. Active secretion of Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) by serous cells produces most of the fluid of gland secretions. Glands are densely innervated by tonically active, mutually excitatory airway intrinsic neurons. Most gland mucus is secreted constitutively in vivo, with large, transient increases produced by emergency reflex drive from the vagus. Elevations of [cAMP]i and [Ca(2+)]i coordinate electrolyte and macromolecular secretion and probably occur together for baseline activity in vivo, with cholinergic elevation of [Ca(2+)]i being mainly responsive for transient increases in secretion. Altered submucosal gland function contributes to the pathology of all obstructive diseases, but is an early stage of pathogenesis only in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26336032

  11. Upper airway test (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    An upper airway biopsy is obtained by using a flexible scope called a bronchoscope. The scope is passed down through ... may be performed when an abnormality of the upper airway is suspected. It may also be performed as ...

  12. Experimental determination of the lateral dose response functions of detectors to be applied in the measurement of narrow photon-beam dose profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, D.; Meyners, J.; Delfs, B.; Muru, A.; Harder, D.; Poppe, B.; Looe, HK

    2015-12-01

    This study aims at the experimental determination of the detector-specific 1D lateral dose response function K(x) and of its associated rotational symmetric counterpart K(r) for a set of high-resolution detectors presently used in narrow-beam photon dosimetry. A combination of slit-beam, radiochromic film, and deconvolution techniques served to accomplish this task for four detectors with diameters of their sensitive volumes ranging from 1 to 2.2 mm. The particular aim of the experiment was to examine the existence of significant negative portions of some of these response functions predicted by a recent Monte-Carlo-simulation (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-607). In a 6 MV photon slit beam formed by the Siemens Artiste collimation system and a 0.5 mm wide slit between 10 cm thick lead blocks serving as the tertiary collimator, the true cross-beam dose profile D(x) at 3 cm depth in a large water phantom was measured with radiochromic film EBT3, and the detector-affected cross-beam signal profiles M(x) were recorded with a silicon diode, a synthetic diamond detector, a miniaturized scintillation detector, and a small ionization chamber. For each detector, the deconvolution of the convolution integral M(x)  =  K(x)  ∗  D(x) served to obtain its specific 1D lateral dose response function K(x), and K(r) was calculated from it. Fourier transformations and back transformations were performed using function approximations by weighted sums of Gaussian functions and their analytical transformation. The 1D lateral dose response functions K(x) of the four types of detectors and their associated rotational symmetric counterparts K(r) were obtained. Significant negative curve portions of K(x) and K(r) were observed in the case of the silicon diode and the diamond detector, confirming the Monte-Carlo-based prediction (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-607). They are typical for the perturbation of the secondary electron field by a detector with

  13. Experimental determination of the lateral dose response functions of detectors to be applied in the measurement of narrow photon-beam dose profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at the experimental determination of the detector-specific 1D lateral dose response function K(x) and of its associated rotational symmetric counterpart K(r) for a set of high-resolution detectors presently used in narrow-beam photon dosimetry. A combination of slit-beam, radiochromic film, and deconvolution techniques served to accomplish this task for four detectors with diameters of their sensitive volumes ranging from 1 to 2.2 mm. The particular aim of the experiment was to examine the existence of significant negative portions of some of these response functions predicted by a recent Monte-Carlo-simulation (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585–607).In a 6 MV photon slit beam formed by the Siemens Artiste collimation system and a 0.5 mm wide slit between 10 cm thick lead blocks serving as the tertiary collimator, the true cross-beam dose profile D(x) at 3 cm depth in a large water phantom was measured with radiochromic film EBT3, and the detector-affected cross-beam signal profiles M(x) were recorded with a silicon diode, a synthetic diamond detector, a miniaturized scintillation detector, and a small ionization chamber. For each detector, the deconvolution of the convolution integral M(x)  =  K(x)  ∗  D(x) served to obtain its specific 1D lateral dose response function K(x), and K(r) was calculated from it. Fourier transformations and back transformations were performed using function approximations by weighted sums of Gaussian functions and their analytical transformation.The 1D lateral dose response functions K(x) of the four types of detectors and their associated rotational symmetric counterparts K(r) were obtained. Significant negative curve portions of K(x) and K(r) were observed in the case of the silicon diode and the diamond detector, confirming the Monte-Carlo-based prediction (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585–607). They are typical for the perturbation of the secondary electron field by a detector

  14. Airway resistance at maximum inhalation as a marker of asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connor George T

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthmatics exhibit reduced airway dilation at maximal inspiration, likely due to structural differences in airway walls and/or functional differences in airway smooth muscle, factors that may also increase airway responsiveness to bronchoconstricting stimuli. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that the minimal airway resistance achievable during a maximal inspiration (Rmin is abnormally elevated in subjects with airway hyperresponsiveness. Methods The Rmin was measured in 34 nonasthmatic and 35 asthmatic subjects using forced oscillations at 8 Hz. Rmin and spirometric indices were measured before and after bronchodilation (albuterol and bronchoconstriction (methacholine. A preliminary study of 84 healthy subjects first established height dependence of baseline Rmin values. Results Asthmatics had a higher baseline Rmin % predicted than nonasthmatic subjects (134 ± 33 vs. 109 ± 19 % predicted, p = 0.0004. Sensitivity-specificity analysis using receiver operating characteristic curves indicated that baseline Rmin was able to identify subjects with airway hyperresponsiveness (PC20 min % predicted, FEV1 % predicted, and FEF25-75 % predicted, respectively. Also, 80% of the subjects with baseline Rmin min > 145% predicted had hyperresponsive airways, regardless of clinical classification as asthmatic or nonasthmatic. Conclusions These findings suggest that baseline Rmin, a measurement that is easier to perform than spirometry, performs as well as or better than standard spirometric indices in distinguishing subjects with airway hyperresponsiveness from those without hyperresponsive airways. The relationship of baseline Rmin to asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness likely reflects a causal relation between conditions that stiffen airway walls and hyperresponsiveness. In conjunction with symptom history, Rmin could provide a clinically useful tool for assessing asthma and monitoring response to treatment.

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 exerts a protective role in ovalbumin-induced neutrophilic airway inflammation by inhibiting Th17 cell-mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanjie; Zhang, Liya; Wu, Jinhong; Di, Caixia; Xia, Zhenwei

    2013-11-29

    Allergic asthma is conventionally considered as a Th2 immune response characterized by eosinophilic inflammation. Recent investigations revealed that Th17 cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of non-eosinophilic asthma (NEA), resulting in steroid-resistant neutrophilic airway inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation, and anti-apoptosis functions. However, its role in NEA is still unclear. Here, we explore the role of HO-1 in a mouse model of NEA. HO-1 inducer hemin or HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin IX was injected intraperitoneally into ovalbumin-challenged DO11.10 mice. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was delivered into mice to knock down HO-1 expression. The results show that induction of HO-1 by hemin attenuated airway inflammation and decreased neutrophil infiltration in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid and was accompanied by a lower proportion of Th17 cells in mediastinal lymph nodes and spleen. More importantly, induction of HO-1 down-regulated Th17-related transcription factor retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) expression and decreased IL-17A levels, all of which correlated with a decrease in phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3) level and inhibition of Th17 cell differentiation. Consistently, the above events could be reversed by tin protoporphyrin IX. Also, HO-1 siRNA transfection abolished the effect of hemin induced HO-1 in vivo. Meanwhile, the hemin treatment promoted the level of Foxp3 expression and enhanced the proportion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Collectively, our findings indicate that HO-1 exhibits anti-inflammatory activity in the mouse model of NEA via inhibition of the p-STAT3-RORγt pathway, regulating kinetics of RORγt and Foxp3 expression, thus providing a possible novel therapeutic target in asthmatic patients. PMID:24097973

  16. Quantitative computed tomography imaging of airway remodeling in severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Philippe A; Fetita, Catalin I; Brillet, Pierre-Yves

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous condition and approximately 5-10% of asthmatic subjects have severe disease associated with structure changes of the airways (airway remodeling) that may develop over time or shortly after onset of disease. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) imaging of the tracheobronchial tree and lung parenchyma has improved during the last 10 years, and has enabled investigators to study the large airway architecture in detail and assess indirectly the small airway structure. In severe asthmatics, morphologic changes in large airways, quantitatively assessed using 2D-3D airway registration and recent algorithms, are characterized by airway wall thickening, luminal narrowing and bronchial stenoses. Extent of expiratory gas trapping, quantitatively assessed using lung densitometry, may be used to assess indirectly small airway remodeling. Investigators have used these quantitative imaging techniques in order to attempt severity grading of asthma, and to identify clusters of asthmatic patients that differ in morphologic and functional characteristics. Although standardization of image analysis procedures needs to be improved, the identification of remodeling pattern in various phenotypes of severe asthma and the ability to relate airway structures to important clinical outcomes should help target treatment more effectively. PMID:26981458

  17. Differential effects of allergen challenge on large and small airway reactivity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Donovan

    Full Text Available The relative contributions of large and small airways to hyperresponsiveness in asthma have yet to be fully assessed. This study used a mouse model of chronic allergic airways disease to induce inflammation and remodelling and determine whether in vivo hyperresponsiveness to methacholine is consistent with in vitro reactivity of trachea and small airways. Balb/C mice were sensitised (days 0, 14 and challenged (3 times/week, 6 weeks with ovalbumin. Airway reactivity was compared with saline-challenged controls in vivo assessing whole lung resistance, and in vitro measuring the force of tracheal contraction and the magnitude/rate of small airway narrowing within lung slices. Increased airway inflammation, epithelial remodelling and fibrosis were evident following allergen challenge. In vivo hyperresponsiveness to methacholine was maintained in isolated trachea. In contrast, methacholine induced slower narrowing, with reduced potency in small airways compared to controls. In vitro incubation with IL-1/TNFα did not alter reactivity. The hyporesponsiveness to methacholine in small airways within lung slices following chronic ovalbumin challenge was unexpected, given hyperresponsiveness to the same agonist both in vivo and in vitro in tracheal preparations. This finding may reflect the altered interactions of small airways with surrounding parenchymal tissue after allergen challenge to oppose airway narrowing and closure.

  18. Difficult Airway Management in A Case of Thalassaemia Major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Bharti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Difficult to ventilate, difficult to intubate cases are the most challenging to anaesthesiologists. We present a case of thalassaemia with difficult airway who underwent splenectomy surgery. The severe maxillary prominence with protruded upper incisors, limited mouth opening, depressed nasal bridge and narrow anterior nares posed a problem in mask ventilation and subsequent tracheal intubation. The patient was intubated successfully using fibreoptic bronchoscope aided with intubating laryngeal mask airway (Fastrach.

  19. The Physiologically Difficult Airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrod M. Mosier

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Airway management in critically ill patients involves the identification and management of the potentially difficult airway in order to avoid untoward complications. This focus on difficult airway management has traditionally referred to identifying anatomic characteristics of the patient that make either visualizing the glottic opening or placement of the tracheal tube through the vocal cords difficult. This paper will describe the physiologically difficult airway, in which physiologic derangements of the patient increase the risk of cardiovascular collapse from airway management. The four physiologically difficult airways described include hypoxemia, hypotension, severe metabolic acidosis, and right ventricular failure. The emergency physician should account for these physiologic derangements with airway management in critically ill patients regardless of the predicted anatomic difficulty of the intubation.

  20. CCL2 release by airway smooth muscle is increased in asthma and promotes fibrocyte migration

    OpenAIRE

    S. R. Singh; Sutcliffe, A.; Kaur, D; Gupta, S.; Desai, D; Saunders, R.; Brightling, C E

    2014-01-01

    Background Asthma is characterized by variable airflow obstruction, airway inflammation, airway hyper-responsiveness and airway remodelling. Airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperplasia is a feature of airway remodelling and contributes to bronchial wall thickening. We sought to investigate the expression levels of chemokines in primary cultures of ASM cells from asthmatics vs healthy controls and to assess whether differentially expressed chemokines (i) promote fibrocyte (FC) migration towards ASM...

  1. Correlates of Narrow Bracketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander; Nafziger, Julia

    associated with low levels of cognitive reflection. In contrast, the phenomena of setting narrow goals or narrow mental budgets seem not to reflect choice errors due to low cognitive reflection, but are tools to overcome self-control problems. Buying small scale insurance is associated with having narrow...... mental budgets - suggesting that people buy such insurance to insure themselves against the consequences of their own self-control strategy....

  2. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by cAMP response element and mRNA stability in a human airway epithelial cell line exposed to zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. Cyclooxygenase 2-derived eicosanoids are important modulators of airway inflammation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional and posttranscriptional events that regulate COX-2 expression in a human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B exposed to Zn2+. Zn2+ exposure resulted in pronounced increases in COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, which were prevented by pretreatment with the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, implying the involvement of transcriptional regulation. This was supported by the observation of increased COX-2 promoter activity in Zn2+-treated BEAS-2B cells. Mutation of the cAMP response element (CRE), but not the κB-binding sites in the COX-2 promoter markedly reduced COX-2 promoter activity induced by Zn2+. Inhibition of NFκB activation did not block Zn2+-induced COX-2 expression. Measurement of mRNA stability demonstrated that Zn2+ exposure impaired the degradation of COX-2 mRNA in BEAS-2B cells. This message stabilization effect of Zn2+ exposure was shown to be dependent on the integrity of the 3'-untranslated region found in the COX-2 transcript. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the CRE and mRNA stability regulates COX-2 expression induced in BEAS-2B cells exposed to extracellular Zn2+

  3. Upper airway obstruction and pulmonary abnormalities due to lymphoproliferative disease following bone marrow transplantation in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report three patients who developed severe supraglottic airway obstruction due to Epstein-Barr virus lymphoproliferative disease following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. In addition to enlarged pharyngeal lymphoid tissue seen in all three patients, two had supraglottic airway narrowing and two developed pulmonary lymphoproliferative disease. They were treated with unmanipulated T cells or EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Life-threatening upper airway obstruction is a radiologically detectable complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in children. (orig.)

  4. Regulation of cytokine production in human alveolar macrophages and airway epithelial cells in response to ambient air pollution particles: Further mechanistic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to better understand how ambient air particulate matter (PM) affect lung health, the two main airway cell types likely to interact with inhaled particles, alveolar macrophages (AM) and airway epithelial cells have been exposed to particles in vitro and followed for endpoints of inflammation, and oxidant stress. Separation of Chapel Hill PM 10 into fine and coarse size particles revealed that the main proinflammatory response (TNF, IL-6, COX-2) in AM was driven by material present in the coarse PM, containing 90-95% of the stimulatory material in PM10. The particles did not affect expression of hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1), a sensitive marker of oxidant stress. Primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE) also responded to the coarse fraction with higher levels of IL-8 and COX-2, than induced by fine or ultrafine PM. All size PM induced oxidant stress in NHBE, while fine PM induced the highest levels of HO-1 expression. The production of cytokines in AM by both coarse and fine particles was blocked by the toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist E5531 involved in the recognition of LPS and Gram negative bacteria. The NHBE were found to recognize coarse and fine PM through TLR2, a receptor with preference for recognition of Gram positive bacteria. Compared to ambient PM, diesel PM induced only a minimal cytokine response in both AM and NHBE. Instead, diesel suppressed LPS-induced TNF and IL-8 release in AM. Both coarse and fine ambient air PM were also found to inhibit LPS-induced TNF release while silica, volcanic ash or carbon black had no inhibitory effect. Diesel particles did not affect cytokine mRNA induction nor protein accumulation but interfered with the release of cytokine from the cells. Ambient coarse and fine PM, on the other hand, inhibited both mRNA induction and protein production. Exposure to coarse and fine PM decreased the expression of TLR4 in the macrophages. Particle-induced decrease in TLR4 and hyporesponsiveness to LPS

  5. Interleukin-19: a constituent of the regulome that controls antigen presenting cells in the lungs and airway responses to microbial products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Hoffman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interleukin (IL-19 has been reported to enhance chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma but the in vivo mechanism is incompletely understood. Because IL-19 is produced by and regulates cells of the monocyte lineage, our studies focused on in vivo responses of CD11c positive (CD11c+ alveolar macrophages and lung dendritic cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: IL-19-deficient (IL-19-/- mice were studied at baseline (naïve and following intranasal challenge with microbial products, or recombinant cytokines. Naïve IL-19-/- mixed background mice had a decreased percentage of CD11c+ cells in the bronchoalveolar-lavage (BAL due to the deficiency in IL-19 and a trait inherited from the 129-mouse strain. BAL CD11c+ cells from fully backcrossed IL-19-/- BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice expressed significantly less Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHCII in response to intranasal administration of lipopolysaccharide, Aspergillus antigen, or IL-13, a pro-allergic cytokine. Neurogenic-locus-notch-homolog-protein-2 (Notch2 expression by lung monocytes, the precursors of BAL CD11c+ cells, was dysregulated: extracellular Notch2 was significantly decreased, transmembrane/intracellular Notch2 was significantly increased in IL-19-/- mice relative to wild type. Instillation of recombinant IL-19 increased extracellular Notch2 expression and dendritic cells cultured from bone marrow cells in the presence of IL-19 showed upregulated extracellular Notch2. The CD205 positive subset among the CD11c+ cells was 3-5-fold decreased in the airways and lungs of naïve IL-19-/- mice relative to wild type. Airway inflammation and histological changes in the lungs were ameliorated in IL-19-/- mice challenged with Aspergillus antigen that induces T lymphocyte-dependent allergic inflammation but not in IL-19-/- mice challenged with lipopolysaccharide or IL-13. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Because MHCII is the molecular platform that displays peptides to T

  6. Fluoroscopic and computed tomographic features of the pharyngeal airway in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suratt, P M; Dee, P; Atkinson, R L; Armstrong, P; Wilhoit, S C

    1983-04-01

    Because it has been suggested that patients with obstructive sleep apnea have a narrower pharyngeal airway than normal persons, we performed lateral fluoroscopy and computed tomographic (CT) scans of the pharynx in patients with this syndrome. Fluoroscopy in 6 sleeping patients showed that the obstruction always began during inspiration when the soft palate touched the tongue and posterior pharyngeal wall. The CT scans in 9 awake subjects demonstrated that the narrowest section of the airway in patients and in control subjects was the region posterior to the soft palate. The cross-sectional area of this region was significantly narrower in patients than it was in control subjects (p less than 0.001). Because a narrow airway would be more likely to collapse during inspiration than a normal one would (Bernoulli's Principle), we conclude that the narrow airways we observed in awake patients may be an important contributing factor in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:6838055

  7. Response to Commentary on "The influence of lung airways branching structure and diffusion time on measurements and models of short-range 3He gas MR diffusion".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M

    2014-02-01

    Our extensive investigation of the cylinder model theory through numerical modelling and purpose-designed experiments has demonstrated that it does produce inaccurate estimates of airway dimensions at all diffusion times currently used. This is due to a variety of effects: incomplete treatment of non-Gaussian effects, finite airway size, branching geometry, background susceptibility gradients and diffusion time dependence of the (3)He MR diffusion behaviour in acinar airways. The cylinder model is a good starting point for the development of a lung morphometry technique from (3)He diffusion MR but its limitations need to be understood and documented in the interest of reliable clinical interpretation. PMID:24342570

  8. Pneumococcal components induce regulatory T cells that attenuate the development of allergic airways disease by deviating and suppressing the immune response to allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorburn, Alison N; Brown, Alexandra C; Nair, Prema M; Chevalier, Nina; Foster, Paul S; Gibson, Peter G; Hansbro, Philip M

    2013-10-15

    The induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs) to suppress aberrant inflammation and immunity has potential as a therapeutic strategy for asthma. Recently, we identified key immunoregulatory components of Streptococcus pneumoniae, type 3 polysaccharide and pneumolysoid (T+P), which suppress allergic airways disease (AAD) in mouse models of asthma. To elucidate the mechanisms of suppression, we have now performed a thorough examination of the role of Tregs. BALB/c mice were sensitized to OVA (day 0) i.p. and challenged intranasal (12-15 d later) to induce AAD. T+P was administered intratracheally at the time of sensitization in three doses (0, 12, and 24 h). T+P treatment induced an early (36 h-4 d) expansion of Tregs in the mediastinal lymph nodes, and later (12-16 d) increases in these cells in the lungs, compared with untreated allergic controls. Anti-CD25 treatment showed that Treg-priming events involving CD25, CCR7, IL-2, and TGF-β were required for the suppression of AAD. During AAD, T+P-induced Tregs in the lungs displayed a highly suppressive phenotype and had an increased functional capacity. T+P also blocked the induction of IL-6 to prevent the Th17 response, attenuated the expression of the costimulatory molecule CD86 on myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), and reduced the number of DCs carrying OVA in the lung and mediastinal lymph nodes. Therefore, bacterial components (T+P) drive the differentiation of highly suppressive Tregs, which suppress the Th2 response, prevent the Th17 response and disable the DC response resulting in the effective suppression of AAD. PMID:24048894

  9. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Soleas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990. In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium.

  10. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    John P. Soleas; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and fun...

  11. Respiratory syncytial virus infection results in airway hyperresponsiveness and enhanced airway sensitization to allergen.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarze, J.; Hamelmann, E; Bradley, K L; Takeda, K.; Gelfand, E. W.

    1997-01-01

    Viral respiratory infections can predispose to the development of asthma by mechanisms that are presently undetermined. Using a murine model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, acute infection is associated with airway hyperresponsiveness as well as enhanced responses to subsequent sensitization to allergen. We demonstrate that acute viral infection results in increased airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine and pulmonary neutrophilic and eosinophilic inflammation. This res...

  12. A multi-scale approach to airway hyperresponsiveness: from molecule to organ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie eLauzon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR, a characteristic of asthma that involves an excessive reduction in airway caliber, is a complex mechanism reflecting multiple processes that manifest over a large range of length and time scales. At one extreme, molecular interactions determine the force generated by airway smooth muscle (ASM. At the other, the spatially distributed constriction of the branching airways leads to breathing difficulties. Similarly, asthma therapies act at the molecular scale while clinical outcomes are determined by lung function. These extremes are linked by events operating over intermediate scales of length and time. Thus, AHR is an emergent phenomenon that limits our understanding of asthma and confounds the interpretation of studies that address physiological mechanisms over a limited range of scales. A solution is a modular computational model that integrates experimental and mathematical data from multiple scales. This includes, at the molecular scale, kinetics and force production of actin-myosin contractile proteins during cross-bridge and latch-state cycling; at the cellular scale, Ca2+ signaling mechanisms that regulate ASM force production; at the tissue scale, forces acting between contracting ASM and opposing viscoelastic tissue that determine airway narrowing; at the organ scale, the topographic distribution of ASM contraction dynamics that determine mechanical impedance of the lung. At each scale, models are constructed with iterations between theory and experimentation to identify the parameters that link adjacent scales. This modular model establishes algorithms for modeling over a wide range of scales and provides a frame-work for the inclusion of other responses such as inflammation or therapeutic regimes. The goal is to develop this lung model so that it can make predictions about bronchoconstriction and identify the pathophysiologic mechanisms having the greatest impact on AHR and its therapy.

  13. Cleavage of endogenous γENaC and elevated abundance of αENaC are associated with increased Na+ transport in response to apical fluid volume expansion in human H441 airway epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Chong D.; Selvanathar, Indusha A.; Baines, Deborah L.

    2011-01-01

    Using human H441 airway epithelial cells cultured at air–liquid interface (ALI), we have uniquely correlated the functional response to apical fluid volume expansion with the abundance and cleavage of endogenous α- and γENaC proteins in the apical membrane. Monolayers cultured at ALI rapidly elevated I sc when inserted into fluid-filled Ussing chambers. The increase in I sc was not significantly augmented by the apical addition of trypsin, and elevation was abolished by the protease inhibitor...

  14. Effects of prior treatment with salmeterol and formoterol on airway and systemic beta 2 responses to fenoterol.

    OpenAIRE

    Grove, A.; Lipworth, B J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that both salmeterol and formoterol act as partial beta 2 receptor agonists in terms of antagonising the extrapulmonary responses to fenoterol in normal subjects. The aim of the present study was to extend previous observations in evaluating the effect of prior treatment with salmeterol and formoterol on bronchodilator responses to fenoterol, a full beta 2 receptor agonist, in patients with asthma. METHODS: Ten stable asthmatic patients of mean (SE) age...

  15. Systems physiology of the airways in health and obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Jason H T

    2016-09-01

    Fresh air entering the mouth and nose is brought to the blood-gas barrier in the lungs by a repetitively branching network of airways. Provided the individual airway branches remain patent, this airway tree achieves an enormous amplification in cross-sectional area from the trachea to the terminal bronchioles. Obstructive lung diseases such as asthma occur when airway patency becomes compromised. Understanding the pathophysiology of these obstructive diseases thus begins with a consideration of the factors that determine the caliber of an individual airway, which include the force balance between the inward elastic recoil of the airway wall, the outward tethering forces of its parenchymal attachments, and any additional forces due to contraction of airway smooth muscle. Other factors may also contribute significantly to airway narrowing, such as thickening of the airway wall and accumulation of secretions in the lumen. Airway obstruction becomes particularly severe when these various factors occur in concert. However, the effect of airway abnormalities on lung function cannot be fully understood only in terms of what happens to a single airway because narrowing throughout the airway tree is invariably heterogeneous and interdependent. Obstructive lung pathologies thus manifest as emergent phenomena arising from the way in which the airway tree behaves a system. These emergent phenomena are studied with clinical measurements of lung function made by spirometry and by mechanical impedance measured with the forced oscillation technique. Anatomically based computational models are linking these measurements to underlying anatomic structure in systems physiology terms. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:423-437. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1347 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27340818

  16. Narrow trachea in mucopolysaccharidoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine of 56 patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) showed small tracheal diamters on the frontal chest radiographs. Autopsy of an MPS I-H (Hurler disease) patient demonstrated that the small calibre was secondary to deposition of glycosaminoglycan (mucopolysaccharide). Autopsies of two patients with other storage diseases, one with geleophysic dysplasia and one with mucolipidosis II, also exhibited compromise of their airways because of storage material accumulation. (orig.)

  17. Neuromechanical control of the isolated upper airway of mice

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Audrey; Pichard, Luis; Schneider, Hartmut; Patil, Susheel P.; Smith, Philip L; Polotsky, Vsevolod; Schwartz, Alan R.

    2008-01-01

    We characterized the passive structural and active neuromuscular control of pharyngeal collapsibility in mice and hypothesized that pharyngeal collapsibility, which is elevated by anatomic loads, is reduced by active neuromuscular responses to airflow obstruction. To address this hypothesis, we examined the dynamic control of upper airway function in the isolated upper airway of anesthetized C57BL/6J mice. Pressures were lowered downstream and upstream to the upper airway to induce inspirator...

  18. Airway Smooth Muscle in Asthma: Just a Target for Bronchodilation?

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Judith L; Reynold A Panettieri; Banerjee, Audreesh; Berger, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) has long been recognized as the main cell type responsible for bronchial hyperresponsiveness. It has thus been considered as a target for bronchodilation. In asthma however, there is a complex relationship between ASM and inflammatory cells such as mast cells and T lymphocytes. Moreover, the increased ASM mass in the asthmatic airways is one of the key features of airway remodeling. This article aims to review the main concepts about the three possible roles of ASM ...

  19. The relationship between eosinophilia and airway remodelling in mild asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, S J; Rigden, H.M.; Ward, J. A.; Laviolette, M.; Jarjour, N N; Djukanović, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Eosinophilia is a marker of corticosteroid responsiveness and risk of exacerbation in asthma; although it has been linked to submucosal matrix deposition, its relationship with other features of airway remodelling is less clear. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between airway eosinophilia and airway remodelling. Methods Bronchial biopsies from subjects (n = 20 in each group) with mild steroid-naïve asthma, with either low (0–0....

  20. Similar response in male and female B10.RIII mice in a murine model of allergic airway inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matheu, Victor; Barrios, Ysamar; Arnau, Maria-Rosa; Navikas, Vaidrius; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several reports have been published on the gender differences associated with allergies in mice. GOAL: In the present study we investigate the influence of gender on allergy response using a strain of mice, B10.RIII, which is commonly used in the collagen-induced arthritis murine mode...

  1. Polarized secretion of interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8 by human airway epithelia 16HBE14o- cells in response to cationic polypeptide challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Wai-ming Chow

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The airway epithelium participates in asthmatic inflammation in many ways. Target cells of the epithelium can respond to a variety of inflammatory mediators and cytokines. Damage to the surface epithelium occurs following the secretion of eosinophil-derived, highly toxic cationic proteins. Moreover, the surface epithelium itself is responsible for the synthesis and release of cytokines that cause the selective recruitment, retention, and accumulation of various inflammatory cells. To mimic the damage seen during asthmatic inflammation, the bronchial epithelium can be challenged with highly charged cationic polypeptides such as poly-L-arginine. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, human bronchial epithelial cells, 16HBE14o- cells, were "chemically injured" by exposing them to poly-l-arginine as a surrogate of the eosinophil cationic protein. Cytokine antibody array data showed that seven inflammatory mediators were elevated out of the 40 tested, including marked elevation in interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA expression levels were elevated as measured with real-time PCR. Cell culture supernatants from apical and basolateral compartments were collected, and the IL-6 and IL-8 production was quantified with ELISA. IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by 16HBE14o- epithelia into the apical compartment was significantly higher than that from the basolateral compartment. Using specific inhibitors, the production of IL-6 and IL-8 was found to be dependent on p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 MAPK, and NF-kappaB pathways. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results clearly demonstrate that damage to the bronchial epithelia by poly-L-arginine stimulates polarized IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. This apically directed secretion of cytokines may play an important role in orchestrating epithelial cell responses to inflammation.

  2. Matrix metalloprotease 9 mediates neutrophil migration into the airways in response to influenza virus-induced toll-like receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda M Bradley

    Full Text Available The early inflammatory response to influenza virus infection contributes to severe lung disease and continues to pose a serious threat to human health. The mechanisms by which neutrophils gain entry to the respiratory tract and their role during pathogenesis remain unclear. Here, we report that neutrophils significantly contributed to morbidity in a pathological mouse model of influenza virus infection. Using extensive immunohistochemistry, bone marrow transfers, and depletion studies, we identified neutrophils as the predominant pulmonary cellular source of the gelatinase matrix metalloprotease (MMP 9, which is capable of digesting the extracellular matrix. Furthermore, infection of MMP9-deficient mice showed that MMP9 was functionally required for neutrophil migration and control of viral replication in the respiratory tract. Although MMP9 release was toll-like receptor (TLR signaling-dependent, MyD88-mediated signals in non-hematopoietic cells, rather than neutrophil TLRs themselves, were important for neutrophil migration. These results were extended using multiplex analyses of inflammatory mediators to show that neutrophil chemotactic factor, CCL3, and TNFα were reduced in the Myd88⁻/⁻ airways. Furthermore, TNFα induced MMP9 secretion by neutrophils and blocking TNFα in vivo reduced neutrophil recruitment after infection. Innate recognition of influenza virus therefore provides the mechanisms to induce recruitment of neutrophils through chemokines and to enable their motility within the tissue via MMP9-mediated cleavage of the basement membrane. Our results demonstrate a previously unknown contribution of MMP9 to influenza virus pathogenesis by mediating excessive neutrophil migration into the respiratory tract in response to viral replication that could be exploited for therapeutic purposes.

  3. Airway distensibility in Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde Marie; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Dirksen, Asger; Petersen, Jens; De Bruijne, Marleen

    2013-01-01

    airway distensibility, defined as the ratio of relative change in lumen diameter to the relative change in total lung volume (TLV) divided by predicted total lung capacity (pTLC) . Methods – We included 1900 participants from the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST); all randomized to annual low......-dose CT for a period of 5 years (table 1). Images were reconstructed both with high contrast resolution (3 mm, kernel C) for emphysema analysis and with high spatial resolution (1 mm, kernel D) for airway analysis. Images were analysed by in-house developed software designed to segment lungs and localize......), 10-20% (mild), 20%-30% (moderate) or >30% (severe). Spirometry was performed annually and participants were divided into severity groups according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). Data were analysed in a mixed effects regression model with log(airway lumen...

  4. Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induce Both the Unfolded Protein and Integrated Stress Responses in Airway Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Emily F A van 't Wout; Annemarie van Schadewijk; Ria van Boxtel; Dalton, Lucy E.; Clarke, Hanna J.; Jan Tommassen; Marciniak, Stefan J; Hiemstra, Pieter S.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection can be disastrous in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Its toxic effects are largely mediated by secreted virulence factors including pyocyanin, elastase and alkaline protease (AprA). Efficient functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for cell survival and appropriate immune responses, while an excess of unfolded proteins within the ER leads to "ER stress" and activation of the "unfolded pr...

  5. Divergent pro-inflammatory profile of human dendritic cells in response to commensal and pathogenic bacteria associated with the airway microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Steen-Jensen, Daniel Bisgaard; Laursen, Janne Marie; Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov; Musavian, Hanieh Sadat; Butt, Tariq Mahmood; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    2012-01-01

    provoked a 3-5 fold higher production of IL-23, IL-12p70 and IL-10 cytokines compared to the commensal bacteria. Based on the differential cytokine production profiles, the studied airway bacteria could be segregated into three groups (Haemophilus spp. and Moraxella spp. vs. Prevotella spp. and Veillonella...... spp. vs. Actinomyces spp.) reflecting their pro-inflammatory effects on DCs. Co-culture experiments found that Prevotella spp. were able to reduce Haemophillus influenzae-induced IL-12p70 in DCs, whereas no effect was observed on IL-23 and IL-10 production. This study demonstrates intrinsic......Recent studies using culture-independent methods have characterized the human airway microbiota and report microbial communities distinct from other body sites. Changes in these airway bacterial communities appear to be associated with inflammatory lung disease, yet the pro-inflammatory properties...

  6. Blockage of upper airway

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is made through the neck into the airway ( tracheostomy or cricothyrotomy). If the obstruction is due to ... team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Choking Throat Disorders Tracheal Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  7. Equine recurrent airway obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Artur Niedźwiedź

    2014-01-01

    Equine Recurrent Airway Obstruction (RAO), also known as heaves or broken wind, is one of the most common disease in middle-aged horses. Inflammation of the airway is inducted by organic dust exposure. This disease is characterized by neutrophilic inflammation, bronchospasm, excessive mucus production and pathologic changes in the bronchiolar walls. Clinical signs are resolved in 3-4 weeks after environmental changes. Horses suffering from RAO are susceptible to allergens throughout their liv...

  8. Breathtaking TRP channels: TRPA1 and TRPV1 in airway chemosensation and reflex control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessac, Bret F; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2008-12-01

    New studies have revealed an essential role for TRPA1, a sensory neuronal TRP ion channel, in airway chemosensation and inflammation. TRPA1 is activated by chlorine, reactive oxygen species, and noxious constituents of smoke and smog, initiating irritation and airway reflex responses. Together with TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor, TRPA1 may contribute to chemical hypersensitivity, chronic cough, and airway inflammation in asthma, COPD, and reactive airway dysfunction syndrome. PMID:19074743

  9. Breathtaking TRP Channels: TRPA1 and TRPV1 in Airway Chemosensation and Reflex Control

    OpenAIRE

    Bessac, Bret F.; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2008-01-01

    New studies have revealed an essential role for TRPA1, a sensory neuronal TRP ion channel, in airway chemosensation and inflammation. TRPA1 is activated by chlorine, reactive oxygen species and noxious constituents of smoke and smog, initiating irritation and airway reflex responses. Together with TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor, TRPA1 may contribute to chemical hypersensitivity, chronic cough and airway inflammation in asthma, COPD and reactive airway dysfunction syndrome.

  10. Upper airway pressure-flow relationships and pharyngeal constrictor EMG activity during prolonged expiration in awake goats

    OpenAIRE

    O'Halloran, K. D.; Bisgard, G. E.

    2008-01-01

    We undertook the present investigation to establish whether narrowing/closure of the upper airway occurs during spontaneous and provoked respiratory rhythm disturbances and whether pharyngeal constrictor muscle recruitment occurs coincident with upper airway occlusion during prolonged expiratory periods. Upper airway pressure-flow relationships and middle pharyngeal constrictor (mPC) EMG activities were recorded in 11 adult female goats during spontaneous and provoked prolongations in expirat...

  11. Narrow Width Pentaquarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccella, F.; Sorba, P.

    A general study of pentaquarks built with four quarks in a L=1 state and an antiquark in S-wave shows that several of such states are forbidden by a selection rule, which holds in the limit of flavor symmetry, to decay into a baryon and a meson final state. We identify the most promising /line{10} multiplet for the classification of the Θ+ and Ξ-- particles recently discovered with the prediction of a narrow width for both of them.

  12. Narrow width pentaquarks

    CERN Document Server

    Buccella, F

    2004-01-01

    A general study of pentaquarks built with four quarks in a L=1 state and an antiquark in S-wave shows that several of such states are forbidden by a selection rule, which holds in the limit of flavour symmetry, to decay into a baryon and a meson final state. We identify the most promising \\bar{10} multiplet for the classification of the Theta^+ and Xi^{--} particles recently discovered with the prediction of a narrow width for both of them.

  13. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future. PMID:27529028

  14. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. ► Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. ► Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. ► Silibinin suppresses NF-κB transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway. Because NF-κB activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-κB activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-κB activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  15. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Ho [Department of Anatomy, Medical School, Institute for Medical Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Guang Yu [Department of Radiology, Yanbian University Hospital, YanJi 133002 (China); Guo, Hui Shu [Centralab, The First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116011 (China); Piao, Hong Mei [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Yanbian University Hospital, YanJi 133000 (China); Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao [Department of Anatomy and Histology and Embryology, Yanbian University School of Basic Medical Sciences, 977 Gongyuan Road, YanJi 133002, Jilin (China); Lin, Zhen Hua [Department of Pathology, Yanbian University School of Basic Medical Sciences, YanJi 133000 (China); Yan, Guang Hai, E-mail: ghyan@ybu.edu.cn [Department of Anatomy and Histology and Embryology, Yanbian University School of Basic Medical Sciences, 977 Gongyuan Road, YanJi 133002, Jilin (China)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  16. Behavioral Inhibition in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) Is Related to the Airways Response, but Not Immune Measures, Commonly Associated with Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Katie Chun; Lisa A Miller; Schelegle, Edward S.; Hyde, Dallas M.; Capitanio, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral inhibition reflects a disposition to react warily to novel situations, and has been associated with atopic diseases such as asthma. Retrospective work established the relationship between behavioral inhibition in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and airway hyperresponsiveness, but not atopy, and the suggestion was made that behavioral inhibition might index components of asthma that are not immune-related. In the present study, we prospectively examined the relationship between beha...

  17. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Addis, A; Adcock, I;

    2014-01-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will...

  18. Airway epithelial cells initiate the allergen response through transglutaminase 2 by inducing IL-33 expression and a subsequent Th2 response

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Keunhee; Seo, Myung Won; Lee, Ga Young; Byoun, Ok-Jin; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Cho, Sang-Heon; Lee, Dong-Sup

    2013-01-01

    Background Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a post-translational protein-modifying enzyme that catalyzes the transamidation reaction, producing crosslinked or polyaminated proteins. Increased TG2 expression and activity have been reported in various inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammation-associated pulmonary fibrosis, and autoimmune encephalitis. In particular, TG2 from epithelial cells is important during the initial inflammatory response in the lung. In this study, w...

  19. Deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in human upper airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei-Chung; Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene nanomaterials have attracted wide attention in recent years on their application to state-of-the-art technology due to their outstanding physical properties. On the other hand, the nanotoxicity of graphene materials also has rapidly become a serious concern especially in occupational health. Graphene naomaterials inevitably could become airborne in the workplace during manufacturing processes. The inhalation and subsequent deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in the human respiratory tract could potentially result in adverse health effects to exposed workers. Therefore, investigating the deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in the human airways is an indispensable component of an integral approach to graphene occupational health. For this reason, this study carried out a series of airway replica deposition experiments to obtain original experimental data for graphene aerosol airway deposition. In this study, graphene aerosols were generated, size classified, and delivered into human airway replicas (nasal and oral-to-lung airways). The deposition fraction and deposition efficiency of graphene aerosol in the airway replicas were obtained by a novel experimental approach. The experimental results acquired showed that the fractional deposition of graphene aerosols in airway sections studied were all less than 4%, and the deposition efficiency in each airway section was generally lower than 0.03. These results indicate that the majority of the graphene nanomaterial aerosols inhaled into the human respiratory tract could easily penetrate through the head airways as well as the upper part of the tracheobronchial airways and then transit down to the lower lung airways, where undesired biological responses might be induced. PMID:26317666

  20. Airway reconstruction in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Background : Airway anomalies are infrequent but potentially life threatening in children. A program to care for these difficult children was set up at our institution, and this paper summarizes our experience. Methods: A total of 34 children were enrolled in the program over a period of three years. These children were evaluated as per the standard protocols. Treatment was individualized. Results: Of these 34 children, 28 had their airways restored and are doing well. Four children continue to remain on tracheostomy and two will require long term tracheostomy. There were two deaths. All children are under surveillance as there is a risk of recurrence. Conclusions: Airway anomalies are complex problems with significant morbidity and mortality. Current therapeutic modalities allow for good results. Most children were successfully decannulated and did well.

  1. Airway molecular endotypes of asthma: dissecting the heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata; Seibold, Max A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review This review will cover advances over the past year in defining airway endotypes in asthma by gene expression and the relationship between these endotypes and clinical traits. Recent findings Expression profiling studies of asthmatic airway samples continue to reveal significant heterogeneity in airway inflammation and dysfunction. Recent studies have indicated multiple distinct, but related Th2 inflammatory asthma endotypes. Moreover, novel biomarkers of Th2 inflammation are being identified in more accessible nasal brushing and induced sputum cell samples. New data suggest the presence of multiple non-Th2-driven asthma molecular endotypes, including ones related to neutrophilic inflammation, airway remodeling, and chemosensory dysfunction. Many of these endotypes are associated with clinical disease features and treatment response. Summary Molecular endotyping of asthmatic patients using gene expression profiling of airway samples is helping to uncover disease mechanisms and potential novel treatment targets. The advancement of endotyping methods holds the promise of future personalized treatment for asthma. PMID:25961390

  2. Equine recurrent airway obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Niedźwiedź

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Equine Recurrent Airway Obstruction (RAO, also known as heaves or broken wind, is one of the most common disease in middle-aged horses. Inflammation of the airway is inducted by organic dust exposure. This disease is characterized by neutrophilic inflammation, bronchospasm, excessive mucus production and pathologic changes in the bronchiolar walls. Clinical signs are resolved in 3-4 weeks after environmental changes. Horses suffering from RAO are susceptible to allergens throughout their lives, therefore they should be properly managed. In therapy the most importanthing is to eliminate dustexposure, administration of corticosteroids and use bronchodilators to improve pulmonary function.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of epithelial host defense in the airways

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, Joost Bastiaan

    2007-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells are indispensable for the host defense system in the lungs. Various strategies by which epithelial cells protect the lungs against inhaled pathogens have been described. In spite of that, the molecular mechanisms by which epithelial cells initiate and control the host defense response have not been explored systematically. In this thesis, the molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation and regulation of the early epithelial host defense response in the airways were ...

  4. Mechanical ventilation causes airway distension with proinflammatory sequelae in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickles, Hannah T; Sumkauskaite, Migle; Wang, Xin; Wegner, Ingmar; Puderbach, Michael; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2014-07-01

    The pathogenesis of ventilator-induced lung injury has predominantly been attributed to overdistension or mechanical opening and collapse of alveoli, whereas mechanical strain on the airways is rarely taken into consideration. Here, we hypothesized that mechanical ventilation may cause significant airway distension, which may contribute to the pathological features of ventilator-induced lung injury. C57BL/6J mice were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated at tidal volumes of 6, 10, or 15 ml/kg body wt. Mice were imaged by flat-panel volume computer tomography, and central airways were segmented and rendered in 3D for quantitative assessment of airway distension. Alveolar distension was imaged by intravital microscopy. Functional dead space was analyzed in vivo, and proinflammatory cytokine release was analyzed in isolated, ventilated tracheae. CT scans revealed a reversible, up to 2.5-fold increase in upper airway volume during mechanical ventilation compared with spontaneous breathing. Airway distension was most pronounced in main bronchi, which showed the largest volumes at tidal volumes of 10 ml/kg body wt. Conversely, airway distension in segmental bronchi and functional dead space increased almost linearly, and alveolar distension increased even disproportionately with higher tidal volumes. In isolated tracheae, mechanical ventilation stimulated the release of the early-response cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β. Mechanical ventilation causes a rapid, pronounced, and reversible distension of upper airways in mice that is associated with an increase in functional dead space. Upper airway distension is most pronounced at moderate tidal volumes, whereas higher tidal volumes redistribute preferentially to the alveolar compartment. Airway distension triggers proinflammatory responses and may thus contribute relevantly to ventilator-induced pathologies. PMID:24816486

  5. Dose the oropharyngeal fat tissue influence the oropharyngeal airway in snorers? Dynamic CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine if snorers have a narrower oropharyngeal airway area because of fat infiltration, and an elevated body mass index. Ten control subjects and 19 patients that snored were evaluated. We obtained 2-mm-thick axial CT scan images every 0.6 seconds during expiration and inspiration at the same level of the oropharynx. We selected the largest and the smallest oropharyngeal airway areas and found the differences. From the slice that had the smallest oropharyngeal airway area, the thickness of the parapharyngeal and subcutaneous fat was measured. The measurements from the left and right side were added together and single values for parapharyngeal and subcutaneous fat tissue thickness were then found. The conventional measure of body mass index was significantly higher in the snorers (ρ 0.05). We concluded that the oropharyngeal fat deposition in snorers is not an important factor, and it does not predispose a person to the upper airway narrowing

  6. Issues of critical airway management (Which anesthesia; which surgical airway?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Giuseppe Bonanno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Which anesthesia for patients with critical airway? Safe and effective analgesia and anesthesia in critical airway is a skilled task especially after severe maxillofacial injury combined with head injury and hemorrhagic shock. If on one side sedation is wanted, on the other hand it may worsen the airway and hemodynamic situation to a point where hypoventilation and decrease of blood pressure, common side-effect of many opioids, may prejudice the patient′s level of consciousness and hemodynamic compensation, compounding an already critical situation. What to do when endotracheal intubation fails and blood is trickling down the airways in an unconscious patient or when a conscious patient has to sit up to breathe? Which surgical airway in critical airway? Comparative studies among the various methods of emergency surgical airway would be unethical; furthermore, operator′s training and experience is relevant for indications and performance.

  7. Issues of critical airway management (Which anesthesia; which surgical airway?).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Fabrizio Giuseppe

    2012-10-01

    Which anesthesia for patients with critical airway? Safe and effective analgesia and anesthesia in critical airway is a skilled task especially after severe maxillofacial injury combined with head injury and hemorrhagic shock. If on one side sedation is wanted, on the other hand it may worsen the airway and hemodynamic situation to a point where hypoventilation and decrease of blood pressure, common side-effect of many opioids, may prejudice the patient's level of consciousness and hemodynamic compensation, compounding an already critical situation. What to do when endotracheal intubation fails and blood is trickling down the airways in an unconscious patient or when a conscious patient has to sit up to breathe? Which surgical airway in critical airway? Comparative studies among the various methods of emergency surgical airway would be unethical; furthermore, operator's training and experience is relevant for indications and performance. PMID:23248494

  8. Potential of Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors in Modulating Airway Innate Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rahul Kushwah; Huibi Cao; Jim Hu

    2007-01-01

    Innate immune responses form the first line of defense against foreign insults and recently significant advances have been made in our understanding of the initiation of innate immune response along with its ability to modulate inflammation. In airway diseases such as asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis, over reacting of the airway innate immune responses leads to cytokine imbalance and airway remodeling or damage. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors have the potential to deliver genes to modulate airway innate immune responses and have many advantages over its predecessors. However, there still are a few limitations that need to be addressed prior to their use in clinical applications.

  9. Computation with narrow CTCs

    CERN Document Server

    Say, A C Cem

    2011-01-01

    We examine some variants of computation with closed timelike curves (CTCs), where various restrictions are imposed on the memory of the computer, and the information carrying capacity and range of the CTC. We give full characterizations of the classes of languages recognized by polynomial time probabilistic and quantum computers that can send a single classical bit to their own past. Such narrow CTCs are demonstrated to add the power of limited nondeterminism to deterministic computers, and lead to exponential speedup in constant-space probabilistic and quantum computation. We show that, given a time machine with constant negative delay, one can implement CTC-based computations without the need to know about the runtime beforehand.

  10. Upper airway evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors are evaluating upper-airway sleep disorders with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and x-ray cine computed tomography (CT). Fixed structural anatomy is visualized with multisection spin-echo MR imaging, the dynamic component with cine CT. Unique aspects of the study are described in this paper

  11. Methods of airway resistance assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbankowski, Tomasz; Przybyłowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Airway resistance is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of the airflow in the airways. The most frequent methods used to measure airway resistance are whole-body plethysmography, the interrupter technique and the forced oscillation technique. All these methods allow to measure resistance during respiration at the level close to tidal volume, they do not require forced breathing manoeuvres or deep breathing during measurement. The most popular method for measuring airway resistance is whole-body plethysmography. The results of plethysmography include among others the following parameters: airway resistance (Raw), airway conductance (Gaw), specific airway resistance (sRaw) and specific airway conductance (sGaw). The interrupter technique is based on the assumption that at the moment of airway occlusion, air pressure in the mouth is equal to the alveolar pressure . In the forced oscillation technique (FOT), airway resistance is calculated basing on the changes in pressure and flow caused by air vibration. The methods for measurement of airway resistance that are described in the present paper seem to be a useful alternative to the most common lung function test - spirometry. The target group in which these methods may be widely used are particularly the patients who are unable to perform spirometry. PMID:27238174

  12. DIFFICULT AIRWAY IN THYROID SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuello-Azcárate JJ

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thyroid surgery has been considered as a risk factor for the management of difficult airway.Method: We review the relevant literature related to the difficult airway and thyroid surgery.Comments: Endothoracic goiter, deformity of the airway, compression of the airway and thyroid cancer do not appear to have an influence on the difficulty for intubation.Classical parameters have a better predictive value: mouth opening less than 35 mm, Mallampati II-IV, short neck, neck movility less than 80 degrees, thyromental distance less than 60 mm, retrognathia, Cormack index III-IV, macroglossia, inability to protude the teeth and body mass index (BMI greater than 35 Kg/m2.Conclusions: According to the literature, thyroid disease does not increase the risk for a difficult airway (ventilation / intubation.The risk of an unexpected difficult airway (false negative cannot be eliminated.All patients must undergo an assessment of the airway

  13. Supraglottic airway devices in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, S; Jayanthi, R

    2011-01-01

    Modern anaesthesia practice in children was made possible by the invention of the endotracheal tube (ET), which made lengthy and complex surgical procedures feasible without the disastrous complications of airway obstruction, aspiration of gastric contents or asphyxia. For decades, endotracheal intubation or bag-and-mask ventilation were the mainstays of airway management. In 1983, this changed with the invention of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), the first supraglottic airway device that blended features of the facemask with those of the ET, providing ease of placement and hands-free maintenance along with a relatively secure airway. The invention and development of the LMA by Dr. Archie Brain has had a significant impact on the practice of anaesthesia, management of the difficult airway and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children and neonates. This review article will be a brief about the clinical applications of supraglottic airways in children. PMID:22174464

  14. Airway epithelial cell tolerance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verghese Margrith W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The respiratory tract epithelium is a critical environmental interface that regulates inflammation. In chronic infectious airway diseases, pathogens may permanently colonize normally sterile luminal environments. Host-pathogen interactions determine the intensity of inflammation and thus, rates of tissue injury. Although many cells become refractory to stimulation by pathogen products, it is unknown whether the airway epithelium becomes either tolerant or hypersensitive in the setting of chronic infection. Our goals were to characterize the response of well-differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to understand whether repeated exposure induced tolerance and, if so, to explore the mechanism(s. Methods The apical surface of well-differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial cell cultures was repetitively challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture filtrates or the bacterial media control. Toxicity, cytokine production, signal transduction events and specific effects of dominant negative forms of signaling molecules were examined. Additional experiments included using IL-1β and TNFα as challenge agents, and performing comparative studies with a novel airway epithelial cell line. Results An initial challenge of the apical surface of polarized human airway epithelial cells with Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture filtrates induced phosphorylation of IRAK1, JNK, p38, and ERK, caused degradation of IκBα, generation of NF-κB and AP-1 transcription factor activity, and resulted in IL-8 secretion, consistent with activation of the Toll-like receptor signal transduction pathway. These responses were strongly attenuated following a second Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or IL-1β, but not TNFα, challenge. Tolerance was associated with decreased IRAK1 protein content and kinase activity and dominant negative IRAK1 inhibited Pseudomonas aeruginosa -stimulated NF-κB transcriptional

  15. Management of the Traumatized Airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Uday; McCunn, Maureen; Smith, Charles E; Pittet, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence-based approach regarding the best practice for airway management in patients with a traumatized airway. General recommendations for the management of the traumatized airway are summarized in table 5. Airway trauma may not be readily apparent, and its evaluation requires a high level of suspicion for airway disruption and compression. For patients with facial trauma, control of the airway may be significantly impacted by edema, bleeding, inability to clear secretions, loss of bony support, and difficulty with face mask ventilation. With the airway compression from neck swelling or hematoma, intubation attempts can further compromise the airway due to expanding hematoma. For patients with airway disruption, the goal is to pass the tube across the injured area without disrupting it or to insert the airway distal to the injury using a surgical approach. If airway injury is extensive, a surgical airway distal to the site of injury may be the best initial approach. Alternatively, if orotracheal intubation is chosen, spontaneous ventilation may be maintained or RSI may be performed. RSI is a common approach. Thus, some of the patients intubated may subsequently require tracheostomy. A stable patient with limited injuries may not require intubation but should be watched carefully for at least several hours. Because of a paucity of evidence-based data, the choice between these approaches and the techniques utilized is a clinical decision depending on the patient's condition, clinical setting, injuries to airway and other organs, and available personnel, expertise, and equipment. Inability to obtain a definitive airway is always an absolute indication for an emergency cricothyroidotomy or surgical tracheostomy. PMID:26517857

  16. Effect of the Velvet Antler of Formosan Sambar Deer (Cervus unicolor swinhoei on the Prevention of an Allergic Airway Response in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yun Kuo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two mouse models were used to assay the antiallergic effects of the velvet antler (VA of Formosan sambar deer (Cervus unicolor swinhoei in this study. The results using the ovalbumin- (OVA- sensitized mouse model showed that the levels of total IgE and OVA-specific IgE were reduced after VA powder was administrated for 4 weeks. In addition, the ex vivo results indicated that the secretion of T helper cell 1 (Th1, regulatory T (Treg, and Th17 cytokines by splenocytes was significantly increased (P<0.05 when VA powder was administered to the mice. Furthermore, OVA-allergic asthma mice that have been orally administrated with VA powder showed a strong inhibition of Th2 cytokine and proinflammatory cytokine production in bronchoalveolar fluid compared to control mice. An increase in the regulatory T-cell population of splenocytes in the allergic asthma mice after oral administration of VA was also observed. All the features of the asthmatic phenotype, including airway inflammation and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness, were reduced by treatment with VA. These findings support the hypothesis that oral feeding of VA may be an effective way of alleviating asthmatic symptoms in humans.

  17. Classification of pulmonary airway disease based on mucosal color analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Melissa; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Riker, David; Ferguson, John Scott; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    Airway mucosal color changes occur in response to the development of bronchial diseases including lung cancer, cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma. These associated changes are often visualized using standard macro-optical bronchoscopy techniques. A limitation to this form of assessment is that the subtle changes that indicate early stages in disease development may often be missed as a result of this highly subjective assessment, especially in inexperienced bronchoscopists. Tri-chromatic CCD chip bronchoscopes allow for digital color analysis of the pulmonary airway mucosa. This form of analysis may facilitate a greater understanding of airway disease response. A 2-step image classification approach is employed: the first step is to distinguish between healthy and diseased bronchoscope images and the second is to classify the detected abnormal images into 1 of 4 possible disease categories. A database of airway mucosal color constructed from healthy human volunteers is used as a standard against which statistical comparisons are made from mucosa with known apparent airway abnormalities. This approach demonstrates great promise as an effective detection and diagnosis tool to highlight potentially abnormal airway mucosa identifying a region possibly suited to further analysis via airway forceps biopsy, or newly developed micro-optical biopsy strategies. Following the identification of abnormal airway images a neural network is used to distinguish between the different disease classes. We have shown that classification of potentially diseased airway mucosa is possible through comparative color analysis of digital bronchoscope images. The combination of the two strategies appears to increase the classification accuracy in addition to greatly decreasing the computational time.

  18. Airways Disease: Phenotyping Heterogeneity Using Measures of Airway Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui Salman; Brightling Christopher E

    2007-01-01

    Despite asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease being widely regarded as heterogeneous diseases, a consensus for an accurate system of classification has not been agreed. Recent studies have suggested that the recognition of subphenotypes of airway disease based on the pattern of airway inflammation may be particularly useful in increasing our understanding of the disease. The use of non-invasive markers of airway inflammation has suggested the presence of four distinct phenotypes: ...

  19. Issues of critical airway management (Which anesthesia; which surgical airway?)

    OpenAIRE

    Fabrizio Giuseppe Bonanno

    2012-01-01

    Which anesthesia for patients with critical airway? Safe and effective analgesia and anesthesia in critical airway is a skilled task especially after severe maxillofacial injury combined with head injury and hemorrhagic shock. If on one side sedation is wanted, on the other hand it may worsen the airway and hemodynamic situation to a point where hypoventilation and decrease of blood pressure, common side-effect of many opioids, may prejudice the patient′s level of consciousness and hemodynami...

  20. Effects of hyperosmolarity on human isolated central airways.

    OpenAIRE

    Jongejan, R. C.; de Jongste, J. C.; Raatgeep, R. C.; Stijnen, T; Bonta, I.L.; Kerrebijn, K. F.

    1991-01-01

    1. We studied the effect of hyperosmolarity on human isolated airways because a better understanding of the effect of hyperosmolarity on the human airway wall may improve insight into the pathophysiology of hyperosmolarity-induced bronchoconstriction in asthma. 2. In cartilaginous bronchial rings dissected from fresh human lung tissue, hyperosmolar krebs-Henseleit buffer (450 mosM, extra sodium chloride added) evoked a biphasic response: a rapid relaxation phase (peak after 5.0 +/- 0.3 min) f...

  1. Biomechanics of liquid-epithelium interactions in pulmonary airways

    OpenAIRE

    Ghadiali, Samir N.; Gaver, Donald P.

    2008-01-01

    The delicate structure of the lung epithelium makes it susceptible to surface tension induced injury. For example, the cyclic reopening of collapsed and/or fluid-filled airways during the ventilation of injured lungs generates hydrodynamic forces that further damage the epithelium and exacerbate lung injury. The interactions responsible for epithelial injury during airway reopening are fundamentally multiscale, since air-liquid interfacial dynamics affect global lung mechanics, while surface ...

  2. Brachycephalic airway syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Stacy D

    2013-08-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome is a common finding in brachycephalic breeds. A combination of primary and secondary changes can progress to life-threatening laryngeal collapse. Early recognition of primary anatomic abnormalities that include stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, and hypoplastic trachea would allow the clinician to make early recommendations for medical and surgical management, which can improve the quality of life in affected animals. PMID:24182996

  3. LIGHT is a crucial mediator of airway remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jen-Yu; Chiang, Shyh-Ren; Tsai, Ming-Ju; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Chong, Inn-Wen; Shieh, Jiunn-Min; Hsu, Ya-Ling

    2015-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory airway diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are major health problems globally. Airway epithelial cells play important role in airway remodeling, which is a critical process in the pathogenesis of diseases. This study aimed to demonstrate that LIGHT, an inflammatory factor secreted by T cells after allergen exposure, is responsible for promoting airway remodeling. LIGHT increased primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and expressing MMP-9. The induction of EMT was associated with increased NF-κB activation and p300/NF-κB association. The interaction of NF-κB with p300 facilitated NF-κB acetylation, which in turn, was bound to the promoter of ZEB1, resulting in E-cadherin downregulation. LIGHT also stimulated HBECs to produce numerous cytokines/chemokines that could worsen airway inflammation. Furthermore, LIGHT enhanced HBECs to secrete activin A, which increased bronchial smooth muscle cell (BSMC) migration. In contrast, depletion of activin A decreased such migration. The findings suggest a new molecular determinant of LIGHT-mediated pathogenic changes in HBECs and that the LIGHT-related vicious cycle involving HBECs and BSMCs may be a potential target for the treatment of chronic inflammation airway diseases with airway remodeling. PMID:25251281

  4. Narrow, duplicated internal auditory canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, T. [Servico de Neurorradiologia, Hospital Garcia de Orta, Avenida Torrado da Silva, 2801-951, Almada (Portugal); Shayestehfar, B. [Department of Radiology, UCLA Oliveview School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Lufkin, R. [Department of Radiology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2003-05-01

    A narrow internal auditory canal (IAC) constitutes a relative contraindication to cochlear implantation because it is associated with aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve or its cochlear branch. We report an unusual case of a narrow, duplicated IAC, divided by a bony septum into a superior relatively large portion and an inferior stenotic portion, in which we could identify only the facial nerve. This case adds support to the association between a narrow IAC and aplasia or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. The normal facial nerve argues against the hypothesis that the narrow IAC is the result of a primary bony defect which inhibits the growth of the vestibulocochlear nerve. (orig.)

  5. Lipids in airway secretions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipids form a significant portion of airway mucus yet they have not received the same attention that epithelial glycoproteins have. We have analysed, by thin layer chromatography, lipids present in airway mucus under 'normal' and hypersecretory (pathological) conditions.The 'normals' included (1) bronchial lavage obtained from healthy human volunteers and from dogs and (2) secretions produced ''in vitro'' by human (bronchial) and canine (tracheal) explants. Hypersecretory mucus samples included (1) lavage from dogs made bronchitic by exposure to SO2, (2) bronchial aspirates from acute and chronic tracheostomy patients, (3) sputum from patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis and (4) postmortem secretions from patients who died from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or from status asthmaticus. Cholesterol was found to be the predominant lipid in 'normal' mucus with lesser amounts of phospholipids. No glycolipids were detected. In the hypersecretory mucus, in addition to neutral and phospholipids, glycolipids were present in appreciable amounts, often the predominant species, suggesting that these may be useful as markers of disease. Radioactive precursors 14C acetate and 14C palmitate were incorporated into lipids secreted ''in vitro'' by canine tracheal explants indicating that they are synthesised by the airway. (author)

  6. Lipids in airway secretions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskar, K.R.; DeFeudis O' Sullivan, D.; Opaskar-Hincman, H.; Reid, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Lipids form a significant portion of airway mucus yet they have not received the same attention that epithelial glycoproteins have. We have analysed, by thin layer chromatography, lipids present in airway mucus under 'normal' and hypersecretory (pathological) conditions.The 'normals' included (1) bronchial lavage obtained from healthy human volunteers and from dogs and (2) secretions produced ''in vitro'' by human (bronchial) and canine (tracheal) explants. Hypersecretory mucus samples included (1) lavage from dogs made bronchitic by exposure to SO/sub 2/, (2) bronchial aspirates from acute and chronic tracheostomy patients, (3) sputum from patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis and (4) postmortem secretions from patients who died from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or from status asthmaticus. Cholesterol was found to be the predominant lipid in 'normal' mucus with lesser amounts of phospholipids. No glycolipids were detected. In the hypersecretory mucus, in addition to neutral and phospholipids, glycolipids were present in appreciable amounts, often the predominant species, suggesting that these may be useful as markers of disease. Radioactive precursors /sup 14/C acetate and /sup 14/C palmitate were incorporated into lipids secreted ''in vitro'' by canine tracheal explants indicating that they are synthesised by the airway.

  7. Upper airway resistance syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, N; Fletcher, E C

    1998-07-01

    Many clinicians are familiar with the clinical symptoms and signs of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In its most blatant form, OSA is complete airway obstruction with repetitive, prolonged pauses in breathing, arterial oxyhemoglobin desaturation; followed by arousal with resumption of breathing. Daytime symptoms of this disorder include excessive daytime somnolence, intellectual dysfunction, and cardiovascular effects such as systemic hypertension, angina, myocardial infarction, and stroke. It has been recently recognized that increased pharyngeal resistance with incomplete obstruction can lead to a constellation of symptoms identical to OSA called "upper airway resistance syndrome" (UARS). The typical findings of UARS on sleep study are: (1) repetitive arousals from EEG sleep coinciding with a (2) waxing and waning of the respiratory airflow pattern and (3) increased respiratory effort as measured by esophageal pressure monitoring. There may be few, if any, obvious apneas or hypopneas with desaturation, but snoring may be a very prominent finding. Treatment with nasal positive airway pressure (NCPAP) eliminates the symptoms and confirms the diagnosis. Herein we describe two typical cases of UARS. PMID:9676067

  8. A new compound, 1H,8H-pyrano[3,4-c]pyran-1,8-dione, suppresses airway epithelial cell inflammatory responses in a murine model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H; Han, A R; Kim, Y; Choi, S H; Ko, E; Lee, N Y; Jeong, J H; Kim, S H; Bae, H

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies have established eosinophilia as a sign of allergic disorders. Activation of eosinophils in the airways is believed to cause epithelial tissue injury, contraction of airway smooth muscle and increased bronchial responsiveness. As part of the search for new antiasthmatic agents produced by medicinal plants, the effects of 270 standardized medicinal plant extracts on cytokine-activated A549 human lung epithelial cells were evaluated. After several rounds of activity-guided screening, the new natural compound, 1H,8H-Pyrano[3,4-c]pyran-1,8-dione (PPY), was isolated from Vitex rotundifolia L. To elucidate the mechanism by which the anti-asthmatic responses of PPY occurred in vitro, lung epithelial cells (A549 cell) were stimulated with TNF-alpha, IL-4 and IL-1beta to induce the expression of chemokines and adhesion molecules involved in eosinophil chemotaxis. PPY treatments reduced the expression of eotaxin, IL-8, IL-16 and VCAM-1 mRNA significantly. Additionally, PPY reduced eotaxin secretion in a dose-dependent manner and significantly inhibited eosinophil migration toward A549 medium. In addition, PPY treatment suppressed the phosphorylation of p65 and ERK1/2, suggesting that it can inhibit the MAPK/NF-KB pathway. To clarify the anti-inflammatory and antiasthmatic effects of PPY in vivo, we examined the influence of PPY on the development of pulmonary eosinophilic inflammation in a murine model of asthma. To accomplish this, mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) and then examined for the following typical asthmatic reactions: an increase in the number of eosinophils in BALF; the presence of Th2 cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-5 in the BALF; the presence of allergen-specific IgE in the serum; and a marked influx of inflammatory cells into the lung. Taken together, our results revealed that PPY exerts profound inhibitory effects on the accumulation of eosinophils into the airways while reducing the levels of IL-4, IL-5

  9. Research Upregulation of CD23 (FcεRII) Expression in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells (huASMC) in Response to IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belleau, Joseph T; Gandhi, Radha K; McPherson, Holly M; Lew, D Betty

    2005-01-01

    Background Airway smooth muscle cells play a key role in remodeling that contributes to airway hyperreactivity. Airway smooth muscle remodeling includes hypertrophy and hyperplasia. It has been previously shown that the expression of CD23 on ASMC in rabbits can be induced by the IgE component of the atopic serum. We examined if other components of atopic serum are capable of inducing CD23 expression independent of IgE. Methods Serum starved huASMC were stimulated with either IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-13, IL-5, PGD2, LTD4, tryptase or a combination of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 each with GM-CSF for a period of 24 h. CD23 expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, western blot, and indirect immunofluorescence. Results The CD23 protein expression was upregulated in huASMC in response to IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF. The percentage of cells with increased fluorescence intensity above the control was 25.1 ± 4.2% (IL-4), 15.6 ± 2.7% (GM-CSF) and 32.9 ± 13.9% (IL-4/GMCSF combination)(n = 3). The protein content of IL-4/GMCSF stimulated cells was significantly elevated. Expression of CD23 in response to IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-4/GM-CSF was accompanied by changes in cell morphology including depolymerization of isoactin fibers, cell spreading, and membrane ruffling. Western blot revealed abundant expression of the IL-4Rα and a low level expression of IL-2Rγc in huASMC. Stimulation with IL-4 resulted in the phosphorylation of STAT-6 and an increase in the expression of the IL-2Rγc. Conclusion CD23 on huASMC is upregulated by IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF. The expression of CD23 is accompanied by an increase in cell volume and an increase in protein content per cell, suggesting hypertrophy. Upregulation of CD23 by IL-4/GM-CSF results in phenotypic changes in huASMC that could play a role in cell migration or a change in the synthetic function of the cells. Upregulation of CD23 in huASMC by IL-4 and GM-CSF can contribute to changes in huASMC and may provide an avenue for new therapeutic options

  10. Research Upregulation of CD23 (FcεRII Expression in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells (huASMC in Response to IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lew D Betty

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway smooth muscle cells play a key role in remodeling that contributes to airway hyperreactivity. Airway smooth muscle remodeling includes hypertrophy and hyperplasia. It has been previously shown that the expression of CD23 on ASMC in rabbits can be induced by the IgE component of the atopic serum. We examined if other components of atopic serum are capable of inducing CD23 expression independent of IgE. Methods Serum starved huASMC were stimulated with either IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-13, IL-5, PGD2, LTD4, tryptase or a combination of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 each with GM-CSF for a period of 24 h. CD23 expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, western blot, and indirect immunofluorescence. Results The CD23 protein expression was upregulated in huASMC in response to IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF. The percentage of cells with increased fluorescence intensity above the control was 25.1 ± 4.2% (IL-4, 15.6 ± 2.7% (GM-CSF and 32.9 ± 13.9% (IL-4/GMCSF combination(n = 3. The protein content of IL-4/GMCSF stimulated cells was significantly elevated. Expression of CD23 in response to IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-4/GM-CSF was accompanied by changes in cell morphology including depolymerization of isoactin fibers, cell spreading, and membrane ruffling. Western blot revealed abundant expression of the IL-4Rα and a low level expression of IL-2Rγc in huASMC. Stimulation with IL-4 resulted in the phosphorylation of STAT-6 and an increase in the expression of the IL-2Rγc. Conclusion CD23 on huASMC is upregulated by IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF. The expression of CD23 is accompanied by an increase in cell volume and an increase in protein content per cell, suggesting hypertrophy. Upregulation of CD23 by IL-4/GM-CSF results in phenotypic changes in huASMC that could play a role in cell migration or a change in the synthetic function of the cells. Upregulation of CD23 in huASMC by IL-4 and GM-CSF can contribute to changes in huASMC and may provide an avenue

  11. Tachykinin receptors mediating airway marcomolecular secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three tachykinin receptor types, termed NK1, NK2, and NK3, can be distinguished by the relative potency of various peptides in eliciting tissue responses. Airway macromolecular secretion is stimulated by the tachykinin substance P (SP). The purposes of this study were to determine the tachykinin receptor subtype responsible for this stimulation, and to examine the possible involvement of other neurotransmitters in mediating this effect. Ferret tracheal explants maintained in organ culture were labeled with 3H-glucosamine, a precursor of high molecular weight glycoconjugates (HMWG) which are released by airway secretory cells. Secretion of labeled HMWG then was determined in the absence and presence of the tachykinins SP, neurokinin A (NKA), neurokinin B (NKB), physalaemin (PHY), and eledoisin (ELE). To evaluate the possible contribution of other mediators, tachykinin stimulation was examined in the presence of several receptor blockers

  12. Anticholinergic treatment in airways diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flynn, Robert A

    2009-10-01

    The prevalence of chronic airways diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma is increasing. They lead to symptoms such as a cough and shortness of breath, partially through bronchoconstriction. Inhaled anticholinergics are one of a number of treatments designed to treat bronchoconstriction in airways disease. Both short-acting and long-acting agents are now available and this review highlights their efficacy and adverse event profile in chronic airways diseases.

  13. Predictors of Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Elite Athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toennesen, Louise L; Porsbjerg, Celeste; Pedersen, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Elite athletes frequently experience asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). We aimed to investigate predictors of airway pathophysiology in a group of unselected elite summer-sport athletes, training for the summer 2008 Olympic Games, including markers of airway inflammation...

  14. Higher harmonics of ac voltage response in narrow strips of YBa2Cu3O7 thin films: evidence for strong thermal fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on measurements of higher harmonics of the ac voltage response in strips of YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films as a function of temperature, frequency and ac current amplitude. The third (fifth) harmonic of the local voltage is found to exhibit a negative (positive) peak at the superconducting transition temperature and their amplitudes are closely related to the slope (derivative) of the first (ohmic) harmonic. The peaks practically do not depend on frequency and no even (second or fourth) harmonics are detected. The observed data can be interpreted in terms of ac current induced thermal modulation of the sample temperature added to strong thermally activated fluctuations in the transition region

  15. Dose-response met-RANTES treatment of experimental periodontitis: a narrow edge between the disease severity attenuation and infection control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Repeke

    Full Text Available Chemokines and chemokine receptors have been implicated in the selective migration of leukocyte subsets to periodontal tissues, which consequently influences the disease outcome. Among these chemoattractants, the chemokines CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5 and its receptors, CCR1 and CCR5, have been associated with increased disease severity in mice and humans. Therefore, in this study we investigated the modulation of experimental periodontitis outcome by the treatment with a specific antagonist of CCR1 and 5 receptors, called met-RANTES. C57Bl/6 mice was orally infected with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and treated with 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.5 and 5 mg doses of met-RANTES on alternate days, and evaluated by morphometric, cellular, enzymatic and molecular methods. At 0.5 mg up to 5 mg doses, a strong reduction in the alveolar bone loss and inflammatory cell migration were observed. Interestingly, 5 mg dose treatment resulted in the maximum inhibition of inflammatory cell migration, but resulted in a similar inhibition of bone loss when compared with the lower doses, and also resulted in increased bacterial load and CRP response. When 0.5 and 5 mg therapy regimens were compared it was observed that both therapeutic protocols were able to downregulate the levels of pro-inflammatory, Th1-type and osteoclastogenic cytokines, and CD3+ and F4/80+ cells migration to periodontal tissues, but the high dose modulates host response in a more pronounced and unspecific and excessive way, interfering also with the production of antimicrobial mediators such as MPO, iNOS and IgG, and with GR1+ and CD19+ cells migration. Our results demonstrate a thin line between beneficial immunoregulation and impaired host defense during experimental periodontitis, and the determination of the exact equilibrium point is mandatory for the improvement of immune-targeted therapy of periodontitis.

  16. Zinc supplementation alters airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness to a common allergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Carrie I

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zinc supplementation can modulate immunity through inhibition of NF-κB, a transcription factor that controls many immune response genes. Thus, we sought to examine the mechanism by which zinc supplementation tempers the response to a common allergen and determine its effect on allergic airway inflammation. Methods Mice were injected with zinc gluconate prior to German cockroach (GC feces (frass exposure and airway inflammation was assessed. Primary bone marrow-derived neutrophils and DMSO-differentiated HL-60 cells were used to assess the role of zinc gluconate on tumor necrosis factor (TNFα expression. NF-κB:DNA binding and IKK activity were assessed by EMSA and in vitro kinase assay. Protein levels of A20, RIP1 and TRAF6 were assessed by Western blot analysis. Establishment of allergic airway inflammation with GC frass was followed by administration of zinc gluconate. Airway hyperresponsiveness, serum IgE levels, eosinophilia and Th2 cytokine production were assessed. Results Administration of zinc gluconate prior to allergen exposure resulted in significantly decreased neutrophil infiltration and TNFα cytokine release into the airways. This correlated with decreased NF-κB activity in the whole lung. Treatment with zinc gluconate significantly decreased GC frass-mediated TNFα production from bone-marrow derived neutrophils and HL-60 cells. We confirmed zinc-mediated decreases in NF-κB:DNA binding and IKK activity in HL-60 cells. A20, a natural inhibitor of NF-κB and a zinc-fingered protein, is a potential target of zinc. Zinc treatment did not alter A20 levels in the short term, but resulted in the degradation of RIP1, an important upstream activator of IKK. TRAF6 protein levels were unaffected. To determine the application for zinc as a therapeutic for asthma, we administered zinc following the establishment of allergic airway inflammation in a murine model. Zinc supplementation decreased airway hyperresponsiveness

  17. Neutrophils mediate airway hyperresponsiveness after chlorine-induced airway injury in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Toby K; Goldberger, Madison; Allard, Benoit; Farahnak, Soroor; Hamamoto, Yoichiro; O'Sullivan, Michael; Hirota, Nobuaki; Martel, Guy; Rousseau, Simon; Martin, James G

    2015-04-01

    Chlorine gas (Cl2) inhalation causes oxidative stress, airway epithelial damage, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and neutrophilia. We evaluated the effect of neutrophil depletion on Cl2-induced AHR and its effect on the endogenous antioxidant response, and if eosinophils or macrophages influence Cl2-induced AHR. We exposed male Balb/C mice to 100 ppm Cl2 for 5 minutes. We quantified inflammatory cell populations in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), the antioxidant response in lung tissue by quantitative PCR, and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) nuclear translocation by immunofluorescence. In vitro, NRF2 nuclear translocation in response to exogenous hypochlorite was assessed using a luciferase assay. Anti-granulocyte receptor-1 antibody or anti-Ly6G was used to deplete neutrophils. The effects of neutrophil depletion on IL-13 and IL-17 were measured by ELISA. Eosinophils and macrophages were depleted using TRFK5 or clodronate-loaded liposomes, respectively. AHR was evaluated with the constant-phase model in response to inhaled aerosolized methacholine. Our results show that Cl2 exposure induced neutrophilia and increased expression of NRF2 mRNA, superoxide dismutase-1, and heme-oxygenase 1. Neutrophil depletion abolished Cl2-induced AHR in large conducting airways and prevented increases in antioxidant gene expression and NRF2 nuclear translocation. Exogenous hypochlorite administration resulted in increased NRF2 nuclear translocation in vitro. After Cl2 exposure, neutrophils occupied 22 ± 7% of the luminal space in large airways. IL-17 in BAL was increased after Cl2, although this effect was not prevented by neutrophil depletion. Neither depletion of eosinophils nor macrophages prevented Cl2-induced AHR. Our data suggest the ability of neutrophils to promote Cl2-induced AHR is dependent on increases in oxidative stress and occupation of luminal space in large airways. PMID:25192041

  18. Highly Visible Light Responsive, Narrow Band gap TiO2 Nanoparticles Modified by Elemental Red Phosphorus for Photocatalysis and Photoelectrochemical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Sajid Ali; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports that the introduction of elemental red phosphorus (RP) into TiO2 can shift the light absorption ability from the UV to the visible region, and confirmed that the optimal RP loading and milling time can effectively improve the visible light driven-photocatalytic activity of TiO2. The resulting RP-TiO2 nanohybrids were characterized systematically by a range of techniques and the photocatalytic ability of the RP-TiO2 photocatalysts was assessed further by the photodegradation of a model Rhodamine B pollutant under visible light irradiation. The results suggest that the RP-TiO2 has superior photodegradation ability for model contaminant decomposition compared to other well-known photocatalysts, such as TiO2 and other reference materials. Furthermore, as a photoelectrode, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, differential pulse voltammetry, and linear scan voltammetry were also performed in the dark and under visible light irradiation. These photoelectrochemical performances of RP-TiO2 under visible light irradiation revealed more efficient photoexcited electron-hole separation and rapid charge transfer than under the dark condition, and thus improved photocatalytic activity. These findings show that the use of earth abundant and inexpensive red phosphorus instead of expensive plasmonic metals for inducing visible light responsive characteristics in TiO2 is an effective strategy for the efficient energy conversion of visible light.

  19. Highly Visible Light Responsive, Narrow Band gap TiO2 Nanoparticles Modified by Elemental Red Phosphorus for Photocatalysis and Photoelectrochemical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Sajid Ali; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports that the introduction of elemental red phosphorus (RP) into TiO2 can shift the light absorption ability from the UV to the visible region, and confirmed that the optimal RP loading and milling time can effectively improve the visible light driven-photocatalytic activity of TiO2. The resulting RP-TiO2 nanohybrids were characterized systematically by a range of techniques and the photocatalytic ability of the RP-TiO2 photocatalysts was assessed further by the photodegradation of a model Rhodamine B pollutant under visible light irradiation. The results suggest that the RP-TiO2 has superior photodegradation ability for model contaminant decomposition compared to other well-known photocatalysts, such as TiO2 and other reference materials. Furthermore, as a photoelectrode, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, differential pulse voltammetry, and linear scan voltammetry were also performed in the dark and under visible light irradiation. These photoelectrochemical performances of RP-TiO2 under visible light irradiation revealed more efficient photoexcited electron-hole separation and rapid charge transfer than under the dark condition, and thus improved photocatalytic activity. These findings show that the use of earth abundant and inexpensive red phosphorus instead of expensive plasmonic metals for inducing visible light responsive characteristics in TiO2 is an effective strategy for the efficient energy conversion of visible light. PMID:27146098

  20. Highly Visible Light Responsive, Narrow Band gap TiO2 Nanoparticles Modified by Elemental Red Phosphorus for Photocatalysis and Photoelectrochemical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Sajid Ali; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports that the introduction of elemental red phosphorus (RP) into TiO2 can shift the light absorption ability from the UV to the visible region, and confirmed that the optimal RP loading and milling time can effectively improve the visible light driven-photocatalytic activity of TiO2. The resulting RP-TiO2 nanohybrids were characterized systematically by a range of techniques and the photocatalytic ability of the RP-TiO2 photocatalysts was assessed further by the photodegradation of a model Rhodamine B pollutant under visible light irradiation. The results suggest that the RP-TiO2 has superior photodegradation ability for model contaminant decomposition compared to other well-known photocatalysts, such as TiO2 and other reference materials. Furthermore, as a photoelectrode, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, differential pulse voltammetry, and linear scan voltammetry were also performed in the dark and under visible light irradiation. These photoelectrochemical performances of RP-TiO2 under visible light irradiation revealed more efficient photoexcited electron-hole separation and rapid charge transfer than under the dark condition, and thus improved photocatalytic activity. These findings show that the use of earth abundant and inexpensive red phosphorus instead of expensive plasmonic metals for inducing visible light responsive characteristics in TiO2 is an effective strategy for the efficient energy conversion of visible light. PMID:27146098

  1. Clinical surveys on the incidence of asthma and airway hyper responsiveness in allergic rhinitis%变应性鼻炎患者潜在哮喘和下气道高反应的筛查研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓芳; 王向东; 王杨; 赵岩; 孙永昌; 张罗

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Allergic rhinitis and its impact on asthma (ARIA) questionnaire combined with indices in spirometric test may facilitate early diagnosis for asthma complicating in allergic rhinitis (AR) and for airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) . METHODS A total of 306 AR patients without diagnosis of asthma received ARIA questionnaire, spirometric test and methacholine challenge test (MCT) to determine the incidence of asthma or AHR. The values corresponding to FEVi% and FEF25-75% were compared and ROC curves were plotted. RESULTS There were 127 cases with more than one positive response in the questionnaire, of which 24 cases showed positive response in pulmonary function diastole test, and 32 cases positive response in MCT. The omission diagnose rate of asthma was 18%, and the incidence of asthma in the cases with positive response was 44.1%. There were 179 cases with no positive response in the questionnaire, of which 41 cases were diagnosed as AHR with the incidence of 13%. The values of FEV1% and FEF25-75% in the different groups with MCT positive responses were significantly lower than those in the group with negative responses. Moreover, the ROC curves demonstrated the diagnostic accuracy of FEF25-75% was slightly higher than that of FEVi% for asthma or AHR. CONCLUSION ARIA questionnaire may help screen the combined asthma in AR. Some AR patients affiliated AHR. Damage in small airway function may prompt occurrence of asthma or AHR, and the related cases should receive MCT.%目的 探讨问卷调查结合肺功能发现变应性鼻炎(AR)合并哮喘和气道高反应性(airway hyperresponsiveness,AHR)的意义.方法 306例无哮喘的AR患者行问卷调查、肺功能乙酰甲胆碱激发试验(methacholine challenge test,MCT),诊断哮喘或AHR.比较第一秒用力呼气容积占预计值的百分比(FEV1%)和用力呼气中段流速(FEF25-75%)值,绘制ROC曲线.结果 127例有哮喘症状,24例肺功能舒张试验阳性,32

  2. Air-Q intubating laryngeal airway: A study of the second generation supraglottic airway device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attarde, Viren Bhaskar; Kotekar, Nalini; Shetty, Sarika M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Air-Q intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILA) is used as a supraglottic airway device and as a conduit for endotracheal intubation. This study aims to assess the efficacy of the Air-Q ILA regarding ease of insertion, adequacy of ventilation, rate of successful intubation, haemodynamic response and airway morbidity. Methods: Sixty patients presenting for elective surgery at our Medical College Hospital were selected. Following adequate premedication, baseline vital parameters, pulse rate and blood pressure were recorded. Air-Q size 3.5 for patients 50-70 kg and size 4.5 for 70-100 kg was selected. After achieving adequate intubating conditions, Air-Q ILA was introduced. Confirming adequate ventilation, appropriate sized endotracheal tube was advanced through the Air-Q blindly to intubate the trachea. Placement of the endotracheal tube in trachea was confirmed. Results: Air-Q ILA was successfully inserted in 88.3% of patients in first attempt and 11.7% patients in second attempt. Ventilation was adequate in 100% of patients. Intubation was successful in 76.7% of patients with Air-Q ILA. 23.3% of patients were intubated by direct laryngoscopy following failure with two attempts using Air-Q ILA. Post-intubation the change in heart rate was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). 10% of patients were noted to have a sore throat and 5% of patients had mild airway trauma. Conclusion: Air-Q ILA is a reliable device as a supraglottic airway ensuring adequate ventilation as well as a conduit for endotracheal intubation. It benefits the patient by avoiding the stress of direct laryngoscopy and is also superior alternative device for use in a difficult airway. PMID:27212722

  3. Cryogenic Detectors (Narrow Field Instruments)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoevers, H.; Verhoeve, P.

    basic elements of the NFI 1 detector array. With a DROID-based array of 48 times 10 elements covering the NFI 1 field of view of 0.5 arcmin, the number of signal wires would already be reduced by a factor 2.4 compared to a 48 times 48 array of single pixels. While the present prototype DROIDS are still covered with a 480 nm thick SiOx insulation layer, this layer could easily be reduced in thickness or omitted. The detection efficiency of such a device with a 500 nm thick Ta absorber would be >80% in the energy range of 100-3000eV, without any disturbing contributions from other layers as in single STJs. Further developments involve devices of lower Tc-superconductors for better energy resolution and faster diffusion (e.g. Mo). The narrow field imager 2 The NFI 2 will consist of an array of 32 times 32 detector pixels. Each detector is a microcalorimeter which consists of a a superconducting to normal phase transition edge thermometer (transition edge sensor, TES) with an operating temperature of 100 mK, and an absorber which allows a detection efficiency of >90% and a filling factor of the focal plane in excess of 90%. Single pixel microcalorimeters with a Ti/Au TES have already shown an energy resolution of 3.9 eV at 5.89 keV in combination with a thermal response time of 100 mus. These results imply that they the high-energy requirement for XEUS can be met, in terms of energy resolution and response time. It has been demonstrated that bismuth can be applied as absorber material without impeding on the detector performance. Bi increases the stopping power in excess of 90 % and allows for a high filling factor since the absorber is can be modeled in the shape of a mushroom, allowing that the wiring to the detector and the thermal support structure are placed under the hat of the mushroom. In order to realize the NFI 2 detector array, there are two major development areas. Firstly, there is the development of micromachined Si and SiN structures that will provide proper

  4. Epithelial injury and repair in airways diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainge, Christopher L; Davies, Donna E

    2013-12-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease characterized by variable respiratory distress with underlying airway inflammation and airflow obstruction. The incidence of asthma has risen inexorably over the past 50 years, suggesting that environmental factors are important in its etiology. All inhaled environmental stimuli interact with the lung at the respiratory epithelium, and it is a testament to the effectiveness of the airway innate defenses that the majority of inhaled substances are cleared without the need to elicit an inflammatory response. However, once this barrier is breached, effective communication with immune and inflammatory cells is required to protect the internal milieu of the lung. In asthma, the respiratory epithelium is known to be structurally and functionally abnormal. Structurally, the epithelium shows evidence of damage and has more mucus-producing cells than normal airways. Functionally, the airway epithelial barrier can be more permeable and more sensitive to oxidants and show a deficient innate immune response to respiratory virus infection compared with that in normal individuals. The potential of a susceptible epithelium and the underlying mesenchyme to create a microenvironment that enables deviation of immune and inflammatory responses to external stimuli may be crucial in the development and progression of asthma. In this review, we consider three important groups of environmental stimuli on the epithelium in asthma: oxidants, such as environmental pollution and acetaminophen; viruses, including rhinovirus; and agents that cause barrier disruption, such as house dust mite allergens. The pathology associated with each stimulus is considered, and potential future treatments arising from research on their effects are presented. PMID:24297122

  5. Prostaglandin I2 enhances cough reflex sensitivity to capsaicin in the asthmatic airway

    OpenAIRE

    Ishiura, Yoshihisa; Fujimura, Masaki; Nobata, Kouichi; Oribe, Yoshitaka; Abo, Miki; Myou, Shigeharu

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators are involved in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation, but the role of prostaglandin I2 (PGI2) remains obscure. This study was designed to investigate the role of PGI2 in cough reflex sensitivity of the asthmatic airway, which is characterized by chronic eosinophilic airway inflammation. The effect of beraprost, a chemically and biologically stable analogue of PGI2, on cough response to inhaled capsaicin was examined in 21 patients with stable asthma in a randomized, ...

  6. Abnormal movement of the arytenoid region as a cause of upper airway obstruction.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, A.; Kanemura, T; Konno, K.

    1992-01-01

    A 75 year old woman presented with a three week history of severe dyspnoea and cough. Auscultation and spirometry suggested extrathoracic inspiratory airway obstruction, and bronchoscopy showed abnormal motion of the arytenoid region (supraglottic area), causing upper airway obstruction only during forced inspiratory efforts. Sedatives improved the symptoms within a week. It is suggested that reversible malfunction of the arytenoid region can be responsible for upper airway obstruction.

  7. Upper airway neuromuscular compensation during sleep is defective in obstructive sleep apnea

    OpenAIRE

    McGinley, Brian M.; Schwartz, Alan R.; Schneider, Hartmut; Kirkness, Jason P.; Smith, Philip L; Patil, Susheel P.

    2008-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is the result of repeated episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep. Recent evidence indicates that alterations in upper airway anatomy and disturbances in neuromuscular control both play a role in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea. We hypothesized that subjects without sleep apnea are more capable of mounting vigorous neuromuscular responses to upper airway obstruction than subjects with sleep apnea. To address this hypothesis we lowered nasal pressu...

  8. Interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 cause barrier dysfunction in human airway epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Saatian, Bahman; Rezaee, Fariba; Desando, Samantha; Emo, Jason; Chapman, Tim; Knowlden, Sara; Steve N. Georas

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that airway epithelial barrier function is compromised in asthma, a disease characterized by Th2-skewed immune response against inhaled allergens, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Th2-type cytokines on airway epithelial barrier function. 16HBE14o- human bronchial epithelial cells monolayers were grown on collagen coated Transwell inserts. The basolateral or apical surfaces of airway epi...

  9. Airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma: Mechanisms, Clinical Significance and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Daniel Brannan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR and airway inflammation are key pathophysiological features of asthma. Bronchial provocation tests (BPTs are objective tests for AHR that are clinically useful to aid in the diagnosis of asthma. BPTs can be either ‘direct’ or ‘indirect’, referring to the mechanism by which a stimulus mediates bronchoconstriction. Direct BPTs refer to the administration of pharmacological agonist (e.g., methacholine or histamine that act on specific receptors on the airway smooth muscle. Airway inflammation and/or airway remodeling may be key determinants of the response to direct stimuli. Indirect BPTs are those in which the stimulus causes the release of mediators of bronchoconstriction from inflammatory cells (e.g., exercise, allergen, mannitol. Airway sensitivity to indirect stimuli is dependent upon the presence of inflammation (e.g., mast cells, eosinophils, which responds to treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS. Thus, there is a stronger relationship between indices of steroid-sensitive inflammation (e.g., sputum eosinophils, fraction of exhaled nitric oxide and airway sensitivity to indirect compared to direct stimuli. Regular treatment with ICS does not result in the complete inhibition of responsiveness to direct stimuli. AHR to indirect stimuli identifies individuals that are highly likely to have a clinical improvement with ICS therapy in association with an inhibition of airway sensitivity following weeks to months of treatment with ICS. To comprehend the clinical utility of direct or indirect stimuli in either diagnosis of asthma or monitoring of therapeutic intervention requires an understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of AHR and mechanisms of action of both stimuli.

  10. Fungal colonization with Pneumocystis correlates to increasing chloride channel accessory 1 (hCLCA1 suggesting a pathway for up-regulation of airway mucus responses, in infant lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Pérez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal colonization with Pneumocystis is associated with increased airway mucus in infants during their primary Pneumocystis infection, and to severity of COPD in adults. The pathogenic mechanisms are under investigation. Interestingly, increased levels of hCLCA1 – a member of the calcium-sensitive chloride conductance family of proteins that drives mucus hypersecretion – have been associated with increased mucus production in patients diagnosed with COPD and in immunocompetent rodents with Pneumocystis infection. Pneumocystis is highly prevalent in infants; therefore, the contribution of Pneumocystis to hCLCA1 expression was examined in autopsied infant lungs. Respiratory viruses that may potentially increase mucus, were also examined. hCLCA1 expression was measured using actin-normalized Western-blot, and the burden of Pneumocystis organisms was quantified by qPCR in 55 autopsied lungs from apparently healthy infants who died in the community. Respiratory viruses were diagnosed using RT-PCR for RSV, metapneumovirus, influenza, and parainfluenza viruses; and by PCR for adenovirus. hCLCA1 levels in virus positive samples were comparable to those in virus-negative samples. An association between Pneumocystis and increased hCLCA1 expression was documented (P=0.028. Additionally, increasing Pneumocystis burden correlated with increasing hCLCA1 protein expression levels (P=0.017. Results strengthen the evidence of Pneumocystis-associated up-regulation of mucus-related airway responses in infant lungs. Further characterization of this immunocompetent host-Pneumocystis-interaction, including assessment of potential clinical significance, is warranted.

  11. Airway emergencies in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Vijaya

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of airway obstruction is always challenging but more so in cancer setting, as obstruction can lie at any level right from pyriform fossa to low down in medistinum. Morbidity is significant but if not managed properly leads to frightful death by suffocation. These cases need to be evaluated, diagnosed and managed with care, skill, speed and appropriate intervention. With the advent of technology, it has become much easier to manage such situations with a team of specialists involving anesthetist, thoracic surgeon and intensivist.

  12. Paediatric airway management: basic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Knudsen, R J; Rasmussen, L S

    2009-01-01

    children. This paper aims at providing the non-paediatric anaesthesiologist with a set of safe and simple principles for basic paediatric airway management. In contrast to adults, most children with difficult airways are recognised before induction of anaesthesia but problems may arise in all children...

  13. Inhibition of NF-κB Expression and Allergen-induced Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Allergic Asthma Model by Andrographolide

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jing; Luo, Li; Wang, Xiaoyun; Liao, Bin; Li, Guoping

    2009-01-01

    Andrographolide from traditional Chinese herbal medicines previously showed it possesses a strong anti-inflammatory activity. In present study, we investigated whether Andrographolide could inhibit allergen-induced airway inflammation and airways hyper-responsiveness and explored the mechanism of Andrographolide on allergen-induced airway inflammation and airways hyper-responsiveness. After sensitized and challenged by ovalbumin, the BALB/c mice were administered intraperitoneally with Androg...

  14. Narrow n anti n resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of the problem of quasinuclear states in systems of nucleons and antinucleons is reviewed. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental data on narrow meson resonances near N anti N threshold which appeared in 1971-74

  15. Flooding correlations in narrow channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat transfer in narrow gap is considered as important phenomena in severe accidents in nuclear power plants. Also in heat removal of electric chip. Critical heat flux(CHF) in narrow gap limits the maximum heat transfer rate in narrow channel. In case of closed bottom channel, flooding limited CHF occurrence is observed. Flooding correlations will be helpful to predict the CHF in closed bottom channel. In present study, flooding data for narrow channel geometry were collected and the work to recognize the effect of the span, w and gap size, s were performed. And new flooding correlations were suggested for high-aspect-ratio geometry. Also, flooding correlation was applied to flooding limited CHF data

  16. Narrow-Band Microwave Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Strizhachenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Original design of the narrow-band compact filters based on the high-quality waveguide-dielectric resonator with anisotropic materials has been presented in this work. Designed filters satisfy the contradictory requirements: they provide the narrow frequency band (0.05 ÷ 0.1 % of the main frequency f0 and the low initial losses α0 ≤ 1 dB.

  17. Maxillofacial Injury-Not Always a Difficult Airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasheen, John; Hennelly, David; Cusack, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    The optimal method for securing the airway in injured patients is controversial. Maxillofacial injury has been shown to be a marker for difficult airway management; however, a delay in intubation may result in deterioration of intubating conditions due to further airway bleeding and swelling. Decisions on the timing and method of airway management depend on multiple factors, including patient characteristics, the skill set of the clinicians, and logistical considerations. This report describes the case of a multi-agency response to a motor-vehicle collision in a rural area in Ireland. One young male patient had sustained significant maxillofacial injuries, multiple limb injuries, and had a decreased level of consciousness. Further airway compromise occurred following extrication. Difficult intubation was predicted; however, abnormal jaw mobility from bilateral mandibular fractures enabled easy laryngoscopy and intubation. Although preparation must be made for difficult airway management in the setting of maxillofacial injury, appropriately trained and experienced practitioners should not be deterred from performing early intubation when indicated. PMID:25994879

  18. Increased Th2 cytokine secretion, eosinophilic airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness in neurturin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Tatiana; Thérésine, Maud; Poli, Aurélie; Domingues, Olivia; Ammerlaan, Wim; Brons, Nicolaas H C; Hentges, François; Zimmer, Jacques

    2011-06-01

    Neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor have been described to be involved in the pathogenesis of asthma. Neurturin (NTN), another neurotrophin from the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family, was shown to be produced by human immune cells: monocytes, B cells, and T cells. Furthermore, it was previously described that the secretion of inflammatory cytokines was dramatically stimulated in NTN knockout (NTN(-/-)) mice. NTN is structurally similar to TGF-β, a protective cytokine in airway inflammation. This study investigates the implication of NTN in a model of allergic airway inflammation using NTN(-/-) mice. The bronchial inflammatory response of OVA-sensitized NTN(-/-) mice was compared with wild-type mice. Airway inflammation, Th2 cytokines, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) were examined. NTN(-/-) mice showed an increase of OVA-specific serum IgE and a pronounced worsening of inflammatory features. Eosinophil number and IL-4 and IL-5 concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were increased. In parallel, Th2 cytokine secretion of lung draining lymph node cells was also augmented when stimulated by OVA in vitro. Furthermore, AHR was markedly enhanced in NTN(-/-) mice after sensitization and challenge when compared with wild-type mice. Administration of NTN before challenge with OVA partially rescues the phenotype of NTN(-/-) mice. These findings provide evidence for a dampening role of NTN on allergic inflammation and AHR in a murine model of asthma. PMID:21508262

  19. Polarized Airway Epithelial Models for Immunological Co-Culture Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papazian, Dick; Würtzen, Peter A; Hansen, Søren Werner Karlskov

    2016-01-01

    epithelial response towards environmental antigens and genetic susceptibility, resulting in inflammation and T cell-derived immune responses. In vivo animal models have long been used to study immune homeostasis of the airways but are limited by species restriction and lack of exposure to a natural...

  20. Possible role of differential growth in airway wall remodeling in asthma

    KAUST Repository

    Moulton, D. E.

    2011-01-20

    Possible role of differential growth in airway wall remodeling in asthma. J Appl Physiol 110: 1003-1012, 2011. First published January 20, 2011; doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00991.2010.- Airway remodeling in patients with chronic asthma is characterized by a thickening of the airway walls. It has been demonstrated in previous theoretical models that this change in thickness can have an important mechanical effect on the properties of the wall, in particular on the phenomenon of mucosal folding induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this paper, we present a model for mucosal folding of the airway in the context of growth. The airway is modeled as a bilayered cylindrical tube, with both geometric and material nonlinearities accounted for via the theory of finite elasticity. Growth is incorporated into the model through the theory of morphoelasticity. We explore a range of growth possibilities, allowing for anisotropic growth as well as different growth rates in each layer. Such nonuniform growth, referred to as differential growth, can change the properties of the material beyond geometrical changes through the generation of residual stresses. We demonstrate that differential growth can have a dramatic impact on mucosal folding, in particular on the critical pressure needed to induce folding, the buckling pattern, as well as airway narrowing. We conclude that growth may be an important component in airway remodeling. Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Airway Smooth Muscle Hypercontractility in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Berair

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, asthma has been defined primarily as an inflammatory disorder with emphasis on inflammation being the principle underlying pathophysiological characteristic driving airway obstruction and remodelling. Morphological abnormalities of asthmatic airway smooth muscle (ASM, the primary structure responsible for airway obstruction seen in asthma, have long been described, but surprisingly, until recently, relatively small number of studies investigated whether asthmatic ASM was also fundamentally different in its functional properties. Evidence from recent studies done on single ASM cells and on ASM-impregnated gel cultures have shown that asthmatic ASM is intrinsically hypercontractile. Several elements of the ASM contraction apparatus in asthmatics and in animal models of asthma have been found to be different from nonasthmatics. These differences include some regulatory contractile proteins and also some components of both the calcium-dependent and calcium-independent contraction signalling pathways. Furthermore, oxidative stress was also found to be heightened in asthmatic ASM and contributes to hypercontractility. Understanding the abnormalities and mechanisms driving asthmatic ASM hypercontractility provides a great potential for the development of new targeted drugs, other than the conventional current anti-inflammatory and bronchodilator therapies, to address the desperate unmet need especially in patients with severe and persistent asthma.

  2. Lentiviral vector gene transfer to porcine airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Patrick L; Cooney, Ashley L; Oakland, Mayumi; Dylla, Douglas E; Wallen, Tanner J; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Chang, Eugene H; McCray, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated lentiviral vector development and transduction efficiencies in well-differentiated primary cultures of pig airway epithelia (PAE) and wild-type pigs in vivo. We noted gene transfer efficiencies similar to that observed for human airway epithelia (HAE). Interestingly, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based vectors transduced immortalized pig cells as well as pig primary cells more efficiently than HIV-1-based vectors. PAE express TRIM5α, a well-characterized species-specific lentiviral restriction factor. We contrasted the restrictive properties of porcine TRIM5α against FIV- and HIV-based vectors using gain and loss of function approaches. We observed no effect on HIV-1 or FIV conferred transgene expression in response to porcine TRIM5α overexpression or knockdown. To evaluate the ability of GP64-FIV to transduce porcine airways in vivo, we delivered vector expressing mCherry to the tracheal lobe of the lung and the ethmoid sinus of 4-week-old pigs. One week later, epithelial cells expressing mCherry were readily detected. Our findings indicate that pseudotyped FIV vectors confer similar tropisms in porcine epithelia as observed in human HAE and provide further support for the selection of GP64 as an appropriate envelope pseudotype for future preclinical gene therapy studies in the porcine model of cystic fibrosis (CF).Molecular Therapy - Nucleic Acids (2012) 1, e56; doi:10.1038/mtna.2012.47; published online 27 November 2012. PMID:23187455

  3. Airway vascular reactivity and vascularisation in human chronic airway disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailey, Simon R; Boustany, Sarah; Burgess, Janette K; Hirst, Stuart J; Sharma, Hari S; Simcock, David E; Suravaram, Padmini R; Weckmann, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Altered bronchial vascular reactivity and remodelling including angiogenesis are documented features of asthma and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Expansion of the bronchial vasculature under these conditions involves both functional (vasodilation, hyperperfusion, increased microvascular

  4. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Simren K; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P; Baines, Deborah L; Moore, Luke S P; Holmes, Alison H; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  5. Rare Upper Airway Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Alanna; Clemmens, Clarice; Jacobs, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    A broad spectrum of congenital upper airway anomalies can occur as a result of errors during embryologic development. In this review, we will describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management strategies for a few select, rare congenital malformations of this system. The diagnostic tools used in workup of these disorders range from prenatal tests to radiological imaging, swallowing evaluations, indirect or direct laryngoscopy, and rigid bronchoscopy. While these congenital defects can occur in isolation, they are often associated with disorders of other organ systems or may present as part of a syndrome. Therefore workup and treatment planning for patients with these disorders often involves a team of multiple specialists, including paediatricians, otolaryngologists, pulmonologists, speech pathologists, gastroenterologists, and geneticists. PMID:26277452

  6. Regulation of actin dynamics by WNT-5A: implications for human airway smooth muscle contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Tim; Kumawat, Kuldeep; Halayko, Andrew J; Gosens, Reinoud

    2016-01-01

    A defining feature of asthma is airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), which underlies the exaggerated bronchoconstriction response of asthmatics. The role of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) in AHR has garnered increasing interest over the years, but how asthmatic ASM differs from healthy ASM is still an

  7. WNT-5A and WNT-5B modulate calcium homeostasis in airway smooth muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Tim; Kumawat, Kudleer; Van Den Berge, Maarten; Hoffmann, Roland; Halayko, Andrew J.; Gosens, Reinoud

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Airway hyperresponsiveness is a common feature of asthma explained in part by an excessive contractile response of the airway smooth muscle (ASM). The underlying mechanisms are complex and in need of study. WNT-5A and WNT-5B, two members of the WNT signaling pathway, may be of significance

  8. AIRWAY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS AND THE PREVALENCE OF WORK-RELATED SYMPTOMS IN WORKERS EXPOSED TO IRRITANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KREMER, AM; PAL, TM; BOLEIJ, JSM; SCHOUTEN, JP; RIJCKEN, B

    1994-01-01

    The association between exposure to airway irritants and the presence of work-related symptoms and whether this association was modified by airway hyper-responsiveness, smoking, and allergy by history was studied in 668 workers of synthetic fiber plants. A Dutch version of the British Medical Resear

  9. CORRELATES BETWEEN HUMAN LUNG INJURY AFTER PARTICLE EXPOSURE AND RECURRENT AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION IN THE HORSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characteristics of the clinical presentation, physiologic changes, and pathology of the human response to particulate matter (PM) are comparable to inflammatory airway disease (lAD) and recurrent airway obstruction (RAO)lheaves in the horse. Both present with symptoms of cough,...

  10. Structural and functional localization of airway effects from episodic exposure of infant monkeys to allergen and/or ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both allergen and ozone exposure increase asthma symptoms and airway responsiveness in children. Little is known about how these inhalants may differentially modify airway responsiveness in large proximal as compared to small distal airways. We evaluated whether bronchi and respiratory bronchioles from infant monkeys exposed episodically to allergen and/or ozone differentially develop intrinsic hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and whether eosinophils and/or pulmonary neuroendocrine cells play a role. Infant monkeys were exposed episodically for 5 months to: (1) filtered air, (2) aerosolized house dust mite allergen, (3) ozone 0.5 ppm, or (4) house dust mite allergen + ozone. Studying the function/structure relationship of the same lung slices, we evaluated methacholine airway responsiveness and histology of bronchi and respiratory bronchioles. In bronchi, intrinsic responsiveness was increased by allergen exposure, an effect reduced by bombesin antagonist. In respiratory bronchioles, intrinsic airway responsiveness was increased by allergen + ozone exposure. Eosinophils were increased by allergen and allergen + ozone exposure in bronchi and by allergen exposure in respiratory bronchioles. In both airways, exposure to allergen + ozone resulted in fewer tissue eosinophils than did allergen exposure alone. In bronchi, but not in respiratory bronchioles, the number of eosinophils and neuroendocrine cells correlated with airway responsiveness. We conclude that episodically exposing infant monkeys to house dust mite allergen with or without ozone increased intrinsic airway responsiveness to methacholine in bronchi differently than in respiratory bronchioles. In bronchi, eosinophils and neuroendocrine cells may play a role in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness

  11. Research Upregulation of CD23 (FcεRII) Expression in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells (huASMC) in Response to IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF

    OpenAIRE

    Lew D Betty; McPherson Holly M; Gandhi Radha K; Belleau Joseph T

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Airway smooth muscle cells play a key role in remodeling that contributes to airway hyperreactivity. Airway smooth muscle remodeling includes hypertrophy and hyperplasia. It has been previously shown that the expression of CD23 on ASMC in rabbits can be induced by the IgE component of the atopic serum. We examined if other components of atopic serum are capable of inducing CD23 expression independent of IgE. Methods Serum starved huASMC were stimulated with either IL-4, GM...

  12. Computed tomographic imaging of dogs with primary laryngeal or tracheal airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Krystina; Hartman, Susan; Matheson, Jodi; O'Brien, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Seventeen dogs with clinical signs attributable to nonneoplastic obstruction of the larynx, trachea, or large bronchi underwent computed tomography (CT) imaging. In 16 of the 17 dogs, CT was performed without general anesthesia using a positioning device. Fifteen of these 16 dogs were imaged without sedation or general anesthesia. Three-dimensional (3D) internal rendering was performed on each image set based on lesion localization determined by routine image planes. Visual laryngeal examination, endoscopy, video fluoroscopy, and necropsy were used for achieving the cause of the upper airway obstruction. The CT and 3D internal rendering accurately indicated the presence and cause of upper airway obstruction in all dogs. CT findings indicative of laryngeal paralysis included failure to abduct the arytenoid cartilages, narrowed rima glottis, and air-filled laryngeal ventricles. Laryngeal collapse findings depended on the grade of collapse and included everted laryngeal saccules, collapse of the cuneiform processes and corniculate processes, and narrowed rima glottis. Trachea abnormalities included hypoplasia, stenosis, or collapse syndrome. The CT findings in tracheal hypoplasia consisted of a severely narrowed lumen throughout the entire length. Tracheal stenosis was represented by a circumferential decrease in tracheal lumen size limited to one region. Tracheal collapse syndrome was diagnosed by severe asymmetric narrowing. Lobar bronchi collapse appeared in CT images as a narrowed asymmetric lumen diameter. CT imaging of unanesthetized dogs with upper airway obstruction compares favorably with traditional definitive diagnostic methods. PMID:21447037

  13. ISO-1, a Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Antagonist, Inhibits Airway Remodeling in a Murine Model of Chronic Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Pei-Fen; Luo, Ya-ling; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jiang-xin; Lai, Wen-yan; Hu, Si-ming; Cheng, Kai Fan; Al-Abed, Yousef

    2010-01-01

    Airway remodeling is the process of airway structural change that occurs in patients with asthma in response to persistent inflammation and leads to increasing disease severity. Drugs that decrease this persistent inflammation play a crucial role in managing asthma episodes. Mice sensitized (by intraperitoneal administration) and then challenged (by inhalation) with ovalbumin (OVA) develop an extensive eosinophilic inflammatory response, goblet cell hyperplasia, collagen deposition, airway sm...

  14. Airway management and morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    Morbidly obese patients present with excess fatty tissue externally on the breast, neck, thoracic wall and abdomen and internally in the mouth, pharynx and abdomen. This excess tissue tends to make access (intubation, tracheostomy) to and patency (during sedation or mask ventilation) of the upper...... morbidly obese patients and should be followed by actions to counteract atelectasis formation. The decision as to weather to use a rapid sequence induction, an awake intubation or a standard induction with hypnotics should depend on the thorough airway examination and comorbidity and should not be based...... solely on whether morbid obesity is present or not. It is important to ensure sufficient depth of anaesthesia before initiating manipulation of the airway because inadequate anaesthesia depth predisposes to aspiration if airway management becomes difficult. The intubating laryngeal mask airway is more...

  15. The Virtual Pediatric Airways Workbench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quammen, Cory W; Taylor Ii, Russell M; Krajcevski, Pavel; Mitran, Sorin; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Superfine, Richard; Davis, Brad; Davis, Stephanie; Zdanski, Carlton

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual Pediatric Airways Workbench (VPAW) is a patient-centered surgical planning software system targeted to pediatric patients with airway obstruction. VPAW provides an intuitive surgical planning interface for clinicians and supports quantitative analysis regarding prospective surgeries to aid clinicians deciding on potential surgical intervention. VPAW enables a full surgical planning pipeline, including importing DICOM images, segmenting the airway, interactive 3D editing of airway geometries to express potential surgical treatment planning options, and creating input files for offline geometric analysis and computational fluid dynamics simulations for evaluation of surgical outcomes. In this paper, we describe the VPAW system and its use in one case study with a clinician to successfully describe an intended surgery outcome. PMID:27046595

  16. Nucleotide-mediated airway clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Andreas; Clunes, Lucy A; Salathe, Mathias; Verdugo, Pedro; Dietl, Paul; Davis, C William; Tarran, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) lines the entire surface of the lung and is the first point of contact between the lung and the environment. Surfactants contained within this layer are secreted in the alveolar region and are required to maintain a low surface tension and to prevent alveolar collapse. Mucins are secreted into the ASL throughout the respiratory tract and serve to intercept inhaled pathogens, allergens and toxins. Their removal by mucociliary clearance (MCC) is facilitated by cilia beating and hydration of the ASL by active ion transport. Throughout the lung, secretion, ion transport and cilia beating are under purinergic control. Pulmonary epithelia release ATP into the ASL which acts in an autocrine fashion on P2Y(2) (ATP) receptors. The enzymatic network describes in Chap. 2 then mounts a secondary wave of signaling by surface conversion of ATP into adenosine (ADO), which induces A(2B) (ADO) receptor-mediated responses. This chapter offers a comprehensive description of MCC and the extensive ramifications of the purinergic signaling network on pulmonary surfaces. PMID:21560046

  17. A new construction algorithm of narrow-band function for artificial history simulation method based on narrow-band superposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a new type of narrow-band function is proposed for the artificial history simulation method based on narrow-band superposition, which aims to meet the needs of both fitting of the target response spectrum and envelop of the power spectral density. The new narrow-band function is based on the normal distribution function and trigonometric functions. Its band width can be controlled and it decays rapidly on both sides. While the target response spectrum is fitted by superimposing the new narrow-band time history, the power spectral density is enveloped by modifying the Fourier amplitude spectrum locally. The numerical example demonstrates that not only the artificial time history generated by this algorithm reaches high matching precision to the target response spectrum, but also the corresponding calculated power spectrum envelopes the target power spectrum. (authors)

  18. A sensory neuronal ion channel essential for airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Ana I; Brackmann, Marian; Elia, Maxwell D; Bessac, Bret F; del Camino, Donato; D'Amours, Marc; Witek, JoAnn S; Fanger, Chistopher M; Chong, Jayhong A; Hayward, Neil J; Homer, Robert J; Cohn, Lauren; Huang, Xiaozhu; Moran, Magdalene M; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2009-06-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disorder caused by airway exposures to allergens and chemical irritants. Studies focusing on immune, smooth muscle, and airway epithelial function revealed many aspects of the disease mechanism of asthma. However, the limited efficacies of immune-directed therapies suggest the involvement of additional mechanisms in asthmatic airway inflammation. TRPA1 is an irritant-sensing ion channel expressed in airway chemosensory nerves. TRPA1-activating stimuli such as cigarette smoke, chlorine, aldehydes, and scents are among the most prevalent triggers of asthma. Endogenous TRPA1 agonists, including reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation products, are potent drivers of allergen-induced airway inflammation in asthma. Here, we examined the role of TRPA1 in allergic asthma in the murine ovalbumin model. Strikingly, genetic ablation of TRPA1 inhibited allergen-induced leukocyte infiltration in the airways, reduced cytokine and mucus production, and almost completely abolished airway hyperreactivity to contractile stimuli. This phenotype is recapitulated by treatment of wild-type mice with HC-030031, a TRPA1 antagonist. HC-030031, when administered during airway allergen challenge, inhibited eosinophil infiltration and prevented the development of airway hyperreactivity. Trpa1(-/-) mice displayed deficiencies in chemically and allergen-induced neuropeptide release in the airways, providing a potential explanation for the impaired inflammatory response. Our data suggest that TRPA1 is a key integrator of interactions between the immune and nervous systems in the airways, driving asthmatic airway inflammation following inhaled allergen challenge. TRPA1 may represent a promising pharmacological target for the treatment of asthma and other allergic inflammatory conditions. PMID:19458046

  19. Methacholine-Induced Variations in Airway Volume and the Slope of the Alveolar Capnogram Are Distinctly Associated with Airflow Limitation and Airway Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantier, Laurent; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Boyer, Laurent; Taillé, Camille; Delclaux, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms driving alteration of lung function in response to inhalation of a methacholine aerosol are incompletely understood. To explore to what extent large and small airways contribute to airflow limitation and airway closure in this context, volumetric capnography was performed before (n = 93) and after (n = 78) methacholine provocation in subjects with an intermediate clinical probability of asthma. Anatomical dead space (VDaw), reflecting large airway volume, and the slope of the alveolar capnogram (slope3), an index of ventilation heterogeneity linked to small airway dysfunction, were determined. At baseline, VDaw was positively correlated with lung volumes, FEV1 and peak expiratory flow, while slope3 was not correlated with any lung function index. Variations in VDaw and slope3 following methacholine stimulation were correlated to a small degree (R2 = -0.20). Multivariate regression analysis identified independent associations between variation in FEV1 and variations in both VDaw (Standardized Coefficient-SC = 0.66) and Slope3 (SC = 0.35). By contrast, variation in FVC was strongly associated with variations in VDaw (SC = 0.8) but not Slope3. Thus, alterations in the geometry and/or function of large and small airways were weakly correlated and contributed distinctly to airflow limitation. While both large and small airways contributed to airflow limitation as assessed by FEV1, airway closure as assessed by FVC reduction mostly involved the large airways. PMID:26599006

  20. Methacholine-Induced Variations in Airway Volume and the Slope of the Alveolar Capnogram Are Distinctly Associated with Airflow Limitation and Airway Closure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Plantier

    Full Text Available Mechanisms driving alteration of lung function in response to inhalation of a methacholine aerosol are incompletely understood. To explore to what extent large and small airways contribute to airflow limitation and airway closure in this context, volumetric capnography was performed before (n = 93 and after (n = 78 methacholine provocation in subjects with an intermediate clinical probability of asthma. Anatomical dead space (VDaw, reflecting large airway volume, and the slope of the alveolar capnogram (slope3, an index of ventilation heterogeneity linked to small airway dysfunction, were determined. At baseline, VDaw was positively correlated with lung volumes, FEV1 and peak expiratory flow, while slope3 was not correlated with any lung function index. Variations in VDaw and slope3 following methacholine stimulation were correlated to a small degree (R2 = -0.20. Multivariate regression analysis identified independent associations between variation in FEV1 and variations in both VDaw (Standardized Coefficient-SC = 0.66 and Slope3 (SC = 0.35. By contrast, variation in FVC was strongly associated with variations in VDaw (SC = 0.8 but not Slope3. Thus, alterations in the geometry and/or function of large and small airways were weakly correlated and contributed distinctly to airflow limitation. While both large and small airways contributed to airflow limitation as assessed by FEV1, airway closure as assessed by FVC reduction mostly involved the large airways.

  1. Activation of Proinflammatory Responses in Cells of the Airway Mucosa by Particulate Matter: Oxidant- and Non-Oxidant-Mediated Triggering Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Johan Øvrevik; Magne Refsnes; Marit Låg; Holme, Jørn A.; Schwarze, Per E

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is considered to play a central role in a diverse range of disease outcomes associated with exposure to various types of inhalable particulates. The initial mechanisms through which particles trigger cellular responses leading to activation of inflammatory responses are crucial to clarify in order to understand what physico-chemical characteristics govern the inflammogenic activity of particulate matter and why some particles are more harmful than others. Recent research suggests...

  2. Upper airway finding on CT scan with and without nasal CPAP in obstructive sleep apnea patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akashiba, Tsuneto; Sasaki, Iwao; Kurashina, Keiji; Yoshizawa, Takayuki; Otsuka, Kenzo; Horie, Takashi (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-04-01

    The area of upper airway (from the nasopharynx to the hypopharynx) was measured by means of computed tomography (CT) scan in 15 confirmed cases of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and in 4 normal controls while they were awake. The minimum cross-sectional area (MA) of the upper airway was 14.7+-20.0 mm{sup 2} in OSA patients and 80.0+-33.1 mm{sup 2} in normal controls and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.01). In OSA patients, MA did not correlate with age, body weight, apnea index, desaturation index, mean nadir-SO{sub 2} and lowest SO{sub 2}. MA was also measured with OSA patients while nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) of 10 cmH{sub 2}O was applied and it was found that MA was significantly widened when NCPAP therapy was performed. We conclude that upper airway narrowing is consistent finding in OSA patients but the degree of narrowing does not correlate with parameters of apnea and gas exchange during sleep, and NCPAP is effective to widen the area of upper airway in OSA patients. (author).

  3. Upper airway finding on CT scan with and without nasal CPAP in obstructive sleep apnea patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The area of upper airway (from the nasopharynx to the hypopharynx) was measured by means of computed tomography (CT) scan in 15 confirmed cases of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and in 4 normal controls while they were awake. The minimum cross-sectional area (MA) of the upper airway was 14.7±20.0 mm2 in OSA patients and 80.0±33.1 mm2 in normal controls and the difference was statistically significant (p2 and lowest SO2. MA was also measured with OSA patients while nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) of 10 cmH2O was applied and it was found that MA was significantly widened when NCPAP therapy was performed. We conclude that upper airway narrowing is consistent finding in OSA patients but the degree of narrowing does not correlate with parameters of apnea and gas exchange during sleep, and NCPAP is effective to widen the area of upper airway in OSA patients. (author)

  4. Vessel-guided Airway Tree Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, P.; Sporring, J.; Ashraf, H.;

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a method for airway tree segmentation that uses a combination of a trained airway appearance model, vessel and airway orientation information, and region growing. We propose a voxel classification approach for the appearance model, which uses a classifier that is trained to...... differentiate between airway and non-airway voxels. This is in contrast to previous works that use either intensity alone or hand crafted models of airway appearance. We show that the appearance model can be trained with a set of easily acquired, incomplete, airway tree segmentations. A vessel orientation...... method is evaluated on 250 low dose computed tomography images from a lung cancer screening trial. Our experiments showed that applying the region growing algorithm on the airway appearance model produces more complete airway segmentations, leading to on average 20% longer trees, and 50% less leakage...

  5. A study of the post-surgical volumetric changes of oropharyngeal visceral cavity, upper airway and the respiratory function of in mandibular setback surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been reported that the narrowing of pharyngeal airway caused by mandibular setback surgery may associate the upper respiratory tract dysfunctions such as sleep apnea/hypopnea. However, there has been no clear relevance between morphological changes of pharyngeal airway in two dimensional evaluation and the onset of postoperative upper airway dysfunction. The aim of this study is to evaluate volumetric change and relevance of oropharyngeal visceral cavity and upper airway with three-dimensional CT (3DCT) and upper airway function before and after mandibular setback surgery. Thirty three patients (6 males and 27 females) who have had mandibular setback surgery were allocated in this study. The difference between pre- and postoperative position of mandibular bone and hyoid bone as well as volume of airway, and oropharyngeal visceral cavity were measured using 3DCT remodeling images. The evaluation of upper airway function was performed Polysomnograph (PSG) pre- and post surgically. These data were corrected just before the operation, just before discharge (10.2±1.8 days after the operation) and 1 year later. After mandibular setback surgery, the volume of airway and oropharyngeal visceral cavity had significantly decreased. However, there was no correlation in the quantity of mandibular setback and reduction of airway volume. PSG, aggravation of apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was confirmed among 7 out of 26 samples (27%) in the postoperative early stage. In addition, aggravation of minimum SpO2, desaturation index and outbreak time of snoring were detected. At the early stage of postoperation, the airway volume decreased and the airway function took a turn for the worse. On the other hand both were recognized to have tendency to recover after 1 year. In this study, there was no correlation in the amount of change of the volume of the airway, oropharyngeal visceral cavity and aggravation of upper airway function. Moreover it was suggested that age and other factors

  6. The effects of emphysema on airway disease: Correlations between multi-detector CT and pulmonary function tests in smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahaba, Misuzu, E-mail: mis_misuzu@yahoo.co.jp; Kawata, Naoko, E-mail: chumito_03@yahoo.co.jp; Iesato, Ken, E-mail: iesato_k@yahoo.co.jp; Matsuura, Yukiko, E-mail: matsuyuki_future@yahoo.co.jp; Sugiura, Toshihiko, E-mail: sugiura@js3.so-net.ne.jp; Kasai, Hajime, E-mail: daikasai6075@yahoo.co.jp; Sakurai, Yoriko, E-mail: yoliri@nifty.com; Terada, Jiro, E-mail: jirotera@chiba-u.jp; Sakao, Seiichiro, E-mail: sakao@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Tada, Yuji, E-mail: ytada@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Tanabe, Nobuhiro, E-mail: ntanabe@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Tatsumi, Koichiro, E-mail: tatsumi@faculty.chiba-u.jp

    2014-06-15

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow limitation caused by emphysema and small airway narrowing. Quantitative evaluation of airway dimensions by multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has revealed a correlation between airway dimension and airflow limitation. However, the effect of emphysema on this correlation is unclear. Objective: The goal of this study was to determine whether emphysematous changes alter the relationships between airflow limitation and airway dimensions as measured by inspiratory and expiratory MDCT. Methods: Ninety-one subjects underwent inspiratory and expiratory MDCT. Images were evaluated for mean airway luminal area (Ai), wall area percentage (WA%) from the third to the fifth generation of three bronchi (B1, B5, B8) in the right lung, and low attenuation volume percent (LAV%). Correlations between each airway index and airflow limitation were determined for each patient and compared between patients with and without evidence of emphysema. Results: In patients without emphysema, Ai and WA% from both the inspiratory and expiratory scans were significantly correlated with FEV{sub 1.} No correlation was detected in patients with emphysema. In addition, emphysematous COPD patients with GOLD stage 1 or 2 disease had significantly lower changes in B8 Ai than non-emphysematous patients. Conclusions: A significant correlation exists between airway parameters and FEV{sub 1} in patients without emphysema. Emphysema may influence airway dimensions even in patients with mild to moderate COPD.

  7. The effects of emphysema on airway disease: Correlations between multi-detector CT and pulmonary function tests in smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow limitation caused by emphysema and small airway narrowing. Quantitative evaluation of airway dimensions by multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has revealed a correlation between airway dimension and airflow limitation. However, the effect of emphysema on this correlation is unclear. Objective: The goal of this study was to determine whether emphysematous changes alter the relationships between airflow limitation and airway dimensions as measured by inspiratory and expiratory MDCT. Methods: Ninety-one subjects underwent inspiratory and expiratory MDCT. Images were evaluated for mean airway luminal area (Ai), wall area percentage (WA%) from the third to the fifth generation of three bronchi (B1, B5, B8) in the right lung, and low attenuation volume percent (LAV%). Correlations between each airway index and airflow limitation were determined for each patient and compared between patients with and without evidence of emphysema. Results: In patients without emphysema, Ai and WA% from both the inspiratory and expiratory scans were significantly correlated with FEV1. No correlation was detected in patients with emphysema. In addition, emphysematous COPD patients with GOLD stage 1 or 2 disease had significantly lower changes in B8 Ai than non-emphysematous patients. Conclusions: A significant correlation exists between airway parameters and FEV1 in patients without emphysema. Emphysema may influence airway dimensions even in patients with mild to moderate COPD

  8. Concomitant exposure to ovalbumin and endotoxin augments airway inflammation but not airway hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Sharry, John; Shalaby, Karim H; Marchica, Cinzia; Farahnak, Soroor; Chieh-Li, Tien; Lapthorne, Susan; Qureshi, Salman T; Shanahan, Fergus; Martin, James G

    2014-01-01

    Varying concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in ovalbumin (OVA) may influence the airway response to allergic sensitization and challenge. We assessed the contribution of LPS to allergic airway inflammatory responses following challenge with LPS-rich and LPS-free commercial OVA. BALB/c mice were sensitized with LPS-rich OVA and alum and then underwent challenge with the same OVA (10 µg intranasally) or an LPS-free OVA. Following challenge, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), airway responsiveness to methacholine and the lung regulatory T cell population (Treg) were assessed. Both OVA preparations induced BAL eosinophilia but LPS-rich OVA also evoked BAL neutrophilia. LPS-free OVA increased interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4 and IL-5 whereas LPS-rich OVA additionally increased IL-1β, IL-12, IFN-γ, TNF-α and KC. Both OVA-challenged groups developed airway hyperresponsiveness. TLR4-deficient mice challenged with either OVA preparation showed eosinophilia but not neutrophilia and had increased IL-5. Only LPS-rich OVA challenged mice had increased lung Tregs and LPS-rich OVA also induced in vitro Treg differentiation. LPS-rich OVA also induced a Th1 cytokine response in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.We conclude that LPS-rich OVA evokes mixed Th1, Th2 and innate immune responses through the TLR-4 pathway, whereas LPS-free OVA evokes only a Th2 response. Contaminating LPS is not required for induction of airway hyperresponsiveness but amplifies the Th2 inflammatory response and is a critical mediator of the neutrophil, Th1 and T regulatory cell responses to OVA. PMID:24968337

  9. Concomitant exposure to ovalbumin and endotoxin augments airway inflammation but not airway hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Mac Sharry

    Full Text Available Varying concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS in ovalbumin (OVA may influence the airway response to allergic sensitization and challenge. We assessed the contribution of LPS to allergic airway inflammatory responses following challenge with LPS-rich and LPS-free commercial OVA. BALB/c mice were sensitized with LPS-rich OVA and alum and then underwent challenge with the same OVA (10 µg intranasally or an LPS-free OVA. Following challenge, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL, airway responsiveness to methacholine and the lung regulatory T cell population (Treg were assessed. Both OVA preparations induced BAL eosinophilia but LPS-rich OVA also evoked BAL neutrophilia. LPS-free OVA increased interleukin (IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5 whereas LPS-rich OVA additionally increased IL-1β, IL-12, IFN-γ, TNF-α and KC. Both OVA-challenged groups developed airway hyperresponsiveness. TLR4-deficient mice challenged with either OVA preparation showed eosinophilia but not neutrophilia and had increased IL-5. Only LPS-rich OVA challenged mice had increased lung Tregs and LPS-rich OVA also induced in vitro Treg differentiation. LPS-rich OVA also induced a Th1 cytokine response in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.We conclude that LPS-rich OVA evokes mixed Th1, Th2 and innate immune responses through the TLR-4 pathway, whereas LPS-free OVA evokes only a Th2 response. Contaminating LPS is not required for induction of airway hyperresponsiveness but amplifies the Th2 inflammatory response and is a critical mediator of the neutrophil, Th1 and T regulatory cell responses to OVA.

  10. Role of Small Airways in Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkas, Lindsay K; Martin, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory condition of both the small and large airways. Recently the small airways have gained attention as studies have shown significant inflammation in the small airways in all severities of asthma. This inflammation has correlated with peripheral airway resistance and as a result, noninvasive methods to reliably measure small airways have been pursued. In addition, recent changes in asthma inhalers have led to alterations in drug formulations and the development of extrafine particle inhalers that improve delivery to the distal airways. PMID:27401620

  11. Sarcoidosis with Major Airway, Vascular and Nerve Compromise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sekiguchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes a 60-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with progressive dyspnea, cough and wheeze. A computed tomography scan of the chest showed innumerable bilateral inflammatory pulmonary nodules with bronchovascular distribution and a mediastinal and hilar infiltrative process with calcified lymphadenopathy leading to narrowing of lobar bronchi and pulmonary arteries. An echocardiogram revealed pulmonary hypertension. Bronchoscopy showed left vocal cord paralysis and significant narrowing of the bilateral bronchi with mucosal thickening and multiple nodules. Transbronchial biopsy was compatible with sarcoidosis. Despite balloon angioplasty of the left lower lobe and pulmonary artery, and medical therapy with oral corticosteroids, her symptoms did not significantly improve. To the authors’ knowledge, the present report describes the first case of pulmonary sarcoidosis resulting in major airway, vascular and nerve compromise due to compressive lymphadenopathy and suspected concurrent granulomatous infiltration. Its presentation mimicked idiopathic mediastinal fibrosis.

  12. Hyaluronan Mediates Ozone-induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Mice*

    OpenAIRE

    Garantziotis, Stavros; Li, Zhuowei; Potts, Erin N.; Kimata, Koji; Zhuo, Lisheng; Morgan, Daniel L.; Savani, Rashmin C.; Noble, Paul W.; Foster, W. Michael; Schwartz, David A; John W Hollingsworth

    2009-01-01

    Ozone is a common urban environmental air pollutant and significantly contributes to hospitalizations for respiratory illness. The mechanisms, which regulate ozone-induced bronchoconstriction, remain poorly understood. Hyaluronan was recently shown to play a central role in the response to noninfectious lung injury. Therefore, we hypothesized that hyaluronan contributes to airway hyperreactivity (AHR) after exposure to ambient ozone. Using an established model of ozone...

  13. LARYNGEAL CHONDROSARCOMA: SUCCESSFUL USE OF VIDEO LARYNGOSCOPE IN ANTICIPATED DIFFICULT AIRWAY MANAGEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinaj, Vladimir; Milošev, Sanja; Janjević, Dušanka

    2016-03-01

    Laryngeal chondrosarcoma is a rare mesenchymal tumor, most frequently affecting cricoid cartilage. The objective of this report is to present successful video laryngoscope usage in a patient with anticipated difficult airway who refused awake fiberoptic endotracheal intubation (AFOI). A 59-year-old male patient was admitted in our hospital due to difficulty breathing and swallowing. On clinical examination performed by ENT surgeon, preoperative endoscopic airway examination (PEAE) could not be performed properly due to the patient's uncooperativeness. Computed tomography revealed a spherical tumor that obstructed the subglottic area almost entirely. Due to the narrowed airway, the first choice for the anticipated difficult airway management was AFOI, which the patient refused. Consequently, we decided to perform endotracheal intubation with indirect laryngoscope using a C-MAC video laryngoscope (Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany). Reinforced endotracheal tube (6.0 mm internal diameter) was placed gently between the tumor mass and the posterior wall of the trachea in the first attempt. Confirmation of endotracheal intubation was done by capnography. In a patient with subglottic area chondrosarcoma refusing PEAE and AFOI, video laryngoscope is a particularly helpful device for difficult airway management when difficult airway is anticipated. PMID:27276783

  14. Interleukin-1 Receptor and Caspase-1 Are Required for the Th17 Response in Nitrogen Dioxide–Promoted Allergic Airway Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Rebecca A.; Ather, Jennifer L.; Lundblad, Lennart K. A.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Budd, Ralph C.; Alcorn, John F.; Flavell, Richard A; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C.; Poynter, Matthew E.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an environmental pollutant and endogenously generated oxidant associated with the development, severity, and exacerbation of asthma. NO2 exposure is capable of allergically sensitizing mice to the innocuous inhaled antigen ovalbumin (OVA), promoting neutrophil and eosinophil recruitment, and a mixed Th2/Th17 response upon antigen challenge that is reminiscent of severe asthma. However, the identity of IL-17A–producing cells and the mechanisms governing their ontogeny...

  15. Nonmicrobial-mediated inflammatory airway diseases--an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh Babu, Polani B; Krishnamoorthy, P

    2014-03-01

    In lungs, airways are in constant contact with air, microbes, allergens, and environmental pollutants. The airway epithelium represents the first line of lung defense through different mechanisms, which facilitate clearance of inhaled pathogens and environmental particles while minimizing an inflammatory response. The innate immune system facilitates immediate recognition of both foreign pathogens and tissue damage through toll-like receptor, which acts as a gateway for all intracellular events leading to inflammation. In the absence of microbial stimulus, the immune system is capable of detecting a wide range of insults against the host. This review focuses on various molecular mechanisms involved in pathophysiology of airway inflammation mediated by environmental factors, cellular stress, and pharmacological and clinical agents. PMID:24293217

  16. Activation of Proinflammatory Responses in Cells of the Airway Mucosa by Particulate Matter: Oxidant- and Non-Oxidant-Mediated Triggering Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øvrevik, Johan; Refsnes, Magne; Låg, Marit; Holme, Jørn A; Schwarze, Per E

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is considered to play a central role in a diverse range of disease outcomes associated with exposure to various types of inhalable particulates. The initial mechanisms through which particles trigger cellular responses leading to activation of inflammatory responses are crucial to clarify in order to understand what physico-chemical characteristics govern the inflammogenic activity of particulate matter and why some particles are more harmful than others. Recent research suggests that molecular triggering mechanisms involved in activation of proinflammatory genes and onset of inflammatory reactions by particles or soluble particle components can be categorized into direct formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with subsequent oxidative stress, interaction with the lipid layer of cellular membranes, activation of cell surface receptors, and direct interactions with intracellular molecular targets. The present review focuses on the immediate effects and responses in cells exposed to particles and central down-stream signaling mechanisms involved in regulation of proinflammatory genes, with special emphasis on the role of oxidant and non-oxidant triggering mechanisms. Importantly, ROS act as a central second-messenger in a variety of signaling pathways. Even non-oxidant mediated triggering mechanisms are therefore also likely to activate downstream redox-regulated events. PMID:26147224

  17. Activation of Proinflammatory Responses in Cells of the Airway Mucosa by Particulate Matter: Oxidant- and Non-Oxidant-Mediated Triggering Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Øvrevik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is considered to play a central role in a diverse range of disease outcomes associated with exposure to various types of inhalable particulates. The initial mechanisms through which particles trigger cellular responses leading to activation of inflammatory responses are crucial to clarify in order to understand what physico-chemical characteristics govern the inflammogenic activity of particulate matter and why some particles are more harmful than others. Recent research suggests that molecular triggering mechanisms involved in activation of proinflammatory genes and onset of inflammatory reactions by particles or soluble particle components can be categorized into direct formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS with subsequent oxidative stress, interaction with the lipid layer of cellular membranes, activation of cell surface receptors, and direct interactions with intracellular molecular targets. The present review focuses on the immediate effects and responses in cells exposed to particles and central down-stream signaling mechanisms involved in regulation of proinflammatory genes, with special emphasis on the role of oxidant and non-oxidant triggering mechanisms. Importantly, ROS act as a central second-messenger in a variety of signaling pathways. Even non-oxidant mediated triggering mechanisms are therefore also likely to activate downstream redox-regulated events.

  18. The Airway Microbiome at Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H.; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  19. The Airway Microbiome at Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  20. Experimental searches for narrow dibaryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A few topics of narrow structures in nuclear physics at excitation energies of several hundred MeV are overviewed. Among these topics, the physics of dibaryons is particularly interesting since if narrow structures are observed, they can be related to precursor partial quark deconfinement. This possibility simulated the large number of data corresponding to such studies. A brief literature survey of these studies is given. The studies and recent data included in this overview are: analyzing powers in nucleon-nucleon elastic scattering, the p(d,pp)X reaction (X being the two proton missing masses), the 2H(p,n)X++ reaction, and dibaryon searches from photonuclear reactions. (R.P.) 39 refs., 6 figs

  1. Narrowing the gap: Literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Underwood, Jean; Banyard, Philip; Betts, Lucy; Farrington-Flint, Lee; Stiller, James; Yeomans, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    This review supports a research programme that is exploring how technology can narrow the gap for under- and low-achieving learners in secondary schools. Technology can support learning for underachievers by improving results and increasing engagement. Research shows that it can do this by: •monitoring behaviour and targeting learners who need special attention •making the curriculum relevant to learners' everyday experiences •encouraging learners' self-assessment and developing...

  2. Recent advances in airway management in children

    OpenAIRE

    Veyckemans, Francis

    2009-01-01

    Recent anatomic findings, technological progress, and both in vitro and in vivo studies of the pressure generated in the cuff of endotracheal tubes and supraglottic airways should lead to modification of the way we control the pediatric upper airway.

  3. Bone marrow cell derived arginase I is the major source of allergen-induced lung arginase but is not required for airway hyperresponsiveness, remodeling and lung inflammatory responses in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothenberg Marc E

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arginase is significantly upregulated in the lungs in murine models of asthma, as well as in human asthma, but its role in allergic airway inflammation has not been fully elucidated in mice. Results In order to test the hypothesis that arginase has a role in allergic airway inflammation we generated arginase I-deficient bone marrow (BM chimeric mice. Following transfer of arginase I-deficient BM into irradiated recipient mice, arginase I expression was not required for hematopoietic reconstitution and baseline immunity. Arginase I deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells decreased allergen-induced lung arginase by 85.8 ± 5.6%. In contrast, arginase II-deficient mice had increased lung arginase activity following allergen challenge to a similar level to wild type mice. BM-derived arginase I was not required for allergen-elicited sensitization, recruitment of inflammatory cells in the lung, and proliferation of cells. Furthermore, allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and collagen deposition were similar in arginase-deficient and wild type mice. Additionally, arginase II-deficient mice respond similarly to their control wild type mice with allergen-induced inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, proliferation and collagen deposition. Conclusion Bone marrow cell derived arginase I is the predominant source of allergen-induced lung arginase but is not required for allergen-induced inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness or collagen deposition.

  4. Partial airway obstruction following manufacturing defect in laryngeal mask airway (Laryngeal Mask Silken™)

    OpenAIRE

    Kiran Jangra; Surender Kumar Malhotra; Vikas Saini

    2014-01-01

    Laryngeal mask (LM) airway is commonly used for securing airway in day-care surgeries. Various problems have been described while using LM airway. Out of those, mechanical obstruction causing airway compromise is most common. Here, we describe a case report of 4-year-old child who had partial upper airway obstruction due to LM manufacturer′s defect. There was a silicon band in upper one-third of shaft of LM airway. This band was made up of the same material as that of LM airway so it was not ...

  5. Detonation Nanodiamond Toxicity in Human Airway Epithelial Cells Is Modulated by Air Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detonational nanodiamonds (DND), a nanomaterial with an increasing range of industrial and biomedical applications, have previously been shown to induce a pro-inflammatory response in cultured human airway epithelial cells (HAEC). We now show that surface modifications induced by...

  6. A multi-omics approach identifies key hubs associated with cell type-specific responses of airway epithelial cells to staphylococcal alpha-toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Richter

    Full Text Available Responsiveness of cells to alpha-toxin (Hla from Staphylococcus aureus appears to occur in a cell-type dependent manner. Here, we compare two human bronchial epithelial cell lines, i.e. Hla-susceptible 16HBE14o- and Hla-resistant S9 cells, by a quantitative multi-omics strategy for a better understanding of Hla-induced cellular programs. Phosphoproteomics revealed a substantial impact on phosphorylation-dependent signaling in both cell models and highlights alterations in signaling pathways associated with cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts as well as the actin cytoskeleton as key features of early rHla-induced effects. Along comparable changes in down-stream activity of major protein kinases significant differences between both models were found upon rHla-treatment including activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR and mitogen-activated protein kinases MAPK1/3 signaling in S9 and repression in 16HBE14o- cells. System-wide transcript and protein expression profiling indicate induction of an immediate early response in either model. In addition, EGFR and MAPK1/3-mediated changes in gene expression suggest cellular recovery and survival in S9 cells but cell death in 16HBE14o- cells. Strikingly, inhibition of the EGFR sensitized S9 cells to Hla indicating that the cellular capacity of activation of the EGFR is a major protective determinant against Hla-mediated cytotoxic effects.

  7. Take the Wnt out of the inflammatory sails: modulatory effects of Wnt in airway diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Sebastian; Beckert, Hendrik; Taube, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic diseases that are associated with inflammation and structural changes in the airways and lungs. Recent findings have implicated Wnt pathways in critically regulating inflammatory responses, especially in asthma. Furthermore, canonical and noncanonical Wnt pathways are involved in structural changes such as airway remodeling, goblet cell metaplasia, and airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation. In COPD, Wnt pathways are not only associated with structural changes in the airways but also involved in the development of emphysema. The present review summarizes the role and function of the canonical and noncanonical Wnt pathway with regard to airway inflammation and structural changes in asthma and COPD. Further identification of the role and function of different Wnt molecules and pathways could help to develop novel therapeutic options for these diseases. PMID:26595171

  8. Narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method of sensing a characteristic of an object provide the capability to realize a characteristic of an object such as density, thickness, or presence, for any desired coordinate position on the object. One application is imaging. The sensor can also be used as an obstruction detector or an electronic trip wire with a narrow field without the disadvantages of impaired performance when exposed to dirt, snow, rain, or sunlight. The sensor employs a transmitter for transmitting a sequence of electromagnetic signals in response to a transmit timing signal, a receiver for sampling only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while excluding all other electromagnetic signals in response to a receive timing signal, and a signal processor for processing the sampled direct RF path electromagnetic signal and providing an indication of the characteristic of an object. Usually, the electromagnetic signal is a short RF burst and the obstruction must provide a substantially complete eclipse of the direct RF path. By employing time-of-flight techniques, a timing circuit controls the receiver to sample only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while not sampling indirect path electromagnetic signals. The sensor system also incorporates circuitry for ultra-wideband spread spectrum operation that reduces interference to and from other RF services while allowing co-location of multiple electronic sensors without the need for frequency assignments. 12 figs

  9. Blockade of Airway Inflammation by Kaempferol via Disturbing Tyk-STAT Signaling in Airway Epithelial Cells and in Asthmatic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Hyun Gong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is characterized by bronchial inflammation causing increased airway hyperresponsiveness and eosinophilia. The interaction between airway epithelium and inflammatory mediators plays a key role in the asthmatic pathogenesis. The in vitro study elucidated inhibitory effects of kaempferol, a flavonoid found in apples and many berries, on inflammation in human airway epithelial BEAS-2B cells. Nontoxic kaempferol at ≤20 μM suppressed the LPS-induced IL-8 production through the TLR4 activation, inhibiting eotaxin-1 induction. The in vivo study explored the demoting effects of kaempferol on asthmatic inflammation in BALB/c mice sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA. Mouse macrophage inflammatory protein-2 production and CXCR2 expression were upregulated in OVA-challenged mice, which was attenuated by oral administration of ≥10 mg/kg kaempferol. Kaempferol allayed the airway tissue levels of eotaxin-1 and eotaxin receptor CCR3 enhanced by OVA challenge. This study further explored the blockade of Tyk-STAT signaling by kaempferol in both LPS-stimulated BEAS-2B cells and OVA-challenged mice. LPS activated Tyk2 responsible for eotaxin-1 induction, while kaempferol dose-dependently inhibited LPS- or IL-8-inflamed Tyk2 activation. Similar inhibition of Tyk2 activation by kaempferol was observed in OVA-induced mice. Additionally, LPS stimulated the activation of STAT1/3 signaling concomitant with downregulated expression of Tyk-inhibiting SOCS3. In contrast, kaempferol encumbered STAT1/3 signaling with restoration of SOCS3 expression. Consistently, oral administration of kaempferol blocked STAT3 transactivation elevated by OVA challenge. These results demonstrate that kaempferol alleviated airway inflammation through modulating Tyk2-STAT1/3 signaling responsive to IL-8 in endotoxin-exposed airway epithelium and in asthmatic mice. Therefore, kaempferol may be a therapeutic agent targeting asthmatic diseases.

  10. IL-6 trans-signaling increases expression of airways disease genes in airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mac B; Deshpande, Deepak A; Chou, Jeffery; Cui, Wei; Smith, Shelly; Langefeld, Carl; Hastie, Annette T; Bleecker, Eugene R; Hawkins, Gregory A

    2015-07-15

    Genetic data suggest that IL-6 trans-signaling may have a pathogenic role in the lung; however, the effects of IL-6 trans-signaling on lung effector cells have not been investigated. In this study, human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells were treated with IL-6 (classical) or IL-6+sIL6R (trans-signaling) for 24 h and gene expression was measured by RNAseq. Intracellular signaling and transcription factor activation were assessed by Western blotting and luciferase assay, respectively. The functional effect of IL-6 trans-signaling was determined by proliferation assay. IL-6 trans-signaling had no effect on phosphoinositide-3 kinase and Erk MAP kinase pathways in HASM cells. Both classical and IL-6 trans-signaling in HASM involves activation of Stat3. However, the kinetics of Stat3 phosphorylation by IL-6 trans-signaling was different than classical IL-6 signaling. This was further reflected in the differential gene expression profile by IL-6 trans-signaling in HASM cells. Under IL-6 trans-signaling conditions 36 genes were upregulated, including PLA2G2A, IL13RA1, MUC1, and SOD2. Four genes, including CCL11, were downregulated at least twofold. The expression of 112 genes was divergent between IL-6 classical and trans-signaling, including the genes HILPDA, NNMT, DAB2, MUC1, WWC1, and VEGFA. Pathway analysis revealed that IL-6 trans-signaling induced expression of genes involved in regulation of airway remodeling, immune response, hypoxia, and glucose metabolism. Treatment of HASM cells with IL-6+sIL6R induced proliferation in a dose-dependent fashion, suggesting a role for IL-6 trans-signaling in asthma pathogenesis. These novel findings demonstrate differential effect of IL-6 trans-signaling on airway cells and identify IL-6 trans-signaling as a potential modifier of airway inflammation and remodeling. PMID:26001777

  11. Epithelium-generated neuropeptide Y induces smooth muscle contraction to promote airway hyperresponsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanru; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Jude, Joseph; Jiang, Meiqi; Zhao, Hengjiang; Cao, Gaoyuan; Yoo, Edwin; Jester, William; Morley, Michael P; Zhou, Su; Wang, Yi; Lu, Min Min; Panettieri, Reynold A; Morrisey, Edward E

    2016-05-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases globally and can be divided into presenting with or without an immune response. Current therapies have little effect on nonimmune disease, and the mechanisms that drive this type of asthma are poorly understood. Here, we have shown that loss of the transcription factors forkhead box P1 (Foxp1) and Foxp4, which are critical for lung epithelial development, in the adult airway epithelium evokes a non-Th2 asthma phenotype that is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) without eosinophilic inflammation. Transcriptome analysis revealed that loss of Foxp1 and Foxp4 expression induces ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y (Npy), which has been reported to be present in the airways of asthma patients, but whose importance in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Treatment of human lung airway explants with recombinant NPY increased airway contractility. Conversely, loss of Npy in Foxp1- and Foxp4-mutant airway epithelium rescued the AHR phenotype. We determined that NPY promotes AHR through the induction of Rho kinase activity and phosphorylation of myosin light chain, which induces airway smooth muscle contraction. Together, these studies highlight the importance of paracrine signals from the airway epithelium to the underlying smooth muscle to induce AHR and suggest that therapies targeting epithelial induction of this phenotype may prove useful in treatment of noneosinophilic asthma. PMID:27088802

  12. Distinct Tlr4-expressing cell compartments control neutrophilic and eosinophilic airway inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    McAlees, Jaclyn W.; Whitehead, Gregory S.; Harley, Isaac T. W.; Cappelletti, Monica; Rewerts, Cheryl L.; Holdcroft, A. Maria; Divanovic, Senad; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Finkelman, Fred D.; Karp, Christopher L.; Cook, Donald N.

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic, inflammatory lung disease. Some forms of allergic asthma are characterized by Th2-driven eosinophilia while others are distinguished by Th17-driven neutrophilia. Stimulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on hematopoietic and airway epithelial cells (AECs) contributes to the inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and allergens, but the specific contribution of TLR4 in these cell compartments to airway inflammatory responses remains poorly understood. W...

  13. Laryngeal mask airway: an alternative for the difficult airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J R

    1995-10-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) was invented by Dr. Archie Brain at the London Hospital, Whitechapel, in 1981. Dr. Brain's main objective for the LMA was that it would provide a better method of maintaining a patient's airway than by face mask. Also, the LMA would be less hemodynamically stressful than with insertion of an endotracheal tube. The LMA consists of a silicone rubber tube connected to a miniature silicone mask. The perimeter of the mask consists of an inflatable elliptical cuff, which forms a tip at the distal aspect of the LMA. The aperture bars in the dome of the mask lift the epiglottis away, so the lumen remains unobstructive. The LMA forms a low pressure seal around the larynx. The LMA is contraindicated in any situation where the patient is at risk for pulmonary aspiration. The LMA is not a substitute for a properly placed endotracheal tube in this situation. The American Society of Anesthesiologists' difficult airway algorithm recommends the insertion of an LMA when ventilation and/or intubation are difficult. The distal aperture of the LMA is in close approximation to the vocal cords, so a 6.0-mm internal diameter endotracheal tube can be passed over an intubating stylet or a pediatric fiberoptic bronchoscope to secure a patient's airway. PMID:7502644

  14. Influence of airway wall compliance on epithelial cell injury and adhesion during interfacial flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuita-Castro, Natalia; Mihai, Cosmin; Hansford, Derek J.

    2014-01-01

    Interfacial flows during cyclic airway reopening are an important source of ventilator-induced lung injury. However, it is not known how changes in airway wall compliance influence cell injury during airway reopening. We used an in vitro model of airway reopening in a compliant microchannel to investigate how airway wall stiffness influences epithelial cell injury. Epithelial cells were grown on gel substrates with different rigidities, and cellular responses to substrate stiffness were evaluated in terms of metabolic activity, mechanics, morphology, and adhesion. Repeated microbubble propagations were used to simulate cyclic airway reopening, and cell injury and detachment were quantified via live/dead staining. Although cells cultured on softer gels exhibited a reduced elastic modulus, these cells experienced less plasma membrane rupture/necrosis. Cells on rigid gels exhibited a minor, but statistically significant, increase in the power law exponent and also exhibited a significantly larger height-to-length aspect ratio. Previous studies indicate that this change in morphology amplifies interfacial stresses and, therefore, correlates with the increased necrosis observed during airway reopening. Although cells cultured on stiff substrates exhibited more plasma membrane rupture, these cells experienced significantly less detachment and monolayer disruption during airway reopening. Western blotting and immunofluorescence indicate that this protection from detachment and monolayer disruption correlates with increased focal adhesion kinase and phosphorylated paxillin expression. Therefore, changes in cell morphology and focal adhesion structure may govern injury responses during compliant airway reopening. In addition, these results indicate that changes in airway compliance, as occurs during fibrosis or emphysema, may significantly influence cell injury during mechanical ventilation. PMID:25213636

  15. Acanthamoeba protease activity promotes allergic airway inflammation via protease-activated receptor 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Kyung Park

    Full Text Available Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba commonly present in the environment and often found in human airway cavities. Acanthamoeba possesses strong proteases that can elicit allergic airway inflammation. To our knowledge, the aeroallergenicity of Acanthamoeba has not been reported. We repeatedly inoculated mice with Acanthamoeba trophozoites or excretory-secretory (ES proteins intra-nasally and evaluated symptoms and airway immune responses. Acanthamoeba trophozoites or ES proteins elicited immune responses in mice that resembled allergic airway inflammation. ES proteins had strong protease activity and activated the expression of several chemokine genes (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, TSLP, and IL-25 in mouse lung epithelial cells. The serine protease inhibitor phenyl-methane-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF inhibited ES protein activity. ES proteins also stimulated dendritic cells and enhanced the differentiation of naive T cells into IL-4-secreting T cells. After repeated inoculation of the protease-activated receptor 2 knockout mouse with ES proteins, airway inflammation and Th2 immune responses were markedly reduced, but not to basal levels. Furthermore, asthma patients had higher Acanthamoeba-specific IgE titers than healthy controls and we found Acanthamoeba specific antigen from house dust in typical living room. Our findings suggest that Acanthamoeba elicits allergic airway symptoms in mice via a protease allergen. In addition, it is possible that Acanthamoeba may be one of the triggers human airway allergic disease.

  16. Vitamin D deficiency causes airway hyperresponsiveness, increases airway smooth muscle mass, and reduces TGF‐β expression in the lungs of female BALB/c mice

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel E Foong; Shaw, Nicole C.; Berry, Luke J.; Hart, Prue H.; Gorman, Shelley; Zosky, Graeme R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin D deficiency is associated with disease severity in asthma. We tested whether there is a causal association between vitamin D deficiency, airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). A physiologically relevant mouse model of vitamin D deficiency was developed by raising BALB/c mice on vitamin D‐deficient or ‐replete diets. AHR was assessed by measuring lung function responses to increasing doses of inhaled methacholine. Five‐micron...

  17. [Airway equipment and its maintenance for a non difficult adult airway management (endotracheal intubation and its alternative: face mask, laryngeal mask airway, laryngeal tube)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francon, D; Estèbe, J P; Ecoffey, C

    2003-08-01

    The airway equipment for a non difficult adult airway management are described: endotracheal tubes with a specific discussion on how to inflate the balloon, laryngoscopes and blades, stylets and intubation guides, oral airways, face masks, laryngeal mask airways and laryngeal tubes. Cleaning and disinfections with the maintenance are also discussed for each type of airway management. PMID:12943860

  18. Multislice helical CT analysis of small-sized airway wall thickness in smokers and patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is accumulating evidence that airway remodeling, which contributes to airway narrowing, plays a role in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma (BA) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Development of the multislice helical CT (MSCT) with improved spatial resolution has made it possible to obtain more precise imaging of small-sized airways. Small-sized airway wall-thickness was measured using the MSCT scan to analyze small-sized airways of smokers and BA patients, and examine the effects of a β2 agonists on small-sized airway wall-thickness of BA patients. Thirty-six non-asthmatics who participated in the Health Check Program of Iwate Medical University and 25 patients with asthma were recruited. Amongst the 36 non-asthmatics were 20 healthy never-smokers and 15 smokers. The other 25 asthmatics were recruited from the outpatient clinic at Iwate Medical University. MSCT was performed and the right B10 bronchus was chosen for dimensional analysis. Airway wall thickness was expressed as a percentage of wall area (WA%). WA% of the 7 asthmatics before and 30 mim after procaterol (20μg) inspiration were compared. Small-sized airway wall thickness was significantly increased in smokers and patients with asthma compared to healthy never-smokers, when determined by MSCT. Both %V50 and %V25 had significant negative correlations with WA% among the healthy never-smokers and smoker population. Procaterol inspiration reduced WA% in the small airway of patients with asthma. Increase of small-sized airway thickness measured by MSCT scan may reflect peripheral obstructive lesions of smokers and BA patients. (author)

  19. Potassium permanganate toxicity: A rare case with difficult airway management and hepatic damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Agrawal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium permanganate (KMnO 4 is rarely used for suicidal attempt. Its ingestion can lead to local as well as systemic toxicities due to coagulation necrosis and damage, caused by free radicals of permanganate. We recently managed a case of suicidal ingestion of KMnO 4 in a lethal dose. She had significant narrowing of upper airway leading to difficult intubation as well as hepatic dysfunction and coagulopathy as systemic manifestation. We suggest to keep ourselves ready to handle difficult airway with the aid of fiber optic bronchoscope or surgical airway management in such patients. Upper gastrointestinal (GI endoscopy should be done at the earliest to determine the extent of upper GI injury and further nutrition planning.

  20. Multidetector CT evaluation of central airways stenoses: Comparison of virtual bronchoscopy, minimal-intensity projection, and multiplanar reformatted images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh K Sundarakumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the diagnostic utility of virtual bronchoscopy, multiplanar reformatted images, and minimal-intensity projection in assessing airway stenoses. Settings and Design: It was a prospective study involving 150 patients with symptoms of major airway disease. Materials and Methods: Fifty-six patients were selected for analysis based on the detection of major airway lesions on fiber-optic bronchoscopy (FB or routine axial images. Comparisons were made between axial images, virtual bronchoscopy (VB, minimal-intensity projection (minIP, and multiplanar reformatted (MPR images using FB as the gold standard. Lesions were evaluated in terms of degree of airway narrowing, distance from carina, length of the narrowed segment and visualization of airway distal to the lesion. Results: MPR images had the highest degree of agreement with FB (Κ = 0.76 in the depiction of degree of narrowing. minIP had the least degree of agreement with FB (Κ = 0.51 in this regard. The distal visualization was best on MPR images (84.2%, followed by axial images (80.7%, whereas FB could visualize the lesions only in 45.4% of the cases. VB had the best agreement with FB in assessing the segment length (Κ = 0.62. Overall there were no statistically significant differences in the measurement of the distance from the carina in the axial, minIP, and MPR images. MPR images had the highest overall degree of confidence, namely, 70.17% (n = 40. Conclusion: Three-dimensional reconstruction techniques were found to improve lesion evaluation compared with axial images alone. The technique of MPR images was the most useful for lesion evaluation and provided additional information useful for surgical and airway interventions in tracheobronchial stenosis. minIP was useful in the overall depiction of airway anatomy.

  1. Mucoactive agents for airway mucus hypersecretory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Duncan F

    2007-09-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a feature of a number of severe respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). However, each disease has a different airway inflammatory response, with consequent, and presumably linked, mucus hypersecretory phenotype. Thus, it is possible that optimal treatment of the mucus hypersecretory element of each disease should be disease-specific. Nevertheless, mucoactive drugs are a longstanding and popular therapeutic option, and numerous compounds (eg, N-acetylcysteine, erdosteine, and ambroxol) are available for clinical use worldwide. However, rational recommendation of these drugs in guidelines for management of asthma, COPD, or CF has been hampered by lack of information from well-designed clinical trials. In addition, the mechanism of action of most of these drugs is unknown. Consequently, although it is possible to categorize them according to putative mechanisms of action, as expectorants (aid and/or induce cough), mucolytics (thin mucus), mucokinetics (facilitate cough transportability), and mucoregulators (suppress mechanisms underlying chronic mucus hypersecretion, such as glucocorticosteroids), it is likely that any beneficial effects are due to activities other than, or in addition to, effects on mucus. It is also noteworthy that the mucus factors that favor mucociliary transport (eg, thin mucus gel layer, "ideal" sol depth, and elasticity greater than viscosity) are opposite to those that favor cough effectiveness (thick mucus layer, excessive sol height, and viscosity greater than elasticity), which indicates that different mucoactive drugs would be required for treatment of mucus obstruction in proximal versus distal airways, or in patients with an impaired cough reflex. With the exception of mucoregulatory agents, whose primary action is unlikely to be directed against mucus, well-designed clinical trials are required to unequivocally determine the

  2. Withdrawal of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy after Malar Advancement and Le Fort II Distraction in a Case of Apert Syndrome with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Nobuto Onda; Shintaro Chiba; Hiroto Moriwaki; Rika Sawai; Akira Yoshigoe; Subaru Watanabe; Yuji Ando; Ryo Uchida; Takeshi Miyawaki; Kota Wada

    2015-01-01

    Apert syndrome is a congenital syndrome characterized by craniosynostosis and craniofacial dysostosis, among other features, and is reported to cause obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) because of upper airway narrowing associated with midfacial dysplasia. We recently encountered a case involving a patient with Apert syndrome complicated by OSA who began to receive continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy at the age of 4. OSA resolved after maxillofacial surgery performed at the age of 11...

  3. Mucus hypersecretion in the airway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ke; WEN Fu-qiang; XU Dan

    2008-01-01

    @@ Mucus hypersecretion is a distinguishing feature of Chronic intlammation diseases,such as asthma,1chronic bronchitis.2 bronchiectasis3 and cystic fibrosis.4Mucus hypersecretion leads to impairment of mucociliary clearance,abnormal bacterial plantation,mucus plug in the airway,and dysfunction of gas exchange.5

  4. Assessment of the Airway Characteristics in Children with Cleft Lip and Palate using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwah, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of our study is to use cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to assess the dimensional changes in the nasopharyngeal soft-tissue characteristics in children of Indian origin with repaired cleft lip and palate (CLP) and to compare the results with patients with ideal occlusion. Materials and methods: A sample of 20 children (10 girls, 10 boys) with repaired CLP was selected. Cone beam computed tomography scans were taken to measure the nasopharyngeal airway changes in terms of linear measurements and sagittal cross-sectional areas. Error analysis was performed to prevent systematic or random errors. Independent means t-tests and Pearson correlation analysis were used to evaluate sex differences and the correlations among the variables. Results: Nasopharyngeal soft-tissue characteristics were different in the control and the study groups. Subjects with repaired CLP had lesser lower aerial width, lower adenoidal width and lower airway width. The upper airway width was also significantly lesser. The retropalatal and the total airway area were significantly greater in the control group. Conclusion: The narrow pharyngeal airway in patients with CLP might result in functional impairment of breathing in patients. Further investigations are necessary to clarify the relationship between pharyngeal structure and airway function in patients with CLP. How to cite this article: Agarwal A, Marwah N. Assessment of the Airway Characteristics in Children with Cleft Lip and Palate using Cone Beam Computed Tomography. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):5-9. PMID:27274147

  5. Sputum mediator profiling and relationship to airway wall geometry imaging in severe asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desai Dhananjay

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe asthma is a heterogeneous disease and the relationship between airway inflammation and airway remodelling is poorly understood. We sought to define sputum mediator profiles in severe asthmatics categorised by CT-determined airway geometry and sputum differential cell counts. Methods In a single centre cross-sectional observational study we recruited 59 subjects with severe asthma that underwent sputum induction and thoracic CT. Quantitative CT analysis of the apical segment of the right upper lobe (RB1 was performed. Forty-one mediators in sputum samples were measured of which 21 mediators that were assessable in >50% of samples were included in the analyses. Results Independent of airway geometry, sputum MMP9 and IL-1β were elevated in those groups with a high sputum neutrophil count while sputum ICAM was elevated in those subjects with a low sputum neutrophil count. In contrast, sputum CCL11, IL-1α and fibrinogen were different in groups stratified by both sputum neutrophil count and airway geometry. Sputum CCL11 concentration was elevated in subjects with a low sputum neutrophil count and high luminal and total RB1 area, whereas sputum IL1α was increased in subjects with a high sputum neutrophil count and low total RB1 area. Sputum fibrinogen was elevated in those subjects with RB1 luminal narrowing and in those subjects with neutrophilic inflammation without luminal narrowing. Conclusions We have demonstrated that sputum mediator profiling reveals a number of associations with airway geometry. Whether these findings reflect important biological phenotypes that might inform stratified medicine approaches requires further investigation.

  6. Sarcoidosis of the upper and lower airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Teirstein, Alvin S

    2011-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology characterized by a variable clinical presentation and disease course. Although clinical granulomatous inflammation may occur within any organ system, more than 90% of sarcoidosis patients have lung disease. Sarcoidosis is considered an interstitial lung disease that is frequently characterized by restrictive physiologic dysfunction on pulmonary function tests. However, sarcoidosis also involves the airways (large and small), causing obstructive airways disease. It is one of a few interstitial lung diseases that affects the entire length of the respiratory tract - from the nose to the terminal bronchioles - and causes a broad spectrum of airways dysfunction. This article examines airway dysfunction in sarcoidosis. The anatomical structure of the airways is the organizational framework for our discussion. We discuss sarcoidosis involving the nose, sinuses, nasal passages, larynx, trachea, bronchi and small airways. Common complications of airways disease, such as, atelectasis, fibrosis, bullous leions, bronchiectasis, cavitary lesions and mycetomas, are also reviewed. PMID:22082167

  7. Systems-level airway models of bronchoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Graham M

    2016-09-01

    Understanding lung and airway behavior presents a number of challenges, both experimental and theoretical, but the potential rewards are great in terms of both potential treatments for disease and interesting biophysical phenomena. This presents an opportunity for modeling to contribute to greater understanding, and here, we focus on modeling efforts that work toward understanding the behavior of airways in vivo, with an emphasis on asthma. We look particularly at those models that address not just isolated airways but many of the important ways in which airways are coupled both with each other and with other structures. This includes both interesting phenomena involving the airways and the layer of airway smooth muscle that surrounds them, and also the emergence of spatial ventilation patterns via dynamic airway interaction. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:459-467. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1349 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27348217

  8. Asthmatic cough and airway oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Heikki O; Purokivi, Minna K; Nieminen, Riina M; Moilanen, Eeva

    2012-05-31

    The mechanisms of cough in asthma are unclear. Asthma is associated with an oxidative stress. Many reactive oxygen species sensitize or activate sensory C-fibers which are capable to induce cough. It was hypothesized that oxidative stress in the airways might contribute to the cough severity in asthma. Exhaled breath condensate samples were collected in ten healthy and 26 asthmatic subjects. The concentration of 8-isoprostane was measured. In addition, the subjects filled in Leicester Cough Questionnaire and underwent cough provocation tests with dry air hyperpnoea and hypertonic saline, among other measurements. Among the asthmatic subjects, high 8-isoprostane was associated with severe cough response to hyperpnoea (p=0.001), low Leicester Cough Questionnaire values (indicating severe subjective cough, p=0.02), and usage of combination asthma drugs (p=0.03-0.04). However, the 8-isoprostane concentrations did not differ significantly between the healthy and the asthmatic subjects. Airway oxidative stress may be associated with experienced cough severity and measured cough sensitivity in asthma. PMID:22546340

  9. S-nitrosoglutathione reductase inhibition regulates allergen-induced lung inflammation and airway hyperreactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E Ferrini

    Full Text Available Allergic asthma is characterized by Th2 type inflammation, leading to airway hyperresponsivenes, mucus hypersecretion and tissue remodeling. S-Nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR is an alcohol dehydrogenase involved in the regulation of intracellular levels of S-nitrosothiols. GSNOR activity has been shown to be elevated in human asthmatic lungs, resulting in diminished S-nitrosothiols and thus contributing to increased airway hyperreactivity. Using a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation, we report that intranasal administration of a new selective inhibitor of GSNOR, SPL-334, caused a marked reduction in airway hyperreactivity, allergen-specific T cells and eosinophil accumulation, and mucus production in the lungs in response to allergen inhalation. Moreover, SPL-334 treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the production of the Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 and the level of the chemokine CCL11 (eotaxin-1 in the airways. Collectively, these observations reveal that GSNOR inhibitors are effective not only in reducing airway hyperresponsiveness but also in limiting lung inflammatory responses mediated by CD4(+ Th2 cells. These findings suggest that the inhibition of GSNOR may provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of allergic airway inflammation.

  10. Available techniques for objective assessment of upper airway narrowing in snoring and sleep apnea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Christian; Grymer, Luisa

    2003-01-01

    A number of techniques are available to determine the level of obstructive predominance in snoring and in the obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS): lateral cephalography, awake endoscopy, awake endoscopy with the Müller maneuver, endoscopy during sleep, endoscopy with nasal continuous...

  11. Prevalence of upper airway obstruction in patients with apparently asymptomatic euthyroid multi nodular goitre

    OpenAIRE

    Menon, Sunil K.; Jagtap, Varsha S.; Vijaya Sarathi; Lila, Anurag R.; Bandgar, Tushar R.; Menon, Padmavathy S; Nalini S. Shah

    2011-01-01

    Aims: To study the prevalence of upper airway obstruction (UAO) in "apparently asymptomatic" patients with euthyroid multinodular goitre (MNG) and find correlation between clinical features, UAO on pulmonary function test (PFT) and tracheal narrowing on computerised tomography (CT). Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients with apparently asymptomatic euthyroid MNG attending thyroid clinic in a tertiary centre underwent clinical examination to elicit features of UAO, PFT, and CT of neck an...

  12. Potassium permanganate toxicity: A rare case with difficult airway management and hepatic damage

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Kumar Agrawal; Abhishek Bansal; Ranjeet Kumar; Bhanwar Lal Kumawat; Parul Mahajan

    2014-01-01

    Potassium permanganate (KMnO 4 ) is rarely used for suicidal attempt. Its ingestion can lead to local as well as systemic toxicities due to coagulation necrosis and damage, caused by free radicals of permanganate. We recently managed a case of suicidal ingestion of KMnO 4 in a lethal dose. She had significant narrowing of upper airway leading to difficult intubation as well as hepatic dysfunction and coagulopathy as systemic manifestation. We suggest to keep ourselves ready to handle difficul...

  13. Noninvasive clearance of airway secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, K A; Anderson, B D

    1996-06-01

    Airway clearance techniques are indicated for specific diseases that have known clearance abnormalities (Table 2). Murray and others have commented that such techniques are required only for patients with a daily sputum production of greater than 30 mL. The authors have observed that patients with diseases known to cause clearance abnormalities can have sputum clearance with some techniques, such as positive expiratory pressure, autogenic drainage, and active cycle of breathing techniques, when PDPV has not been effective. Hasani et al has shown that use of the forced exhalatory technique in patients with nonproductive cough still resulted in movement of secretions proximally from all regions of the lung in patients with airway obstruction. It is therefore reasonable to consider airway clearance techniques for any patient who has a disease known to alter mucous clearance, including CF, dyskinetic cilia syndromes, and bronchiectasis from any cause. Patients with atelectasis from mucous plugs and hypersecretory states, such as asthma and chronic bronchitis, patients with pain secondary to surgical procedures, and patients with neuromuscular disease, weak cough, and abnormal patency of the airway may also benefit from the application of airway clearance techniques. Infants and children up to 3 years of age with airway clearance problems need to be treated with PDPV. Manual percussion with hands alone or a flexible face mask or cup and small mechanical vibrator/percussors, such as the ultrasonic devices, can be used. The intrapulmonary percussive ventilator shows growing promise in this area. The high-frequency oscillator is not supplied with vests of appropriate sizes for tiny babies and has not been studied in this group. Young patients with neuromuscular disease may require assisted ventilation and airway oscillations can be applied. CPAP alone has been shown to improve achievable flow rates that will increase air-liquid interactions for patients with these diseases

  14. Aeroallergen-induced eosinophilic inflammation, lung damage, and airways hyperreactivity in mice can occur independently of IL-4 and allergen-specific immunoglobulins.

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan, S P; A. Mould; Kikutani, H; Ramsay, A. J.; Foster, P.S.

    1997-01-01

    In this investigation we have used a mouse model containing certain phenotypic characteristics consistent with asthma and IL-4- and CD40-deficient mice to establish the role of this cytokine and allergen-specific immunoglobulins in the initiation of airways hyperreactivity and morphological changes to the airways in responses to aeroallergen challenge. Sensitization and aerosol challenge of mice with ovalbumin resulted in a severe airways inflammatory response which directly correlated with t...

  15. Broad Diphotons from Narrow States

    CERN Document Server

    An, Haipeng; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS and CMS have each reported a modest diphoton excess consistent with the decay of a broad resonance at ~ 750 GeV. We show how this signal can arise in a weakly coupled theory comprised solely of narrow width particles. In particular, if the decaying particle is produced off-shell, then the associated diphoton resonance will have a broad, adjustable width. We present simplified models which explain the diphoton excess through the three-body decay of a scalar or fermion. Our minimal ultraviolet completion is a weakly coupled and renormalizable theory of a singlet scalar plus a heavy vector-like quark and lepton. The smoking gun of this mechanism is an asymmetric diphoton peak recoiling against missing transverse energy, jets, or leptons.

  16. Narrow-width approximation accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of general properties of the narrow-width approximation (NWA) with polarization/spin decorrelation is presented. We prove for sufficiently inclusive differential rates of arbitrary resonant decay or scattering processes with an on-shell intermediate state decaying via a cubic or quartic vertex that decorrelation effects vanish and the NWA is of order Γ. Its accuracy is then determined numerically for all resonant 3-body decays involving scalars, spin-1/2 fermions or vector bosons. We specialize the general results to MSSM benchmark scenarios. Significant off-shell corrections can occur - similar in size to QCD corrections. We qualify the configurations in which a combined consideration is advisable. For this purpose, we also investigate process-independent methods to improve the NWA

  17. Polyopes affinis alleviates airway inflammation in a murine model of allergic asthma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dae-Sung Lee; Won Sun Park; Soo-Jin Heo; Seon-Heui Cha; Daekyung Kim; You-Jin Jeon; Sae-Gwang Park; Su-Kil Seo; Jung Sik Choi; Sung-Jae Park; Eun Bo Shim; Il-Whan Choi; Won-Kyo Jung

    2011-12-01

    Marine algae have been utilized in food as well as medicine products for a variety of purposes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an ethanol extract of Polyopes affinis (P.affinis) can inhibit the pathogenesis of T helper 2 (Th2)-mediated allergen-induced airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma. Mice that were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) evidenced typical asthmatic reactions such as the following: an increase in the number of eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid; a marked influx of inflammatory cells into the lung around blood vessels and airways as well as the narrowing of the airway luminal; the development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR); the presence of pulmonary Th2 cytokines; and the presence of allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) in the serum. The successive intraperitoneal administration of P. affinis ethanolic extracts before the last airway OVA-challenge resulted in a significant inhibition of all asthmatic reactions. These data suggest that P. affinis ethanolic extracts possess therapeutic potential for the treatment of pulmonary allergic disorders such as allergic asthma.

  18. Distinct Tlr4-expressing cell compartments control neutrophilic and eosinophilic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlees, J W; Whitehead, G S; Harley, I T W; Cappelletti, M; Rewerts, C L; Holdcroft, A M; Divanovic, S; Wills-Karp, M; Finkelman, F D; Karp, C L; Cook, D N

    2015-07-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic, inflammatory lung disease. Some forms of allergic asthma are characterized by T helper type 2 (Th2)-driven eosinophilia, whereas others are distinguished by Th17-driven neutrophilia. Stimulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on hematopoietic and airway epithelial cells (AECs) contributes to the inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and allergens, but the specific contribution of TLR4 in these cell compartments to airway inflammatory responses remains poorly understood. We used novel, conditionally mutant Tlr4(fl/fl) mice to define the relative contributions of AEC and hematopoietic cell Tlr4 expression to LPS- and allergen-induced airway inflammation. We found that Tlr4 expression by hematopoietic cells is critical for neutrophilic airway inflammation following LPS exposure and for Th17-driven neutrophilic responses to the house dust mite (HDM) lysates and ovalbumin (OVA). Conversely, Tlr4 expression by AECs was found to be important for robust eosinophilic airway inflammation following sensitization and challenge with these same allergens. Thus, Tlr4 expression by hematopoietic and airway epithelial cells controls distinct arms of the immune response to inhaled allergens. PMID:25465099

  19. Paediatric airway management: What is new?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway management plays a pivotal role in Paediatric Anaesthesia. Over the last two decades many improvements in this area have helped us to overcome this final frontier. From an era where intubation with a conventional laryngoscope or blind nasal intubation was the only tool for airway management, we have come a long way. Today supraglottic airway devices have pride of place in the Operating Room and are becoming important airway devices used in routine procedures. Direct and indirect fibreoptic laryngoscopes and transtracheal devices help us overcome difficult and previously impossible airway situations. These developments mean that we need to update our knowledge on these devices. Also much of our basic understanding of the physiology and anatomy of the paediatric airway has changed. This article attempts to shed light on some of the most important advances/opinions in paediatric airway management like, cuffed endotracheal tubes, supraglottic airway devices, video laryngoscopes, rapid sequence intubation, the newly proposed algorithm for difficult airway management and the role of Ex Utero Intrapartum Treatment (EXIT procedure in the management of the neonatal airway.

  20. Multiscale Vessel-guided Airway Tree Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Sporring, Jon; de Bruijne, Marleen

    This paper presents a method for airway tree segmentation that uses a combination of a trained airway appearance model, vessel and airway orientation information, and region growing. The method uses a voxel classification based appearance model, which involves the use of a classifier that is trai...... evaluated within EXACT’09 on a diverse set of CT scans. Results show a favorable combination of a relatively large portion of the tree detected correctly with very few false positives.......This paper presents a method for airway tree segmentation that uses a combination of a trained airway appearance model, vessel and airway orientation information, and region growing. The method uses a voxel classification based appearance model, which involves the use of a classifier that is...... trained to differentiate between airway and non-airway voxels. Vessel and airway orientation information are used in the form of a vessel orientation similarity measure, which indicates how similar the orientation of the an airway candidate is to the orientation of the neighboring vessel. The method is...

  1. Paediatric airway management: What is new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, S; Jayanthi, R; Archana, SR

    2012-01-01

    Airway management plays a pivotal role in Paediatric Anaesthesia. Over the last two decades many improvements in this area have helped us to overcome this final frontier. From an era where intubation with a conventional laryngoscope or blind nasal intubation was the only tool for airway management, we have come a long way. Today supraglottic airway devices have pride of place in the Operating Room and are becoming important airway devices used in routine procedures. Direct and indirect fibreoptic laryngoscopes and transtracheal devices help us overcome difficult and previously impossible airway situations. These developments mean that we need to update our knowledge on these devices. Also much of our basic understanding of the physiology and anatomy of the paediatric airway has changed. This article attempts to shed light on some of the most important advances/opinions in paediatric airway management like, cuffed endotracheal tubes, supraglottic airway devices, video laryngoscopes, rapid sequence intubation, the newly proposed algorithm for difficult airway management and the role of Ex Utero Intrapartum Treatment (EXIT) procedure in the management of the neonatal airway. PMID:23293383

  2. Simvastatin inhibits TGFβ1-induced fibronectin in human airway fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavami Saeid

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchial fibroblasts contribute to airway remodelling, including airway wall fibrosis. Transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 plays a major role in this process. We previously revealed the importance of the mevalonate cascade in the fibrotic response of human airway smooth muscle cells. We now investigate mevalonate cascade-associated signaling in TGFβ1-induced fibronectin expression by bronchial fibroblasts from non-asthmatic and asthmatic subjects. Methods We used simvastatin (1-15 μM to inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methlyglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase which converts HMG-CoA to mevalonate. Selective inhibitors of geranylgeranyl transferase-1 (GGT1; GGTI-286, 10 μM and farnesyl transferase (FT; FTI-277, 10 μM were used to determine whether GGT1 and FT contribute to TGFβ1-induced fibronectin expression. In addition, we studied the effects of co-incubation with simvastatin and mevalonate (1 mM, geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (30 μM or farnesylpyrophosphate (30 μM. Results Immunoblotting revealed concentration-dependent simvastatin inhibition of TGFβ1 (2.5 ng/ml, 48 h-induced fibronectin. This was prevented by exogenous mevalonate, or isoprenoids (geranylgeranylpyrophosphate or farnesylpyrophosphate. The effects of simvastatin were mimicked by GGTI-286, but not FTI-277, suggesting fundamental involvement of GGT1 in TGFβ1-induced signaling. Asthmatic fibroblasts exhibited greater TGFβ1-induced fibronectin expression compared to non-asthmatic cells; this enhanced response was effectively reduced by simvastatin. Conclusions We conclude that TGFβ1-induced fibronectin expression in airway fibroblasts relies on activity of GGT1 and availability of isoprenoids. Our results suggest that targeting regulators of isoprenoid-dependent signaling holds promise for treating airway wall fibrosis.

  3. Hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging ventilation defects in asthma: relationship to airway mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Del; Svenningsen, Sarah; Guo, Fumin; Bhatawadekar, Swati; Parraga, Grace; Maksym, Geoffrey N

    2016-04-01

    In patients with asthma, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides direct measurements of regional ventilation heterogeneity, the etiology of which is not well-understood, nor is the relationship of ventilation abnormalities with lung mechanics. In addition, respiratory resistance and reactance are often abnormal in asthmatics and the frequency dependence of respiratory resistance is thought to reflect ventilation heterogeneity. We acquiredMRIventilation defect maps, forced expiratory volume in one-second (FEV1), and airways resistance (Raw) measurements, and used a computational airway model to explore the relationship of ventilation defect percent (VDP) with simulated measurements of respiratory system resistance (Rrs) and reactance (Xrs).MRIventilation defect maps were experimentally acquired in 25 asthmatics before, during, and after methacholine challenge and these were nonrigidly coregistered to the airway tree model. Using the model coregistered to ventilation defect maps, we narrowed proximal (9th) and distal (14th) generation airways that were spatially related to theMRIventilation defects. The relationships forVDPwith Raw measured using plethysmography (r = 0.79), and model predictions of Rrs>14(r = 0.91,P 9(r = 0.88,P < 0.0001) were significantly stronger (P = 0.005;P = 0.03, respectively) than withFEV1(r = -0.68,P = 0.0001). The slopes for the relationship ofVDPwith simulated lung mechanics measurements were different (P < 0.0001); among these, the slope for theVDP-Xrs0.2relationship was largest, suggesting thatVDPwas dominated by peripheral airway heterogeneity in these patients. In conclusion, as a first step toward understanding potential links between lung mechanics and ventilation defects, impedance predictions were made using a computational airway tree model with simulated constriction of airways related to ventilation defects measured in mild-moderate asthmatics. PMID:27053294

  4. Chronic inflammatory airway diseases: the central role of the epithelium revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohy, S T; Hupin, C; Pilette, C; Ladjemi, M Z

    2016-04-01

    The respiratory epithelium plays a critical role for the maintenance of airway integrity and defense against inhaled particles. Physical barrier provided by apical junctions and mucociliary clearance clears inhaled pathogens, allergens or toxics, to prevent continuous stimulation of adaptive immune responses. The "chemical barrier", consisting of several anti-microbial factors such as lysozyme and lactoferrin, constitutes another protective mechanism of the mucosae against external aggressions before adaptive immune response starts. The reconstruction of damaged respiratory epithelium is crucial to restore this barrier. This review examines the role of the airway epithelium through recent advances in health and chronic inflammatory diseases in the lower conducting airways (in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Better understanding of normal and altered epithelial functions continuously provides new insights into the physiopathology of chronic airway diseases and should help to identify new epithelial-targeted therapies. PMID:27021118

  5. Arginase inhibition in airways from normal and nitric oxide synthase 2-knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arginase1 and nitric oxide synthase2 (NOS2) utilize L-arginine as a substrate, with both enzymes expressed at high levels in the asthmatic lung. Inhibition of arginase in ovalbumin-exposed C57BL/6 mice with the transition state inhibitor Nω-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA) significantly increased total L-arginine content in the airway compartment. We hypothesized that such an increase in L-arginine content would increase the amount of nitric oxide (NO) being produced in the airways and thereby decrease airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilic influx. We further hypothesized that despite arginase inhibition, NOS2 knockout (NOS2-/-) mice would be unable to up-regulate NO production in response to allergen exposure and would demonstrate higher amounts of airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilia under conditions of arginase inhibition than C57BL/6 animals. We found that administration of nor-NOHA significantly decreased airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilic airway inflammation in ovalbumin-exposed C57BL/6 mice, but these parameters were unchanged in ovalbumin-exposed NOS2-/- mice. Arginase1 protein content was increased in mice exposed to ovalbumin, an effect that was reversed upon nor-NOHA treatment in C57BL/6 mice. Arginase1 protein content in the airway compartment directly correlated with the degree of airway hyperreactivity in all treatment groups. NOS2-/- mice had significantly greater arginase1 and arginase2 concentrations compared to their respective C57BL/6 groups, indicating that inhibition of arginase may be dependent upon NOS2 expression. Arginase1 and 2 content were not affected by nor-NOHA administration in the NOS2-/- mice. We conclude that L-arginine metabolism plays an important role in the development of airway hyperreactivity and eosinophilic airway inflammation. Inhibition of arginase early in the allergic inflammatory response decreases the severity of the chronic inflammatory phenotype. These effects appear to be attributable to NOS2, which is a

  6. Role of Inhaled Steroids in Vascular Airway Remodelling in Asthma and COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Alfredo Chetta; Dario Olivieri

    2012-01-01

    In chronic obstructive airway diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), changes in bronchial microvasculature are present in response to inflammatory stimuli. Vascular changes may significantly contribute to airway wall remodelling. Angiogenesis and vascular leakage are prevalent in asthma, while vasodilation and vascular leakage dominate in COPD. An endothelial dysfunction may be present both in asthma and in COPD. Vascular changes may occur simultaneously wi...

  7. Haemophilus influenzae Infection Drives IL-17-Mediated Neutrophilic Allergic Airways Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Essilfie, Ama-Tawiah; Simpson, Jodie L.; Horvat, Jay C.; Julie A Preston; Dunkley, Margaret L.; Paul S Foster; Gibson, Peter G; Hansbro, Philip M

    2011-01-01

    A subset of patients with stable asthma has prominent neutrophilic and reduced eosinophilic inflammation, which is associated with attenuated airways hyper-responsiveness (AHR). Haemophilus influenzae has been isolated from the airways of neutrophilic asthmatics; however, the nature of the association between infection and the development of neutrophilic asthma is not understood. Our aim was to investigate the effects of H. influenzae respiratory infection on the development of hallmark featu...

  8. Repeated Nitrogen Dioxide Exposures and Eosinophilic Airway Inflammation in Asthmatics: A Randomized Crossover Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ezratty, Véronique; Guillossou, Gaëlle; Neukirch, Catherine; Dehoux, Monique; Koscielny, Serge; Bonay, Marcel; Cabanes, Pierre-André; Samet, Jonathan M; Mure, Patrick; Ropert, Luc; Tokarek, Sandra; Lambrozo, Jacques; Aubier, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a ubiquitous atmospheric pollutant, may enhance the asthmatic response to allergens through eosinophilic activation in the airways. However, the effect of NO2 on inflammation without allergen exposure is poorly studied. Objectives: We investigated whether repeated peaks of NO2, at various realistic concentrations, induce changes in airway inflammation in asthmatics. Methods: Nineteen nonsmokers with asthma were exposed at rest in a double-blind, crossover s...

  9. Haemophilus influenzae infection drives IL-17-mediated neutrophilic allergic airways disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Ama-Tawiah Essilfie; Simpson, Jodie L.; Horvat, Jay C.; Julie A Preston; Dunkley, Margaret L.; Paul S Foster; Gibson, Peter G; Hansbro, Philip M

    2011-01-01

    A subset of patients with stable asthma has prominent neutrophilic and reduced eosinophilic inflammation, which is associated with attenuated airways hyper-responsiveness (AHR). Haemophilus influenzae has been isolated from the airways of neutrophilic asthmatics; however, the nature of the association between infection and the development of neutrophilic asthma is not understood. Our aim was to investigate the effects of H. influenzae respiratory infection on the development of hallmark featu...

  10. Corticosteroid modulation of Na(+)-K+ pump-mediated relaxation in maturing airway smooth muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Schramm, C. M.; Grunstein, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The ontogeny of the relaxant influence of the airway electrogenic Na(+)-K+ pump and its potential modulation by corticosteroids were examined in airway smooth muscle (ASM) segments isolated from newborn and adult rabbits. 2. Control and methylprednisolone-treated (MP) ASM segments were half-maximally contracted with methacholine in K(+)-free buffer and the ASM relaxant responses to Na(+)-K+ pump activation were subsequently evaluated. Relative to adult ASM, control newborn ASM showed signi...

  11. M2 Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor modulates rat airway smooth muscle cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Placeres-Uray, Fabiola A; Febres-Aldana, Christopher A; Fernandez-Ruiz, Ruth; Gonzalez de Alfonzo, Ramona; Lippo de Becemberg, Itala A; Alfonzo, Marcelo J

    2013-01-01

    Airways chronic inflammatory conditions in asthma and COPD are characterized by tissue remodeling, being smooth muscle hyperplasia, the most important feature. Non-neuronal and neuronal Acetylcholine acting on muscarinic receptors (MAChRs) has been postulated as determinant of tissue remodeling in asthma and COPD by promoting proliferation and phenotypic changes of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC). The objective was to evaluate proliferative responses to muscarinic agonist as carbamylcholine...

  12. Ionotropic and Metabotropic Proton-Sensing Receptors Involved in Airway Inflammation in Allergic Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    An acidic microenvironment has been shown to evoke a variety of airway responses, including cough, bronchoconstriction, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lung, and stimulation of mucus hyperproduction. Except for the participation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in severe acidic pH (of less than 6.0)-induced cough and bronchoconstriction through sensory neurons, the molecular mechanisms underly...

  13. Sealing of Airway Fistulas for Metallic Covered Z-type Stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwu WANG

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Treating airway fistulas, including esophagorespiratory fistulas (ERFs, bronchopleural fistulas (BPFs, and tracheomediastinal fistulas (TMFs, is difficult. The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and clinical efficacy of metallic covered Z-type stents (CZTS for the treatment of airway fistulas through bronchoscopy or fluroscopy. Methods Thirty-eight patients with fistulas between the esophagus, mediastina, and airways (32 ERFs, 5 BPFs, and 1 TMF were retrospectively reviewed after treatment with covered metallic esophageal and airway stents. The fistulas were caused by esophageal (n=26, bronchogenic (n=11, and thyroid (n=1 carcinomas. Results Forty-six fistulas were found in 38 patients. The fistula size ranged from 0.5 cm to 7.0 cm. Forty airway covered metal stents (24 Y-type, 8 L-type, and 8 I-type and 24 esophageal metal stents were placed. Complete responses to the sealing effects of fistulas were noted in 4.3% of all the fistulas, 60.9% showed complete clinical responses, 23.9% showed partial responses, and 10.9% showed no response. An effectivity rate of 89.1% was observed, and the median survival duration of all patients was 5 months. Conclusion The use of CZTS appears to be safe and feasible for the palliative treatment of ERFs, BPFs, and TMFs. Airway stent placement is recommended for patients with ERF. In the event that airway stents fail, esophageal stents should be given. Airway bifurcation stents were observed to be especially suitable for the sealing of fistulas near the trachea carina.

  14. SIRT1 pathway dysregulation in the smoke-exposed airway epithelium and lung tumor tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Beane, Jennifer; Cheng, Luis; Soldi, Raffaella; Zhang, Xiaohui; Liu, Gang; Anderlind, Christina; Lenburg, Marc E.; Spira, Avrum; Bild, Andrea H

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoke produces a molecular “field of injury” in epithelial cells lining the respiratory tract. However, the specific signaling pathways that are altered in the airway of smokers and the signaling processes responsible for the transition from smoking-induced airway damage to lung cancer remain unknown. In this study, we use a genomic approach to study the signaling processes associated with tobacco smoke exposure and lung cancer. First, we developed and validated pathway-specific gen...

  15. Enhancement of Allergen-induced Airway Inflammation by NOX2 Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Won, Hee Yeon; Jang, Eun Jung; Min, Hyun Jung; Hwang, Eun Sook

    2011-01-01

    Background NADPH oxidase (NOX) modulates cell proliferation, differentiation and immune response through generation of reactive oxygen species. Particularly, NOX2 is recently reported to be important for regulating Treg cell differentiation of CD4+ T cells. Methods We employed ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in wild-type and NOX2-deficient mice and analyzed tissue histopathology and cytokine profiles. Results We investigated whether NOX2-deficiency affects T cell-mediated airway inflamm...

  16. United airway disease: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Giavina-Bianchi P; Aun MV; Takejima P; Kalil J; Agondi RC

    2016-01-01

    Pedro Giavina-Bianchi,* Marcelo Vivolo Aun,* Priscila Takejima, Jorge Kalil, Rosana Câmara Agondi Clinical Immunology and Allergy Division, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil*These authors contributed equally to this work. Abstract: Upper and lower airways are considered a unified morphological and functional unit, and the connection existing between them has been observed for many years, both in health and in disease. There is str...

  17. Genetics of Complex Airway Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cookson, William O C; Moffatt, Miriam F

    2011-01-01

    The past 3 years have seen highly significant genetic effects identified for a wide variety of common complex diseases, including the airway disorders of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It appears that only a portion of the genetically mediated susceptibility to complex diseases has been identified, and there is much left to be discovered. This review briefly describes the results of the genome-wide association studies of asthma and gives an overview of the parallel and incr...

  18. Airway bacteria drive a progressive COPD-like phenotype in mice with polymeric immunoglobulin receptor deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Bradley W; Brucker, Robert M; Han, Wei; Du, Rui-Hong; Zhang, Yongqin; Cheng, Dong-Sheng; Gleaves, Linda; Abdolrasulnia, Rasul; Polosukhina, Dina; Clark, Peter E; Bordenstein, Seth R; Blackwell, Timothy S; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms driving persistent airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are incompletely understood. As secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) deficiency in small airways has been reported in COPD patients, we hypothesized that immunobarrier dysfunction resulting from reduced SIgA contributes to chronic airway inflammation and disease progression. Here we show that polymeric immunoglobulin receptor-deficient (pIgR(-/-)) mice, which lack SIgA, spontaneously develop COPD-like pathology as they age. Progressive airway wall remodelling and emphysema in pIgR(-/-) mice are associated with an altered lung microbiome, bacterial invasion of the airway epithelium, NF-κB activation, leukocyte infiltration and increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-12 and neutrophil elastase. Re-derivation of pIgR(-/-) mice in germ-free conditions or treatment with the anti-inflammatory phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor roflumilast prevents COPD-like lung inflammation and remodelling. These findings show that pIgR/SIgA deficiency in the airways leads to persistent activation of innate immune responses to resident lung microbiota, driving progressive small airway remodelling and emphysema. PMID:27046438

  19. Pulmonary surfactant in the airway physiology: a direct relaxing effect on the smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkovska, A; Uhliarova, B; Joskova, M; Franova, S; Kolomaznik, M; Calkovsky, V; Smolarova, S

    2015-04-01

    Beside alveoli, surface active material plays an important role in the airway physiology. In the upper airways it primarily serves in local defense. Lower airway surfactant stabilizes peripheral airways, provides the transport and defense, has barrier and anti-edematous functions, and possesses direct relaxant effect on the smooth muscle. We tested in vitro the effect of two surfactant preparations Curosurf® and Alveofact® on the precontracted smooth muscle of intra- and extra-pulmonary airways. Relaxation was more pronounced for lung tissue strip containing bronchial smooth muscle as the primary site of surfactant effect. The study does not confirm the participation of ATP-dependent potassium channels and cAMP-regulated epithelial chloride channels known as CFTR chloride channels, or nitric oxide involvement in contractile response of smooth muscle to surfactant.By controlling wall thickness and airway diameter, pulmonary surfactant is an important component of airway physiology. Thus, surfactant dysfunction may be included in pathophysiology of asthma, COPD, or other diseases with bronchial obstruction. PMID:25583659

  20. Airway injury during emergency transcutaneous airway access: a comparison at cricothyroid and tracheal sites.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Salah, Nazar

    2009-12-01

    Oxygenation via the cricothyroid membrane (CTM) may be required in emergencies, but inadvertent tracheal cannulation may occur. In this study, we compared airway injury between the tracheal and CTM sites using different techniques for airway access.

  1. Nrf2 protects against airway disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a ubiquitous master transcription factor that regulates antioxidant response elements (AREs)-mediated expression of antioxidant enzyme and cytoprotective proteins. In the unstressed condition, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) suppresses cellular Nrf2 in cytoplasm and drives its proteasomal degradation. Nrf2 can be activated by diverse stimuli including oxidants, pro-oxidants, antioxidants, and chemopreventive agents. Nrf2 induces cellular rescue pathways against oxidative injury, abnormal inflammatory and immune responses, apoptosis, and carcinogenesis. Application of Nrf2 germ-line mutant mice has identified an extensive range of protective roles for Nrf2 in experimental models of human disorders in the liver, gastrointestinal tract, airway, kidney, brain, circulation, and immune or nerve system. In the lung, lack of Nrf2 exacerbated toxicity caused by multiple oxidative insults including supplemental respiratory therapy (e.g., hyperoxia, mechanical ventilation), cigarette smoke, allergen, virus, bacterial endotoxin and other inflammatory agents (e.g., carrageenin), environmental pollution (e.g., particles), and a fibrotic agent bleomycin. Microarray analyses and bioinformatic studies elucidated functional AREs and Nrf2-directed genes that are critical components of signaling mechanisms in pulmonary protection by Nrf2. Association of loss of function with promoter polymorphisms in NRF2 or somatic and epigenetic mutations in KEAP1 and NRF2 has been found in cohorts of patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome or lung cancer, which further supports the role for NRF2 in these lung diseases. In the current review, we address the role of Nrf2 in airways based on emerging evidence from experimental oxidative disease models and human studies.

  2. β2-Agonist induced cAMP is decreased in asthmatic airway smooth muscle due to increased PDE4D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Trian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Asthma is associated with airway narrowing in response to bronchoconstricting stimuli and increased airway smooth muscle (ASM mass. In addition, some studies have suggested impaired β-agonist induced ASM relaxation in asthmatics, but the mechanism is not known. OBJECTIVE: To characterize the potential defect in β-agonist induced cAMP in ASM derived from asthmatic in comparison to non-asthmatic subjects and to investigate its mechanism. METHODS: We examined β(2-adrenergic (β(2AR receptor expression and basal β-agonist and forskolin (direct activator of adenylyl cyclase stimulated cAMP production in asthmatic cultured ASM (n = 15 and non-asthmatic ASM (n = 22. Based on these results, PDE activity, PDE4D expression and cell proliferation were determined. RESULTS: In the presence of IBMX, a pan PDE inhibitor, asthmatic ASM had ∼50% lower cAMP production in response to isoproterenol, albuterol, formoterol, and forskolin compared to non-asthmatic ASM. However when PDE4 was specifically inhibited, cAMP production by the agonists and forskolin was normalized in asthmatic ASM. We then measured the amount and activity of PDE4, and found ∼2-fold greater expression and activity in asthmatic ASM compared to non-asthmatic ASM. Furthermore, inhibition of PDE4 reduced asthmatic ASM proliferation but not that of non-asthmatic ASM. CONCLUSION: Decreased β-agonist induced cAMP in ASM from asthmatics results from enhanced degradation due to increased PDE4D expression. Clinical manifestations of this dysregulation would be suboptimal β-agonist-mediated bronchodilation and possibly reduced control over increasing ASM mass. These phenotypes appear to be "hard-wired" into ASM from asthmatics, as they do not require an inflammatory environment in culture to be observed.

  3. Dosimetry of narrow band UVB treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: For many years psoriasis has been treated with broad band UVB lamps. These lamps have a bell shaped spectrum which peaks at 305 nm and extends from 280 nm to 350 nm. However research with monochromatic UV radiation has shown that wavelengths between 300 nm and 320 nm are the most efficacious for clearing psoriasis while wavelengths below 305 nm are most effective for producing the undesirable side effect of erythema (sunburn). In response to these findings Philips developed a narrow band UVB tube in which a large fraction of the output was confined to a narrow peak (bandwidth 2.5 nm) situated at 311 nm. Christchurch Hospital replaced broad band UVB with narrow band treatments in August 1995 and as this required UV exposures to be substantially increased new protocols had to be developed. Three aspects needed to be addressed. These were translating the dose from broad band to narrow band for current patients, determining the initial dose for new patients and developing a formula for increasing subsequent exposures to both types of patient. To translate doses the spectral irradiance (μW/cm2/nm) that would fall on the patient was measured in both the old broad band and the new narrow band treatment units and from this UV doses were calculated. All doses were expressed in mJ/cm2 of unweighted UV over the range 250 nm to 400 nm. The erythemal effectiveness of the two units were compared by using the CIE 1987 curve to express doses in terms of the equivalent exposure of monochromatic 297 nm radiation. It was found that an exposure of 3.96 mJ/cm2 from the broad band FS40 tubes and 12.79 mJ/cm2 from the narrow band TL/01 tubes were both equivalent to 1.00 mJ/cm2 of monochromatic 297 nm radiation so when transferring patients all broad band doses needed to be increased by a factor of 3.2. Before transferring any patients this factor was confirmed by conducting two minimal erythema dose (MED) tests on a normal subject, one in each unit. For new patients a narrow

  4. Nasal and bronchial airway reactivity in allergic and non allergic airway inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Kölbeck, Karl-Gustav

    2003-01-01

    In allergic or asthmatic airways disease, upper and lower airways show a uniform eosinophilic inflammation of the mucosa, and bronchial hyperreactivity is a common finding. To study the co- variation of mucosal reactivity in upper and lower airways, histamine challenges of both sites were performed in a group of patients with allergic rhinitis during non-season. Upper airways were monitored during challenge by the use of rhinostereometry, an optical technique that non-invasi...

  5. The Three A’s in Asthma – Airway Smooth Muscle, Airway Remodeling & Angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Keglowich, L F; Borger, P

    2015-01-01

    Asthma affects more than 300 million people worldwide and its prevalence is still rising. Acute asthma attacks are characterized by severe symptoms such as breathlessness, wheezing, tightness of the chest, and coughing, which may lead to hospitalization or death. Besides the acute symptoms, asthma is characterized by persistent airway inflammation and airway wall remodeling. The term airway wall remodeling summarizes the structural changes in the airway wall: epithelial cell shedding, goblet ...

  6. The three A's in asthma - airway smooth muscle, airway remodeling & angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Keglowich, L F; Borger, P

    2015-01-01

    Asthma affects more than 300 million people worldwide and its prevalence is still rising. Acute asthma attacks are characterized by severe symptoms such as breathlessness, wheezing, tightness of the chest, and coughing, which may lead to hospitalization or death. Besides the acute symptoms, asthma is characterized by persistent airway inflammation and airway wall remodeling. The term airway wall remodeling summarizes the structural changes in the airway wall: epithelial cell shedding, goblet ...

  7. The airway microvasculature and exercise induced asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, S. D.; Daviskas, E

    1992-01-01

    It has been proposed that exercise induced asthma is a result of "rapid expansion of the blood volume of peribronchial plexi" (McFadden ER, Lancet 1990;335:880-3). This hypothesis proposes that the development of exercise induced asthma depends on the thermal gradient in the airways at the end of hyperpnoea. The events that result in exercise induced asthma are vasoconstriction and airway cooling followed by reactive hyperaemia. We agree that the airway microcirculation has the potential for ...

  8. Complications and failure of airway management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, T M; MacDougall-Davis, S R

    2012-12-01

    Airway management complications causing temporary patient harm are common, but serious injury is rare. Because most airways are easy, most complications occur in easy airways: these complications can and do lead to harm and death. Because these events are rare, most of our learning comes from large litigation and critical incident databases that help identify patterns and areas where care can be improved: but both have limitations. The recent 4th National Audit Project of the Royal College of Anaesthetists and Difficult Airway Society provides important detailed information and our best estimates of the incidence of major airway complications. A significant proportion of airway complications occur in Intensive Care Units and Emergency Departments, and these more frequently cause patient harm/death and are associated with suboptimal care. Hypoxia is the commonest cause of airway-related deaths. Obesity markedly increases risk of airway complications. Pulmonary aspiration remains the leading cause of airway-related anaesthetic deaths, most cases having identifiable risk factors. Unrecognized oesophageal intubation is not of only historical interest and is entirely avoidable. All airway management techniques fail and prediction scores are rather poor, so many failures are unanticipated. Avoidance of airway complications requires institutional and individual preparedness, careful assessment, good planning and judgement, good communication and teamwork, knowledge and use of a range of techniques and devices, and a willingness to stop performing techniques when they are failing. Analysis of major airway complications identifies areas where practice is suboptimal; research to improve understanding, prevention, and management of such complications remains an anaesthetic priority. PMID:23242753

  9. Obesity and upper airway control during sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Alan R.; Patil, Susheel P.; Squier, Samuel; Schneider, Hartmut; Kirkness, Jason P.; Smith, Philip L

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms linking obesity with upper airway dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea are reviewed. Obstructive sleep apnea is due to alterations in upper airway anatomy and neuromuscular control. Upper airway structural alterations in obesity are related to adipose deposition around the pharynx, which can increase its collapsibility or critical pressure (Pcrit). In addition, obesity and, particularly, central adiposity lead to reductions in resting lung volume, resulting in loss of caudal trac...

  10. The Neonatal Airway: Problems and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Bingham, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    Altered, distressed, and noisy breathing during the neonatal period may indicate problems of the upper airway. Typically, a neonate with upper airway obstruction will present with stridor, which may be inspiratory and/or expiratory, and which may represent either a minor or a life-threatening illness. Evaluation of stridor will require a systematic history and physical examination, laboratory and radiologic studies, and possible endoscopic examination of the airway. Rapid diagnosis and interv...

  11. Predominant constitutive CFTR conductance in small airways

    OpenAIRE

    Lytle Christian; Wang Xiaofei; Quinton Paul M

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The pathological hallmarks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are inflammation of the small airways (bronchiolitis) and destruction of lung parenchyma (emphysema). These forms of disease arise from chronic prolonged infections, which are usually never present in the normal lung. Despite the fact that primary hygiene and defense of the airways presumably requires a well controlled fluid environment on the surface of the bronchiolar airway, very little is known ...

  12. Airway oxidative stress in chronic cough

    OpenAIRE

    Koskela, Heikki O; Purokivi, Minna K

    2013-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of chronic cough are unclear. Many reactive oxygen species affect airway sensory C-fibres which are capable to induce cough. Several chronic lung diseases are characterised by cough and oxidative stress. In asthma, an association between the cough severity and airway oxidative stress has been demonstrated. The present study was conducted to investigate whether airway oxidative stress is associated with chronic cough in subjects without chronic lung diseases. Methods ...

  13. Inhibition of aldose reductase prevents experimental allergic airway inflammation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh C S Yadav

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The bronchial asthma, a clinical complication of persistent inflammation of the airway and subsequent airway hyper-responsiveness, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Several studies have shown that oxidative stress plays a key role in initiation as well as amplification of inflammation in airways. However, still there are no good anti-oxidant strategies available for therapeutic intervention in asthma pathogenesis. Most recent studies suggest that polyol pathway enzyme, aldose reductase (AR, contributes to the pathogenesis of oxidative stress-induced inflammation by affecting the NF-kappaB-dependent expression of cytokines and chemokines and therefore inhibitors of AR could be anti-inflammatory. Since inhibitors of AR have already gone through phase-III clinical studies for diabetic complications and found to be safe, our hypothesis is that AR inhibitors could be novel therapeutic drugs for the prevention and treatment of asthma. Hence, we investigated the efficacy of AR inhibition in the prevention of allergic responses to a common natural airborne allergen, ragweed pollen that leads to airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness in a murine model of asthma. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Primary Human Small Airway Epithelial Cells (SAEC were used to investigate the in vitro effects of AR inhibition on ragweed pollen extract (RWE-induced cytotoxic and inflammatory signals. Our results indicate that inhibition of AR prevents RWE -induced apoptotic cell death as measured by annexin-v staining, increase in the activation of NF-kappaB and expression of inflammatory markers such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, cycloxygenase (COX-2, Prostaglandin (PG E(2, IL-6 and IL-8. Further, BALB/c mice were sensitized with endotoxin-free RWE in the absence and presence of AR inhibitor and followed by evaluation of perivascular and peribronchial inflammation, mucin production, eosinophils infiltration and

  14. Cholinergic Regulation of Airway Inflammation and Remodelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Kolahian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine is the predominant parasympathetic neurotransmitter in the airways that regulates bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion. Recent findings suggest that acetylcholine regulates additional functions in the airways, including inflammation and remodelling during inflammatory airway diseases. Moreover, it has become apparent that acetylcholine is synthesized by nonneuronal cells and tissues, including inflammatory cells and structural cells. In this paper, we will discuss the regulatory role of acetylcholine in inflammation and remodelling in which we will focus on the role of the airway smooth muscle cell as a target cell for acetylcholine that modulates inflammation and remodelling during respiratory diseases such as asthma and COPD.

  15. Airway Tree Extraction with Locally Optimal Paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Sporring, Jon; Pedersen, Jesper Johannes Holst; de Bruijne, Marleen

    This paper proposes a method to extract the airway tree from CT images by continually extending the tree with locally optimal paths. This is in contrast to commonly used region growing based approaches that only search the space of the immediate neighbors. The result is a much more robust method...... for tree extraction that can overcome local occlusions. The cost function for obtaining the optimal paths takes into account of an airway probability map as well as measures of airway shape and orientation derived from multi-scale Hessian eigen analysis on the airway probability. Significant...

  16. Emergency surgical airway management in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, C V; Kehlet Nørskov, Anders; Wetterslev, J;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The emergency surgical airway (ESA) is the final option in difficult airway management. We identified ESA procedures registered in the Danish Anaesthesia Database (DAD) and described the performed airway management. METHODS: We extracted a cohort of 452 461 adult patients undergoing...... per thousand (95% CI; 1.0-2.4). A Supraglottic Airway Device and/or the administration of a neuromuscular blocking agent before ESA were used as a rescue in 6/27 and 13/27 of the patients, respectively. In 19/27 patients ENT surgeons performed the ESA's and anaesthetists attempted 6/27 of the ESAs of...

  17. Automated lobe-based airway labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Suicheng; Wang, Zhimin; Siegfried, Jill M; Wilson, David; Bigbee, William L; Pu, Jiantao

    2012-01-01

    Regional quantitative analysis of airway morphological abnormalities is of great interest in lung disease investigation. Considering that pulmonary lobes are relatively independent functional unit, we develop and test a novel and efficient computerized scheme in this study to automatically and robustly classify the airways into different categories in terms of pulmonary lobe. Given an airway tree, which could be obtained using any available airway segmentation scheme, the developed approach consists of four basic steps: (1) airway skeletonization or centerline extraction, (2) individual airway branch identification, (3) initial rule-based airway classification/labeling, and (4) self-correction of labeling errors. In order to assess the performance of this approach, we applied it to a dataset consisting of 300 chest CT examinations in a batch manner and asked an image analyst to subjectively examine the labeled results. Our preliminary experiment showed that the labeling accuracy for the right upper lobe, the right middle lobe, the right lower lobe, the left upper lobe, and the left lower lobe is 100%, 99.3%, 99.3%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Among these, only two cases are incorrectly labeled due to the failures in airway detection. It takes around 2 minutes to label an airway tree using this algorithm. PMID:23093951

  18. Cigarette Smoke and Estrogen Signaling in Human Airway Smooth Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatachalem Sathish

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Cigarette smoke (CS in active smokers and second-hand smoke exposure exacerbate respiratory disorders such as asthma and chronic bronchitis. While women are known to experience a more asthmatic response to CS than emphysema in men, there is limited information on the mechanisms of CS-induced airway dysfunction. We hypothesize that CS interferes with a normal (protective bronchodilatory role of estrogens, thus worsening airway contractility. Methods: We tested effects of cigarette smoke extract (CSE on 17β-estradiol (E2 signaling in enzymatically-dissociated bronchial airway smooth muscle (ASM obtained from lung samples of non-smoking female patients undergoing thoracic surgery. Results: In fura-2 loaded ASM cells, CSE increased intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i responses to 10µM histamine. Acute exposure to physiological concentrations of E2 decreased [Ca2+]i responses. However, in 24h exposed CSE cells, although expression of estrogen receptors was increased, the effect of E2 on [Ca2+]i was blunted. Acute E2 exposure also decreased store-operated Ca2+ entry and inhibited stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1 phosphorylation: effects blunted by CSE. Acute exposure to E2 increased cAMP, but less so in 24h CSE-exposed cells. 24h CSE exposure increased S-nitrosylation of ERα. Furthermore, 24h CSE-exposed bronchial rings showed increased bronchoconstrictor agonist responses that were not reduced as effectively by E2 compared to non-CSE controls. Conclusion: These data suggest that CS induces dysregulation of estrogen signaling in ASM, which could contribute to increased airway contractility in women exposed to CS.

  19. Anger perceptually and conceptually narrows cognitive scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gable, Philip A; Poole, Bryan D; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2015-07-01

    For the last 50 years, research investigating the effect of emotions on scope of cognitive processing was based on models proposing that affective valence determined cognitive scope. More recently, our motivational intensity model suggests that this past work had confounded valence with motivational intensity. Research derived from this model supports the idea that motivational intensity, rather than affective valence, explains much of the variance emotions have on cognitive scope. However, the motivational intensity model is limited in that the empirical work has examined only positive affects high in approach and negative affects high in avoidance motivation. Thus, perhaps only approach-positive and avoidance-negative states narrow cognitive scope. The present research was designed to clarify these conceptual issues by examining the effect of anger, a negatively valenced approach-motivated state, on cognitive scope. Results revealed that anger narrowed attentional scope relative to a neutral state and that attentional narrowing to anger was similar to the attentional narrowing caused by high approach-motivated positive affects (Study 1). This narrowing of attention was related to trait approach motivation (Studies 2 and Study 3). Anger also narrowed conceptual cognitive categorization (Study 4). Narrowing of categorization related to participants' approach motivation toward anger stimuli. Together, these results suggest that anger, an approach-motivated negative affect, narrows perceptual and conceptual cognitive scope. More broadly, these results support the conceptual model that motivational intensity per se, rather than approach-positive and avoidance-negative states, causes a narrowing of cognitive scope. PMID:26011662

  20. Intratracheal Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulates Tachykinin System, Suppresses Airway Remodeling and Reduces Airway Hyperresponsiveness in an Animal Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Urbanek

    Full Text Available The need for new options for chronic lung diseases promotes the research on stem cells for lung repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can modulate lung inflammation, but the data on cellular processes involved in early airway remodeling and the potential involvement of neuropeptides are scarce.To elucidate the mechanisms by which local administration of MSCs interferes with pathophysiological features of airway hyperresponsiveness in an animal model.GFP-tagged mouse MSCs were intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin mouse model with subsequent functional tests, the analysis of cytokine levels, neuropeptide expression and histological evaluation of MSCs fate and airway pathology. Additionally, MSCs were exposed to pro-inflammatory factors in vitro.Functional improvement was observed after MSC administration. Although MSCs did not adopt lung cell phenotypes, cell therapy positively affected airway remodeling reducing the hyperplastic phase of the gain in bronchial smooth muscle mass, decreasing the proliferation of epithelium in which mucus metaplasia was also lowered. Decrease of interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and increase of interleukin-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage was also observed. Exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines, MSCs upregulated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Moreover, asthma-related in vivo upregulation of pro-inflammatory neurokinin 1 and neurokinin 2 receptors was counteracted by MSCs that also determined a partial restoration of VIP, a neuropeptide with anti-inflammatory properties.Intratracheally administered MSCs positively modulate airway remodeling, reduce inflammation and improve function, demonstrating their ability to promote tissue homeostasis in the course of experimental allergic asthma. Because of a limited tissue retention, the functional impact of MSCs may be attributed to their immunomodulatory response combined with the interference of neuropeptide system activation and tissue

  1. The effect of smoking cessation on airway inflammation in young asthma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Christian Grabow; Porsbjerg, C; Backer, V

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Smoking has been shown to have several detrimental effects on asthma, including poor symptom control, attenuated treatment response and accelerated decline in lung function. In spite of this, smoking is at least as common among asthma patients as in the rest of the population. The...... any parameters. CONCLUSION: Smoking cessation improved asthma control, but the changes were not related to change in eosinophilic inflammation, and the reduction in neutrophils was small. Thus, airway inflammation with eosinophils and neutrophils may be less important drivers of asthma control in...... aggravations of smoking on asthma may be caused by effects on airway inflammation, which has been found to be changed in asthmatic smokers. It is not known whether these smoking-induced airway inflammation changes are reversible after smoking cessation. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess airway...

  2. Next generation in vitro systems for biofilm studies - a cystic fibrosis patient airway perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss Nielsen, Martin

    Bacterial infections have a large impact on the health of the general public, however individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) are immensely susceptible to acquire pulmonary infections with environmental bacteria, viruses and fungal species. Ultimately pulmonary infections are the major cause of...... develop an accurate tool for growing biofilms that can mimic the cystic fibrosis airways, emulating one of the most important characteristics of the human airways, the oxygen environments. Microfluidic approaches that allow biofilm formation under controllable oxygen concentrations, and furthermore enable....... Different microenvironments within the airways of the patients lead to phenotypic and genotypic diversification, sculpting the bacteria to become an efficient colonizer despite the environmental niche in the CF airways. Despite intensive antibiotic treatment and a profound immunologic response, the...

  3. Continuous exposure to house dust mite elicits chronic airway inflammation and structural remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jill R; Wiley, Ryan E; Fattouh, Ramzi; Swirski, Filip K; Gajewska, Beata U; Coyle, Anthony J; Gutierrez-Ramos, José-Carlos; Ellis, Russ; Inman, Mark D; Jordana, Manel

    2004-02-01

    It is now fully appreciated that asthma is a disease of a chronic nature resulting from intermittent or continued aeroallergen exposure leading to airway inflammation. To investigate responses to continuous antigen exposure, mice were exposed to either house dust mite extract (HDM) or ovalbumin intranasally for five consecutive days, followed by 2 days of rest, for up to seven consecutive weeks. Continuous exposure to HDM, unlike ovalbumin, elicited severe and persistent eosinophilic airway inflammation. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an accumulation of CD4+ lymphocytes in the lung with elevated expression of inducible costimulator a marker of T cell activation, and of T1/ST2, a marker of helper T Type 2 effector cells. We also detected increased and sustained production of helper T cell Type 2-associated cytokines by splenocytes of HDM-exposed mice on in vitro HDM recall. Histologic analysis of the lung showed evidence of airway remodeling in mice exposed to HDM, with goblet cell hyperplasia, collagen deposition, and peribronchial accumulation of contractile tissue. In addition, HDM-exposed mice demonstrated severe airway hyperreactivity to methacholine. Finally, these responses were studied for up to 9 weeks after cessation of HDM exposure. We observed that whereas airway inflammation resolved fully, the remodeling changes did not resolve and airway hyperreactivity resolved only partly. PMID:14597485

  4. Ionotropic and Metabotropic Proton-Sensing Receptors Involved in Airway Inflammation in Allergic Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Aoki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An acidic microenvironment has been shown to evoke a variety of airway responses, including cough, bronchoconstriction, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR, infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lung, and stimulation of mucus hyperproduction. Except for the participation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1 and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs in severe acidic pH (of less than 6.0-induced cough and bronchoconstriction through sensory neurons, the molecular mechanisms underlying extracellular acidic pH-induced actions in the airways have not been fully understood. Recent studies have revealed that ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1-family G protein-coupled receptors, which sense pH of more than 6.0, are expressed in structural cells, such as airway smooth muscle cells and epithelial cells, and in inflammatory and immune cells, such as eosinophils and dendritic cells. They function in a variety of airway responses related to the pathophysiology of inflammatory diseases, including allergic asthma. In the present review, we discuss the roles of ionotropic TRPV1 and ASICs and metabotropic OGR1-family G protein-coupled receptors in the airway inflammation and AHR in asthma and respiratory diseases.

  5. Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 2-Mediated Interleukin-8 Production in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells via the α7-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Shane J. O'Neill; McElvaney, Noel G; Wells, Robert J.; Hugh Ramsay; Greene, Catherine M

    2010-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disorder characterised by chronic inflammation of the airways. The lung manifestations of CF include colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus leading to neutrophil-dominated airway inflammation and tissue damage. Inflammation in the CF lung is initiated by microbial components which activate the innate immune response via Toll-like receptors (TLRs), increasing airway epithelial cell production of proinflammatory mediators such as ...

  6. Potentially pathogenic airway bacteria and neutrophilic inflammation in treatment resistant severe asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Green

    Full Text Available Molecular microbiological analysis of airway samples in asthma has demonstrated an altered microbiome in comparison to healthy controls. Such changes may have relevance to treatment-resistant severe asthma, particularly those with neutrophilic airway inflammation, as bacteria might be anticipated to activate the innate immune response, a process that is poorly steroid responsive. An understanding of the relationship between airway bacterial presence and dominance in severe asthma may help direct alternative treatment approaches.We aimed to use a culture independent analysis strategy to describe the presence, dominance and abundance of bacterial taxa in induced sputum from treatment resistant severe asthmatics and correlate findings with clinical characteristics and airway inflammatory markers.Induced sputum was obtained from 28 stable treatment-resistant severe asthmatics. The samples were divided for supernatant IL-8 measurement, cytospin preparation for differential cell count and Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP profiling for bacterial community analysis.In 17/28 patients, the dominant species within the airway bacterial community was Moraxella catarrhalis or a member of the Haemophilus or Streptococcus genera. Colonisation with these species was associated with longer asthma disease duration (mean (SD 31.8 years (16.7 vs 15.6 years (8.0, p = 0.008, worse post-bronchodilator percent predicted FEV1 (68.0% (24.0 vs 85.5% (19.7, p = 0.025 and higher sputum neutrophil differential cell counts (median (IQR 80% (67-83 vs 43% (29-67, p = 0.001. Total abundance of these organisms significantly and positively correlated with sputum IL-8 concentration and neutrophil count.Airway colonisation with potentially pathogenic micro-organisms in asthma is associated with more severe airways obstruction and neutrophilic airway inflammation. This altered colonisation may have a role in the development of an asthma phenotype

  7. Spirometric abnormalities associated with chronic bronchitis, asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness among boilermaker construction workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, R.; Eisen, E,A,; Pothier, L,; Lewis, D,; Bledsoe, T,; Christiani, D.C. [Harvard University, Boston, MA (United States). School of Public Health

    2002-06-01

    In a 2-year longitudinal study of boilermaker construction workers, authors found a significant association between working at oil-fired, coal-fired, and gas-fired industries during the past year and reduced lung function. In the present study, authors investigated whether chronic bronchitis, asthma, or baseline methacholine airway responsiveness can explain the heterogeneity in lung function response to boilermaker work. Exposure was assessed with a work history questionnaire. Spirometry was performed annually to assess lung function. A generalized estimating equation approach was used to account for the repeated-measures design. One hundred eighteen boilermakers participated in the study. Self-reported history of chronic bronchitis and asthma were associated with a larger FEV1 reduction in response to workplace exposure at coal-fired and gas-fired industries. Although a high prevalence (39%) of airway hyperresponsiveness (provocative concentration of methacholine causing a 20% fall in FEVI of {lt} 8 mg/mL) among boilermakers was found, there was no consistent pattern of effect modification by airway responsiveness. Conclusions: Although chronic bronchitis and asthma were associated with a greater loss in lung function in response to hours worked as a boilermaker, and therefore they acted as effect modifiers of the exposure-lung function relationship, airway hyperresponsiveness did not. However, the high prevalence of airway hyperresponsiveness found in the cohort may be a primary consequence of long-term workplace exposure among boilermakers.

  8. Modified nasopharyngeal tube for upper airway obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Masters, I; Chang, A; Harris, M.; O'Neil, M.

    1999-01-01

    A modified nasopharyngeal tube is described that does not add airway dead space and resistance, is well tolerated, highly successful, and allows simultaneous use of oxygen prongs. This potentially reduces the need for surgical intervention to relieve high upper airway obstruction from Pierre-Robin syndrome and other causes.



  9. Editorial: The upper airway - the forgotten organ

    OpenAIRE

    Shelly, Maire P

    2001-01-01

    The upper airway is an organ not often investigated. Relatively little is known about its complex functions, and misunderstandings abound. The paper by Thomachot et al in this issue provides an opportunity to ponder on this important organ. Although the main result seems to be negative, the study provides some interesting physiological information on the upper airway and how it works.

  10. Diagnostic tools assessing airway remodelling in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, L; Reche, M; Padial, M A; Valbuena, T; Pascual, C

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease of the lower airways characterised by the presence of airway inflammation, reversible airflow obstruction and airway hyperresponsiveness and alterations on the normal structure of the airways, known as remodelling. Remodelling is characterised by the presence of metaplasia of mucous glands, thickening of the lamina reticularis, increased angiogenesis, subepithelial fibrosis and smooth muscle hypertrophy/hyperplasia. Several techniques are being optimised at present to achieve a suitable diagnosis for remodelling. Diagnostic tools could be divided into two groups, namely invasive and non-invasive methods. Invasive techniques bring us information about bronchial structural alterations, obtaining this information directly from pathological tissue, and permit measure histological modification placed in bronchi layers as well as inflammatory and fibrotic cell infiltration. Non-invasive techniques were developed to reduce invasive methods disadvantages and measure airway remodelling-related markers such as cytokines, inflammatory mediators and others. An exhaustive review of diagnostic tools used to analyse airway remodelling in asthma, including the most useful and usually employed methods, as well as the principal advantages and disadvantages of each of them, bring us concrete and summarised information about all techniques used to evaluate alterations on the structure of the airways. A deep knowledge of these diagnostic tools will make an early diagnosis of airway remodelling possible and, probably, early diagnosis will play an important role in the near future of asthma. PMID:22236733

  11. Extraction of Airways from CT (EXACT'09)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo, P.; Ginneken, B. van; Reinhardt, J.M.; Tarunashree, Y.; Jong, P.A. de; Irving, B.; Fetita, C.; Ortner, M.; Pinho, R.; Sijbers, J.; Feuerstein, M.; Fabijanska, A.; Bauer, C.; Beichel, R.; Mendoza, C.S.; Wiemker, R.; Lee, J. van der; Reeves, A.P.; Born, S.; Weinheimer, O.; Rikxoort, E.M. van; Tschirren, J.; Mori, K.; Odry, B.; Naidich, D.P.; Hartmann, I.J.; Hoffman, E.A.; Prokop, M.; Pedersen, J.H.; Bruijne, M. de

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for establishing a reference airway tree segmentation, which was used to quantitatively evaluate fifteen different airway tree extraction algorithms in a standardized manner. Because of the sheer difficulty involved in manually constructing a complete reference stand

  12. Narrow-linewidth and tunable fiber lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Morkel, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    1. Introduction 2. Line-narrowed fiber laser devices Integral fiber reflective Bragg grating lasers Intra-cavity etalon laser 3. Tunable, line narrowed fiber laser devices Ring lasers using wavelength selective couplers Tunable lasers using bulk-optic components a) Mechanical tuning b) Electronic tuning 4. Single frequency fiber lasers Integral fiber reflective Bragg grating laser Interferometric cavity laser Injection locked laser Travellin...

  13. Airway tissue engineering for congenital laryngotracheal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Elizabeth; Lesage, Flore; Butler, Colin R; Hynds, Robert E; Hewitt, Richard; Janes, Sam M; Deprest, Jan A; Coppi, Paolo De

    2016-06-01

    Regenerative medicine offers hope of a sustainable solution for severe airway disease by the creation of functional, immunocompatible organ replacements. When considering fetuses and newborns, there is a specific spectrum of airway pathologies that could benefit from cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. While hypoplastic lungs associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) could benefit from cellular based treatments aimed at ameliorating lung function, patients with upper airway obstruction could take advantage from a de novo tissue engineering approach. Moreover, the international acceptance of the EXIT procedure as a means of securing the precarious neonatal airway, together with the advent of fetal surgery as a method of heading off postnatal co-morbidities, offers the revolutionary possibility of extending the clinical indication for tissue-engineered airway transplantation to infants affected by diverse severe congenital laryngotracheal malformations. This article outlines the necessary basic components for regenerative medicine solutions in this potential clinical niche. PMID:27301606

  14. Inflammatory Signalings Involved in Airway and Pulmonary Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ta Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In respiratory diseases, there is an increased expression of multiple inflammatory proteins in the respiratory tract, including cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. Chemokines have been shown to regulate inflammation and immune cell differentiation. Moreover, many of the known inflammatory target proteins, such as matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, and cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2, are associated with airway and lung inflammation in response to various stimuli. Injuriously environmental stimuli can access the lung through either the airways or the pulmonary and systemic circulations. The time course and intensity of responses by resident and circulating cells may be regulated by various inflammatory signalings, including Src family kinases (SFKs, protein kinase C (PKC, growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH/reactive oxygen species (ROS, PI3K/Akt, MAPKs, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB, activator protein-1 (AP-1, and other signaling molecules. These signaling molecules regulate both key inflammatory signaling transduction pathways and target proteins involved in airway and lung inflammation. Here, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the expression of inflammatory target proteins associated with the respiratory diseases. Knowledge of the mechanisms of inflammation regulation could lead to the pharmacological manipulation of anti-inflammatory drugs in the respiratory diseases.

  15. Use of spirometry in detecting airway obstruction in asymptomatic smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To detect spirometric abnormalities in asymptomatic smokers in relation to duration of smoking. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out at PNS Shifa from Oct 2006 to June 2007. Subjects and Methods: Hundred individuals were included in this study who fulfilled the required criteria. Spirometry was done after briefing the patient about the procedure. Smokers were divided into two groups. Group I (5 to 9 pack years) and group II (= 10 pack years). All relevant information were recorded on Performa (Annex-A). The data was analyzed through SPSS-10, in terms of Mean +- SD (Standard Deviation) for numeric response variables and independent sample T test was applied to compare significance of proportion for numeric response variables at p < 0.05. Categorical variables were compared by applying Chi-square test at p < 0.05 level of significance. Results: Significant statistical difference was found between the mean age in the two groups with p-value of 0.011. This may be due to the longer duration of smoking history in Group II. Strong association was found between number of cigarette smoked and the pattern of airway obstruction as significant statistical difference of airway obstruction and early airflow limitation was found between the two groups of smokers at p value of 0.004. Conclusion: There is strong association between duration of smoking and development of airway obstruction even before the smoker become symptomatic. (author)

  16. Modular microfluidic system as a model of cystic fibrosis airways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skolimowski, Maciej; Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Abeille, Fabien;

    2012-01-01

    pumps, bubble traps, gas exchange chip, and cell culture chambers. We have successfully applied this system for studying the antibiotic therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the bacteria mainly responsible for morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis, in different oxygen environments. Furthermore, we...... have mimicked the bacterial reinoculation of the aerobic compartments (lower respiratory tract) from the anaerobic compartments (cystic fibrosis sinuses) following an antibiotic treatment. This effect is hypothesised as the one on the main reasons for recurrent lung infections in cystic fibrosis......A modular microfluidic airways model system that can simulate the changes in oxygen tension in different compartments of the cystic fibrosis (CF) airways was designed, developed, and tested. The fully reconfigurable system composed of modules with different functionalities: multichannel peristaltic...

  17. Investigating the geometry of pig airways using computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Azad, Md Khurshidul; McMurray, Brandon; Henry, Brian; Royston, Thomas J.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2015-03-01

    Numerical modeling of sound propagation in the airways requires accurate knowledge of the airway geometry. These models are often validated using human and animal experiments. While many studies documented the geometric details of the human airways, information about the geometry of pig airways is scarcer. In addition, the morphology of animal airways can be significantly different from that of humans. The objective of this study is to measure the airway diameter, length and bifurcation angles in domestic pigs using computed tomography. After imaging the lungs of 3 pigs, segmentation software tools were used to extract the geometry of the airway lumen. The airway dimensions were then measured from the resulting 3 D models for the first 10 airway generations. Results showed that the size and morphology of the airways of different animals were similar. The measured airway dimensions were compared with those of the human airways. While the trachea diameter was found to be comparable to the adult human, the diameter, length and branching angles of other airways were noticeably different from that of humans. For example, pigs consistently had an early airway branching from the trachea that feeds the superior (top) right lung lobe proximal to the carina. This branch is absent in the human airways. These results suggested that the human geometry may not be a good approximation of the pig airways and may contribute to increasing the errors when the human airway geometric values are used in computational models of the pig chest.

  18. Quantitative analysis of dynamic airway changes after methacholine and salbutamol inhalation on xenon-enhanced chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Joon; Goo, Jin Mo; Kim, Jong Hyo; Park, Eun-Ah [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang Hyun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Healthcare Gangnam Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jae-Woo; Park, Heung-Woo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang-Heon [Seoul National University Hospital, Healthcare Gangnam Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To investigate the dynamic changes in airways in response to methacholine and salbutamol inhalation and to correlate the xenon ventilation index on xenon-enhanced chest CTs in asthmatics. Thirty-one non-smokers (6 normal, 25 asthmatics) underwent xenon-enhanced chest CT and pulmonary function tests. Images were obtained at three stages (basal state, after methacholine inhalation and after salbutamol inhalation), and the total xenon ventilation index (TXVI) as well as airway values were measured and calculated. The repeated measures ANOVA and Spearman's correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. TXVI in the normal group did not significantly change (P > 0.05) with methacholine and salbutamol. For asthmatics, however, the TXVI significantly decreased after methacholine inhalation and increased after salbutamol inhalation (P < 0.05). Of the airway parameters, the airway inner area (IA) significantly increased after salbutamol inhalation in all airways (P < 0.01) in asthmatics. Airway IA, wall thickness and wall area percentage did not significantly decrease after methacholine inhalation (P > 0.05). IA of the large airways was well correlated with basal TXVI, FEV{sub 1} and FVC (P < 0.05). Airway IA is the most reliable parameter for reflecting the dynamic changes after methacholine and salbutamol inhalation, and correlates well with TXVI in asthmatics on xenon-enhanced CT. (orig.)

  19. Inflammation and airway microbiota during cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith T Zemanick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary exacerbations (PEx, frequently associated with airway infection and inflammation, are the leading cause of morbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF. Molecular microbiologic approaches detect complex microbiota from CF airway samples taken during PEx. The relationship between airway microbiota, inflammation, and lung function during CF PEx is not well understood. OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationships between airway microbiota, inflammation, and lung function in CF subjects treated for PEx. METHODS: Expectorated sputum and blood were collected and lung function testing performed in CF subjects during early (0-3d. and late treatment (>7d. for PEx. Sputum was analyzed by culture, pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons, and quantitative PCR for total and specific bacteria. Sputum IL-8 and neutrophil elastase (NE; and circulating C-reactive protein (CRP were measured. RESULTS: Thirty-seven sputum samples were collected from 21 CF subjects. At early treatment, lower diversity was associated with high relative abundance (RA of Pseudomonas (r = -0.67, p<0.001, decreased FEV(1% predicted (r = 0.49, p = 0.03 and increased CRP (r = -0.58, p = 0.01. In contrast to Pseudomonas, obligate and facultative anaerobic genera were associated with less inflammation and higher FEV₁. With treatment, Pseudomonas RA and P. aeruginosa by qPCR decreased while anaerobic genera showed marked variability in response. Change in RA of Prevotella was associated with more variability in FEV₁ response to treatment than Pseudomonas or Staphylococcus. CONCLUSIONS: Anaerobes identified from sputum by sequencing are associated with less inflammation and higher lung function compared to Pseudomonas at early exacerbation. CF PEx treatment results in variable changes of anaerobic genera suggesting the need for larger studies particularly of patients without traditional CF pathogens.

  20. Prevalence of upper airway obstruction in patients with apparently asymptomatic euthyroid multi nodular goitre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K Menon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To study the prevalence of upper airway obstruction (UAO in "apparently asymptomatic" patients with euthyroid multinodular goitre (MNG and find correlation between clinical features, UAO on pulmonary function test (PFT and tracheal narrowing on computerised tomography (CT. Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients with apparently asymptomatic euthyroid MNG attending thyroid clinic in a tertiary centre underwent clinical examination to elicit features of UAO, PFT, and CT of neck and chest. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was done with SPSS version 11.5 using paired t-test, Chi square test, and Fisher′s exact test. P value of <0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: Fifty-six patients (52 females and four males were studied. The prevalence of UAO (PFT and significant tracheal narrowing (CT was 14.3%. and 9.3%, respectively. Clinical features failed to predict UAO or significant tracheal narrowing. Tracheal narrowing (CT did not correlate with UAO (PFT. Volume of goitre significantly correlated with degree of tracheal narrowing. Conclusions: Clinical features do not predict UAO on PFT or tracheal narrowing on CT in apparently asymptomatic patients with euthyroid MNG.

  1. Prevalence of upper airway obstruction in patients with apparently asymptomatic euthyroid multi nodular goitre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Sunil K.; Jagtap, Varsha S.; Sarathi, Vijaya; Lila, Anurag R.; Bandgar, Tushar R.; Menon, Padmavathy S; Shah, Nalini S.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: To study the prevalence of upper airway obstruction (UAO) in “apparently asymptomatic” patients with euthyroid multinodular goitre (MNG) and find correlation between clinical features, UAO on pulmonary function test (PFT) and tracheal narrowing on computerised tomography (CT). Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients with apparently asymptomatic euthyroid MNG attending thyroid clinic in a tertiary centre underwent clinical examination to elicit features of UAO, PFT, and CT of neck and chest. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was done with SPSS version 11.5 using paired t-test, Chi square test, and Fisher's exact test. P value of <0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: Fifty-six patients (52 females and four males) were studied. The prevalence of UAO (PFT) and significant tracheal narrowing (CT) was 14.3%. and 9.3%, respectively. Clinical features failed to predict UAO or significant tracheal narrowing. Tracheal narrowing (CT) did not correlate with UAO (PFT). Volume of goitre significantly correlated with degree of tracheal narrowing. Conclusions: Clinical features do not predict UAO on PFT or tracheal narrowing on CT in apparently asymptomatic patients with euthyroid MNG. PMID:21966649

  2. Interaction between otorhinolaryngology and orthodontics: correlation between the nasopharyngeal airway and the craniofacial complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stellzig-Eisenhauer, Angelika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In terms of pathophysiology, an anatomically narrow airway is a predisposing factor for obstruction of the upper respiratory tract. The correlation between the nasopharyngeal airway and the craniofacial structures is discussed in this context. Thus a mutual interaction between the pharynx and the mandibular position was demonstrated, whereby the transverse dimension of the nasopharynx was significantly larger in patients with prognathism than in patients with retrognathism. The influence of chronic obstruction of the nasal airway on craniofacial development was also discussed. The form-and-function interaction, which ought to explain the causal relationship between nasal obstruction and craniofacial growth, appears to be of a multifactorial rather than a one-dimensional, linear nature. It is not disputed, however, that expanding the maxilla improves not only nasal volume and nasal flow, but also the subjective sensation of patients, although it is not possible to make a prognostic statement about the extent of this improvement because of the differing reactions of individuals. Orthodontic appliances for advancing the mandible can also be successfully used in the treatment of mild obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. This treatment method should be considered particularly for patients who are unwilling to undergo or cannot tolerate CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

  3. Up-regulation of endothelin receptors induced by cigarette smoke--involvement of MAPK in vascular and airway hyper-reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yaping; Edvinsson, Lars; Xu, Cang-Bao

    2010-01-01

    hyper-reactivity plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and airway diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated that endothelin receptor up-regulation mediates vascular and airway hyper-reactivity in response to endothelin-1 (ET-1, endothelin receptor agonist) in cardiovascular and......-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and subsequently results in the up-regulation of endothelin receptors in the vasculature and airways, which mediates vascular and airway hyper-reactivity, one of the important pathogenic characteristics of cardiovascular and airway diseases. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of...... how cigarette smoke causes up-regulation of endothelin receptors in the vasculature and airways may provide new strategies for the treatment of cigarette smoke-associated cardiovascular and lung diseases....

  4. The Effects of Proresolution of Ellagic Acid in an Experimental Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiney de Freitas Alves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a disease of airway inflammation characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic inflammation, and hypersecretion of mucus. Ellagic acid, a compound derived from medicinal plants and fruits, has shown anti-inflammatory activity in several experimental disease models. We used the classical experimental model, in BALB/c mice, of sensibilization with ovalbumin to determine the effect of ellagic acid (10 mg/kg; oral route in the resolution of allergic airways response. Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg; subcutaneous route was used as a positive control. The control group consisted of nonimmunized mice that received challenge with ovalbumin. Ellagic acid and dexamethasone or vehicle (water were administered before or after intranasal allergen challenge. Ellagic acid accelerated the resolution of airways inflammation by decreasing total leukocytes and eosinophils numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, the mucus production and lung inflammation in part by reducing IL-5 concentration, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO activity, and P-selectin expression, but not activator protein 1 (AP-1 and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB pathways. In addition, ellagic acid enhanced alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of IgG-OVA-coated beads ex vivo, a new proresolving mechanism for the clearance of allergen from the airways. Together, these findings identify ellagic acid as a potential therapeutic agent for accelerating the resolution of allergic airways inflammation.

  5. Comparative evaluation of intraocular pressure changes subsequent to insertion of laryngeal mask airway and endotracheal tube.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghai B

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To evaluate the intraocular pressure and haemodynamic changes subsequent to insertion of laryngeal mask airway and endotracheal tube. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The study was conducted in 50 adult patients. A standard general anaesthesia was administered to all the patients. After 3 minutes of induction of anaesthesia baseline measurements of heart rate, non-invasive blood pressure and intraocular pressure were taken following which patients were divided into two groups: laryngeal mask airway was inserted in group 1 and tracheal tube in group 2. These measurements were repeated at 15-30 second, every minute thereafter up to 5 minutes after airway instrumentation. RESULTS: A statistically significant rise in heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and intraocular pressure was seen in both the groups subsequent to insertion of laryngeal mask airway or endotracheal tube. Mean maximum increase was statistically more after endotracheal intubation than after laryngeal mask airway insertion. The duration of statistically significant pressure responses was also longer after endotracheal intubation. CONCLUSION: Laryngeal mask airway is an acceptable alternative technique for ocular surgeries, offering advantages in terms of intraocular pressure and cardiovascular stability compared to tracheal intubation.

  6. Adoptive transfer of induced-Treg cells effectively attenuates murine airway allergic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    Full Text Available Both nature and induced regulatory T (Treg lymphocytes are potent regulators of autoimmune and allergic disorders. Defects in endogenous Treg cells have been reported in patients with allergic asthma, suggesting that disrupted Treg cell-mediated immunological regulation may play an important role in airway allergic inflammation. In order to determine whether adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells generated in vitro can be used as an effective therapeutic approach to suppress airway allergic inflammation, exogenously induced Treg cells were infused into ovalbumin-sensitized mice prior to or during intranasal ovalbumin challenge. The results showed that adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells prior to allergen challenge markedly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophil recruitment, mucus hyper-production, airway remodeling, and IgE levels. This effect was associated with increase of Treg cells (CD4(+FoxP3(+ and decrease of dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes, and with reduction of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell response as compared to the controls. Moreover, adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells during allergen challenge also effectively attenuate airway inflammation and improve airway function, which are comparable to those by natural Treg cell infusion. Therefore, adoptive transfer of in vitro induced Treg cells may be a promising therapeutic approach to prevent and treat severe asthma.

  7. Adoptive transfer of induced-Treg cells effectively attenuates murine airway allergic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Lan, Qin; Chen, Maogen; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Ning; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wang, Julie; Fan, Huimin; Yan, Chun-Song; Kuang, Jiu-Long; Warburton, David; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Ryffel, Bernhard; Zheng, Song-Guo; Shi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Both nature and induced regulatory T (Treg) lymphocytes are potent regulators of autoimmune and allergic disorders. Defects in endogenous Treg cells have been reported in patients with allergic asthma, suggesting that disrupted Treg cell-mediated immunological regulation may play an important role in airway allergic inflammation. In order to determine whether adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells generated in vitro can be used as an effective therapeutic approach to suppress airway allergic inflammation, exogenously induced Treg cells were infused into ovalbumin-sensitized mice prior to or during intranasal ovalbumin challenge. The results showed that adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells prior to allergen challenge markedly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophil recruitment, mucus hyper-production, airway remodeling, and IgE levels. This effect was associated with increase of Treg cells (CD4(+)FoxP3(+)) and decrease of dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes, and with reduction of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell response as compared to the controls. Moreover, adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells during allergen challenge also effectively attenuate airway inflammation and improve airway function, which are comparable to those by natural Treg cell infusion. Therefore, adoptive transfer of in vitro induced Treg cells may be a promising therapeutic approach to prevent and treat severe asthma. PMID:22792275

  8. 21 CFR 868.5090 - Emergency airway needle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... provide an emergency airway during upper airway obstruction. (b) Classification. Class II (performance... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emergency airway needle. 868.5090 Section 868.5090...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5090 Emergency airway needle....

  9. 21 CFR 868.2600 - Airway pressure monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2600 Airway pressure monitor. (a) Identification. An airway pressure monitor is a device used to measure the pressure in a patient's upper airway... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Airway pressure monitor. 868.2600 Section...

  10. Bystander suppression of allergic airway inflammation by lung resident memory CD8+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsland, Benjamin J.; Harris, Nicola L.; Camberis, Mali; Kopf, Manfred; Hook, Sarah M.; Le Gros, Graham

    2004-04-01

    CD8+ memory T cells have recently been recognized as playing a key role in natural immunity against unrelated viral infections, a phenomenon referred to as "heterologous antiviral immunity." We now provide data that the cellular immunological interactions that underlie such heterologous immunity can play an equally important role in regulating T helper 2 immune responses and protecting mucosal surfaces from allergen-induced inflammation. Our data show that CD8+ T cells, either retained in the lung after infection with influenza virus, or adoptively transferred via the intranasal route can suppress allergic airway inflammation. The suppression is mediated by IFN-, which acts to reduce the activation level, T helper 2 cytokine production, airways hyperresponsiveness, and migration of allergen-specific CD4+ T cells into the lung, whereas the systemic and draining lymph node responses remain unchanged. Of note, adoptive transfer of previously activated transgenic CD8+ T cells conferred protection against allergic airway inflammation, even in the absence of specific-antigen. Airway resident CD8+ T cells produced IFN- when directly exposed to conditioned media from activated dendritic cells or the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-18. Taken together these data indicate that effector/memory CD8+ T cells present in the airways produce IFN- after inflammatory stimuli, independent of specific-antigen, and as a consequence play a key role in modifying the degree and frequency of allergic responses in the lung.

  11. Expression of IL-4/IL-13 receptors in differentiating human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Steven R; Martin, Linda D; Stern, Randi; Laxman, Bharathi; Marroquin, Bertha A

    2010-11-01

    IL-4 and IL-13 elicit several important responses in airway epithelium including chemokine secretion and mucous secretion that may contribute to airway inflammation, cell migration, and differentiation. These cytokines have overlapping but not identical effector profiles likely due to shared subunits in their receptor complexes. These receptors are variably described in epithelial cells, and the relative expression, localization, and function of these receptors in differentiated and repairing epithelial cells are not clear. We examined IL-4/IL-13 receptor expression and localization in primary airway epithelial cells collected from normal human lungs and grown under conditions yielding both undifferentiated and differentiated cells inclusive of basal, goblet, and ciliated cell phenotypes. Gene expression of the IL-4Rα, IL-2Rγc, IL-13Rα1, and IL-13Rα2 receptor subunits increased with differentiation, but different patterns of localization and protein abundance were seen for each subunit based on both differentiation and the cell subtypes present. Increased expression of receptor subunits observed in more differentiated cells was associated with more substantial functional responses to IL-4 stimulation including increased eotaxin-3 expression and accelerated migration after injury. We demonstrate substantial differences in IL-4/IL-13 receptor subunit expression and responsiveness to IL-4 based on the extent of airway epithelial cell differentiation and suggest that these differences may have functional consequences in airway inflammation. PMID:20729386

  12. Effect of Perinatal secondhand tobacco smoke exposure on in vivo and intrinsic airway structure/function in non-human primates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infants exposed to second hand smoke (SHS) experience more problems with wheezing. This study was designed to determine if perinatal SHS exposure increases intrinsic and/or in vivo airway responsiveness to methacholine and whether potential structural/cellular alterations in the airway might explain the change in responsiveness. Pregnant rhesus monkeys were exposed to filtered air (FA) or SHS (1 mg/m3 total suspended particulates) for 6 h/day, 5 days/week starting at 50 days gestational age. The mother/infant pairs continued the SHS exposures postnatally. At 3 months of age each infant: 1) had in vivo lung function measurements in response to inhaled methacholine, or 2) the right accessory lobe filled with agarose, precision-cut to 600 μm slices, and bathed in increasing concentrations of methacholine. The lumenal area of the central airway was determined using videomicrometry followed by fixation and histology with morphometry. In vivo tests showed that perinatal SHS increases baseline respiratory rate and decreases responsiveness to methacholine. Perinatal SHS did not alter intrinsic airway responsiveness in the bronchi. However in respiratory bronchioles, SHS exposure increased airway responsiveness at lower methacholine concentrations but decreased it at higher concentrations. Perinatal SHS did not change eosinophil profiles, epithelial volume, smooth muscle volume, or mucin volume. However it did increase the number of alveolar attachments in bronchi and respiratory bronchioles. In general, as mucin increased, airway responsiveness decreased. We conclude that perinatal SHS exposure alters in vivo and intrinsic airway responsiveness, and alveolar attachments

  13. Comparison of bougie-guided insertion of Proseal tm laryngeal mask airway with digital technique in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Kuppusamy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Proseal TM laryngeal mask airway (PLMA TM , Laryngeal Mask Company, UK was designed to improve ventilatory characteristics and offer protection against regurgitation and gastric insufflation. The PLMA is a modified laryngeal mask airway with large ventral cuff, dorsal cuff and a drain tube. These modifications improve seal around glottis and enable better ventilatory characteristics. The drain tube prevents gastric distension and offers protection against aspiration. There were occasional problems, like failed insertion and inadequate ventilation, in placing PLMA TM using the classical digital technique. To overcome these problems, newer placement techniques like thumb insertion technique, introducer tool placement and gum elastic bougie (GEB-aided placement were devised. We compared classical digital placement of PLMA TM with gum elastic bougie-aided technique in 60 anaesthetised adult patients (with 30 patients in each group with respect to number of attempts to successful placement, effective airway time, airway trauma during insertion, postoperative airway morbidity and haemodynamic response to insertion. The number of attempts to successful placement, airway trauma during insertion and haemodynamic response to insertion were comparable among the two groups, while effective airway time and oropharyngeal leak pressure were significantly higher in bougie- guided insertion of PLMA. Postoperatively, sore throat was more frequent with digital technique while dysphagia was more frequent with bougie-guided technique. Hence gum elastic bougie guided, laryngoscope aided insertion of PLMA is an excellent alternate to classical digital technique.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pediatric airway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the pediatric airway is often complex and may require multiple imaging techniques and invasive procedures. We performed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the airway in 34 children with clinical evidence of chronic airway obstruction and compared MR findings with those obtained by surgery and/or endoscopy. MR diagnoses included vascular compression in 15 patients, primary tracheomalacic states in 12 patients, and mediastinal masses in 4 patients. Findings were normal for 3 patients. The MR findings were in agreement with the endoscopic findings in 25 to 28 cases and in agreement with the surgical findings in 21 to 21 cases. (orig./GDG)

  15. Airways disorders and the swimming pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougault, Valérie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Concerns have been expressed about the possible detrimental effects of chlorine derivatives in indoor swimming pool environments. Indeed, a controversy has arisen regarding the possibility that chlorine commonly used worldwide as a disinfectant favors the development of asthma and allergic diseases. The effects of swimming in indoor chlorinated pools on the airways in recreational and elite swimmers are presented. Recent studies on the influence of swimming on airway inflammation and remodeling in competitive swimmers, and the phenotypic characteristics of asthma in this population are reviewed. Preventative measures that could potentially reduce the untoward effects of pool environment on airways of swimmers are discussed. PMID:23830132

  16. Leukocyte trafficking in alveoli and airway passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doerschuk Claire M

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many pulmonary diseases preferentially affect the large airways or the alveoli. Although the mechanisms are often particular to each disease process, site-specific differences in leukocyte trafficking and the regulation of inflammation also occur. Differences in the process of margination, sequestration, adhesion, and migration occur that can be attributed to differences in anatomy, hemodynamics, and the expression of proteins. The large airways are nourished by the bronchial circulation, whereas the pulmonary circulation feeds the distal lung parenchyma. The presence of different cell types in large airways from those in alveoli might contribute to site-specific differences in the molecular regulation of the inflammatory process.

  17. Device Physics of Narrow Gap Semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Junhao

    2010-01-01

    Narrow gap semiconductors obey the general rules of semiconductor science, but often exhibit extreme features of these rules because of the same properties that produce their narrow gaps. Consequently these materials provide sensitive tests of theory, and the opportunity for the design of innovative devices. Narrow gap semiconductors are the most important materials for the preparation of advanced modern infrared systems. Device Physics of Narrow Gap Semiconductors offers descriptions of the materials science and device physics of these unique materials. Topics covered include impurities and defects, recombination mechanisms, surface and interface properties, and the properties of low dimensional systems for infrared applications. This book will help readers to understand not only the semiconductor physics and materials science, but also how they relate to advanced opto-electronic devices. The last chapter applies the understanding of device physics to photoconductive detectors, photovoltaic infrared detector...

  18. Acrolein stimulates eicosanoid release from bovine airway epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Injury to the airway mucosa after exposure to environmental irritants is associated with pulmonary inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. To better understand the relationships between mediator release and airway epithelial cell injury during irritant exposures, we studied the effects of acrolein, a low-molecular-weight aldehyde found in cigarette smoke, on arachidonic acid metabolism in cultured bovine tracheal epithelial cells. Confluent airway epithelial cell monolayers, prelabeled with [3H]arachidonic acid, released significant levels of 3H activity when exposed (20 min) to 100 microM acrolein. [3H]arachidonic acid products were resolved using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Under control conditions the released 3H activity coeluted predominantly with the cyclooxygenase product, prostaglandin (PG) E2. After exposure to acrolein, significant peaks in 3H activity coeluted with the lipoxygenase products 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) and 15-HETE, as well as with PGE2, PGF2 alpha, and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha. Dose-response relationships for acrolein-induced release of immunoreactive PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from unlabeled epithelial monolayers demonstrated 30 microM acrolein as the threshold dose, with 100 microM acrolein inducing nearly a fivefold increase in both PGF2 alpha and PGE2. Cellular viability after exposure to 100 microM acrolein, determined by released lactate dehydrogenase activity, was not affected until exposure periods were greater than or equal to 2 h. These results implicate the airway epithelial cell as a possible source of eicosanoids after exposure to acrolein

  19. Narrow linewidth pulsed optical parametric oscillator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Das

    2010-11-01

    Tunable narrow linewidth radiation by optical parametric oscillation has many applications, particularly in spectroscopic investigation. In this paper, different techniques such as injection seeding, use of spectral selecting element like grating, grating and etalon in combination, grazing angle of incidence, entangled cavity configuration and type-II phase matching have been discussed for generating tunable narrow linewidth radiation by singly resonant optical parametric oscillation process.

  20. Continuous positive airway pressure titration in infants with severe upper airway obstruction or bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Khirani, Sonia; Ramirez, Adriana; Aloui, Sabrina; Leboulanger, Nicolas; Picard, Arnaud; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Abstracta Introduction Noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is recognized as an effective treatment for severe airway obstruction in young children. The aim of the present study was to compare a clinical setting with a physiological setting of noninvasive CPAP in infants with nocturnal alveolar hypoventilation due to severe upper airway obstruction (UAO) or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Methods The breathing pattern and respiratory muscle output of all consecutive infant...

  1. Clinical review: Airway hygiene in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Jelic, Sanja; Cunningham, Jennifer A; Factor, Phillip

    2008-01-01

    Maintenance of airway secretion clearance, or airway hygiene, is important for the preservation of airway patency and the prevention of respiratory tract infection. Impaired airway clearance often prompts admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and can be a cause and/or contributor to acute respiratory failure. Physical methods to augment airway clearance are often used in the ICU but few are substantiated by clinical data. This review focuses on the impact of oral hygiene, tracheal suctio...

  2. Obstructive airway in Morquio A syndrome, the past, the present and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Averill, Lauren W; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Mackenzie, William G; Bober, Michael B; Pizarro, Christian; Goff, Christopher J; Xie, Li; Orii, Tadao; Theroux, Mary

    2016-02-01

    Patients with severe tracheal obstruction in Morquio A syndrome are at risk of dying of sleep apnea and related complications. Tracheal obstruction also leads to life-threatening complications during anesthesia as a result of the difficulty in managing the upper airway due to factors inherent to the Morquio A syndrome, compounded by the difficulty in intubating the trachea. A detailed description of the obstructive pathology of the trachea is not available in the literature probably due to lack of a homogenous group of Morquio A patients to study at any one particular center. We present a series of cases with significant tracheal obstruction who were unrecognized due to the difficulty in interpreting tracheal narrowing airway symptoms. Our goal is to provide the guidelines in the management of these patients that allow earlier recognition and intervention of tracheal obstruction. Sagittal MRI images of the cervical spine of 28 Morquio A patients (12±8.14years) showed that19/28 (67.9%) patients had at least 25% tracheal narrowing and that narrowing worsened with age (all 8 patients over 15years had greater than 50% narrowing). Eight out of 28 patients were categorized as severe (>75%) tracheal narrowing when images were evaluated in neutral head and neck position. Of the 19 patients with tracheal narrowing, compression by the tortuous brachiocephalic artery was the most common cause (n=15). Evidence of such tracheal narrowing was evident as early as at 2years of age. The etiology of tracheal impingement by the brachiocephalic artery in Morquio A appears to be due to a combination of the narrow thoracic inlet crowding structures and the disproportionate growth of trachea and brachiocephalic artery in relationship to the chest cavity leading to tracheal tortuosity. In conclusion, tracheal narrowing, often due to impression from the crossing tortuous brachiocephalic artery, increases with age in Morquio A patients. Greater attention to the trachea is needed when

  3. Effects of age and gender on upper airway, lower airway and upper lip growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Cassia Gonçalves

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present retrospective study was to evaluate the influence of age and gender on upper and lower airway width and upper lip length. In this study, 390 lateral cephalograms were divided into 13 age groups (ranging from 6 to 18 years and were analyzed. The intergroup differences were analyzed using a MANOVA (Multivariate Analysis of the Variance, and the intragroup differences were analyzed using an ANOVA (Analysis of the Variance and Tukey's test. The results of the present study indicated that although the airway width and the upper lip length increased with age, the lower airway width exhibited variable growth between the ages of six and eighteen years. The airway width was significantly greater in females than males, whereas the upper airway width was similar between these two genders. The lip length was significantly shorter in females than males. The lower airway width and upper lip length were significantly different between males and females, whereas the upper airway width was similar for the genders. The upper airway width and upper lip exhibited incremental growth between the ages of six and eighteen years. The upper lip closely followed the growth pattern of the upper airway width; the growth plateaued between the ages of 6 and 9 years, increased from 9 to 16 years and plateaued from 16 to 18 years.

  4. Synchronized imaging and acoustic analysis of the upper airway in patients with sleep-disordered breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progressive narrowing of the upper airway increases airflow resistance and can produce snoring sounds and apnea/hypopnea events associated with sleep-disordered breathing due to airway collapse. Recent studies have shown that acoustic properties during snoring can be altered with anatomic changes at the site of obstruction. To evaluate the instantaneous association between acoustic features of snoring and the anatomic sites of obstruction, a novel method was developed and applied in nine patients to extract the snoring sounds during sleep while performing dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The degree of airway narrowing during the snoring events was then quantified by the collapse index (ratio of airway diameter preceding and during the events) and correlated with the synchronized acoustic features. A total of 201 snoring events (102 pure retropalatal and 99 combined retropalatal and retroglossal events) were recorded, and the collapse index as well as the soft tissue vibration time were significantly different between pure retropalatal (collapse index, 24  ±  11%; vibration time, 0.2  ±  0.3 s) and combined (retropalatal and retroglossal) snores (collapse index, 13  ±  7% [P ≤ 0.0001]; vibration time, 1.2  ±  0.7 s [P ≤ 0.0001]). The synchronized dynamic MRI and acoustic recordings successfully characterized the sites of obstruction and established the dynamic relationship between the anatomic site of obstruction and snoring acoustics. (paper)

  5. Airway CD8(+) T Cells Are Associated with Lung Injury during Infant Viral Respiratory Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Thomas J; Ravindranath, Thyyar M; Bickham, Kara L; Gordon, Claire L; Zhang, Feifan; Levin, Bruce; Baird, John S; Farber, Donna L

    2016-06-01

    Infants and young children are disproportionately susceptible to severe complications from respiratory viruses, although the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Recent studies show that the T cell response in the lung is important for protective responses to respiratory infections, although details on the infant/pediatric respiratory immune response remain sparse. The objectives of the present study were to characterize the local versus systemic immune response in infants and young children with respiratory failure from viral respiratory tract infections and its association to disease severity. Daily airway secretions were sampled from infants and children 4 years of age and younger receiving mechanical ventilation owing to respiratory failure from viral infection or noninfectious causes. Samples were examined for immune cell composition and markers of T cell activation. These parameters were then correlated with clinical disease severity. Innate immune cells and total CD3(+) T cells were present in similar proportions in airway aspirates derived from infected and uninfected groups; however, the CD8:CD4 T cell ratio was markedly increased in the airways of patients with viral infection compared with uninfected patients, and specifically in infected infants with acute lung injury. T cells in the airways were phenotypically and functionally distinct from those in blood with activated/memory phenotypes and increased cytotoxic capacity. We identified a significant increase in airway cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells in infants with lung injury from viral respiratory tract infection that was distinct from the T cell profile in circulation and associated with increasing disease severity. Airway sampling could therefore be diagnostically informative for assessing immune responses and lung damage. PMID:26618559

  6. An ovine tracheal explant culture model for allergic airway inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeynaike Latasha

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The airway epithelium is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthmatic disease. However, much of our understanding of airway epithelial cell function in asthma has been derived from in vitro studies that may not accurately reflect the interactive cellular and molecular pathways active between different tissue constituents in vivo. Methods Using a sheep model of allergic asthma, tracheal explants from normal sheep and allergic sheep exposed to house dust mite (HDM allergen were established to investigate airway mucosal responses ex vivo. Explants were cultured for up to 48 h and tissues were stained to identify apoptotic cells, goblet cells, mast cells and eosinophils. The release of cytokines (IL-1α, IL-6 and TNF-α by cultured tracheal explants, was assessed by ELISA. Results The general morphology and epithelial structure of the tracheal explants was well maintained in culture although evidence of advanced apoptosis within the mucosal layer was noted after culture for 48 h. The number of alcian blue/PAS positive mucus-secreting cells within the epithelial layer was reduced in all cultured explants compared with pre-cultured (0 h explants, but the loss of staining was most evident in allergic tissues. Mast cell and eosinophil numbers were elevated in the allergic tracheal tissues compared to naïve controls, and in the allergic tissues there was a significant decline in mast cells after 24 h culture in the presence or absence of HDM allergen. IL-6 was released by allergic tracheal explants in culture but was undetected in cultured control explants. Conclusions Sheep tracheal explants maintain characteristics of the airway mucosa that may not be replicated when studying isolated cell populations in vitro. There were key differences identified in explants from allergic compared to control airways and in their responses in culture for 24 h. Importantly, this study establishes the potential for the

  7. Immunomodulation of airway epithelium cell activation by mesenchymal stromal cells ameliorates house dust mite-induced airway inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Khang M; Arikkatt, Jaisy; Ullah, M Ashik; Lynch, Jason P; Zhang, Vivian; Atkinson, Kerry; Sly, Peter D; Phipps, Simon

    2015-11-01

    Allergic asthma is underpinned by T helper 2 (Th2) inflammation. Redundancy in Th2 cytokine function and production by innate and adaptive immune cells suggests that strategies aimed at immunomodulation may prove more beneficial. Hence, we sought to determine whether administration of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to house dust mite (HDM) (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus)-sensitized mice would suppress the development of Th2 inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) after HDM challenge. We report that the intravenous administration of allogeneic donor MSCs 1 hour before allergen challenge significantly attenuated the features of allergic asthma, including tissue eosinophilia, Th2 cytokine (IL-5 and IL-13) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and AHR. The number of infiltrating type 2 innate lymphoid cells was not affected by MSC transfer, suggesting that MSCs may modulate the adaptive arm of Th2 immunity. The effect of MSC administration was long lasting; all features of allergic airway disease were significantly suppressed in response to a second round of HDM challenge 4 weeks after MSC administration. Further, we observed that MSCs decreased the release of epithelial cell-derived alarmins IL-1α and high mobility group box-1 in an IL-1 receptor antagonist-dependent manner. This significantly decreased the expression of the pro-Th2 cytokine IL-25 and reduced the number of activated and antigen-acquiring CD11c(+)CD11b(+) dendritic cells in the lung and mediastinal lymph nodes. Our findings suggest that MSC administration can ameliorate allergic airway inflammation by blunting the amplification of epithelial-derived inflammatory cytokines induced by HDM exposure and may offer long-term protection against Th2-mediated allergic airway inflammation and AHR. PMID:25789608

  8. Numerical simulation of airway dimension effects on airflow patterns and odorant deposition patterns in the rat nasal cavity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehong Wei

    Full Text Available The sense of smell is largely dependent on the airflow and odorant transport in the nasal cavity, which in turn depends on the anatomical structure of the nose. In order to evaluate the effect of airway dimension on rat nasal airflow patterns and odorant deposition patterns, we constructed two 3-dimensional, anatomically accurate models of the left nasal cavity of a Sprague-Dawley rat: one was based on high-resolution MRI images with relatively narrow airways and the other was based on artificially-widening airways of the MRI images by referencing the section images with relatively wide airways. Airflow and odorant transport, in the two models, were determined using the method of computational fluid dynamics with finite volume method. The results demonstrated that an increase of 34 µm in nasal airway dimension significantly decreased the average velocity in the whole nasal cavity by about 10% and in the olfactory region by about 12% and increased the volumetric flow into the olfactory region by about 3%. Odorant deposition was affected to a larger extent, especially in the olfactory region, where the maximum odorant deposition difference reached one order of magnitude. The results suggest that a more accurate nasal cavity model is necessary in order to more precisely study the olfactory function of the nose when using the rat.

  9. Role of platelets in allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idzko, Marco; Pitchford, Simon; Page, Clive

    2015-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests an important role for platelets and their products (e.g., platelet factor 4, β-thromboglobulin, RANTES, thromboxane, or serotonin) in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. A variety of changes in platelet function have been observed in patients with asthma, such as alterations in platelet secretion, expression of surface molecules, aggregation, and adhesion. Moreover, platelets have been found to actively contribute to most of the characteristic features of asthma, including bronchial hyperresponsiveness, bronchoconstriction, airway inflammation, and airway remodeling. This review brings together the current available data from both experimental and clinical studies that have investigated the role of platelets in allergic airway inflammation and asthma. It is anticipated that a better understanding of the role of platelets in the pathogenesis of asthma might lead to novel promising therapeutic approaches in the treatment of allergic airway diseases. PMID:26051948

  10. Central airways remodeling in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pini L

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Laura Pini,1 Valentina Pinelli,2 Denise Modina,1 Michela Bezzi,3 Laura Tiberio,4 Claudio Tantucci1 1Unit of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Spedali Civili di Brescia, 3Department Bronchoscopy, Spedali Civili di Brescia, 4Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy Background: The contribution to airflow obstruction by the remodeling of the peripheral airways in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients has been well documented, but less is known about the role played by the large airways. Few studies have investigated the presence of histopathological changes due to remodeling in the large airways of COPD patients. Objectives: The aim of this study was to verify the presence of airway remodeling in the central airways of COPD patients, quantifying the airway smooth muscle (ASM area and the extracellular matrix (ECM protein deposition, both in the subepithelial region and in the ASM, and to verify the possible contribution to airflow obstruction by the above mentioned histopathological changes. Methods: Biopsies of segmental bronchi spurs were performed in COPD patients and control smoker subjects and immunostained for collagen type I, versican, decorin, biglycan, and alpha-smooth muscle actin. ECM protein deposition was measured at both subepithelial, and ASM layers. Results: The staining for collagen I and versican was greater in the subepithelial layer of COPD patients than in control subjects. An inverse correlation was found between collagen I in the subepithelial layer and both forced expiratory volume in 1 second and ratio between forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity. A statistically significant increase of the ASM area was observed in the central airways of COPD patients versus controls. Conclusion: These findings indicate that airway remodeling also affects

  11. Store-operated Ca2+ channels in airway epithelial cell function and implications for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Krishna; Parekh, Anant B

    2016-08-01

    The epithelial cells of the lung are at the interface of a host and its environment and are therefore directly exposed to the inhaled air-borne particles. Rather than serving as a simple physical barrier, airway epithelia detect allergens and other irritants and then help organize the subsequent immune response through release of a plethora of secreted signals. Many of these signals are generated in response to opening of store-operated Ca(2+) channels in the plasma membrane. In this review, we describe the properties of airway store-operated channels and their role in regulating airway epithelial cell function.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377718

  12. Anaesthesia and airway management in mucopolysaccharidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Robert; Belani, Kumar G.; Braunlin, Elizabeth A.; Bruce, Iain A.; Hack, Henrik; Harmatz, Paul R.; Jones, Simon; Rowe, Richard; Solanki, Guirish A.; Valdemarsson, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed overview and discussion of anaesthesia in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS), the evaluation of risk factors in these patients and their anaesthetic management, including emergency airway issues. MPS represents a group of rare lysosomal storage disorders associated with an array of clinical manifestations. The high prevalence of airway obstruction and restrictive pulmonary disease in combination with cardiovascular manifestations poses a high anaesthetic ...

  13. Dynamic Properties of Human Bronchial Airway Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jau-Yi; Mesquida, Patrick; Pallai, Prathap; Corrigan, Chris J; Lee, Tak H

    2011-01-01

    Young's Modulus and dynamic force moduli were measured on human bronchial airway tissues by compression. A simple and low-cost system for measuring the tensile-strengh of soft bio-materials has been built for this study. The force-distance measurements were undertaken on the dissected bronchial airway walls, cartilages and mucosa from the surgery-removed lungs donated by lung cancer patients with COPD. Young's modulus is estimated from the initial slope of unloading force-displacement curve a...

  14. Anastomotic Airway Complications after Lung Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Eun Na; Haam, Suk Jin; Kim, Song Yee; Chang, Yoon Soo; Paik, Hyo Chae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anastomotic airway complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation (LTx). In this study, the authors identified types and clinical outcomes of airway complications after LTx. Materials and Methods All bronchial anastomotic complications were analyzed in a total of 94 LTx cases involving 90 recipients who underwent surgery between July 2006 and May 2014. Fifteen LTx cases (14 recipients) with incomplete medical records for fiberoptic bronchoscopy (...

  15. Leukocyte trafficking in alveoli and airway passages

    OpenAIRE

    Doerschuk Claire M

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Many pulmonary diseases preferentially affect the large airways or the alveoli. Although the mechanisms are often particular to each disease process, site-specific differences in leukocyte trafficking and the regulation of inflammation also occur. Differences in the process of margination, sequestration, adhesion, and migration occur that can be attributed to differences in anatomy, hemodynamics, and the expression of proteins. The large airways are nourished by the bronchial circula...

  16. Reversible airway obstruction in cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Ormerod, L P; Thomson, R A; Anderson, C. M.; Stableforth, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    Fourteen (29%) of 48 children with cystic fibrosis had a greater than 15% improvement in forced expiratory volume in one second, or in forced vital capacity after inhalation of salbutamol. All these children were atopic (one or more positive prick tests) and had a significantly higher mean serum IgE than either non-atopic subjects or those atopic subjects without airways reversibility (p less than 0.02). Half of those with airways reversibility had or subsequently developed the clinical pictu...

  17. Insights into Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells in Human Airway Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karta, Maya R; Broide, David H; Doherty, Taylor A

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries have led to the identification of a novel group of immune cells, the innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). The members of this group are divided into three subpopulations: ILC1s, ILC2s, and ILC3s. ILC2s produce Th2 cytokines, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, upon activation by epithelial cell-derived cytokines, lipid mediators (cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2), and TNF family member TL1A and promote structural and immune cell responses in the airways after antigen exposure. In addition, ILC2 function is also influenced by inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS)/ICOS-ligand (ICOS-L) interactions via direct contact between immune cells. The most common airway antigens are allergens and viruses which are highly linked to the induction of airway diseases with underlying type 2 inflammation including asthma and allergic rhinitis. Based on recent findings linking ILC2s and airway Th2 responses, there is intensive investigation into the role of ILC2s in human disease with the hope of a better understanding of the pathophysiology and the discovery of novel potential therapeutic targets. This review summarizes the recent advances made in elucidating ILC2 involvement in human Th2 airway disease. PMID:26746844

  18. TRPA1 is a major oxidant sensor in murine airway sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessac, Bret F; Sivula, Michael; von Hehn, Christian A; Escalera, Jasmine; Cohn, Lauren; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2008-05-01

    Sensory neurons in the airways are finely tuned to respond to reactive chemicals threatening airway function and integrity. Nasal trigeminal nerve endings are particularly sensitive to oxidants formed in polluted air and during oxidative stress as well as to chlorine, which is frequently released in industrial and domestic accidents. Oxidant activation of airway neurons induces respiratory depression, nasal obstruction, sneezing, cough, and pain. While normally protective, chemosensory airway reflexes can provoke severe complications in patients affected by inflammatory airway conditions like rhinitis and asthma. Here, we showed that both hypochlorite, the oxidizing mediator of chlorine, and hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species, activated Ca(2+) influx and membrane currents in an oxidant-sensitive subpopulation of chemosensory neurons. These responses were absent in neurons from mice lacking TRPA1, an ion channel of the transient receptor potential (TRP) gene family. TRPA1 channels were strongly activated by hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide in primary sensory neurons and heterologous cells. In tests of respiratory function, Trpa1(-/-) mice displayed profound deficiencies in hypochlorite- and hydrogen peroxide-induced respiratory depression as well as decreased oxidant-induced pain behavior. Our results indicate that TRPA1 is an oxidant sensor in sensory neurons, initiating neuronal excitation and subsequent physiological responses in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18398506

  19. Link between vitamin D and airway remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berraies A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anissa Berraies, Kamel Hamzaoui, Agnes HamzaouiPediatric Respiratory Diseases Department, Abderrahmen Mami Hospital, Ariana, and Research Unit 12SP15 Tunis El Manar University, Tunis, TunisiaAbstract: In the last decade, many epidemiologic studies have investigated the link between vitamin D deficiency and asthma. Most studies have shown that vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of asthma and allergies. Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with asthma severity and loss of control, together with recurrent exacerbations. Remodeling is an early event in asthma described as a consequence of production of mediators and growth factors by inflammatory and resident bronchial cells. Consequently, lung function is altered, with a decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second and exacerbated airway hyperresponsiveness. Subepithelial fibrosis and airway smooth muscle cell hypertrophy are typical features of structural changes in the airways. In animal models, vitamin D deficiency enhances inflammation and bronchial anomalies. In severe asthma of childhood, major remodeling is observed in patients with low vitamin D levels. Conversely, the antifibrotic and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D in smooth muscle cells have been described in several experiments. In this review, we briefly summarize the current knowledge regarding the relationship between vitamin D and asthma, and focus on its effect on airway remodeling and its potential therapeutic impact for asthma.Keywords: vitamin D, asthma, airway remodeling, airway smooth muscle, supplementation

  20. Interleukin-20 promotes airway remodeling in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wenbin; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yuguo; Hao, Junqing; Xing, Chunyan; Chu, Qi; Wang, Guicheng; Zhao, Jiping; Wang, Junfei; Dong, Qian; Liu, Tian; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Dong, Liang

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that interleukin-20 (IL-20) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine, and it has been implicated in psoriasis, lupus nephritis, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and ulcerative colitis. Little is known about the effects of IL-20 in airway remodeling in asthma. The aim of our study was to demonstrate the function of IL-20 in airway remodeling in asthma. To identify the expression of IL-20 and its receptor, IL-20R1/IL-20R2, in the airway epithelium in bronchial tissues, bronchial biopsy specimens were collected from patients and mice with asthma and healthy subjects and stained with specific antibodies. To characterize the effects of IL-20 in asthmatic airway remodeling, we silenced and stimulated IL-20 in cell lines isolated from mice by shRNA and recombinant protein approaches, respectively, and detected the expression of α-SMA and FN-1 by Western blot analysis. First, overexpression of IL-20 and its receptor, IL-20R1/IL-20R2, was detected in the airway epithelium collected from patients and mice with asthma. Second, IL-20 increased the expression of fibronectin-1 and α-SMA, and silencing of IL-20 in mouse lung epithelial (MLE)-12 cells decreased the expression of fibronectin-1 and α-SMA. IL-20 may be a critical cytokine in airway remodeling in asthma. This study indicates that targeting IL-20 and/or its receptors may be a new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:25028099

  1. Ultrasound: A novel tool for airway imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharthkumar Bhikhabhai Parmar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The scope of ultrasound is emerging in medical science, particularly outside traditional areas of radiology practice. Aims: We designed this study to evaluate feasibility of bedside sonography as a tool for airway assessment and to describe sonographic anatomy of airway. Settings and Design: A prospective, clinical study. Materials and Methods: We included 100 adult, healthy volunteers of either sex to undergo airway imaging systemically starting from floor of the mouth to the sternal notch in anterior aspect of neck by sonography. Results: We could visualize mandible and hyoid bone as a bright hyperechoic structure with hypoechoic acoustic shadow underneath. Epiglottis, thyroid cartilage, cricoid cartilage, and tracheal rings appeared hypoechoic. Vocal cords were visualized through thyroid cartilage. Interface between air and mucosa lining the airway produced a bright hyperechoic linear appearance. Artifacts created by intraluminal air prevented visualization of posterior pharynx, posterior commissure, and posterior wall of trachea. Conclusions: Ultrasound is safe, quick, noninvasive, repeatable, and bedside tool to assess the airway and can provide real-time dynamic images relevant for several aspects of airway management.

  2. Maximum opening of the mouth by mouth prop during dental procedures increases the risk of upper airway constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Ito

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Hiroshi Ito1, Hiroyoshi Kawaai1, Shinya Yamazaki1, Yosuke Suzuki21Division of Systemic Management, Department of Oral Function, 2Division of Radiology and Diagnosis, Department of Medical Sciences, Ohu University, Post Graduate School of Dentistry, Koriyama City, Fukushima Prefecture, JapanAbstract: From a retrospective evaluation of data on accidents and deaths during dental procedures, it has been shown that several patients who refused dental treatment died of asphyxia during dental procedures. We speculated that forcible maximum opening of the mouth by using a mouth prop triggers this asphyxia by affecting the upper airway. Therefore, we assessed the morphological changes of the upper airway following maximal opening of the mouth. In 13 healthy adult volunteers, the sagittal diameter of the upper airway on lateral cephalogram was measured between the two conditions; closed mouth and maximally open mouth. The dyspnea in each state was evaluated by a visual analog scale. In one subject, a computed tomograph (CT was taken to assess the three-dimensional changes in the upper airway. A significant difference was detected in the mean sagittal diameter of the upper airway following use of the prop (closed mouth: 18.5 ± 3.8 mm, maximally open mouth: 10.4 ± 3.0 mm. All subjects indicated upper airway constriction and significant dyspnea when their mouth was maximally open. Although a CT scan indicated upper airway constriction when the mouth was maximally open, muscular compensation was admitted. Our results further indicate that the maximal opening of the mouth narrows the upper airway diameter and leads to dyspnea. The use of a prop for the patient who has communication problems or poor neuromuscular function can lead to asphyxia. When the prop is used for patient refusal in dentistry, the respiratory condition should be monitored strictly, and it should be kept in mind that the “sniffing position” is effective for avoiding upper airway

  3. Trigger of bronchial hyperresponsiveness development may not always need eosinophilic airway inflammation in very early stage of asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Obase, Yasushi; Shimoda, Terufumi; Kishikawa, Reiko; Kohno, Shigeru; Iwanaga, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cough variant asthma (CVA), a suggested precursor of standard bronchial asthma (SBA), is characterized by positive bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and a chronic cough response to bronchodilator that persists for >8 weeks. Objective: Airway inflammation, BHR, and airway obstructive damage were analyzed to assess whether CVA represents early or mild-stage SBA. Methods: Patients with newly diagnosed CVA (n = 72) and SBA (n = 84) naive to oral or inhaled corticosteroids and withou...

  4. Anti-IgE treatment, airway inflammation and remodelling in severe allergic asthma: current knowledge and future perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos Samitas; Vasiliki Delimpoura; Eleftherios Zervas; Mina Gaga

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a disorder of the airways involving various inflammatory cells and mediators and characterised by bronchial hyperresponsiveness, chronic inflammation and structural alterations in the airways, also known as remodelling. IgE is an important mediator of allergic reactions and has a central role in allergic asthma pathophysiology, as it is implicated in both the early and late phase allergic response. Moreover, clinical and mechanistic evidence has lately emerged, implicating IgE in th...

  5. Recent Advances in Mechanisms and Treatments of Airway Remodeling in Asthma: A Message from the Bench Side to the Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Jae Youn

    2011-01-01

    Airway remodeling in asthma is a result of persistent inflammation and epithelial damage in response to repetitive injury. Recent studies have identified several important mediators associated with airway remodeling in asthma, including transforming growth factor-β, interleukin (IL)-5, basic fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, LIGHT, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, thymic stromal lymphopoietin, IL-33, and IL-25. In addition, the epithelium mesenchymal transformation (...

  6. Acetyl salicylic acid inhibits Th17 airway inflammation via blockade of IL-6 and IL-17 positive feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Hyung-Geun; Kang, Chil Sung; Choi, Jun-Pyo; Choi, Dong Sic; Choi, Hyun Il; Choi, Yong Wook; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Yoo, Joo-Yeon; Jang, Myoung Ho; Gho, Yong Song; Kim, Yoon-Keun

    2013-01-01

    T-helper (Th)17 cell responses are important for the development of neutrophilic inflammatory disease. Recently, we found that acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) inhibited Th17 airway inflammation in an asthma mouse model induced by sensitization with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-containing allergens. To investigate the mechanism(s) of the inhibitory effect of ASA on the development of Th17 airway inflammation, a neutrophilic asthma mouse model was generated by intranasal sensitization with LPS plus ova...

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin modulates mucin glycosylation with sialyl-Lewis(x) to increase binding to airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, J L; Jia, J; Choi, W; Choe, S; Miao, J; Xu, Y; Powell, R; Lin, J; Kuang, Z; Gaskins, H R; Lau, G W

    2016-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients battle life-long pulmonary infections with the respiratory pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). An overabundance of mucus in CF airways provides a favorable niche for PA growth. When compared with that of non-CF individuals, mucus of CF airways is enriched in sialyl-Lewis(x), a preferred binding receptor for PA. Notably, the levels of sialyl-Lewis(x) directly correlate with infection severity in CF patients. However, the mechanism by which PA causes increased sialylation remains uncharacterized. In this study, we examined the ability of PA virulence factors to modulate sialyl-Lewis(x) modification in airway mucins. We found pyocyanin (PCN) to be a potent inducer of sialyl-Lewis(x) in both mouse airways and in primary and immortalized CF and non-CF human airway epithelial cells. PCN increased the expression of C2/4GnT and ST3Gal-IV, two of the glycosyltransferases responsible for the stepwise biosynthesis of sialyl-Lewis(x), through a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-mediated phosphoinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC)-dependent pathway. Furthermore, PA bound more efficiently to airway epithelial cells pre-exposed to PCN in a flagellar cap-dependent manner. Importantly, antibodies against sialyl-Lewis(x) and anti-TNF-α attenuated PA binding. These results indicate that PA secretes PCN to induce a favorable environment for chronic colonization of CF lungs by increasing the glycosylation of airway mucins with sialyl-Lewis(x). PMID:26555707

  8. Temporal correlation of optical coherence tomography in-vivo images of rabbit airway for the diagnosis of edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, DongYel; Wang, Alex; Tjoa, Tjoson; Volgger, Veronika; Hamamoto, Ashley; Su, Erica; Jing, Joseph; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, full-range optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems have been developed to image the human airway. These novel systems utilize a fiber-based OCT probe which acquires three-dimensional (3-D) images with micrometer resolution. Following an airway injury, mucosal edema is the first step in the body's inflammatory response, which occasionally leads to airway stenosis, a life-threatening condition for critically ill newborns. Therefore, early detection of edema is vital for airway management and prevention of stenosis. In order to examine the potential of the full-range OCT to diagnose edema, we investigated temporal correlation of OCT images obtained from the subglottic airway of live rabbits. Temporally correlated OCT images were acquired at fixed locations in the rabbit subglottis of either artificially induced edema or normal tissues. Edematous tissue was experimentally modeled by injecting saline beneath the epithelial layer of the subglottic mucosa. The calculated cross temporal correlations between OCT images of normal airway regions show periodicity that correlates with the respiratory motion of the airway. However, the temporal correlation functions calculated from OCT images of the edematous regions show randomness without the periodic characteristic. These in-vivo experimental results of temporal correlations between OCT images show the potential of a computer-based or -aided diagnosis of edema in the human respiratory mucosa with a full-range OCT system.

  9. Origins of increased airway smooth muscle mass in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berair, Rachid; Saunders, Ruth; Brightling, Christopher E

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by both chronic inflammation and airway remodeling. Remodeling--the structural changes seen in asthmatic airways--is pivotal in the pathogenesis of the disease. Although significant advances have been made recently in understanding the different aspects of airway remodeling, the exact biology governing these changes remains poorly understood. There is broad agreement that, in asthma, increased airway smooth muscle mass, in part due to smooth muscle hyperplasia, is a very significant component of airway remodeling. However, significant debate persists on the origins of these airway smooth muscle cells. In this review article we will explore the natural history of airway remodeling in asthma and we will discuss the possible contribution of progenitors, stem cells and epithelial cells in mesenchymal cell changes, namely airway smooth muscle hyperplasia seen in the asthmatic airways. PMID:23742314

  10. Airway Inflammation in Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps and Asthma: The United Airways Concept Further Supported

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Kåre; Bachert, Claus; Konge, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been established that patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) often have co-existing asthma. Objective We aimed to test two hypotheses: (i) upper and lower airway inflammation in CRSwNP is uniform in agreement with the united airways concept; and (ii...

  11. Mucosal exposure to cockroach extract induces allergic sensitization and allergic airway inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arizmendi Narcy G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergic sensitization to aeroallergens develops in response to mucosal exposure to these allergens. Allergic sensitization may lead to the development of asthma, which is characterized by chronic airway inflammation. The objective of this study is to describe in detail a model of mucosal exposure to cockroach allergens in the absence of an exogenous adjuvant. Methods Cockroach extract (CE was administered to mice intranasally (i.n. daily for 5 days, and 5 days later mice were challenged with CE for 4 consecutive days. A second group received CE i.n. for 3 weeks. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR was assessed 24 h after the last allergen exposure. Allergic airway inflammation was assessed by BAL and lung histology 48 h after the last allergen exposure. Antigen-specific antibodies were assessed in serum. Lungs were excised from mice from measurement of cytokines and chemokines in whole lung lysate. Results Mucosal exposure of Balb/c mice to cockroach extract induced airway eosinophilic inflammation, AHR and cockroach-specific IgG1; however, AHR to methacholine was absent in the long term group. Lung histology showed patchy, multicentric damage with inflammatory infiltrates at the airways in both groups. Lungs from mice from the short term group showed increased IL-4, CCL11, CXCL1 and CCL2 protein levels. IL4 and CXCL1 were also increased in the BAL of cockroach-sensitized mice in the short-term protocol. Conclusions Mucosal exposure to cockroach extract in the absence of adjuvant induces allergic airway sensitization characterized by AHR, the presence of Th2 cytokines in the lung and eosinophils in the airways.

  12. In Utero Cigarette Smoke Affects Allergic Airway Disease But Does Not Alter the Lung Methylome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R Eyring

    Full Text Available Prenatal and postnatal cigarette smoke exposure enhances the risk of developing asthma. Despite this as well as other smoking related risks, 11% of women still smoke during pregnancy. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke exposure during prenatal development generates long lasting differential methylation altering transcriptional activity that correlates with disease. In a house dust mite (HDM model of allergic airway disease, we measured airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR and airway inflammation between mice exposed prenatally to cigarette smoke (CS or filtered air (FA. DNA methylation and gene expression were then measured in lung tissue. We demonstrate that HDM-treated CS mice develop a more severe allergic airway disease compared to HDM-treated FA mice including increased AHR and airway inflammation. While DNA methylation changes between the two HDM-treated groups failed to reach genome-wide significance, 99 DMRs had an uncorrected p-value < 0.001. 6 of these 99 DMRs were selected for validation, based on the immune function of adjacent genes, and only 2 of the 6 DMRs confirmed the bisulfite sequencing data. Additionally, genes near these 6 DMRs (Lif, Il27ra, Tle4, Ptk7, Nfatc2, and Runx3 are differentially expressed between HDM-treated CS mice and HDM-treated FA mice. Our findings confirm that prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke is sufficient to modify allergic airway disease; however, it is unlikely that specific methylation changes account for the exposure-response relationship. These findings highlight the important role in utero cigarette smoke exposure plays in the development of allergic airway disease.

  13. Pore Narrowing of Mesoporous Silica Materials

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    Christophe Detavernier

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To use mesoporous silicas as low-k materials, the pore entrances must be really small to avoid diffusion of metals that can increase the dielectric constant of the low-k dielectric. In this paper we present a new method to narrow the pores of mesoporous materials through grafting of a cyclic-bridged organosilane precursor. As mesoporous material, the well-studied MCM-41 powder was selected to allow an easy characterization of the grafting reactions. Firstly, the successful grafting of the cyclic-bridged organosilane precursor on MCM-41 is presented. Secondly, it is demonstrated that pore narrowing can be obtained without losing porosity by removing the porogen template after grafting. The remaining silanols in the pores can then be end-capped with hexamethyl disilazane (HMDS to make the material completely hydrophobic. Finally, we applied the pore narrowing method on organosilica films to prove that this method is also successful on existing low-k materials.

  14. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Lamwers, Stephanie; Tepel, Martin; Sanner, Bernd M

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is linked to increased cardiovascular risk. This risk can be reduced by nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) treatment. As OSA is associated with an increase of several vasoconstrictive factors, we investigated whether nCPAP influences the digital volume...... automated analysis. In patients with OSA and an apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) of >10 events · h(-1), a significant vasoconstriction was observed during the night (p<0.0001 by Friedman's test). A significant positive correlation existed between vasoconstriction and AHI (Spearman correlation, r = 0.27; p<0.......01; n = 94) and the arousal index (Spearman correlation, r = 0.21; p < 0.05; n = 94). After 6 months of nCPAP treatment, the AHI was significantly reduced from 27 ± 3 events · h(-1) to 4 ± 2 events · h(-1) (each n = 29; p<0.001) and vasoconstriction during the night was significantly reduced from 10 ± 3...

  15. Left mainstem bronchial narrowing: a vascular compression syndrome? Evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and objective. Vascular compression of the left mainstem bronchus (LMSB) between the descending aorta (DA) and pulmonary artery (PA) has been suggested as a cause for LMSB narrowing in children. These anatomic relationships have not been compared with those in children with a normal LMSB. Materials and methods. We undertook a retrospective review of the medical and radiologic records of 10 symptomatic young children (1-19 months, 5 boys, 5 girls) with MR demonstration of LMSB narrowing and compared them to 40 young children without great vessel or bronchial abnormality on MR (1 week-19 months, 28 boys, 12 girls). Chest MR evaluation included assessment of airway and great vessel anatomy with specific attention to the course of the LMSB and its relationship to the adjacent DA and PA. The position of the DA in relation to the spine was carefully evaluated. Results. Five children had focal and five had diffuse LMSB narrowing. DA position at the level of the crossing LMSB: in 40 % of symptomatic children the DA was located in front of the adjacent vertebral body; in 40 %, 1/2-3/4 and in 20 % 1/4-1/2 of the circumference of the DA was located anterior to the spine. In the control group, the DA was prespinal in 10 %, with a trend toward a more paraspinal location of the DA. The trend toward a difference in position of the DA between symptomatic and control patients was statistically significant (P < 0.05). DA position was not related to age (up to 19 months). At the level where the LMSB crossed the DA, a segment of the PA was located anterior to the LMSB, more often the right PA (RPA) or pulmonary bifurcation in symptomatic children and the left PA (LPA) in controls. No correlation was apparent between length of LMSB narrowing and DA or PA position. Chest radiographic abnormalities, when present, were subtle. Excellent MR/bronchoscopic correlation of LMSB narrowing was found in nine of the ten symptomatic children. One child underwent posterior aortopexy and

  16. Left mainstem bronchial narrowing: a vascular compression syndrome? Evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hungate, R.G.; Newman, B.; Meza, M.P. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital of Pittsburgh and University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 3705 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Background and objective. Vascular compression of the left mainstem bronchus (LMSB) between the descending aorta (DA) and pulmonary artery (PA) has been suggested as a cause for LMSB narrowing in children. These anatomic relationships have not been compared with those in children with a normal LMSB. Materials and methods. We undertook a retrospective review of the medical and radiologic records of 10 symptomatic young children (1-19 months, 5 boys, 5 girls) with MR demonstration of LMSB narrowing and compared them to 40 young children without great vessel or bronchial abnormality on MR (1 week-19 months, 28 boys, 12 girls). Chest MR evaluation included assessment of airway and great vessel anatomy with specific attention to the course of the LMSB and its relationship to the adjacent DA and PA. The position of the DA in relation to the spine was carefully evaluated. Results. Five children had focal and five had diffuse LMSB narrowing. DA position at the level of the crossing LMSB: in 40 % of symptomatic children the DA was located in front of the adjacent vertebral body; in 40 %, {sup 1}/{sub 2}-{sup 3}/{sub 4} and in 20 % {sup 1}/{sub 4}-{sup 1}/{sub 2} of the circumference of the DA was located anterior to the spine. In the control group, the DA was prespinal in 10 %, with a trend toward a more paraspinal location of the DA. The trend toward a difference in position of the DA between symptomatic and control patients was statistically significant (P < 0.05). DA position was not related to age (up to 19 months). At the level where the LMSB crossed the DA, a segment of the PA was located anterior to the LMSB, more often the right PA (RPA) or pulmonary bifurcation in symptomatic children and the left PA (LPA) in controls. No correlation was apparent between length of LMSB narrowing and DA or PA position. Chest radiographic abnormalities, when present, were subtle. Excellent MR/bronchoscopic correlation of LMSB narrowing was found in nine of the ten symptomatic

  17. Recombination in narrow-gapped semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In narrow-gapped semiconductors of the type Hgsub(1-x)Cdsub(x)Te as well as in lead chalcogenides and their mixed crystals with energy gaps of some tenths of eV, the band-band recombination processes dominate if the samples are sufficiently perfect in their crystal lattices. The relative importance of the radiative or Auger recombination depends on the width of the energy gap and the charge carrier concentration. In the extreme case of very narrow energy gaps plasmon and one-electron recombination occurs additionally

  18. Countercurrent flow limitation in narrow rectangular ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Countercurrent air-water two phase flow limitation in vertical narrow rectangular ducts was investigated. The scale effect was investigated using three narrow rectangular ducts with different gaps (2 x 100, 5 x 100, 10 x 100 mm). The experimental data showed similar tendency in spite of gap or upper plenum liquid level. The Wallis type correlation with constant C = 0.65 gave a good agreement with the experimental data. A comparison with the prediction by the envelope theory using the Bharathan friction factor correlation was also discussed. (author)

  19. Heat transfer models in narrow gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For severe accident assessment in a light water reactor (LWR), heat transfer models in a narrow annular gap between the overheated core debris and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are important to evaluate the integrity of RPV and emergency procedures. Some heat transfer models have been proposed as gap cooling CHF (critical heat flux) but the effects of superheat on the heat transfer surface were not taken into account. This paper presents the effects of superheat based on existing data and heat transfer models in a narrow gap. (author)

  20. Numerical simulation for the upper airway flow characteristics of Chinese patients with OSAHS using CFD models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jie; Huang, Jianmin; Yang, Jianguo; Wang, Desheng; Liu, Jianzhi; Liu, Jingbo; Lin, Shuchun; Li, Chen; Lai, Haichun; Zhu, Hongyu; Hu, Xiaohua; Chen, Dongxu; Zheng, Longxiang

    2013-03-01

    OSAHS is a common disease with many factors related to the etiology. Airflow plays an important role in the pathogenesis of OSAHS. Previous research has not yielded a sufficient understanding of the relationship between airflow in upper airway and the pathophysiology of OSAHS. Therefore, a better understanding of the flow inside the upper airway in an OSAHS patient is necessary. In this study, ten Chinese adults with OSAHS were recruited. We used the software MIMICS 13.1 to construct 3-dimensional (3-D) models based on the computer tomography scans of them. The numerical simulations were carried out using the software ANSYS 12.0. We found that during the inhalation phase, the vortices and turbulences were located in both the anterior part of the cavity and nasopharynx. But there is no vortex in the whole nasal cavity during the expiratory phase. The airflow velocity is much higher than that of the normal models. The distributions of pressure and wall shear stress are different in two phases. The maximum velocity, pressure and wall shear stress (WSS) are located in velopharynx. It is notable that a strong negative pressure region is found in pharyngeal airway. The maximum velocity is 19.26 ± 12.4 and 19.46 ± 13.1 m/s; the average pressure drop is 222.71 ± 208.84 and 238.5 ± 218.56 Pa and the maximum average WSS is 0.72 ± 0.58 and 1.01 ± 0.61 Pa in inspiratory and expiratory, respectively. The changes of airflow due to the structure changes play an important role in the occurrence of collapse and obstruction of the upper airway, especially, the abnormal pressure changes in velopharyngeal during both inspiratory and expiratory phases. We can say that the airway narrowing in the pharynx may be one of the most important factors driving airway collapse. In addition, the most collapsible region of the pharyngeal airway of the patient with OSAHS may be the velopharynx and oropharynx. In spite of limitations, our results can provide a basis for the further research