WorldWideScience

Sample records for airplanes

  1. Airplane crash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May, 1974, a severe airplane crash occurred near Springfield, llinois; the crew of three and a courier were killed. The plane was carrying a large container of controlled water with a slight amount of 60Co. A survey of the crash site by Air Force detectives and the radiological assistance team from Wright--Patterson Air Force Base indicated no radioactivity. Experiences of the incident were used to develop guidelines for future emergency preparedness

  2. Amphibious Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The airplane pictured is the new Air Shark I, a four-place amphibian that makes extensive use of composite materials and cruises at close to 200 miles per hour under power from a 200-horsepower engine. Air Shark I is a "homebuilt" airplane, assembled from a kit of parts and components furnished by Freedom Master Corporation, Satellite Beach, Florida. The airplane incorporates considerable NASA technology and its construction benefited from research assistance provided by Kennedy Space Center (KSC) In designing the Shark, company president Arthur M. Lueck was able to draw on NASA's aeronautical technology bank through KSC's computerized "recon" library. As a result of his work at KSC, the wing of the Air Shark I is a new airfoil developed by Langley Research Center for light aircraft. In addition, Lueck opted for NASA-developed "winglets," vertical extensions of the wing that reduce drag by smoothing air turbulence at the wingtips. The NASA technology bank also contributed to the hull design. Lueck is considering application of NASA laminar flow technology-means of smoothing the airflow over wing and fuselage-to later models for further improvement of the Shark's aerodynamic efficiency. A materials engineer, Lueck employed his own expertise in designing and selecting the materials for the composite segments, which include all structural members, exposed surfaces and many control components. The materials are fiber reinforced plastics, or FRP They offer a high strength-to-weight ratio, with a nominal strength rating about one and a half times that of structural steel. They provide other advantages: the materials can be easily molded into finished shapes without expensive tooling or machining, and they are highly corrosion resistant. The first homebuilt to be offered by Freedom Master, Air Shark I completed air and water testing in mid-1985 and the company launched production of kits.

  3. The Light Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driggs, Ivan H.

    1925-01-01

    This report begins with a review and analysis of the work being done to develop light airplanes in the U.S. and abroad. A technical discussion of the construction and innovations in light airplanes is then presented.

  4. 77 FR 50644 - Airworthiness Directives; Cessna Airplane Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Directives; Cessna Airplane Company Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... certain Cessna Airplane Company Model 525 airplanes equipped with certain part number (P/N)...

  5. 78 FR 22432 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ...: Vladimir Ulyanov, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA... airplanes. One existing AD currently requires revising the airplane flight manual (AFM) to include... provide appropriate operational procedures to prevent the airplane flight directors (FDs), autopilot...

  6. The Bristol "Badminton" Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    1926-01-01

    The Bristol Badminton, Type 99 airplane has a radial aircooled engine (a Bristol Jupiter 9 cylinder 450 HP.) and three fuel tanks. It is a single seat biplane weighing 1,840 lbs. empty and 2,460 lbs. loaded.

  7. Mars Gashopper Airplane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Mars Gas Hopper Airplane, or "gashopper" is a novel concept for propulsion of a robust Mars flight and surface exploration vehicle that utilizes indigenous CO2...

  8. Prospect of ultralight airplanes development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam KONICZEK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents characteristic of ultralight airplanes, rules and current interest of them. The purpose is to determine prospect of ultralight airplanes development on the basis of Civil Aviation Authority statistics analysis and trend of aviation market.

  9. Flatulence on airplanes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans C; Burcharth, Jakob; Fischer, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    Flatus is natural and an invariable consequence of digestion, however at times it creates problems of social character due to sound and odour. This problem may be more significant on commercial airplanes where many people are seated in limited space and where changes in volume of intestinal gases......, due to altered cabin pressure, increase the amount of potential flatus. Holding back flatus on an airplane may cause significant discomfort and physical symptoms, whereas releasing flatus potentially presents social complications. To avoid this problem we humbly propose that active charcoal should be...... airplanes, by using a methane breath test or to alter the fibre content of airline meals in order to reduce its flatulent potential. We conclude that the use of active charcoal on airlines may improve flight comfort for all passengers....

  10. Flatulence on airplanes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Fischer, Anders; Thomas, William E G; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Flatus is natural and an invariable consequence of digestion, however at times it creates problems of social character due to sound and odour. This problem may be more significant on commercial airplanes where many people are seated in limited space and where changes in volume of intestinal gases...... airplanes, by using a methane breath test or to alter the fibre content of airline meals in order to reduce its flatulent potential. We conclude that the use of active charcoal on airlines may improve flight comfort for all passengers......., due to altered cabin pressure, increase the amount of potential flatus. Holding back flatus on an airplane may cause significant discomfort and physical symptoms, whereas releasing flatus potentially presents social complications. To avoid this problem we humbly propose that active charcoal should be...

  11. 14 CFR 36.7 - Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... airplanes and jet airplanes. 36.7 Section 36.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... § 36.7 Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes. (a) Applicability. This section applies to all transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes for which an acoustical...

  12. The evolution of airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejan, A.; Charles, J. D.; Lorente, S.

    2014-07-01

    The prevailing view is that we cannot witness biological evolution because it occurred on a time scale immensely greater than our lifetime. Here, we show that we can witness evolution in our lifetime by watching the evolution of the flying human-and-machine species: the airplane. We document this evolution, and we also predict it based on a physics principle: the constructal law. We show that the airplanes must obey theoretical allometric rules that unite them with the birds and other animals. For example, the larger airplanes are faster, more efficient as vehicles, and have greater range. The engine mass is proportional to the body size: this scaling is analogous to animal design, where the mass of the motive organs (muscle, heart, lung) is proportional to the body size. Large or small, airplanes exhibit a proportionality between wing span and fuselage length, and between fuel load and body size. The animal-design counterparts of these features are evident. The view that emerges is that the evolution phenomenon is broader than biological evolution. The evolution of technology, river basins, and animal design is one phenomenon, and it belongs in physics.

  13. Unmanned Airplane Autopilot Tuning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Getsov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article considers different approaches for autopilot controller gain values adjustment. The correct autopilot performance is tested using modeling methods. A variant of land-based autopilot is considered. Examined are scenarios of UAV airplanes in level flight. The latter are applicable to tasks such as remote sensing, controlled area surveillance, etc.

  14. 14 CFR 23.3 - Airplane categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane categories. 23.3 Section 23.3... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES General § 23.3 Airplane categories. (a) The normal category is limited to airplanes that have a seating configuration, excluding...

  15. Airplane crash simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impact loads are considered in nuclear facility design as the result of the loading effects of certain design basis accidents and design basis threats made up of natural as well as man-made hazards. Also, beyond design basis accidents and threats are considered. Typical missiles include objects caused by tornado winds, aircrafts, war or terrorist activities, dropped objects, turbine fragments and other missiles resulting from failure of rotating equipment and whipping pipes and other objects of failure of pressurized fluid systems. The aim of the work is to study the potential of tools for numerical simulations to study the local load effects of airplane missiles impacting concrete structures. Two of the leading commercial computer codes for analysis of highly dynamic events, ABAQUS/Explicit and AUTODYN, have been evaluated. Numerical simulations have been carried out for rigid as well as deformable missiles with the characteristics of airplane engines. The analysis results have been compared with test results from a test program performed in the USA at Sandia National Laboratory and in Japan at Kobori Research Complex and Central Research Institute of the Electric Power industry. Finally, numerical simulations of a large passenger airliner impacting a reactor containment has been carried out using the analysis methodology developed. (author)

  16. Gamma rays at airplane altitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An examination of the gamma ray flux above 1 TeV in the atmosphere is needed to better understand the anomalous showers from point sources. Suggestions are made for future experiments on board airplanes

  17. Airplane Upset Training Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawron, Valerie J.; Jones, Patricia M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Airplane upset accidents are a leading factor in hull losses and fatalities. This study compared five types of airplane-upset training. Each group was composed of eight, non-military pilots flying in their probationary year for airlines operating in the United States. The first group, 'No aero / no upset,' was made up of pilots without any airplane upset training or aerobatic flight experience; the second group, 'Aero/no upset,' of pilots without any airplane-upset training but with aerobatic experience; the third group, 'No aero/upset,' of pilots who had received airplane-upset training in both ground school and in the simulator; the fourth group, 'Aero/upset,' received the same training as Group Three but in addition had aerobatic flight experience; and the fifth group, 'In-flight' received in-flight airplane upset training using an instrumented in-flight simulator. Recovery performance indicated that clearly training works - specifically, all 40 pilots recovered from the windshear upset. However few pilots were trained or understood the use of bank to change the direction of the lift vector to recover from nose high upsets. Further, very few thought of, or used differential thrust to recover from rudder or aileron induced roll upsets. In addition, recovery from icing-induced stalls was inadequate.

  18. 75 FR 39804 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 757 Airplanes, Model 767 Airplanes, and Model...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... airplanes. That NPRM was published in the Federal Register on March 13, 2008 (73 FR 13483). That NPRM... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), and (3) Will... Model 757 Airplanes, Model 767 Airplanes, and Model 777-200 and -300 Series Airplanes AGENCY:...

  19. 78 FR 53640 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... this AD, before further flight, repair using a method approved by either the Manager, International...: Vladimir Ulyanov, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA... of Compliance (AMOCs): The Manager, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane...

  20. 77 FR 58785 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ..., Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA, 1601 Lind Avenue SW... fuselage, using a method approved by either the Manager, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane... door frame shells, which could result in in-flight decompression of the airplane and consequent...

  1. 14 CFR 121.605 - Airplane equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 121.605 Section 121.605..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.605 Airplane equipment. No person may dispatch or release an airplane unless it is airworthy and is equipped as prescribed in §...

  2. 14 CFR 125.93 - Airplane limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane limitations. 125.93 Section 125.93...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Requirements § 125.93...

  3. 76 FR 79560 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... airplanes; Model A330-223F and -243F airplanes; and Model A340-200, -300, -500, and -600 series...

  4. 76 FR 79558 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... F4-600R series airplanes, and Model C4-605R Variant F airplanes (collectively called A300-600...

  5. 78 FR 28152 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ..., Amendment 39-16526 (75 FR 75878, December 7, 2010), exempted airplanes on which Airbus Modification 34804..., Amendment 39-16526 (75 FR 75878, December 7, 2010). Except for Model A318-121 and -122 airplanes, and except...) of AD 2010-24-07, Amendment 39-16526 (75 FR 75878, December 7, 2010). Except for airplanes on...

  6. 76 FR 77934 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-15

    ... series airplanes. Since we issued AD 2005-23-02, Amendment 39-14360 (70 FR 69067, November 14, 2005), The... certain ACT equipped airplanes, produced after AD 2005-23-02, Amendment 39-14360 (70 FR 69067, November 14...-14360 (70 FR 69067, November 14, 2005). Applicability (c) This AD applies to Airbus airplanes listed...

  7. 77 FR 51717 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... visual inspection of the forward fitting at frame (FR) 40 on both sides of the airplane for cracks, and..., Amendment 39-16229 (75 FR cycles. 11435, March 11, 2010)), whichever occurs later; except, for airplanes... inspection for cracks of the forward fitting at FR 40 without nut removal on both sides of the airplane,...

  8. 77 FR 59149 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes..., and F4-600R series airplanes, and Model A300 C4-605R Variant F airplanes (collectively called...

  9. 77 FR 75833 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... fitting at frame (FR) 40 on both sides of the airplane for cracks, and repair if necessary. This new AD...-time detailed visual inspection of the forward fitting at FR 40 on both sides of the airplane, in..., Amendment 39- 16229 (75 FR 11435, March 11, 2010)), whichever occurs later; except, for airplanes that,...

  10. 78 FR 68347 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ... (74 FR 7549, February 18, 2009). Airbus also stated that for Model A340-541 and A340-642 airplanes.... Airbus stated that this requirement for Model A330 MRTT airplanes is equivalent to one in the NPRM (78 FR... (f) of AD 2009-04-07, Amendment 39-15813 (74 FR 7549, February 18, 2009). For all airplanes...

  11. Building concepts against airplane crash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Germany safety related buildings of nuclear facilities as well as their equipment are to be designed against airplane crash. While the safety of the structure itself can always be guaranteed by structural means, the induced vibrations may cause severe problems for the equipment. Considerable effort was expended in recent years to comprehend the load case airplane crash in a more exact manner and to evaluate reasonable floor response spectra. Besides this analytical effort, investigations are cited to minimize the induced vibrations by new structural concepts. The present paper gives a survey concerning the development of structural concepts, culminating in the double shell structures that are state of the art today. Then the idea of spring supports, as it is known for the aseismic foundation of buildings, is further developed to a new spring concept which reduces the induced vibrations in an optimum way in the load case airplane crash and which additionally isolates earthquake vibrations. (orig.)

  12. 14 CFR 121.207 - Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Provisionally certificated airplanes... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.207 Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations....

  13. Supersonic airplane study and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Samson

    1993-01-01

    A supersonic airplane creates shocks which coalesce and form a classical N-wave on the ground, forming a double bang noise termed sonic boom. A recent supersonic commercial transport (the Concorde) has a loud sonic boom (over 100 PLdB) and low aerodynamic performance (cruise lift-drag ratio 7). To enhance the U.S. market share in supersonic transport, an airframer's market risk for a low-boom airplane has to be reduced. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used to design airplanes to meet the dual constraints of low sonic boom and high aerodynamic performance. During the past year, a research effort was focused on three main topics. The first was to use the existing design tools, developed in past years, to design one of the low-boom wind-tunnel configurations (Ames Model 3) for testing at Ames Research Center in April 1993. The second was to use a Navier-Stokes code (Overflow) to support the Oblique-All-Wing (OAW) study at Ames. The third was to study an optimization technique applied on a Haack-Adams body to reduce aerodynamic drag.

  14. 77 FR 7523 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... 12866; 2. Is not a ''significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034...-055-AD; Amendment 39-16952; AD 2012-03-10] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... A340-600 series airplanes. This AD requires modifying the fire extinguishing system from a...

  15. 78 FR 72834 - Airworthiness Directives; SOCATA Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    ... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Directives; SOCATA Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT... (AD) for SOCATA Model TBM 700 airplanes. This proposed AD results from mandatory...

  16. 78 FR 1723 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ... Order 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034...-227-AD; Amendment 39-17312; AD 2012-26-51] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... airplanes. This emergency AD was sent previously to all known U.S. owners and operators of these...

  17. 78 FR 46536 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska; and 4. Will... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... B4-600R series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of cracks found in the bottom...

  18. 14 CFR 125.355 - Airplane equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 125.355 Section 125.355...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules § 125.355...

  19. 78 FR 40057 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska; and 4. Will... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... A321 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of certain sliding windows that...

  20. 78 FR 37498 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska; and 4. Will... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... Freighter, and -300 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a report that a certain wire...

  1. 77 FR 11793 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... airplanes). (k) Terminating Action for AD 2007-03-18, Amendment 39-14929 (72 FR 5919, February 8, 2007..., Amendment 39-14929 (72 FR 5919, February 8, 2007), for that airplane. (l) Reporting Submit a report..., Amendment 39- 14929 (72 FR 5919, February 8, 2007)] was to mandate, for A300 and A300-600...

  2. 76 FR 50706 - Airworthiness Directives; SOCATA Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; SOCATA Airplanes... SOCATA Model TBM 700 Airplanes. This proposed AD results from mandatory continuing...

  3. 77 FR 51729 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes..., A340-200 and A340-300 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a report that revealed...

  4. 77 FR 69391 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska... Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... A310-204, -222, -304, -322, and -324 airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by the manufacturer...

  5. 77 FR 19067 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation...-047-AD; Amendment 39-16992; AD 2012-06-11] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... A321-131, -211, -212, and -231 airplanes. This AD requires a rotating probe inspection for cracking...

  6. 77 FR 19065 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not affect intrastate...-057-AD; Amendment 39-16993; AD 2012-06-12] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... A340-600 series airplanes. This AD requires a detailed inspection for abnormalities of the ball...

  7. 77 FR 15636 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska; and... Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed..., A319, and A320 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of unsuccessful...

  8. 76 FR 72350 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ..., A319, A320, and A321 airplanes. Since we issued AD 2008-08-04, Amendment 39-15456 (73 FR 19975, April..., Amendment 39-15456 (73 FR 19975, April 14, 2008), With Revised Affected Airplanes Referenced Conditions (j... proposed AD. Discussion On March 31, 2008, we issued AD 2008-08-04, Amendment 39-15456 (73 FR 19975,...

  9. 77 FR 16492 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports that some nuts installed on the wing, including...

  10. 78 FR 40074 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska; and 4. Will... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a determination that oxygen generators installed on...

  11. 77 FR 19071 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska; and 4. Will...-056-AD; Amendment 39-16991; AD 2012-06-10] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... A330-200, A330-300, A340-500, and A340-600 series airplanes. This AD requires a detailed inspection...

  12. 78 FR 39190 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... A321 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a determination that certain special...

  13. Error Analysis of Determining Airplane Location by Global Positioning System

    OpenAIRE

    Hajiyev, Chingiz; Burat, Alper

    1999-01-01

    This paper studies the error analysis of determining airplane location by global positioning system (GPS) using statistical testing method. The Newton Rhapson method positions the airplane at the intersection point of four spheres. Absolute errors, relative errors and standard deviation have been calculated The results show that the positioning error of the airplane varies with the coordinates of GPS satellite and the airplane.

  14. 14 CFR 21.5 - Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. 21.5... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS General § 21.5 Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. (a) With each airplane or rotorcraft that was not type certificated with an Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight...

  15. 14 CFR 91.821 - Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits... Noise Limits § 91.821 Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits. Except for Concorde airplanes having... airplane that does not comply with Stage 2 noise limits of part 36 in effect on October 13, 1977,...

  16. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage...

  17. Visual servoing of an airplane for auto-landing

    OpenAIRE

    Bourquardez, O.; Chaumette, François

    2007-01-01

    International audience In this paper, a visual servoing scheme is proposed to control an airplane during its landing. A linearized model of the airplane dynamics and decoupled visual features are used to build the control scheme. A desired trajectory which takes into account the airplane dynamic is designed. Coupling this trajectory and the control law enables the airplane to join its desired path. Then the airplane is controlled to follow the glide path, realize the flare manoeuvre and fi...

  18. Landing and Braking of Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breguet, Louis

    1929-01-01

    In the numerical examples, we have considered an airplane landing in calm air in a fixed direction after crossing the border (with its obstacles) at a height of 30 m. Its stopping point is at a distance D from the obstacle, comprising: a distance D(sub 1) in regular gliding flight; a distance D(sub 2) in levelling off; a distance D(sub 3) in taxying on the ground. The calculations enable us to make out the following table, which gives an idea of the improvements to be expected in the use of various possible methods of braking in the air and on the ground.

  19. 14 CFR 121.331 - Supplemental oxygen requirements for pressurized cabin airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... pressurized cabin airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered airplanes. 121.331 Section 121.331 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND... pressurized cabin airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered airplanes. (a) When operating a reciprocating...

  20. Airplane impacts on reinforced concrete shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of nonlinear and ultimate load finite element analyses of reinforced concrete shells subject to airplane impact loads are presented. Algorithmic difficulties and impact-release conditions are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Installing paparazzi autopilot into a model airplane

    OpenAIRE

    Ojala, Allan

    2010-01-01

    This Bachelor degree study explores the open source Autopilot “Paparazzi” that was installed into a model airplane. The aim for this was to get the model airplane to fly short flight and study what difficulties there are in a project like this. The field of UAV research is innovative and number of companies selling ready UAV products is growing, also many education institutes and amateurs are making their own implementations of UAVs. Paparazzi autopilot is a complete system of hardware a...

  2. 77 FR 2238 - Airworthiness Directives; Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and (4) Will not... Industries PC-6 airplanes, Fairchild Heli Porter PC-6 airplanes, or Fairchild-Hiller Corporation...

  3. 14 CFR 125.75 - Airplane flight manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane flight manual. 125.75 Section 125...,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Manual Requirements § 125.75 Airplane flight manual. (a) Each certificate holder shall keep a current approved Airplane Flight Manual...

  4. 14 CFR 121.141 - Airplane flight manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane flight manual. 121.141 Section 121... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Manual Requirements § 121.141 Airplane flight manual. (a) Each certificate holder shall keep a current approved airplane flight manual for each type...

  5. 78 FR 23458 - Airworthiness Directives; Dassault Aviation Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... CONTACT: Tom Rodriguez, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate..., International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, Washington... Dassault Aviation Model FALCON 7X airplanes. This AD requires revising the aircraft flight manual...

  6. 14 CFR 125.407 - Maintenance log: Airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintenance log: Airplanes. 125.407 Section... OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6... Maintenance log: Airplanes. (a) Each person who takes corrective action or defers action concerning a...

  7. 14 CFR 121.303 - Airplane instruments and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane instruments and equipment. 121.303... Airplane instruments and equipment. (a) Unless otherwise specified, the instrument and equipment... airspeed limitation and item of related information in the Airplane Flight Manual and pertinent...

  8. 14 CFR 125.91 - Airplane requirements: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane requirements: General. 125.91... AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane...

  9. 14 CFR 61.159 - Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aeronautical experience: Airplane category... Transport Pilots § 61.159 Aeronautical experience: Airplane category rating. (a) Except as provided in... certificate with an airplane category and class rating must have at least 1,500 hours of total time as a...

  10. 14 CFR 121.161 - Airplane limitations: Type of route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane limitations: Type of route. 121... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Aircraft Requirements § 121.161 Airplane... specifications, no certificate holder may operate a turbine-engine-powered airplane over a route that contains...

  11. 14 CFR 121.570 - Airplane evacuation capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane evacuation capability. 121.570... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Operations § 121.570 Airplane evacuation capability. (a) No person may cause an airplane carrying passengers to be moved on the surface, take off,...

  12. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 23.71 Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical...

  13. 14 CFR 121.159 - Single-engine airplanes prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Single-engine airplanes prohibited. 121.159 Section 121.159 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... airplanes prohibited. No certificate holder may operate a single-engine airplane under this part....

  14. 14 CFR 125.205 - Equipment requirements: Airplanes under IFR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment requirements: Airplanes under IFR... CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD... Equipment Requirements § 125.205 Equipment requirements: Airplanes under IFR. No person may operate...

  15. 14 CFR 121.199 - Nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.199 Nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating...

  16. Nonlinear analysis of a reactor building for airplane impact loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose is to analyze the influence of material nonlinear behavior on the response of a reinforced concrete reactor building and on equipment response for airplane impact loadings. Two analyses are performed: first, the impact of a slow-flying commercial airplane (Boeing 707), then the impact of a fast flying military airplane (Phantom). (orig./HP)

  17. 14 CFR 121.503 - Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes... Operations § 121.503 Flight time limitations: Pilots: airplanes. (a) A certificate holder conducting supplemental operations may schedule a pilot to fly in an airplane for eight hours or less during any...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1437 - Accessories for multiengine airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accessories for multiengine airplanes. 23... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1437 Accessories for multiengine airplanes. For multiengine...

  19. 78 FR 42417 - Airworthiness Directives; Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... during production could reduce the structural integrity of the airplane. We are issuing this AD to... faulty rivets installed in the airframes during production could reduce the structural integrity of the airplane. We are issuing this AD to ensure the structural integrity of the airplane. (f) Actions...

  20. 14 CFR 135.422 - Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for multiengine airplanes certificated with nine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for multiengine airplanes certificated with nine or fewer passenger seats. 135.422 Section 135.422... Maintenance, and Alterations § 135.422 Aging airplane inspections and records reviews for...

  1. Stresses Produced in Airplane Wings by Gusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kussner, Hans Georg

    1932-01-01

    Accurate prediction of gust stress being out of the question because of the multiplicity of the free air movements, the exploration of gust stress is restricted to static method which must be based upon: 1) stress measurements in free flight; 2) check of design specifications of approved type airplanes. With these empirical data the stress must be compared which can be computed for a gust of known intensity and structure. This "maximum gust" then must be so defined as to cover the whole ambit of empiricism and thus serve as prediction for new airplane designs.

  2. Atmospheric electron flux at airplane altitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a new detector to systematically measure the cosmic-ray electron flux at airplane altitudes. We loaded a lead-glass-based electron telescope onto a commercial cargo airplane. The first experiment was carried out using the air route between Narita (Japan) and Sydney (Australia); during this flight we measured the electron flux at various altitudes and latitudes. The thresholds of the electron energies were 1, 2, and 4 GeV. The results agree with a simple estimation using one-dimensional shower theory. A comparison with a Monte Carlo calculation was made

  3. 14 CFR 121.181 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En... OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.181 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En... person operating a reciprocating engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight,...

  4. Headache attributed to airplane travel (“airplane headache”: first italian case

    OpenAIRE

    Mainardi, Federico; Lisotto, Carlo; Palestini, Claudia; Sarchielli, Paola; Maggioni, Ferdinando; Zanchin, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    A new form of headache, whose attacks seem to be stereotyped, has been recently reported; because of the peculiarity of its onset, strictly related to airplane travel, the name of “Airplane headache” was proposed. A total of 7 cases have been published. Here we present the first Italian one. Furthermore the revision of the clinical characteristics of each patient leads us to propose provisional diagnostic criteria.

  5. 77 FR 14314 - Airworthiness Directives; SOCATA Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... receipt. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Albert Mercado, Aerospace Engineer, FAA, Small Airplane..., the U.S. regulatory system requires all actions of this AD to be done by a certified mechanic....

  6. 78 FR 66861 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... required repetitive inspections to check the play of the eye-end of the piston rod of the elevator servo... piston rod of the elevator servo controls, which could result in failure of the elevator servo-control... replacing certain retraction brackets of the main landing gear; and revising the airplane flight...

  7. Computing Airplane Stopping Distance: Applications of Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylee, J. Louis

    1997-01-01

    Presents two real world applications that use derivatives and are related to computing the distance required to stop an airplane. Examines the curve-fitting techniques used to develop an equation for braking force and develops equations for the deceleration and speed. (DDR)

  8. 78 FR 70207 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... (FR) 41 and FR 46, on one A300-600 aeroplane a crack was detected in the area 2 of the foot of frame... INFORMATION CONTACT: Dan Rodina, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Discussion We issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 CFR part...

  9. 78 FR 78294 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Vladimir Ulyanov, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane...-1149. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Comments Invited We invite you to send any written relevant data... specified products. The MCAI states: During Final Assembly Line tests on an A330 aeroplane, the...

  10. 78 FR 64162 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... of the mask tube at the end of the oxygen supply causing a high temperature oxygen generator and mask... of supplemental oxygen. DATES: This AD becomes effective December 2, 2013. The Director of the...: Sanjay Ralhan, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate,...

  11. 78 FR 31386 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... 2010-02-10, Amendment 39-16181 (75 FR 4477, January 28, 2010)): Not earlier than 2,500 flight cycles or...- 16181 (75 FR 4477, January 28, 2010)): Not earlier than 2,500 flight cycles or 22 months from the..., International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton,...

  12. 78 FR 8054 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ...-07, Amendment 39-13741 (69 FR 44592, July 27, 2004). For airplanes on which Airbus Modification 5106...-07, Amendment 39-13741 (69 FR 44592, July 27, 2004). That AD required actions intended to address an... (69 FR 44592, July 27, 2004), the manufacturer has done a reassessment of the previous...

  13. Developing aircraft photonic networks for airplane systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Henry J.; Brownjohn, Nick; Baptista, João;

    2013-01-01

    Achieving affordable high speed fiber optic communication networks for airplane systems has proved to be challenging. In this paper we describe a summary of the EU Framework 7 project DAPHNE (Developing Aircraft Photonic Networks). DAPHNE aimed to exploit photonic technology from terrestrial...

  14. 78 FR 78705 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ..., Amendment 39-16526 (75 FR 75878, December 7, 2010). Except for airplanes on which Airbus Modification 34804... publications listed in this AD as of January 11, 2011 (75 FR 75878, December 7, 2010). ADDRESSES: You may... 14, 2013 (78 FR 28152), and proposed to supersede AD 2010-24-07, Amendment 39-16526 (75 FR...

  15. 14 CFR 129.25 - Airplane security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... security requirements in 49 CFR chapter XII. ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane security. 129.25 Section 129.25... AND FOREIGN OPERATORS OF U.S.-REGISTERED AIRCRAFT ENGAGED IN COMMON CARRIAGE General § 129.25...

  16. Operation peculiarities of airplane brake systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Г. Докучаев

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Analyzed is the loading of airplane brake systems. Complex methods are proposed for investi­gation of highly loaded brake systems. The results of investigation of the influence of various factors on technical condition of friction units are given

  17. 78 FR 78694 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ..., Amendment 39-16068 (74 FR 62208, November 27, 2009)), whichever occurs first. (B) For airplanes on which... as of December 14, 2009 (74 FR 62208, November 27, 2009). ADDRESSES: You may examine the AD docket on... products. The NPRM was published in the Federal Register on May 8, 2013 (78 FR 26716), and proposed...

  18. 77 FR 2928 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Airbus Model A310 series...

  19. Safety and design in airplane construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Alfred

    1934-01-01

    The author gives a survey of the principles of stress analysis and design of airplane structures, and discusses the fundamental strength specifications and their effect on the stress analysis as compared with the safety factors used in other branches of engineering.

  20. Radiation exposure of airplane crews. Exposure levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even at normal height levels of modern jet airplanes, the flying crew is exposed to a radiation level which is higher by several factors than the terrestrial radiation. There are several ways in which this can be hazardous; the most important of these is the induction of malignant growths, i.e. tumours. (orig./MG)

  1. 77 FR 60325 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ...) of AD 2008-08-04, Amendment 39-15456 (73 FR 19975, April 14, 2008). For airplanes on which none of... published in the Federal Register on November 23, 2011 (76 FR 72350). That earlier NPRM proposed to supersede AD 2008-08-04, Amendment 39-15456 (73 FR 19975, April 14, 2008), which superseded AD...

  2. 78 FR 71992 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ..., Amendment 39-14523 (71 FR 15023, March 27, 2006). For Model A318-111 and -112 airplanes; Model ] A319-111... as of May 1, 2006 (71 FR 15023, March 27, 2006). ADDRESSES: You may examine the AD docket on the... published in the Federal Register on August 20, 2013 (78 FR 51117), and proposed to supersede AD...

  3. 78 FR 21227 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... SNPRM (77 FR 55163, September 7, 2012) be changed from ``* * * first flight of the airplane,'' to... specified products. That SNPRM was published in the Federal Register on September 7, 2012 (77 FR 55163... consistent with the intent that was proposed in the SNPRM (77 FR 55163, September 7, 2012) for correcting...

  4. 77 FR 63716 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ..., Amendment 39-16097 (74 FR 62219, November 27, 2009). For Model A318-111 and -112 airplanes, and Model A319... this AD as of December 14, 2009 (74 FR 62219, November 27, 2009). The Director of the Federal Register..., 2007 (72 FR 40222, July 24, 2007). ADDRESSES: You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at...

  5. 78 FR 79292 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ... and A340-642 airplanes), and installing ground fault interrupters to the center tank fuel pump control... corresponds to FAA AD 2007-14-01, Amendment 39-15123, (72 FR 38006, July 12, 2007)] to require compliance with... 2007-14-01, Amendment 39-15123, (72 FR 38006, July 12, 2007)] to require compliance with FAL...

  6. 77 FR 48425 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... that Ground Fault Interrupters (GFI) are installed into the electrical power supply circuits of fuel... protection is to electrically isolate the pump if a ground fault condition occurs downstream of the GFI. The..., 2012 (for Model A340-200 and -300 series airplanes); to include a test procedure for a certain...

  7. 14 CFR 121.205 - Nontransport category airplanes: Landing limitations: Alternate airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nontransport category airplanes: Landing... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.205 Nontransport category airplanes: Landing limitations:...

  8. Perturbed Motion of Airplane and Safe Store Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Raisinghani

    1984-07-01

    Full Text Available A method is presented to predict the perturbed motion of an airplane following stores jettisoning. The mass, moment of inertia, forces, and moments acting on the airplane are suitable split into contributions from the stores and the rest of the airplane parts. The seperation of stores is assumed to result in a step change of mass, moment of intertai, forces, and moments contributed by stores. The resulting set of perturbed state equations of motion are solved for two illustrative airplane stroes combination. A criterion is evolved to qualitatively indicate locations for safe store separation. It is suggested that the present method be used to predict airplane perturbed motion following stores separation for a given airplane store combination and results be used in conjunction with store trajectory analysis for finally declaring a store location as safe unsafe.

  9. Experimental test of airplane boarding methods

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Jason H

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of an experimental comparison of different airplane boarding methods. This test was conducted in a mock 757 fuselage, located on a Southern California soundstage, with 12 rows of six seats and a single aisle. Five methods were tested using 72 passengers of various ages. We found a significant reduction in the boarding times of optimized methods over traditional methods. These improved methods, if properly implemented, could result in a significant savings to airline companies.

  10. Airplane impact on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short report on investigations of nuclear power plants under airplane attack is given. It concerns the modeling of planes with regard to mass and stiffness, the relevant plane velocity and finally the determination of load-time functions. The necessary analysis of the concrete containment structure is shortly addressed. Finally a proposal for a structure to keep planes from such building structures is discussed. (author)

  11. Advanced Subsonic Airplane Design and Economic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebeck, Robert H.; Andrastek, Donald A.; Chau, Johnny; Girvin, Raquel; Lyon, Roger; Rawdon, Blaine K.; Scott, Paul W.; Wright, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    A study was made to examine the effect of advanced technology engines on the performance of subsonic airplanes and provide a vision of the potential which these advanced engines offered. The year 2005 was selected as the entry-into-service (EIS) date for engine/airframe combination. A set of four airplane classes (passenger and design range combinations) that were envisioned to span the needs for the 2005 EIS period were defined. The airframes for all classes were designed and sized using 2005 EIS advanced technology. Two airplanes were designed and sized for each class: one using current technology (1995) engines to provide a baseline, and one using advanced technology (2005) engines. The resulting engine/airframe combinations were compared and evaluated on the basis on sensitivity to basic engine performance parameters (e.g. SFC and engine weight) as well as DOC+I. The advanced technology engines provided significant reductions in fuel burn, weight, and wing area. Average values were as follows: reduction in fuel burn = 18%, reduction in wing area = 7%, and reduction in TOGW = 9%. Average DOC+I reduction was 3.5% using the pricing model based on payload-range index and 5% using the pricing model based on airframe weight. Noise and emissions were not considered.

  12. On the take-off of heavily loaded airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breguet, Louis

    1928-01-01

    This report examines the take-off conditions of airplanes equipped with tractive propellers, and particularly the more difficult take-off of airplanes heavily loaded per unit of wing area (wing loading) or per unit of engine power (power loading).

  13. 78 FR 61220 - Airworthiness Directives; Dassault Aviation Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ...) Subject Air Transport Association (ATA) of America Code 27, Flight Controls. (e) Reason This AD was..., International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, WA 98057-3356... necessary. This proposed AD would require revising the airplane flight manual (AFM) to include procedures...

  14. Variable-Structure Control of a Model Glider Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Anderson, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    A variable-structure control system designed to enable a fuselage-heavy airplane to recover from spin has been demonstrated in a hand-launched, instrumented model glider airplane. Variable-structure control is a high-speed switching feedback control technique that has been developed for control of nonlinear dynamic systems.

  15. 78 FR 7647 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... trunnions will lead to a disconnect of the horizontal stabilizer and subsequent loss of the aeroplane...-2B19 (Regional Jet Series 100 & 440) airplanes. This AD was prompted by a report that the safe life... stabilizer and subsequent loss of controllability of the airplane. DATES: This AD becomes effective March...

  16. 78 FR 25905 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... airplane is operated long enough without any intervention. The FAA's WFD final rule (75 FR 69746, November... fly an airplane beyond its LOV, unless an extended LOV is approved. The WFD rule (75 FR 69746... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and (4)...

  17. 78 FR 21854 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation... Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice... certain The Boeing Company Model 747-400 and -400F series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by...

  18. 14 CFR 91.805 - Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. 91... § 91.805 Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in §§ 91.809 and 91.811, on and after January 1, 1985, no person may operate to or from an airport in the United States any subsonic...

  19. Prospect of atomic airplane and mini-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    History of R and D of atomic airplane was reviewed. inclusive of problem and actuality, principle and attaching. Prospect of R and D of atomic airplane in China is described extensively. Some suggestions to the government and establishments were made as well. (authors)

  20. 78 FR 42727 - Airworthiness Directives; the Boeing Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... transport category airplanes related to the wiring for the passenger cabin in-flight entertainment (IFE... cabin of various transport category airplanes, related to the wiring for the passenger cabin in-flight... systems and other non-essential electrical systems through a switch in the flight compartment in the...

  1. 14 CFR 121.177 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.177 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a reciprocating engine powered airplane may takeoff that airplane unless it...

  2. 14 CFR 121.185 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing limitations: Destination airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.185 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing limitations... reciprocating engine powered airplane may take off that airplane, unless its weight on arrival, allowing...

  3. 14 CFR 121.195 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.195 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane...

  4. 14 CFR 121.197 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.197 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate... turbine engine powered airplane unless (based on the assumptions in § 121.195 (b)) that airplane at...

  5. 14 CFR 135.389 - Large nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large nontransport category airplanes... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.389 Large nontransport category airplanes: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a large nontransport category airplane...

  6. 14 CFR 91.219 - Altitude alerting system or device: Turbojet-powered civil airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...: Turbojet-powered civil airplanes. 91.219 Section 91.219 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... system or device: Turbojet-powered civil airplanes. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, no person may operate a turbojet-powered U.S.-registered civil airplane unless that airplane...

  7. 14 CFR 91.863 - Transfers of Stage 2 airplanes with base level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transfers of Stage 2 airplanes with base... Noise Limits § 91.863 Transfers of Stage 2 airplanes with base level. (a) Stage 2 airplanes may be... the corresponding number of Stage 2 airplanes. (b) No portion of a U.S. operator's base...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for all phases of operation. The airplane must...

  9. Simulation of Dynamics of a Flexible Miniature Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszak, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    A short report discusses selected aspects of the development of the University of Florida micro-aerial vehicle (UFMAV) basically, a miniature airplane that has a flexible wing and is representative of a new class of airplanes that would operate autonomously or under remote control and be used for surveillance and/or scientific observation. The flexibility of the wing is to be optimized such that passive deformation of the wing in the presence of aerodynamic disturbances would reduce the overall response of the airplane to disturbances, thereby rendering the airplane more stable as an observation platform. The aspect of the development emphasized in the report is that of computational simulation of dynamics of the UFMAV in flight, for the purpose of generating mathematical models for use in designing control systems for the airplane. The simulations are performed by use of data from a wind-tunnel test of the airplane in combination with commercial software, in which are codified a standard set of equations of motion of an airplane, and a set of mathematical routines to compute trim conditions and extract linear state space models.

  10. Fuzzy Logic Decoupled Lateral Control for General Aviation Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerksen, Noel

    1997-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that a human pilot uses the same set of generic skills to control a wide variety of aircraft. If this is true, then it should be possible to construct an electronic controller which embodies this generic skill set such that it can successfully control different airplanes without being matched to a specific airplane. In an attempt to create such a system, a fuzzy logic controller was devised to control aileron or roll spoiler position. This controller was used to control bank angle for both a piston powered single engine aileron equipped airplane simulation and a business jet simulation which used spoilers for primary roll control. Overspeed, stall and overbank protection were incorporated in the form of expert systems supervisors and weighted fuzzy rules. It was found that by using the artificial intelligence techniques of fuzzy logic and expert systems, a generic lateral controller could be successfully used on two general aviation aircraft types that have very different characteristics. These controllers worked for both airplanes over their entire flight envelopes. The controllers for both airplanes were identical except for airplane specific limits (maximum allowable airspeed, throttle ]ever travel, etc.). This research validated the fact that the same fuzzy logic based controller can control two very different general aviation airplanes. It also developed the basic controller architecture and specific control parameters required for such a general controller.

  11. Fuzzy Logic Decoupled Longitudinal Control for General Aviation Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerksen, Noel

    1996-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that a human pilot uses the same set of generic skills to control a wide variety of aircraft. If this is true, then it should be possible to construct an electronic controller which embodies this generic skill set such that it can successfully control difference airplanes without being matched to a specific airplane. In an attempt to create such a system, a fuzzy logic controller was devised to control throttle position and another to control elevator position. These two controllers were used to control flight path angle and airspeed for both a piston powered single engine airplane simulation and a business jet simulation. Overspeed protection and stall protection were incorporated in the form of expert systems supervisors. It was found that by using the artificial intelligence techniques of fuzzy logic and expert systems, a generic longitudinal controller could be successfully used on two general aviation aircraft types that have very difference characteristics. These controllers worked for both airplanes over their entire flight envelopes including configuration changes. The controllers for both airplanes were identical except for airplane specific limits (maximum allowable airspeed, throttle lever travel, etc.). The controllers also handled configuration changes without mode switching or knowledge of the current configuration. This research validated the fact that the same fuzzy logic based controller can control two very different general aviation airplanes. It also developed the basic controller architecture and specific control parameters required for such a general controller.

  12. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design(RAPID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert E.; Bloor, Malcolm I. G.; Wilson, Michael J.; Thomas, Almuttil M.

    2004-01-01

    An efficient methodology is presented for defining a class of airplane configurations. Inclusive in this definition are surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, vertical tail, horizontal tail, and canard components. The wing, tail, and canard components are manifested by solving a fourth-order partial differential equation subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design variables are incorporated into the boundary conditions, and the solution is expressed as a Fourier series. The fuselage has circular cross section, and the radius is an algebraic function of four design parameters and an independent computational variable. Volume grids are obtained through an application of the Control Point Form method. Grid sensitivity is obtained by applying the automatic differentiation precompiler ADIFOR to software for the grid generation. The computed surface grids, volume grids, and sensitivity derivatives are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation and configuration optimizations.

  13. A numerical study of airplanes flying in proximity

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, David B.

    1993-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited During an emergency such as an unsafe landing gear indication, a second aircraft is often used to perform an airborne visual inspection of the landing gear. The chase airplane may be quite dissimilar in size and wing loading and consequently experience unexpected aerodynamic forces and moments caused by the other airplane. A numerical study of the inherent danger involved with the aerodynamic interaction of aircraft flying in proximity...

  14. Mathematical model of induced flow on the airplane vertical tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotaru, Constantin; Cîrciu, Ionicǎ; Edu, Raluca Ioana

    2016-06-01

    In this paper is presented a mathematical model of the flow around the vertical tail of an airplane, based on the general elements of the aerodynamic design, with details leading to the separate formulation of the Fourier coefficients in the series solution of the Prandtl's lifting-line equation. Numerical results are obtained in Maple soft environment, for a standard configuration of an airplane geometry. The results include the discussion of the vortex model for the sidewash gradient on the vertical stabilizer.

  15. Simple Electromagnetic Modeling of Small Airplanes: Neural Network Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tobola

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the development of simple electromagnetic models of small airplanes, which can contain composite materials in their construction. Electromagnetic waves can penetrate through the surface of the aircraft due to the specific electromagnetic properties of the composite materials, which can increase the intensity of fields inside the airplane and can negatively influence the functionality of the sensitive avionics. The airplane is simulated by two parallel dielectric layers (the left-hand side wall and the right-hand side wall of the airplane. The layers are put into a rectangular metallic waveguide terminated by the absorber in order to simulate the illumination of the airplane by the external wave (both of the harmonic nature and pulse one. Thanks to the simplicity of the model, the parametric analysis can be performed, and the results can be used in order to train an artificial neural network. The trained networks excel in further reduction of CPU-time demands of an airplane modeling.

  16. Measured Engine Installation Effects of Four Civil Transport Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senzig, David A.; Fleming, Gregg G.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    2001-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration's Integrated Noise Model (INM) is one of the primary tools for land use planning around airports. The INM currently calculates airplane noise lateral attenuation using the methods contained in the Society of Automotive Engineer's Aerospace Information Report No. 1751 (SAE AIR 1751). Researchers have noted that improved lateral attenuation algorithms may improve airplane noise prediction. The authors of SAE AIR 1751 based existing methods on empirical data collected from flight tests using 1960s-technology airplanes with tail-mounted engines. To determine whether the SAE AIR 1751 methods are applicable for predicting the engine installation component of lateral attenuation for airplanes with wing-mounted engines, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsored a series of flight tests during September 2000 at their Wallops Flight Facility. Four airplanes, a Boeing 767-400, a Douglas DC-9, a Dassault Falcon 2000, and a Beech KingAir, were flown through a 20 microphone array. The airplanes were flown through the array at various power settings, flap settings, and altitudes to simulate take-off and arrival configurations. This paper presents the preliminary findings of this study.

  17. Revolution in airplane construction? Grob G110: The first modern fiber glass composition airplane shortly before its maiden flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorpinghaus, R.

    1982-01-01

    A single engine two passenger airplane, constructed completely from fiber reinforced plastic materials is introduced. The cockpit, controls, wing profile, and landing gear are discussed. Development of the airframe is also presented.

  18. 76 FR 25229 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Aerospace LP (GALP) Model G250 Airplane, Dynamic Test Requirements...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ..., Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service, 1601 Lind Avenue, SW., Renton, Washington... contact surface of this structure be covered with at least two inches of energy-absorbing protective.... Yanamura, Acting Manager, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. BILLING CODE...

  19. 75 FR 65052 - Consensus Standards, Standard Practice for Maintenance of Airplane Electrical Wiring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Standard Practice for Maintenance of Airplane... Practice for Maintenance of Airplane Electrical Wiring Systems (Standard Practice) as an acceptable means... FAA finds the standards to be acceptable methods and procedures for maintenance of electrical...

  20. 14 CFR 121.179 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: All engines operating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.179 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: All engines operating. (a) No person operating a reciprocating engine powered airplane may take off...

  1. 14 CFR 135.375 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing limitations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. 135.375 Section 135.375 Aeronautics and... Limitations § 135.375 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing limitations... reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off that airplane, unless its weight...

  2. 14 CFR 135.371 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: One...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. 135.371 Section 135.371 Aeronautics... Limitations § 135.371 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations... reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off that airplane at a weight,...

  3. 14 CFR 121.175 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Weight limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.175 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Weight limitations. (a) No person may take off a reciprocating engine powered airplane from an airport located at...

  4. 75 FR 29962 - Special Conditions: Cirrus Design Corporation Model SF50 Airplane; Function and Reliability Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... Airplane; Function and Reliability Testing AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... January 15, 1951, and deleted the service test requirements in Section 3.19 for airplanes of 6,000 pounds... service test requirement was removed for airplanes ] of 6,000 pounds maximum weight or less...

  5. 14 CFR 91.605 - Transport category civil airplane weight limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transport category civil airplane weight... Equipment and Operating Requirements for Large and Transport Category Aircraft § 91.605 Transport category civil airplane weight limitations. (a) No person may take off any transport category airplane...

  6. 14 CFR Appendix M to Part 121 - Airplane Flight Recorder Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane Flight Recorder Specifications M... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. M Appendix M to Part 121—Airplane... airplanes operated under § 121.344(f) 0.5° A sampling rate of 0.25 is recommended. 7. Roll attitude 2...

  7. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 121 - Airplane Flight Recorder Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane Flight Recorder Specification B... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. B Appendix B to Part 121—Airplane... airplanes that can demonstrate the capability of deriving either the control input on control movement...

  8. 14 CFR 125.175 - Protection of other airplane components against fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protection of other airplane components... CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD... Requirements § 125.175 Protection of other airplane components against fire. (a) Except as provided...

  9. 14 CFR 121.409 - Training courses using airplane simulators and other training devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training courses using airplane simulators... Program § 121.409 Training courses using airplane simulators and other training devices. (a) Training courses utilizing airplane simulators and other training devices may be included in the certificate...

  10. 14 CFR 135.397 - Small transport category airplane performance operating limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Small transport category airplane... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.397 Small transport category airplane performance operating limitations. (a) No person may operate a reciprocating...

  11. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 125 - Airplane Flight Recorder Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane Flight Recorder Specification D... AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD... Appendix D to Part 125—Airplane Flight Recorder Specification Parameters Range Accuracy sensor input...

  12. 14 CFR 121.407 - Training program: Approval of airplane simulators and other training devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Approval of airplane... Program § 121.407 Training program: Approval of airplane simulators and other training devices. (a) Each airplane simulator and other training device that is used in a training course permitted under §...

  13. 14 CFR 135.399 - Small nontransport category airplane performance operating limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Small nontransport category airplane... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.399 Small nontransport category airplane performance operating limitations. (a) No person may operate a reciprocating engine...

  14. 14 CFR 121.412 - Qualifications: Flight instructors (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator). 121.412 Section 121.412 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... OPERATIONS Training Program § 121.412 Qualifications: Flight instructors (airplane) and flight instructors (simulator). (a) For the purposes of this section and § 121.414: (1) A flight instructor (airplane) is...

  15. 14 CFR 121.277 - Protection of other airplane components against fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protection of other airplane components....277 Protection of other airplane components against fire. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, all airplane surfaces aft of the nacelles in the area of one nacelle diameter on...

  16. 14 CFR Appendix E to Part 125 - Airplane Flight Recorder Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane Flight Recorder Specifications E... AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD... Appendix E to Part 125—Airplane Flight Recorder Specifications The recorded values must meet the...

  17. 14 CFR 121.1105 - Aging airplane inspections and records reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aging airplane inspections and records... Improvements § 121.1105 Aging airplane inspections and records reviews. (a) Applicability. This section applies to all airplanes operated by a certificate holder under this part, except for those...

  18. 14 CFR 121.411 - Qualifications: Check airmen (airplane) and check airmen (simulator).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualifications: Check airmen (airplane) and... § 121.411 Qualifications: Check airmen (airplane) and check airmen (simulator). (a) For the purposes of this section and § 121.413: (1) A check airman (airplane) is a person who is qualified, and...

  19. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 135 - Airplane Flight Recorder Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane Flight Recorder Specification D.... D Appendix D to Part 135—Airplane Flight Recorder Specification Parameters Range Accuracy sensor.... 3 For airplanes that can demonstrate the capability of deriving either the control input on...

  20. 14 CFR 125.377 - Fuel supply: Turbine-engine-powered airplanes other than turbopropeller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel supply: Turbine-engine-powered... AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules § 125.377 Fuel supply: Turbine-engine-powered airplanes other than... takeoff a turbine-powered airplane (other than a turbopropeller-powered airplane) unless, considering...

  1. 14 CFR 121.193 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines inoperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.193 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two...). No person may operate a turbine engine powered airplane along an intended route unless he...

  2. 14 CFR 121.191 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.191 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that...

  3. 14 CFR 135.391 - Large nontransport category airplanes: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large nontransport category airplanes: En... AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.391 Large nontransport category airplanes: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) Except...

  4. 14 CFR 121.509 - Flight time limitations: Four pilot crews: airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...: airplanes. 121.509 Section 121.509 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Operations § 121.509 Flight time limitations: Four pilot crews: airplanes. (a) No certificate holder conducting supplemental operations may schedule a pilot— (1) For flight deck duty in an airplane that has...

  5. 14 CFR 121.189 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.189 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating...

  6. 14 CFR 36.1583 - Noncomplying agricultural and fire fighting airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... airplanes. 36.1583 Section 36.1583 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Limitations and Information § 36.1583 Noncomplying agricultural and fire fighting airplanes. (a) This section applies to propeller-driven, small airplanes that— (1) Are designed for “agricultural aircraft...

  7. 14 CFR 121.203 - Nontransport category airplanes: Landing limitations: Destination airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nontransport category airplanes: Landing...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.203 Nontransport category airplanes: Landing limitations:...

  8. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.379 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine...

  9. 14 CFR 121.201 - Nontransport category airplanes: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nontransport category airplanes: En route...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.201 Nontransport category airplanes: En route limitations: One...

  10. 14 CFR 125.375 - Fuel supply: Nonturbine and turbopropeller-powered airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...-powered airplanes. 125.375 Section 125.375 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE... AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules § 125.375 Fuel supply: Nonturbine and turbopropeller-powered airplanes....

  11. 14 CFR 91.819 - Civil supersonic airplanes that do not comply with part 36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes that do not... RULES Operating Noise Limits § 91.819 Civil supersonic airplanes that do not comply with part 36. (a) Applicability. This section applies to civil supersonic airplanes that have not been shown to comply with...

  12. 14 CFR 91.815 - Agricultural and fire fighting airplanes: Noise operating limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agricultural and fire fighting airplanes... RULES Operating Noise Limits § 91.815 Agricultural and fire fighting airplanes: Noise operating limitations. (a) This section applies to propeller-driven, small airplanes having standard...

  13. 14 CFR 121.198 - Cargo service airplanes: Increased zero fuel and landing weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cargo service airplanes: Increased zero... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.198 Cargo service airplanes: Increased zero fuel and landing...

  14. 14 CFR 23.574 - Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of commuter category airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... evaluation of commuter category airplanes. 23.574 Section 23.574 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Fatigue Evaluation § 23.574 Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of commuter category airplanes. For commuter category airplanes— (a) Metallic damage tolerance....

  15. 14 CFR 121.344a - Digital flight data recorders for 10-19 seat airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... seat airplanes. 121.344a Section 121.344a Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Equipment Requirements § 121.344a Digital flight data recorders for 10-19 seat airplanes. (a) Except as... airplane having a passenger seating configuration, excluding any required crewmember seat, of 10 to...

  16. 14 CFR 91.323 - Increased maximum certificated weights for certain airplanes operated in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Civil Air Regulations (14 CFR part 4a, 1964 ed.) if that airplane is operated in the State of Alaska by... certain airplanes operated in Alaska. 91.323 Section 91.323 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... certain airplanes operated in Alaska. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of the Federal...

  17. 14 CFR 121.505 - Flight time limitations: Two pilot crews: airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...: airplanes. 121.505 Section 121.505 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Operations § 121.505 Flight time limitations: Two pilot crews: airplanes. (a) If a certificate holder... relieve that pilot of all duty with it during that rest period. (b) No pilot of an airplane that has...

  18. 14 CFR 91.607 - Emergency exits for airplanes carrying passengers for hire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency exits for airplanes carrying... Emergency exits for airplanes carrying passengers for hire. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this chapter, no person may operate a large airplane (type certificated under the Civil Air...

  19. 14 CFR 121.643 - Fuel supply: Nonturbine and turbo-propeller-powered airplanes: Supplemental operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...-powered airplanes: Supplemental operations. 121.643 Section 121.643 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Flight Release Rules § 121.643 Fuel supply: Nonturbine and turbo-propeller-powered airplanes... flight or takeoff a nonturbine or turbo-propeller-powered airplane unless, considering the wind and...

  20. 14 CFR 121.507 - Flight time limitations: Three pilot crews: airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...: airplanes. 121.507 Section 121.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Operations § 121.507 Flight time limitations: Three pilot crews: airplanes. (a) No certificate holder conducting supplemental operations may schedule a pilot— (1) For flight deck duty in an airplane that has...

  1. 14 CFR 21.7 - Continued airworthiness and safety improvements for transport category airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... improvements for transport category airplanes. 21.7 Section 21.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... § 21.7 Continued airworthiness and safety improvements for transport category airplanes. (a) On or... subchapter. (b) For new transport category airplanes manufactured under the authority of the FAA, the...

  2. Solar Airplanes and Regenerative Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.

    2007-01-01

    A solar electric aircraft with the potential to "fly forever" has captured NASA's interest, and the concept for such an aircraft was pursued under Aeronautics Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Feasibility of this aircraft happens to depend on the successful development of solar power technologies critical to NASA's Exploration Initiatives; hence, there was widespread interest throughout NASA to bring these technologies to a flight demonstration. The most critical is an energy storage system to sustain mission power during night periods. For the solar airplane, whose flight capability is already limited by the diffuse nature of solar flux and subject to latitude and time of year constraints, the feasibility of long endurance flight depends on a storage density figure of merit better than 400-600 watt-hr per kilogram. This figure of merit is beyond the capability of present day storage technologies (other than nuclear) but may be achievable in the hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell (RFC). This potential has led NASA to undertake the practical development of a hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell, initially as solar energy storage for a high altitude UAV science platform but eventually to serve as the primary power source for NASAs lunar base and other planet surface installations. Potentially the highest storage capacity and lowest weight of any non-nuclear device, a flight-weight RFC aboard a solar-electric aircraft that is flown continuously through several successive day-night cycles will provide the most convincing demonstration that this technology's widespread potential has been realized. In 1998 NASA began development of a closed cycle hydrogen oxygen PEM RFC under the Aeronautics Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project and continued its development, originally for a solar electric airplane flight, through FY2005 under the Low Emissions Alternative Power (LEAP) project. Construction of

  3. Planetary Airplane Extraction System Development and Subscale Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teter, John E., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The Aerial Regional-scale Environmental Survey (ARES) project will employ an airplane as the science platform from which to collect science data in the previously inaccessible, thin atmosphere of Mars. In order for the airplane to arrive safely in the Martian atmosphere, a number of sequences must occur. A critical element in the entry sequence at Mars is an extraction maneuver to separate the airplane quickly (in less than a second) from its protective backshell to reduce the possibility of re-contact, potentially leading to mission failure. This paper describes the development, testing, and lessons learned from building a 1/3 scale model of this airplane extraction system. This design, based on the successful Mars Exploration Rover (MER) extraction mechanism, employs a series of trucks rolling along tracks located on the surface of the central parachute can. Numerous tests using high speed video were conducted at the Langley Research Center to validate this concept. One area of concern was that that although the airplane released cleanly, a pitching moment could be introduced. While targeted for a Mars mission, this concept will enable environmental surveys by aircraft in other planetary bodies with a sensible atmosphere such as Venus or Saturn's moon, Titan.

  4. Solar Airplane Concept Developed for Venus Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    An airplane is the ideal vehicle for gathering atmospheric data over a wide range of locations and altitudes, while having the freedom to maneuver to regions of scientific interest. Solar energy is available in abundance on Venus. Venus has an exoatmospheric solar flux of 2600 W/m2, compared with Earth's 1370 W/m2. The solar intensity is 20 to 50 percent of the exoatmospheric intensity at the bottom of the cloud layer, and it increases to nearly 95 percent of the exoatmospheric intensity at 65 km. At these altitudes, the temperature of the atmosphere is moderate, in the range of 0 to 100 degrees Celsius, depending on the altitude. A Venus exploration aircraft, sized to fit in a small aeroshell for a "Discovery" class scientific mission, has been designed and analyzed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. For an exploratory aircraft to remain continually illuminated by sunlight, it would have to be capable of sustained flight at or above the wind speed, about 95 m/sec at the cloud-top level. The analysis concluded that, at typical flight altitudes above the cloud layer (65 to 75 km above the surface), a small aircraft powered by solar energy could fly continuously in the atmosphere of Venus. At this altitude, the atmospheric pressure is similar to pressure at terrestrial flight altitudes.

  5. Response of equipment in nuclear power plants to airplane crash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plants in Germany are to be designed against airplane crash. Two problems arise: first, the local problem of penetration as well as local destruction of the building and secondly the airplane induced vibrations of the whole building which cause loadings for secondary systems (equipment). This paper deals especially with the second problem. Floor response spectra due to airplane crash are presented for two different power plant buildings. The influence of various parameters (time history of excitation, direction and location of impact, mathematical model, soil, damping, etc.) are discussed. A comparison with the results of earthquake loading is given. Suggestions are made for developing suitable floor design spectra and using them to analyse multidegree-of-freedom systems. However, the paper gives only a partial answer to the questions arising because of some important restrictions which had to be made. Studies concerning these restrictions are still being conducted and will be presented in a separate paper. (Auth.)

  6. Flight test results for several light, canard-configured airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Philip W.

    1987-01-01

    Brief flight evaluations of two different, light, composite constructed, canard and winglet configured airplanes were performed to assess their handling qualities; one airplane was a single engine, pusher design and the other a twin engine, push-pull configuration. An emphasis was placed on the slow speed/high angle of attack region for both airplanes and on the engine-out regime for the twin. Mission suitability assessment included cockpit and control layout, ground and airborne handling qualities, and turbulence response. Very limited performance data was taken. Stall/spin tests and the effects of laminar flow loss on performance and handling qualities were assessed on an extended range, single engine pusher design.

  7. Estimation of fatigue damage of airplane landing gear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ke-ge; YAN Chu-liang; ZHANG Shu-ming

    2006-01-01

    Taking the main landing gears of fighter and transport airplanes as examples,the fatigue life was estimated by means of the Miner's rule and from the spectrum of the real measurements.The computed results show that the landing damage to the fighter and transport airplanes is 75% and 60% of the total damage,and the damage caused by the landing stroke is 40% of the landing-gear damage.The fatigue damage properties can provide important information for reliable designing and the structural optimization.

  8. Advances in Thrust-Based Emergency Control of an Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, Gray; Burken, John J.; Burcham, Bill

    2003-01-01

    Engineers at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center have received a patent on an emergency flight-control method implemented by a propulsion-controlled aircraft (PCA) system. Utilizing the preexisting auto-throttle and engine-pressure-ratio trim controls of the airplane, the PCA system provides pitch and roll control for landing an airplane safely without using aerodynamic control surfaces that have ceased to function because of a primary-flight-control-system failure. The installation of the PCA does not entail any changes in pre-existing engine hardware or software. [Aspects of the method and system at previous stages of development were reported in Thrust-Control System for Emergency Control of an Airplane (DRC-96-07), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 3 (March 2001), page 68 and Emergency Landing Using Thrust Control and Shift of Weight (DRC-96-55), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 5 (May 2002), page 58.]. Aircraft flight-control systems are designed with extensive redundancy to ensure low probabilities of failure. During recent years, however, several airplanes have exhibited major flight-control-system failures, leaving engine thrust as the last mode of flight control. In some of these emergency situations, engine thrusts were successfully modulated by the pilots to maintain flight paths or pitch angles, but in other situations, lateral control was also needed. In the majority of such control-system failures, crashes resulted and over 1,200 people died. The challenge lay in creating a means of sufficient degree of thrust-modulation control to safely fly and land a stricken airplane. A thrust-modulation control system designed for this purpose was flight-tested in a PCA an MD-11 airplane. The results of the flight test showed that without any operational control surfaces, a pilot can land a crippled airplane (U.S. Patent 5,330,131). The installation of the original PCA system entailed modifications not only of the flight-control computer (FCC) of the airplane but

  9. The span as a fundamental factor in airplane design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, G

    1928-01-01

    Previous theoretical investigations of steady curvilinear flight did not afford a suitable criterion of "maneuverability," which is very important for judging combat, sport and stunt-flying airplanes. The idea of rolling ability, i.e., of the speed of rotation of the airplane about its X axis in rectilinear flight at constant speed and for a constant, suddenly produced deflection of the ailerons, is introduced and tested under simplified assumptions for the air-force distribution over the span. This leads to the following conclusions: the effect of the moment of inertia about the X axis is negligibly small, since the speed of rotation very quickly reaches a uniform value.

  10. Solar-Powered Airplane with Cameras and WLAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Robert G.; Dunagan, Steve E.; Sullivan, Don; Slye, Robert; Brass, James; Leung, Joe G.; Gallmeyer, Bruce; Aoyagi, Michio; Wei, Mei Y.; Herwitz, Stanley R.; Johnson, Lee; Arvesen, John C.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental airborne remote sensing system includes a remotely controlled, lightweight, solar-powered airplane (see figure) that carries two digital-output electronic cameras and communicates with a nearby ground control and monitoring station via a wireless local-area network (WLAN). The speed of the airplane -- typically <50 km/h -- is low enough to enable loitering over farm fields, disaster scenes, or other areas of interest to collect high-resolution digital imagery that could be delivered to end users (e.g., farm managers or disaster-relief coordinators) in nearly real time.

  11. The frequency content of the control input and airplane response obtained during service operations of fighter airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, John P; Hamer, Harold A

    1957-01-01

    The frequency content of the control input and resulting airplane motions is presented as power spectral densities for one operational flight of the fighter airplane (Republic F-84G). The frequency content, which is described by the shape of the spectrum, may be useful in providing inputs for the design of power control systems. For normal load factors, the results presented for the operational flight considered are in general agreement with the results of more complete data on three fighter airplanes (Republic F-84G, Republic F-84F, and North American F-86A) . The frequency content for the three control positions was similar and the frequency content for the three angular velocities was also similar when normalized by dividing the mean-square value.

  12. Commercial Pilot Airplane Written Test Guide. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    This guide is intended to help applicants prepare for the Commercial Airplane Pilot Written Test. The guide outlines the aeronautical knowledge requirements for a commercial pilot, informs the applicant of source material that can be used to acquire their knowledge, and includes test items and illustrations representative of those used in the…

  13. Private Pilot Airplane Written Test Guide. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    This guide is intended to assist persons preparing to take the written test for the private airplane pilot rating. Guidance is offered on what to expect on the FAA-administered test. Recommendations for study material are presented. Samples of test forms are included and 119 pages of sample questions are provided. (RE)

  14. 78 FR 12991 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... elevator surface, resulting in a significant pitch upset and possible loss of control of the airplane.... 12128 (66 FR 13227, March 5, 2001)). Inspection of elevator PCA 23 work-hours x $85 per 0 390 $1,955... actions if necessary, and repetitive lubrications of the rudder and elevator components. For...

  15. The airplane: A simulated commercial air transportation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauteuil, Mark; Geniesse, Pete; Hunniford, Michael; Lawler, Kathleen; Quirk, Elena; Tognarelli, Michael

    1993-01-01

    The 'Airplane' is a moderate-range, 70 passenger aircraft. It is designed to serve demands for flights up to 10,000 feet and it cruises at 32 ft/s. The major drivers for the design of the Airplane are economic competitiveness, takeoff performance, and weight minimization. The Airplane is propelled by a single Astro 15 electric motor and a Zinger 12-8 propeller. The wing section is a Spica airfoil which, because of its flat bottom, provides simplicity in manufacturing and thus helps to cut costs. The wing is constructed of a single load bearing mainspar and shape-holding ribs coated with Monokote skin, lending to a light weight structural makeup. The fuselage houses the motor, flight deck and passenger compartments as well as the fuel and control actuating systems. The wing will be attached to the top of the fuselage as will the fuel and control actuator systems for easy disassembly and maintenance. The aircraft is maneuvered about its pitch axis by means of an aft elevator on the flat plate horizontal tail. The twin vertical tail surfaces are also flat plates and each features a rudder for both directional and roll control. Along with wing dihedral, the rudders will be used to roll the aircraft. The Airplane is less costly to operate at its own maximum range and capacity as well as at its maximum range and the HB-40's maximum capacity than the HB-40.

  16. The Paper Airplane Challenge: A Market Economy Simulation. Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Kimberly

    This lesson plan features a classroom simulation that helps students understand the characteristics of a market economic system. The lesson plan states a purpose; cites student objectives; suggests a time duration; lists materials needed; and details a step-by-step teaching procedure. The "Paper Airplane Challenge" handout is attached. (BT)

  17. 78 FR 71989 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ... report that during the replacement of the No. 2 engine, an operator conducted a non-destructive test (NDT... result in separation of an engine under power from the airplane, and consequent loss of control of the... CFR 11.43 and 11.45, by any of the following methods: Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to...

  18. 78 FR 26720 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... certain airplanes. Since we issued that AD, an operator reported a crack found in a 6061 machined aluminum...-18-07, Amendment 39-15664 (73 FR 56960, October 1, 2008), for certain The Boeing Company Model 747... during an emergency evacuation. Actions Since Existing AD (73 FR 56960, October 1, 2008) Was Issued...

  19. 78 FR 8999 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034...-400 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of auxiliary power unit (APU) faults... the APU power feeder cables; replacing the clamps and installing grommets; and related...

  20. 78 FR 12256 - Airworthiness Directives; Embraer S.A. Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not... unit (APU) electronic starter controller (ESC) power cables and the airplane tail cone firewall. This... APU ESC power cables, installing ] new grommet support in the tail cone firewall, and...

  1. 78 FR 27310 - Airworthiness Directives; the Boeing Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... wiring; installation of new circuit breakers, relays, relay connectors, and wiring; and replacement of certain circuit breakers with higher-rated circuit breakers. For certain airplanes, that AD also requires... 20, 2008), requires installing new relay(s), circuit breakers (as applicable), and wiring to...

  2. 77 FR 65501 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ...-17-20, Amendment 39-12411 (66 FR 44954, August 27, 2001), for certain Model 707 airplanes, and Model... AD, Amendment 39-12411 (66 FR 44954, August 27, 2001) Was Issued Since we issued AD 2001-17-20, Amendment 39-12411 (66 FR 44954, August 27, 2001), we have determined through service experience that...

  3. 78 FR 14469 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... 2010-20-08, Amendment 39-16442 (75 FR 61337, October 5, 2010), for certain Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747... in depressurization of the airplane in flight. Actions Since Existing AD (75 FR 61337, October 5, 2010) Was Issued Since we issued AD 2010-20-08, Amendment 39-16442 (75 FR 61337, October 5, 2010),...

  4. 78 FR 4047 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ... FR 18137). That NPRM proposed to require various repetitive inspections of the MDSCD latch pin... presents the comments received on the proposal (77 FR 18137, March 27, 2012) and the FAA's response to each... limit the applicability of the NPRM (77 FR 18137, March 27, 2012) to airplanes with a...

  5. 77 FR 26945 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... Southwest Airlines) and Southwest Airlines (SWA) requested that the NPRM (76 FR 22828, April 25, 2011) be... NPRM published in the Federal Register on April 25, 2011 (76 FR 22828). That NPRM proposed to require... (76 FR 22828, April 25, 2011) applies to all airplanes identified in paragraph (h) of this AD and...

  6. 78 FR 25377 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... changed the AD in this regard. Request for Change to Airplane Groups Southwest Airlines requested a change... the Federal Register on March 16, 2012 (77 FR 15638). The original NPRM (74 FR 15683, April 7, 2009... in developing this AD. The following presents the comments received on the supplemental NPRM (77...

  7. Physical and situational inequality on airplanes predicts air rage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCelles, Katherine A; Norton, Michael I

    2016-05-17

    We posit that the modern airplane is a social microcosm of class-based society, and that the increasing incidence of "air rage" can be understood through the lens of inequality. Research on inequality typically examines the effects of relatively fixed, macrostructural forms of inequality, such as socioeconomic status; we examine how temporary exposure to both physical and situational inequality, induced by the design of environments, can foster antisocial behavior. We use a complete set of all onboard air rage incidents over several years from a large, international airline to test our predictions. Physical inequality on airplanes-that is, the presence of a first class cabin-is associated with more frequent air rage incidents in economy class. Situational inequality-boarding from the front (requiring walking through the first class cabin) versus the middle of the plane-also significantly increases the odds of air rage in both economy and first class. We show that physical design that highlights inequality can trigger antisocial behavior on airplanes. More broadly, these results point to the importance of considering the design of environments-from airplanes to office layouts to stadium seating-in understanding both the form and emergence of antisocial behavior. PMID:27140642

  8. 78 FR 78701 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... ground fault interrupter (GFI) feature, installing ground studs and a bonding jumper, doing certain..., replacing fuel pump power control relays with new relays having a ground fault interrupter (GFI) feature... AD 2011-12-09. (i) Ground Fault Interrupt (GFI) Relay Position Change For airplanes in Groups 5, 6,...

  9. 77 FR 45515 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will...-30 airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of fatigue cracks found in Stringer 11 at the outboard flap, inboard drive hinge at Station Xrs=164.000. This proposed AD would require...

  10. 77 FR 16151 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... property and life from wild fires without providing a meaningful improvement in airplane operational safety... (76 FR 34014). That NPRM proposed to correct an unsafe condition for the specified products. The MCAI.... recommended that all flight limitations contained in the NPRM (76 FR 34014, June 10, 2011) be changed...

  11. 78 FR 9346 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will... airplanes, modifications to the escape slide/rafts and escape slides. We are proposing this AD to prevent a latch hook moving from closed to open in an escape slide/raft or escape slide, which could result in...

  12. 78 FR 47233 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... inspections of the radome assembly of various Model 737 series airplanes that had in-flight entertainment...). This proposed AD was prompted by reports of cracks found during inspections of the in-flight... charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing...

  13. Boeing Satellite Television Airplane Receiving System (STARS) performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertatschitsch, Edward J.; Fitzsimmons, George W.

    1995-01-01

    Boeing Defense and Space Group is developing a Satellite Television Airplane Receiving System (STARS) capable of delivering Direct Broadcast Satellite (DBS) television to an aircraft in-flight. This enables a new service for commercial airplanes that will make use of existing and future DBS systems. The home entertainment satellites, along with STARS, provide a new mobile satellite communication application. This paper will provide a brief background of the antenna issues associated with STARS for commercial airplanes and then describe the innovative Boeing phased-array solution to these problems. The paper then provides a link budget of the STARS using the Hughes DBS as an example, but the system will work with all of the proposed DBS satellites in the 12.2-12.7 GHz band. It concludes with operational performance calculations of the STARS system, supported by measured test data of an operational 16-element subarray. Although this system is being developed for commercial airplanes, it is well suited for a wide variety of mobile military and other commercial communications systems in air, on land and at sea. The applications include sending high quality video for the digital battlefield and large volumes of data on the information superhighway at rates in excess of 350 Mbps.

  14. 76 FR 67346 - Airworthiness Directives; Cessna Aircraft Company Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... equipped with a lithium-ion battery as the main aircraft battery. We are issuing this AD to correct the... 525C airplane equipped with a lithium-ion battery, Cessna P/N 9914788-1, as the main aircraft battery... through 0052, that: (1) Have a lithium-ion battery, Cessna part number (P/N) 9914788-1, installed......

  15. Blended Buffet-Load-Alleviation System for Fighter Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    The capability of modern fighter airplanes to sustain flight at high angles of attack and/or moderate angles of sideslip often results in immersion of part of such an airplane in unsteady, separated, vortical flow emanating from its forebody or wings. The flows from these surfaces become turbulent and separated during flight under these conditions. These flows contain significant levels of energy over a frequency band coincident with that of low-order structural vibration modes of wings, fins, and control surfaces. The unsteady pressures applied to these lifting surfaces as a result of the turbulent flows are commonly denoted buffet loads, and the resulting vibrations of the affected structures are known as buffeting. Prolonged exposure to buffet loads has resulted in fatigue of structures on several airplanes. Damage to airplanes caused by buffeting has led to redesigns of airplane structures and increased support costs for the United States Air Force and Navy as well as the armed forces of other countries. Time spent inspecting, repairing, and replacing structures adversely affects availability of aircraft for missions. A blend of rudder-control and piezoelectric- actuator engineering concepts was selected as a basis for the design of a vertical-tail buffet-load-alleviation system for the F/A-18 airplane. In this system, the rudder actuator is used to control the response of the first tail vibrational mode (bending at a frequency near 15 Hz), while directional patch piezoelectric actuators are used to control the second tail vibrational mode (tip torsion at a frequency near 45 Hz). This blend of two types of actuator utilizes the most effective features of each. An analytical model of the aeroservoelastic behavior of the airplane equipped with this system was validated by good agreement with measured results from a full-scale ground test, flight-test measurement of buffet response, and an in-flight commanded rudder frequency sweep. The overall performance of the

  16. 78 FR 63845 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplanes; Isolation or Airplane Electronic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ..., 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http://DocketsInfo.dot.gov/ . Docket: Background documents or... find and read the electronic form of all comments received into any FAA docket, including the name of... airplane models. This may allow the exploitation of network security vulnerabilities and increase...

  17. Investigation of control law reconfigurations to accommodate a control element failure on a commercial airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroff, A. J.; Hueschen, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of a pilot to reconfigure the control surfaces on an airplane after a failure, allowing the airplane to recover to a safe condition, becomes more difficult with increasing airplane complexity. Techniques are needed to stabilize and control the airplane immediately after a failure, allowing the pilot more time to make longer range decisions. This paper presents a baseline design of a discrete multivariable control law using four controls for the longitudinal channel of a B-737. Non-reconfigured and reconfigured control laws are then evaluated, both analytically and by means of a digital airplane simulation, for three individual control element failures (stabilizer, elevator, spoilers). The simulation results are used to evaluate the effectiveness of the control reconfiguration on tracking ability during the approach and landing phase of flight with severe windshear and turbulence disturbing the airplane dynamics.

  18. 14 CFR Appendix F to Part 135 - Airplane Flight Recorder Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane Flight Recorder Specification F.... F Appendix F to Part 135—Airplane Flight Recorder Specification The recorded values must meet the....125 0.004g 6. Pitch Attitude ±75% ±2° 1 or 0.25 for airplanes operated under § 135.152(j) 0.5°...

  19. Simulation study of the oscillatory longitudinal motion of an airplane at the stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Hybrid simulation of the longitudinal motion of a straight-wing airplane at the stall was studied to investigate the effect of hysteresis in the development of lift and pitching moments on the wing as a function of angle of attack on the occurrence of longitudinal oscillations at the stall. Flight data for the simulated airplane and for various other airplanes are shown for the simulated airplane and for comparison. The results show that oscillations similar to those measured in flight may be obtained by incorporating hysteresis in the lift and pitching-moment curves.

  20. Physical interpretation of gray cloud observed from airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Rintaro; Iwabuchi, Hironobu

    2016-07-20

    When obliquely observed from an airplane, gray clouds near the horizon are sometimes observed to overlap with white clouds. Photographic observation from an airplane and simulations using a three-dimensional radiative transfer model are conducted to understand why such clouds appear gray. From observations, the brightness depression rate of gray clouds relative to surrounding whitish clouds is about 25%, whereas in simulations, it is as high as about 30%. Conditions necessary for the observation of gray clouds are as follows: (1) two clouds at different altitudes do not overlap, but the higher cloud overlaps with the lower cloud along the line of sight when these clouds are observed in near-horizontal direction, and (2) the higher cloud is optically thin in the vertical direction, but optically thick along the line of sight. PMID:27463934

  1. Development of Outboard Nacelle for the XB-36 Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuber, Robert J.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation of two 1/14 scale model configurations of an outboard nacelle for the XB-36 airplane was made in the Langley two-dimensional low-turbulence tunnels over a range of airplane lift coefficients (C (sub L) = 0.409 to C(sub L) = 0.943) for three representative flow conditions. The purpose of the investigation was to develop a low-drag wing-nacelle pusher combination which incorporated an internal air-flow system. The present investigation has led to the development of a nacelle which had external drag coefficients of similar order of magnitude to those obtained previously from tests of an inboard nacelle configuration at the corresponding operating lift coefficients and from approximately one-third to one-half of those of conventional tractor designs having the same ratio of wing thickness to nacelle diameter.

  2. Obstacle detection using thermal imaging sensors for large passenger airplane

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Jie

    2012-01-01

    This thesis addresses the issue of ground collision in poor weather conditions. As bad weather is an adverse factor when airplanes are taxiing, an obstacle detection system based on thermal vision is proposed to enhance the awareness of pilots during taxiing in poor weather conditions. Two infrared cameras are employed to detect the objects and estimate the distance of the obstacle. The distance is computed by stereo vision technology. A warning will be given if the distance is less than the ...

  3. Headache associated with airplane travel: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Cherian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Airplane travel headache is rare and has recently been described as a new form of headache associated with a specific situation. Of the 1,208 patients with primary headaches attending a tertiary care neurology hospital, two (0.16% patients satisfied the criteria for headache related to airplane travel. Both the patients fulfilled the proposed diagnostic criteria for airplane travel headache. This unique headache had a mean duration of 24 minutes, localized to the medial supraorbital region described as having an intense jabbing or stabbing character that occurred exclusively and maximally during aircraft landing or take-off, following which pain intensity subsided . This rare headache felt on aircraft descent is probably due to the squeeze effect on the frontal sinus wall, when air trapped inside it contracts producing a negative pressure leading to mucosal edema, transudation and intense pain. Use of nasal decongestants either alone or in combination with naproxen sodium prior to ascent and descent abated the headache episodes. Awareness about this unique entity is essential to provide proper treatment and avoid patient suffering.

  4. Numerical simulation of RCS for carrier electronic warfare airplanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Kuizhi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the radar cross section (RCS of carrier electronic warfare airplanes. Under the typical naval operations section, the mathematical model of the radar wave’s pitch angle incidence range analysis is established. Based on the CATIA software, considering dynamic deflections of duck wing leading edge flaps, flaperons, horizontal tail, and rudder, as well as aircraft with air-to-air missile, anti-radiation missile, electronic jamming pod, and other weapons, the 3D models of carrier electronic warfare airplanes Model A and Model B with weapons were established. Based on the physical optics method and the equivalent electromagnetic flow method, by the use of the RCSAnsys software, the characteristics of carrier electronic warfare airplanes’ RCS under steady and dynamic flights were simulated under the UHF, X, and S radar bands. This paper researches the detection probability of aircraft by radars under the condition of electronic warfare, and completes the mathematical statistical analysis of the simulation results. The results show that: The Model A of carrier electronic warfare airplane is better than Model B on stealth performance and on discover probability by radar detection effectively.

  5. Flight comparison of the transonic agility of the F-111A airplane and the F-111 supercritical wing airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, E. L.; Sakamoto, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    A flight research program was conducted to investigate the improvements in maneuverability of an F-111A airplane equipped with a supercritical wing. In this configuration the aircraft is known as the F-111 TACT (transonic aircraft technology) airplane. The variable-wing-sweep feature permitted an evaluation of the supercritical wing in many configurations. The primary emphasis was placed on the transonic Mach number region, which is considered to be the principal air combat arena for fighter aircraft. An agility study was undertaken to assess the maneuverability of the F-111A aircraft with a supercritical wing at both design and off-design conditions. The evaluation included an assessment of aerodynamic and maneuver performance in conjunction with an evaluation of precision controllability during tailchase gunsight tracking tasks.

  6. 76 FR 63823 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Aerospace LP (GALP) Model G280 Airplane Pilot-Compartment View...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ...-SC for the GALP Model G280 airplane was published in the Federal Register on May 25, 2011 (76 FR... following novel or unusual design features: The GALP Model G280 airplane flight-deck design incorporates a... as the approach to land, where the airplane is at a higher-than-normal pitch attitude. In these...

  7. 77 FR 5990 - Special Conditions: Learjet Inc., Model LJ-200-1A10 Airplane, Pilot-Compartment View Through...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... Learjet Model LJ-200-1A10 airplane was published in the Federal Register on October 14, 2011 (76 FR 63851... novel or unusual design features: The Model LJ-200-1A10 airplane flight deck design incorporates a... approach to land, where the airplane is at a higher-than-normal pitch attitude. In these cases, areas...

  8. 78 FR 8961 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Hydrophobic Coatings in Lieu of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ...-550 airplanes was published in the Federal Register on November 9, 2012, (77 FR 67308). No comments...; Hydrophobic Coatings in Lieu of Windshield Wipers AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION...-550 airplane. This airplane will have a novel or unusual design feature(s) associated with...

  9. 78 FR 68985 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 777-200, -300, and -300ER Series Airplanes; Aircraft Electronic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ...These special conditions are issued for the Boeing Model 777- 200, -300, and -300ER series airplanes. These airplanes, as modified by the Boeing Company, will have novel or unusual design features associated with the architecture and connectivity of the passenger service computer network systems to the airplane critical systems and data networks. This onboard network system will be composed of......

  10. 76 FR 472 - Harmonization of Airworthiness Standards for Transport Category Airplanes-Landing Gear Retracting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Airworthiness Standards for Transport Category Airplanes--Landing Gear Retracting Mechanisms and Pilot... transport category airplanes on landing gear retracting mechanisms and the pilot compartment view. This... in a stalling maneuver, and would add an additional requirement to keep the landing gear and doors...

  11. 77 FR 1614 - Harmonization of Airworthiness Standards for Transport Category Airplanes-Landing Gear Retracting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... Register on January 5, 2011 (76 FR 472). The NPRM proposed to amend the standards for landing gear... Transport Category Airplanes--Landing Gear Retracting Mechanisms and Pilot Compartment View AGENCY: Federal... the airworthiness standards for transport category airplanes on landing gear retracting mechanisms...

  12. 14 CFR 135.367 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations. 135.367 Section 135.367 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL....367 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off...

  13. 14 CFR 135.365 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Weight limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...: Reciprocating engine powered: Weight limitations. 135.365 Section 135.365 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Weight limitations. (a) No person may take off a reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane from an airport located at an elevation...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047 Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine...

  15. 14 CFR 121.187 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airport. 121.187 Section 121.187 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.187 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing...

  16. 14 CFR 135.377 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports. 135.377 Section 135.377 Aeronautics and... Limitations § 135.377 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing...

  17. 76 FR 38062 - Airworthiness Directives; Gulfstream Aerospace LP Model Galaxy and Gulfstream 200 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... 12866; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Aerospace LP Model Galaxy and Gulfstream 200 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... LP Model Galaxy and Gulfstream 200 airplanes, certificated in any category, serial numbers...

  18. 14 CFR 121.641 - Fuel supply: Nonturbine and turbo-propeller-powered airplanes: Flag operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...-powered airplanes: Flag operations. 121.641 Section 121.641 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.641 Fuel supply: Nonturbine and turbo-propeller-powered airplanes:...

  19. 76 FR 27227 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A310 Series Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    ... further flight, repair in accordance with a method approved by either the Manager, International Branch... approved by either the Manager, International Branch, ANM-116, FAA, Transport Airplane Directorate, or..., International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA, has the authority to approve AMOCs for...

  20. 75 FR 6092 - Special Conditions: Model C-27J Airplane; Class E Cargo Compartment Lavatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ... Groves, FAA, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification... that each cargo compartment must meet one of the Class requirements of Sec. 25.857; and the flight.... Two types of shut-off systems meet this requirement: A manual system, with an airplane flight...

  1. 76 FR 42 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A310 Series Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... flight, repair in accordance with a method approved by either the Manager, International Branch, ANM-116...): The Manager, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA, has the authority to... ATTN: Dan Rodina, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane...

  2. 76 FR 50 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A310 Series Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... further flight, repair in accordance with a method approved by either the Manager, International Branch... Rodina, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA, 1601 Lind... method approved by either the Manager, International Branch, ANM-116, FAA, Transport Airplane...

  3. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 135 - Airplane Flight Recorder Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane Flight Recorder Specifications B Appendix B to Part 135 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION.... B Appendix B to Part 135—Airplane Flight Recorder Specifications Parameters Range Installed system...

  4. 14 CFR Appendix E to Part 91 - Airplane Flight Recorder Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane Flight Recorder Specifications E Appendix E to Part 91 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Appendix E to Part 91—Airplane Flight Recorder Specifications Parameters Range Installed system 1...

  5. 77 FR 60005 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Airplane and Engine Issues'' (77 FR 59243), in FR Doc. 2012-23709, that published on September 26, 2012... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public...

  6. 76 FR 17183 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane and Engine Issues-New Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    ... Transport Airplanes'' (70 FR 40166, July 12, 2005), and the industry's ability to provide the necessary... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane and Engine Issues--New Task AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of new...

  7. 75 FR 16902 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane and Engine Issue Area-New Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane and Engine Issue Area--New Task AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of new task... Transport Airplanes'' (70 FR 40166, July 12, 2005). The ARAC working group should provide information...

  8. 14 CFR 121.329 - Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine... Equipment Requirements § 121.329 Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine engine powered airplanes. (a... airplane with sustaining oxygen and dispensing equipment for use as set forth in this section: (1)...

  9. 14 CFR 121.517 - Flight time limitations: Other commercial flying: airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Other commercial flying: airplanes. 121.517 Section 121.517 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.517 Flight time limitations: Other commercial flying: airplanes....

  10. 14 CFR 121.513 - Flight time limitations: Overseas and international operations: airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Overseas and international operations: airplanes. 121.513 Section 121.513 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: airplanes. In place of the flight time limitations in §§ 121.503 through 121.511, a certificate...

  11. 14 CFR 121.515 - Flight time limitations: All airmen: airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: All airmen: airplanes. 121.515 Section 121.515 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Operations § 121.515 Flight time limitations: All airmen: airplanes. No airman may be aloft as a...

  12. 14 CFR 135.398 - Commuter category airplanes performance operating limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... all commuter category airplanes notwithstanding their stated applicability to turbine-engine-powered... used, the elevation of the airport, the effective runway gradient, and ambient temperature, and wind... person may take off an airplane type certificated in the commuter category at a weight greater than...

  13. The effect of airplane noise on the inhabitants of areas near Okecie Airport in Warsaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszarny, Z.; Maziarka, S.; Szata, W.

    1981-01-01

    The state of health and noise annoyance among persons living in areas near Okecie airport exposed to various intensities of noise was evaluated. Very high annoyance effects of airplane noise of intensities over 100 dB (A) were established. A connection between the airplane noise and certain ailments complained about by the inhabitants was demonstrated.

  14. 76 FR 41041 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Aerospace LP (GALP) Model G250 Airplane, Interaction of Systems...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... interaction of control systems and structures. The usual deterministic approach to defining the loads envelope... Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Gulfstream Aerospace LP (GALP) Model G250 Airplane, Interaction... special conditions are issued for the Gulfstream Aerospace LP (GALP) Model G250 airplane. This...

  15. 76 FR 13069 - Airworthiness Directives; BAE Systems (Operations) Limited Model ATP Airplanes; BAE Systems...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant... (Operations) Limited Model ATP Airplanes; BAE Systems (Operations) Limited Model HS 748 Airplanes AGENCY... specified products. The MCAI states: Early in the life of the ATP (circa 1989), a report was received that...

  16. 76 FR 12556 - Airworthiness Directives; Various Transport Category Airplanes Equipped With Chemical Oxygen...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Category Airplanes Equipped With Chemical Oxygen Generators Installed in a Lavatory AGENCY: Federal... affected airplanes identified above. This AD requires modifying the chemical oxygen generators in...

  17. Aviation Education Through Building an Airplane. Advisory Circular 20-86.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    A popular school project being undertaken around the country today is the amateur-built airplane. Many schools have already finished their first airplane and are working on their second. A list of some of these schools is provided. Interest in these programs has risen greatly among both students and teachers along with grades, attendance,…

  18. 76 FR 31800 - Airworthiness Directives; Viking Air Limited Model DHC-3 (Otter) Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska... Model DHC-3 (Otter) Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule... Model DHC-3 (Otter) airplanes equipped with a Honeywell TPE331-10 or -12JR turboprop engine...

  19. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells for electrical power generation on-board commercial airplanes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curgus, Dita Brigitte; Munoz-Ramos, Karina (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Pratt, Joseph William; Akhil, Abbas Ali (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Schenkman, Benjamin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-05-01

    Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they offer a performance advantage for the airplane as a whole. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic and electrical simulation, we found that while adding a fuel cell system using today's technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage is technically feasible, it will not likely give the airplane a performance benefit. However, when we re-did the analysis using DOE-target technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage, we found that the fuel cell system would provide a performance benefit to the airplane (i.e., it can save the airplane some fuel), depending on the way it is configured.

  20. Reconfigurable multivariable control law for commercial airplane using a direct digital output feedback design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroff, A. J.; Hueschen, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of a pilot to reconfigure the control surfaces on an airplane after a failure, allowing the airplane to recover to a safe condition for landing, becomes more difficult with increasing airplane complexity. Techniques are needed to stabilize and control the airplane immediately after a failure, allowing the pilot time to make longer range decisions. This paper shows a design of a discrete multivariable control law using four controls for the longitudinal channel of a B-737. Single control element failures are allowed in three of the four controls. The four controls design and failure cases are analyzed by means of a digital airplane simulation, with regard to tracking capability and ability to overcome severe windshear and turbulence during the aproach and landing phase of flight.

  1. Radiated Emissions from a Remote-Controlled Airplane-Measured in a Reverberation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Jay J.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Szatkowski, George N.; Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.; Mielnik, John J.; Hogge, Edward F.; Hill, Boyd L.; Strom, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    A full-vehicle, subscale all-electric model airplane was tested for radiated emissions, using a reverberation chamber. The mission of the NASA model airplane is to test in-flight airframe damage diagnosis and battery prognosis algorithms, and provide experimental data for other aviation safety research. Subscale model airplanes are economical experimental tools, but assembling their systems from hobbyist and low-cost components may lead to unforseen electromagnetic compatibility problems. This report provides a guide for accommodating the on-board radio systems, so that all model airplane systems may be operated during radiated emission testing. Radiated emission data are provided for on-board systems being operated separately and together, so that potential interferors can be isolated and mitigated. The report concludes with recommendations for EMI/EMC best practices for subscale model airplanes and airships used for research.

  2. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Joesph W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Klebanoff, Leonard E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Munoz-Ramos, Karina [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Akhil, Abbas A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Curgus, Dita B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schenkman, Benjamin L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they offer a performance advantage for the airplane as a whole. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic and electrical simulation, we found that while adding a fuel cell system using today’s technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage is technically feasible, it will not likely give the airplane a performance benefit. However, when we re-did the analysis using DOE-target technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage, we found that the fuel cell system would provide a performance benefit to the airplane (i.e., it can save the airplane some fuel), depending on the way it is configured.

  3. Performance of PWR buidings in case of airplane crush

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety standards for the French nuclear power plants are defined in RCC-G. For the risk estimation of airplan crush two type of planes are considered: Lear-Jet 23, and Cesna 210. For estimating the resistance to impact shock of the reactor building deformation criteria were established for concrete and steel reinforcement. A practical calculation method is recommended in RCC-G. Results contain data resulting from impact shock dependent on the military plane type and speed. Finite element method was applied as well as simplified method proposed by Comite Europeen du Breton

  4. STATIC TESTS OF UNCONVENTIONAL PROPULSION UNITS FOR ULTRALIGHT AIRPLANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Helmich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents static tests of a new unconventional propulsion unit for small aviation airplanes. Our laboratory stand – a fan drive demonstrator – enables us to compare various design options. We performed experiments to verify the propulsion functionality and a measurement procedure to determine the available thrust of the propulsion unit and its dependence on engine speed. The results used for subsequent optimization include the operating parameters of the propulsion unit, and the temperature and velocity fields in parts of the air duct.

  5. High energy gamma ray telescope using a cargo airplane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method to measure high energy gamma rays from astronomical objects is presented. In this method, we use commercial cargo airplanes to get the altitude near the air shower maximum. Gamma rays with the energy greater than 100 GeV can be detected by the lead-glass based detector. Directions of gamma rays are determined by those of the secondary electrons (positrons) in the showers. The angular resolution obtained by this method is considered to be better than 1 degree. The detector is sensitive to the gamma ray point sources. (author)

  6. Comparative Analysis of Interference Pathloss Coupling Patterns on B-737 VS. B757 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafri, Madiha; Ely, Jay; Vahala, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Portable wireless technology provides many benefits to modern day travelers. Over the years however, numerous reports have cited portable electronic devices (PEDs) as a possible cause of electromagnetic interference (EMI) to aircraft navigation and communication radio systems. PEDs may act as transmitters, both intentional and unintentional, and their signals may be detected by the various radio receiver antennas installed on the aircraft. Measurement of the radiated field coupling between passenger cabin locations and aircraft communication and navigation receivers, via their antennas is defined herein as interference path loss (IPL). IPL data is required for assessing the threat of PEDs to aircraft radios, and is very dependent upon airplane size, the interfering transmitter position within the airplane, and the location of the particular antenna for the aircraft system of concern. NASA Langley Research Center, Eagles Wings Inc., and United Airlines personnel performed extensive IPL measurements on several Boeing 737 airplanes. In the Spring of 2004, extensive IPL measurements were also taken on several Boeing 757 airplanes under a cooperative agreement between NASA Langley Research Center and Delta Airlines. The objective of this paper is to analyze IPL measurement data, to better understand the impact on coupling levels based on the different locations of the aircraft radio antennas on B-757 and B-737 airplanes, and to provide a basis for future fuzzy logic modeling of airplane IPL. This effort will build upon previous fuzzy modeling of IPL data for B-737 airplane data.

  7. Predicting Tail Buffet Loads of a Fighter Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Robert W.; Pototzky, Anthony S.

    2006-01-01

    Buffet loads on aft aerodynamic surfaces pose a recurring problem on most twin-tailed fighter airplanes: During maneuvers at high angles of attack, vortices emanating from various surfaces on the forward parts of such an airplane (engine inlets, wings, or other fuselage appendages) often burst, immersing the tails in their wakes. Although these vortices increase lift, the frequency contents of the burst vortices become so low as to cause the aft surfaces to vibrate destructively. Now, there exists a new analysis capability for predicting buffet loads during the earliest design phase of a fighter-aircraft program. In effect, buffet pressures are applied to mathematical models in the framework of a finite-element code, complete with aeroelastic properties and working knowledge of the spatiality of the buffet pressures for all flight conditions. The results of analysis performed by use of this capability illustrate those vibratory modes of a tail fin that are most likely to be affected by buffet loads. Hence, the results help in identifying the flight conditions during which to expect problems. Using this capability, an aircraft designer can make adjustments to the airframe and possibly the aerodynamics, leading to a more robust design.

  8. Bird flight and airplane flight. [instruments to measure air currents and flight characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnan, A.

    1980-01-01

    Research was based on a series of mechanical, electrical, and cinematographic instruments developed to measure various features of air current behavior as well as bird and airplane flight. Investigation of rising obstruction and thermal currents led to a theory of bird flight, especially of the gliding and soaring types. It was shown how a knowledge of bird flight can be applied to glider and ultimately motorized aircraft construction. The instruments and methods used in studying stress in airplanes and in comparing the lift to drag ratios of airplanes and birds are described.

  9. Flight Tests of a Ministick Controller in an F/A-18 Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliker, Patrick C.; Carter, John

    2003-01-01

    In March of 1999, five pilots performed flight tests to evaluate the handling qualities of an F/A-18 research airplane equipped with a small-displacement center stick (ministick) controller that had been developed for the JAS 39 Gripen airplane (a fighter/attack/ reconnaissance airplane used by the Swedish air force). For these tests, the ministick was installed in the aft cockpit (see figure) and production support flight control computers (PSFCCs) were used as interfaces between the controller hardware and the standard F/A-18 flight-control laws. The primary objective of the flight tests was to assess any changes in handling qualities of the F/A-18 airplane attributable to the mechanical characteristics of the ministick. The secondary objective was to demonstrate the capability of the PSFCCs to support flight-test experiments.

  10. System design overview of JAXA small supersonic experimental airplane (NEXST-1)

    OpenAIRE

    Takami, Hikaru; 高見 光

    2007-01-01

    The system of JAXA small supersonic experimental airplane (NEXST-1: National EXperimental Supersonic Transport-1) has been briefly explained. Some design problems that the designers have encountered have also been briefly explained.

  11. “COANDA-1910” - the first jet propulsor for airplane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romulus PETCU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains the authors’ research regarding the first airplane equippedwith a jet propulsion system made by Henri Coanda in 1910, also being homage pays toHenri Coanda, his inventor.

  12. 78 FR 21700 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a public meeting of the FAA's Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee...

  13. 77 FR 59243 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a public meeting of the FAA's Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee...

  14. 78 FR 60995 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of rescheduled public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces the rescheduling of a public meeting of the FAA's...

  15. 76 FR 14115 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a public meeting of the FAA's Aviation Rulemaking Advisory...

  16. 78 FR 57672 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a public meeting of the FAA's Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee...

  17. 77 FR 24759 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a public meeting of the FAA's Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee...

  18. 75 FR 10551 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a public meeting of the FAA's Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee...

  19. 77 FR 40699 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Teleconference on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Teleconference on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public teleconference. SUMMARY: This notice announces a public teleconference of the FAA's Aviation Rulemaking...

  20. 75 FR 55393 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a public meeting of the FAA's Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee...

  1. 76 FR 60115 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a public meeting of the FAA's Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee...

  2. 75 FR 52807 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane and Engine Issues-New Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane and Engine Issues--New Task AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of new task assignment for the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC). SUMMARY: The FAA assigned the...

  3. 78 FR 15112 - Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane Performance and Handling Characteristics-New Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane Performance and Handling Characteristics--New Task AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of new task assignment for the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC). SUMMARY: The FAA...

  4. Effects of road traffic background noise on judgments of individual airplane noises. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    Two laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of road-traffic background noise on judgments of individual airplane flyover noises. In the first experiment, 27 subjects judged a set of 16 airplane flyover noises in the presence of traffic-noise sessions of 30-min duration consisting of the combinations of 3 traffic-noise types and 3 noise levels. In the second experiment, 24 subjects judged the same airplane flyover noises in the presence of traffic-noise sessions of 10-min duration consisting of the combinations of 2 traffic-noise types and 4 noise levels. In both experiments the airplane noises were judged less annoying in the presence of high traffic-noise levels than in the presence of low traffic-noise levels.

  5. Multistroke cloud-to-ground strike to the NASA F-106B airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Vladislav; Fisher, Bruce D.; Brown, Philip W.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of electromagnetic waveform records and video images of a multistroke cloud-to-ground (CG) strike to the NASA F-106B instrumented airplane is presented. The CG flash started as a lightning strike triggered by the airplane and later produced multiple return strokes to the ground (the ground strike network registered six return strokes). Although there are some uncertainties in data interpretation resulting from lack of independent measurements with other than the airborne instruments, recoil streamers and eight sequences of dart leaders followed by return strokes (two more than were indicated by the ground network) were identified in the airborne data. At least three of the subsequent return strokes were attached to the airplane. The analysis provides evidence that formation of recoil streamers and dart leaders is accompanied by a surge in continuous current. This feature is similar to that observed in the bidirectional leader development during lightning initiation on the airplane.

  6. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells for electrical power generation on-board commercial airplanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We examine proton exchange membrane fuel cells on-board commercial airplanes. ► We model the added fuel cell system’s effect on overall airplane performance. ► It is feasible to implement an on-board fuel cell system with current technology. ► Systems that maximize waste heat recovery are the best performing. ► Current PEM and H2 storage technology results in an airplane performance penalty. -- Abstract: Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they could offer a performance advantage for the airplane when using today’s off-the-shelf technology. We also examine the effects of the fuel cell system on airplane performance with (1) different electrical loads, (2) different locations on the airplane, and (3) expected advances in fuel cell and hydrogen storage technologies. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic simulation, we found that an additional fuel cell system on a commercial airplane is technically feasible using current technology. Although applied to a Boeing 787-type airplane, the method presented is applicable to other airframes as well. Recovery and on-board use of the heat and water that is generated by the fuel cell is an important method to increase the benefit of such a system. The best performance is achieved when the fuel cell is coupled to a load that utilizes the full output of the fuel cell for the entire flight. The effects of location are small and location may be better determined by other considerations such as safety and modularity. Although the PEM fuel cell generates power more efficiently than the gas turbine generators currently used, when considering the effect of the fuel cell system on the airplane’s overall performance we found that an overall

  7. Modeling the Aerodynamics and Performances of a Historic Airplane: the Spanish

    OpenAIRE

    A. González-Betes; R. Martínez-Val

    2003-01-01

    The process of modeling the aerodynamics and performances of a historic airplane is very similar to the conceptual and preliminary design phases of a new plane, with the advantage of knowing the configuration and that the airplane was airworthy; thus it is unnecessary to outline and assess many different alternatives. However, the drag polar, the real performances, stability features, etc, are still unknown. For various reasons (in particular because of two World Wars, or the Civil War in the...

  8. Traian Vuia – the Romanian inventor who first flew a powered airplane in 1906

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu FILIMON

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available As observed the beginning of heavier than air devices started with Wright Brothers who flew in 1903 the first catapulted airplane equipped with an engine, similar to present motor gliders. In March 1906 took place the first flight of Vuia’s monoplane using on board installations. Since then a real competition between manufacturers has started to improve their airplanes as they become more efficient. Traian Vuia’s first flights and his beginnings are explained below.

  9. Structural concepts and experimental considerations for a versatile high-speed research airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, L. R.; Kirkham, F. S.; Weidner, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Future aircraft may be hydrogen fueled and fly at hypersonic speeds. The resulting environments will require new structural concepts to satisfy performance goals. Large representative structures will have to be flight tested prior to commitment to a costly vehicle fleet. To perform flight tests, a versatile, economical, high-speed research airplane is defined. Results of this study including experimental considerations for a hypersonic research airplane are reported.

  10. Evolution of a Mars Airplane Concept for the ARES Mars Scout Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen C.; Guynn, Mark D.; Smith, Stephen C.; Parks, Robert W.; Gelhausen, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    ARES (Aerial Regional-scale Environmental Survey of Mars) is a proposed Mars Scout mission using an airplane to provide high-value science measurements in the areas of atmospheric chemistry, surface geology and mineralogy, and crustal magnetism. The use of an airplane for robotic exploration of Mars has been studied for over 25 years. There are, however, significant challenges associated with getting an airplane to Mars and flying through the thin, carbon dioxide Martian atmosphere. The traditional wisdom for aircraft design does not always apply for this type of vehicle and geometric, aerodynamic, and mission constraints result in a limited feasible design space. The ARES airplane design is the result of a concept exploration and evolution involving a number of trade studies, downselects, and design refinements. Industry, university, and NASA partners initially proposed a number of different concepts, drawing heavily on past Mars airplane design experience. Concept downselects were conducted with qualitative evaluation and high level analyses, focused on the most important parameters for the ARES mission. Following a successful high altitude test flight of the basic configuration, additional design refinement led to the current design. The resulting Mars airplane concept enables the high-value science objectives of the ARES mission to be accomplished while also fulfilling the desire for a simple, low-risk design.

  11. F-16XL Airplane Research Paint Scheme Aerials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA F-16XL research airplane is shown in flight over Eastern Shore of Virginia During the Cranked-Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project (CAWAP). The aircraft is shown in the research paint scheme utilized for on-surface flow visualization. During CAWAP, tufts, oil, and liquid crystals were used to document the flow patterns on the upper surfaces of the wings. The images were recorded by onboard video cameras and hand-held video and still cameras in a chase aircraft. The visual images are being correlated with on board measurements of surface pressures, boundary-layer velocity profiles, and skin friction. Ultimately, the in-flight data will be combined with wind-tunnel results and computational-fluid-dynamics solutions to document the aerodynamics of cranked-arrow wings. CAWAP is a cooperative venture of the Langley Research Center and the Dryden Flight Research Center.

  12. Identification of the stability parameters of an aeroelastic airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynaski, E. G.; Andrisani, D., II; Weingarten, N.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of the parameter identification of large scale dynamic systems involving a system matrix characterized by approximately 200 elements is addressed. By using phase variable transformations, a mathematical model of an aeroelastic airplane is described in a form that is amenable to partial or piecemeal acceptance of parameters estimated from flight data. A mathematical model of the U.S. Air Force Total In-Flight Simulator was computed using the FLEXSTAB digital computer program. As data became available during the progress of the flight test program, this data was processed and substituted in the mathematical model for parameters analytically obtained from the FLEXSTAB program. The results tend to show a progressive and orderly transition from an analytically defined mathematical model to one obtained from the flight tests of the actual aircraft.

  13. Response of equipment in nuclear power plants to airplane crash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question has been posed concerning the effect of airplane crash on the safety of the equipment (pipes, vessels, etc.) mounted on the floors and walls inside the outer structure. This equipment is set into vibration by the crash-induced shaking of the outer building; the resulting stresses may be quite appreciable. The following questions arise: a) how large are these stresses. Can they, for example, be larger than the stresses produced by earthquake loading. b) What are the significant response parameters. c) Which methods of analysis and design criteria are reasonable. To what extent is it possible to apply the techniques which have become generally accepted for earthquake loading. The paper presents a preliminary answer to these questions pending further work in this area. (orig./HP)

  14. Modelling and Simulation of Fuel Cell Dynamics for Electrical Energy Usage of Hercules Airplanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Radmanesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC with hydrogen storage system for generating part of Hercules airplanes electrical energy is presented. Feasibility of using fuel cell (FC for this airplane is evaluated by means of simulations. Temperature change and dual layer capacity effect are considered in all simulations. Using a three-level 3-phase inverter, FC’s output voltage is connected to the essential bus of the airplane. Moreover, it is possible to connect FC’s output voltage to airplane DC bus alternatively. PID controller is presented to control flow of hydrogen and oxygen to FC and improve transient and steady state responses of the output voltage to load disturbances. FC’s output voltage is regulated via an ultracapacitor. Simulations are carried out via MATLAB/SIMULINK and results show that the load tracking and output voltage regulation are acceptable. The proposed system utilizes an electrolyser to generate hydrogen and a tank for storage. Therefore, there is no need for batteries. Moreover, the generated oxygen could be used in other applications in airplane.

  15. Application of Monte Carlo Technique for Determining Maneuvering Loads from Statistical Information on Airplane Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Harold A.; Mayer, John P.; Huston, Wilber B.

    1961-01-01

    Results of a statistical analysis of horizontal-tail loads on a fighter airplane are presented. The data were obtained from a number of operational training missions with flight at altitudes up to about 50,000 feet and at Mach numbers up to 1.22. The analysis was performed to determine the feasibility of calculating horizontal-tail load from data on the flight conditions and airplane motions. In the analysis the calculated loads are compared with the measured loads for the different types of missions performed. The loads were calculated by two methods: a direct approach and a Monte Carlo technique. The procedures used and some of the problems associated with the data analysis are discussed. frequencies of occurrence of tail loads of given magnitudes are derived from statistical information on the flight quantities. In the direct method, a time history of tail load is calculated from time-history measurements of the flight quantities. The Monte Carlo method could be useful for extending loads information for design of prospective airplanes . For the Monte Carlo method, the The results indicate that the accuracy of loads, regardless of the method used for calculation, is largely dependent on the knowledge of the pertinent airplane aerodynamic characteristics and center-of-gravity location. In addition, reliable Monte Carlo results require an adequate sample of statistical data and a knowledge of the more important statistical dependencies between the various flight conditions and airplane motions.

  16. Aerodynamic Effects of a 24-foot Multisegmented Telescoping Nose Boom on an F-15B Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Smith, Mark S.; Frederick, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental multisegmented telescoping nose boom has been installed on an F-15B airplane to be tested in a flight environment. The experimental nose boom is representative of one that could be used to tailor the sonic boom signature of an airplane such as a supersonic business jet. The nose boom consists of multiple sections and could be extended during flight to a length of 24 ft. The preliminary analyses indicate that the addition of the experimental nose boom could adversely affect vehicle flight characteristics and air data systems. Before the boom was added, a series of flights was conducted to update the aerodynamic model and characterize the air data systems of the baseline airplane. The baseline results have been used in conjunction with estimates of the nose boom's influence to prepare for a series of research flights conducted with the nose boom installed. Data from these flights indicate that the presence of the experimental boom reduced the static pitch and yaw stability of the airplane. The boom also adversely affected the static-position error of the airplane but did not significantly affect angle-of-attack or angle-of-sideslip measurements. The research flight series has been successfully completed.

  17. Modeling the Aerodynamics and Performances of a Historic Airplane: the Spanish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. González-Betes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of modeling the aerodynamics and performances of a historic airplane is very similar to the conceptual and preliminary design phases of a new plane, with the advantage of knowing the configuration and that the airplane was airworthy; thus it is unnecessary to outline and assess many different alternatives. However, the drag polar, the real performances, stability features, etc, are still unknown. For various reasons (in particular because of two World Wars, or the Civil War in the Spanish case most details of many historical airplanes have been lost.In the present research work, the situation is as follows. In June 1933 the "Cuatro Vientos", a Spanish-built Bréguet XIX Super TR, flew non-stop from Seville to Cuba; a distance of 7500 km (about 4100 nautical miles in around 40 hours. A few days later, in a far less complicated stage between Havana and Mexico, the airplane was lost with its occupants to a storm in the Yucatan peninsula.The modeling considered in this paper starts by addressing the aerodynamic modifications introduced in the airplane for the extremely long flight. Then, with the help of old and present day aerodynamic data and methods the drag polar is estimated. The available engine data is completed and extrapolated to obtain information on power and fuel consumption. Finally, all this data is integrated to provide a reliable and technically sound reproduction of the Seville-Cuba flight.

  18. 78 FR 65235 - Special Conditions: Learjet Inc., Model LJ-200-1A10 Airplane; Crashworthiness, Emergency Landing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... Airplane; Crashworthiness, Emergency Landing Conditions AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http://DocketsInfo... landing condition regulations. For example, airplane emergency load factors in Sec. 25.561, General,...

  19. 78 FR 5146 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane, Dive Speed Definition With Speed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... Statement can be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477 19478), as well as...., Model EMB-550 Airplane, Dive Speed Definition With Speed Protection System AGENCY: Federal Aviation... category airplanes. These design features include a high-speed protection system. The...

  20. 75 FR 70090 - Special Conditions: Bombardier Inc. Model CL-600-2E25 Airplane, Operation Without Normal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... (APU)-generated electrical power. Service experience on other airplane models with similar electrical... engine generators or APU, is not extremely improbable. Thus, it must be demonstrated that the airplane... landing with inoperative normal engine- and APU-generated electrical power (for example,...

  1. 76 FR 482 - Airworthiness Directives; Fokker Services B.V. Model F.28 Mark 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Requirements'' (66 FR 23086, May 7, 2001). In addition to new airworthiness standards for transport airplanes... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or.... Model F.28 Mark 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),...

  2. 14 CFR 36.9 - Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category airplanes. 36.9 Section 36.9 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION General §...

  3. 75 FR 2433 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8/-8F Airplanes, Systems and Data Networks Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... Federal Register on October 2, 2009 (74 FR 50926). No comments were received. Applicability As discussed... Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8/-8F Airplanes, Systems and Data Networks Security--Protection of Airplane Systems and Data Networks From Unauthorized External Access...

  4. 78 FR 70848 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 777-200, -300, and -300ER Series Airplanes; Aircraft Electronic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... the EFB architecture and existing airplane network systems. The applicable airworthiness regulations... interface to existing aircraft systems. The proposed network architecture is used for a diverse set of... architecture and network configuration in the Boeing Model 777- 200, -300, and -300ER series airplanes...

  5. 14 CFR 121.333 - Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. 121.333 Section 121.333... for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. (a... passenger cabin occupants. (3) For first-aid treatment of occupants who for physiological reasons...

  6. Approximations for column effect in airplane wing spars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Edward P; Short, Mac

    1927-01-01

    The significance attaching to "column effect" in airplane wing spars has been increasingly realized with the passage of time, but exact computations of the corrections to bending moment curves resulting from the existence of end loads are frequently omitted because of the additional labor involved in an analysis by rigorously correct methods. The present report represents an attempt to provide for approximate column effect corrections that can be graphically or otherwise expressed so as to be applied with a minimum of labor. Curves are plotted giving approximate values of the correction factors for single and two bay trusses of varying proportions and with various relationships between axial and lateral loads. It is further shown from an analysis of those curves that rough but useful approximations can be obtained from Perry's formula for corrected bending moment, with the assumed distance between points of inflection arbitrarily modified in accordance with rules given in the report. The discussion of general rules of variation of bending stress with axial load is accompanied by a study of the best distribution of the points of support along a spar for various conditions of loading.

  7. A New Intelligent Airplane Landing Planning Method in Congested Airports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Dastgerdi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays considering many advantages of air traveling, we notice that traffic congestion has significantly increased in airspace of countries, and it is expected that this growth rate, increases even more in the forthcoming years.This growth rate and different limitations posed on developing some airports led to the problem of landing airplanes to become one of the most important issues formed in the field of aviation. In this paper, in the form of a new approach based on CPSO algorithm for intelligent landing planning, determining optimal landing times, optimal allocation of runways, and at last the order of successive landings of planes has been done in a way that appropriately fulfills the main goal of the problem (minimizing the total flights delays; thus helping significantly to controlling air traffic congestion in airports approaches. The simulation results show that compared to the last presented methods, including methods based on genetic algorithms, GLS and Bionomic, has decreased the total amounts of flight delays considerably. Getting zero for total amount of flight delays for the two problems with real data of DFW airport in Texas, United States, confirms the more capability of CPSO algorithm compared to the other intelligent methods for obtaining optimal solutions to the problem.

  8. A nonlinear 3D containment analysis for airplane impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Federal Republic of Germany, it is pertinent safety philosophy to design nuclear facilities against airplane impact, despite its very unlikely probability of occurrence. For safety reasons, the following conditions have to be met: 1) In the close impact area of the projectile, the structure can be stressed up to its ultimate load capacity, so that impact energy is dissipated partly. Hereby, it must be strictly clarified that local structural failure within the impact zone is avoided. 2) Residual impact energy is transferred to the 'non-disturbed' containment structure and to the interior structure. The subject of reinforced concrete structures under impact loads shows still clear gaps between the findings of experimental and analytical analyses. To clarify this highly nonlinear phenomena comprehensive tests have recently been performed in Germany. It is the aim of this paper to carry out a three-dimensional analysis of a nuclear facility. To perform the calculations, the finite element ADINA code is applied. In order to obtain optimum results, a very fine mesh leading to several thousand DOF is used. To model the impact area of the concrete structure realistically, its linear and mostly nonlinear material behaviour as well as its failure criteria must be taken into account. Herewith the structural response is reduced due to increased energy dissipation. This reduction rate is valued by variation of the assumed size of impact zone, the load impact location and the assumed load-time function. (orig./RW)

  9. Development of Inboard Nacelle for the XB-36 Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuber, Robert J.

    1947-01-01

    A series of investigations of several 1/14-scale models of an inboard nacelle for the XB-36 airplane was made in the Langley two-dimensional low-turbulence tunnels. The purpose of these investigations was to develop a low-drag wing-nacelle pusher combination which incorporated an internal air-flow system. As a result of these investigations, a nacelle was developed which had external drag coefficients considerably lower than the original basic form with the external nacelle drag approximately one-half to two-thirds of those of conventional tractor designs. The largest reductions in drag resulted from sealing the gaps between the wing flaps and nacelle, reducing the thickness of the nacelle training-edge lip, and bringing the under-wing air inlet to the wing leading edge. It was found that without the engine cooling fan adequate cooling air would be available for all conditions of flight except for cruise and climb at 40,000 feet. Sufficient oil cooling at an altitude of 40,000 feet may be obtained by the use of flap-type exit doors.

  10. Self-Propelled Pedestrian Dynamics Model: Application to Passenger Movement and Infection Propagation in Airplanes

    CERN Document Server

    Namilae, S; Mubayi, A; Scotch, M; Pahle, R

    2016-01-01

    Reducing the number of contacts between passengers on an airplane can potentially curb the spread of infectious diseases. In this paper, a social force based pedestrian movement model is formulated and applied to evaluate the movement and contacts among passengers during boarding and deplaning of an airplane. Within the social force modeling framework, we introduce location dependence on the self-propelling momentum of pedestrian particles. The model parameters are varied over a large design space and the results are compared with experimental observations to validate the model. This model is then used to assess the different approaches to minimize passenger contacts during boarding and deplaning of airplanes. We find that smaller aircrafts are effective in reducing the contacts between passengers. Column wise deplaning and random boarding are found to be two strategies that reduced the number of contacts during passenger movement, and can potentially lower the likelihood of infection spread.

  11. Trade Study of Multiple Thruster Options for the Mars Airplane Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Christopher A.; Gayle, Steven W.; Hunter, Craig A.; Kenney, Patrick S.; Scola, Salvatore; Paddock, David A.; Wright, Henry S.; Gasbarre, Joseph F.

    2009-01-01

    A trade study was performed at NASA Langley Research Center under the Planetary Airplane Risk Reduction (PARR) project (2004-2005) to examine the option of using multiple, smaller thrusters in place of a single large thruster on the Mars airplane concept with the goal to reduce overall cost, schedule, and technical risk. The 5-lbf (22N) thruster is a common reaction control thruster on many satellites. Thousands of these types of thrusters have been built and flown on numerous programs, including MILSTAR and Intelsat VI. This study has examined the use of three 22N thrusters for the Mars airplane propulsion system and compared the results to those of the baseline single thruster system.

  12. Research and application of ORACLE performance optimizing technologies for building airplane environment resource database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianjun; Sun, Jianyong; Cheng, Conggao

    2013-03-01

    Many problems exist in processing experimental aircraft vibration (temperature, humidity) data and generating the intermediate calculations during the construction of airplane environment resource database, such as the need to deal with both structural and non-structural data, weak capacity of the client browser for data processing and massive network data transferring etc. To solve the above problems, some strategies on tuning and optimization performance of database are employed base on Oracle11g, which include data storage structure tuning, the memory configuration of the server, the disk I/O tuning and SQL statement tuning. The experimental results show that the performance of airplane environment resource database is enhanced about 80% compared with the database developed in the initial demonstration and validation phase. The application of new optimization strategies to the database construction can lay a sound foundation for finishing building airplane environment resource database.

  13. A controls engineering approach for analyzing airplane input-output characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuckle, P. Douglas

    1991-01-01

    An engineering approach for analyzing airplane control and output characteristics is presented. State-space matrix equations describing the linear perturbation dynamics are transformed from physical coordinates into scaled coordinates. The scaling is accomplished by applying various transformations to the system to employ prior engineering knowledge of the airplane physics. Two different analysis techniques are then explained. Modal analysis techniques calculate the influence of each system input on each fundamental mode of motion and the distribution of each mode among the system outputs. The optimal steady state response technique computes the blending of steady state control inputs that optimize the steady state response of selected system outputs. Analysis of an example airplane model is presented to demonstrate the described engineering approach.

  14. A Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulator for Software Development for a Mars Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagowski, Stefan E.; Vican, Justin E.; Kenney, P. Sean

    2007-01-01

    Draper Laboratory recently developed a Hardware-In-The-Loop Simulator (HILSIM) to provide a simulation of the Aerial Regional-scale Environmental Survey (ARES) airplane executing a mission in the Martian environment. The HILSIM was used to support risk mitigation activities under the Planetary Airplane Risk Reduction (PARR) program. PARR supported NASA Langley Research Center's (LaRC) ARES proposal efforts for the Mars Scout 2011 opportunity. The HILSIM software was a successful integration of two simulation frameworks, Draper's CSIM and NASA LaRC's Langley Standard Real-Time Simulation in C++ (LaSRS++).

  15. Design study of technology requirements for high performance single-propeller-driven business airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlman, D. L.; Hammer, J.

    1985-01-01

    Developments in aerodyamic, structural and propulsion technologies which influence the potential for significant improvements in performance and fuel efficiency of general aviation business airplanes are discussed. The advancements include such technolgies as natural laminar flow, composite materials, and advanced intermittent combustion engines. The design goal for this parameter design study is a range of 1300 nm at 300 knots true airspeed with a payload of 1200lbs at 35,000 ft cruise altitude. The individual and synergistic effects of various advanced technologies on the optimization of this class of high performance, single engine, propeller driven business airplanes are identified.

  16. Organization for breakthrough. How skunkworks developed airplanes; Breakthrough no tameno kaihatsu soshiki. Rokkidosha skunkworks ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, K. [Civil Aircraft Engineering Service Co., Bellevue (United States)

    1998-07-05

    `Skunkworks` is stated to be a secret research institute or equipments for developing reformative products in the fields of aviation and aerospace. Skunkworks was established in 1943 by Lockheed Company to develop the first jet engine fighter. This team continued after that and successfully developed advanced airplanes. Skunkworks is now used as a pronoun of the development form of this kind. This paper introduces its organization, development form and results. Fourteen rules of Skunkworks are dealt with first. Then the developments of SR-71 supersonic reconnaissance planes and F-117 stealth fighters are described. Skunkworks has successfully developed advanced airplanes in a short time in secret. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Airplane Ice Detector Based on a Microwave Transmission Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Phong; Arndt, G. Dickey; Carl, James R.

    2004-01-01

    An electronic instrument that could detect the potentially dangerous buildup of ice on an airplane wing is undergoing development. The instrument is based on a microwave transmission line configured as a capacitance probe: at selected spots, the transmission-line conductors are partly exposed to allow any ice and/or liquid water present at those spots to act as predominantly capacitive electrical loads on the transmission line. These loads change the input impedance of the transmission line, as measured at a suitable excitation frequency. Thus, it should be possible to infer the presence of ice and/or liquid water from measurements of the input impedance and/or electrical parameters related to the input impedance. The sensory transmission line is of the microstrip type and thus thin enough to be placed on an airplane wing without unduly disturbing airflow in flight. The sensory spots are small areas from which the upper layer of the microstrip has been removed to allow any liquid water or ice on the surface to reach the transmission line. The sensory spots are spaced at nominal open-circuit points, which are at intervals of a half wavelength (in the transmission line, not in air) at the excitation frequency. The excitation frequency used in the experiments has been 1 GHz, for which a half wavelength in the transmission line is .4 in. (.10 cm). The figure depicts a laboratory prototype of the instrument. The impedance-related quantities chosen for use in this version of the instrument are the magnitude and phase of the scattering parameter S11 as manifested in the in-phase (I ) and quadrature (Q) outputs of the phase detector. By careful layout of the transmission line (including the half-wavelength sensor spacing), one can ensure that the amplitude and phase of the input to the phase detector keep shifting in the same direction as ice forms on one or more of the sensor areas. Although only one transmission-line sensor strip is used in the laboratory version, in a

  18. Electromagnetic compatibility and the all-electric airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, Al

    1995-01-01

    NASA is studying the feasibility of installing 'all-electric' controls in future commercial aircraft, replacing the current hydraulic and pneumatic systems. Planes utilizing such equipment should weigh less and be cheaper to maintain, but might also be susceptible to interference from undesired external electromagnetic fields. Possible sources of these extraneous signals include radio and television broadcasters, two-way communications stations, and radar installations of all kinds. One way to reduce the hazard would be to use fiber-optic cables to carry signals from the cockpit to the various points of use, a concept known as 'fly-by-light' or FBL. However, electrical circuits (PBW, or 'power-by-wire') would still be required at both ends of the cables to perform control functions, so the possibility of harmful interference would remain. Computer models for two different antennas were created in order to find the magnitude of the electric fields which would be generated in the airspace around them while in the transmit mode. The first antenna was a horizontal 'rhombic' used by the Voice of America (VOA) for long-distance short-wave broadcasting. The second antenna was a multi-element 'log-periodic dipole array' (LPDA) of a type often used for two-way radio communications. For each case, a specified amount of power was applied in the computer model, and the resulting electric field intensity was predicted at a variety of locations surrounding the antenna. This information will then be used to calculate the levels of interference which could occur inside an airplane flying in the vicinity of these radiation emitters.

  19. Scaling behavior of an airplane-boarding model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brics, Martins; Kaupužs, Jevgenijs; Mahnke, Reinhard

    2013-04-01

    An airplane-boarding model, introduced earlier by Frette and Hemmer [Phys. Rev. E 85, 011130 (2012)], is studied with the aim of determining precisely its asymptotic power-law scaling behavior for a large number of passengers N. Based on Monte Carlo simulation data for very large system sizes up to N=2(16)=65536, we have analyzed numerically the scaling behavior of the mean boarding time and other related quantities. In analogy with critical phenomena, we have used appropriate scaling Ansätze, which include the leading term as some power of N (e.g., [proportionality]N(α) for ), as well as power-law corrections to scaling. Our results clearly show that α=1/2 holds with a very high numerical accuracy (α=0.5001±0.0001). This value deviates essentially from α=/~0.69, obtained earlier by Frette and Hemmer from data within the range 2≤N≤16. Our results confirm the convergence of the effective exponent α(eff)(N) to 1/2 at large N as observed by Bernstein. Our analysis explains this effect. Namely, the effective exponent α(eff)(N) varies from values about 0.7 for small system sizes to the true asymptotic value 1/2 at N→∞ almost linearly in N(-1/3) for large N. This means that the variation is caused by corrections to scaling, the leading correction-to-scaling exponent being θ≈1/3. We have estimated also other exponents: ν=1/2 for the mean number of passengers taking seats simultaneously in one time step, β=1 for the second moment of t(b), and γ≈1/3 for its variance. PMID:23679383

  20. A Brief Study of the Speed Reduction of Overtaking Airplanes by Means of Air Brakes, Special Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, H. A.; Amderspm. R. F.

    1942-01-01

    As an aid to airplane designers interested in providing pursuit airplanes with decelerating devices intended to increase the firing time when overtaking another airplane, formulas are given relating the pertinent distances and speeds in horizontal flight to the drag increase required. Charts are given for a representative parasite-drag coefficient from which the drag increase, the time gained, and the closing distance may be found. The charts are made up for three values of the ratio of the final speed of the pursuing airplane to the speed of the pursued airplane and for several values of the ratio of the speed of the pursued airplane to the initial speed of the pursuing airplane. Charts are also given indicating the drag increases obtainable with double split flaps and with conventional propellers. The use of the charts is illustrated by an example in which it is indicated that either double split flaps or, under certain ideal conditions, reversible propellers should provide the speed reductions required.

  1. Analysis of VGH data from two types of four-engine airplanes in commercial cargo service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, F. M.

    1972-01-01

    Data are presented for derived gust velocities and for incremental normal accelerations due to gusts, maneuvers, and landing impacts. The data were obtained from NASA VGH recorders installed on three four-engine cargo airplanes operated by three airlines. Continental United States and trans-Pacific routes were covered.

  2. 14 CFR 135.369 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: All...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: All engines operating. 135.369 Section 135.369 Aeronautics... Limitations § 135.369 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: All engines operating. (a) No person operating a reciprocating engine powered large transport...

  3. 78 FR 68357 - Airworthiness Directives; Aermacchi S.p.A. Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ... and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska....260C, F.260D, F.260E, F.260F, S.208, and S.208A airplanes equipped with a Lycoming O-540 wide cylinder... governor (ref to Lycoming Service Instruction No. 1343B and Lycoming Service Letter L220C) are...

  4. 75 FR 50853 - Special Conditions: Cirrus Design Corporation Model SF50 Airplane; Function and Reliability Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ..., 2010, 75 FR 29962. No comments were received, and the special conditions are adopted as proposed... Airplane; Function and Reliability Testing AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION....'' Amendment 3-4 to CAR part 3 became effective January 15, 1951, and deleted the service test requirements...

  5. Teaching Lean Six Sigma within a Supply Chain Context: The Airplane Supply Chain Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Scott C.; Goldsby, Thomas J.; Bailey, Ana M.; Oh, Jae-Young

    2014-01-01

    Lean six sigma is a management methodology that firms can employ to achieve substantial improvement in supply chain performance. However, few pedagogical exercises facilitate students' use of a comprehensive set of lean six sigma principles within a supply chain context. We describe the Airplane Supply Chain Simulation that helps students…

  6. 78 FR 63848 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplanes; Sidestick Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... the comment for an association, business, labor union, etc.). DOT's complete Privacy Act Statement can be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http... airplane will use passive sidestick controllers for pitch and roll control instead of a...

  7. 76 FR 35324 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787 Series Airplanes; Seats With Inflatable Lapbelts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ... galley loading, passenger baggage, etc.); airplanes also operate where exposure to high intensity.... The inflatable material may not have an average burn rate of greater than 2.5 inches/minute when... materials are needed. The standard normally applied to fabrics is a 12-second vertical ignition...

  8. 76 FR 18964 - Airworthiness Directives; Costruzioni Aeronautiche Tecnam srl Model P2006T Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... 12866; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Aeronautiche Tecnam srl Model P2006T Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of...: Aviation Programs,'' describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority. We are issuing...

  9. 76 FR 48045 - Airworthiness Directives; Costruzioni Aeronautiche Tecnam srl Model P2006T Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic... Directives; Costruzioni Aeronautiche Tecnam srl Model P2006T Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation... authority of the FAA Administrator. ``Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs,'' describes in more detail the...

  10. 76 FR 31454 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Automatic Speed Protection for Design Dive Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... for Gulfstream GVI airplanes was published in the Federal Register on February 16, 2011 (76 FR 8917...; Automatic Speed Protection for Design Dive Speed AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... high speed protection system. These special conditions contain the additional safety standards that...

  11. 78 FR 70209 - Airworthiness Directives; XtremeAir GmbH Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ..., Aerospace Engineer, FAA, Small Airplane Directorate, 901 Locust, Room 301, Kansas City, Missouri 64106; telephone: (816) 329-4123; fax: (816) 329-4090; email: karl.schletzbaum@faa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION... mounts from a specific supplier may be affected. This condition, if not detected and corrected,...

  12. 78 FR 64894 - Airworthiness Directives; B-N Group Ltd. Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Taylor Martin, Aerospace Engineer, FAA, Small Airplane Directorate, 901 Locust, Room 301... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Comments Invited We invite you to send any written relevant data, views, or arguments... control of the aeroplane. To address this potential unsafe condition, Britten-Norman Aircraft have...

  13. Analysis of oscillatory motion of a light airplane at high values of lift coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterson, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A modified stepwise regression is applied to flight data from a light research air-plane operating at high angles at attack. The well-known phenomenon referred to as buckling or porpoising is analyzed and modeled using both power series and spline expansions of the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients associated with the longitudinal equations of motion.

  14. 78 FR 76772 - Special Conditions: Airbus Model A350-900 Airplanes; Permanently Installed Rechargeable Lithium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... reworded the CAR requirements. Increased use of nickel-cadmium batteries in small airplanes resulted in... to the electric-vehicle industry, have noted potential hazards with lithium-ion batteries and battery... availability of electrical power, when needed, from the batteries. The FAA proposes that the following...

  15. 78 FR 70892 - Airworthiness Directives; ATR-GIE Avions de Transport Régional Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... approved by the Manager, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA; or the... of a cockpit forward right-hand side blow out during flight. This proposed AD would require.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tom Rodriguez, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch,...

  16. 76 FR 27220 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A310 Series Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    ... flight, repair in accordance with a method approved by either the Manager, International Branch, ANM-116... Flight Standards District Office, as appropriate. If sending information directly to the International..., Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA, 1601 Lind Avenue,...

  17. Determination of stability and control parameters of a general aviation airplane from flight data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasy, I.

    1983-01-01

    Values for the stability and control parameters for a general aviation airplane were determined from flight data. Lateral and longitudinal transient maneuvers were analyzed by the equation error and output error methods. There was a good agreement between the parameters extracted from flight data and those predicted by wind tunnel.

  18. Brace for impact! A thesis on medical care following an airplane crash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.L.E. Postma

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis the events and management of a mass casualty incident (MCI) of an airplane crash are studied from a medical point of view. The incident is broken down into areas that are applicable to other MCIs. it is believed that the detailed study of an exceptional event can provide vital informa

  19. An example of applied colour vision research: the conspicuity of airplane colour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the combined knowledge on colorimetry, colour imaging (visualization) and colour perception in an aviation related research project. It involves the optimisation of the conspicuity of the colour scheme of an airplane, with the purpose of minimizing the changes

  20. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 60 - Qualification Performance Standards for Airplane Full Flight Simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... References. (1) 14 CFR part 60. (2) 14 CFR part 61. (3) 14 CFR part 63. (4) 14 CFR part 119. (5) 14 CFR part 121. (6) 14 CFR part 125. (7) 14 CFR part 135. (8) 14 CFR part 141. (9) 14 CFR part 142. (10) AC 120... Airplane Full Flight Simulators A Appendix A to Part 60 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL...

  1. A Conceptual Design and Analysis Method for Conventional and Unconventional Airplanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elmendorp, R.J.M.; Vos, R.; La Rocca, G.

    2014-01-01

    A design method is presented that has been implemented in a software program to investigate the merits of conventional and unconventional transport airplanes. Design and analysis methods are implemented in a design tool capable of creating a conceptual design based on a set of toplevel requirements.

  2. 78 FR 1765 - Requirements for Chemical Oxygen Generators Installed on Transport Category Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ..., Security Considerations for Lavatory Oxygen Systems (76 FR 12550, March 8, 2011), Docket No. FAA-2011-0186... Statement can be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as... Airplanes (77 FR 38000, June 26, 2012). Several years ago in an unrelated initiative, the FAA tasked...

  3. 75 FR 21528 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model MD-90-30 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), and 3. Will not have a significant economic... have the same design as those installed on Model MD-90-30 airplanes. Therefore, Model MD-90-30..., hangar lighting, flashlight, or ] droplight and may require removal or opening of access panels or...

  4. 75 FR 27857 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane and Engine Issue Area-New Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... Issue Area--New Task AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of new task... ARAC tasking notice published in the Federal Register on April 2, 2010 (75 FR 16902). The following is... Airworthiness Issues for Transport Airplanes'' (70 FR 40166, July 12, 2005). The ARAC working group...

  5. 76 FR 65105 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Model GIV-X Airplane; Isolation or Aircraft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http://DocketsInfo... function of the docket Web site, anyone can find and read the electronic form of all comments received into... airplane models. This may allow the exploitation of network security vulnerabilities and increased...

  6. 78 FR 65155 - Special Conditions: Learjet Model 45 Series Airplanes; Isolation or Security Protection of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http... the search function of the docket Web site, anyone can find and read the electronic form of all... airplane models. This may allow the exploitation of network security vulnerabilities and increased...

  7. 76 FR 67633 - Airworthiness Directives; Dassault Aviation Model Mystere-Falcon 50 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will... products listed above. This proposed AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI... the flap tracks could lead to flap asymmetry and loss of control of the airplane. The proposed...

  8. 78 FR 41684 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A. Model EMB-550 Airplanes, Sudden Engine Stoppage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-11

    ... airplane, was published in the Federal Register on September 25, 2012 (77 FR 58970). No comments were... auxiliary power unit (APU) installations, the APU mounts and adjacent supporting airframe structure must be... imposed by each of the following: (a) Sudden APU deceleration due to malfunction or structural...

  9. 76 FR 8314 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Operation Without Normal Electric Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... power unit (APU) generated electrical power inoperative. Service experience has shown that loss of all electrical power from the airplane's engine and APU driven generators is not extremely improbable. Thus... failure must be made. 4. Availability of APU operation should not be considered in establishing...

  10. 76 FR 14346 - Airworthiness Directives; Diamond Aircraft Industries GmbH Model DA 42 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... 12866; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Industries GmbH Model DA 42 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... been reportedly found on DA 42 Main Landing Gear (MLG) Damper-to-Trailing Arm joints during...

  11. Fear of Flying in Airplanes: Effects of Minimal Therapist Guided Stress Inoculation Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Jean C.; And Others

    Flight phobia is an area which has received little controlled investigation, even though between 10 and 20 percent of flight passengers report a fear of flying in airplanes. A study was conducted to examine the efectiveness of a minimal therapist guided form of stress inoculation training (SIT) for flight phobia. Flight phobic volunteers (N=28)…

  12. 76 FR 291 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Single-Occupant Side-Facing Seats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... Service, 1601 Lind Avenue, SW., Renton, Washington 98057-3356; telephone (425) 227-2676; facsimile (425... absorbing protective padding (foam or equivalent), such as Ensolite. 3. Thoracic Trauma: Thoracic trauma... Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. BILLING CODE 4910-13-P...

  13. 14 CFR 121.327 - Supplemental oxygen: Reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen: Reciprocating engine... Equipment Requirements § 121.327 Supplemental oxygen: Reciprocating engine powered airplanes. (a) General. Except where supplemental oxygen is provided in accordance with § 121.331, no person may operate...

  14. 77 FR 16486 - Airworthiness Directives; Fokker Services B.V. Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ..., Amendment 39-10310 (63 FR 6066, February 6, 1998); and FAA AD 2009-18-05, Amendment 39-16001 (74 FR 43625... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not... arcing and potentially an onboard fire, possibly resulting in damage to the airplane and injury...

  15. 75 FR 52255 - Airworthiness Directives; Air Tractor, Inc. Models AT-802 and AT-802A Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... (75 FR 35616, June 23, 2010), and by adding a new AD to read as follows: 2010-17-18 Air Tractor, Inc... FR 19994, April 19, 2006), the Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by..., AT-600, and AT- 800 series airplanes. In 2001, we issued AD 2001-10-04, Amendment 39-12230 (66...

  16. 75 FR 35616 - Airworthiness Directives; Air Tractor, Inc. Models AT-802 and AT-802A Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... airplane. DATES: This AD becomes effective on July 28, 2010. As of April 21, 2006 (71 FR 19994, April 19... (74 FR 39243). The NPRM proposed to supersede AD 2006-08-09 to clarify the SNs of the Models AT-802... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a...

  17. 76 FR 1979 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 757 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... eddy current inspections for cracking of the aluminum spring arm, and the corrective action is... -300 series airplanes. This AD requires an inspection of the two spring arms in the spin brake assemblies in the nose wheel well to determine if the spring arms are made of aluminum or composite...

  18. 14 CFR 121.519 - Flight time limitations: Deadhead transportation: airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Deadhead transportation: airplanes. 121.519 Section 121.519 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.519 Flight time limitations: Deadhead transportation:...

  19. 14 CFR 26.39 - Newly produced airplanes: Fuel tank flammability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) that meet the requirements of 14 CFR 25.981 in effect on December 26, 2008. (1) The fuel tank is... an Fleet Average Flammability Exposure of 7 percent must have an IMM that meets 14 CFR 25.981(d) in... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Newly produced airplanes: Fuel...

  20. Piercing of the containment shell of a reactor building in case of airplane crash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents a simple calculation model for a realistic check of the piercing safety of containments of reactor buildings in case of airplane crash. Its application is illustrated by a numerical example (Starfighter crash on the Unterweser nuclear power plant). (orig.)

  1. 77 FR 21395 - Airworthiness Directives; Fokker Services B.V. Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... 12866; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034...-085-AD; Amendment 39-17011; AD 2012-07-05] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Fokker Services B.V... Fokker Services B.V. Model F.27 Mark 050 airplanes. This proposed AD would require performing a...

  2. 75 FR 70854 - Harmonization of Various Airworthiness Standards for Transport Category Airplanes-Flight Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-19

    ... complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78) or you... Conditions. In the preamble to that rulemaking (72 FR 44665), the FAA stated that we needed more time and... preamble to Amendment 25- 72, Special Review: Transport Category Airplane Airworthiness Standards (55...

  3. 76 FR 74649 - Harmonization of Various Airworthiness Standards for Transport Category Airplanes-Flight Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... November 19, 2010 (75 FR 70854). The proposal discussed changes to part 25 in four areas: 1. Selection of... (55 FR 29756), July 20, 1990. The FAA considered them unnecessary since directional and lateral... Standards for Transport Category Airplanes--Flight Rules AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),...

  4. 78 FR 275 - Airworthiness Directives; REIMS Aviation S.A. Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    ... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Directives; REIMS Aviation S.A. Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a...

  5. 75 FR 50869 - Airworthiness Directives; Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Model PC-12/47E Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... Register on June 10, 2010 (75 FR 32863). That NPRM proposed to correct an unsafe condition for the... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and (3) Will not have a significant... Ltd. Model PC-12/47E Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department...

  6. 75 FR 12150 - Airworthiness Directives; PILATUS Aircraft Ltd. Model PC-7 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-15

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic... Ltd. Model PC-7 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation.... Relevant Service Information PILATUS Aircraft Ltd. has issued PILATUS PC-7 Service Bulletin No....

  7. 75 FR 32863 - Airworthiness Directives; PILATUS AIRCRAFT LTD. Model PC-12/47E Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or... Directives; PILATUS AIRCRAFT LTD. Model PC-12/47E Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... receive comments by July 26, 2010. Affected ADs (b) None. Applicability (c) This AD applies to...

  8. 75 FR 66655 - Airworthiness Directives; PILATUS Aircraft Ltd. Model PC-7 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... Register on August 26, 2010 (75 FR 52482). That NPRM proposed to correct an unsafe condition for the...'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and (3) Will not have a... Ltd. Model PC-7 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of...

  9. 75 FR 52482 - Airworthiness Directives; PILATUS Aircraft Ltd. Model PC-7 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... 12866; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Ltd. Model PC-7 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation... Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. has issued PC-7 Service Bulletin No. 57-015, Rev. No. 1, date July 23, 2010....

  10. 75 FR 20518 - Special Conditions: Cirrus Design Corporation Model SF50 Airplane; Full Authority Digital Engine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... design feature(s) associated with the use of an electronic engine control system instead of a traditional... design features: Electronic engine control system. Applicability As discussed above, these special... certification basis for Cirrus Design Corporation model SF50 airplanes. 1. Electronic Engine Control...

  11. 14 CFR 121.511 - Flight time limitations: Flight engineers: airplanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Flight engineers... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.511 Flight time limitations: Flight engineers: airplanes. (a) In any operation in which...

  12. 76 FR 72855 - Airworthiness Directives; Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER) Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Empresa Brasileira... all Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER) Model ERJ 190 airplanes. This proposed AD...

  13. 77 FR 36224 - Airworthiness Directives; Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER) Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ... 12866; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Empresa Brasileira... all Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER) Model EMB-135 airplanes, and Model...

  14. 77 FR 16155 - Airworthiness Directives; Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER) Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska; and...-035-AD; Amendment 39-16980; AD 2012-05-08] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Empresa Brasileira... directive (AD) for all Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER) Model ERJ 170 airplanes. This...

  15. Brace for impact! A thesis on medical care following an airplane crash

    OpenAIRE

    Goslings, J.C.; Bloemers, F.W.; Bijlsma, T.S.; Heetveld, M.J.; Postma, I.L.E.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis the events and management of a mass casualty incident (MCI) of an airplane crash are studied from a medical point of view. The incident is broken down into areas that are applicable to other MCIs. it is believed that the detailed study of an exceptional event can provide vital information for many other kinds of exceptional events.

  16. 76 FR 36864 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Operation Without Normal Electric Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-23

    ... published in the Federal Register on February 14, 2011 (76 FR 8314). Only one comment was received, which... normal sources of engine and auxiliary power unit (APU) generated electrical power inoperative. Service experience has shown that loss of all electrical power from the airplane's engine and APU driven...

  17. 76 FR 81360 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Aerospace LP (GALP) Model G280 Airplane, Operation Without Normal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... 27, 2011 (76 FR 66660). No comments were received, and the special conditions are adopted as proposed... generation and distribution architecture is equipped with an auxiliary power unit (APU) and is not equipped... power, which is generated by the airplane's engine generators or APU is not extremely improbable....

  18. 78 FR 65153 - Special Conditions: Learjet Model 45 Series Airplanes; Aircraft Electronic System Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... Privacy Act Statement can be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478... systems architecture composed of several connected networks. The proposed architecture and network... access to or by systems external to the airplane. Discussion The architecture and network...

  19. 76 FR 5503 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 777-200 Series Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ..., and wiring to allow the flightcrew to turn off electrical power to the in-flight entertainment (IFE... category airplanes, we conducted a comprehensive in-flight entertainment (IFE) systems review. Earlier.... Unsafe Condition (e) This AD results from an in-flight entertainment (IFE) systems review. We...

  20. 76 FR 5505 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 777-200 Series Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ..., and wiring to allow the flightcrew to turn off electrical power to the in-flight entertainment (IFE... various models of transport category airplanes, we conducted a comprehensive in-flight entertainment (IFE... in-flight entertainment (IFE) systems review. We are issuing this AD to ensure that the flightcrew...

  1. 75 FR 38945 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 777-200 and -300 Series Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... AD results from an in-flight entertainment (IFE) systems review. We are proposing this AD to ensure... category airplanes, we conducted a comprehensive in-flight entertainment (IFE) systems review. Earlier...: Communications. Unsafe Condition (e) This AD results from an in-flight entertainment (IFE) systems review. We...

  2. 76 FR 12617 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 777-200 and -300 Series Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    .... This proposed AD results from an in-flight entertainment (IFE) systems review. We are proposing this AD... various models of transport category airplanes, we conducted a comprehensive in-flight entertainment (IFE... AD results from an in-flight entertainment (IFE) systems review. We are issuing this AD to...

  3. Estimation of cosmic ray dose in airplanes with pocket dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of dose control of aircrew, many dose measurements have been conducted in airplanes. In IRPA9, we have reported data mainly based on a Na(Tl) scintillation spectrometer. In the present study, however, analyses were done on data of pocket dosimeters (Silicon detectors: Aloka PDM-101 for ionizing components and PDM-303 for neutrons). As the pocket dosimeters are compact and easy to handle, their uses are certainly advantageous to collect numbers of data with small efforts. However, we need to apply proper conversion as indicated values are not real doses. Currently we have suggested that 2.7 times the indicated value of PDM-101 would approximate the total dose (=ionizing components + neutrons), and about 40% of ionizing components' dose would reflect neutron dose in case 'quality factor Q' before ICRP Publication 60 is used. These conversion factors are based on our simultaneous in-flight measurements with various types of detectors. This paper presents numerical data which provide bases of such conversion. Comparisons are also made between measurements and calculations using computer codes CARI-2/4 to check the reliability of the conversion. Furthermore, special attention was paid to neutron dose in airflights. As neutron dose measurements are scarce, accumulation of data is required first. To meet this, uses of pocket dosimeters are preferable. However, as a neutron detector counts incident protons as well as knocked-on protons induced by incident neutrons, the neutron dose will be overestimated unless contribution of incident protons is rightly removed. In this situation, simultaneous in-flight measurements with PDM-303 and PDM-101 have been conducted in many international and domestic flights covering Japan, China, USA, Brazil and European countries. A linear relationship was obtained between indicated values of PDM-303 and the neutron doses calculated following the aforementioned hypotheses, i.e., neutron dose=2.7x(indicated dose of PDM-101)/1.4x

  4. 76 FR 63851 - Special Conditions: Learjet Inc., Model LJ-200-1A10 Airplane, Pilot-Compartment View Through...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ... the following novel or unusual design features: The Model LJ-200-1A10 airplane flight deck design... pitch attitude. In these cases, areas of airflow disturbance or separation on the windshield could...

  5. Parametric study of variation in cargo-airplane performance related to progression from current to spanloader designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    A parametric analysis was made to investigate the relationship between current cargo airplanes and possible future designs that may differ greatly in both size and configuration. The method makes use of empirical scaling laws developed from statistical studies of data from current and advanced airplanes and, in addition, accounts for payload density, effects of span distributed load, and variations in tail area ratio. The method is believed to be particularly useful for exploratory studies of design and technology options for large airplanes. The analysis predicts somewhat more favorable variations of the ratios of payload to gross weight and block fuel to payload as the airplane size is increased than has been generally understood from interpretations of the cube-square law. In terms of these same ratios, large all wing (spanloader) designs show an advantage over wing-fuselage designs.

  6. Comparison of theoretical predicted longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics with full-scale wind tunnel data on the ATLIT airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandam, C. P. G.; Griswold, M.; Roskam, J.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical method is presented for predicting the lift coefficient, the pitching moment coefficient, and the drag coefficient of light, twin-engine, propeller-driven airplanes. The method was applied to the Advanced Technology Light Twin-Engine airplane. The calculated characteristics were then correlated against full scale wind tunnel data. The analytical method was found to predict the drag and pitching moment fairly well. However, the lift prediction was extremely poor.

  7. Rotation-and-scale-invariant airplane detection in high-resolution satellite images based on deep-Hough-forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yongtao; Guan, Haiyan; Zai, Dawei; Ji, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes a rotation-and-scale-invariant method for detecting airplanes from high-resolution satellite images. To improve feature representation capability, a multi-layer feature generation model is created to produce high-order feature representations for local image patches through deep learning techniques. To effectively estimate airplane centroids, a Hough forest model is trained to learn mappings from high-order patch features to the probabilities of an airplane being present at specific locations. To handle airplanes with varying orientations, patch orientation is defined and integrated into the Hough forest to augment Hough voting. The scale invariance is achieved by using a set of scale factors embedded in the Hough forest. Quantitative evaluations on the images collected from Google Earth service show that the proposed method achieves a completeness, correctness, quality, and F1-measure of 0.968, 0.972, 0.942, and 0.970, respectively, in detecting airplanes with arbitrary orientations and sizes. Comparative studies also demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the other three existing methods in accurately and completely detecting airplanes in high-resolution remotely sensed images.

  8. A flight evaluation of a vectored thrust jet V/STOL airplane during simulated instrument approaches using the Kestrel (XV-6A) airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, S. A.; Person, L. H., Jr.; Shanks, R. E.; Culpepper, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    An in-flight investigation was made to determine the terminal-area operating problems of a vectored-thrust-jet vertical and short take-off landing (V/STOL) airplane under simulated instrument conditions. Handling-qualities data pertinent to the terminal-area approach and landing task are presented in the text, and additional documentation is included in the appendixes. Problems dealing with the cruise letdown to localizer capture, conversion to powered-lift flight, precise control of the glide slope, approach velocity or deceleration schedule, hover, and landing are discussed.

  9. Predicted performance benefits of an adaptive digital engine control system of an F-15 airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Myers, L. P.; Ray, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) program will demonstrate and evaluate the improvements in performance and mission effectiveness that result from integrating engine-airframe control systems. Currently this is accomplished on the NASA Ames Research Center's F-15 airplane. The two control modes used to implement the systems are an integrated flightpath management mode and in integrated adaptive engine control system (ADECS) mode. The ADECS mode is a highly integrated mode in which the airplane flight conditions, the resulting inlet distortion, and the available engine stall margin are continually computed. The excess stall margin is traded for thrust. The predicted increase in engine performance due to the ADECS mode is presented in this report.

  10. The development of coastal diffusion observation method with a model airplane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tethered ballon system has been developed in order to take aerial photograph of dye-cloud in times of coastal diffusion experiment. The system has some weakpoints; it can not be used both under strong wind and under on-shore blowing wind. To cover these wind conditions, another method of aerial photography is developed making use of model airplane. Radio controlled airplane on the market is reconstructed to mount 35 mm camera, the shutter of which is handled through the channel ordinarily used to control wheel logs. The procedure of the new system in case of diffusion experiment is similar to that of the tethered balloon system. Observations with this system has been carried out from winter to summer this year. Some results of them are described. (author)

  11. Studies on aerodynamic interferences between the components of transport airplane using unstructured Navier-Stokes simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that the aerodynamic interference flows widely exist between the components of conventional transport airplane, for example, the wing-fuselage juncture flow, wing-pylon-nacelle flow and tail-fuselage juncture flow. The main characteristic of these aerodynamic interferences is flow separation, which will increase the drag, reduce the lift and cause adverse influence on the stability and controllability of the airplane. Therefore, the modern civil transport designers should do their best to eliminate negative effects of aerodynamic interferences, which demands that the aerodynamic interferences between the aircraft components should be predicted and analyzed accurately. Today's CFD techniques provide us powerful and efficient analysis tools to achieve this objective. In this paper, computational investigations of the interferences between transport aircraft components have been carried out by using a viscous flow solver based on mixed element type unstructured meshes. (author)

  12. 76 FR 9495 - Airworthiness Directives; Air Tractor, Inc. Models AT-802 and AT-802A Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ..., amendment 39-16412 (75 FR 52255, August 25, 2010), for all Air Tractor Models AT-802 and AT- 802A airplanes.... On December 16, 2010, we issued AD 2010-17-18 R1, amendment 39- 16552 (75 FR 82219, December 30, 2010...-029-AD; Amendment 39-16552; AD 2010-17-18 R1] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Air Tractor,...

  13. Exposure to tri-o-cresyl phosphate detected in jet airplane passengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyasova, Mariya; Li, Bin; Schopfer, Lawrence M; Nachon, Florian; Masson, Patrick; Furlong, Clement E; Lockridge, Oksana

    2011-11-01

    The aircraft cabin and flight deck ventilation are supplied from partially compressed unfiltered bleed air directly from the engine. Worn or defective engine seals can result in the release of engine oil into the cabin air supply. Aircrew and passengers have complained of illness following such "fume events". Adverse health effects are hypothesized to result from exposure to tricresyl phosphate mixed esters, a chemical added to jet engine oil and hydraulic fluid for its anti-wear properties. Our goal was to develop a laboratory test for exposure to tricresyl phosphate. The assay was based on the fact that the active-site serine of butyrylcholinesterase reacts with the active metabolite of tri-o-cresyl phosphate, cresyl saligenin phosphate, to make a stable phosphorylated adduct with an added mass of 80 Da. No other organophosphorus agent makes this adduct in vivo on butyrylcholinesterase. Blood samples from jet airplane passengers were obtained 24-48 h after completing a flight. Butyrylcholinesterase was partially purified from 25 ml serum or plasma, digested with pepsin, enriched for phosphorylated peptides by binding to titanium oxide, and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Of 12 jet airplane passengers tested, 6 were positive for exposure to tri-o-cresyl phosphate that is, they had detectable amounts of the phosphorylated peptide FGEpSAGAAS. The level of exposure was very low. No more than 0.05 to 3% of plasma butyrylcholinesterase was modified. None of the subjects had toxic symptoms. Four of the positive subjects were retested 3 to 7 months following their last airplane trip and were found to be negative for phosphorylated butyrylcholinesterase. In conclusion, this is the first report of an assay that detects exposure to tri-o-cresyl phosphate in jet airplane travelers. PMID:21723309

  14. Aerodynamic study of a blended wing body, comparison with a conventional transport airplane.

    OpenAIRE

    Ayuso Moreno, Luis Manuel; Sant Palma, Rodolfo; Plagaro Pascual, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Blended-wing-body (BWB) aircraft are being studied with interest and effort to improve economic efficiency and to overcome operational and infrastructure related problems associated to the increasing size of conventional transport airplanes. The objective of the research reported here is to assess the aerodynamic feasibility and operational efficiency of a great size, blended wing body layout, a configuration which has many advantages. To this end, the conceptual aerodynamic design process of...

  15. Analysis of airplane boarding via space-time geometry and random matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bachmat, E; Skiena, S S; Stolyarov, N; Berend, D; Bachmat, Eitan; Sapir, Luba; Skiena, Steven; Stolyarov, Natan; berend, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    We show that airplane boarding can be asymptotically modeled by 2-dimensional Lorentzian geometry. Boarding time is given by the maximal proper time among curves in the model. Discrepancies between the model and simulation results are closely related to random matrix theory. We then show how such models can be used to explain why some commonly practiced airline boarding policies are ineffective and even detrimental.

  16. Application of selected advanced technologies to high performance, single-engine, business airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domack, C. S.; Martin, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    Improvements in performance and fuel efficiency are evaluated for five new configurations of a six place, single turboprop, business airplane derived from a conventional, aluminum construction baseline aircraft. Results show the greatest performance gains for enhancements in natural laminar flow. A conceptual diesel engine provides greater fuel efficiency but reduced performance. Less significant effects are produced by the utilization of composite materials construction or by reconfiguration from tractor to pusher propeller installation.

  17. Evaluation of damages of airplane crash in European Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (EU-ABWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    European Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (EU-ABWR) is developed by Toshiba. EU-ABWR accommodates an armored reactor building against Airplane Crash (APC), severe accident mitigation systems, N+2 principle in safety systems and a large output of 1600 MWe. Thanks to above mentioned features, EU-ABWR's design objectives and principles are consistent with safety requirements in an European market. In this paper, evaluation of damages induced by APC has been summarized. (author)

  18. Role of Meteorology in Flights of a Solar-Powered Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Casey

    2004-01-01

    In the summer of 2001, the Helios prototype solar-powered uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) [a lightweight, remotely piloted airplane] was deployed to the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), at Kauai, Hawaii, in an attempt to fly to altitudes above 100,000 ft (30.48 km). The goal of flying a UAV to such high altitudes has been designated a level-I milestone of the NASA Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. In support of this goal, meteorologists from NASA Dryden Flight Research Center were sent to PMRF, as part of the flight crew, to provide current and forecast weather information to the pilots, mission directors, and planners. Information of this kind is needed to optimize flight conditions for peak aircraft performance and to enable avoidance of weather conditions that could adversely affect safety. In general, the primary weather data of concern for ground and flight operations are wind speeds (see Figure 1). Because of its long wing span [247 ft (.75 m)] and low weight [1,500 to 1,600 lb (about 680 to 726 kg)], the Helios airplane is sensitive to wind speeds exceeding 7 kn (3.6 m/s) at the surface. Also, clouds are of concern because they can block sunlight needed to energize an array of solar photovoltaic cells that provide power to the airplane. Vertical wind shear is very closely monitored in order to prevent damage or loss of control due to turbulence.

  19. Maximum likelihood method for estimating airplane stability and control parameters from flight data in frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, V.

    1980-01-01

    A frequency domain maximum likelihood method is developed for the estimation of airplane stability and control parameters from measured data. The model of an airplane is represented by a discrete-type steady state Kalman filter with time variables replaced by their Fourier series expansions. The likelihood function of innovations is formulated, and by its maximization with respect to unknown parameters the estimation algorithm is obtained. This algorithm is then simplified to the output error estimation method with the data in the form of transformed time histories, frequency response curves, or spectral and cross-spectral densities. The development is followed by a discussion on the equivalence of the cost function in the time and frequency domains, and on advantages and disadvantages of the frequency domain approach. The algorithm developed is applied in four examples to the estimation of longitudinal parameters of a general aviation airplane using computer generated and measured data in turbulent and still air. The cost functions in the time and frequency domains are shown to be equivalent; therefore, both approaches are complementary and not contradictory. Despite some computational advantages of parameter estimation in the frequency domain, this approach is limited to linear equations of motion with constant coefficients.

  20. Ground-to-Flight Handling Qualities Comparisons for a High Performance Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Jay M.; Glaab, Louis J.; Brown, Philip W.; Phillips, Michael R.

    1995-01-01

    A flight test program was conducted in conjunction with a ground-based piloted simulation study to enable a comparison of handling qualities ratings for a variety of maneuvers between flight and simulation of a modern high performance airplane. Specific objectives included an evaluation of pilot-induced oscillation (PIO) tendencies and a determination of maneuver types which result in either good or poor ground-to-flight pilot handling qualities ratings. A General Dynamics F-16XL aircraft was used for the flight evaluations, and the NASA Langley Differential Maneuvering Simulator was employed for the ground based evaluations. Two NASA research pilots evaluated both the airplane and simulator characteristics using tasks developed in the simulator. Simulator and flight tests were all conducted within approximately a one month time frame. Maneuvers included numerous fine tracking evaluations at various angles of attack, load factors and speed ranges, gross acquisitions involving longitudinal and lateral maneuvering, roll angle captures, and an ILS task with a sidestep to landing. Overall results showed generally good correlation between ground and flight for PIO tendencies and general handling qualities comments. Differences in pilot technique used in simulator evaluations and effects of airplane accelerations and motions are illustrated.

  1. Analysis of an NPP Structure subjected to Vibrations Induced from Airplane Crashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the terrorists' attacks with civilian airplanes on September 11, 2001, special attention has been paid to the potential for an airplane crash into a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) as a man-made hazard. An airplane crash (APC) into an NPP has the potential to damage the roofs and walls of these structures, as well as other systems and components such as pipelines, electric motors, power supplies, power cables of electricity transmission that are important for safety. Therefore, an evaluation of the structural response to an APC is important for the safety of NPPs to be confirmed. A structural integrity analysis was carried out focusing on the vibration effects of an APC on an NPP structure. The NPP structure under consideration has been conceptually redesigned based on APR1400 to have double containments for the purpose of a feasibility study to meet European requirements. The finite element method was used for the structural analysis of the NPP, and the computer code ABAQUS was employed for this analysis

  2. Exposure to tri-o-cresyl phosphate detected in jet airplane passengers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liyasova, Mariya, E-mail: mliyasov@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Department of Environmental, Agricultural, and Occupational Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Li, Bin, E-mail: binli@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Schopfer, Lawrence M., E-mail: lmschopf@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Nachon, Florian, E-mail: fnachon@nachon.net [Departement de Toxicologie, Institut de Recherche Biomedicale des Armees, 24 avenue des Marquis du Gresivaudan, 38702 La Tronche (France); Masson, Patrick, E-mail: pmasson@unmc.edu [Departement de Toxicologie, Institut de Recherche Biomedicale des Armees, 24 avenue des Marquis du Gresivaudan, 38702 La Tronche (France); Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Furlong, Clement E., E-mail: clem@uw.edu [Department of Medicine (Div. Medical Genetics) and Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Lockridge, Oksana, E-mail: olockrid@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Department of Environmental, Agricultural, and Occupational Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2011-11-15

    The aircraft cabin and flight deck ventilation are supplied from partially compressed unfiltered bleed air directly from the engine. Worn or defective engine seals can result in the release of engine oil into the cabin air supply. Aircrew and passengers have complained of illness following such 'fume events'. Adverse health effects are hypothesized to result from exposure to tricresyl phosphate mixed esters, a chemical added to jet engine oil and hydraulic fluid for its anti-wear properties. Our goal was to develop a laboratory test for exposure to tricresyl phosphate. The assay was based on the fact that the active-site serine of butyrylcholinesterase reacts with the active metabolite of tri-o-cresyl phosphate, cresyl saligenin phosphate, to make a stable phosphorylated adduct with an added mass of 80 Da. No other organophosphorus agent makes this adduct in vivo on butyrylcholinesterase. Blood samples from jet airplane passengers were obtained 24-48 h after completing a flight. Butyrylcholinesterase was partially purified from 25 ml serum or plasma, digested with pepsin, enriched for phosphorylated peptides by binding to titanium oxide, and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Of 12 jet airplane passengers tested, 6 were positive for exposure to tri-o-cresyl phosphate that is, they had detectable amounts of the phosphorylated peptide FGEpSAGAAS. The level of exposure was very low. No more than 0.05 to 3% of plasma butyrylcholinesterase was modified. None of the subjects had toxic symptoms. Four of the positive subjects were retested 3 to 7 months following their last airplane trip and were found to be negative for phosphorylated butyrylcholinesterase. In conclusion, this is the first report of an assay that detects exposure to tri-o-cresyl phosphate in jet airplane travelers. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Travel on jet airplanes is associated with an illness, aerotoxic syndrome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A possible cause is exposure to

  3. Exposure to tri-o-cresyl phosphate detected in jet airplane passengers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aircraft cabin and flight deck ventilation are supplied from partially compressed unfiltered bleed air directly from the engine. Worn or defective engine seals can result in the release of engine oil into the cabin air supply. Aircrew and passengers have complained of illness following such “fume events”. Adverse health effects are hypothesized to result from exposure to tricresyl phosphate mixed esters, a chemical added to jet engine oil and hydraulic fluid for its anti-wear properties. Our goal was to develop a laboratory test for exposure to tricresyl phosphate. The assay was based on the fact that the active-site serine of butyrylcholinesterase reacts with the active metabolite of tri-o-cresyl phosphate, cresyl saligenin phosphate, to make a stable phosphorylated adduct with an added mass of 80 Da. No other organophosphorus agent makes this adduct in vivo on butyrylcholinesterase. Blood samples from jet airplane passengers were obtained 24–48 h after completing a flight. Butyrylcholinesterase was partially purified from 25 ml serum or plasma, digested with pepsin, enriched for phosphorylated peptides by binding to titanium oxide, and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Of 12 jet airplane passengers tested, 6 were positive for exposure to tri-o-cresyl phosphate that is, they had detectable amounts of the phosphorylated peptide FGEpSAGAAS. The level of exposure was very low. No more than 0.05 to 3% of plasma butyrylcholinesterase was modified. None of the subjects had toxic symptoms. Four of the positive subjects were retested 3 to 7 months following their last airplane trip and were found to be negative for phosphorylated butyrylcholinesterase. In conclusion, this is the first report of an assay that detects exposure to tri-o-cresyl phosphate in jet airplane travelers. -- Highlights: ► Travel on jet airplanes is associated with an illness, aerotoxic syndrome. ► A possible cause is exposure to tricresyl phosphate in engine lubricating oil. ► A blood

  4. A knowledge-based design framework for airplane conceptual and preliminary design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemaat, Wilhelmus A. J.

    The goal of work described herein is to develop the second generation of Advanced Aircraft Analysis (AAA) into an object-oriented structure which can be used in different environments. One such environment is the third generation of AAA with its own user interface, the other environment with the same AAA methods (i.e. the knowledge) is the AAA-AML program. AAA-AML automates the initial airplane design process using current AAA methods in combination with AMRaven methodologies for dependency tracking and knowledge management, using the TechnoSoft Adaptive Modeling Language (AML). This will lead to the following benefits: (1) Reduced design time: computer aided design methods can reduce design and development time and replace tedious hand calculations. (2) Better product through improved design: more alternative designs can be evaluated in the same time span, which can lead to improved quality. (3) Reduced design cost: due to less training and less calculation errors substantial savings in design time and related cost can be obtained. (4) Improved Efficiency: the design engineer can avoid technically correct but irrelevant calculations on incomplete or out of sync information, particularly if the process enables robust geometry earlier. Although numerous advancements in knowledge based design have been developed for detailed design, currently no such integrated knowledge based conceptual and preliminary airplane design system exists. The third generation AAA methods are tested over a ten year period on many different airplane designs. Using AAA methods will demonstrate significant time savings. The AAA-AML system will be exercised and tested using 27 existing airplanes ranging from single engine propeller, business jets, airliners, UAV's to fighters. Data for the varied sizing methods will be compared with AAA results, to validate these methods. One new design, a Light Sport Aircraft (LSA), will be developed as an exercise to use the tool for designing a new airplane

  5. Effects from airplane crashes and gas explosions to Leningrad nuclear plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junttila, K.; Varpasuo, P. [IVO Power Engineering Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    In this study the effects of aircraft crash and gas explosion to Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant has been researched. One of the two reactor buildings is modeled with finite element method using the pre-processor program MSC/PATRAN and analyzed with MSC/NASTRAN analysis program. In MSC/PATRAN or FEMAP, which is a pre-processor program of MSC/NASTRAN for Windows, the reactor building of the plant has been modeled with shell and beam elements and the load sets describing the aircraft crash and gas explosion have been developed. The crash loads are from Cessna 210 civil airplane crash with impact velocity 360 km/h and maximum impact force of 7 MN and Phantom RF-43 military airplane crash with impact velocity 215 m/s and with maximum impact force of 110 MN. The gas explosion pressure wave simulates the deflagration wave with maximum pressure of 0,045 MPa. Seven Cessna 210 airplane crash locations, two Phantom RF-43 airplane crash locations and one gas explosion load case is modeled. Airplane crash loads were from different directions and to different points of impact in the reactor building. The gas explosion load was assumed to affect the reactor building from one side parallel to one of the global coordinate axes of the model. With MSC/NASTRAN reactions from loads are analyzed. All loads were timedependent; their magnitude varied with time and consequently the analysis was carried out with the aid of transient response analysis. Time step in Cessna 210 analysis was 0,003 s and in Phantom RF-43 and gas explosion analyses 0,01 s. The greatest displacement from Cessna 210 loads was 12 mm and from Phantom RF-43 load 344 mm. The last value shows that construction would fail with that load. The greatest displacement from gas explosion load was 68 mm. Stresses are not so interesting in this preliminary analysis of the effects, but they are shown in pictures embedded in the report text. Displacements were greatest in upper part of the reactor building, where no intersections

  6. Definition of 1992 Technology Aircraft Noise Levels and the Methodology for Assessing Airplane Noise Impact of Component Noise Reduction Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumasaka, Henry A.; Martinez, Michael M.; Weir, Donald S.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the methodology for assessing the impact of component noise reduction on total airplane system noise. The methodology is intended to be applied to the results of individual study elements of the NASA-Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program, which will address the development of noise reduction concepts for specific components. Program progress will be assessed in terms of noise reduction achieved, relative to baseline levels representative of 1992 technology airplane/engine design and performance. In this report, the 1992 technology reference levels are defined for assessment models based on four airplane sizes - an average business jet and three commercial transports: a small twin, a medium sized twin, and a large quad. Study results indicate that component changes defined as program final goals for nacelle treatment and engine/airframe source noise reduction would achieve from 6-7 EPNdB reduction of total airplane noise at FAR 36 Stage 3 noise certification conditions for all of the airplane noise assessment models.

  7. Comparison of low-frequency noise levels of the Concorde supersonic transport with other commercial service airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C. A.; Mccurdy, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    Fifty-two airplane noise recordings, made at several locations around Dulles International Airport, were analyzed to compare the low-frequency noise levels of the Concorde supersonic transport with those of other commercial jet airplanes. Comparisons of the relative low-frequency noise levels which were produced at close and distant locations for departures and arrivals were made for three noise measures: the sound pressure level in the 1/3 octave band centered at 20 Hz, the total sound pressure level in the 1/3 octave bands with center frequencies less than or equal to 125 Hz, and the total sound pressure level in the 1/3 octave bands with center frequencies less than or equal to 500 Hz. Although the absolute noise levels for Concorde were found, in general, to be higher than those for the other airplane types, the level of low-frequency noise of the Concorde relative to the perceived noise level (PNL), effective perceived noise level (EPNL), and overall sound pressure level (OASPL) was within the range established by the other airplane types, except for the arrival operations of four-engine, narrow-body airplanes. The measure OASPL was found to be a significantly better predictor of low-frequency noise level than PNL or EPNL.

  8. 77 FR 64029 - Special Conditions: Airbus Model A318, A319, A320, and A321 Series Airplanes; Design Dive Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ... April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http: DocketsInfo.dot.gov/. Docket: Background... Series Airplanes; Design Dive Speed AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final... airplanes. These design features include a high-speed protection system. The applicable...

  9. 14 CFR Appendix F to Part 36 - Flyover Noise Requirements for Propeller-Driven Small Airplane and Propeller-Driven, Commuter...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flyover Noise Requirements for Propeller-Driven Small Airplane and Propeller-Driven, Commuter Category Airplane Certification Tests Prior to December 22, 1988 F Appendix F to Part 36 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT NOISE...

  10. Investigation of a fatal airplane crash: autopsy, computed tomography, and injury pattern analysis used to determine who was steering the plane at time of accident. A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Christian Bjerre; Nielsen, Trine Skov; Nagel, Lise Loft;

    2012-01-01

    A fatal accident is reported in which a small single-engine light airplane crashed. The airplane carried two persons in the front seats, both of whom possessed valid pilot certificates. Both victims were subject to autopsy, including post-mortem computed tomography scanning (PMCT) prior to the...... autopsy. The autopsies showed massive destruction to the bodies of the two victims but did not identify any signs of acute or chronic medical conditions that could explain loss of control of the airplane. PMCT, histological examination, and forensic chemical analysis also failed to identify an explanation...... for the crash. A detailed review of an airplane identical to the crashed airplane was performed in collaboration with the Danish Accident Investigation Board and the Danish National Police, National Centre of Forensic Services. The injuries were described using the abbreviated injury scale, the injury...

  11. Design of a Mars Airplane Propulsion System for the Aerial Regional-Scale Environmental Survey (ARES) Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl. Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    The Aerial Regional-Scale Environmental Survey (ARES) is a Mars exploration mission concept with the goal of taking scientific measurements of the atmosphere, surface, and subsurface of Mars by using an airplane as the payload platform. ARES team first conducted a Phase-A study for a 2007 launch opportunity, which was completed in May 2003. Following this study, significant efforts were undertaken to reduce the risk of the atmospheric flight system, under the NASA Langley Planetary Airplane Risk Reduction Project. The concept was then proposed to the Mars Scout program in 2006 for a 2011 launch opportunity. This paper summarizes the design and development of the ARES airplane propulsion subsystem beginning with the inception of the ARES project in 2002 through the submittal of the Mars Scout proposal in July 2006.

  12. Simulator study of stall/post-stall characteristics of a fighter airplane with relaxed longitudinal static stability. [F-16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, L. T.; Ogburn, M. E.; Gilbert, W. P.; Kibler, K. S.; Brown, P. W.; Deal, P. L.

    1979-01-01

    A real-time piloted simulation was conducted to evaluate the high-angle-of-attack characteristics of a fighter configuration based on wind-tunnel testing of the F-16, with particular emphasis on the effects of various levels of relaxed longitudinal static stability. The aerodynamic data used in the simulation was conducted on the Langley differential maneuvering simulator, and the evaluation involved representative low-speed combat maneuvering. Results of the investigation show that the airplane with the basic control system was resistant to the classical yaw departure; however, it was susceptible to pitch departures induced by inertia coupling during rapid, large-amplitude rolls at low airspeed. The airplane also exhibited a deep-stall trim which could be flown into and from which it was difficult to recover. Control-system modifications were developed which greatly decreased the airplane susceptibility to the inertia-coupling departure and which provided a reliable means for recovering from the deep stall.

  13. Full-Scale Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the VZ-5 Four-Propeller Deflected-Slipstream VTOL Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Marvin P.

    1963-01-01

    The investigation was conducted to determine the static stability and control characteristics of the VZ-5 VTOL air-plane over the speed range from hovering to forward flight. Force and moment data were taken over a range of angles of attack of 0 to 15 deg and a range of sideslip of +/-10 deg for flap deflections from 0 to 77 deg. The longitudinal stability and trim characteristics were found to be quite unacceptable and it did not seem that they could be corrected with any reasonable modifications to the airplane.

  14. Impact of sequential disorder on the scaling behavior of airplane boarding time

    CERN Document Server

    Baek, Yongjoo; Jeong, Hawoong

    2013-01-01

    Airplane boarding process is an example where disorder properties of the system are relevant to the emergence of universality classes. Based on a simple model, we present a systematic analysis of finite-size effects in boarding time, and propose a comprehensive view of the role of sequential disorder in the scaling behavior of boarding time against the plane size. Using numerical simulations and mathematical arguments, we find how the scaling behavior depends on the number of seat columns and the range of sequential disorder. Our results show that new scaling exponents can arise as disorder is localized to varying extents.

  15. AVIATR - Aerial Vehicle for In-situ and Airborne Titan Reconnaissance A Titan Airplane Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jason W.; Lemke, Lawrence; Foch, Rick; McKay, Christopher P.; Beyer, Ross A.; Radebaugh, Jani; Atkinson, David H.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; LeMouelic, Stephane; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Gundlach, Jay; Giannini, Francesco; Bain, Sean; Flasar, F. Michael; Hurford, Terry; Anderson, Carrie M.; Merrison, Jon; Adamkovics, Mate; Kattenhorn, Simon A.; Mitchell, Jonathan; Burr, Devon M.; Colaprete, Anthony; Schaller, Emily; Friedson, A. James; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Coradini, Angioletta; Adriani, Alberto; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Malaska, Michael J.; Morabito, David; Reh, Kim

    2011-01-01

    We describe a mission concept for a stand-alone Titan airplane mission: Aerial Vehicle for In-situ and Airborne Titan Reconnaissance (AVIATR). With independent delivery and direct-to-Earth communications, AVIATR could contribute to Titan science either alone or as part of a sustained Titan Exploration Program. As a focused mission, AVIATR as we have envisioned it would concentrate on the science that an airplane can do best: exploration of Titan's global diversity. We focus on surface geology/hydrology and lower-atmospheric structure and dynamics. With a carefully chosen set of seven instruments-2 near-IR cameras, 1 near-IR spectrometer, a RADAR altimeter, an atmospheric structure suite, a haze sensor, and a raindrop detector-AVIATR could accomplish a significant subset of the scientific objectives of the aerial element of flagship studies. The AVIATR spacecraft stack is composed of a Space Vehicle (SV) for cruise, an Entry Vehicle (EV) for entry and descent, and the Air Vehicle (AV) to fly in Titan's atmosphere. Using an Earth-Jupiter gravity assist trajectory delivers the spacecraft to Titan in 7.5 years, after which the AVIATR AV would operate for a 1-Earth-year nominal mission. We propose a novel 'gravity battery' climb-then-glide strategy to store energy for optimal use during telecommunications sessions. We would optimize our science by using the flexibility of the airplane platform, generating context data and stereo pairs by flying and banking the AV instead of using gimbaled cameras. AVIATR would climb up to 14 km altitude and descend down to 3.5 km altitude once per Earth day, allowing for repeated atmospheric structure and wind measurements all over the globe. An initial Team-X run at JPL priced the AVIATR mission at FY10 $715M based on the rules stipulated in the recent Discovery announcement of opportunity. Hence we find that a standalone Titan airplane mission can achieve important science building on Cassini's discoveries and can likely do so within

  16. Assessment of JVX Proprotor Performance Data in Hover and Airplane-Mode Flight Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acree, C. W., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    A 0.656-scale V-22 proprotor, the Joint Vertical Experimental (JVX) rotor, was tested at the NASA Ames Research Center in both hover and airplane-mode (high-speed axial flow) flight conditions, up to an advance ratio of 0.562 (231 knots). This paper examines the two principal data sets generated by those tests, and includes investigations of hub spinner tares, torque/thrust measurement interactions, tunnel blockage effects, and other phenomena suspected of causing erroneous measurements or predictions. Uncertainties in hover and high-speed data are characterized. The results are reported here to provide guidance for future wind tunnel tests, data processing, and data analysis.

  17. Real-Time Simulation of Aeroheating of the Hyper-X Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Les

    2005-01-01

    A capability for real-time computational simulation of aeroheating has been developed in support of the Hyper-X program, which is directed toward demonstrating the feasibility of operating an air-breathing ramjet/scramjet engine at mach 5, mach 7, and mach 10. The simulation software will serve as a valuable design tool for initial trajectory studies in which aerodynamic heating is expected to exert a major influence in the design of the Hyper-X airplane; this tool will aid in the selection of materials, sizing of structural skin thicknesses, and selection of components of a thermal-protection system (TPS) for structures that must be insulated against aeroheating.

  18. The energy spectrum of high energy gamma rays observed at an airplane altitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to get some knowledge of altitude variation of high energy cosmic rays in the atmosphere, an emulsion chamber (EC) has been flown at the atmospheric depth of 260 g/cm2 on an airplane jet cargo. The total amount of exposure is 165 m2hour. Approximately 400 showers with energy greater than 1.0 TeV are observed. The energy spectrum of high energy gamma rays is presented. The comparison with similar measurement at greater depth is made. (orig.)

  19. Effect of two types of helium circulators on the performance of a subsonic nuclear powered airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strack, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    Two types of helium circulators are analytically compared on the bases of their influence on airplane payload and on propulsion system variables. One type of circulator is driven by the turbofan engines with power takeoff shafting while the other, a turbocirculator, is powered by a turbine placed in the helium loop between the nuclear reactor and the helium-to-air heat exchangers inside the engines. Typical results show that the turbocirculator yields more payload for circulator efficiencies greater than 0.82. Optimum engine and heat exchanger temperatures and pressures are significantly lower in the turbocirculator case compared to the engine-driven circulator scheme.

  20. A revolutionary approach to composite construction and flight management systems for small, general aviation airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskam, Jan; Wenninger, ED

    1992-01-01

    The design studies for two composite general aviation airplanes are presented. The main consideration for both of the designs was to avoid the typical 'metal replacement' philosophy that has hindered the widespread use of composites in general aviation aircraft. The first design is for a low wing aircraft based on the Smith Aircraft Corporation GT-3 Global Trainer. The second aircraft is a composite version of the Cessna 152. The project was conducted as a graduate level design class under the auspices of the KU/NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program in aeronautics. The results obtained from the Fall semester of 1991 and the Spring semester of 1992 are presented.

  1. Fuel-Cell-Powered Electric Motor Drive Analyzed for a Large Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Choi, Benjamin B.

    2005-01-01

    Because of its high efficiency, fuel cell technology may be used to launch a new generation of more-electric aeropropulsion and power systems for future aircraft. Electric-motor-driven airplanes using fuel-cell powerplants would be beneficial to the environment because of fuel savings, low noise, and zero carbon-dioxide emissions. In spite of the fuel cell s efficiency benefit, to produce the same shaft drive power, a fuel cell- powered electric-drive system must be definitely heavier than a turbine-drive system. However, the fuel-cell system s overall efficiency from fuel-to-shaft power is higher than for a turbine-drive system. This means that the fuel consumption rate could be lower than for a conventional system. For heavier, fuel-laden planes for longer flights, we might achieve substantial fuel savings. In the airplane industry, in fact, an efficiency gain of even a few percentage points can make a major economic difference in operating costs.

  2. Flight Test Results from the Rake Airflow Gage Experiment on the F-15B Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Michael A.; Ratnayake, Nalin A.

    2011-01-01

    The Rake Airflow Gage Experiment involves a flow-field survey rake that was flown on the Propulsion Flight Test Fixture at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center using the Dryden F-15B research test bed airplane. The objective of this flight test was to ascertain the flow-field angularity, local Mach number profile, total pressure distortion, and dynamic pressure at the aerodynamic interface plane of the Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment. This new mixed-compression, supersonic inlet is planned for flight test in the near term. Knowledge of the flow-field characteristics at this location underneath the airplane is essential to flight test planning and computational modeling of the new inlet, anairplane, flying at a free-stream Mach number of 1.65 and a pressure altitude of 40,000 ft, would achieve the desired local Mach number for the future inlet flight test. Interface plane distortion levels of 2 percent and a local angle of attack of -2 deg were observed at this condition. Alternative flight conditions for future testing and an exploration of certain anomalous data also are provided.

  3. Flight Test of the F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, David

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation of flight tests performed on the F/A active aeroelastic wing airplane is shown. The topics include: 1) F/A-18 AAW Airplane; 2) F/A-18 AAW Control Surfaces; 3) Flight Test Background; 4) Roll Control Effectiveness Regions; 5) AAW Design Test Points; 6) AAW Phase I Test Maneuvers; 7) OBES Pitch Doublets; 8) OBES Roll Doublets; 9) AAW Aileron Flexibility; 10) Phase I - Lessons Learned; 11) Control Law Development and Verification & Validation Testing; 12) AAW Phase II RFCS Envelopes; 13) AAW 1-g Phase II Flight Test; 14) Region I - Subsonic 1-g Rolls; 15) Region I - Subsonic 1-g 360 Roll; 16) Region II - Supersonic 1-g Rolls; 17) Region II - Supersonic 1-g 360 Roll; 18) Region III - Subsonic 1-g Rolls; 19) Roll Axis HOS/LOS Comparison Region II - Supersonic (open-loop); 20) Roll Axis HOS/LOS Comparison Region II - Supersonic (closed-loop); 21) AAW Phase II Elevated-g Flight Test; 22) Region I - Subsonic 4-g RPO; and 23) Phase II - Lessons Learned

  4. Study and Analysis on the Influence of Flutter Frequency on Airplane Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Janarthanan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the nationwide requirement of the growth in commercial aviation safety and profit, the field of Aeroelastic science plays a vital role. Flutter is one of the dynamic aeroelastic problems, it mainly occurs at lifting surfaces when the airplane cruises at high speeds. At relatively low speeds, the torsional stiffness of the wing is enough to counteract the twisting. However, the variation in flutter frequency causes the instability motion on aircraft. Therefore, the wing displacement against the flow field plays a vital role in dynamic stability analysis. As per the commercial aviation concern, an aircraft which is able to overcome the significant aeroelastic problems can yield maximum running profit. In order to maintain the airplane stability in high-speed, wings can be designed to minimize the distance between aerodynamic centre and shear centre (on the elastic axis. The main focus of this project is to calculate the frequency of an aircraft wing while it is subjected to aeroelastic (flutter instability. The analytical process identified for this work is the Eigen value method. By using MATLAB solver, the optimization has been carried out along the span of real-time model. In future, the efficient structural model is then simulated and analysis is carried out to evaluate the longitudinal stability due to flutter phenomena.

  5. Engine Installation Effects of Four Civil Transport Airplanes: Wallops Flight Facility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Gregg G.; Senzig, David A.; McCurdy, David A.; Roof, Christopher J.; Rapoza, Amanda S.

    2003-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Langley Research Center (LaRC), the Environmental Measurement and Modeling Division of the United States Department of Transportation s John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe), and several other organizations (see Appendix A for a complete list of participating organizations and individuals) conducted a noise measurement study at NASA s Wallops Flight Facility (Wallops) near Chincoteague, Virginia during September 2000. This test was intended to determine engine installation effects on four civil transport airplanes: a Boeing 767-400, a McDonnell-Douglas DC9, a Dassault Falcon 2000, and a Beechcraft King Air. Wallops was chosen for this study because of the relatively low ambient noise of the site and the degree of control over airplane operating procedures enabled by operating over a runway closed to other uses during the test period. Measurements were conducted using a twenty microphone U-shaped array oriented perpendicular to the flight path; microphones were mounted such that ground effects were minimized and low elevation angles were observed.

  6. An integer programming for airplane rounting in the U.S. Center-TRACON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srisawat Supsomboon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Air travel has been a major transportation for commerce and tour in many countries. As the demand of air traffic has been increasing, air traffic management has confronted with poverty of handling the increase of the demand of runway facilities where congestion often takes place. In order to cope with such problems, runway efficiency enhancement or capacity increasing are taken into account. In air traffic management, the effective air space utilization and air control workload management can be improved by the use of many up-to-date technologies in forms of decision support tools. This study developed a computer-aided decision support model in the form of integer programming. The purpose of the model was to allocate airplanes arrival at U.S. Center-TRACON airspace to enter feeder gates and to design optimal routes along the track to runway. Results of optimal path of the airplanes throughout the TRACON air space system which yield a minimum delay were presented.

  7. Roll Utilization of an F-100A Airplane During Service Operational Flying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matranga, Gene J.

    1959-01-01

    As a means of evaluating the roll utilization of a fighter airplane capable of supersonic speeds, an instrumented North American F-100A fighter airplane was flown by U.S. Air Force pilots at Nellis Air Force Base, NV, during 20 hours of service operational flying. Mach numbers up to 1.22 and altitudes up to 50,000 feet were realized in this investigation. Results of the study showed that except for high g barrel rolls performed as evasive maneuvers and rolls performed in acrobatic flying, rolling was utilized primarily as a means of changing heading. Acrobatic and air combat maneuvering produced the largest bank angles (1,200 deg), roll velocities (3.3 radians/sec), rolling accelerations (8 radians/sq sec) and sideslip angles (10.8 deg). Full aileron deflections were utilized on numerous occasions. Although high rolling velocities and accelerations also were experienced during several air-to-air gunnery missions, generally, air-to-air gunnery and air-to-ground gunnery and bombing required only two-thirds of maximum aileron deflection. The air-to-air gunnery and air combat maneuvers initiated from supersonic speeds utilized up to two-thirds aileron deflection and bank angles of less than 18 deg and resulted in rolling velocities and accelerations of 2 radians per second and 4.6 radians/sq sec, respectively. Rolling maneuvers were often initiated from high levels of normal acceleration, but from levels of negative normal acceleration only once.

  8. Flight Research Using F100 Engine P680063 in the NASA F-15 Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Conners, Timothy R.; Maxwell, Michael D.

    1994-01-01

    The value of flight research in developing and evaluating gas turbine engines is high. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has been conducting flight research on propulsion systems for many years. The F100 engine has been tested in the NASA F-15 research airplane in the last three decades. One engine in particular, S/N P680063, has been used for the entire program and has been flown in many pioneering propulsion flight research activities. Included are detailed flight-to-ground facility tests; tests of the first production digital engine control system, the first active stall margin control system, the first performance-seeking control system; and the first use of computer-controlled engine thrust for emergency flight control. The flight research has been supplemented with altitude facility tests at key times. This paper presents a review of the tests of engine P680063, the F-15 airplanes in which it flew, and the role of the flight test in maturing propulsion technology.

  9. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 141 - Flight Instructor Instrument (For an Airplane, Helicopter, or Powered-Lift Instrument Instructor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Airplane, Helicopter, or Powered-Lift Instrument Instructor Rating, as Appropriate) Certification Course G Appendix G to Part 141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Pt. 141, App. G Appendix G to Part...

  10. 14 CFR 135.373 - Part 25 transport category airplanes with four or more engines: Reciprocating engine powered: En...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Part 25 transport category airplanes with four or more engines: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines inoperative. 135... engines: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines inoperative. (a) No person...

  11. 14 CFR 121.183 - Part 25 airplanes with four or more engines: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Part 25 airplanes with four or more engines: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines inoperative. 121.183 Section 121.183 Aeronautics... more engines: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines inoperative. (a)...

  12. 75 FR 38011 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Model CL-600-2B16 (CL-604 Variant) Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... products. That NPRM was published in the Federal Register on January 4, 2010 (75 FR 91). That NPRM proposed... Order 12866; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR.... Model CL-600-2B16 (CL- 604 Variant) Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),...

  13. 76 FR 64229 - Function and Reliability Flight Testing for Turbine-Powered Airplanes Weighing 6,000 Pounds or Less

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... Certificated Weight.'' (See 69 FR 5239, February 3, 2004.) In that notice, we announced our intention to.... (See 75 FR 50853, August 18, 2010.) This final rule will eliminate the need for issuing special...-Powered Airplanes Weighing 6,000 Pounds or Less.'' (See 75 FR 18134, April 9, 2010.) In that NPRM,...

  14. 77 FR 67308 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Hydrophobic Coatings in Lieu of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http://DocketsInfo.dot.gov/ . Docket: Background... name of the individual sending the comment (or signing the comment for an association, business, labor... airplane is at higher-than-normal pitch angle. Type Certification Basis Under the provisions of 14 CFR...

  15. 78 FR 11562 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplanes; Flight Envelope Protection: High Speed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Embraer S.A. Model EMB-550 airplanes was published in the Federal Register on November 20, 2012 (77 FR...; Flight Envelope Protection: High Speed Limiting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... inadvertently or intentionally exceeding a speed approximately equivalent to V FC or attaining V DF ....

  16. 14 CFR 125.333 - Stowage of food, beverage, and passenger service equipment during airplane movement on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stowage of food, beverage, and passenger service equipment during airplane movement on the surface, takeoff, and landing. 125.333 Section 125.333 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR...

  17. 14 CFR 121.577 - Stowage of food, beverage, and passenger service equipment during airplane movement on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stowage of food, beverage, and passenger service equipment during airplane movement on the surface, takeoff, and landing. 121.577 Section 121.577 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR...

  18. 78 FR 76731 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 777-200, -300, and -300ER Series Airplanes; Rechargeable Lithium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ..., the ARINC Aerospace Company applied for a supplemental type certificate for installing equipment that... series airplanes. Should the ARINC Aerospace Company apply at a later date for a supplemental type... Aerospace Company will have a novel or unusual design feature, specifically the installation of...

  19. 78 FR 52107 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 777-200, -300, and -300ER Series Airplanes; Rechargeable Lithium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ... installation of batteries in large transport category airplanes were derived from Civil Air Regulations (CAR... 1965. The new battery requirements, Sec. 25.1353(c)(1) through (c)(4), basically reworded the CAR... requirements, are established to ensure the availability of electrical power from the batteries when needed....

  20. 76 FR 41142 - Special Conditions; Cessna Aircraft Company Model M680 Airplane; Lithium-ion Battery Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Aircraft Company Model M680 Airplane; Lithium-ion Battery Installations AGENCY: Federal Aviation... design feature associated with Lithium-ion batteries. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not...) T00012WI for installation of Lithium-ion batteries in the Model 680. The Model 680 is a twin-engine,...

  1. 76 FR 11844 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane and Engine Issue Area-Phase 2 of Low...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... Engine Issue Area--Phase 2 of Low Speed Alerting Task AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... Issues Group. (The FAA published a notice of Phase 1 task assignment in the Federal Register (75 FR 16902... Airplanes'' (70 FR 40166, July 12, 2005). The ARAC working group should provide information that could...

  2. 76 FR 28373 - Airworthiness Directives; Fokker Services B.V. Model F.28 Mark 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... and Maintenance and Inspection Requirements'' (66 FR 23086, May 7, 2001). In addition to new... Order 12866; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR.... Model F.28 Mark 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),...

  3. 76 FR 18029 - Airworthiness Directives; Fokker Services B.V. Model F.28 Mark 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... was published in the Federal Register on January 5, 2011 (76 FR 482). That NPRM proposed to correct an... Executive Order 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR.... Model F.28 Mark 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...

  4. 76 FR 50111 - Airworthiness Directives; Fokker Services B.V. Model F.28 Mark 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... published in the Federal Register on May 17, 2011 (76 FR 28376). That NPRM proposed to correct an unsafe... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or..., 2000, 3000, and 4000 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department...

  5. 76 FR 50115 - Airworthiness Directives; Fokker Services B.V. Model F.28 Mark 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... products. That NPRM was published in the Federal Register on May 17, 2011 (76 FR 28373). That NPRM proposed... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or.... Model F.28 Mark 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...

  6. 76 FR 28376 - Airworthiness Directives; Fokker Services B.V. Model F.28 Mark 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... and Maintenance and Inspection Requirements'' (66 FR 23086, May 7, 2001). In addition to new... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will.... Model F.28 Mark 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),...

  7. Floor response spectra of the main process building of a reprocessing plant against earthquake, airplane crash and blast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the general concept of the planned reprocessing plant for spent fuel elements, the main process building has the central function. This building will be designed to withstand earthquake, airplane crash and blast. This report deals with the stress on components and systems due to vibration of the building, the floor response spectra

  8. Application of probabilistic method for estimation of risk of vulnerability of nuclear power station at falling of airplane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the analysis of safety of NPP it is necessary to take into account possibility of damage of the reactor setting or systems which provide its safety, as a result of the external influencing, including related to activity of man. The problems of safety of NPP at the possible falling on it of airplane are analyzed in the article

  9. 77 FR 24425 - Airworthiness Directives; Empresa Brasileria de Aeronáutica S.A. (EMBRAER) Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and (4) Will... Directives; Empresa Brasileria de Aeron utica S.A. (EMBRAER) Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation...: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Empresa Brasileria de Aeron...

  10. 75 FR 53609 - Airworthiness Directives; Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER) Model EMB-500 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or... Directives; Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER) Model EMB-500 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation... docket. Relevant Service Information Empresa Brasileira de Aeron utica S.A. (EMBRAER) has issued...

  11. 77 FR 70941 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Interaction of Systems and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-28

    ... the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http://DocketsInfo...., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Interaction of Systems and Structures AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... feature(s) associated with the interaction of systems and structures. The applicable...

  12. 14 CFR 121.645 - Fuel supply: Turbine-engine powered airplanes, other than turbo propeller: Flag and supplemental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel supply: Turbine-engine powered airplanes, other than turbo propeller: Flag and supplemental operations. 121.645 Section 121.645 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR...

  13. 75 FR 76647 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8 Airplanes, Systems and Data Networks Security-Isolation or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... passenger domain computer systems to the airplane critical systems and data networks. The applicable...: Digital systems architecture composed of several connected networks. The proposed network architecture... Domain), and 4. The capability to allow access to or by external network sources. Discussion The...

  14. 78 FR 70849 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 777-200, -300, and -300ER Series Airplanes; Aircraft Electronic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... the EFB architecture and existing airplane network systems. The applicable airworthiness regulations.... The proposed network architecture is used for a diverse set of functions, providing data connectivity..., software-configurable avionics, and fiber-optic avionics networks. The proposed Class 3 EFB architecture...

  15. 75 FR 71346 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Lightning Protection of Fuel Tank Structure To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-23

    ..., 2009 (74 FR 52698). Several comments were received from two commenters (Cessna and NATCA). Cessna 1.... The Boeing Model 787-8 airplane will incorporate a fuel tank nitrogen generation system (NGS) that... Features The 787 will have a fuel tank NGS that is intended to control fuel tank flammability. This NGS...

  16. Capabilities and applications of a computer program system for dynamic loads analyses of flexible airplanes with active controls /DYLOFLEX/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, B., III; Goetz, R. C.; Kroll, R. I.; Miller, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes and illustrates the capabilities of the DYLOFLEX Computer Program System. DYLOFLEX is an integrated system of computer programs for calculating dynamic loads of flexible airplanes with active control systems. A brief discussion of the engineering formulation for each of the nine DYLOFLEX programs is described. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by the analyses of two example configurations.

  17. Motion of the two-control airplane in rectilinear flight after initial disturbances with introduction of controls following an exponential law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemin, Alexander

    1937-01-01

    An airplane in steady rectilinear flight was assumed to experience an initial disturbance in rolling or yawing velocity. The equations of motion were solved to see if it was possible to hasten recovery of a stable airplane or to secure recovery of an unstable airplane by the application of a single lateral control following an exponential law. The sample computations indicate that, for initial disturbances complex in character, it would be difficult to secure correlation with any type of exponential control. The possibility is visualized that the two-control operation may seriously impair the ability to hasten recovery or counteract instability.

  18. Free-to-Roll Testing of Airplane Models in Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Francis J.; Owens, D. Bruce; Hall, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    A free-to-roll (FTR) test technique and test rig make it possible to evaluate both the transonic performance and the wingdrop/ rock behavior of a high-strength airplane model in a single wind-tunnel entry. The free-to-roll test technique is a single degree-of-motion method in which the model is free to roll about the longitudinal axis. The rolling motion is observed, recorded, and analyzed to gain insight into wing-drop/rock behavior. Wing-drop/rock is one of several phenomena symptomatic of abrupt wing stall. FTR testing was developed as part of the NASA/Navy Abrupt Wing Stall Program, which was established for the purposes of understanding and preventing significant unexpected and uncommanded (thus, highly undesirable) lateral-directional motions associated with wing-drop/rock, which have been observed mostly in fighter airplanes under high-subsonic and transonic maneuvering conditions. Before FTR testing became available, wingrock/ drop behavior of high-performance airplanes undergoing development was not recognized until flight testing. FTR testing is a reliable means of detecting, and evaluating design modifications for reducing or preventing, very complex abrupt wing stall phenomena in a ground facility prior to flight testing. The FTR test rig was designed to replace an older sting attachment butt, such that a model with its force balance and support sting could freely rotate about the longitudinal axis. The rig (see figure) includes a rotary head supported in a stationary head with a forward spherical roller bearing and an aft needle bearing. Rotation is amplified by a set of gears and measured by a shaft-angle resolver; the roll angle can be resolved to within 0.067 degrees at a rotational speed up to 1,000 degrees/s. An assembly of electrically actuated brakes between the rotary and stationary heads can be used to hold the model against a rolling torque at a commanded roll angle. When static testing is required, a locking bar is used to fix the rotating

  19. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/40-Scale Model of the McConnell F-101A Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel of a 1/40-scale model of the McDonnell F-101A airplane to alleviate the unfavorable spinning characteristics encountered with the airplane. The model results indicate that a suitable strake extended on the inboard side of the nose of the airplane (right side in a right spin) in conjunction with the use of optimum control recovery technique will terminate spin rotation of the airplane. It may be difficult to recover from subsequent high angle-of-attack trimmed flight attitudes even by forward stick movement. The optimum spin-recovery control technique for the McDonnell F-101A is simultaneous full rudder reversal to against the spin and aileron movement to full with the spin (stick full right in a right erect spin) and forward movement of the stick immediately after rotation stops.

  20. 75 FR 8476 - Airworthiness Directives; ATR-GIE Avions de Transport Régional Model ATR42 and ATR72 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tom Rodriguez, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport... Engineer, International Branch, ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA, 1601 Lind Avenue, SW., Renton... extinguishers, usually fitted or stowed in aircraft passenger cabins and flight decks. EASA published...

  1. Compilation of Test Data on 111 Free-Spinning Airplane Models Tested in the Langley 15-Foot and 20-Foot Free-Spinning Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvestuto, Frank S.; Gale, Lawrence J.; Wood, John H.

    1947-01-01

    A compilation of free-spinning-airplane model data on the spin and recovery characteristics of 111 airplanes is presented. These data were previously published in separate memorandum reports and were obtained from free-spinning tests in the Langley 15-foot and the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnels. The model test data presented include the steady-spin and recovery characteristics of each model for various combinations of aileron and elevator deflections and for various loadings and dimensional configurations. Dimensional data, mass data, and a three-view drawing of the corresponding free-spinning tunnel model are also presented for each airplane. The data presented should be of value to designers and should facilitate the design of airplanes incorporating satisfactory spin-recovery characteristics.

  2. On the analytic and numeric optimisation of airplane trajectories under real atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, J.; Domínguez, D.; López, D.

    2014-12-01

    From the beginning of aviation era, economic constraints have forced operators to continuously improve the planning of the flights. The revenue is proportional to the cost per flight and the airspace occupancy. Many methods, the first started in the middle of last century, have explore analytical, numerical and artificial intelligence resources to reach the optimal flight planning. In parallel, advances in meteorology and communications allow an almost real-time knowledge of the atmospheric conditions and a reliable, error-bounded forecast for the near future. Thus, apart from weather risks to be avoided, airplanes can dynamically adapt their trajectories to minimise their costs. International regulators are aware about these capabilities, so it is reasonable to envisage some changes to allow this dynamic planning negotiation to soon become operational. Moreover, current unmanned airplanes, very popular and often small, suffer the impact of winds and other weather conditions in form of dramatic changes in their performance. The present paper reviews analytic and numeric solutions for typical trajectory planning problems. Analytic methods are those trying to solve the problem using the Pontryagin principle, where influence parameters are added to state variables to form a split condition differential equation problem. The system can be solved numerically -indirect optimisation- or using parameterised functions -direct optimisation-. On the other hand, numerical methods are based on Bellman's dynamic programming (or Dijkstra algorithms), where the fact that two optimal trajectories can be concatenated to form a new optimal one if the joint point is demonstrated to belong to the final optimal solution. There is no a-priori conditions for the best method. Traditionally, analytic has been more employed for continuous problems whereas numeric for discrete ones. In the current problem, airplane behaviour is defined by continuous equations, while wind fields are given in a

  3. Flight investigation of the effects of an outboard wing-leading-edge modification on stall/spin characteristics of a low-wing, single-engine, T-tail light airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, H. Paul, III; Dicarlo, Daniel J.; Patton, James M., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Flight tests were performed to investigate the change in stall/spin characteristics due to the addition of an outboard wing-leading-edge modification to a four-place, low-wing, single-engine, T-tail, general aviation research airplane. Stalls and attempted spins were performed for various weights, center of gravity positions, power settings, flap deflections, and landing-gear positions. Both stall behavior and wind resistance were improved compared with the baseline airplane. The latter would readily spin for all combinations of power settings, flap deflections, and aileron inputs, but the modified airplane did not spin at idle power or with flaps extended. With maximum power and flaps retracted, the modified airplane did enter spins with abused loadings or for certain combinations of maneuver and control input. The modified airplane tended to spin at a higher angle of attack than the baseline airplane.

  4. Spin-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/28-Scale Model of a Subsonic Attack Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Henry A.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1964-01-01

    An investigation has been made of a 1/28-scale model of the Grumman A-6A airplane in the Langley spin tunnel. The erect spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the flight design gross weight loading and for a loading with full internal fuel and empty external wing fuel tanks. The effects of extending slats and deflecting flaps were investigated. Inverted-spin and recovery characteristics of the model were determined for the flight design gross weight loading. The size of the spin-recovery tail parachute necessary to insure satisfactory spin-recovery was determined, and the effect of firing wing-mounded rockets during spins was investigated.

  5. Nanosecond-level time synchronization of AERA using a beacon reference transmitter and commercial airplanes

    CERN Document Server

    Huege, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Radio detection of cosmic-ray air showers requires time synchronization of detectors on a nanosecond level, especially for advanced reconstruction algorithms based on the wavefront curvature and for interferometric analysis approaches. At the Auger Engineering Radio Array, the distributed, autonomous detector stations are time-synchronized via the Global Positioning System which, however, does not provide sufficient timing accuracy. We thus employ a dedicated beacon reference transmitter to correct for event-by-event clock drifts in our offline data analysis. In an independent cross-check of this "beacon correction" using radio pulses emitted by commercial airplanes, we have shown that the combined timing accuracy of the two methods is better than 2 nanoseconds.

  6. Pitch Controllability Based on Airplane Model without Short-Period Approximation—Flight Simulator Experiment—

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Osamu; Kobayashi, Osamu

    Pitch controllability of an airplane is very important for longitudinal flying qualities, therefore, much research has been conducted. However, it has not been clarified why pitch handling qualities degrades in the low speed, e.g. take-off and landing flight phases. On this topic, this paper investigates the effect of several parameters of the short-period mode and phugoid mode using a flight simulator. The results show the following conclusions: The difference between the initial phase angles in two modal components in the pitch attitude response to elevator step input plays the most important role in the pitch handling qualities among modal parameters; and the difference of the two modal natural frequencies has small effect on the pitch controllability even when flight speed decreases.

  7. Experiments to Determine Neighborhood Reactions to Light Airplanes With and Without External Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwell, Fred S

    1953-01-01

    The work reported was part of a program of experimentation with external noise reduction on light airplanes. This particular study was in effect a byproduct survey conceived to utilize already available equipment and personnel to further the findings of the original research and to determine reactions in populated neighborhoods to light aircraft with and without noise-reduction equipment. The findings indicate that at the 10 sites within and about metropolitan Boston the degree of noise reduction previously found to be aerodynamically and structurally feasible did eliminate substantially all neighborhood objections to noise per se. The evidence clearly suggests that, when the noise nuisance is minimized to the extent found feasible, the number and severity of other objections also diminish -- evidently because the flight operations are noticed less when heard less.

  8. Subjective response to combined noise and vibration during flight of a large twin-jet airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenson, S. A.

    1976-01-01

    A NASA twin-jet airplane was used to obtain controlled noise and vibration environments during flight while obtaining subjective responses from 13 passenger-subjects (6 females and 7 males). Subjective ratings of overall comfort, comfort when considering only vibration, and comfort when considering only noise were obtained during times of different vibration and noise environments. Passenger-subjects were able to distinguish and rate noise better than vibration. In addition, there was a statistically significant difference in ratings of ride comfort due to both sex type and flight experience. Males rated flying discomfort much more severely than females when rating the overall ride and the ride when considering only the noise environment. Experienced passengers also rated the overall ride to be more uncomfortable than inexperienced passengers.

  9. UWB EMI To Aircraft Radios: Field Evaluation on Operational Commercial Transport Airplanes. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oria, A. J. (Editor); Ely, Jay J.; Martin, Warren L.; Shaver, Timothy W.; Fuller, Gerald L.; Zimmerman, John; Fuschino, Robert L.; Larsen, William E.

    2005-01-01

    Ultrawideband (UWB) transmitters may soon be integrated into a wide variety of portable electronic devices (PEDs) that passengers routinely carry on board commercial airplanes. Airlines and the FAA will have difficulty controlling passenger use of UWB transmitters during flights with current airline policies and existing wireless product standards. The aeronautical community is concerned as to whether evolving FCC UWB rules are adequate to protect legacy and emerging aeronautical radio systems from electromagnetic interference (EMI) from emerging UWB products. To address these concerns, the NASA Office of Space Communications and Chief Spectrum Managers assembled a multidisciplinary team from NASA LaRC, NASA JPL, NASA ARC, FAA, United Airlines, Sky West Airlines, and Eagles Wings Inc. to carry out a comprehensive series of tests aimed at determining the nature and extent of any EMI to aeronautical communication and navigation systems from UWB devices meeting FCCapproved and proposed levels for unlicensed handheld transmitters.

  10. Effects of control inputs on the estimation of stability and control parameters of a light airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannaday, R. L.; Suit, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    The maximum likelihood parameter estimation technique was used to determine the values of stability and control derivatives from flight test data for a low-wing, single-engine, light airplane. Several input forms were used during the tests to investigate the consistency of parameter estimates as it relates to inputs. These consistencies were compared by using the ensemble variance and estimated Cramer-Rao lower bound. In addition, the relationship between inputs and parameter correlations was investigated. Results from the stabilator inputs are inconclusive but the sequence of rudder input followed by aileron input or aileron followed by rudder gave more consistent estimates than did rudder or ailerons individually. Also, square-wave inputs appeared to provide slightly improved consistency in the parameter estimates when compared to sine-wave inputs.

  11. ANALYSIS FOR AERODYNAMICS OF THE SIMPLIFIED MODEL OF A COMMERCIAL AIRPLANE CRUISING AT TRANSONIC SPEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KIM YANGKYUN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the computational analysis and visualization of flow around the model of a commercial airplane, Boeing 747-400. The geometry was realized through reverse engineering technique based on the photo scanning measurement. The steady three-dimensional viscous compressible governing equations were solved in the unstructured grid system. The basic conditions for computation were chosen as the same to those of Boeing 747-400’s cruising state. The high Reynolds turbulence models are tried. The angle of attack is varied to investigate the effect of the flight conditions to the aerodynamic performance. And flow and aerodynamic characteristics due to the existence of winglet were compared.

  12. Mathematical adventures in performance analysis from storage systems, through airplane boarding, to express line queues

    CERN Document Server

    Bachmat, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    This monograph describes problems in the field of performance analysis, primarily the study of storage systems and the diverse mathematical techniques that are required for solving such problems. Topics covered include best practices for scheduling I/O requests to a disk drive, how this problem is related to airplane boarding, and how both problems can be modeled using space-time geometry. The author also explains how Riemann's proof of the analytic continuation and functional equation of the Riemann zeta function can be used to analyze express-line queues in a minimarket. Overall, the book reveals the surprising applicability of abstract mathematical ideas that are not usually associated with applied topics. Advanced undergraduate students or graduate students with an interest in the applications of mathematics will find this book a useful resource. It will also be of interest to professional mathematicians who want exposure to the surprising ways that theoretical mathematics may be applied to engineering pr...

  13. Wing Torsional Stiffness Tests of the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokos, William A.; Olney, Candida D.; Crawford, Natalie D.; Stauf, Rick; Reichenbach, Eric Y.

    2002-01-01

    The left wing of the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) F/A-18 airplane has been ground-load-tested to quantify its torsional stiffness. The test has been performed at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in November 1996, and again in April 2001 after a wing skin modification was performed. The primary objectives of these tests were to characterize the wing behavior before the first flight, and provide a before-and-after measurement of the torsional stiffness. Two streamwise load couples have been applied. The wing skin modification is shown to have more torsional flexibility than the original configuration has. Additionally, structural hysteresis is shown to be reduced by the skin modification. Data comparisons show good repeatability between the tests.

  14. Effects of Medium Characteristics on Laser RCS of Airplane with E-Wave Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosam El-Ocla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plane wave incidence should be postulated to have an authentic target detection. Practically, the plane wave is incapable usually of keeping its power in the far field especially when propagating through an inhomogeneous medium. Consequently, we assume an incident beam wave with a finite width around the target. In this work, we calculate numerically a laser radar cross section (LRCS of conducting targets having smooth cross sections with inflection points such as airplane in random media. Effects of fluctuations intensity of random media on the LRCS performance are studied in this paper. E-wave polarization (E-wave incidence is considered while the mean target size is approximately twice the wavelength.

  15. A statistical mechanics model for free-for-all airplane passenger boarding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I discuss a model for free-for-all passenger boarding which is employed by some discount air carriers. The model is based on the principles of statistical mechanics where each seat in the aircraft has an associated energy which reflects the preferences of travelers. As each passenger enters the airplane they select their seats using Boltzmann statistics, proceed to that location, load their luggage, sit down, and the partition function seen by remaining passengers is modified to reflect this fact. I discuss the various model parameters and make qualitative comparisons of this passenger boarding model with those that involve assigned seats. The model can be used to predict the probability that certain seats will be occupied at different times during the boarding process. These results might provide a useful description of this boarding method. The model is a relatively unusual application of undergraduate level physics and describes a situation familiar to many students and faculty

  16. Vibration isolation of a building against earthquake, airplane crash and blast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of three different support concepts on the vibration responses of a building to the load cases earthquake, airplane crash and blast is numerically investigated. Compared are the three concepts: the standard version of a double shell structure with a combined base for inner and outer building without isolation system; the same building with isolation system between foundation slab and soil, as vibration isolation known so far; and as a third concept a double shell structure with completely separated inner and outer building, where the isolation system is placed between the two parts of the building. The results show that, compared to the standard concept, the third concept leads to a nearly complete isolation of shock-induced vibrations, and to a reduction of the vibrations caused by an earthquake, comparable to the reduction in the isolation concept known so far. (orig.)

  17. Design of a nuclear facility against earthquake, airplane crash and blast wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integral 3D shell model for the vitrification plant is developed at which all global static and dynamic results as displacements, accelerations, reinforcement, floor response spectra are determined. For the design of the outer walls, dominated by the direct impacts of airplane crash, a non-linear 2-mass-model is used. The results are verified by a finite element model with non-linear material laws for the reinforced concrete inducing cracking, tension stiffening and membrane effects. The floor response spectra of the load cases APC envelop the load case earthquake which again covers the load case blast. The equipment in the cells requires a coupled 3-D beam model of steel structure, vessels and piping. The report shows the state of the art in the design of a nuclear facility against extreme internal and external load cases

  18. A statistical mechanics model for free-for-all airplane passenger boarding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    I discuss a model for free-for-all passenger boarding which is employed by some discount air carriers. The model is based on the principles of statistical mechanics where each seat in the aircraft has an associated energy which reflects the preferences of travelers. As each passenger enters the airplane they select their seats using Boltzmann statistics, proceed to that location, load their luggage, sit down, and the partition function seen by remaining passengers is modified to reflect this fact. I discuss the various model parameters and make qualitative comparisons of this passenger boarding model with those that involve assigned seats. The model can be used to predict the probability that certain seats will be occupied at different times during the boarding process. These results might provide a useful description of this boarding method. The model is a relatively unusual application of undergraduate level physics and describes a situation familiar to many students and faculty.

  19. Annoyance from Road Traffic, Trains, Airplanes and from Total Environmental Noise Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragettli, Martina S; Goudreau, Sophie; Plante, Céline; Perron, Stéphane; Fournier, Michel; Smargiassi, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of studies assessing the exposure-response relationship between transportation noise and annoyance in North America. Our aims were to investigate the prevalence of noise annoyance induced by road traffic, trains and airplanes in relation to distance to transportation noise sources, and to total environmental noise levels in Montreal, Canada; annoyance was assessed as noise-induced disturbance. A telephone-based survey among 4336 persons aged >18 years was conducted. Exposure to total environmental noise (A-weighted outdoor noise levels-LAeq24h and day-evening-night equivalent noise levels-Lden) for each study participant was determined using a statistical noise model (land use regression-LUR) that is based on actual outdoor noise measurements. The proportion of the population annoyed by road traffic, airplane and train noise was 20.1%, 13.0% and 6.1%, respectively. As the distance to major roads, railways and the Montreal International Airport increased, the percentage of people disturbed and highly disturbed due to the corresponding traffic noise significantly decreased. When applying the statistical noise model we found a relationship between noise levels and disturbance from road traffic and total environmental noise, with Prevalence Proportion Ratios (PPR) for highly disturbed people of 1.10 (95% CI: 1.07-1.13) and 1.04 (1.02-1.06) per 1 dB(A) Lden, respectively. Our study provides the first comprehensive information on the relationship between transportation noise levels and disturbance in a Canadian city. LUR models are still in development and further studies on transportation noise induced annoyance are consequently needed, especially for sources other than road traffic. PMID:26729143

  20. Drop test and crash simulation of a civil airplane fuselage section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiaochuan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Crashworthiness of a civil airplane fuselage section was studied in this paper. Firstly, the failure criterion of a rivet was studied by test, showing that the ultimate tension and shear failure loads were obviously affected by the loading speed. The relations between the loading speed and the average ultimate shear, tension loads were expressed by two logarithmic functions. Then, a vertical drop test of a civil airplane fuselage section was conducted with an actual impact velocity of 6.85 m/s, meanwhile the deformation of cabin frame and the accelerations at typical locations were measured. The finite element model of a main fuselage structure was developed and validated by modal test, and the error between the calculated frequencies and the test ones of the first four modes were less than 5%. Numerical simulation of the drop test was performed by using the LS-DYNA code and the simulation results show a good agreement with that of drop test. Deforming mode of the analysis was the same as the drop test; the maximum average rigid acceleration in test was 8.81g while the calculated one was 9.17g, with an error of 4.1%; average maximum test deformation at four points on the front cabin floor was 420 mm, while the calculated one was 406 mm, with an error of 3.2%; the peak value of the calculated acceleration at a typical location was 14.72g, which is lower than the test result by 5.46%; the calculated rebound velocity result was greater than the test result 17.8% and energy absorption duration was longer than the test result by 5.73%.

  1. Sleep Disturbance from Road Traffic, Railways, Airplanes and from Total Environmental Noise Levels in Montreal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Stéphane; Plante, Céline; Ragettli, Martina S; Kaiser, David J; Goudreau, Sophie; Smargiassi, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    The objective of our study was to measure the impact of transportation-related noise and total environmental noise on sleep disturbance for the residents of Montreal, Canada. A telephone-based survey on noise-related sleep disturbance among 4336 persons aged 18 years and over was conducted. LNight for each study participant was estimated using a land use regression (LUR) model. Distance of the respondent's residence to the nearest transportation noise source was also used as an indicator of noise exposure. The proportion of the population whose sleep was disturbed by outdoor environmental noise in the past 4 weeks was 12.4%. The proportion of those affected by road traffic, airplane and railway noise was 4.2%, 1.5% and 1.1%, respectively. We observed an increased prevalence in sleep disturbance for those exposed to both rail and road noise when compared for those exposed to road only. We did not observe an increased prevalence in sleep disturbance for those that were both exposed to road and planes when compared to those exposed to road or planes only. We developed regression models to assess the marginal proportion of sleep disturbance as a function of estimated LNight and distance to transportation noise sources. In our models, sleep disturbance increased with proximity to transportation noise sources (railway, airplane and road traffic) and with increasing LNight values. Our study provides a quantitative estimate of the association between total environmental noise levels estimated using an LUR model and sleep disturbance from transportation noise. PMID:27529260

  2. Annoyance from Road Traffic, Trains, Airplanes and from Total Environmental Noise Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina S. Ragettli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of studies assessing the exposure-response relationship between transportation noise and annoyance in North America. Our aims were to investigate the prevalence of noise annoyance induced by road traffic, trains and airplanes in relation to distance to transportation noise sources, and to total environmental noise levels in Montreal, Canada; annoyance was assessed as noise-induced disturbance. A telephone-based survey among 4336 persons aged >18 years was conducted. Exposure to total environmental noise (A-weighted outdoor noise levels—LAeq24h and day-evening-night equivalent noise levels—Lden for each study participant was determined using a statistical noise model (land use regression—LUR that is based on actual outdoor noise measurements. The proportion of the population annoyed by road traffic, airplane and train noise was 20.1%, 13.0% and 6.1%, respectively. As the distance to major roads, railways and the Montreal International Airport increased, the percentage of people disturbed and highly disturbed due to the corresponding traffic noise significantly decreased. When applying the statistical noise model we found a relationship between noise levels and disturbance from road traffic and total environmental noise, with Prevalence Proportion Ratios (PPR for highly disturbed people of 1.10 (95% CI: 1.07–1.13 and 1.04 (1.02–1.06 per 1 dB(A Lden, respectively. Our study provides the first comprehensive information on the relationship between transportation noise levels and disturbance in a Canadian city. LUR models are still in development and further studies on transportation noise induced annoyance are consequently needed, especially for sources other than road traffic.

  3. Sleep Disturbance from Road Traffic, Railways, Airplanes and from Total Environmental Noise Levels in Montreal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Perron

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our study was to measure the impact of transportation-related noise and total environmental noise on sleep disturbance for the residents of Montreal, Canada. A telephone-based survey on noise-related sleep disturbance among 4336 persons aged 18 years and over was conducted. LNight for each study participant was estimated using a land use regression (LUR model. Distance of the respondent’s residence to the nearest transportation noise source was also used as an indicator of noise exposure. The proportion of the population whose sleep was disturbed by outdoor environmental noise in the past 4 weeks was 12.4%. The proportion of those affected by road traffic, airplane and railway noise was 4.2%, 1.5% and 1.1%, respectively. We observed an increased prevalence in sleep disturbance for those exposed to both rail and road noise when compared for those exposed to road only. We did not observe an increased prevalence in sleep disturbance for those that were both exposed to road and planes when compared to those exposed to road or planes only. We developed regression models to assess the marginal proportion of sleep disturbance as a function of estimated LNight and distance to transportation noise sources. In our models, sleep disturbance increased with proximity to transportation noise sources (railway, airplane and road traffic and with increasing LNight values. Our study provides a quantitative estimate of the association between total environmental noise levels estimated using an LUR model and sleep disturbance from transportation noise.

  4. AIRPLANE INFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Air France Over the past few years. Air France has been committed to bringing its brand image up-to-date. Today, Air France unveils an important new stage, its revamped logo. To avoid additional costs, the change will be made gradually. Aircraft will be painted with the new

  5. Calculated performance of a mercury-compressor-jet powered airplane using a nuclear reactor as an energy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, R B

    1951-01-01

    An analysis was made at a flight Mach number of 1.5, an altitude of 45,000 feet, a turbine-inlet temperature of 1460 degrees R, of a mercury compressor-jet powered airplane using a nuclear reactor as an energy source. The calculations covered a range of turbine-exhaust and turbine-inlet pressures and condenser-inlet Mach numbers. For a turbine--inlet pressure of 40 pounds per square inch absolute, a turbine-exhaust pressure of 14 pounds per square inch absolute, and a condenser-inlet Mach number of 0.23 the calculated airplane gross weight required to carry a 20,000 pound payload was 322000 pounds and the reactor heat release per unit volume was 8.9 kilowatts per cubic inch. These do not represent optimum operating conditions.

  6. Applications of power beaming from space-based nuclear power stations. [Laser beaming to airplanes; microwave beaming to ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, J.R.; Botts, T.E.; Hertzberg, A.

    1981-01-01

    Power beaming from space-based reactor systems is examined using an advanced compact, lightweight Rotating Bed Reactor (RBR). Closed Brayton power conversion efficiencies in the range of 30 to 40% can be achieved with turbines, with reactor exit temperatures on the order of 2000/sup 0/K and a liquid drop radiator to reject heat at temperatures of approx. 500/sup 0/K. Higher RBR coolant temperatures (up to approx. 3000/sup 0/K) are possible, but gains in power conversion efficiency are minimal, due to lower expander efficiency (e.g., a MHD generator). Two power beaming applications are examined - laser beaming to airplanes and microwave beaming to fixed ground receivers. Use of the RBR greatly reduces system weight and cost, as compared to solar power sources. Payback times are a few years at present prices for power and airplane fuel.

  7. Applications of Power Spectral Analysis Methods to Maneuver Loads Obtained on Jet Fighter Airplanes During Service Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, John P.; Hamer, Harold A.

    1961-01-01

    Power spectral densities of normal load factor have been obtained for two service operational training flights of a Republic F-84G airplane and three service operational training flights of a North American F-86A airplane in order to indicate the load-factor frequency content and possible uses of power spectral methods in analyzing maneuver load data. It was determined that the maneuvering load-factor time histories appeared to be described by a truncated normal distribution. The power spectral densities obtained were relatively level at frequencies below 0.03 cycle per second and varied inversely with approximately the cube of the frequency at the higher frequencies. In general, the frequency content was very low above 0.2 cycle per second. The load-factor peak distributions were estimated fairly well from the spectrum analysis. In addition, peak load data obtained during service operations of fighter-type airplanes with flight time totaling about 24,000 hours were examined and appeared to agree reasonably well with the type of equations obtained from spectrum peak-load distributions.

  8. The Unmanned Research Airplane Facility at the Cyprus Institute: Advanced Atmospheric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Manfred A.; Argyrides, Marios; Ioannou, Stelios; Keleshis, Christos

    2014-05-01

    Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) have been established as versatile tools for different applications, providing data and observations for atmospheric and Earth-Systems research. They provide an urgently needed link between in-situ ground based measurements and satellite remote sensing observations and are distinguished by significant versatility, flexibility and moderate operational costs. Building on an earlier project (Autonomous Flying Platforms for Atmospheric and Earth Surface Observations project; APAESO) of the Energy, Environment and Water Research Center (EEWRC) at the Cyprus Institute (APAESO is co-financed by the European Development Fund and the Republic of Cyprus through the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation), we have built up an Unmanned Research Aircraft Facility at The Cyprus Institute (CyI-URAF). The basic components of this facility comprise four CRUISERS airplanes (ET-Air, Slovakia) as UAS platforms, a substantial range of scientific instruments to be flown on these platforms, a mobile Ground Control Station and a well-equipped workshop and calibration laboratory. The APAESO platforms are suitable to carrying out atmospheric and earth-surface observations in the (Eastern) Mediterranean (and elsewhere). They enable 3D measurements for determining physical, chemical and radiative atmospheric properties, aerosol and dust concentrations and atmospheric dynamics as well as 2D investigations into land management practices, vegetation and agricultural mapping, contaminant detection and the monitoring and assessment of hydrological parameters and processes of a given region at high spatial resolution. We will report on some of the essential modifications of the platforms and some of the instrumentation that were instrumental in preparing the research airplanes for a variety of collaborative research projects with. The first scientific mission involved the employment of a DOAS-system (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) in cooperation with

  9. Measurement of energetic radiation generated during thunderstorm by a sounding balloon and an airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Tatsuo; Sanada, Yukihisa; Nishizawa, Yukiyasu; Yamada, Tsutomu; Orita, Tadashi; Muraoka, Koji; Sato, Masayuki; Watanabe, Akira

    2015-04-01

    Energetic radiation caused by thunderstorm activity is observed at various places, such as the ground, high mountain areas, and artificial satellites. In order to investigate the source location of the radiation and its energy distribution, we observed radiation using a sounding balloon and an airplane in the inside and above the thundercloud which would be near a source of radiation. On the measurement in the thundercloud, we conducted a sounding observation using a radiosonde mounted two GM tubes (for gamma-rays, and for beta/gamma-rays), besides meteorological instruments. The balloon passed through a region of strong echoes in a thundercloud shown by radar image, at which time an increase in counting rate of the GM tube about 2 orders of magnitude occurred at the altitude from 5 km to 7.5 km. Furthermore, the counting rate of 2 GM tubes indicated the tendency different depending on movement of a balloon. This result suggests that the ratio for the gamma-rays (energetic photons) of the beta-rays (energetic electrons) varies according to the place in the thundercloud. Then, we measured the variation of the energetic radiation from the top of the thundercloud using an airplane. At this time, we used two NaI detectors different in the size -- the large one is with the size of 5 inches (12.7cmφ ×12.7cm) to detect the energetic radiation (< 30 MeV) that will be emitted from strong electric field in a thundercloud, and 3 inches (7.62cmφ×7.62cm) detector for the measurement of low energy gamma-rays( < 3 MeV). We performed the radiation measurement by flying around the thunderclouds at 12 -- 14 km in height by the observation in the summer. Furthermore, in the winter season, we flew 5 -- 6 km in height and measured the radiation around the thunderclouds. The event that the counting rate was slightly exceeding a normal variation was observed by a result of the winter observation. About the cause, we are analyzing it now. We report the result of these measurements and

  10. Free-spinning-tunnel Investigation of a 1/30 Scale Model of a Twin-jet-swept-wing Fighter Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.; Healy, Frederick M.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel to determine the erect and inverted spin and recovery characteristics of a 1/30-scale dynamic model of a twin-jet swept-wing fighter airplane. The model results indicate that the optimum erect spin recovery technique determined (simultaneous rudder reversal to full against the spin and aileron deflection to full with the spin) will provide satisfactory recovery from steep-type spins obtained on the airplane. It is considered that the air-plane will not readily enter flat-type spins, also indicated as possible by the model tests, but developed-spin conditions should be avoided in as much as the optimum recovery procedure may not provide satisfactory recovery if the airplane encounters a flat-type developed spin. Satisfactory recovery from inverted spins will be obtained on the airplane by neutralization of all controls. A 30-foot- diameter (laid-out-flat) stable tail parachute having a drag coefficient of 0.67 and a towline length of 27.5 feet will be satisfactory for emergency spin recovery.

  11. Proposed Flight Research of a Dual-Bell Rocket Nozzle Using the NASA F-15 Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel S.; Bui, Trong T.; Ruf, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    For more than a half-century, several types of altitude-compensating rocket nozzles have been proposed and analyzed, but very few have been adequately tested in a relevant flight environment. One type of altitude-compensating nozzle is the dual-bell rocket nozzle, which was first introduced into literature in 1949. Despite the performance advantages that have been predicted, both analytically and through static test data, the dual-bell nozzle has still not been adequately tested in a relevant flight environment. This paper proposes a method for conducting testing and research with a dual-bell rocket nozzle in a flight environment. We propose to leverage the existing NASA F-15 airplane and Propulsion Flight Test Fixture as the flight testbed, with the dual-bell nozzle operating during captive-carried flights, and with the nozzle subjected to a local flow field similar to that of a launch vehicle. The primary objective of this effort is not only to advance the technology readiness level of the dual-bell nozzle, but also to gain a greater understanding of the nozzle mode transitional sensitivity to local flow-field effects, and to quantify the performance benefits with this technology. The predicted performance benefits are significant, and may result in reducing the cost of delivering payloads to low-Earth orbit.

  12. Radon-222 measurements aboard an airplane for the description of atmospheric diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon-222 is absorbed aboard an airplane in tubes filled with 50 g of selected charcoal and cooked in Dewars by carbon dioxide and freon. After air collection at different heights up to 5 km, the tubes are evacuated and heated in the laboratory for desorption of the gas molecules and for transfer into a decay chamber covered with zinc-sulfide serving as a scintillator for the detection of alpha activity from radon-222 and its daughters. In general, the measurements show an exponential decrease of the concentration up to 5 km in height, if there is no cloud layer. The height for a reduction by a factor of two is about 900 meters. Assuming a constant diffusion coefficient K0 up to 5 km, the measurements yield a K0 of approximately 3.7 x 104 cm2s-1. For flights in stratiform clouds a decrease is observed of the concentration up to a certain height, then radon-222 is again increasing or remains constant. This must be explained with respect to the meteorological situation. Assuming only a constant value for K0 between the different flying heights, it was possible to appraise the development of the eddy diffusion coefficient with height

  13. Study on depleted uranium at the airplane accident in Bijlmermeer, Amsterdam, Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The El Al airplane, which crashed in the urban area Bijlmermeer in Amsterdam, Netherlands, October 4th, 1992, contained balance weights of depleted uranium. Part of the balance weights has not been found after the disaster and its not sure what happened with the lost part. One of the options is that the uranium atomized during or after the fire. To clarify this the Dutch Civil Aviation Authority (RLD) ordered the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN) to study the fore-mentioned option on the basis of the following questions: (1) at which temperature will depleted uranium atomize and thus be released into the air?; (2) at which temperature will depleted uranium burn?; and (3) what is the chance that depleted uranium will atomize under the conditions as they occurred during the aircraft accident in the Bijlmermeer? The overall impression is that during the fire little if any uranium oxide has been released into the air. Because of lack of knowledge about the actual conditions, partial or complete oxidation can not be excluded with cast-iron certainty. 16 refs

  14. Airplane crash in Guam, August 6, 1997: the aeromedical evacuation response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancio, Leopoldo C

    2006-01-01

    A civilian airplane crash on the island of Guam in 1997 produced 16 burned survivors. The U.S. Army Burn Flight Team and U.S. Air Force Critical Care Air Transport Teams conducted a joint aeromedical mission in response to this disaster. This experience was reviewed from the Burn Flight Team perspective. A record of events was made during the mission, and an after-action review was conducted after the mission. Twelve patients were transported to Korea, and four critically ill patients were transported to the U.S. Army Burn Center in San Antonio, TX. The latter mission required 21 hours of in-flight critical care and was completed 4 days and 3 hours after the crash. After-action review resulted in changes in communications procedures, administrative oversight, supplies and equipment, composition of the Burn Flight Team, and readiness and training. These peacetime lessons contributed to the military's ability to transport wartime burn casualties in ensuing years and indicate the close interdependence of the disaster response and combat missions. PMID:16998396

  15. Nighttime observations of thunderstorm electrical activity from a high altitude airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, M.; Rhodes, C.; Vaughan, O. H., Jr.; Orville, R. E.; Vonnegut, B.

    1984-01-01

    Photographs from a NASA U-2 airplane flying over nocturnal thunderstorms show frequent lightning activity in the upper part of the cloud. In some cases, unobscured segments of lightning channels 1 km or longer are visible in clear air around and above the cloud. Multiple images of lightning channels indicate multiple discharges in the same channel. Photographs taken through a diffraction grating show that the lightning has a spectrum similar to that observed in the lower troposphere. Lightning spectra obtained with a slitless line-scan spectrometer show strong singly ionized nitrogen emissions at 463.0 and 500.5 nm. Field changes measured with an electric field-change meter correlate with pulses measured with a photocell optical system. Optical signals corresponding to dart leader, return stroke, and continuing current events are readily distinguished in the scattered light emerging from the cloud surface. The variation of light intensity with time in lightning events is consistent with predicted modification of optical lightning signals by clouds. It appears that satellite based optical sensor measurements cannot provide reliable information on current rise times in return strokes. On the other hand, discrimination between cloud-to-ground and intracloud flashes and the counting of ground strokes is possible using the optical pulse pairs which have been identified with leader, return-stroke events in the cloud-to-ground flashes studied.

  16. Auto-immune concept for dealing with the problem of airplane hijacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibi, Dov Y.

    2003-08-01

    This paper analyzes the inherent contradictions that exist in most of the conventional approaches dealing with airplane hijacking, and presents a completely different approach, employing innovative technological and operational solution. The suggested techno-operational concept is derived from the Systematic Inventive Thinking (SIT) methodology which enforces the problem solver to search for a solution under a few constraining rules -- causing the solution (if found) to be very cost effective. The basic problem that arises from most existing conventional concepts is their very poor cost effectiveness. Passengers, airport operators and aviation companies are all forced to invest on a continual basis, huge amounts of resources and time in order to prevent a hijacking event. The "Auto Immune" concept, discussed here, is based upon enlisting the passengers (in a case of "Hijacking Event" only) to foil the event successfully by releasing, in real-time, a very effective "One-time Non-Lethal Apparatus" (ONLA). This new paradigm changes dramatically the balance of power in favor of the "good guys", and the few hijackers will be neutralized at low risk to the passengers and the aircraft. The detailed technological and operational concept is described, including: operation modes of ONLA, location, release method, safety issues, psychological and legal issues, etc.

  17. Why do airlines want and use thrust reversers? A compilation of airline industry responses to a survey regarding the use of thrust reversers on commercial transport airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    1995-01-01

    Although thrust reversers are used for only a fraction of the airplane operating time, their impact on nacelle design, weight, airplane cruise performance, and overall airplane operating and maintenance expenses is significant. Why then do the airlines want and use thrust reversers? In an effort to understand the airlines need for thrust reversers, a survey of the airline industry was made to determine why and under what situations thrust reversers are currently used or thought to be needed. The survey was intended to help establish the cost/benefits trades for the use of thrust reversers and airline opinion regarding alternative deceleration devices. A compilation and summary of the responses given to the survey questionnaire is presented.

  18. Analysis of the turbojet engine for propulsion of supersonic fighter airplanes / David S. Gabriel, Richard P. Krebs, E.Clinton Wilcox, Stanley L.Koutz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, David S; Krebs, Richard P; Wilcox, E Clinton; Koutz, Stanley L

    1953-01-01

    An analytical investigation was made of two supersonic interceptor type airplanes to determine the most desirable turbojet engine characteristics for this application The airplanes were designed differently primarily because of the amount of subsonic flight incorporated in the flight plan--one flight having none and the other, a cruise radius of 400 nautical miles. Several power plant design variables were varied independently to determine the effect of changes in each parameter on airplane performance. These parameters included compressor pressure ratio, compressor efficiency, turbine-inlet temperature, afterburner temperature, engine specific weight, and air-handling capacity. The effects of using a convergent-divergent exhaust nozzle and of changing the design flight Mach number were also investigated.

  19. Piloted-simulation study of effects of vortex flaps on low-speed handling qualities of a Delta-wing airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Jay M.; Brown, Philip W.; Wunschel, Alfred J.

    1987-01-01

    A piloted-simulation study was conducted to investigate the effects of vortex flaps on low-speed handling qualities of a delta-wing airplane. The simulation math model was developed from wind tunnel tests of a 0.15 scale model of the F-106B airplane. Pilot evaluations were conducted using a six-degree-of-freedom motion base simulator. The results of the investigation showed that the reduced static longitudinal stability caused by the vortex flaps significantly degraded handling qualities in the approach-to-landing task. Acceptable handling qualities could be achieved by limiting the aft center-of-gravity location, consequently reducing the operational envelope of the airplane. Further improvement were possible by modifying the flight control force-feel system to reduce pitch-control sensitivity.

  20. A Preliminary Flight Test on a Basic Performance of the Flight Research Airplane Do 228:Velocity v.s. Glide Path Angle

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshikazu, Miyazawa; Takatsugu, Ono; Yasuhito, Kawagoe

    1989-01-01

    A preliminary flight test was conducted of the research airplane Dornier Do228-200 that is being modified for use as an in-flight simulator by the National Aerospace Laboratory. The basic performance of the airplane was evaluated by the flight test. Glide path angles were examined with various parameters, such as velocity, altitude, and power. The flight test results were compared with those of a mathematical model based on the Dornier GmbH wind-tunnel test data. Since an onboard data acquisi...