WorldWideScience

Sample records for aircraft structural metals

  1. Analytical and experimental investigation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites. Phase 3: Major component development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, L. L.; Mccarty, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations, performed to establish the feasibility of reinforcing metal aircraft structures with advanced filamentary composites, are reported. Aluminum-boron-epoxy and titanium-boron-epoxy were used in the design and manufacture of three major structural components. The components were representative of subsonic aircraft fuselage and window belt panels and supersonic aircraft compression panels. Both unidirectional and multidirectional reinforcement concepts were employed. Blade penetration, axial compression, and inplane shear tests were conducted. Composite reinforced structural components designed to realistic airframe structural criteria demonstrated the potential for significant weight savings while maintaining strength, stability, and damage containment properties of all metal components designed to meet the same criteria.

  2. Knowledge based system and decision making methodologies in materials selection for aircraft cabin metallic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Pashupati Raj

    Materials selection processes have been the most important aspects in product design and development. Knowledge-based system (KBS) and some of the methodologies used in the materials selection for the design of aircraft cabin metallic structures are discussed. Overall aircraft weight reduction means substantially less fuel consumption. Part of the solution to this problem is to find a way to reduce overall weight of metallic structures inside the cabin. Among various methodologies of materials selection using Multi Criterion Decision Making (MCDM) techniques, a few of them are demonstrated with examples and the results are compared with those obtained using Ashby's approach in materials selection. Pre-defined constraint values, mainly mechanical properties, are employed as relevant attributes in the process. Aluminum alloys with high strength-to-weight ratio have been second-to-none in most of the aircraft parts manufacturing. Magnesium alloys that are much lighter in weight as alternatives to the Al-alloys currently in use in the structures are tested using the methodologies and ranked results are compared. Each material attribute considered in the design are categorized as benefit and non-benefit attribute. Using Ashby's approach, material indices that are required to be maximized for an optimum performance are determined, and materials are ranked based on the average of consolidated indices ranking. Ranking results are compared for any disparity among the methodologies.

  3. Aircraft Metal Skin Repair and Honeycomb Structure Repair; Sheet Metal Work 3: 9857.02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course helps students determine types of repairs, compute repair sizes, and complete the repair through surface protection. Course content includes goals, specific objectives, protection of metals, repairs to metal skin, and honeycomb structure repair. A bibliography and post-test are appended. A prerequisite for this course is mastery of the…

  4. Residual stress alleviation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J. B.; June, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Methods to eliminate or reduce residual stresses in aircraft metal structures reinforced by filamentary composites are discussed. Residual stress level reductions were achieved by modifying the manufacturing procedures used during adhesive bonding. The residual stress alleviation techniques involved various forms of mechanical constraint which were applied to the components during bonding. Nine methods were evaluated, covering a wide range in complexity. All methods investigated during the program affected the residual stress level. In general, residual stresses were reduced by 70 percent or more from the stress level produced by conventional adhesive bonding procedures.

  5. Analysis and Testing of a Metallic Repair Applicable to Pressurized Composite Aircraft Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    Development of repair technology is vital to the long-term application of new structural concepts on aircraft structure. The design, analysis, and testing of a repair concept applicable to a stiffened composite panel based on the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure was recently completed. The damage scenario considered was a mid-bay to mid-bay saw-cut with a severed stiffener, flange, and skin. A bolted metallic repair was selected so that it could be easily applied in the operational environment. The present work describes results obtained from tension and pressure panel tests conducted to validate both the repair concept and finite element analysis techniques used in the design effort. Simulation and experimental strain and displacement results show good correlation, indicating that the finite element modeling techniques applied in the effort are an appropriate compromise between required fidelity and computational effort. Static tests under tension and pressure loadings proved that the proposed repair concept is capable of sustaining load levels that are higher than those resulting from the current working stress allowables. Furthermore, the pressure repair panel was subjected to 55,000 pressure load cycles to verify that the design can withstand a life cycle representative for a transport category aircraft. These findings enable upward revision of the stress allowables that had been kept at an overly-conservative level due to concerns associated with repairability of the panels. This conclusion enables more weight efficient structural designs utilizing the composite concept under investigation.

  6. Properties of Graphite Intercalates and of Aircraft Structural Metals and Alloys. A Comprehensive Data Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-05-01

    aid Bittel, J.T., "Rea- ommended Property and Reaction Kinetics Da for Us. In Evaluating a Light-Water-Cooled Reactor Loss-of-Coolant Incidet Involving...Electric Co., Cilncinati, Ohio, GEMP-643, 14 pp., 1968. 13 6477 Fleluhouse, L B., "Thermal Conductivity of Aircraft Structural and Reactor Materials...For extrap olation of data to higher temperatures and for estimation of values for the molten aloy, * the same methods as those discussed in the

  7. An overview of the crash dynamics failure behavior of metal and composite aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carden, Huey D.; Boitnott, Richard L.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jones, Lisa E.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of failure behavior results is presented from some of the crash dynamics research conducted with concepts of aircraft elements and substructure not necessarily designed or optimized for energy absorption or crash loading considerations. Experimental and analytical data are presented that indicate some general trends in the failure behavior of a class of composite structures that includes fuselage panels, individual fuselage sections, fuselage frames, skeleton subfloors with stringers and floor beams without skin covering, and subfloors with skin added to the frame stringer structure. Although the behavior is complex, a strong similarity in the static/dynamic failure behavior among these structures is illustrated through photographs of the experimental results and through analytical data of generic composite structural models.

  8. Composite materials for aircraft structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baker, A. A; Dutton, Stuart; Kelly, Donald

    2004-01-01

    ... materials for aircraft structures / Alan Baker, Stuart Dutton, and Donald Kelly- 2nd ed. p. cm. - (Education series) Rev. ed. of: Composite materials for aircraft structures / edited by B. C. Hos...

  9. An assessment of tailoring of lightning protection design requirements for a composite wing structure on a metallic aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Navy A-6E aircraft is presently being modified with a new wing which uses graphite/epoxy structures and substructures around a titanium load-bearing structure. The ability of composites to conduct electricity is less than that of aluminum. This is cause for concern when the wing may be required to conduct large lightning currents. The manufacturer attempted to solve lightning protection issues by performing a risk assessment based on a statistical approach which allows relaxation of the wing lightning protection design levels over certain locations of the composite wing. A sensitivity study is presented designed to define the total risk of relaxation of the design levels.

  10. Commercial transport aircraft composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccarty, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    The role that analysis plays in the development, production, and substantiation of aircraft structures is discussed. The types, elements, and applications of failure that are used and needed; the current application of analysis methods to commercial aircraft advanced composite structures, along with a projection of future needs; and some personal thoughts on analysis development goals and the elements of an approach to analysis development are discussed.

  11. Advanced technology composite aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Walker, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Work performed during the 25th month on NAS1-18889, Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures, is summarized. The main objective of this program is to develop an integrated technology and demonstrate a confidence level that permits the cost- and weight-effective use of advanced composite materials in primary structures of future aircraft with the emphasis on pressurized fuselages. The period from 1-31 May 1991 is covered.

  12. General rules for metal aircraft construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidoni, Alessandre

    1924-01-01

    The Commissariat of Aviation deems it expedient to issue a few rules of a general character which should be followed by constructors in designing aircraft, into the manufacture of which metal enters to a considerable extent. The materials covered include: aluminum, duralumin, soft steel, high-resistance steel, in sheets, tubing, and shaped elements.

  13. Carbon fiber counting. [aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pride, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for characterizing the number and lengths of carbon fibers accidentally released by the burning of composite portions of civil aircraft structure in a jet fuel fire after an accident. Representative samplings of carbon fibers collected on transparent sticky film were counted from photographic enlargements with a computer aided technique which also provided fiber lengths.

  14. Structural evaluation of spent nuclear fuel storage facilities under aircraft crash impact. Numerical study on evaluation of sealing performance of metal cask subjected to impact force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namba, Kosuke; Shirai, Koji; Saegusa, Toshiari

    2008-01-01

    A lot of safety evaluations on the important nuclear facilities against the aircraft crash have been reported in other countries. But the condition and the evaluation method to define impact force of aircraft crash have not been described clearly in the reports. In Japan, public concern with the safety evaluation against aircraft crash is increasing. It is important to make clear the behavior of the storage facilities installing the metal casks on impact loading due to aircraft crash. In this study, concerning crash between commercial aircraft and storage facility, impact analysis using dynamic analysis code LS-DYNA has been executed. The results showed that the storage facility was not completely destroyed. But the rigid aircraft engine may penetrate into the storage facility with local failure. Thus, we assumed the engine hit a metal cask in the storage facility and evaluated sealing performance of the metal cask under the impact loading. If the engine with 90m/s crashed the storage facility having concrete wall of 85cm in thickness, the remaining velocity became 60m/s after penetration. We calculated impact force of the engine with 60m/s crashing into the metal cask. Concerning the metal cask loaded the impact force, impact analysis was executed. We assumed two directions of impact force. One is vertical load and another is horizontal load against the cask. The result showed that plastic strain was not generated on flanges of the 1st lid and the sealing performance of the cask was maintained in each impact case. (author)

  15. Safety Assessment of a Metal Cask under Aircraft Engine Crash

    OpenAIRE

    Sanghoon Lee; Woo-Seok Choi; Ki-Seog Seo

    2016-01-01

    The structural integrity of a dual-purpose metal cask currently under development by the Korea Radioactive Waste Agency (KORAD) was evaluated, through numerical simulations and a model test, under high-speed missile impact reflecting targeted aircraft crash conditions. The impact conditions were carefully chosen through a survey on accident cases and recommendations from literature. In the impact scenario, a missile flying horizontally hits the top side of the cask, which is freestanding on a...

  16. Impact analysis of composite aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifko, Allan B.; Kushner, Alan S.

    1993-01-01

    The impact analysis of composite aircraft structures is discussed. Topics discussed include: background remarks on aircraft crashworthiness; comments on modeling strategies for crashworthiness simulation; initial study of simulation of progressive failure of an aircraft component constructed of composite material; and research direction in composite characterization for impact analysis.

  17. Optimisation of the geometry of the drill bit and process parameters for cutting hybrid composite/metal structures in new aircrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbilir, Ozden

    Owing to their desirable strength-to-weight characteristics, carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites have been favourite materials for structural applications in different industries such as aerospace, transport, sports and energy. They provide a weight reduction in whole structure and consequently decrease fuel consumption. The use of lightweight materials such as titanium and its alloys in modern aircrafts has also increased significantly in the last couple of decades. Titanium and its alloys offer high strength/weight ratio, high compressive and tensile strength at high temperatures, low density, excellent corrosion resistance, exceptional erosion resistance, superior fatigue resistance and relatively low modulus of elasticity. Although composite/metal hybrid structures are increasingly used in airframes nowadays, number of studies regarding drilling of composite/metal stacks is very limited. During drilling of multilayer materials different problems may arise due to very different attributes of these materials. Machining conditions of drilling such structures play an important role on tool wear, quality of holes and cost of machining.. The research work in this thesis is aimed to investigate drilling of CFRP/Ti6Al4V hybrid structure and to optimize process parameters and drill geometry. The research work consist complete experimental study including drilling tests, in-situ and post measurements and related analysis; and finite element analysis including fully 3-D finite element models. The experimental investigations focused on drilling outputs such as thrust force, torque, delamination, burr formation, surface roughness and tool wear. An algorithm was developed to analyse drilling induced delamination quantitatively based on the images. In the numerical analysis, novel 3-D finite element models of drilling of CFRP, Ti6Al4V and CFRP/Ti6Al4V hybrid structure were developed with the use of 3-D complex drill geometries. A user defined subroutine was developed

  18. Safety Assessment of a Metal Cask under Aircraft Engine Crash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghoon Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The structural integrity of a dual-purpose metal cask currently under development by the Korea Radioactive Waste Agency (KORAD was evaluated, through numerical simulations and a model test, under high-speed missile impact reflecting targeted aircraft crash conditions. The impact conditions were carefully chosen through a survey on accident cases and recommendations from literature. In the impact scenario, a missile flying horizontally hits the top side of the cask, which is freestanding on a concrete pad, with a velocity of 150 m/s. A simplified missile simulating a commercial aircraft engine was designed from an impact load–time function available in literature. In the analyses, the dynamic behavior of the metal cask and the integrity of the containment boundary were assessed. The simulation results were compared with the test results for a 1:3 scale model. Although the dynamic behavior of the cask in the model test did not match exactly with the prediction from the numerical simulation, other structural responses, such as the acceleration and strain history during the impact, showed very good agreement. Moreover, the containment function of the cask survived the missile impact as expected from the numerical simulation. Thus, the procedure and methodology adopted in the structural numerical analyses were successfully validated.

  19. Safety assessment of a metal cask under aircraft engine crash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hoon [Dept. of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Woo Seok; Seo, Ki Seog [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The structural integrity of a dual-purpose metal cask currently under development by the Korea Radioactive Waste Agency (KORAD) was evaluated, through numerical simulations and a model test, under high-speed missile impact reflecting targeted aircraft crash conditions. The impact conditions were carefully chosen through a survey on accident cases and recommendations from literature. In the impact scenario, a missile flying horizontally hits the top side of the cask, which is free standing on a concrete pad, with a velocity of 150 m/s. A simplified missile simulating a commercial aircraft engine was designed from an impact load-time function available in literature. In the analyses, the dynamic behavior of the metal cask and the integrity of the containment boundary were assessed. The simulation results were compared with the test results for a 1:3 scale model. Although the dynamic behavior of the cask in the model test did not match exactly with the prediction from the numerical simulation, other structural responses, such as the acceleration and strain history during the impact, showed very good agreement. Moreover, the containment function of the cask survived the missile impact as expected from the numerical simulation. Thus, the procedure and methodology adopted in the structural numerical analyses were successfully validated.

  20. Design of the crashworthy structure of an urban aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Bairong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of general aviation, the urban aircraft is around the corner. The urban aircraft with composite is considered as an ultralight vehicle and the crashworthiness is of vital importance for such an ultralight aircraft. Composites are being widely and increasingly used in the aerospace industry because of their advantages that include the high specific strength and stiffness over traditional metallic materials. Besides, composites have the potential for absorbing the energy in a crash event. The crashworthiness of the cockpit section is analyzed in this paper and some modifications in the subfloor have been made to improve the survivability of the pilot. Advances in commercial softwares have enabled engineers to simulate crash events. The three-dimensional structure model is established by use of CATIA software and the crash process is simulated by MSC/DYTRAN. By comparing the crashworthiness of composite structures, reliable basis is provided for the design of a safe and sound structure.

  1. Lightning Protection for Composite Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, G. O.

    1985-01-01

    Lightning protection system consisting of two layers of aluminum foil separated by layer of dielectric material protects graphite/epoxy composite structures on aircraft. Protective layer is secondarily applied lightning protection system, prime advantage of which is nullification of thermal and right angle effect of lightning arc attachment to graphite/epoxy laminate.

  2. Strength analysis and modeling of hybrid composite-aluminum aircraft structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kapidzic, Zlatan

    2013-01-01

    The current trend in aircraft design is to increase the proportion of fiber composites in the structures. Since many primary parts also are constructed using metals, the number of hybrid metal-composite structures is increasing. Such structures have traditionally often been avoided as an option because of the lack of methodology to handle the mismatch between the material properties. Composite and metal properties differ with respect to: thermal expansion, failure mechanisms, plasticity, sens...

  3. Structural analysis at aircraft conceptual design stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Reza

    In the past 50 years, computers have helped by augmenting human efforts with tremendous pace. The aircraft industry is not an exception. Aircraft industry is more than ever dependent on computing because of a high level of complexity and the increasing need for excellence to survive a highly competitive marketplace. Designers choose computers to perform almost every analysis task. But while doing so, existing effective, accurate and easy to use classical analytical methods are often forgotten, which can be very useful especially in the early phases of the aircraft design where concept generation and evaluation demands physical visibility of design parameters to make decisions [39, 2004]. Structural analysis methods have been used by human beings since the very early civilization. Centuries before computers were invented; the pyramids were designed and constructed by Egyptians around 2000 B.C, the Parthenon was built by the Greeks, around 240 B.C, Dujiangyan was built by the Chinese. Persepolis, Hagia Sophia, Taj Mahal, Eiffel tower are only few more examples of historical buildings, bridges and monuments that were constructed before we had any advancement made in computer aided engineering. Aircraft industry is no exception either. In the first half of the 20th century, engineers used classical method and designed civil transport aircraft such as Ford Tri Motor (1926), Lockheed Vega (1927), Lockheed 9 Orion (1931), Douglas DC-3 (1935), Douglas DC-4/C-54 Skymaster (1938), Boeing 307 (1938) and Boeing 314 Clipper (1939) and managed to become airborne without difficulty. Evidencing, while advanced numerical methods such as the finite element analysis is one of the most effective structural analysis methods; classical structural analysis methods can also be as useful especially during the early phase of a fixed wing aircraft design where major decisions are made and concept generation and evaluation demands physical visibility of design parameters to make decisions

  4. Smart Patches for Monitoring Fatigue Crack Growth in Aircraft Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ihn, Jeong-Beom

    2001-01-01

    A built-in cost-effective diagnostic system for monitoring crack growth in aircraft structures was developed, particularly for riveted fuselage joints and cracked aircraft parts with composite bonded patches...

  5. NOVEL APPROACH TO DESIGN OF LIGHTWEIGHT AND RELIABLE COMPOSITE PRIMARY AIRCRAFT STRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The experience of construction of composite primary aircraft structures has approved that the weight decrease for composite aggregates of aircraft in comparison with metallic analogues cannot be obtained within the frames of conventional structures based on stiffened laminated composite skin. One of the main reasons is the low level of stress-strain characteris- tics of current polymer resins, which does not allow to realize high strength characteristics of carbon fibers in laminated composit...

  6. Critical joints in large composite aircraft structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, W. D.; Bunin, B. L.; Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    A program was conducted at Douglas Aircraft Company to develop the technology for critical structural joints of composite wing structure that meets design requirements for a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The prime objective of the program was to demonstrate the ability to reliably predict the strength of large bolted composite joints. Ancillary testing of 180 specimens generated data on strength and load-deflection characteristics which provided input to the joint analysis. Load-sharing between fasteners in multirow bolted joints was computed by the nonlinear analysis program A4EJ. This program was used to predict strengths of 20 additional large subcomponents representing strips from a wing root chordwise splice. In most cases, the predictions were accurate to within a few percent of the test results. In some cases, the observed mode of failure was different than anticipated. The highlight of the subcomponent testing was the consistent ability to achieve gross-section failure strains close to 0.005. That represents a considerable improvement over the state of the art.

  7. Uncertain structural dynamics of aircraft panels and fuzzy structures analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Victor W.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    2002-11-01

    Aircraft fuselage panels, seemingly simple structures, are actually complex because of the uncertainty of the attachments of the frame stiffeners and longitudinal stringers. It is clearly important to understand the dynamics of these panels because of the subsequent radiation into the passenger cabin, even when complete information is not available for all portions of the finite-element model. Over the last few years a fuzzy structures analysis (FSA) approach has been undertaken at Penn State and NASA Langley to quantify the uncertainty in modeling aircraft panels. A new MSC.Nastran [MSC.Software Corp. (Santa Ana, CA)] Direct Matrix Abstraction Program (DMAP) code was written and tested [AIAA paper 2001-1320, 42nd AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conf., Seattle, WA, 16 April 2001] and was applied to simple fuselage panel models [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 2410(A) (2001)]. Recently the work has focused on understanding the dynamics of a realistic aluminum fuselage panel, typical of today's aircraft construction. This presentation will provide an overview of the research and recent results will be given for the fuselage panel. Comparison between experiments and the FSA results will be shown for different fuzzy input parameters. [Work supported by NASA Research Cooperative Agreement NCC-1-382.

  8. The Durability of Metal-Honeycomb Sandwich Structure Exposed to High Humidity Conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rider, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    .... The processes leading to degradation of metal-honeycomb sandwich structure and its effect on the structural integrity of F-111 structure is critical information required for successful, long term aircraft management...

  9. Reengineering Aircraft Structural Life Prediction Using a Digital Twin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Tuegel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Reengineering of the aircraft structural life prediction process to fully exploit advances in very high performance digital computing is proposed. The proposed process utilizes an ultrahigh fidelity model of individual aircraft by tail number, a Digital Twin, to integrate computation of structural deflections and temperatures in response to flight conditions, with resulting local damage and material state evolution. A conceptual model of how the Digital Twin can be used for predicting the life of aircraft structure and assuring its structural integrity is presented. The technical challenges to developing and deploying a Digital Twin are discussed in detail.

  10. Effects of aircraft noise on flight and ground structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixson, J. S.; Mayes, W. H.; Willis, C. M.

    1976-01-01

    Acoustic loads measured on jet-powered STOL configurations are presented for externally blown and upper surface blown flap models ranging in size from a small laboratory model up to a full-scale aircraft model. The implications of the measured loads for potential acoustic fatigue and cabin noise are discussed. Noise transmission characteristics of light aircraft structures are presented. The relative importance of noise transmission paths, such as fuselage sidewall and primary structure, is estimated. Acceleration responses of a historic building and a residential home are presented for flyover noise from subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Possible effects on occupant comfort are assessed. The results from these three examples show that aircraft noise can induce structural responses that are large enough to require consideration in the design or operation of the aircraft.

  11. Perspectives on Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Civil Aircraft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groves, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Safe and cost effective operation are the highest priorities for civil aircraft. Considering that many events that can occur during normal aircraft operation which cause a reduction in the residual strength of the structure, a rigid adherence to inspection and maintenance schedules and timely repair

  12. Resin transfer molding for advanced composite primary aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Alan; Palmer, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) has been identified by Douglas Aircraft Company (DAC) and industry to be one of the promising processes being developed today which can break the cost barrier of implementing composite primary structures into a commercial aircraft production environment. The RTM process developments and scale-up plans Douglas Aircrart will be conducting under the NASA ACT contract are discussed.

  13. Bayesian Computational Sensor Networks for Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-02

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0094 Bayesian Computational Sensor Networks for Aircraft Structural Health Monitoring. Thomas Henderson UNIVERSITY OF UTAH SALT ...Adams Grant Number: FA9550-12-1-0291 AFOSR PI: Dr. Frederica Darema 25 January 2016 University of Utah, Salt lake City UT 84112 Executive Summary...samples provided by a sensor network. This approach was applied to the aircraft structural health monitoring problem. Structural health monitoring

  14. Impact Analyses and Tests of Metal Cask Considering Aircraft Engine Crash - 12308

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sanghoon; Choi, Woo-Seok; Kim, Ki-Young; Jeon, Je-Eon; Seo, Ki-Seog [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    The structural integrity of a dual purpose metal cask currently under development by the Korea Radioactive Waste Management Cooperation (KRMC) is evaluated through analyses and tests under a high-speed missile impact considering the targeted aircraft crash conditions. The impact conditions were carefully chosen through a survey on accident cases and recommendations from the literature. The missile impact velocity was set at 150 m/s, and two impact orientations were considered. A simplified missile simulating a commercial aircraft engine is designed from an impact load history curve provided in the literature. In the analyses, the focus is on the evaluation of the containment boundary integrity of the metal cask. The analyses results are compared with the results of tests using a 1/3 scale model. The results show very good agreements, and the procedure and methodology adopted in the structural analyses are validated. While the integrity of the cask is maintained in one evaluation where the missile impacts the top side of the free standing cask, the containment boundary is breached in another case in which the missile impacts the center of the cask lid in a perpendicular orientation. A safety assessment using a numerical simulation of an aircraft engine crash into spent nuclear fuel storage systems is performed. A commercially available explicit finite element code is utilized for the dynamic simulation, and the strain rate effect is included in the modeling of the materials used in the target system and missile. The simulation results show very good agreement with the test results. It is noted that this is the first test considering an aircraft crash in Korea. (authors)

  15. Safety analysis of dual purpose metal cask subjected to impulsive loads due to aircraft engine crash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Koji; Namba, Kosuke; Saegusa, Toshiari

    2009-01-01

    In Japan, the first Interim Storage Facility of spent nuclear fuel away from reactor site is being planned to start its commercial operation around 2010, in use of dual-purpose metal cask in the northern part of Main Japan Island. Business License Examination for safety design approval has started since March, 2007. To demonstrate the more scientific and rational performance of safety regulation activities on each phase for the first license procedure, CREPEI has executed demonstration tests with full scale casks, such as drop tests onto real targets without impact limiters and seismic tests subjected to strong earthquake motions. Moreover, it is important to develop the knowledge for the inherent security of metal casks under extreme mechanical-impact conditions, especially for increasing interest since the terrorist attacks from 11th September 2001. This paper presents dynamic mechanical behavior of the metal cask lid closure system caused by direct aircraft engine crash and describes calculated results (especially, leak tightness based on relative dynamic displacements between metallic seals). Firstly, the local penetration damage of the interim storage facility building by a big passenger aircraft engine research (diameter 2.7m, length 4.3m, weight 4.4ton, impact velocity 90m/s) has been examined. The reduced velocity is calculated by the local damage formula for concrete structure with its thickness of 70cm. The load vs. time function for this reduced velocity (60m/s) is estimated by the impact analysis using Finite Element code LS-DYNA with the full scale engine model onto a hypothetically rigid target. Secondly, as the most critical scenarios for the metal cask, two impact scenarios (horizontal impact hitting the cask and vertical impact onto the lid metallic seal system) are chosen. To consider the geometry of all bolts for two lids, the gasket reaction forces and the inner pressure of the cask cavity, the detailed three dimensional FEM models are developed

  16. Safety Analysis of Dual Purpose Metal Cask Subjected to Impulsive Loads due to Aircraft Engine Crash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Koji; Namba, Kosuke; Saegusa, Toshiari

    In Japan, the first Interim Storage Facility of spent nuclear fuel away from reactor site is being planned to start its commercial operation around 2010, in use of dual-purpose metal cask in the northern part of Main Japan Island. Business License Examination for safety design approval has started since March, 2007. To demonstrate the more scientific and rational performance of safety regulation activities on each phase for the first license procedure, CREPEI has executed demonstration tests with full scale casks, such as drop tests onto real targets without impact limiters(1) and seismic tests subjected to strong earthquake motions(2). Moreover, it is important to develop the knowledge for the inherent security of metal casks under extreme mechanical-impact conditions, especially for increasing interest since the terrorist attacks from 11th September 2001(3)-(6). This paper presents dynamic mechanical behavior of the metal cask lid closure system caused by direct aircraft engine crash and describes calculated results (especially, leak tightness based on relative dynamic displacements between metallic seals). Firstly, the local penetration damage of the interim storage facility building by a big passenger aircraft engine crash (diameter 2.7m, length 4.3m, weight 4.4ton, impact velocity 90m/s) has been examined. The reduced velocity is calculated by the local damage formula for concrete structure with its thickness of 70cm. The load vs. time function for this reduced velocity (60m/s) is estimated by the impact analysis using Finite Element code LS-DYNA with the full scale engine model onto a hypothetically rigid target. Secondly, as the most critical scenarios for the metal cask, two impact scenarios (horizontal impact hitting the cask and vertical impact onto the lid metallic seal system) are chosen. To consider the geometry of all bolts for two lids, the gasket reaction forces and the inner pressure of the cask cavity, the detailed three dimensional FEM models are

  17. Reengineering Aircraft Structural Life Prediction Using a Digital Twin

    OpenAIRE

    Tuegel, Eric J.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.; Eason, Thomas G.; Spottswood, S. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Reengineering of the aircraft structural life prediction process to fully exploit advances in very high performance digital computing is proposed. The proposed process utilizes an ultrahigh fidelity model of individual aircraft by tail number, a Digital Twin, to integrate computation of structural deflections and temperatures in response to flight conditions, with resulting local damage and material state evolution. A conceptual model of how the Digital Twin can be used for predicting the lif...

  18. Variable Geometry Aircraft Pylon Structure and Related Operation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Parthiv N. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An aircraft control structure can be utilized for purposes of drag management, noise control, or aircraft flight maneuvering. The control structure includes a high pressure engine nozzle, such as a bypass nozzle or a core nozzle of a turbofan engine. The nozzle exhausts a high pressure fluid stream, which can be swirled using a deployable swirl vane architecture. The control structure also includes a variable geometry pylon configured to be coupled between the nozzle and the aircraft. The variable geometry pylon has a moveable pylon section that can be deployed into a deflected state to maintain or alter a swirling fluid stream (when the swirl vane architecture is deployed) for drag management purposes, or to assist in the performance of aircraft flight maneuvers.

  19. Advanced organic composite materials for aircraft structures: Future program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Revolutionary advances in structural materials have been responsible for revolutionary changes in all fields of engineering. These advances have had and are still having a significant impact on aircraft design and performance. Composites are engineered materials. Their properties are tailored through the use of a mix or blend of different constituents to maximize selected properties of strength and/or stiffness at reduced weights. More than 20 years have passed since the potentials of filamentary composite materials were identified. During the 1970s much lower cost carbon filaments became a reality and gradually designers turned from boron to carbon composites. Despite progress in this field, filamentary composites still have significant unfulfilled potential for increasing aircraft productivity; the rendering of advanced organic composite materials into production aircraft structures was disappointingly slow. Why this is and research and technology development actions that will assist in accelerating the application of advanced organic composites to production aircraft is discussed.

  20. Structural design for aircraft impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.; Heckhausen, H.; Chen, C.; Rieck, P.J.; Lemons, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of military aircraft and proximity to commercial air routes requires the analysis of aircraft impact effect on nuclear power plant facilities in Europe. The typical approach on recent projects has been the hardening of safety-related buildings and/or protection of redundant safety-related equipment through separation. The 'hardened-building' approach has led to the consideration of severe shock and vibration caused by the aircraft impact and development of corresponding floor response spectra for component design. Conservatively calculated loads resulting from these are in some cases quite severe. The reactor auxiliary system building (Soft Shell Hardcore design) allows a more defensive alternate in the form of a partially softened design. In this approach the equipment layout is arranged such that equipment performing either safety functions or having the potential for significant release of radioactivity (upon destruction) is located in the central area of the plant and is enclosed in thick concrete walls for shielding and protection purposes. The non-safety class equipment is arranged in the area peripheral to the hardened central area and enclosed in thin concrete walls. Since the kinetic energy of the impacting aircraft is absorbed by the collapsed thin walls and ceilings, the vibrational effect on the safety class equipment is drastically reduced. In order to achieve the objective of absorbing high kinetic energy and yet reduce the shock and vibration effects, the softened exterior walls require low resistance and high ductility. This investigation determines the feasibility of two 0.5 m thick walls of the Soft Shell with the simplest possible mathematical model. (Auth.)

  1. The structure of expanding metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, R.; Hensel, F.; Bodensteiner, T.; Glaeser, W.

    1985-01-01

    The liquid metal structure is investigated by neutron diffraction up to 2000 K and 200 bar by determining the structure factor SCQJ for liquid cesium and rubidium. The rather complicated experimental equipment is described. (BHO)

  2. Structural Health Monitoring of Transport Aircraft with Fuzzy Logic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray C. Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A structural health monitoring method based on the concept of static aeroelasticity is presented in this paper. This paper focuses on the estimation of these aeroelastic effects on older transport aircraft, in particular the structural components that are most affected, in severe atmospheric turbulence. Because the structural flexibility properties are mostly unknown to aircraft operators, only the trend, not the magnitude, of these effects is estimated. For this purpose, one useful concept in static aeroelastic effects for conventional aircraft structures is that under aeroelastic deformation the aerodynamic center should move aft. This concept is applied in the present paper by using the fuzzy-logic aerodynamic models. A twin-jet transport aircraft in severe atmospheric turbulence involving plunging motion is examined. It is found that the pitching moment derivatives in cruise with moderate to severe turbulence in transonic flight indicate some degree of abnormality in the stabilizer (i.e., the horizontal tail. Therefore, the horizontal tail is the most severely affected structural component of the aircraft probably caused by vibration under the dynamic loads induced by turbulence.

  3. NOVEL APPROACH TO DESIGN OF LIGHTWEIGHT AND RELIABLE COMPOSITE PRIMARY AIRCRAFT STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The experience of construction of composite primary aircraft structures has approved that the weight decrease for composite aggregates of aircraft in comparison with metallic analogues cannot be obtained within the frames of conventional structures based on stiffened laminated composite skin. One of the main reasons is the low level of stress-strain characteris- tics of current polymer resins, which does not allow to realize high strength characteristics of carbon fibers in laminated composite packages. This consequence does not allow to use stiffened composite skin as a universal structure element, un- like metallic stiffened skin that sustains all main mechanical loads, including impact, loads from pressurizing and also sus- tains environmental factors. Hence, creation of lightweight and reliable composite primary structure elements of airframe, the novel types of structure layouts, allowing to realize high potential of current composite materials to the maximal extent, should be developed. In order to provide the development of such layots the novel approach is required, as the conventional stage-by-stage approach is based on a number of sufficient assumptions, most of which are correct only for the structures made of metallic alloys, but not correct as applied to the structures made of composite materials. The impossibility of the application of a stage-by-stage approach together with a significant increase of number of design parameters (in comparison with metallic structures, leads to the radical increase of labor input of the design task of composite structures.The novel approach to design of composite airframes, allowing to significantly decrease the extremely high labor input of the design process for composite structures is presented in this study. The approach presumes simultaneous solu- tions of design tasks on different levels of detailing of composite aircraft structure within the frames of the one integral design stage. The

  4. Multidisciplinary Design and Optimization Framework for Aircraft Box Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, R.E.C.; Zhao, X.; Wang, H.; Van Dalen, F.

    2012-01-01

    Competitive aircraft box structures are a perfect compromise between weight and price. The conceptual design process of these structures is a typical Multidisciplinary Design and Optimization effort, normally conducted by human engineers. The iterative nature of MDO turns development into a long and

  5. Implementation of New Materials on Aging Aircraft Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-04-01

    Structure f Aging Aircraft [les Nouveaux Materiaux metalliques pour les structures des aeronefs d’ancienne generation] To order the complete...verified the empirical analysis and showed a 50% decrease in in-flight deflections (Figure 11). 2-10 Spares Rework Costs at Depot Current New Design

  6. Global Local Structural Optimization of Transportation Aircraft Wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciampa, P.D.; Nagel, B.; Van Tooren, M.J.L.

    2010-01-01

    The study presents a multilevel optimization methodology for the preliminary structural design of transportation aircraft wings. A global level is defined by taking into account the primary wing structural components (i.e., ribs, spars and skin) which are explicitly modeled by shell layered finite

  7. Low-Cost Composite Materials and Structures for Aircraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Ravi B.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Holzwarth, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of current applications of composite materials and structures in military, transport and General Aviation aircraft is presented to assess the maturity of composites technology, and the payoffs realized. The results of the survey show that performance requirements and the potential to reduce life cycle costs for military aircraft and direct operating costs for transport aircraft are the main reasons for the selection of composite materials for current aircraft applications. Initial acquisition costs of composite airframe components are affected by high material costs and complex certification tests which appear to discourage the widespread use of composite materials for aircraft applications. Material suppliers have performed very well to date in developing resin matrix and fiber systems for improved mechanical, durability and damage tolerance performance. The next challenge for material suppliers is to reduce material costs and to develop materials that are suitable for simplified and inexpensive manufacturing processes. The focus of airframe manufacturers should be on the development of structural designs that reduce assembly costs by the use of large-scale integration of airframe components with unitized structures and manufacturing processes that minimize excessive manual labor.

  8. Structural Integrity Assessment of Reactor Containment Subjected to Aircraft Crash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Junyong; Chang, Yoonsuk

    2013-01-01

    When an accident occurs at the NPP, containment building which acts as the last barrier should be assessed and analyzed structural integrity by internal loading or external loading. On many occasions that can occur in the containment internal such as LOCA(Loss Of Coolant Accident) are already reflected to design. Likewise, there are several kinds of accidents that may occur from the outside of containment such as earthquakes, hurricanes and strong wind. However, aircraft crash that at outside of containment is not reflected yet in domestic because NPP sites have been selected based on the probabilistic method. After intentional aircraft crash such as World Trade Center and Pentagon accident in US, social awareness for safety of infrastructure like NPP was raised world widely and it is time for assessment of aircraft crash in domestic. The object of this paper is assessment of reactor containment subjected to aircraft crash by FEM(Finite Element Method). In this paper, assessment of structural integrity of containment building subjected to certain aircraft crash was carried out. Verification of structure integrity of containment by intentional severe accident. Maximum stress 61.21MPa of horizontal shell crash does not penetrate containment. Research for more realistic results needed by steel reinforced concrete model

  9. Nuclear containment structure subjected to commercial and fighter aircraft crash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadique, M.R., E-mail: rehan.sadique@gmail.com; Iqbal, M.A., E-mail: iqbalfce@iitr.ernet.in; Bhargava, P., E-mail: bhpdpfce@iitr.ernet.in

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Nuclear containment response has been studied against aircraft crash. • Concrete damaged plasticity and Johnson–Cook elasto-viscoplastic models were employed. • Boeing 747-400 and Boeing 767-400 aircrafts caused global failure of containment. • Airbus A320 and Boeing 707-320 aircrafts caused local damage. • Tension damage of concrete was found more prominent compared to compression damage. -- Abstract: The response of a boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear containment vessel has been studied against commercial and fighter aircraft crash using a nonlinear finite element code ABAQUS. The aircrafts employed were Boeing 747-400, Boeing 767-400, Airbus A-320, Boeing 707-320 and Phantom F4. The containment was modeled as a three-dimensional deformable reinforced concrete structure while the loading of aircraft was assigned using the respective reaction–time curve. The location of strike was considered near the junction of dome and cylinder, and the angle of incidence, normal to the containment surface. The material behavior of the concrete was incorporated using the damaged plasticity model while that of the reinforcement, the Johnson–Cook elasto-viscoplastic model. The containment could not sustain the impact of Boeing 747-400 and Boeing 767-400 aircrafts and suffered rupture of concrete around the impact region leading to global failure. On the other hand, the maximum local deformation at the point of impact was found to be 0.998 m, 0.099 m, 0.092 m, 0.089 m, and 0.074 m against Boeing 747-400, Phantom F4, Boeing 767, Boeing 707-320 and Airbus A-320 aircrafts respectively. The results of the present study were compared with those of the previous analytical and numerical investigations with respect to the maximum deformation and overall behavior of the containment.

  10. Nuclear containment structure subjected to commercial and fighter aircraft crash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadique, M.R.; Iqbal, M.A.; Bhargava, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Nuclear containment response has been studied against aircraft crash. • Concrete damaged plasticity and Johnson–Cook elasto-viscoplastic models were employed. • Boeing 747-400 and Boeing 767-400 aircrafts caused global failure of containment. • Airbus A320 and Boeing 707-320 aircrafts caused local damage. • Tension damage of concrete was found more prominent compared to compression damage. -- Abstract: The response of a boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear containment vessel has been studied against commercial and fighter aircraft crash using a nonlinear finite element code ABAQUS. The aircrafts employed were Boeing 747-400, Boeing 767-400, Airbus A-320, Boeing 707-320 and Phantom F4. The containment was modeled as a three-dimensional deformable reinforced concrete structure while the loading of aircraft was assigned using the respective reaction–time curve. The location of strike was considered near the junction of dome and cylinder, and the angle of incidence, normal to the containment surface. The material behavior of the concrete was incorporated using the damaged plasticity model while that of the reinforcement, the Johnson–Cook elasto-viscoplastic model. The containment could not sustain the impact of Boeing 747-400 and Boeing 767-400 aircrafts and suffered rupture of concrete around the impact region leading to global failure. On the other hand, the maximum local deformation at the point of impact was found to be 0.998 m, 0.099 m, 0.092 m, 0.089 m, and 0.074 m against Boeing 747-400, Phantom F4, Boeing 767, Boeing 707-320 and Airbus A-320 aircrafts respectively. The results of the present study were compared with those of the previous analytical and numerical investigations with respect to the maximum deformation and overall behavior of the containment

  11. Metal working and dislocation structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Microstructural observations are presented for different metals deformed from low to high strain by both traditional and new metal working processes. It is shown that deformation induced dislocation structures can be interpreted and analyzed within a common framework of grain subdivision on a finer...... and finer scale down to the nanometer dimension, which can be reached at ultrahigh strains. It is demonstrated that classical materials science and engineering principles apply from the largest to the smallest structural scale but also that new and unexpected structures and properties characterize metals...

  12. Structural Configuration Systems Analysis for Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Welstead, Jason R.; Quinlan, Jesse R.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Structural configuration analysis of an advanced aircraft fuselage concept is investigated. This concept is characterized by a double-bubble section fuselage with rear mounted engines. Based on lessons learned from structural systems analysis of unconventional aircraft, high-fidelity finite-element models (FEM) are developed for evaluating structural performance of three double-bubble section configurations. Structural sizing and stress analysis are applied for design improvement and weight reduction. Among the three double-bubble configurations, the double-D cross-section fuselage design was found to have a relatively lower structural weight. The structural FEM weights of these three double-bubble fuselage section concepts are also compared with several cylindrical fuselage models. Since these fuselage concepts are different in size, shape and material, the fuselage structural FEM weights are normalized by the corresponding passenger floor area for a relative comparison. This structural systems analysis indicates that an advanced composite double-D section fuselage may have a relative structural weight ratio advantage over a conventional aluminum fuselage. Ten commercial and conceptual aircraft fuselage structural weight estimates, which are empirically derived from the corresponding maximum takeoff gross weight, are also presented and compared with the FEM- based estimates for possible correlation. A conceptual full vehicle FEM model with a double-D fuselage is also developed for preliminary structural analysis and weight estimation.

  13. Development of thermoplastic composite aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renieri, Michael P.; Burpo, Steven J.; Roundy, Lance M.; Todd, Stephanie A.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    Efforts focused on the use of thermoplastic composite materials in the development of structural details associated with an advanced fighter fuselage section with applicability to transport design. In support of these designs, mechanics developments were conducted in two areas. First, a dissipative strain energy approach to material characterization and failure prediction, developed at the Naval Research Laboratory, was evaluated as a design/analysis tool. Second, a finite element formulation for thick composites was developed and incorporated into a lug analysis method which incorporates pin bending effects. Manufacturing concepts were developed for an upper fuel cell cover. A detailed trade study produced two promising concepts: fiber placement and single-step diaphragm forming. Based on the innovative design/manufacturing concepts for the fuselage section primary structure, elements were designed, fabricated, and structurally tested. These elements focused on key issues such as thick composite lugs and low cost forming of fastenerless, stiffener/moldine concepts. Manufacturing techniques included autoclave consolidation, single diaphragm consolidation (SDCC) and roll-forming.

  14. Status of Advanced Stitched Unitized Composite Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Velicki, Alex

    2013-01-01

    NASA has created the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project to explore and document the feasibility, benefits and technical risk of advanced vehicle configurations and enabling technologies that will reduce the impact of aviation on the environment. A critical aspect of this pursuit is the development of a lighter, more robust airframe that will enable the introduction of unconventional aircraft configurations that have higher lift-to-drag ratios, reduced drag, and lower community noise levels. The primary structural concept being developed under the ERA project in the Airframe Technology element is the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept. This paper describes how researchers at NASA and The Boeing Company are working together to develop fundamental PRSEUS technologies that could someday be implemented on a transport size aircraft with high aspect ratio wings or unconventional shapes such as a hybrid wing body airplane design.

  15. Feedback Linearized Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS ) Neural Network was developed which learns a topology representing network (TRN) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is combined with a feedback linearized tracking controller to produce a robust control architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off-nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes network and its performance for accident scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control, stability derivative variation, and turbulence.

  16. Development of Textile Reinforced Composites for Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, H. Benson

    1998-01-01

    NASA has been a leader in development of composite materials for aircraft applications during the past 25 years. In the early 1980's NASA and others conducted research to improve damage tolerance of composite structures through the use of toughened resins but these resins were not cost-effective. The aircraft industry wanted affordable, robust structures that could withstand the rigors of flight service with minimal damage. The cost and damage tolerance barriers of conventional laminated composites led NASA to focus on new concepts in composites which would incorporate the automated manufacturing methods of the textiles industry and which would incorporate through-the-thickness reinforcements. The NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program provided the resources to extensively investigate the application of textile processes to next generation aircraft wing and fuselage structures. This paper discusses advanced textile material forms that have been developed, innovative machine concepts and key technology advancements required for future application of textile reinforced composites in commercial transport aircraft. Multiaxial warp knitting, triaxial braiding and through-the-thickness stitching are the three textile processes that have surfaced as the most promising for further development. Textile reinforced composite structural elements that have been developed in the NASA ACT Program are discussed. Included are braided fuselage frames and window-belt reinforcements, woven/stitched lower fuselage side panels, stitched multiaxial warp knit wing skins, and braided wing stiffeners. In addition, low-cost processing concepts such as resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film infusion (RFI), and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) are discussed. Process modeling concepts to predict resin flow and cure in textile preforms are also discussed.

  17. Ceramic Replaces Metal In High Performance Optomechanical Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Peter; Fox, Robert L.; Sandford, Stephen P.

    1995-01-01

    Recently developed ceramic materials and fabrication techniques integrated by Langley Research Center workers to produce superior optomechanical structures for spacecraft and aircraft instrumentation. Basic features of these novel supports, such as dimensional stability, low cost, and ease of fabrication, also make them ideal for many commerical optical systems as well. Ceramic supports for optical components and benches offer important advantages over usual metal parts. Ceramic materials expand and contract only slightly with changes in temperature. Moreover, they are relatively inexpensive and lightweight.

  18. Development of Stitched Composite Structure for Advanced Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegley, Dawn; Przekop, Adam; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew; Velicki, Alex; Linton, Kim; Wu, Hsi-Yung; Baraja, Jaime; Thrash, Patrick; Hoffman, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    NASA has created the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project to develop technologies which will reduce the impact of aviation on the environment. A critical aspect of this pursuit is the development of a lighter, more robust airframe that will enable the introduction of unconventional aircraft configurations. NASA and The Boeing Company are working together to develop a structural concept that is lightweight and an advancement beyond state-of-the-art composites. The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is an integrally stiffened panel design where elements are stitched together and designed to maintain residual load-carrying capabilities under a variety of damage scenarios. With the PRSEUS concept, through-the-thickness stitches are applied through dry fabric prior to resin infusion, and replace fasteners throughout each integral panel. Through-the-thickness reinforcement at discontinuities, such as along flange edges, has been shown to suppress delamination and turn cracks, which expands the design space and leads to lighter designs. The pultruded rod provides stiffening away from the more vulnerable skin surface and improves bending stiffness. A series of building blocks were evaluated to explore the fundamental assumptions related to the capability and advantages of PRSEUS panels. These building blocks addressed tension, compression, and pressure loading conditions. The emphasis of the development work has been to assess the loading capability, damage arrestment features, repairability, post-buckling behavior, and response of PRSEUS flat panels to out-of plane pressure loading. The results of this building-block program from coupons through an 80%-scale pressure box have demonstrated the viability of a PRSEUS center body for the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) transport aircraft. This development program shows that the PRSEUS benefits are also applicable to traditional tube-andwing aircraft, those of advanced configurations, and other

  19. Proceedings of the FAA-NASA symposium on the continued airworthiness of aircraft structures : part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-01

    This publication contains the fifty-two technical papers presented at the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. The symposium, hosted by the FAA Center of Excellence for Computational Modeling of : Aircraft Structu...

  20. Proceedings of the FAA-NASA symposium on the continued airworthiness of aircraft structures : part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-01

    This publication contains the fifty-two technical papers presented at the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. The symposium, hosted by the FAA Center of Excellence for Computational Modeling of : Aircraft Structu...

  1. Direct Adaptive Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1997-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS) Neural Network was developed which learns topology representing networks (TRNS) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is integrated into a direct adaptive tracking controller. The combination produces a robust adaptive architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off- nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes the DCS network and modifications to the parameter estimation procedure. The work represents one step towards an integrated real-time reconfiguration control architecture for rapid prototyping of new aircraft designs. Performance was evaluated using three off-line benchmarks and on-line nonlinear Virtual Reality simulation. Flight control was evaluated under scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control and stability derivative variations, and air turbulence.

  2. Fuzzy Structures Analysis of Aircraft Panels in NASTRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Victor W.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper concerns an application of the fuzzy structures analysis (FSA) procedures of Soize to prototypical aerospace panels in MSC/NASTRAN, a large commercial finite element program. A brief introduction to the FSA procedures is first provided. The implementation of the FSA methods is then disclosed, and the method is validated by comparison to published results for the forced vibrations of a fuzzy beam. The results of the new implementation show excellent agreement to the benchmark results. The ongoing effort at NASA Langley and Penn State to apply these fuzzy structures analysis procedures to real aircraft panels is then described.

  3. Lay-up Optimisation of Fibre Metal Laminates : Development of a Design Methodology for Wing Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ?en, I.

    2015-01-01

    The lower wing skin is one of the primary structures of an aircraft. To further improve the fatigue and damage tolerance (F&DT) performance of the lower wing, fibre metal laminates (FML) are proposed as a new material solution. FML consist of thin metal layers bonded with layers of fibre composites.

  4. Composite Structure Modeling and Analysis of Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Sorokach, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project and the Boeing Company are collabrating to advance the unitized damage arresting composite airframe technology with application to the Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) aircraft. The testing of a HWB fuselage section with Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) construction is presently being conducted at NASA Langley. Based on lessons learned from previous HWB structural design studies, improved finite-element models (FEM) of the HWB multi-bay and bulkhead assembly are developed to evaluate the performance of the PRSEUS construction. In order to assess the comparative weight reduction benefits of the PRSEUS technology, conventional cylindrical skin-stringer-frame models of a cylindrical and a double-bubble section fuselage concepts are developed. Stress analysis with design cabin-pressure load and scenario based case studies are conducted for design improvement in each case. Alternate analysis with stitched composite hat-stringers and C-frames are also presented, in addition to the foam-core sandwich frame and pultruded rod-stringer construction. The FEM structural stress, strain and weights are computed and compared for relative weight/strength benefit assessment. The structural analysis and specific weight comparison of these stitched composite advanced aircraft fuselage concepts demonstrated that the pressurized HWB fuselage section assembly can be structurally as efficient as the conventional cylindrical fuselage section with composite stringer-frame and PRSEUS construction, and significantly better than the conventional aluminum construction and the double-bubble section concept.

  5. Brazilian Air Force aircraft structural integrity program: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto W. S. Mello Junior

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of the activities developed by the Structural Integrity Group at the Institute of Aeronautics and Space - IAE, Brazil, as well as the status of ongoing work related to the life extension program for aircraft operated by the Brazilian Air Force BAF. The first BAF-operated airplane to undergo a DTA-based life extension was the F-5 fighter, in the mid 1990s. From 1998 to 2001, BAF worked on a life extension project for the BAF AT- 26 Xavante trainer. All analysis and tests were performed at IAE. The fatigue critical locations (FCLs were presumed based upon structural design and maintenance data and also from exchange of technical information with other users of the airplane around the world. Following that work, BAF started in 2002 the extension of the operational life of the BAF T-25 “Universal”. The T-25 is the basic training airplane used by AFA - The Brazilian Air Force Academy. This airplane was also designed under the “safe-life” concept. As the T-25 fleet approached its service life limit, the Brazilian Air Force was questioning whether it could be kept in flight safely. The answer came through an extensive Damage Tolerance Analysis (DTA program, briefly described in this paper. The current work on aircraft structural integrity is being performed for the BAF F-5 E/F that underwent an avionics and weapons system upgrade. Along with the increase in weight, new configurations and mission profiles were established. Again, a DTA program was proposed to be carried out in order to establish the reliability of the upgraded F-5 fleet. As a result of all the work described, the BAF has not reported any accident due to structural failure on aircraft submitted to Damage Tolerance Analysis.

  6. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles, summary. [aircraft design of aircraft fuel systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrello, C. J.; Baker, A. H.; Stone, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed analytical study was made to investigate the effects of fuselage cross section (circular and elliptical) and the structural arrangement (integral and nonintegral tanks) on aircraft performance. The vehicle was a 200 passenger, liquid hydrogen fueled Mach 6 transport designed to meet a range goal of 9.26 Mn (5000 NM). A variety of trade studies were conducted in the area of configuration arrangement, structural design, and active cooling design in order to maximize the performance of each of three point design aircraft: (1) circular wing-body with nonintegral tanks, (2) circular wing-body with integral tanks and (3) elliptical blended wing-body with integral tanks. Aircraft range and weight were used as the basis for comparison. The resulting design and performance characteristics show that the blended body integral tank aircraft weights the least and has the greatest range capability, however, producibility and maintainability factors favor nonintegral tank concepts.

  7. Threats to Aircraft Structural Safety Including a Compendium of Selected Structural Accidents/Incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Photos Illustrating Rivet Damage on 747SR Rear Pressure Bulkhead C10 C13 Photo of Boeing 747-200 C11 C14 Crack Location under Edge of Repair...Association AIB Accident Investigation Board AIDS Accident/Incident Data System API Armor Piercing Incendiary ASIP Aircraft Structural...transport aircraft be designed to be fail-safe in spite of the fact that some manufacturers have such self imposed design requirements. The lack of such a

  8. Experimental study on mechanical properties of aircraft honeycomb sandwich structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talebi Mazraehshahi H.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical behaviour of sandwich panels under different conditions have been exprimentally studied in this research to increase the knowledge of aircraft sandwich panel structures and facilitate design criteria for aircraft structures. Tests were concentrated on the honeycomb sandwich structures under different loads including flexural, insert shear, flat wise tension and compression loads. Furthermore, effect of core density and face material on mechanical behavior of different samples were investigated and compared with analytical and FEM method. Effects of skin thickness on strength of honycomb sandwhich panels under shear pull out and moments have also been considerd in this study. According to this investigation, insert strength and flexural test under different load conditions is strongly affected by face thickness, but compression and tearoff (falt wise tensile properties of a sandwich panel depends on core material. The study concludes that the correlation between experimental results and the analytical predictions will enable the designer to predict the mechanical behaviour and strength of a sandwich beam; however, applied formula may lead engineers to unreliable results for shear modulus.

  9. Structural sound absorption in liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niyazov, S.

    1993-01-01

    Present article is devoted to structural sound absorption in liquid metals. The study of sound absorption in liquid metals shown that in all studied objects the structural absorption of sound was observed. The mechanism of structural relaxation in molten metal was revealed.

  10. Durability of commercial aircraft and helicopter composite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexter, H.B.

    1982-01-01

    The development of advanced composite technology during the past decade is discussed. Both secondary and primary components fabricated with boron, graphite, and Kevlar composites are evaluated. Included are spoilers, rudders, and fairings on commercial transports, boron/epoxy reinforced wing structure on C-130 military transports, and doors, fairings, tail rotors, vertical fins, and horizontal stabilizers on commercial helicopters. The development of composite structures resulted in advances in design and manufacturing technology for secondary and primary composite structures for commercial transports. Design concepts and inspection and maintenance results for the components in service are reported. The flight, outdoor ground, and controlled laboratory environmental effects on composites were also determined. Effects of moisture absorption, ultraviolet radiation, aircraft fuels and fluids, and sustained tensile stress are included. Critical parameters affecting the long term durability of composite materials are identified

  11. Recent NASA progress in composites. [application to spacecraft and aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldenfels, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The application of composites in aerospace vehicle structures is reviewed. Research and technology program results and specific applications to space vehicles, aircraft engines, and aircraft and helicopter structures are discussed in detail. Particular emphasis is given to flight service evaluation programs that are or will be accumulating substantial experience with secondary and primary structural components on military and commercial aircraft to increase confidence in their use.

  12. Material Distribution Optimization for the Shell Aircraft Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsov, S.; Zhilyaev, I.; Oganesyan, P.; Axenov, V.

    2016-09-01

    One of the main goal in aircraft structures designing isweight decreasing and stiffness increasing. Composite structures recently became popular in aircraft because of their mechanical properties and wide range of optimization possibilities.Weight distribution and lay-up are keys to creating lightweight stiff strictures. In this paperwe discuss optimization of specific structure that undergoes the non-uniform air pressure at the different flight conditions and reduce a level of noise caused by the airflowinduced vibrations at the constrained weight of the part. Initial model was created with CAD tool Siemens NX, finite element analysis and post processing were performed with COMSOL Multiphysicsr and MATLABr. Numerical solutions of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations supplemented by k-w turbulence model provide the spatial distributions of air pressure applied to the shell surface. At the formulation of optimization problem the global strain energy calculated within the optimized shell was assumed as the objective. Wall thickness has been changed using parametric approach by an initiation of auxiliary sphere with varied radius and coordinates of the center, which were the design variables. To avoid a local stress concentration, wall thickness increment was defined as smooth function on the shell surface dependent of auxiliary sphere position and size. Our study consists of multiple steps: CAD/CAE transformation of the model, determining wind pressure for different flow angles, optimizing wall thickness distribution for specific flow angles, designing a lay-up for optimal material distribution. The studied structure was improved in terms of maximum and average strain energy at the constrained expense ofweight growth. Developed methods and tools can be applied to wide range of shell-like structures made of multilayered quasi-isotropic laminates.

  13. Critical joints in large composite primary aircraft structures. Volume 2: Technology demonstration test report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunin, Bruce L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technology for critical structural joints in composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The results of four large composite multirow bolted joint tests are presented. The tests were conducted to demonstrate the technology for critical joints in highly loaded composite structure and to verify the analytical methods that were developed throughout the program. The test consisted of a wing skin-stringer transition specimen representing a stringer runout and skin splice on the wing lower surface at the side of the fuselage attachment. All tests were static tension tests. The composite material was Toray T-300 fiber with Ciba-Geigy 914 resin in 10 mil tape form. The splice members were metallic, using combinations of aluminum and titanium. Discussions are given of the test article, instrumentation, test setup, test procedures, and test results for each of the four specimens. Some of the analytical predictions are also included.

  14. Aircraft Structural Analysis, Design Optimization, and Manufacturing Tool Integration, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovative research is proposed in integrating fundamental aircraft design processes with an emphasis on composite structures. Efficient, lightweight composite...

  15. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Aircraft design evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobe, T.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross sections and structural members on the performance of hypersonic cruise aircraft are evaluated. Representative fuselage/tank area structure was analyzed for strength, stability, fatigue and fracture mechanics. Various thermodynamic and structural tradeoffs were conducted to refine the conceptual designs with the primary objective of minimizing weight and maximizing aircraft range.

  16. Joining porous components to solid metal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortini, A.; Tulisiak, G.

    1972-01-01

    Process for joining porous metal material to solid metal structure without cracking or blockage of porous component is described. Procedures of electron beam welding and electroforming are discussed. Illustration of microstructure resulting from process is included.

  17. Comparison of Response between RC and SC Containment Structures Subjected to Aircraft Impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Sang Shup; Choi, In Kil; Park, Tae Hyo

    2012-01-01

    Since the aircraft terror to the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001, an aircraft impact problem has been increasingly interested. The possibilities of aircraft impacts against nuclear power plants are one of important category. To date, the impact load of the analysis on aircraft impacts has been applied to target structures in local areas by using the impact force-time history function of Riera. However, Riera forcing function is not recommended at the expectation of unreasonable damage or perforation to target structures. The numerical analysis of rc and sc containment structures subjected to aircraft impact is performed by using the AUTODYN-3D. It is carried out the four different types for RC and SC structures. Thus, in this study, the different behaviors of containment structures and the safety of SC structure are expected

  18. Comparison of Response between RC and SC Containment Structures Subjected to Aircraft Impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sang Shup; Choi, In Kil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Tae Hyo [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Since the aircraft terror to the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001, an aircraft impact problem has been increasingly interested. The possibilities of aircraft impacts against nuclear power plants are one of important category. To date, the impact load of the analysis on aircraft impacts has been applied to target structures in local areas by using the impact force-time history function of Riera. However, Riera forcing function is not recommended at the expectation of unreasonable damage or perforation to target structures. The numerical analysis of rc and sc containment structures subjected to aircraft impact is performed by using the AUTODYN-3D. It is carried out the four different types for RC and SC structures. Thus, in this study, the different behaviors of containment structures and the safety of SC structure are expected

  19. Structural Health Monitoring of an Advanced Composite Aircraft Structure Using a Modal Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooijevaar, T.H.; Loendersloot, Richard; Warnet, Laurent; Akkerman, Remko; de Boer, Andries; Chang, F.K.; Guemes, A.

    2011-01-01

    The experimental feasibility of a vibration based approach to identify damage in an advanced composite aircraft structure is presented. Analysis showed that the Modal Strain Energy Damage Index (MSE-DI) algorithm can be used to detect and localize single and multiple damage scenarios by using modal

  20. Fibre Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Aircraft Composite Structures: Recent Advances and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Raffaella

    2015-07-30

    In-service structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures plays a key role in the assessment of their performance and integrity. In recent years, Fibre Optic Sensors (FOS) have proved to be a potentially excellent technique for real-time in-situ monitoring of these structures due to their numerous advantages, such as immunity to electromagnetic interference, small size, light weight, durability, and high bandwidth, which allows a great number of sensors to operate in the same system, and the possibility to be integrated within the material. However, more effort is still needed to bring the technology to a fully mature readiness level. In this paper, recent research and applications in structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures using FOS have been critically reviewed, considering both the multi-point and distributed sensing techniques.

  1. Fibre Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Aircraft Composite Structures: Recent Advances and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Di Sante

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In-service structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures plays a key role in the assessment of their performance and integrity. In recent years, Fibre Optic Sensors (FOS have proved to be a potentially excellent technique for real-time in-situ monitoring of these structures due to their numerous advantages, such as immunity to electromagnetic interference, small size, light weight, durability, and high bandwidth, which allows a great number of sensors to operate in the same system, and the possibility to be integrated within the material. However, more effort is still needed to bring the technology to a fully mature readiness level. In this paper, recent research and applications in structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures using FOS have been critically reviewed, considering both the multi-point and distributed sensing techniques.

  2. Fibre Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Aircraft Composite Structures: Recent Advances and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    In-service structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures plays a key role in the assessment of their performance and integrity. In recent years, Fibre Optic Sensors (FOS) have proved to be a potentially excellent technique for real-time in-situ monitoring of these structures due to their numerous advantages, such as immunity to electromagnetic interference, small size, light weight, durability, and high bandwidth, which allows a great number of sensors to operate in the same system, and the possibility to be integrated within the material. However, more effort is still needed to bring the technology to a fully mature readiness level. In this paper, recent research and applications in structural health monitoring of composite aircraft structures using FOS have been critically reviewed, considering both the multi-point and distributed sensing techniques. PMID:26263987

  3. Functionally Graded Metal-Metal Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Craig A. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Methods and devices are disclosed for creating a multiple alloy composite structure by forming a three-dimensional arrangement of a first alloy composition in which the three-dimensional arrangement has a substantially open and continuous porosity. The three-dimensional arrangement of the first alloy composition is infused with at least a second alloy composition, where the second alloy composition comprises a shape memory alloy. The three-dimensional arrangement is consolidated into a fully dense solid structure, and the original shape of the second alloy composition is set for reversible transformation. Strain is applied to the fully dense solid structure, which is treated with heat so that the shape memory alloy composition becomes memory activated to recover the original shape. An interwoven composite of the first alloy composition and the memory-activated second alloy composition is thereby formed in the multiple alloy composite structure.

  4. Testing and Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Aircraft Fuselage Structure . Part II; Severe Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Rouse, Marshall; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2016-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aimed to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration were not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One airframe concept identified by the project as having the potential to dramatically improve aircraft performance was a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presented inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses a finite element analysis and the testing of a large-scale hybrid wing body center section structure developed and constructed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. Part II of the paper considers the final test to failure of the test article in the presence of an intentionally inflicted severe discrete source damage under the wing up-bending loading condition. Finite element analysis results are compared with measurements acquired during the test and demonstrate that the hybrid wing body test article was able to redistribute and support the required design loads in a severely damaged condition.

  5. Special Issue: Adaptive/Smart Structures and Multifunctional Materials with Application to Morphing Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafic Ajaj

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in smart structures and multifunctional materials have facilitated many novel aerospace technologies such as morphing aircraft. A morphing aircraft, bio-inspired by natural fliers, has gained a lot of interest as a potential technology to meet the ambitious goals of the Advisory Council for Aeronautics Research in Europe (ACARE Vision 2020 and the FlightPath 2050 documents. A morphing aircraft continuously adjusts its wing geometry to enhance flight performance, control authority, and multi-mission capability.[...

  6. Fabrication of metallic glass structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, C.F.

    1983-10-20

    Amorphous metal powders or ribbons are fabricated into solid shapes of appreciable thickness by the application of compaction energy. The temperature regime wherein the amorphous metal deforms by viscous flow is measured. The metal powders or ribbons are compacted within the temperature regime.

  7. Analysis of reinforced concrete structures subjected to aircraft impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, J.; Scharpf, F.; Schwarz, R.

    1983-01-01

    Concerning the evaluation of the effects of aircraft impact loading on the reactor building and the contained equipment special interest belongs to both the characteristic of loading conditions and the consideration of the nonlinear behaviour of the local impacted area as well as the overall behaviour of the structure. To cover this extensive scope of problems the fully 3-dimensional code DYSMAS/L was prepared for the analysis of highly dynamic continuum mechanics problems. For this totally Lagrangian description, derived and tested in the field of the simulation of impact phenomena and penetration of armoured structures, an extension was made for the reasonable modelling of the material behaviour of reinforced concrete. Conforming the available experimental data a nonlinear stress-strain curve is given and a continuous triaxial failure-surface is composed which allows cracking of concrete in the tensile region and its crushing in the compressive mode. For the separately modeled reinforcement an elastic-plastic stress-strain relationship with kinematic hardening is used. (orig./RW)

  8. Structural Analysis and Optimization of a Composite Fan Blade for Future Aircraft Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroneos, Rula M.

    2012-01-01

    This report addresses the structural analysis and optimization of a composite fan blade sized for a large aircraft engine. An existing baseline solid metallic fan blade was used as a starting point to develop a hybrid honeycomb sandwich construction with a polymer matrix composite face sheet and honeycomb aluminum core replacing the original baseline solid metallic fan model made of titanium. The focus of this work is to design the sandwich composite blade with the optimum number of plies for the face sheet that will withstand the combined pressure and centrifugal loads while the constraints are satisfied and the baseline aerodynamic and geometric parameters are maintained. To satisfy the requirements, a sandwich construction for the blade is proposed with composite face sheets and a weak core made of honeycomb aluminum material. For aerodynamic considerations, the thickness of the core is optimized whereas the overall blade thickness is held fixed so as to not alter the original airfoil geometry. Weight is taken as the objective function to be minimized by varying the core thickness of the blade within specified upper and lower bounds. Constraints are imposed on radial displacement limitations and ply failure strength. From the optimum design, the minimum number of plies, which will not fail, is back-calculated. The ply lay-up of the blade is adjusted from the calculated number of plies and final structural analysis is performed. Analyses were carried out by utilizing the OpenMDAO Framework, developed at NASA Glenn Research Center combining optimization with structural assessment.

  9. Structure of polyvalent metal halide melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.P.

    1990-12-01

    A short review is given of recent progress in determining and understanding the structure of molten halide salts involving polyvalent metal ions. It covers the following three main topics: (i) melting mechanisms and types of liquid structure for pure polyvalent-metal chlorides; (ii) geometry and stability of local coordination for polyvalent metal ions in molten mixtures of their halides with alkali halides; and (iii) structure breaking and electron localization on addition of metal to the melt. (author). 28 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  10. Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Pressurized Aircraft Fuselage Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.; Shaw, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aims to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration are not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One of the airframe concepts that might dramatically improve aircraft performance is a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presents inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses a nonlinear finite element analysis of a large-scale test article being developed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. There are specific reasons why geometrically nonlinear analysis may be warranted for the hybrid wing body flat panel structure. In general, for sufficiently high internal pressure and/or mechanical loading, energy related to the in-plane strain may become significant relative to the bending strain energy, particularly in thin-walled areas such as the minimum gage skin extensively used in the structure under analysis. To account for this effect, a geometrically nonlinear strain-displacement relationship is needed to properly couple large out-of-plane and in-plane deformations. Depending on the loading, this nonlinear coupling mechanism manifests itself in a distinct manner in compression- and tension-dominated sections of the structure. Under significant compression, nonlinear analysis is needed to accurately predict loss of stability and postbuckled deformation. Under significant tension, the nonlinear effects account for suppression of the out-of-plane deformation due to in-plane stretching. By comparing the present results with the previously

  11. Advanced composite structural concepts and material technologies for primary aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Anthony

    1991-01-01

    Structural weight savings using advanced composites have been demonstrated for many years. Most military aircraft today use these materials extensively and Europe has taken the lead in their use in commercial aircraft primary structures. A major inhibiter to the use of advanced composites in the United States is cost. Material costs are high and will remain high relative to aluminum. The key therefore lies in the significant reduction in fabrication and assembly costs. The largest cost in most structures today is assembly. As part of the NASA Advanced Composite Technology Program, Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company has a contract to explore and develop advanced structural and manufacturing concepts using advanced composites for transport aircraft. Wing and fuselage concepts and related trade studies are discussed. These concepts are intended to lower cost and weight through the use of innovative material forms, processes, structural configurations and minimization of parts. The approach to the trade studies and the downselect to the primary wing and fuselage concepts is detailed. The expectations for the development of these concepts is reviewed.

  12. Structural Health Management of Damaged Aircraft Structures Using the Digital Twin Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Banavara R.; Krishnamurthy, Thiagarajan

    2017-01-01

    The development of multidisciplinary integrated Structural Health Management (SHM) tools will enable accurate detection, and prognosis of damaged aircraft under normal and adverse conditions during flight. As part of the digital twin concept, methodologies are developed by using integrated multiphysics models, sensor information and input data from an in-service vehicle to mirror and predict the life of its corresponding physical twin. SHM tools are necessary for both damage diagnostics and prognostics for continued safe operation of damaged aircraft structures. The adverse conditions include loss of control caused by environmental factors, actuator and sensor faults or failures, and structural damage conditions. A major concern in these structures is the growth of undetected damage/cracks due to fatigue and low velocity foreign object impact that can reach a critical size during flight, resulting in loss of control of the aircraft. To avoid unstable, catastrophic propagation of damage during a flight, load levels must be maintained that are below a reduced load-carrying capacity for continued safe operation of an aircraft. Hence, a capability is needed for accurate real-time predictions of damage size and safe load carrying capacity for structures with complex damage configurations. In the present work, a procedure is developed that uses guided wave responses to interrogate damage. As the guided wave interacts with damage, the signal attenuates in some directions and reflects in others. This results in a difference in signal magnitude as well as phase shifts between signal responses for damaged and undamaged structures. Accurate estimation of damage size, location, and orientation is made by evaluating the cumulative signal responses at various pre-selected sensor locations using a genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization procedure. The damage size, location, and orientation is obtained by minimizing the difference between the reference responses and the

  13. Residual thermal stress control in composite reinforced metal structures. [by mechanical loading of metal component prior to bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J. B.; June, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced composite materials, composed of boron or graphite fibers and a supporting matrix, make significant structural efficiency improvements available to aircraft and aerospace designers. Residual stress induced during bonding of composite reinforcement to metal structural elements can be reduced or eliminated through suitable modification to the manufacturing processes. The most successful method employed during this program used a steel tool capable of mechanically loading the metal component in compression prior to the adhesive bonding cycle. Compression loading combined with heating to 350 F during the bond cycle can result in creep deformation in aluminum components. The magnitude of the deformation increases with increasing stress level during exposure to 350 F.

  14. Graphene/Epoxy Coating as Multifunctional Material for Aircraft Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullio Monetta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the use of graphene as a conductive nanofiller in the preparation of inorganic/polymer nanocomposites has attracted increasing interest in the aerospace field. The reason for this is the possibility of overcoming problems strictly connected to the aircraft structures, such as electrical conductivity and thus lightning strike protection. In addition, graphene is an ideal candidate to enhance the anti-corrosion properties of the resin, since it absorbs most of the light and provides hydrophobicity for repelling water. An important aspect of these multifunctional materials is that all these improvements can be realized even at very low filler loadings in the polymer matrix. In this work, graphene nanoflakes were incorporated into a water-based epoxy resin, and then the hybrid coating was applied to Al 2024-T3 samples. The addition of graphene considerably improved some physical properties of the hybrid coating as demonstrated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS analysis, ameliorating anti-corrosion performances of raw material. DSC measurements and Cross-cut Test showed that graphene did not affect the curing process or the adhesion properties. Moreover, an increment of water contact angle was displayed.

  15. Resistance ability evaluation of safety-related structures for the simulated aircraft accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Sung Woon; Choi, Jang Kyu [Daewoo E and C Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2003-03-15

    Aircraft accidents on nuclear safety-related structures can cause severe damage to the safety of NPP(Nuclear Power Plant)s. To assess the safety of nuclear safety-related structures, the local damage and the dynamic response of global structures should be investigated together. This study have compared several local damage assessment formulas suggested for aircraft as an impactor, and have set the assessment system of local damage for impact-proof design of NPP containment buildings. And the local damage of nuclear safety-related structures in operation in Korea for commercial aircraft as impactor have been estimated. Impact load-time functions of the aircraft crash have been decided to assessment the safety of nuclear safety-related structures against the intentional colliding of commercial aircraft. Boeing 747 and Boeing 767 is selected as target aircraft based on the operation frequencies and weights. Comparison of the fire analysis methods showed that the method considering heat convection and radiation is adequate for the temperature analysis of the aircraft fuel fire. Finally, the study covered the analysis of the major structural drawings and design drawings with which three-dimensional finite element model analysis is expected to be performed.

  16. A numerical model for bird strike on sidewall structure of an aircraft nose

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jun; Li, Yulong; Gao, Xiaosheng; Yu, Xiancheng

    2014-01-01

    In order to examine the potential of using the coupled smooth particles hydrodynamic (SPH) and finite element (FE) method to predict the dynamic responses of aircraft structures in bird strike events, bird-strike tests on the sidewall structure of an aircraft nose are carried out and numerically simulated. The bird is modeled with SPH and described by the Murnaghan equation of state, while the structure is modeled with finite elements. A coupled SPH–FE method is developed to simulate the bird...

  17. Synthesis and structures of metal chalcogenide precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Duraj, Stan A.; Eckles, William E.; Andras, Maria T.

    1990-01-01

    The reactivity of early transition metal sandwich complexes with sulfur-rich molecules such as dithiocarboxylic acids was studied. Researchers recently initiated work on precursors to CuInSe2 and related chalcopyrite semiconductors. Th every high radiation tolerance and the high absorption coefficient of CuInSe2 makes this material extremely attractive for lightweight space solar cells. Their general approach in early transition metal chemistry, the reaction of low-valent metal complexes or metal powders with sulfur and selenium rich compounds, was extended to the synthesis of chalcopyrite precursors. Here, the researchers describe synthesis, structures, and and routes to single molecule precursors to metal chalcogenides.

  18. Compton imaging tomography for nondestructive evaluation of large multilayer aircraft components and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Volodymyr; Grubsky, Victor; Zahiri, Feraidoon

    2017-02-01

    We present a novel NDT/NDE tool for non-contact, single-sided 3D inspection of aerospace components, based on Compton Imaging Tomography (CIT) technique, which is applicable to large, non-uniform, and/or multilayer structures made of composites or lightweight metals. CIT is based on the registration of Compton-scattered X-rays, and permits the reconstruction of the full 3D (tomographic) image of the inspected objects. Unlike conventional computerized tomography (CT), CIT requires only single-sided access to objects, and therefore can be applied to large structures without their disassembly. The developed tool provides accurate detection, identification, and precise 3D localizations and measurements of any possible internal and surface defects (corrosions, cracks, voids, delaminations, porosity, and inclusions), and also disbonds, core and skin defects, and intrusion of foreign fluids (e.g., fresh and salt water, oil) inside of honeycomb sandwich structures. The NDE capabilities of the system were successfully demonstrated on various aerospace structure samples provided by several major aerospace companies. Such a CIT-based tool can detect and localize individual internal defects with dimensions about 1-2 mm3, and honeycomb disbond defects less than 6 mm by 6 mm area with the variations in the thickness of the adhesive by 100 m. Current maximum scanning speed of aircraft/spacecraft structures is about 5-8 min/ft2 (50-80 min/m2).

  19. Electromagnetic Behaviour of Metallic Wire Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Chui, S T

    2013-01-01

    Despite the recent development and interest in the photonics of metallic wire structures, the relatively simple concepts and physics often remain obscured or poorly explained to those who do not specialize in the field. Electromagnetic Behaviour of Metallic Wire Structures provides a clear and coherent guide to understanding these phenomena without excessive numerical calculations.   Including both background material and detailed derivations of the various different formulae applied, Electromagnetic Behaviour of Metallic Wire Structures describes how to extend basic circuit theory relating to voltages, currents, and resistances of metallic wire networks to include situations where the currents are no longer spatially uniform along the wire. This lays a foundation for a deeper understanding of the many new phenomena observed in meta-electromagnetic materials.   Examples of applications are included to support this new approach making Electromagnetic Behaviour of Metallic Wire Structures a comprehensive and ...

  20. Creating a Test-Validated Finite-Element Model of the X-56A Aircraft Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truong, Samson

    2014-01-01

    Small modeling errors in a finite-element model will eventually induce errors in the structural flexibility and mass, thus propagating into unpredictable errors in the unsteady aerodynamics and the control law design. One of the primary objectives of the X-56A Multi-Utility Technology Testbed aircraft is the flight demonstration of active flutter suppression and, therefore, in this study, the identification of the primary and secondary modes for the structural model tuning based on the flutter analysis of the X-56A aircraft. The ground-vibration test-validated structural dynamic finite-element model of the X-56A aircraft is created in this study. The structural dynamic finite-element model of the X-56A aircraft is improved using a model-tuning tool. In this study, two different weight configurations of the X-56A aircraft have been improved in a single optimization run. Frequency and the cross-orthogonality (mode shape) matrix were the primary focus for improvement, whereas other properties such as c.g. location, total weight, and off-diagonal terms of the mass orthogonality matrix were used as constraints. The end result was an improved structural dynamic finite-element model configuration for the X-56A aircraft. Improved frequencies and mode shapes in this study increased average flutter speeds of the X-56A aircraft by 7.6% compared to the baseline model.

  1. Deformed metals - structure, recrystallisation and strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2011-01-01

    It is shown how new discoveries and advanced experimental techniques in the last 25 years have led to paradigm shifts in the analysis of deformation and annealing structures of metals and in the way the strength of deformed samples is related to structural parameters. This is described in three...... sections: structural evolution by grain subdivision, recovery and recrystallisation and strength-structure relationships....

  2. Metal structures with parallel pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherfey, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Four methods of fabricating metal plates having uniformly sized parallel pores are studied: elongate bundle, wind and sinter, extrude and sinter, and corrugate stack. Such plates are suitable for electrodes for electrochemical and fuel cells.

  3. High temperature ceramic/metal joint structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  4. Some interesting structural features and metallated hypervalent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The metallation of hypervalent species/electron deficient molecules 1 of main group elements with transition metals through nucleophilic substitution reactions has resulted in the isolation of some novel products 2. These synthetic species have some interesting structural features. An overview of our experience in this field is ...

  5. Structure and properties of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Kurzydlowski, K J

    1999-01-01

    Metals are one of the most widely used types of engineering materials. Some of their properties, e.g. elastic constants, can be directly related to the nature of the metallic bonds between the atoms. On the other hand, macro- and $9 microstructural features of metals, such as point defects, dislocations, grain boundaries, and second phase particles, control their yield, flow, and fracture stress. Images of microstructural elements can be obtained by modern $9 imaging techniques. Modern computer aided methods can be further used to obtain a quantitative description of these microstructures. These methods take advantage of the progress made in recent years in the field of image processing, $9 mathematical morphology and quantitative stereology. Quantitative description of the microstructures are used for modeling processes taking place under the action of applied load at a given temperature and test (service) environment. $9 These model considerations can be illustrated on the example of an austenitic stainless...

  6. Modular dry-coupled ultrasonic probes for field inspections of multilayered aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komsky, Igor N.

    2005-05-01

    Most of the multi-layered aircraft structures including composite structures are still inspected primarily through various visual methods that require removal of multiple structural components to detect flaws in the internal layers of the structure. Some aircraft operators utilize for the multi-layered inspections more advanced NDI techniques such as X-ray. However, application of the X-ray technique still requires access to the bottom layers of the multi-layered structures for proper positioning of films or digital sensors. Additional time is also needed to comply with the safety rules for the X-ray inspection procedures. Hence, current inspection procedures for the multi-layered aircraft structures are fairly cumbersome, time-consuming and costly. Application of the dry-coupled ultrasonic modules makes it possible to detect and characterize defects in the internal layers from outside aircraft skin without disassembly. The inspection technique is easy to use, and, at the same time, is sensitive enough to identify critical structural degradation caused by the defects. The dry-coupled inspection technique is also sufficiently rapid so that aircraft downtime is minimized. The modules are also suitable for concurrent flaw detection and sealant quality monitoring in the multi-layer aircraft structures. The concept of the dry-coupled transducer modules has already been tested on the DC-10 horizontal stabilizer (crack detection around fasteners). Several current inspection procedures for aircraft multi-layered composite structures were reviewed to identify the areas for effective implementation of the dry-coupled ultrasonic techniques. Ultrasonic inspection techniques are being developed including flaw detection and characterization protocols for internal defects in various layers of the multi-layered structures. Modular dry-coupled ultrasonic transducers with exchangeable elements and digital encoding systems are being modified for applications on the multi

  7. The mechanical behavior of GLARE laminates for aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guocai; Yang, J.-M.

    2005-01-01

    GLARE (glass-reinforced aluminum laminate) is a new class of fiber metal laminates for advanced aerospace structural applications. It consists of thin aluminum sheets bonded together with unidirectional or biaxially reinforced adhesive prepreg of high-strength glass fibers. GLARE laminates offer a unique combination of properties such as outstanding fatigue resistance, high specific static properties, excellent impact resistance, good residual and blunt notch strength, flame resistance and corrosion properties, and ease of manufacture and repair. GLARE laminates can be tailored to suit a wide variety of applications by varying the fiber/resin system, the alloy type and thickness, stacking sequence, fiber orientation, surface pretreatment technique, etc. This article presents a comprehensive overview of the mechanical properties of various GLARE laminates under different loading conditions.

  8. Minerals with metal-organic framework structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskić, Igor; Pekov, Igor V; Krivovichev, Sergey V; Friščić, Tomislav

    2016-08-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are an increasingly important family of advanced materials based on open, nanometer-scale metal-organic architectures, whose design and synthesis are based on the directed assembly of carefully designed subunits. We now demonstrate an unexpected link between mineralogy and MOF chemistry by discovering that the rare organic minerals stepanovite and zhemchuzhnikovite exhibit structures found in well-established magnetic and proton-conducting metal oxalate MOFs. Structures of stepanovite and zhemchuzhnikovite, exhibiting almost nanometer-wide and guest-filled apertures and channels, respectively, change the perspective of MOFs as exclusively artificial materials and represent, so far, unique examples of open framework architectures in organic minerals.

  9. Mechanical Performance of Amorphous Metallic Cellular Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Joseph P.

    Metallic glass and metallic glass matrix composites are excellent candidates for application in cellular structures because of their outstanding plastic yield strengths and their ability to deform plastically prior to fracture. The mechanical performance of metallic-glass and metallic-glass-matrix-composite honeycomb structures are discussed, and their strength and energy absorption capabilities examined in quasi-static compression tests for both in-plane and out-of-plane loading. These structures exhibit strengths and energy absorption that well exceed the performance of similar structures made from crystalline metals. The strength and energy absorption capabilities of amorphous metal foams produced by a powder metallurgy process are also examined, showing that foams produced by this method can be highly porous and are able to inherit the strength of the parent metallic glass and absorb large amounts of energy. The mechanical properties of a highly stochastic set of foams are examined at low and high strain rates. It is observed that upon a drastic increase in strain rate, the dominant mechanism of yielding for these foams undergoes a change from elastic buckling to plastic yielding. This mechanism change is thought to be the result of the rate of the mechanical test approaching or even eclipsing the speed of elastic waves in the material.

  10. Health and usage monitoring system for the small aircraft composite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Růžička, Milan; Dvořák, Milan; Schmidová, Nikola; Šašek, Ladislav; Štěpánek, Martin

    2017-07-01

    This paper is focused on the design of the health and usage monitoring system (HUMS) of the composite ultra-light aircrafts. A multichannel measuring system was developed and installed for recording of the long-term operational measurements of the UL airplane. Many fiber Bragg grating sensors were implemented into the composite aircraft structure, mainly in the glue joints. More than ten other analog functions and signals of the aircraft is monitored and can be correlated together. Changing of the FBG sensors responses in monitored places and their correlations, comparing with the calibration and recalibration procedures during a monitored life may indicate damage (eg. in bonded joints) and complements the HUMS system.

  11. Optimization of a Human-Powered Aircraft Using Fluid–Structure Interaction Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Vanderhoydonck

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The special type of aircrafts in which the human power of the pilot is sufficient to take off and sustain flight are known as Human-Powered Aircrafts (HPAs. To explore the peculiarities of these aircrafts, the aerodynamic performance of an existing design is evaluated first, using both the vortex lattice method and computational fluid dynamics. In a second step, it is attempted to design and optimize a new HPA capable of winning the Kremer International Marathon Competition. The design will be special in that it allows one to include a second pilot on board the aircraft. As the structural deflection of the wing is found to be a key aspect during design, fluid–structure interaction simulations are performed and included in the optimization procedure. To assess the feasibility of winning the competition, the physical performance of candidate pilots is measured and compared with the predicted required power.

  12. Proceedings of the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Catherine A. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This publication contains the fifty-two technical papers presented at the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. The symposium, hosted by the FAA Center of Excellence for Computational Modeling of Aircraft Structures at Georgia Institute of Technology, was held to disseminate information on recent developments in advanced technologies to extend the life of high-time aircraft and design longer-life aircraft. Affiliations of the participants included 33% from government agencies and laboratories, 19% from academia, and 48% from industry; in all 240 people were in attendance. Technical papers were selected for presentation at the symposium, after a review of extended abstracts received by the Organizing Committee from a general call for papers.

  13. Proceedings of the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Catherine A. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This publication contains the fifty-two technical papers presented at the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. The symposium, hosted by the FAA Center of Excellence for Computational Modeling of Aircraft Structures at Georgia Institute of Technology, was held to disseminate information on recent developments in advanced technologies to extend the life of high-time aircraft and design longer-life aircraft. Affiliations of the participants included 33% from government agencies and laboratories, 19% from academia, and 48% from industry; in all 240 people were in attendance. Technical papers were selected for presentation at the symposium, after a review of extended abstracts received by the Organizing Committee from a general call for papers.

  14. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Design/manufacturing concept assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Robert L.; Bayha, Tom D.; Davis, HU; Ingram, J. ED; Shukla, Jay G.

    1992-01-01

    Composite Wing and Fuselage Structural Design/Manufacturing Concepts have been developed and evaluated. Trade studies were performed to determine how well the concepts satisfy the program goals of 25 percent cost savings, 40 percent weight savings with aircraft resizing, and 50 percent part count reduction as compared to the aluminum Lockheed L-1011 baseline. The concepts developed using emerging technologies such as large scale resin transfer molding (RTM), automatic tow placed (ATP), braiding, out-of-autoclave and automated manufacturing processes for both thermoset and thermoplastic materials were evaluated for possible application in the design concepts. Trade studies were used to determine which concepts carry into the detailed design development subtask.

  15. NACA Conference on Aircraft Loads, Flutter, and Structures: A compilation of Papers Presented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1953-03-04

    Hughes Aircraft Co. RAY, George D. NACA Subcommittee on Aircraft Structures RAYE , Alexander H. Curtiss-Wright Corp. REEDER, John P. NACA - Langley...abscissa is the length of the areas. The bars represent the number of areas out of 1,00 which are expected to fall in the given 10-mile class interval...summary, the most efficient material of each of the class of alloys is taken as the basis for comparison. For each comparison, three bar graphs are

  16. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  17. Active Structural Acoustic Control in an Original A400M Aircraft Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehne, C; Sachau, D; Renger, K

    2016-01-01

    Low frequency noise has always been a challenge in propeller driven aircraft. At low frequencies passive noise treatments are not as efficient as active noise reduction systems. The Helmut-Schmidt-University has built up a full-scale test rig with an original A400M aircraft structure. This provides a good opportunity to develop and test active noise reduction systems in a realistic environment. The currently installed system consists of mechanical actuators and acoustical sensors. The actuators are called TVAs (Tuneable Vibration Absorber) and contain two spring-mass systems whose natural frequencies are adjusted to the BPFs (Blade Passage Frequency) of the propellers. The TVAs are mounted to the frames and the force direction is normal to the skin. The sensors are condenser microphones which are attached to the primary structure of the airframe. The TVAs are equipped with signal processing devices. These components carry out Fourier transforms and signal amplification for the sensor data and actuator signals. The communication between the TVAs and the central control unit is implemented by the CAN Bus protocol and mainly consists of complex coefficients for the sensor and actuator data. This paper describes the basic structure of the system, the hardware set-up and function tests of the controller. (paper)

  18. Super high conductivity effect in metal-polymer-metal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionov, Alexander N.; Zakrevskii, V. A.; Svetlichny, V. M.; Rentzsch, R.

    2003-06-01

    We have observed that films of a polyimide precursor of poly[4,4'-bis(4"-N-phenoxy)diphenyl-sulfone] amid acid of 1,3-bis(3',4-dicarboxyphenoxy) benzene which is called type (1) polymer- or co-poly[4,4'-bis(4"-N-phenoxy)diphenyl-sulfone-α,ω-bis(η-amino propyl)oligodimethylsiloxane]imide of 1,3-bis(3',4-dicarboxyphenoxy)benzene type (2) polymer, placed between two metallic electrodes become highly conducting in a relatively small electric field (E<1 V/cm). If the metallic electrodes (Sn, Nb) in sandwich structures were in the superconducting state an effective resistance of zero was recorded. A typical current-voltage characteristic of an S-P-S structure looks like a Josephson type. We hve experimentally shown that for a S-P-S structure, a point contact between the superconductor and the polymer film plays the role of a weak link.

  19. Mathematical Modeling of Linear and Non-Linear Aircraft Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    7 A-A OBO 439 LISORY GROUP FOR AEROSPACE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT--ETC F IG 1/2 MATHENATICAL MODELING OF LINEAR AND NON-LINEAR AIRCRAFT STRUCTu...theoretical model. (see Fig.1): Continuum Physical Model Mathematical Model Numerical computation ] Analytical treatment (Discretization)Ft Fig.: 1...this model neglecting unessential details. This "Mathematical Model" is usually solved by numerical computation , which means that a discretization of

  20. Application of Functionally Graded Materials in Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Matlab scripts). ABAQUS uses the Python object-oriented programming language to interface with the ABAQUS kernel (program) and allows for scripting that...and can be avoided with an advanced Python script which allows ABAQUS to query the Python script for material properties at the Gaussian points for...modeling FGMs using ABAQUS software. Conclusions drawn from FGM characterization are used to develop a patch to retrofit a cracked aircraft exhaust wash

  1. Studies on metal-dielectric plasmonic structures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chettiar, Uday K. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Liu, Zhengtong (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Thoreson, Mark D. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Shalaev, Vladimir M. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Drachev, Vladimir P. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Pack, Michael Vern; Kildishev, Alexander V. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Nyga, Piotr (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of light with nanostructured metal leads to a number of fascinating phenomena, including plasmon oscillations that can be harnessed for a variety of cutting-edge applications. Plasmon oscillation modes are the collective oscillation of free electrons in metals under incident light. Previously, surface plasmon modes have been used for communication, sensing, nonlinear optics and novel physics studies. In this report, we describe the scientific research completed on metal-dielectric plasmonic films accomplished during a multi-year Purdue Excellence in Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories. A variety of plasmonic structures, from random 2D metal-dielectric films to 3D composite metal-dielectric films, have been studied in this research for applications such as surface-enhanced Raman sensing, tunable superlenses with resolutions beyond the diffraction limit, enhanced molecular absorption, infrared obscurants, and other real-world applications.

  2. Magneto-mechanical impedance of metallic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrai, Andrei N

    2009-01-01

    Impedance measurements with a magneto-elastic active sensor are explored for inferring the magneto-mechanical impedance (MMI) of a metallic structure. It is shown that the MMI contains electrical response of the sensor and both electrical and mechanical structural responses. An analytical model is suggested that accounts for electrical characteristics of the sensor, sensor/structure electromagnetic interaction, and multimodal structural dynamic behavior. The model is validated with a set of MMI experiments demonstrating feasibility of deducing structural natural frequencies and structural vibration modes.

  3. Local damage to reinforced concrete structures caused by impact of aircraft engine missiles. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, T.; Tsubota, H.; Kasai, Y.; Koshika, N.; Ohnuma, H.; Von Riesemann, W.A.; Bickel, D.C.; Parks, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    Structural damage induced by an aircraft crashing into a reinforced concrete structure includes local damage caused by the deformable engines, and global damage caused by the entire aircraft. Local damage to the target may consist of spalling of concrete from its front face together with missile penetration into it, scabbing of concrete from its rear face, and perforation of missile through it. Until now, local damage to concrete structures has been mainly evaluated by rigid missile impact tests. Past research work regarding local damage caused by impact of deformable missiles has been limited. This paper presents the results of a series of impact tests of small-, intermediate-, and full-scale engine models into reinforced concrete panels. The purpose of the tests was to determine the local damage to a reinforced concrete structure caused by the impact of a deformable aircraft engine. (orig.)

  4. [Application of UV spectroscopy in structural studies of metal centre of metal-protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, H; Zhou, Y; Shen, P

    1997-02-01

    The principle of UV spectroscopy applied in structural studies of metal centre of complexes is introduced in this paper. Several examples prove that such spectroscopy is an effective technical method in structural studies of metal centre of metal-protein.

  5. An artificial intelligence-based structural health monitoring system for aging aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Tang, Stanley S.; Chen, K. L.

    1993-01-01

    To reduce operating expenses, airlines are now using the existing fleets of commercial aircraft well beyond their originally anticipated service lives. The repair and maintenance of these 'aging aircraft' has therefore become a critical safety issue, both to the airlines and the Federal Aviation Administration. This paper presents the results of an innovative research program to develop a structural monitoring system that will be used to evaluate the integrity of in-service aerospace structural components. Currently in the final phase of its development, this monitoring system will indicate when repair or maintenance of a damaged structural component is necessary.

  6. Development of pressure containment and damage tolerance technology for composite fuselage structures in large transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. J.; Thomson, L. W.; Wilson, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    NASA sponsored composites research and development programs were set in place to develop the critical engineering technologies in large transport aircraft structures. This NASA-Boeing program focused on the critical issues of damage tolerance and pressure containment generic to the fuselage structure of large pressurized aircraft. Skin-stringer and honeycomb sandwich composite fuselage shell designs were evaluated to resolve these issues. Analyses were developed to model the structural response of the fuselage shell designs, and a development test program evaluated the selected design configurations to appropriate load conditions.

  7. Analysis of NPP protection structure reliability under impact of a falling aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shul'man, G.S.

    1996-01-01

    Methodology for evaluation of NPP protection structure reliability by impact of aircraft fall down is considered. The methodology is base on the probabilistic analysis of all potential events. The problem is solved in three stages: determination of loads on structural units, calculation of local reliability of protection structures by assigned loads and estimation of the structure reliability. The methodology proposed may be applied at the NPP design stage and by determination of reliability of already available structures

  8. Designing of Metallic Photonic Structures and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong-Sung Kim

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis our main interest has been to investigate metallic photonic crystal and its applications. We explained how to solve a periodic photonic structure with transfer matrix method and when and how to use modal expansion method. Two different coating methods were introduced, modifying a photonic structure's intrinsic optical properties and rigorous calculation results are presented. Two applications of metallic photonic structures are introduced. For thermal emitter, we showed how to design and find optimal structure. For conversion efficiency increasing filter, we calculated its efficiency and the way to design it. We presented the relation between emitting light spectrum and absorption and showed the material and structural dependency of the absorption spectrum. By choosing a proper base material and structural parameters, we can design a selective emitter at a certain region we are interested in. We have developed a theoretical model to analyze a blackbody filament enclosed by a metallic mesh which can increase the efficiency of converting a blackbody radiation to visible light. With this model we found that a square lattice metallic mesh enclosing a filament might increase the efficiency of incandescent lighting sources. Filling fraction and thickness dependency were examined and presented. Combining these two parameters is essential to achieve the maximum output result

  9. Investigation of vulnerability of aircraft structure and materials towards cabin explosions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wentzel, C.M.; Kasteele, R.M. van de; Soetens, F.

    2007-01-01

    Damage Tolerance of aircraft fuselage structures has a strong link to explosion resistance. Though accidental explosions can and do occur, intentional explosions are more common as the terrorist threat increases. Structural toughness is as welcome in these scenarios as it is under penetration of non

  10. Comparison of Requirements for Composite Structures for Aircraft and Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Elliot, Kenny B.; Hampton, Roy W.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Aggarwal, Pravin; Engelstad, Stephen P.; Chang, James B.

    2010-01-01

    In this report, the aircraft and space vehicle requirements for composite structures are compared. It is a valuable exercise to study composite structural design approaches used in the airframe industry and to adopt methodology that is applicable for space vehicles. The missions, environments, analysis methods, analysis validation approaches, testing programs, build quantities, inspection, and maintenance procedures used by the airframe industry, in general, are not transferable to spaceflight hardware. Therefore, while the application of composite design approaches from aircraft and other industries is appealing, many aspects cannot be directly utilized. Nevertheless, experiences and research for composite aircraft structures may be of use in unexpected arenas as space exploration technology develops, and so continued technology exchanges are encouraged.

  11. Corrosion Resistant Steels for Structural Applications in Aircraft

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olson, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Unlike chrome plating, where environmental and health problems are generally associated with the plating process, the problems with cadmium are intrinsic to the metal itself, creating occupational safety and health (OSH...

  12. A Study on External Fire Damage of Structures subjected to Aircraft Impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sang Shup [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hahm, Daegi; Kim, Min Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A large commercial aircraft consists of various components as fuselage, wings, fuel tank, engine etc. During a collision of the aircraft, the fuel tank with a large amount of jet fuel have a significant effect on the total load of the aircraft as well as causing explosive fire and smoke which affect the safety of the structure and equipment. US Sandia National Laboratories and Finland VTT etc. performed the test and simulation studies to evaluate the dispersion range of the fluid after the crash of liquid filled cylinder missiles. The test condition and results have been referred in this paper. The fluid modeling approach using SPH is applied to evaluate the dispersing range of the fluid, and is compared with the Brown's results. The jet fuel is idealized as particles contained in an aluminum cylinder missile, where those particles can be dispersed to the surrounding area after the missile crashes into a rigid target. The fluid model using the SPH method is briefly verified through comparison with test results, and then the modelling method is applied to a jet fuel model in an aircraft model. The dispersion analysis of jet fuel caused by aircraft impact is performed using an aircraft model for the determination of fire duration and fire affected zone in a nuclear power plant. Finally, the structural integrity of the roof of the structure during a jet fuel fire is evaluated. In this study, the filled jet fuel was modeled by using smooth particle hydrodynamics technique; jet fuel spread area following an aircraft crash was analyzed.

  13. Performance analysis of a reduced cost manufacturing process for composite aircraft secondary structure

    OpenAIRE

    Crump, Duncan Andrew

    2009-01-01

    In the current, environmentally-aware, climate aircraft designers are under increasing pressure toproduce fuel efficient vehicles. Weight reduction is an important method for increasing fuelefficiency. Fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are known to offer weight savings overtraditional metallic components, due to their excellent stiffness and strength to weight ratios.However, the major limiting factor for the use of aerospace quality composites is themanufacturing cost. The costs incu...

  14. On the structure of heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedel, J.

    1958-01-01

    The properties of the last series of Mendeleef's table are compared with those of the elements of the preceding series. This comparison suggests an electronic structure of the 'transition metal' type, with narrow bands, at the beginning of this series (up to certain phases at least of plutonium); then of the rare earth metal type, with independent non-saturated internal layers, further on in the series. The 5 f orbits seem to play an important part in these two types of structure, from uranium on. A more detailed study of the very heavy elements (americium and beyond) and alloys would allow these conclusions to be confirmed. Certain general points, concerning the nature of homopolar connections and paramagnetism in the transition metals, are developed in an additional section. (author) [fr

  15. Electronic structure of hcp transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, O.; Andersen, O. Krogh; Mackintosh, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    Using the linear muffin-tin-orbital method described in the previous paper, we have calculated the electronic structures of the hcp transition metals, Zr, Hf, Ru, and Os. We show how the band structures of these metals may be synthesized from the sp and d bands, and illustrate the effects...... of hybridization, relativistic band shifts, and spin-orbit coupling by the example of Os. By making use of parameters derived from the muffin-tin potential, we discuss trends in the positions and widths of the energy bands, especially the d bands, as a function of the location in the periodic table. The densities...... of states of the four metals are presented, and the calculated heat capacities compared with experiment. The Fermi surfaces of both Ru and Os are found to be in excellent quantitative agreement with de Haas-van Alphen measurements, indicating that the calculated d-band position is misplaced by less than 10...

  16. A study on the utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the technology and data needed to support the introduction of advanced composite materials in the wing structure of future production aircraft. The study accomplished the following: (1) definition of acceptance factors, (2) identification of technology issues, (3) evaluation of six candidate wing structures, (4) evaluation of five program options, (5) definition of a composite wing technology development plan, (6) identification of full-scale tests, (7) estimation of program costs for the total development plan, (8) forecast of future utilization of composites in commercial transport aircraft and (9) identification of critical technologies for timely program planning.

  17. A review on the development and properties of continuous fiber/epoxy/aluminum hybrid composites for aircraft structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Cocchieri Botelho

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Weight reduction and improved damage tolerance characteristics were the prime drivers to develop new family of materials for the aerospace/aeronautical industry. Aiming this objective, a new lightweight Fiber/Metal Laminate (FML has been developed. The combination of metal and polymer composite laminates can create a synergistic effect on many properties. The mechanical properties of FML shows improvements over the properties of both aluminum alloys and composite materials individually. Due to their excellent properties, FML are being used as fuselage skin structures of the next generation commercial aircrafts. One of the advantages of FML when compared with conventional carbon fiber/epoxy composites is the low moisture absorption. The moisture absorption in FML composites is slower when compared with polymer composites, even under the relatively harsh conditions, due to the barrier of the aluminum outer layers. Due to this favorable atmosphere, recently big companies such as EMBRAER, Aerospatiale, Boing, Airbus, and so one, starting to work with this kind of materials as an alternative to save money and to guarantee the security of their aircrafts.

  18. Layered Structures in Deformed Metals and Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2014-01-01

    Layered structures characterize metals and alloys deformed to high strain. The morphology is typical lamellar or fibrous and the interlamellar spacing can span several length scales down to the nanometer dimension. The layered structures can be observed in bulk or in surface regions, which is shown...... by the way of examples of different processing routes: friction, wire drawing, shot peening, high pressure torsion and rolling. The interlamellar spacing reaches from 5-10 nanometers to about one micrometer and the analysis will cover structural evolution, strengthening parameters and strength-structure...... relationships. Finally, the results will be discussed based on universal principles for the evolution of microstructure and properties during plastic deformation of metals and alloys from low to high strain....

  19. Technical evaluation of Russian aircraft stealth coating and structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gac, F.D.; Young, A.T. Jr.; Migliori, A.

    1996-10-01

    Treating aircraft, missiles, and ships with materials that absorb electromagnetic energy continues to be an important technique for reducing a vehicle`s radar cross section (RCS) and improving tis combat effectiveness and survivability. Work at the Russian Scientific Center for Applied Problems in Electrodynamics (SCAPE) has produced and experimentally validated an accurate predictor of the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with discontinuous composite materials consisting of magnetic and/or dielectric particles dispersed in a non-conductive matrix (i.e. percolation systems). The primary purpose of this project was to analyze rf-absorbing coatings and validate manufacturing processes associated with the Russian percolation system designs. An additional objective was to apply the percolation methodology toward a variety of civilian applications by transferring the technology to US industry.

  20. MetalS(3), a database-mining tool for the identification of structurally similar metal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valasatava, Yana; Rosato, Antonio; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Andreini, Claudia

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a database search tool to identify metal sites having structural similarity to a query metal site structure within the MetalPDB database of minimal functional sites (MFSs) contained in metal-binding biological macromolecules. MFSs describe the local environment around the metal(s) independently of the larger context of the macromolecular structure. Such a local environment has a determinant role in tuning the chemical reactivity of the metal, ultimately contributing to the functional properties of the whole system. The database search tool, which we called MetalS(3) (Metal Sites Similarity Search), can be accessed through a Web interface at http://metalweb.cerm.unifi.it/tools/metals3/ . MetalS(3) uses a suitably adapted version of an algorithm that we previously developed to systematically compare the structure of the query metal site with each MFS in MetalPDB. For each MFS, the best superposition is kept. All these superpositions are then ranked according to the MetalS(3) scoring function and are presented to the user in tabular form. The user can interact with the output Web page to visualize the structural alignment or the sequence alignment derived from it. Options to filter the results are available. Test calculations show that the MetalS(3) output correlates well with expectations from protein homology considerations. Furthermore, we describe some usage scenarios that highlight the usefulness of MetalS(3) to obtain mechanistic and functional hints regardless of homology.

  1. Tunable, omnidirectional structural color on reflection based on metal-SiOx-metal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenying; Mao, Kening; Shen, Weidong; Fang, Bo; Fang, Xu; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Yueguang; Liu, Xu

    2016-12-01

    An omnidirectional structural color based on the metal-SiOx-metal stack structure is proposed, which can present the same perceived color for a broad range of incidence angles. The tunable structural color can be obtained with adjustable intermediate dielectric layer by simply adjusting the deposition condition, especially the oxygen flow rate during the deposition processes. The resonance condition can be satisfied across the whole visible light region with this special dielectric. The strong absorption caused by the resonance within the metal-SiOx-metal structure accounts for the efficient spectral filtering feature, and the constant phase shift within the dielectric layer leads to angle insensitivity of this color filter. This simple color tuning method for omnidirectional structural colors can have a great potential in various applications such as displaying, imaging, colorful decoration, anti-counterfeiting and so forth.

  2. Dirac cones in isogonal hexagonal metallic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang

    2018-03-01

    A honeycomb hexagonal metallic lattice is equivalent to a triangular atomic one and cannot create Dirac cones in its electromagnetic wave spectrum. We study in this work the low-frequency electromagnetic band structures in isogonal hexagonal metallic lattices that are directly related to the honeycomb one and show that such structures can create Dirac cones. The band formation can be described by a tight-binding model that allows investigating, in terms of correlations between local resonance modes, the condition for the Dirac cones and the consequence of the third structure tile sustaining an extra resonance mode in the unit cell that induces band shifts and thus nonlinear deformation of the Dirac cones following the wave vectors departing from the Dirac points. We show further that, under structure deformation, the deformations of the Dirac cones result from two different correlation mechanisms, both reinforced by the lattice's metallic nature, which directly affects the resonance mode correlations. The isogonal structures provide new degrees of freedom for tuning the Dirac cones, allowing adjustment of the cone shape by modulating the structure tiles at the local scale without modifying the lattice periodicity and symmetry.

  3. Structural Load Alleviation Applied to Next Generation Aircraft and Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Reducing the environmental impact of aviation is a goal of the Subsonic Fixed Wing Project under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program of NASAs Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate. Environmental impact of aviation is being addressed by novel aircraft configurations and materials that reduce aircraft weight and increase aerodynamic efficiency. NASA is developing tools to address the challenges of increased airframe flexibility created by wings constructed with reduced structural material and novel light-weight materials. This talk will present a framework and demonstration of a flight control system using optimal control allocation with structural load feedback and constraints to achieve safe aircraft operation. As wind turbines age, they become susceptible to many forms of blade degradation. Results will be presented on work in progress that uses adaptive contingency control for load mitigation in a wind turbine simulation with blade damage progression modeled.

  4. Full-Scale Structural and NDI Validation Tests of Bonded Composite Doublers for Commercial Aircraft Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1999-02-01

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. Most of the concerns surrounding composite doubler technology pertain to long-term survivability, especially in the presence of non-optimum installations, and the validation of appropriate inspection procedures. This report focuses on a series of full-scale structural and nondestructive inspection (NDI) tests that were conducted to investigate the performance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Full-scale tests were conducted on fuselage panels cut from retired aircraft. These full-scale tests studied stress reductions, crack mitigation, and load transfer capabilities of composite doublers using simulated flight conditions of cabin pressure and axial stress. Also, structures which modeled key aspects of aircraft structure repairs were subjected to extreme tension, shear and bending loads to examine the composite laminate's resistance to disbond and delamination flaws. Several of the structures were loaded to failure in order to determine doubler design margins. Nondestructive inspections were conducted throughout the test series in order to validate appropriate techniques on actual aircraft structure. The test results showed that a properly designed and installed composite doubler is able to enhance fatigue life, transfer load away from damaged structure, and avoid the introduction of new stress risers (i.e. eliminate global reduction in the fatigue life of the structure). Comparisons with test data obtained prior to the doubler installation revealed that stresses in the parent material can be reduced 30%--60% through the use of the composite doubler. Tests to failure demonstrated that the bondline is able to transfer plastic strains into the doubler and that

  5. Structural Analysis Approach to Fault Diagnosis with Application to Fixed-wing Aircraft Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a structural analysis based method for fault diagnosis purposes. The method uses the structural model of the system and utilizes the matching idea to extract system's inherent redundant information. The structural model is represented by a bipartite directed graph. FDI Possibil...... Possibilities are examined by further analysis of the obtained information. The method is illustrated by applying on the LTI model of motion of a fixed-wing aircraft....

  6. Structural Analysis Approach to Fault Diagnosis with Application to Fixed-wing Aircraft Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents a structural analysis based method for fault diagnosis purposes. The method uses the structural model of the system and utilizes the matching idea to extract system's inherent redundant information. The structural model is represented by a bipartite directed graph. FDI Possibil...... Possibilities are examined by further analysis of the obtained information. The method is illustrated by applying on the LTI model of motion of a fixed-wing aircraft....

  7. Enhanced Structural Support of Metal Sites as Nodes in Metal-Organic Frameworks Compared to Metal Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Sanjit

    2013-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks are a new class of crystalline, porous solid-state materials with metal ions periodically linked by organic linkers. This gives rise to one-, two- or three-dimensional structures. Here, we compare the stability of similar metal sites toward external ligand (solvent) induced disruption of the coordination environment in metal complexes and in metal-organic frameworks. Our experimental results show that a metal site as node of a metal-organic framework retains much high...

  8. Aircraft components structural health monitoring using flexible ultrasonic transducer arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W.-L.; Jen, C.-K.; Kobayashi, M.; Mrad, N.

    2011-04-01

    A damage detection capability based on a flexible ultrasonic transducer (FUT) array bonded onto a planar and a curved surface is presented. The FUT array was fabricated on a 75 μm titanium substrate using sol-gel spray technique. Room temperature curable adhesive is used as the bonding agent and ultrasonic couplant between the transducer and the test article. The bonding agent was successfully tested for aircraft environmental temperatures between -80 °C and 100 °C. For a planar test article, selected FUT arrays were able to detect fasteners damage within a planar distance of 176 mm, when used in the pulse-echo mode. Such results illustrate the effectiveness of the developed FUT transducer as compared to commercial 10MHz ultrasonic transducer (UT). These FUT arrays were further demonstrated on a curved test article. Pulse-echo measurements confirmed the reflected echoes from the specimen. Such measurement was not possible with commercial UTs due to the curved nature of the test article and its accessibility, thus demonstrating the suitability and superiority of the developed flexible ultrasonic transducer capability.

  9. Some experiences in aircraft aeroelastic design using Preliminary Aeroelastic Design of Structures (PAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovcich, N. A.

    1984-01-01

    The design experience associated with a benchmark aeroelastic design of an out of production transport aircraft is discussed. Current work being performed on a high aspect ratio wing design is reported. The Preliminary Aeroelastic Design of Structures (PADS) system is briefly summarized and some operational aspects of generating the design in an automated aeroelastic design environment are discussed.

  10. Transport jet aircraft noise abatement in foreign countries: Growth, structure, impact. Volume 1: Europe, July 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, F. A.

    1980-01-01

    The development and implementation of aircraft noise control regulations in various European states are described. The countries include the United Kingdom, France, Switzerland, Federal Republic of Germany, Sweden, Denmark, and the Netherlands. Topics discussed include noise monitoring, airport curfews, land use planning, and the government structure for noise regulation.

  11. Development of an ultrasonic nondestructive inspection method for impact damage detection in composite aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capriotti, M.; Kim, H. E.; Lanza di Scalea, F.; Kim, H.

    2017-04-01

    High Energy Wide Area Blunt Impact (HEWABI) due to ground service equipment can often occur in aircraft structures causing major damages. These Wide Area Impact Damages (WAID) can affect the internal components of the structure, hence are usually not visible nor detectable by typical one-sided NDE techniques and can easily compromise the structural safety of the aircraft. In this study, the development of an NDI method is presented together with its application to impacted aircraft frames. The HEWABI from a typical ground service scenario has been previously tested and the desired type of damages have been generated, so that the aircraft panels could become representative study cases. The need of the aircraft industry for a rapid, ramp-friendly system to detect such WAID is here approached with guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) and a scanning tool that accesses the whole structure from the exterior side only. The wide coverage of the specimen provided by GUW has been coupled to a differential detection approach and is aided by an outlier statistical analysis to be able to inspect and detect faults in the challenging composite material and complex structure. The results will be presented and discussed with respect to the detection capability of the system and its response to the different damage types. Receiving Operating Characteristics curves (ROC) are also produced to quantify and assess the performance of the proposed method. Ongoing work is currently aimed at the penetration of the inner components of the structure, such as shear ties and C-frames, exploiting different frequency ranges and signal processing techniques. From the hardware and tool development side, different transducers and coupling methods, such as air-coupled transducers, are under investigation together with the design of a more suitable scanning technique.

  12. Damage monitoring of aircraft structures made of composite materials using wavelet transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molchanov, D.; Safin, A.; Luhyna, N.

    2016-10-01

    The present article is dedicated to the study of the acoustic properties of composite materials and the application of non-destructive testing methods to aircraft components. A mathematical model of a wavelet transformed signal is presented. The main acoustic (vibration) properties of different composite material structures were researched. Multiple vibration parameter dependencies on the noise reduction factor were derived. The main steps of a research procedure and new method algorithm are presented. The data obtained was compared with the data from a three dimensional laser-Doppler scanning vibrometer, to validate the results. The new technique was tested in the laboratory and on civil aircraft at a training airfield.

  13. Automatic Aircraft Structural Topology Generation for Multidisciplinary Optimization and Weight Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensmeier, Mark D.; Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2005-01-01

    An approach is proposed for the application of rapid generation of moderate-fidelity structural finite element models of air vehicle structures to allow more accurate weight estimation earlier in the vehicle design process. This should help to rapidly assess many structural layouts before the start of the preliminary design phase and eliminate weight penalties imposed when actual structure weights exceed those estimated during conceptual design. By defining the structural topology in a fully parametric manner, the structure can be mapped to arbitrary vehicle configurations being considered during conceptual design optimization. A demonstration of this process is shown for two sample aircraft wing designs.

  14. Testing and Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Aircraft Fuselage Structure. Part 1; Ultimate Design Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Rouse, Marshall; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2016-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aimed to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration were not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One airframe concept identified by the project as having the potential to dramatically improve aircraft performance was a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presented inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses finite element analysis and testing of a large-scale hybrid wing body center section structure developed and constructed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. Part I of the paper considers the five most critical load conditions, which are internal pressure only and positive and negative g-loads with and without internal pressure. Analysis results are compared with measurements acquired during testing. Performance of the test article is found to be closely aligned with predictions and, consequently, able to support the hybrid wing body design loads in pristine and barely visible impact damage conditions.

  15. Eddy current technologies for thick metal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Toshiyuki; Endo, Hisashi

    2004-01-01

    One of approach of an eddy current testing (ECT) for thick metal structures is introduced. The detection limit of ECT is capable of enlarging thick more than 10 mm, which is ordinarily about 5 mm, by the design of probe. On the basis of results of numerical analysis, the defect detection in thick and shape is evaluated by the distribution of experimental ECT signals. The problems of ECT for thick metal structures and measures, approach to probe design, the specifications of probe, evaluation of experimental results and defect detection are described. By ECT fast simulator, good slit sharp is simulated in the case of 10 and 20 mm of EDM slit length and 5, 10 and 15 mm of slit height. (S.Y.)

  16. Buffet induced structural/flight-control system interaction of the X-29A aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, David F.; Clarke, Robert

    1991-01-01

    High angle-of-attack flight regime research is currently being conducted for modern fighter aircraft at the NASA Ames Research Center's Dryden Flight Research Facility. This flight regime provides enhanced maneuverability to fighter pilots in combat situations. Flight research data are being acquired to compare and validate advanced computational fluid dynamic solutions and wind-tunnel models. High angle-of-attack flight creates unique aerodynamic phenomena including wing rock and buffet on the airframe. These phenomena increase the level of excitation of the structural modes, especially on the vertical and horizontal stabilizers. With high gain digital flight-control systems, this structural response may result in an aeroservoelastic interaction. A structural interaction on the X-29A aircraft was observed during high angle-of-attack flight testing. The roll and yaw rate gyros sensed the aircraft's structural modes at 11, 13, and 16 Hz. The rate gyro output signals were then amplified through the flight-control laws and sent as commands to the flaperons and rudder. The flight data indicated that as the angle of attack increased, the amplitude of the buffet on the vertical stabilizer increased, which resulted in more excitation to the structural modes. The flight-control system sensors and command signals showed this increase in modal power at the structural frequencies up to a 30 degree angle-of-attack. Beyond a 30 degree angle-of-attack, the vertical stabilizer response, the feedback sensor amplitude, and control surface command signal amplitude remained relatively constant. Data are presented that show the increased modal power in the aircraft structural accelerometers, the feedback sensors, and the command signals as a function of angle of attack. This structural interaction is traced from the aerodynamic buffet to the flight-control surfaces.

  17. Characterization of nano structured metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin A, M.; Gutierrez W, C.; Cruz C, R.; Angeles C, C.

    1997-01-01

    Nowadays the search of new materials with specific optical properties has carried out to realize a series of experiments through the polymer synthesis [(C 3 N 3 ) 2 (NH) 3 ] n doped with gold metallic nanoparticles. The thermal stability of a polymer is due to the presence of tyazine rings contained in the structure. The samples were characterized by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction by the Powder method, Ft-infrared and its thermal properties by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetry (TGA). One of the purposes of this work is to obtain nano structured materials over a polymeric matrix. (Author)

  18. Development of Morphing Structures for Aircraft Using Shape Memory Polymers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khan, Fazeel J

    2008-01-01

    ...), aerospace structures. In particular, shape memory polymers (SMP) in filled and unfilled form have been investigated with particular emphasis on the recovery time and force as the materials undergo transformation...

  19. Hybrid Composite Structures : Multifunctionality through Metal Fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, T.

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of fibre reinforced polymer composites into the wings and fuselages of the newest aircraft are changing the design and manufacturing approach. Composites provide greater freedom to designers who want to improve aircraft performance in an affordable way. In this quest, researchers

  20. Numerical analysis of nuclear power plant structure subjected to aircraft crash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Reza; Alinejad, Majid; Mahdavi, Mir Omid; Sepanloo, Kamran

    2017-12-01

    An aircraft crashing into a nuclear containment may induce a series of disasters related to containment capacity, including local penetration and perforation of the containment, intensive vibrations, and fire ignited after jet fuel leakage. In this study, structural safety of a reinforced concrete containment vessel (RCCV) has been studied against the direct hit of Airbus A320, Boeing 707-320 and Phantom F4 aircrafts. ABAQUS/explicit finite element code has been used to carry out the three-dimensional numerical simulations. The impact locations identified on the nuclear containment structure are mid height of containment, center of the cylindrical portion, junction of dome and cylinder, and over the cylindrical portion close to the foundation level. The loading of the aircraft has been assigned through the corresponding reaction-time response curve. The concrete damaged plasticity model was predicted to simulate the behavior of concrete while the behavior of steel reinforcement was incorporated using elastoplastic material model. Dynamic loading conditions were considered using dynamic increase factor. The mid height of containment and center of cylindrical portion have been found to experience most severe deformation against each aircraft crash. It has also been found that compression damage in concrete is not critical at none of the impact locations.

  1. Aircraft crash upon a containment structure of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, D.K.; Abbas, H.; Godbole, P.N.; Nayak, G.C.

    1993-01-01

    The reinforced concrete outer containment of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is required to be designed to withstand the impact of aircraft and aircrash debris etc. The problem is of strategic significance because the damage caused to the structure by these missiles may lead to the leakage of nuclear radiations. The safety design of NPP against aircraft crash requires the evaluation of crash probability. If the probability is smaller than the allowable value then the aircraft crash is neglected as design basis item. Otherwise adequate measures are taken to bring the released radioactive material within the permissible limit. The aircrafts and their striking velocity to be considered in the design of a structure are decided by the accident analysis. The probabilistic aspect of the problem has not been covered in the present work. The non-affordability of coupled analysis of large problems like aircraft crash on NPP, automobile impact on a structure etc. due to the requirement of excessive amount of manual as well as computer time and storage compels us to switch over to the uncoupled analysis. Moreover, the results of coupled analysis are heavily influenced by the analyst's modelling technique and choice of increment size. It is uncoupling of the missile and the target which converts the impact load to the impulse load. This impulse can be found by taking into consideration only the inertial and stiffness properties of missile and considering the target to be rigid. Though the impulse load so obtained disregards the inertial and stiffness characteristics of the target but its effect can be incorporated by modifying it for the inertial and stiffness properties of target at different time steps as we march in time domain during the analysis of the target

  2. A numerical model for bird strike on sidewall structure of an aircraft nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine the potential of using the coupled smooth particles hydrodynamic (SPH and finite element (FE method to predict the dynamic responses of aircraft structures in bird strike events, bird-strike tests on the sidewall structure of an aircraft nose are carried out and numerically simulated. The bird is modeled with SPH and described by the Murnaghan equation of state, while the structure is modeled with finite elements. A coupled SPH–FE method is developed to simulate the bird-strike tests and a numerical model is established using a commercial software PAM-CRASH. The bird model shows no signs of instability and correctly modeled the break-up of the bird into particles. Finally the dynamic response such as strains in the skin is simulated and compared with test results, and the simulated deformation and fracture process of the sidewall structure is compared with images recorded by a high speed camera. Good agreement between the simulation results and test data indicates that the coupled SPH–FE method can provide a very powerful tool in predicting the dynamic responses of aircraft structures in events of bird strike.

  3. The structure of small metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Pettersson, L. G. M.

    1986-01-01

    One metal atom surrounded by its 12 nearest neighbors is considered for both D(3d) (face-centered cubic-like) and D(3h) (hexagonal close-packed-like) geometries. For Al and Be, the neutral cluster and the positive and negative ions are considered for idealized (all bonds equal) and distorted geometries. The D(3d) geometry is found to be the lowest for Be13, while the D(3h) geometry is lower for Al13. This is the reverse of what is expected based upon the bulk metal structures, Be(hcp) and Al(fcc). Al13 is found to have only small distortions, while Be13 shows large distortions for both the D(3d) and D(3h) geometries. The ions have geometries which are similar to those found for the neutral systems. Both all-electron and effective core potential calculations were carried out on the X13 clusters; the agreement is very good.

  4. Magic structures of binary metallic clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Riccardo

    2005-03-01

    The structure of binary metallic clusters is investigated by a variety of computational tools, ranging from genetic and basin-hopping global optimization algorithms, to molecular dynamics, and to density-functional calculations. Three different binary systems are investigated: Ag-Cu, Ag-Ni, and Ag-Pd. A new family of magic cluster structures is found. These clusters have the common feature of presenting a perfect core-shell chemical arrangement (with an outer Ag shell of monoatomic thickness) and of being polyicosahedra, that is being made of interpenetrating icosahedra of 13 atoms. Core-shell polyicosahedra are of special stability, which originates from the interplay of different factors. First of all, polyicosahedra are very compact structures, so that they maximize the number of nearest-neighbor bonds for a given size. However, in single-element clusters, these bonds are not optimal, since inner bonds are strongly compressed and surface bonds are expanded. This is the contrary of what is required from the bond order -bond length correlation in metals, which favors contracted surface bonds. In binary clusters, the situation is different. Substituting the inner atoms of a single-element polyicosahedron with different atoms of smaller size, the bonds can relax close to their optimal distance. This leads naturally to the appearance of core-shell polyicosahedra. In Ag-Cu, Ag-Ni and Ag-Pd the formation of these structures is reinforced by the tendency of Ag atoms to surface segregation. A similar mechanism of structural relaxation, originating from the interplay of cluster geometry and bond order - bond length correlation, is also the cause of the destabilization of icosahedral structures in pure Pt and Au clusters . In these clusters, the compressed inner atoms of the icosahedra can relax because of the formation of rosette structures at vertices in the outer layer.

  5. Validating metal binding sites in macromolecule structures using the CheckMyMetal web server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Heping; Chordia, Mahendra D.; Cooper, David R.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Müller, Peter; Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Metals play vital roles in both the mechanism and architecture of biological macromolecules. Yet structures of metal-containing macromolecules where metals are misidentified and/or suboptimally modeled are abundant in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). This shows the need for a diagnostic tool to identify and correct such modeling problems with metal binding environments. The "CheckMyMetal" (CMM) web server (http://csgid.org/csgid/metal_sites/) is a sophisticated, user-friendly web-based method to evaluate metal binding sites in macromolecular structures in respect to 7350 metal binding sites observed in a benchmark dataset of 2304 high resolution crystal structures. The protocol outlines how the CMM server can be used to detect geometric and other irregularities in the structures of metal binding sites and alert researchers to potential errors in metal assignment. The protocol also gives practical guidelines for correcting problematic sites by modifying the metal binding environment and/or redefining metal identity in the PDB file. Several examples where this has led to meaningful results are described in the anticipated results section. CMM was designed for a broad audience—biomedical researchers studying metal-containing proteins and nucleic acids—but is equally well suited for structural biologists to validate new structures during modeling or refinement. The CMM server takes the coordinates of a metal-containing macromolecule structure in the PDB format as input and responds within a few seconds for a typical protein structure modeled with a few hundred amino acids. PMID:24356774

  6. Structural capacity assessment of a generic pre-stressed concrete containment structure under aircraft impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliev, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The studied containment expressed adequate capacity to resist impact loads in the upper range of the studied diapason. The aircraft impact capacity of the containment for impact in the upper part of the cylindrical shell is about 25‐30% higher than the capacity for impact in the middle part of the cylindrical shell. The obtained fragility curves reefed to MoA can be then used for various additional calculations in the safety assessment of nuclear facilities under aircraft impact

  7. Electromigration and the structure of metallic nanocontacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann-Vogel, R.

    2017-09-01

    This article reviews efforts to structurally characterize metallic nanocontacts. While the electronic characterization of such junctions is relatively straight forward, usually it is technically challenging to study the nanocontact's structure at small length scales. However, knowing that the structure is the basis for understanding the electronic properties of the nanocontact, for example, it is necessary to explain the electronic properties by calculations based on structural models. Besides using a gate electrode, controlling the structure is an important way of understanding how the electronic transport properties can be influenced. A key to make structural information directly accessible is to choose a fabrication method that is adapted to the structural characterization method. Special emphasis is given to transmission electron microscopy fabrication and to thermally assisted electromigration methods due to their potential for obtaining information on both electrodes of the forming nanocontact. Controlled electromigration aims at studying the contact at constant temperature of the contact during electromigration compared to studies at constant temperature of the environment as done previously. We review efforts to calculate electromigration forces. We describe how hot spots are formed during electromigration. We summarize implications for the structure obtained from studies of the ballistic transport regime, tunneling, and Coulomb-blockade. We review the structure of the nanocontacts known from direct structural characterization. Single-crystalline wires allow suppressing grain boundary electromigration. In thin films, the substrate plays an important role in influencing the defect and temperature distribution. Hot-spot formation and recrystallization are observed. We add information on the local temperature and current density and on alloys important for microelectronic interconnects.

  8. Lightweight Cellular Metals with High Structural Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    10-2 10-1 0.01 0.1 Open-Cell Closed-Cell ERG Fraunhofer Alulight Alporas Cymat Relative Density, ρ* /ρ s Closed-Cell Open-Cell 10-4 10-3 10-2 10-1...0.01 0.1 Open-Cell Closed-Cell ERG Fraunhofer Alulight Alporas Cymat Relative Density, ρ* /ρ s Closed-Cell Open-Cell Stochastic Foams: Modulus and...Structures NATO ARW 22 Stiffness limited design at minimum weight Applications of Cellular Metals Cymat , Inc. Messiah College Beams (free area), columns

  9. Electronic Structure of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, B.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental photoelectron spectroscopic results for the actinide metals are reviewed and compared with the theoretical picture of the basic electronic structure that has been developed for the actinides during the last decade. In particular the experimental data confirm the change from...... itinerant to localized 5f electron behaviour calculated to take place between plutonium and americium. From experimental data it is shown that the screening of deep core-holes is due to 5f electrons for the lighter actinide elements and 6d electrons for the heavier elements. A simplified model for the full...

  10. Underwater laser cutting of metallic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfille, J.P.; Schildknecht, J.; Ramaswami, V.S.

    1993-01-01

    In the frame of an european contract, the feasibility of the underwater cutting with a CO 2 laser power is studied. The aim of this work is the dismantling metallic structures of reactors pools. The paper analyzes the general concept of the experimental device, the underwater cutting head, the experimenting vessel, examples of cuttings in dismantling situation with a 500 W CO 2 laser, and examples of cuttings with a 5 kW CO 2 laser. (author). 2 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Critical joints in large composite primary aircraft structures. Volume 1: Technical summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunin, Bruce L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted at Douglas Aircraft Company to develop the technology for critical joints in composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. In fulfilling this objective, analytical procedures for joint design and analysis were developed during Phase 1 of the program. Tests were conducted at the element level to supply the empirical data required for methods development. Large composite multirow joints were tested to verify the selected design concepts and for correlation with analysis predictions. The Phase 2 program included additional tests to provide joint design and analysis data, and culminated with several technology demonstration tests of a major joint area representative of a commercial transport wing. The technology demonstration program of Phase 2 is discussed. The analysis methodology development, structural test program, and correlation between test results and analytical strength predictions are reviewed.

  12. Influence of the condition of the airfield pavement structures on the operation safety of aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesołowski Mariusz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the airfield pavement is a set of layers, whose task is to take over and transfer loads from moving aircraft to a ground subsoil in a safety manner. Airfield pavements are designed for a specific period of operation, assuming the forecasted intensity and the structure of the air traffic. The safety of air operations executed by the aircraft on airfield pavements depends primarily on the condition of their structure’s load capacity. In order to assess the load capacity of airfield pavements, the method ACN-PCN, which was introduced by the International Civil Aviation Organization ICAO and according to which the load capacity of the airfield pavement is expressed with the PCN index, is applied.

  13. Aging Evaluation Programs for Jet Transport Aircraft Structural Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borivoj Galović

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with criteria and procedures in evaluationof timely preventive maintenance recommendations that willsupport continued safe operation of aging jet transports untiltheir retirement from service. The active service life of commercialaircraft has increased in recent years as a result of low fuelcost, and increasing costs and delivery times for fleet replacements.Air transport industry consensus is that older jet transportswill continue in service despite anticipated substantial increasesin required maintenance. Design concepts, supportedby testing, have worked well due to the system that is used to ensureflying safety. Continuing structural integrity by inspectionand overhaul recommendation above the level contained inmaintenance and service bulletins is additional requirement, insuch cases. Airplane structural safety depends on the performanceof all participants in the system and the responsibility forsafety cannot be delegated to a single participant. This systemhas three major participants: the manufacturers who design,build and support airplanes in service, the airlines who operate,inspect and mantain airplanes and the airworthiness authoritieswho establish rules and regulations, approve the design andpromote airline maintenance performance.

  14. Thermal stress analysis of a graded zirconia/metal gas path seal system for aircraft gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    A ceramic/metallic aircraft gas turbine outer gas path seal designed to enable improved engine performance is studied. Flexible numerical analysis schemes suitable for the determination of transient temperature profiles and thermal stress distributions in the seal are outlined. An estimation of the stresses to which a test seal is subjected during simulated engine deceleration from sea level takeoff to idle conditions is made. Experimental evidence has indicated that the surface layer of the seal is probably subjected to excessive tensile stresses during cyclic temperature loading. This assertion is supported by the analytical results presented. Brief consideration is given to means of mitigating this adverse stressing.

  15. Conformal Load-Bearing Antenna Structure for Australian Defence Force Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    conventional capacitors are required to store 1 MJ. A potential alternative is the structural capacitor , where energy is stored in coated wires that are woven... capacitors if they were incorporated into the wings and fuselage of an aircraft. Armour Intuitively it should be relatively straightforward to...and Control (AEW&C), the radar disc on the E- 3 Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) or the bulging nose on the RQ-4 Global Hawk. It is clear

  16. Two-leaf wall structures under 'soft' impact load - aircraft crash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibl, J.; Block, K.

    1982-01-01

    The article describes a mechanical model with which the load conditions associated with aircraft crash on a two-leaf wall or roof structure can be analysed quite simply. The necessary assumptions for the material behaviour governing the contact of the two slabs and, in general, the maximum limit deformations of reinforced concrete slabs are more particularly dealt with. Treating the problem the authors make use, inter alia, of some of their own experimental results. (orig.)

  17. Stability of bulk metallic glass structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, H.; Williams, D.B.

    2003-06-18

    The fundamental origins of the stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a prototype for a whole class of BMG formers, were explored. While much of the properties of their BMGs have been characterized, their glass-stability have not been explained in terms of the atomic and electronic structure. The local structure around all three constituent atoms was obtained, in a complementary way, using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), to probe the nearest neighbor environment of the metals, and extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS), to investigate the environment around P. The occupied electronic structure was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs receive their stability from cumulative, and interrelated, effects of both atomic and electronic origin. The stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs can be explained in terms of the stability of Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20}, glasses at the end of BMG formation. The atomic structure in these alloys is very similar to those of the binary phosphide crystals near x=0 and x=80, which are trigonal prisms of Pd or Ni atoms surrounding P atoms. Such structures are known to exist in dense, randomly-packed systems. The structure of the best glass former in this series, Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} is further described by a weighted average of those of Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20}. Bonding states present only in the ternary alloys were found and point to a further stabilization of the system through a negative heat of mixing between Pd and Ni atoms. The Nagel and Tauc criterion, correlating a decrease in the density of states at the Fermi level with an increase in the glass stability, was consistent with greater stability of the Pd{sub x}Ni{sub (80-x)}P{sub 20} glasses with respect to the binary alloys of P. A valence electron concentration of 1.8 e/a, which

  18. Damage detection strategies for aircraft shell-like structures based on propagation guided elastic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zak, A; Ostachowicz, W; Krawczuk, M

    2011-01-01

    Damage of aircraft structural elements in any form always present high risks. Failures of these elements can be caused by various reasons including material fatigue or impact leading to damage initiation and growth. Detection of these failures at their earliest stage of development, estimation of their size and location, are one of the most crucial factors for each damage detection method. Structural health monitoring strategies based on propagation of guided elastic waves in structures and wave interaction with damage related discontinuities are very promising tools that offer not only damage detection capabilities, but are also meant to provide precise information about the state of the structures and their remaining lifetime. Because of that various techniques are employed to simulate and mimic the wave-discontinuity interactions. The use of various types of sensors, their networks together with sophisticated contactless measuring techniques are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Certain results of numerical simulations obtained by the use of the spectral finite element method are presented by the authors and related with propagation of guided elastic waves in shell-type aircraft structures. Two types of structures are considered: flat 2D panels with or without stiffeners and 3D shell structures. The applicability of two different damage detection approaches is evaluated in order to detect and localise damage in these structures. Selected results related with the use of laser scanning vibrometry are also presented and discussed by the authors.

  19. Computation of the Structure Factor of Some Transition Liquid Metals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applying the solution of the Percus-Yevic equation to a one component hard sphere system and using the recently developed potential for liquid transition liquid metals, the structure factor of transition liquid metals were computed. The peak height and peak position of the structure factor of the liquid metals were studied.

  20. Properties of structural materials in liquid metal environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.U.

    1991-12-01

    The proceedings contain 16 contributions to the following topics: 1. Creep-Rupture Behaviour of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; 2. Behaviour of Materials in Liquid Metal Environment under Off-Normal Conditions; 3. Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; and 4. Crack Propagation in Liquid Sodium. (MM)

  1. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures. Structural response and failure analysis: ISPAN modules users manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Ten; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    The ISPAN Program (Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis) is an interactive design tool that is intended to provide a means of performing simple and self contained preliminary analysis of aircraft primary structures made of composite materials. The program combines a series of modules with the finite element code DIAL as its backbone. Four ISPAN Modules were developed and are documented. These include: (1) flat stiffened panel; (2) curved stiffened panel; (3) flat tubular panel; and (4) curved geodesic panel. Users are instructed to input geometric and material properties, load information and types of analysis (linear, bifurcation buckling, or post-buckling) interactively. The program utilizing this information will generate finite element mesh and perform analysis. The output in the form of summary tables of stress or margins of safety, contour plots of loads or stress, and deflected shape plots may be generalized and used to evaluate specific design.

  2. Advanced Metal Foam Structures for Outer Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanan, Jay; Johnson, William; Peker, Atakan

    2005-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use advanced materials especially bulk metallic glass (BMG) foams in structural components of spacecraft, lunar habitats, and the like. BMG foams, which are already used on Earth in some consumer products, are superior to conventional metal foams: BMG foams have exceptionally low mass densities and high strength-to-weight ratios and are more readily processable into strong, lightweight objects of various sizes and shapes. These and other attractive properties of BMG foams would be exploited, according to the proposal, to enable in situ processing of BMG foams for erecting and repairing panels, shells, containers, and other objects. The in situ processing could include (1) generation of BMG foams inside prefabricated deployable skins that would define the sizes and shapes of the objects thus formed and (2) thermoplastic deformation of BMG foams. Typically, the generation of BMG foams would involve mixtures of precursor chemicals that would be subjected to suitable pressure and temperature schedules. In addition to serving as structural components, objects containing or consisting of BMG foams could perform such functions as thermal management, shielding against radiation, and shielding against hypervelocity impacts of micrometeors and small debris particles.

  3. Fluid/Structure Interaction Studies of Aircraft Using High Fidelity Equations on Parallel Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruswamy, Guru; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Abstract Aeroelasticity which involves strong coupling of fluids, structures and controls is an important element in designing an aircraft. Computational aeroelasticity using low fidelity methods such as the linear aerodynamic flow equations coupled with the modal structural equations are well advanced. Though these low fidelity approaches are computationally less intensive, they are not adequate for the analysis of modern aircraft such as High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) and Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) which can experience complex flow/structure interactions. HSCT can experience vortex induced aeroelastic oscillations whereas AST can experience transonic buffet associated structural oscillations. Both aircraft may experience a dip in the flutter speed at the transonic regime. For accurate aeroelastic computations at these complex fluid/structure interaction situations, high fidelity equations such as the Navier-Stokes for fluids and the finite-elements for structures are needed. Computations using these high fidelity equations require large computational resources both in memory and speed. Current conventional super computers have reached their limitations both in memory and speed. As a result, parallel computers have evolved to overcome the limitations of conventional computers. This paper will address the transition that is taking place in computational aeroelasticity from conventional computers to parallel computers. The paper will address special techniques needed to take advantage of the architecture of new parallel computers. Results will be illustrated from computations made on iPSC/860 and IBM SP2 computer by using ENSAERO code that directly couples the Euler/Navier-Stokes flow equations with high resolution finite-element structural equations.

  4. Stochastic metallic-glass cellular structures exhibiting benchmark strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetriou, Marios D; Veazey, Chris; Harmon, John S; Schramm, Joseph P; Johnson, William L

    2008-10-03

    By identifying the key characteristic "structural scales" that dictate the resistance of a porous metallic glass against buckling and fracture, stochastic highly porous metallic-glass structures are designed capable of yielding plastically and inheriting the high plastic yield strength of the amorphous metal. The strengths attainable by the present foams appear to equal or exceed those by highly engineered metal foams such as Ti-6Al-4V or ferrous-metal foams at comparable levels of porosity, placing the present metallic-glass foams among the strongest foams known to date.

  5. Novel matrix resins for composites for aircraft primary structures, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Edmund P.; Puckett, P. M.; Maynard, S.; Bishop, M. T.; Bruza, K. J.; Godschalx, J. P.; Mullins, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the contract is the development of matrix resins with improved processability and properties for composites for primarily aircraft structures. To this end, several resins/systems were identified for subsonic and supersonic applications. For subsonic aircraft, a series of epoxy resins suitable for RTM and powder prepreg was shown to give composites with about 40 ksi compressive strength after impact (CAI) and 200 F/wet mechanical performance. For supersonic applications, a thermoplastic toughened cyanate prepreg system has demonstrated excellent resistance to heat aging at 360 F for 4000 hours, 40 ksi CAI and useful mechanical properties at greater than or equal to 310 F. An AB-BCB-maleimide resin was identified as a leading candidate for the HSCT. Composite panels fabricated by RTM show CAI of approximately 50 ksi, 350 F/wet performance and excellent retention of mechanical properties after aging at 400 F for 4000 hours.

  6. Rapid Assessment of Aircraft Structural Topologies for Multidisciplinary Optimization and Weight Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.; Sensmeier, mark D.; Stewart, Bret A.

    2006-01-01

    Algorithms for rapid generation of moderate-fidelity structural finite element models of air vehicle structures to allow more accurate weight estimation earlier in the vehicle design process have been developed. Application of these algorithms should help to rapidly assess many structural layouts before the start of the preliminary design phase and eliminate weight penalties imposed when actual structure weights exceed those estimated during conceptual design. By defining the structural topology in a fully parametric manner, the structure can be mapped to arbitrary vehicle configurations being considered during conceptual design optimization. Recent enhancements to this approach include the porting of the algorithms to a platform-independent software language Python, and modifications to specifically consider morphing aircraft-type configurations. Two sample cases which illustrate these recent developments are presented.

  7. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Structural response and failure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorris, William J.; Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Tien; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    Non-linear analysis methods were adapted and incorporated in a finite element based DIAL code. These methods are necessary to evaluate the global response of a stiffened structure under combined in-plane and out-of-plane loading. These methods include the Arc Length method and target point analysis procedure. A new interface material model was implemented that can model elastic-plastic behavior of the bond adhesive. Direct application of this method is in skin/stiffener interface failure assessment. Addition of the AML (angle minus longitudinal or load) failure procedure and Hasin's failure criteria provides added capability in the failure predictions. Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis modules were developed as interactive pre-and post-processors. Each module provides the means of performing self-initiated finite elements based analysis of primary structures such as a flat or curved stiffened panel; a corrugated flat sandwich panel; and a curved geodesic fuselage panel. This module brings finite element analysis into the design of composite structures without the requirement for the user to know much about the techniques and procedures needed to actually perform a finite element analysis from scratch. An interactive finite element code was developed to predict bolted joint strength considering material and geometrical non-linearity. The developed method conducts an ultimate strength failure analysis using a set of material degradation models.

  8. System data communication structures for active-control transport aircraft, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, A. L.; Martin, J. H.; Brock, L. D.; Jansson, D. G.; Serben, S.; Smith, T. B.; Hanley, L. D.

    1981-01-01

    The application of communication structures to advanced transport aircraft are addressed. First, a set of avionic functional requirements is established, and a baseline set of avionics equipment is defined that will meet the requirements. Three alternative configurations for this equipment are then identified that represent the evolution toward more dispersed systems. Candidate communication structures are proposed for each system configuration, and these are compared using trade off analyses; these analyses emphasize reliability but also address complexity. Multiplex buses are recognized as the likely near term choice with mesh networks being desirable for advanced, highly dispersed systems.

  9. Reduction of the dynamic response by aircraft crash on building structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krutzik, N.J.

    1988-01-01

    Through the use of the double-shell concept the dynamic loads applied by a hypothetical aircraft impact as well as the response of the structure can be reduced significantly. Steel-fiber-reinforced concrete shells with thicknesses of about 0.8 m have a sufficient nonlinear capacity for loads applied by a military airplane such as the Phantom jet. The secondary impact after damage of the outer shell as well as the dynamic response of the structure can be additionally reduced using damping material supporting the impacted shell. Construction of the double shell design does not result in any practical problems. (orig./HP)

  10. Factors governing the metal coordination number in metal complexes from Cambridge Structural Database analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudev, Minko; Wang, Jonathan; Dudev, Todor; Lim, Carmay

    2006-02-02

    The metal coordination number (CN) is a key determinant of the structure and properties of metal complexes. It also plays an important role in metal selectivity in certain metalloproteins. Despite its central role, the preferred CN for several metal cations remains ambiguous, and the factors determining the metal CN are not fully understood. Here, we evaluate how the CN depends on (1) the metal's size, charge, and charge-accepting ability for a given set of ligands, and (2) the ligand's size, charge, charge-donating ability, and denticity for a given metal by analyzing the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) structures of metal ions in the periodic table. The results show that for a given ligand type, the metal's size seems to affect its CN more than its charge, especially if the ligand is neutral, whereas, for a given metal type, the ligand's charge and charge-donating ability appear to affect the metal CN more than the ligand's size. Interestingly, all 98 metal cations surveyed could adopt more than than one CN, and most of them show an apparent preference toward even rather than odd CNs. Furthermore, as compared to the preferred metal CNs observed in the CSD, those in protein binding sites generally remain the same. This implies that the protein matrix (excluding amino acid residues in the metal's first and second coordination shell) does not impose severe geometrical restrictions on the bound metal cation.

  11. Structural characterization of water-metal interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryczko, Kevin; Tamblyn, Isaac

    2017-08-01

    We analyze and compare the structural, dynamical, and electronic properties of liquid water next to prototypical metals including Pt, graphite, and graphene. Our results are built on Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) generated using density functional theory (DFT) which explicitly include van der Waals (vdW) interactions within a first principles approach. All calculations reported use large simulation cells, allowing for an accurate treatment of the water-electrode interfaces. We have included vdW interactions through the use of the optB86b-vdW exchange correlation functional. Comparisons with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange correlation functional are also shown. We find an initial peak, due to chemisorption, in the density profile of the liquid water-Pt interface not seen in the liquid water-graphite interface, liquid water-graphene interface, nor interfaces studied previously. To further investigate this chemisorption peak, we also report differences in the electronic structure of single water molecules on both Pt and graphite surfaces. We find that a covalent bond forms between the single water molecule and the Pt surface but not between the single water molecule and the graphite surface. We also discuss the effects that defects and dopants in the graphite and graphene surfaces have on the structure and dynamics of liquid water.

  12. Smart Intelligent Aircraft Structures (SARISTU) : Proceedings of the Final Project Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Papadopoulos, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The book includes the research papers presented in the final conference of the EU funded SARISTU (Smart Intelligent Aircraft Structures) project, held at Moscow, Russia between 19-21 of May 2015. The SARISTU project, which was launched in September 2011, developed and tested a variety of individual applications as well as their combinations. With a strong focus on actual physical integration and subsequent material and structural testing, SARISTU has been responsible for important progress on the route to industrialization of structure integrated functionalities such as Conformal Morphing, Structural Health Monitoring and Nanocomposites. The gap- and edge-free deformation of aerodynamic surfaces known as conformal morphing has gained previously unrealized capabilities such as inherent de-icing, erosion protection and lightning strike protection, while at the same time the technological risk has been greatly reduced. Individual structural health monitoring techniques can now be applied at the part-manufacturin...

  13. C-V Test Structures for Metal Gate CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bankras, R.G.; Tiggelman, M.P.J.; Negara, M. Adi; Sasse, G.T.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2006-01-01

    Gate leakage has complicated the layout and measurement of C-V test structures. In this paper the impact of metal gate introduction to C-V test structure design is discussed. The metal gate allows for wider-gate structures and for the application of n+-p+ diffusion edges. We show, both theoretically

  14. Metallacyclopentadienes: structural features and coordination in transition metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgushin, Fedor M; Yanovsky, Aleksandr I; Antipin, Mikhail Yu

    2004-01-01

    Results of structural studies of polynuclear transition metal complexes containing the metallacyclopentadiene fragment are overviewed. The structural features of the complexes in relation to the nature of the substituents in the organic moiety of the metallacycles, the nature of the transition metals and their ligand environment are analysed. The main structural characteristics corresponding to different modes of coordination of metallacyclopentadienes to one or two additional metal centres are revealed.

  15. Modeling and Design Analysis Methodology for Tailoring of Aircraft Structures with Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.

    2004-01-01

    Composite materials provide design flexibility in that fiber placement and orientation can be specified and a variety of material forms and manufacturing processes are available. It is possible, therefore, to 'tailor' the structure to a high degree in order to meet specific design requirements in an optimum manner. Common industrial practices, however, have limited the choices designers make. One of the reasons for this is that there is a dearth of conceptual/preliminary design analysis tools specifically devoted to identifying structural concepts for composite airframe structures. Large scale finite element simulations are not suitable for such purposes. The present project has been devoted to creating modeling and design analysis methodology for use in the tailoring process of aircraft structures. Emphasis has been given to creating bend-twist elastic coupling in high aspect ratio wings or other lifting surfaces. The direction of our work was in concert with the overall NASA effort Twenty- First Century Aircraft Technology (TCAT). A multi-disciplinary team was assembled by Dr. Damodar Ambur to work on wing technology, which included our project.

  16. Structural disorder in metallic glass-forming liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shao-Peng; Feng, Shi-Dong; Wang, Li-Min; Qiao, Jun-Wei; Niu, Xiao-Feng; Dong, Bang-Shao; Wang, Wei-Min; Qin, Jing-Yu

    2016-06-09

    We investigated structural disorder by a new structural parameter, quasi-nearest atom (QNA), in atomistic configurations of eight metallic glass-forming systems generated through molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures. Structural analysis reveals that the scaled distribution of the number of QNA appears to be an universal property of metallic liquids and the spatial distribution of the number of QNA displays to be clearly heterogeneous. Furthermore, the new parameter can be directly correlated with potential energy and structural relaxation at the atomic level. Some straightforward relationships between QNA and other properties (per-atom potential energy and α-relaxation time) are introduced to reflect structure-property relationship in metallic liquids. We believe that the new structural parameter can well reflect structure disorder in metallic liquids and play an important role in understanding various properties in metallic liquids.

  17. Thermal Characterization of Defects in Aircraft Structures Via Spatially Controlled Heat Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Winfree, William P.

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in thermal imaging technology have spawned a number of new thermal NDE techniques that provide quantitative information about flaws in aircraft structures. Thermography has a number of advantages as an inspection technique. It is a totally noncontacting, nondestructive, imaging technology capable of inspecting a large area in a matter of a few seconds. The development of fast, inexpensive image processors have aided in the attractiveness of thermography as an NDE technique. These image processors have increased the signal to noise ratio of thermography and facilitated significant advances in post-processing. The resulting digital images enable archival records for comparison with later inspections thus providing a means of monitoring the evolution of damage in a particular structure. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center has developed a thermal NDE technique designed to image a number of potential flaws in aircraft structures. The technique involves injecting a small, spatially controlled heat flux into the outer surface of an aircraft. Images of fatigue cracking, bond integrity and material loss due to corrosion are generated from measurements of the induced surface temperature variations. This paper will present a discussion of the development of the thermal imaging system as well as the techniques used to analyze the resulting thermal images. Spatial tailoring of the heat coupled with the analysis techniques represent a significant improvement in the delectability of flaws over conventional thermal imaging. Results of laboratory experiments on fabricated crack, disbond and material loss samples will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the technique. An integral part of the development of this technology is the use of analytic and computational modeling. The experimental results will be compared with these models to demonstrate the utility of such an approach.

  18. Local damage to Ultra High Performance Concrete structures caused by an impact of aircraft engine missiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, Werner; Noeldgen, Markus; Strassburger, Elmar; Thoma, Klaus; Fehling, Ekkehard

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Experimental series on UHPC panels subjected to aircraft engine impact. → Improved ballistic limit of fiber reinforced UHPC in comparison to conventional R/C. → Detailed investigation of failure mechanisms of fiber reinforced UHPC panel. - Abstract: The impact of an aircraft engine missile causes high stresses, deformations and a severe local damage to conventional reinforced concrete. As a consequence the design of R/C protective structural elements results in components with rather large dimensions. Fiber reinforced Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC) is a concrete based material which combines ultra high strength, high packing density and an improved ductility with a significantly increased energy dissipation capacity due to the addition of fiber reinforcement. With those attributes the material is potentially suitable for improved protective structural elements with a reduced need for material resources. The presented paper reports on an experimental series of scaled aircraft engine impact tests with reinforced UHPC panels. The investigations are focused on the material behavior and the damage intensity in comparison to conventional concrete. The fundamental work of is taken as reference for the evaluation of the results. The impactor model of a Phantom F4 GE-J79 engine developed and validated by Sugano et al. is used as defined in the original work. In order to achieve best comparability, the experimental configuration and method are adapted for the UHPC experiments. With 'penetration', 'scabbing' and 'perforation' all relevant damage modes defined in are investigated so that a full set of results are provided for a representative UHPC structural configuration.

  19. MetalPDB in 2018: a database of metal sites in biological macromolecular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putignano, Valeria; Rosato, Antonio; Banci, Lucia; Andreini, Claudia

    2018-01-04

    MetalPDB (http://metalweb.cerm.unifi.it/) is a database providing information on metal-binding sites detected in the three-dimensional (3D) structures of biological macromolecules. MetalPDB represents such sites as 3D templates, called Minimal Functional Sites (MFSs), which describe the local environment around the metal(s) independently of the larger context of the macromolecular structure. The 2018 update of MetalPDB includes new contents and tools. A major extension is the inclusion of proteins whose structures do not contain metal ions although their sequences potentially contain a known MFS. In addition, MetalPDB now provides extensive statistical analyses addressing several aspects of general metal usage within the PDB, across protein families and in catalysis. Users can also query MetalPDB to extract statistical information on structural aspects associated with individual metals, such as preferred coordination geometries or aminoacidic environment. A further major improvement is the functional annotation of MFSs; the annotation is manually performed via a password-protected annotator interface. At present, ∼50% of all MFSs have such a functional annotation. Other noteworthy improvements are bulk query functionality, through the upload of a list of PDB identifiers, and ftp access to MetalPDB contents, allowing users to carry out in-depth analyses on their own computational infrastructure. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Biomimetic FAA-certifiable, artificial muscle structures for commercial aircraft wings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, Ronald M; Barrett, Cassandra M

    2014-01-01

    This paper is centered on a new form of adaptive material which functions much in the same way as skeletal muscle tissue, is structurally modeled on plant actuator cells and capable of rapidly expanding or shrinking by as much as an order of magnitude in prescribed directions. Rapid changes of plant cell shape and sizes are often initiated via ion-transport driven fluid migration and resulting turgor pressure variation. Certain plant cellular structures like those in Mimosa pudica (sensitive plant), Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa tree), or Dionaea muscipula (Venus Flytrap) all exhibit actuation physiology which employs such turgor pressure manipulation. The paper begins with dynamic micrographs of a sectioned basal articulation joint from A. julibrissin. These figures show large cellular dimensional changes as the structure undergoes foliage articulation. By mimicking such structures in aircraft flight control mechanisms, extremely lightweight pneumatic control surface actuators can be designed. This paper shows several fundamental layouts of such surfaces with actuator elements made exclusively from FAA-certifiable materials, summarizes their structural mechanics and shows actuator power and energy densities that are higher than nearly all classes of conventional adaptive materials available today. A sample flap structure is shown to possess the ability to change its shape and structural stiffness as its cell pressures are manipulated, which in turn changes the surface lift-curve slope when exposed to airflows. Because the structural stiffness can be altered, it is also shown that the commanded section lift-curve slope can be similarly controlled between 1.2 and 6.2 rad −1 . Several aircraft weight reduction principles are also shown to come into play as the need to concentrate loads to pass through point actuators is eliminated. The paper concludes with a summary of interrelated performance and airframe-level improvements including enhanced gust rejection, load

  1. Biomimetic FAA-certifiable, artificial muscle structures for commercial aircraft wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Ronald M.; Barrett, Cassandra M.

    2014-07-01

    This paper is centered on a new form of adaptive material which functions much in the same way as skeletal muscle tissue, is structurally modeled on plant actuator cells and capable of rapidly expanding or shrinking by as much as an order of magnitude in prescribed directions. Rapid changes of plant cell shape and sizes are often initiated via ion-transport driven fluid migration and resulting turgor pressure variation. Certain plant cellular structures like those in Mimosa pudica (sensitive plant), Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa tree), or Dionaea muscipula (Venus Flytrap) all exhibit actuation physiology which employs such turgor pressure manipulation. The paper begins with dynamic micrographs of a sectioned basal articulation joint from A. julibrissin. These figures show large cellular dimensional changes as the structure undergoes foliage articulation. By mimicking such structures in aircraft flight control mechanisms, extremely lightweight pneumatic control surface actuators can be designed. This paper shows several fundamental layouts of such surfaces with actuator elements made exclusively from FAA-certifiable materials, summarizes their structural mechanics and shows actuator power and energy densities that are higher than nearly all classes of conventional adaptive materials available today. A sample flap structure is shown to possess the ability to change its shape and structural stiffness as its cell pressures are manipulated, which in turn changes the surface lift-curve slope when exposed to airflows. Because the structural stiffness can be altered, it is also shown that the commanded section lift-curve slope can be similarly controlled between 1.2 and 6.2 rad-1. Several aircraft weight reduction principles are also shown to come into play as the need to concentrate loads to pass through point actuators is eliminated. The paper concludes with a summary of interrelated performance and airframe-level improvements including enhanced gust rejection, load

  2. Corrosion Behavior of Brazed Zinc-Coated Structured Sheet Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nikitin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arc brazing has, in comparison to arc welding, the advantage of less heat input while joining galvanized sheet metals. The evaporation of zinc is reduced in the areas adjacent to the joint and improved corrosion protection is achieved. In the automotive industry, lightweight design is a key technology against the background of the weight and environment protection. Structured sheet metals have higher stiffness compared to typical automobile sheet metals and therefore they can play an important role in lightweight structures. In the present paper, three arc brazing variants of galvanized structured sheet metals were validated in terms of the corrosion behavior. The standard gas metal arc brazing, the pulsed arc brazing, and the cold metal transfer (CMT® in combination with a pulsed cycle were investigated. In experimental climate change tests, the influence of the brazing processes on the corrosion behavior of galvanized structured sheet metals was investigated. After that, the corrosion behavior of brazed structured and flat sheet metals was compared. Because of the selected lap joint, the valuation of damage between sheet metals was conducted. The pulsed CMT brazing has been derived from the results as the best brazing method for the joining process of galvanized structured sheet metals.

  3. Numerical modeling of interaction of the aircraft engine with concrete protective structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenko, P. A.; Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.; Plevkov, V. S.

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents numerical modeling results considering interaction of Boeing 747 aircraft engine with nuclear power station protective shell. Protective shell has been given as a reinforced concrete structure with complex scheme of reinforcement. The engine has been simulated by cylinder projectile made from titanium alloy. The interaction velocity has comprised 180 m/s. The simulation is three-dimensional solved by finite element method using the author’s own software package EFES. Fracture and fragmentation of materials have been considered in calculations. Program software has been assessed to be used in calculation of multiple-contact objectives.

  4. Local damage to reinforced concrete structures caused by impact of aircraft engine missiles. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, T.; Tsubota, H.; Kasai, Y.; Koshika, N.; Itoh, C.; Shirai, K.; Von Riesemann, W.A.; Bickel, D.C.; Parks, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    Three sets of impact tests, small-, intermediate-, and full-scale tests, have been executed to determine local damage to reinforced concrete structures caused by the impact of aircraft engine missiles. The results of the test program showed that (1) the use of the similarity law is appropriate, (2) suitable empirical formulas exist for predicting the local damage caused by rigid missiles, (3) reduction factors may be used for evaluating the reduction in local damage due to the deformability of the engines, (4) the reinforcement ratio has no effect on local damage, and (5) the test results could be adequately predicted using nonlinear response analysis. (orig.)

  5. Vibrational behavior of adaptive aircraft wing structures modelled as composite thin-walled beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, O.; Librescu, L.; Rogers, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    The vibrational behavior of cantilevered aircraft wings modeled as thin-walled beams and incorporating piezoelectric effects is studied. Based on the converse piezoelectric effect, the system of piezoelectric actuators conveniently located on the wing yield the control of its associated vertical and lateral bending eigenfrequencies. The possibility revealed by this study enabling one to increase adaptively the eigenfrequencies of thin-walled cantilevered beams could play a significant role in the control of the dynamic response and flutter of wing and rotor blade structures.

  6. Structural Metals in the Group I Intron: A Ribozyme with a Multiple Metal Ion Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahley,M.; Adams, P.; Wang, J.; Strobel, S.

    2007-01-01

    Metal ions play key roles in the folding and function for many structured RNAs, including group I introns. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Azoarcus bacterial group I intron in complex with its 5' and 3' exons. In addition to 222 nucleotides of RNA, the model includes 18 Mg2+ and K+ ions. Five of the metals bind within 12 Angstroms of the scissile phosphate and coordinate the majority of the oxygen atoms biochemically implicated in conserved metal-RNA interactions. The metals are buried deep within the structure and form a multiple metal ion core that is critical to group I intron structure and function. Eight metal ions bind in other conserved regions of the intron structure, and the remaining five interact with peripheral structural elements. Each of the 18 metals mediates tertiary interactions, facilitates local bends in the sugar-phosphate backbone or binds in the major groove of helices. The group I intron has a rich history of biochemical efforts aimed to identify RNA-metal ion interactions. The structural data are correlated to the biochemical results to further understand the role of metal ions in group I intron structure and function.

  7. Planform, aero-structural, and flight control optimization for tailless morphing aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Giulio; Arrieta, Andres F.; Ermanni, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Tailless airplanes with swept wings rely on variations of the spanwise lift distribution to provide controllability in roll, pitch and yaw. Conventionally, this is achieved utilizing multiple control surfaces, such as elevons, on the wing trailing edge. As every flight condition requires different control moments (e.g. to provide pitching moment equilibrium), these surfaces are practically permanently displaced. Due to their nature, causing discontinuities, corners and gaps, they bear aerodynamic penalties, mostly in terms of shape drag. Shape adaptation, by means of chordwise morphing, has the potential of varying the lift of a wing section by deforming its profile in a way that minimizes the resulting drag. Furthermore, as the shape can be varied differently along the wingspan, the lift distribution can be tailored to each specific flight condition. For this reason, tailless aircraft appear as a prime choice to apply morphing techniques, as the attainable benefits are potentially significant. In this work, we present a methodology to determine the optimal planform, profile shape, and morphing structure for a tailless aircraft. The employed morphing concept is based on a distributed compliance structure, actuated by Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) piezoelectric elements. The multidisciplinary optimization is performed considering the static and dynamic aeroelastic behavior of the resulting structure. The goal is the maximization of the aerodynamic efficiency while guaranteeing the controllability of the plane, by means of morphing, in a set of flight conditions.

  8. Dual-Mode Patch Filter with Metal Wall Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A dual-mode patch filter with metal wall structures is presented. The proposed structure consists of substrate 1 with metal wall structures and substrate 2 with a patch resonator. Because the symmetry of the structure can be perturbed by both long and short strips of the metal wall structures, the dual mode is achieved. The inductive element is introduced to the patch resonator through vias of the metal wall structures. The capacitive element is introduced through a gap between the patch resonator and the metal strips. The measured 3 dB fractional bandwidth for the passband is 10.4%, and the measured minimum insertion loss is 1.3 dB.

  9. Properties of structural materials in liquid metal environment. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgstedt, H.U. [ed.

    1991-12-15

    The International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) Specialists Meeting on Properties of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment was held during June 18 to June 20, 1991, at the Nuclear Research Centre (Kernforschungszentrum) in Karlsruhe, Germany. The Specialists Meeting was divided into five technical sessions which addressed topics as follows: Creep-Rupture Behaviour of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; Behaviour of Materials in Liquid Metal Environments under Off-Normal Conditions;Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue of Structural Materials in Liquid Metal Environment; Crack Propagation in Liquid Sodium; and Conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  10. Prognostic investigation of galvanic corrosion precursors in aircraft structures and their detection strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Robin; Kim, Tae Hee; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2017-04-01

    Aluminum alloys have been the dominant materials for aerospace construction in the past fifty years due to their light weight, forming and alloying, and relative low cost in comparison to titanium and composites. However, in recent years, carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) and honeycomb materials have been used in aircrafts in the quest to attain lower weight, high temperature resistance, and better fuel efficiency. When these two materials are coupled together, the structural strength of the aircraft is unparalleled, but this comes at a price, namely galvanic corrosion. Previous experimental results have shown that when CFRP composite materials are joined with high strength aluminum alloys (AA7075-T6 or AA2024-T3), galvanic corrosion occurs at the material interfaces, and the aluminum is in greater danger of corroding, particularly since carbon and aluminum are on the opposite ends of the galvanic series. In this paper, we explore the occurrence of the recognizable precursors of galvanic corrosion when CFRP plate is coupled to an aluminum alloy using SS-304 bolts and exposed to environmental degradation, which creates significant concerns for aircraft structural reliability. The galvanic corrosion software package, BEASY, is used to simulate the growth of corrosion in the designed specimen after which a microwave non-destructive testing (NDT) technique is explored to detect corrosion defects that appear at the interface of this galvanic couple. This paper also explores a loaded waveguide technique to determine the dielectric constant of the final corrosion product at the Q-band millimeter-wave frequency range (33-50 GHz), as this can be an invaluable asset in developing early detection strategies.

  11. Structural Design Optimization of a Tiltrotor Aircraft Composite Wing to Enhance Whirl Flutter Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Taeseong; Kim, Jaehoon; Shin, Sang Joon

    2013-01-01

    In order to enhance the aeroelastic stability of a tiltrotor aircraft, a structural optimization framework is developed by applying a multi-level optimization approach. Each optimization level is designed to achieve a different purpose; therefore, relevant optimization schemes are selected for each...... level. Enhancement of the aeroelastic stability is selected as an objective in the upper-level optimization. This is achieved by seeking the optimal structural properties of a composite wing, including its mass, vertical, chordwise, and torsional stiffness. In the upper-level optimization, the response...... surface method (RSM), is selected. On the other hand, lower-level optimization seeks to determine the local detailed cross-sectional parameters, such as the ply orientation angles and ply thickness, which are relevant to the wing structural properties obtained at the upper-level. To avoid manufacturing...

  12. MetalPDB: a database of metal sites in biological macromolecular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreini, Claudia; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Lorenzini, Serena; Rosato, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We present here MetalPDB (freely accessible at http://metalweb.cerm.unifi.it), a novel resource aimed at conveying the information available on the three-dimensional (3D) structures of metal-binding biological macromolecules in a consistent and effective manner. This is achieved through the systematic and automated representation of metal-binding sites in proteins and nucleic acids by way of Minimal Functional Sites (MFSs). MFSs are 3D templates that describe the local environment around the metal(s) independently of the larger context of the macromolecular structure embedding the site(s), and are the central objects of MetalPDB design. MFSs are grouped into equistructural (broadly defined as sites found in corresponding positions in similar structures) and equivalent sites (equistructural sites that contain the same metals), allowing users to easily analyse similarities and variations in metal-macromolecule interactions, and to link them to functional information. The web interface of MetalPDB allows access to a comprehensive overview of metal-containing biological structures, providing a basis to investigate the basic principles governing the properties of these systems. MetalPDB is updated monthly in an automated manner.

  13. Band structure engineered layered metals for low-loss plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerding, Morten Niklas; Pandey, Mohnish; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2017-01-01

    dichalcogenide TaS2, due to an extraordinarily small density of states for scattering in the near-IR originating from their special electronic band structure. On the basis of this observation, we propose a new class of band structure engineered van der Waals layered metals composed of hexagonal transition metal...

  14. The Surface Structure of Ground Metal Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, W.; Schmid, E.

    1944-01-01

    The changes produced on metallic surfaces as a result of grinding and polishing are not as yet fully understood. Undoubtedly there is some more or less marked change in the crystal structure, at least, in the top layer. Hereby a diffusion of separated crystal particles may be involved, or, on plastic material, the formation of a layer in greatly deformed state, with possible recrystallization in certain conditions. Czochralski verified the existence of such a layer on tin micro-sections by successive observations of the texture after repeated etching; while Thomassen established, roentgenographically by means of the Debye-Scherrer method, the existence of diffused crystal fractions on the surface of ground and polished tin bars, which he had already observed after turning (on the lathe). (Thickness of this layer - 0.07 mm). Whether this layer borders direct on the undamaged base material or whether deformed intermediate layers form the transition, nothing is known. One observation ty Sachs and Shoji simply states that after the turning of an alpha-brass crystal the disturbance starting from the surface, penetrates fairly deep (approx. 1 mm) into the crystal (proof by recrystallization at 750 C).

  15. A METHOD FOR DETERMINING THE RADIALLY-AVERAGED EFFECTIVE IMPACT AREA FOR AN AIRCRAFT CRASH INTO A STRUCTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, William C. [ORNL

    2018-02-01

    This report presents a methodology for deriving the equations which can be used for calculating the radially-averaged effective impact area for a theoretical aircraft crash into a structure. Conventionally, a maximum effective impact area has been used in calculating the probability of an aircraft crash into a structure. Whereas the maximum effective impact area is specific to a single direction of flight, the radially-averaged effective impact area takes into consideration the real life random nature of the direction of flight with respect to a structure. Since the radially-averaged effective impact area is less than the maximum effective impact area, the resulting calculated probability of an aircraft crash into a structure is reduced.

  16. Effects of reinforcement ratio and arrangement on the structural behavior of a nuclear building under aircraft impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thai, Duc-Kien; Kim, Seung-Eock; Lee, Hyuk-Kee

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Numerical analysis of RC nuclear building model under aircraft impact was conducted. • The analysis result shows similar behavior as compared to the Riera function. • The effects of reinforcement ratio and arrangement were enumerated. • The appropriate number of layer of longitudinal rebar was recommended. - Abstract: This study presents the effectiveness of the rebar ratio and the arrangement of reinforced concrete (RC) structures on the structural behavior of nuclear buildings under aircraft impact using a finite element (FE) approach. A simplified model of a fictitious nuclear building using RC structures was fully modeled. The aircraft model of a Boeing 767-400 was used for impact simulation and was developed and verified with a conventional impact force–time history curve. The IRIS Punching test was used to validate the damage prediction capabilities of the RC wall under impact loading. With regard to the different rebar ratios and rebar arrangements of a nuclear RC building, the structural behavior of a building under aircraft impact was investigated. The structural behavior investigated included plastic deformation, displacement, energy dissipation, perforation/penetration depth and scabbing area. The results showed that the rebar ratio has a significant effect on withstanding aircraft impact and reducing local damage. With four layers of rebar, the RC wall absorbed and dissipated the impact energy more than once with only two layers of rebar for the same rebar ratio

  17. Understanding metallic bonding: Structure, process and interaction by Rasch analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Oon, Pey-Tee

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of 3006 Year 10-12 students on their understandings of metallic bonding. The instrument was developed based on Chi's ontological categories of scientific concepts and students' understanding of metallic bonding as reported in the literature. The instrument has two parts. Part one probed into students' understanding of metallic bonding as (a) a submicro structure of metals, (b) a process in which individual metal atoms lose their outermost shell electrons to form a 'sea of electrons' and octet metal cations or (c) an all-directional electrostatic force between delocalized electrons and metal cations, that is, an interaction. Part two assessed students' explanation of malleability of metals, for example (a) as a submicro structural rearrangement of metal atoms/cations or (b) based on all-directional electrostatic force. The instrument was validated by the Rasch Model. Psychometric assessment showed that the instrument possessed reasonably good properties of measurement. Results revealed that it was reliable and valid for measuring students' understanding of metallic bonding. Analysis revealed that the structure, process and interaction understandings were unidimensional and in an increasing order of difficulty. Implications for the teaching of metallic bonding, particular through the use of diagrams, critiques and model-based learning, are discussed.

  18. Materials Stock of the Civilian Aircraft Fleet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Woidasky

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently, about 25,500 large commercial aircraft are in use for passenger transport or as freighters, or in storage. As of today, the most prevalent metals in aircraft recycling are aluminium, as well as nickel and titanium super alloys, e.g., for the engines. The total fleet weight amounts to about 1.3 million metric tons of materials (not only metals. The aircraft engine material stock alone amounts to about 170,000 metric tons in the entire fleet. In the coming decade, more than 200,000 metric tons of obsolete aircraft structural materials can be expected for recycling. This article aims to quantify this flying stock in more detail.

  19. A unified picture of the crystal structures of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederlind, P.; Eriksson, O.; Johansson, B.; Wills, J.M.; Boring, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The crystal structures of the light actinides have intrigued physicists and chemists for several decades. Simple metals and transition metals have close-packed, high-symmetry structures, such as body-centred cubic, face-centred cubic hexagonal close packing. In contrast, the structures of the light actinides are very loosely packed and of low symmetry -tetragonal, orthorhombic and monoclinic. To understand these differences, we have have performed total-energy calculations, as a function of volume, for both high- and low-symmetry structures of a simple metal (aluminium), a non-magnetic transition metal (niobium), a ferromagnetic transition metal (iron) and a light actinide (uranium). We find that the crystal structure of all these metals is determined by the balance between electrostatic (Madelung) interactions, which favour high symmetry, and a Peierls distortion of the crystal lattice, which favours low symmetry. We show that simple metals and transition metals can adopt low-symmetry structures on expansion of the lattice; and we predict that, conversely, the light actinides will undergo transitions to structures of higher symmetry on compression. (author)

  20. Data mining of metal ion environments present in protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Heping; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Lasota, Piotr; Lebioda, Lukasz; Minor, Wladek

    2008-09-01

    Analysis of metal-protein interaction distances, coordination numbers, B-factors (displacement parameters), and occupancies of metal-binding sites in protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography and deposited in the PDB shows many unusual values and unexpected correlations. By measuring the frequency of each amino acid in metal ion-binding sites, the positive or negative preferences of each residue for each type of cation were identified. Our approach may be used for fast identification of metal-binding structural motifs that cannot be identified on the basis of sequence similarity alone. The analysis compares data derived separately from high and medium-resolution structures from the PDB with those from very high-resolution small-molecule structures in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). For high-resolution protein structures, the distribution of metal-protein or metal-water interaction distances agrees quite well with data from CSD, but the distribution is unrealistically wide for medium (2.0-2.5A) resolution data. Our analysis of cation B-factors versus average B-factors of atoms in the cation environment reveals substantial numbers of structures contain either an incorrect metal ion assignment or an unusual coordination pattern. Correlation between data resolution and completeness of the metal coordination spheres is also found.

  1. A Scalable Synthesis Pathway to Nanoporous Metal Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coaty, Christopher; Zhou, Hongyao; Liu, Haodong; Liu, Ping

    2018-01-23

    A variety of nanoporous transition metals, Fe, Co, Au, Cu, and others, have been readily formed by a scalable, room-temperature synthesis process. Metal halide compounds are reacted with organolithium reductants in a nonpolar solvent to form metal/lithium halide nanocomposites. The lithium halide is then dissolved out of the nanocomposite with a common organic solvent, leaving behind a continuous, three-dimensional network of metal filaments that form a nanoporous structure. This approach is applicable to both noble metals (Cu, Au, Ag) and less-noble transition metals (Co, Fe, Ni). The microstructures of these nanoporous transition metals are tunable, as controlling the formation of the metal structure in the nanocomposite dictates the final metal structure. Microscopy studies and nitrogen adsorption analysis show these materials form pores ranging from 2 to 50 nm with specific surface areas from 1.0 m 2 /g to 160 m 2 /g. Our analysis also shows that pore size, pore volume, and filament size of the nanoporous metal networks depend on the mobility of target metal and the amount of lithium halide produced by the conversion reaction. Further, it has been demonstrated that hybrid nanoporous structures of two or more metals could be synthesized by performing the same process on mixtures of precursor compounds. Metals (e.g., Co and Cu) have been found to stabilize each other in nanoporous forms, resulting in smaller pore sizes and higher surface areas than each element in their pure forms. This scalable and versatile synthesis pathway greatly expands our access to additional compositions and microstructures of nanoporous metals.

  2. Review of Current State of the Art and Key Design Issues With Potential Solutions for Liquid Hydrogen Cryogenic Storage Tank Structures for Aircraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Arnold, Steven M.; Sullivan, Roy M.; Manderscheid, Jane M.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2006-01-01

    Due to its high specific energy content, liquid hydrogen (LH2) is emerging as an alternative fuel for future aircraft. As a result, there is a need for hydrogen tank storage systems, for these aircraft applications, that are expected to provide sufficient capacity for flight durations ranging from a few minutes to several days. It is understood that the development of a large, lightweight, reusable cryogenic liquid storage tank is crucial to meet the goals of and supply power to hydrogen-fueled aircraft, especially for long flight durations. This report provides an annotated review (including the results of an extensive literature review) of the current state of the art of cryogenic tank materials, structural designs, and insulation systems along with the identification of key challenges with the intent of developing a lightweight and long-term storage system for LH2. The broad classes of insulation systems reviewed include foams (including advanced aerogels) and multilayer insulation (MLI) systems with vacuum. The MLI systems show promise for long-term applications. Structural configurations evaluated include single- and double-wall constructions, including sandwich construction. Potential wall material candidates are monolithic metals as well as polymer matrix composites and discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites. For short-duration flight applications, simple tank designs may suffice. Alternatively, for longer duration flight applications, a double-wall construction with a vacuum-based insulation system appears to be the most optimum design. The current trends in liner material development are reviewed in the case that a liner is required to minimize or eliminate the loss of hydrogen fuel through permeation.

  3. 76 FR 35912 - Business Jet Aircraft Industry: Structure and Factors Affecting Competitiveness; Institution of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 332-526] Business Jet Aircraft Industry... International Trade Commission (Commission) instituted investigation No. 332-526, Business Jet Aircraft Industry... Hearing AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Following receipt...

  4. Electronic structure of disordered transition metals within scattering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakyibchuk, P.M.; Volkov, O.V.; Vakarchuk, S.O.

    2005-01-01

    Here we present a new approach to the calculation of density of states of disordered transition metals based on the T-matrix framework presented by Lloyd within generalized Ziman's theory of transport properties and energy structure of disordered metals. This approach makes it possible to avoid such difficulties of familiar calculations as renormalized perturbation theory. We have achieved double hill energy resonance for transition metals at Fe and Co groups caused by hybridization potential. So the results are in good correlation with model presentation of energy structure of these metals conduction band for explaining magnetic and transport properties

  5. Fuel containment, lightning protection and damage tolerance in large composite primary aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Charles F.; James, Arthur M.

    1985-01-01

    The damage-tolerance characteristics of high strain-to-failure graphite fibers and toughened resins were evaluated. Test results show that conventional fuel tank sealing techniques are applicable to composite structures. Techniques were developed to prevent fuel leaks due to low-energy impact damage. For wing panels subjected to swept stroke lightning strikes, a surface protection of graphite/aluminum wire fabric and a fastener treatment proved effective in eliminating internal sparking and reducing structural damage. The technology features developed were incorporated and demonstrated in a test panel designed to meet the strength, stiffness, and damage tolerance requirements of a large commercial transport aircraft. The panel test results exceeded design requirements for all test conditions. Wing surfaces constructed with composites offer large weight savings if design allowable strains for compression can be increased from current levels.

  6. Concepts for improving the damage tolerance of composite compression panels. [aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, M. D.; Williams, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The residual strength of specimens with damage and the sensitivity to damage while subjected to an applied inplane compression load were determined for flatplate specimens and blade-stiffened panels. The results suggest that matrix materials that fail by delamination have the lowest damage tolerance capability. Alternate matrix materials or laminates which are transversely reinforced suppress the delamination mode of failure and change the failure mode to transverse shear crippling which occurs at a higher strain value. Several damage-tolerant blade-stiffened panel design concepts are evaluated. Structural efficiency studies conducted show only small mass penalties may result from incorporating these damage-tolerant features in panel design. The implication of test results on the design of aircraft structures was examined with respect to FAR requirements.

  7. Critical Joints in Large Composite Primary Aircraft Structures. Volume 3: Ancillary Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunin, Bruce L.; Sagui, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technology for critical structural joints for composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The results of a comprehensive ancillary test program are summarized, consisting of single-bolt composite joint specimens tested in a variety of configurations. These tests were conducted to characterize the strength and load deflection properties that are required for multirow joint analysis. The composite material was Toray 300 fiber and Ciba-Geigy 914 resin, in the form of 0.005 and 0.01 inch thick unidirectional tape. Tests were conducted in single and double shear for loaded and unloaded hole configurations under both tensile and compressive loading. Two different layup patterns were examined. All tests were conducted at room temperature. In addition, the results of NASA Standard Toughness Test (NASA RP 1092) are reported, which were conducted for several material systems.

  8. Topological structures of vortex flow on a flying wing aircraft, controlled by a nanosecond pulse discharge plasma actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hai; Shi, Zhiwei; Cheng, Keming; Wei, Dechen; Li, Zheng; Zhou, Danjie; He, Haibo; Yao, Junkai; He, Chengjun

    2016-06-01

    Vortex control is a thriving research area, particularly in relation to flying wing or delta wing aircraft. This paper presents the topological structures of vortex flow on a flying wing aircraft controlled by a nanosecond plasma dielectric barrier discharge actuator. Experiments, including oil flow visualization and two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV), were conducted in a wind tunnel with a Reynolds number of 0.5 × 106. Both oil and PIV results show that the vortex can be controlled. Oil topological structures on the aircraft surface coincide with spatial PIV flow structures. Both indicate vortex convergence and enhancement when the plasma discharge is switched on, leading to a reduced region of separated flow.

  9. Surface Structures of Model Metal Catalysts in Reactant Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Ralston, Walter T; Liu, Huimin; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2018-01-18

    Atomic scale knowledge of the surface structure of a metal catalyst is essential for fundamentally understanding the catalytic reactions performed on it. A correlation between the true atomic surface structure of a metal catalyst under reaction conditions and the corresponding catalytic performance is the key in pursuing mechanistic insight at a molecular level. Here the surface structures of model, metal catalysts in both ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) and gaseous environments of CO at a wide range of pressures are discussed. The complexity of observed surface structures in CO is illustrated, driving the necessity for visualization of the catalytic metals under realistic reaction conditions. Technical barriers for visualization of metal surfaces in situ at high temperature and high pressure are discussed.

  10. Fielding a structural health monitoring system on legacy military aircraft: A business perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, Marcel J.

    2015-01-01

    An important trend in the sustainment of military aircraft is the transition from preventative maintenance to condition based maintenance (CBM). For CBM, it is essential that the actual system condition can be measured and the measured condition can be reliably extrapolated to a convenient moment in the future in order to facilitate the planning process while maintaining flight safety. Much research effort is currently being made for the development of technologies that enable CBM, including structural health monitoring (SHM) systems. Great progress has already been made in sensors, sensor networks, data acquisition, models and algorithms, data fusion/mining techniques, etc. However, the transition of these technologies into service is very slow. This is because business cases are difficult to define and the certification of the SHM systems is very challenging. This paper describes a possibility for fielding a SHM system on legacy military aircraft with a minimum amount of certification issues and with a good prospect of a positive return on investment. For appropriate areas in the airframe the application of SHM will reconcile the fail-safety and slow crack growth damage tolerance approaches that can be used for safeguarding the continuing airworthiness of these areas, combining the benefits of both approaches and eliminating the drawbacks

  11. Electronic and chemical structure of metal-silicon interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunthaner, P. J.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews our current understanding of the near-noble metal silicides and the interfaces formed with Si(100). Using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, we compare the chemical composition and electronic structure of the room temperature metal-silicon and reacted silicide-silicon interfaces. The relationship between the interfacial chemistry and the Schottky barrier heights for this class of metals on silicon is explored.

  12. Metals 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, S.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Slaughter, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Boensch, F.D. [6025 Oak Hill Lane, Centerville, OH (United States); Claus, R.O.; de Vries, M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This strategic planning exercise identified and characterized new and emerging advanced metallic technologies in the context of the drastic changes in global politics and decreasing fiscal resources. In consideration of a hierarchy of technology thrusts stated by various Department of Defense (DOD) spokesmen, and the need to find new and creative ways to acquire and organize programs within an evolving Wright Laboratory, five major candidate programs identified are: C-17 Flap, Transport Fuselage, Mach 5 Aircraft, 4.Fighter Structures, and 5. Missile Structures. These results were formed by extensive discussion with selected major contractors and other experts, and a survey of advanced metallic structure materials. Candidate structural applications with detailed metal structure descriptions bracket a wide variety of uses which warrant consideration for the suggested programs. An analysis on implementing smart skins and structures concepts is given from a metal structures perspective.

  13. Metal nanoparticle direct inkjet printing for low-temperature 3D micro metal structure fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seung Hwan; Nam, Koo Hyun; Chung, Jaewon; Hotz, Nico; Grigoropoulos, Costas P

    2010-01-01

    Inkjet printing of functional materials is a key technology toward ultra-low-cost, large-area electronics. We demonstrate low-temperature 3D micro metal structure fabrication by direct inkjet printing of metal nanoparticles (NPs) as a versatile, direct 3D metal structuring approach representing an alternative to conventional vacuum deposition and photolithographic methods. Metal NP ink was inkjet-printed to exploit the large melting temperature drop of the nanomaterial and the ease of the NP ink formulation. Parametric studies on the basic conditions for stable 3D inkjet printing of NP ink were carried out. Furthermore, diverse 3D metal microstructures, including micro metal pillar arrays, helices, zigzag and micro bridges were demonstrated and electrical characterization was performed. Since the process requires low temperature, it carries substantial potential for fabrication of electronics on a plastic substrate

  14. MetalPDB: a database of metal sites in biological macromolecular structures

    OpenAIRE

    Andreini, Claudia; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Lorenzini, Serena; Rosato, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We present here MetalPDB (freely accessible at http://metalweb.cerm.unifi.it), a novel resource aimed at conveying the information available on the three-dimensional (3D) structures of metal-binding biological macromolecules in a consistent and effective manner. This is achieved through the systematic and automated representation of metal-binding sites in proteins and nucleic acids by way of Minimal Functional Sites (MFSs). MFSs are 3D templates that describe the local environment around the ...

  15. Hollow needle used to cut metal honeycomb structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, E. A.

    1966-01-01

    Hollow needle tool cuts metal honeycomb structures without damaging adjacent material. The hollow needle combines an electrostatic discharge and a stream of oxygen at a common point to effect rapid, accurate metal cutting. The tool design can be varied to use the hollow needle principle for cutting a variety of shapes.

  16. Thin films of metal oxides on metal single crystals: Structure and growth by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, H.C.

    1995-12-01

    Detailed studies of the growth and structure of thin films of metal oxides grown on metal single crystal surfaces using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) are presented. The oxide overlayer systems studied are iron oxide and titanium oxide on the Pt(III) surface. The complexity of the metal oxides and large lattice mismatches often lead to surface structures with large unit cells. These are particularly suited to a local real space technique such as scanning tunneling microscopy. In particular, the symmetry that is directly observed with the STM elucidates the relationship of the oxide overlayers to the substrate as well as distinguishing, the structures of different oxides

  17. Ultrasonic techniques for repair of aircraft structures with bonded composite patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. H.; Senapati, N.; Francini, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    This is a paper on a research and development project to demonstrate a novel ultrasonic process for the field application of boron/epoxy (B/Ep) patches for repair of aircraft structures. The first phase of the project was on process optimization and testing to develop the most practical ultrasonic processing techniques. Accelerated testing and aging behavior of precured B/Ep patches, which were ultrasonically bonded to simulated B-52 wing panel assemblies, were performed by conducting flight-by-flight spectrum loading fatigue tests. The spectrum represented 2340 missions/flights or 30 years of service. The effects of steady-state applied temperature and prior exposure of the B/Ep composite patches were evaluated. Representative experimental results of this phase of the project are presented.

  18. Stimulated emission of surface plasmons by electron tunneling in metal-barrier-metal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, D. P.; Gustafson, T. K.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that correlation currents arising from the superposition of pairs of states on distinct sides of a potential barrier in metal-barrier-metal structures can result in inelastic tunneling through the emission of surface plasmons. Net gain of an externally excited plasmon field is possible.

  19. A Study of the Utilization of Advanced Composites in Fuselage Structures of Commercial Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, D. J.; Sumida, P. T.; Bunin, B. L.; Janicki, G. S.; Walker, J. V.; Fox, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the technology and data needed to support the introduction of advanced composites in the future production of fuselage structure in large transport aircraft. Fuselage structures of six candidate airplanes were evaluated for the baseline component. The MD-100 was selected on the basis of its representation of 1990s fuselage structure, an available data base, its impact on the schedule and cost of the development program, and its availability and suitability for flight service evaluation. Acceptance criteria were defined, technology issues were identified, and a composite fuselage technology development plan, including full-scale tests, was identified. The plan was based on composite materials to be available in the mid to late 1980s. Program resources required to develop composite fuselage technology are estimated at a rough order of magnitude to be 877 man-years exclusive of the bird strike and impact dynamic test components. A conceptual composite fuselage was designed, retaining the basic MD-100 structural arrangement for doors, windows, wing, wheel wells, cockpit enclosure, major bulkheads, etc., resulting in a 32 percent weight savings.

  20. The use of neutron imaging for the study of honeycomb structures in aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungler, P.C.; Bennett, L.G.I.; Lewis, W.J.; Brenizer, J.S.; Heller, A.K.

    2009-01-01

    Highly maneuverable aircraft, such as the CF188 Hornet, have several flight control surfaces on both the leading and the trailing edges of the wing surfaces. They are composed of composite panels constructed of aluminum honeycomb core usually covered with graphite epoxy skins. Although very light and structurally stiff, they are being compromised by water ingress. The trapped water degrades their structural integrity by interacting with the adhesive. Various studies are underway to understand the movement of water in the honeycomb core as well as to determine a method of removing the water. With a vertical neutron beam tube at Royal Military College (RMC), the component can be positioned horizontally and the pooled water in each honeycomb cell can be imaged. These images have been compared with those from a horizontal beam and thus vertical placement of the structure at Pennsylvania State University Radiation Science and Engineer Center's Breazeale reactor. Thereby, both the filet bond between the honeycomb and the skin as well as the node bond between the honeycomb cells can be studied to determine their contribution to the movement of water throughout the structure. Moreover, the exit path for water has been visualized as part of developing a drying procedure for these flight control surfaces.

  1. Assessment of the response of reinforced concrete structural members to aircraft crash impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandes, K.

    1988-01-01

    For the containments of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany, the loading caused by a striking military aircraft decisively influences their design. The low probability of occurrence of this loading can be associated with an increase of consequences and reduced safety margins used in the design of structures. This requires that the actual response of structures to extreme loads has to be predicted with a higher degree of confidence than is typically the case with conventional structures. The adequacy of the computer-oriented mechanical-mathematical methods and the associated computer-codes used in the design of nuclear power plants can only be verified by comparing results from both, analytical and experimental studies. After having confirmed the adequacy of the analytical tools, a probabilistic risk analysis can be sufficiently performed. A series of tests is described which have been performed with the aim to improve the mechanical and physical modelling of RC-structures. Furthermore, a case study is presented to evolve a feeling for the safety margins which are implicitely included in the deterministic design calculation. (orig.)

  2. Energy Finite Element Analysis Developments for Vibration Analysis of Composite Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahopoulos, Nickolas; Schiller, Noah H.

    2011-01-01

    The Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) has been utilized successfully for modeling complex structural-acoustic systems with isotropic structural material properties. In this paper, a formulation for modeling structures made out of composite materials is presented. An approach based on spectral finite element analysis is utilized first for developing the equivalent material properties for the composite material. These equivalent properties are employed in the EFEA governing differential equations for representing the composite materials and deriving the element level matrices. The power transmission characteristics at connections between members made out of non-isotropic composite material are considered for deriving suitable power transmission coefficients at junctions of interconnected members. These coefficients are utilized for computing the joint matrix that is needed to assemble the global system of EFEA equations. The global system of EFEA equations is solved numerically and the vibration levels within the entire system can be computed. The new EFEA formulation for modeling composite laminate structures is validated through comparison to test data collected from a representative composite aircraft fuselage that is made out of a composite outer shell and composite frames and stiffeners. NASA Langley constructed the composite cylinder and conducted the test measurements utilized in this work.

  3. Two-dimensional modeling of an aircraft engine structural bladed disk-casing modal interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Mathias; Pierre, Christophe; Cartraud, Patrice; Lombard, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    In modern turbo machines such as aircraft jet engines, structural contacts between the casing and bladed disk may occur through a variety of mechanisms: coincidence of vibration modes, thermal deformation of the casing, rotor imbalance due to design uncertainties to name a few. These nonlinear interactions may result in severe damage to both structures and it is important to understand the physical circumstances under which they occur. In this study, we focus on a modal coincidence during which the vibrations of each structure take the form of a k-nodal diameter traveling wave characteristic of axi-symmetric geometries. A realistic two-dimensional model of the casing and bladed disk is introduced in order to predict the occurrence of this very specific interaction phenomenon versus the rotation speed of the engine. The equations of motion are solved using an explicit time integration scheme in conjunction with the Lagrange multiplier method where friction is accounted for. This model is validated from the comparison with an analytical solution. The numerical results show that the structures may experience different kinds of behaviors (namely damped, sustained and divergent motions) mainly depending on the rotational velocity of the bladed disk.

  4. Large Lateral Photovoltaic Effect in Metal-(Oxide-Semiconductor Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongqi Yu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE can be used in position-sensitive detectors to detect very small displacements due to its output of lateral photovoltage changing linearly with light spot position. In this review, we will summarize some of our recent works regarding LPE in metal-semiconductor and metal-oxide-semiconductor structures, and give a theoretical model of LPE in these two structures.

  5. Large lateral photovoltaic effect in metal-(oxide-) semiconductor structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chongqi; Wang, Hui

    2010-01-01

    The lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) can be used in position-sensitive detectors to detect very small displacements due to its output of lateral photovoltage changing linearly with light spot position. In this review, we will summarize some of our recent works regarding LPE in metal-semiconductor and metal-oxide-semiconductor structures, and give a theoretical model of LPE in these two structures.

  6. Band structure engineered layered metals for low-loss plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerding, Morten N.; Pandey, Mohnish; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2017-04-01

    Plasmonics currently faces the problem of seemingly inevitable optical losses occurring in the metallic components that challenges the implementation of essentially any application. In this work, we show that Ohmic losses are reduced in certain layered metals, such as the transition metal dichalcogenide TaS2, due to an extraordinarily small density of states for scattering in the near-IR originating from their special electronic band structure. On the basis of this observation, we propose a new class of band structure engineered van der Waals layered metals composed of hexagonal transition metal chalcogenide-halide layers with greatly suppressed intrinsic losses. Using first-principles calculations, we show that the suppression of optical losses lead to improved performance for thin-film waveguiding and transformation optics.

  7. Alkali metal ion templated transition metal formate framework materials: synthesis, crystal structures, ion migration, and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikeland, Espen; Lock, Nina; Filsø, Mette; Stingaciu, Marian; Shen, Yanbin; Overgaard, Jacob; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2014-10-06

    Four transition metal formate coordination polymers with anionic frameworks, namely, Na[Mn(HCOO)3], K[Mn(HCOO)3], Na2[Cu3(HCOO)8], and K2[Cu5(HCOO)12], were synthesized using a mild solution chemistry approach. Multitemperature single-crystal (100-300 K) and powder X-ray diffraction studies of the compounds reveal structures of large diversity ranging from cubic chiral Na-Mn formate to triclinic Na-Cu formate. The structural variety is caused by the nature of the transition metals, the alkali metal ion templation, and the versatility of the formate group, which offers metal-metal coordination through three different O-C-O bridging modes (syn-syn, syn-anti, anti-anti) in addition to metal-metal bridging via a single oxygen atom. The two manganese(II) compounds contain mononuclear, octahedrally coordinated moieties, but the three-dimensional connectivity between the manganese octahedra is very different in the two structures. The two copper frameworks, in contrast, consist of binuclear and mononuclear moieties (Na-Cu formate) and trinuclear and mononuclear moieties (K-Cu formate), respectively. Procrystal electron density analysis of the compounds indicates one-dimensional K(+)-ion conductivity in K-Mn and K-Cu, and the nature of the proposed potassium ion migration is compared with results from similar analysis on known Na(+) and K(+) ion conductors. K-Mn and Na-Mn were tested as cathode materials, but this resulted in poor reversibility due to low conductivity or structural collapse. The magnetic properties of the compounds were studied by vibrating sample magnetometric measurements, and their thermal stabilities were determined by thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. Despite structural differences, the metal formates that contain the same transition metal have similar magnetic properties and thermal decomposition pathways, that is, the nature of the transition metal controls the compound properties.

  8. Chemical compatibility of structural materials in alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Rink, D.L.; Haglund, R.

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the chemical compatibility of structural alloys such as V-5 wt.%Cr-5 wt.%Ti alloy and Type 316 stainless steel for application in liquid alkali metals such as lithium and sodium-78 wt.% potassium (NaK) at temperatures in the range that are of interest for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER); (b) evaluate the transfer of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen between structural materials and liquid metals; and (c) evaluate the effects of such transfers on the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the materials for long-term service in liquid-metal-environments

  9. Hypervelocity Impact Evaluation of Metal Foam Core Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasensky, John; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2007-01-01

    A series of hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were conducted by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HITF) [1], building 267 (Houston, Texas) between January 2003 and December 2005 to test the HVI performance of metal foams, as compared to the metal honeycomb panels currently in service. The HITF testing was conducted at the NASA JSC White Sands Testing Facility (WSTF) at Las Cruces, New Mexico. Eric L. Christiansen, Ph.D., and NASA Lead for Micro-Meteoroid Orbital Debris (MMOD) Protection requested these hypervelocity impact tests as part of shielding research conducted for the JSC Center Director Discretionary Fund (CDDF) project. The structure tested is a metal foam sandwich structure; a metal foam core between two metal facesheets. Aluminum and Titanium metals were tested for foam sandwich and honeycomb sandwich structures. Aluminum honeycomb core material is currently used in Orbiter Vehicle (OV) radiator panels and in other places in space structures. It has many desirable characteristics and performs well by many measures, especially when normalized by density. Aluminum honeycomb does not perform well in Hypervelocity Impact (HVI) Testing. This is a concern, as honeycomb panels are often exposed to space environments, and take on the role of Micrometeoroid / Orbital Debris (MMOD) shielding. Therefore, information on possible replacement core materials which perform adequately in all necessary functions of the material would be useful. In this report, HVI data is gathered for these two core materials in certain configurations and compared to gain understanding of the metal foam HVI performance.

  10. A Novel 3D Printer to Support Additive Manufacturing of Gradient Metal Alloy Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gradient metal alloy structures possess multi-functional properties that conventional monolithic metal counterparts do not have. Such structures can potentially...

  11. A Novel 3D Printer to Support Additive Manufacturing of Gradient Metal Alloy Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gradient metal alloy structures possess multi-functional properties that conventional monolithic metal counterparts do not have. Such structures can potentially...

  12. Crystal structures of Dronpa complexed with quenchable metal ions provide insight into metal biosensor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In Jung; Kim, Sangsoo; Park, Jeahyun; Eom, Intae; Kim, Sunam; Kim, Jin-Hong; Ha, Sung Chul; Kim, Yeon Gil; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Nam, Ki Hyun

    2016-09-01

    Many fluorescent proteins (FPs) show fluorescence quenching by specific metal ions, which can be applied towards metal biosensor development. In this study, we investigated the significant fluorescence quenching of Dronpa by Co(2+) and Cu(2+) ions. Crystal structures of Co(2+) -, Ni(2+) - and Cu(2+) -bound Dronpa revealed previously unseen, unique, metal-binding sites for fluorescence quenching. These metal ions commonly interact with surface-exposed histidine residues (His194-His210 and His210-His212), and interact indirectly with chromophores. Structural analysis of the Co(2+) - and Cu(2+) - binding sites of Dronpa provides insight into FP-based metal biosensor engineering. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Structural refinement and coarsening in deformed metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N.; Huang, X.; Xing, Q.

    2005-01-01

    The microstructural refinement by plastic deformation is analysed in terms of key parameters, the spacing between and the misorientation angle across the boundaries subdividing the structure. Coarsening of such structures by annealing is also characterised. For both deformed and annealed structures...

  14. Investigation on strain sensing properties of carbon-based nanocomposites for structural aircraft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Patrizia; Spinelli, Giovanni; Tucci, Vincenzo; Guadagno, Liberata; Vertuccio, Luigi; Russo, Salvatore

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical and electrical properties of a thermosetting epoxy resin particularly indicated for the realization of structural aeronautic components and reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, at 0.3 wt%) are investigated for specimens subjected to cycles and different levels of applied strain (i.e. ɛ) loaded both in axial tension and flexural mode. It is found that the piezoresistive behavior of the resulting nanocomposite evaluated in terms of variation of the electrical resistance is strongly affected by the applied mechanical stress mainly due to the high sensibility and consequent rearrangement of the electrical percolating network formed by MWCNTs in the composite at rest or even under a small strain. In fact, the variations in electrical resistance that occur during the mechanical stress are correlated to the deformation exhibited by the nanocomposites. In particular, the overall response of electrical resistance of the composite is characterized by a linear increase with the strain at least in the region of elastic deformation of the material in which the gauge factor (i.e. G.F.) of the sensor is usually evaluated. Therefore, the present study aims at investigating the possible use of the nanotechnology for application of embedded sensor systems in composite structures thus having capability of self-sensing and of responding to the surrounding environmental changes, which are some fundamental requirements especially for structural aircraft monitoring applications.

  15. Fuel containment and damage tolerance in large composite primary aircraft structures. Phase 2: Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandifer, J. P.; Denny, A.; Wood, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Technical issues associated with fuel containment and damage tolerance of composite wing structures for transport aircraft were investigated. Material evaluation tests were conducted on two toughened resin composites: Celion/HX1504 and Celion/5245. These consisted of impact, tension, compression, edge delamination, and double cantilever beam tests. Another test series was conducted on graphite/epoxy box beams simulating a wing cover to spar cap joint configuration of a pressurized fuel tank. These tests evaluated the effectiveness of sealing methods with various fastener types and spacings under fatigue loading and with pressurized fuel. Another test series evaluated the ability of the selected coatings, film, and materials to prevent fuel leakage through 32-ply AS4/2220-1 laminates at various impact energy levels. To verify the structural integrity of the technology demonstration article structural details, tests were conducted on blade stiffened panels and sections. Compression tests were performed on undamaged and impacted stiffened AS4/2220-1 panels and smaller element tests to evaluate stiffener pull-off, side load and failsafe properties. Compression tests were also performed on panels subjected to Zone 2 lightning strikes. All of these data were integrated into a demonstration article representing a moderately loaded area of a transport wing. This test combined lightning strike, pressurized fuel, impact, impact repair, fatigue and residual strength.

  16. Probability of detection for bolt hole eddy current in extracted from service aircraft wing structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, P. R.; Uemura, C.; Krause, T. W.

    2018-04-01

    Fatigue cracks are prone to develop around fasteners found in multi-layer aluminum structures on aging aircraft. Bolt hole eddy current (BHEC) is used for detection of cracks from within bolt holes after fastener removal. In support of qualification towards a target a90/95 (detect 90% of cracks of depth a, 95% of the time) of 0.76 mm (0.030"), a preliminary probability of detection (POD) study was performed to identify those parameters whose variation may keep a bolt hole inspection from attaining its goal. Parameters that were examined included variability in lift-off due to probe type, out-of-round holes, holes with diameters too large to permit surface-contact of the probe and mechanical damage to the holes, including burrs. The study examined the POD for BHEC of corner cracks in unfinished fastener holes extracted from service material. 68 EDM notches were introduced into two specimens of a horizontal stabilizer from a CC-130 Hercules aircraft. The fastener holes were inspected in the unfinished state, simulating potential inspection conditions, by 7 certified inspectors using a manual BHEC setup with an impedance plane display and also with one inspection conducted utilizing a BHEC automated C-Scan apparatus. While the standard detection limit of 1.27 mm (0.050") was achieved, given the a90/95 of 0.97 mm (0.039"), the target 0.76 mm (0.030") was not achieved. The work highlighted a number of areas where there was insufficient information to complete the qualification. Consequently, a number of recommendations were made. These included; development of a specification for minimum probe requirements; criteria for condition of the hole to be inspected, including out-of-roundness and presence of corrosion pits; statement of range of hole sizes; inspection frequency and data display for analysis.

  17. Surface/structure functionalization of copper-based catalysts by metal-support and/or metal-metal interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsolakis, Michalis; Ioakeimidis, Zisis

    2014-11-01

    Cu-based catalysts have recently attracted great attention both in catalysis and electro-catalysis fields due to their excellent catalytic performance and low cost. Given that their performance is determined, to a great extent, by Cu sites local environment, considerable efforts have been devoted on the strategic modifications of the electronic and structural properties of Cu sites. In this regard, the feasibility of tuning the local structure of Cu entities by means of metal-support or metal-metal interactions is investigated. More specifically, the physicochemical properties of Cu entities are modified by employing: (i) different oxides (CeO2, La2O3, Sm2O3), or (ii) ceria-based mixed oxides (Ce1-xSmxOδ) as supporting carriers, and (iii) a second metal (Cobalt) adjacent to Cu (bimetallic Cu-Co/CeO2). A characterization study, involving BET, XRD, TPR, and XPS, reveal that significant modifications on structural, redox and electronic properties of Cu sites can be induced by adopting either different oxide carriers or bimetallic complexes. Fundamental insights into the tuning of Cu local environment by metal-support or metal-metal interactions are provided, paving the way for real-life industrial applications.

  18. Structure and properties of transition metal-metalloid glasses based on refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.L.; Williams, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    The structure and properties of several new transition metal-metalloid (TM/sub 1-x/M/sub x/) metallic glasses based on refractory transition metals (e.g. Mo, W, Ru etc.) have been systemically investigated as a function of composition. The structure of the alloys has been investigated by x-ray diffraction methods and measurements of superconducting properties, electrical resistivity, density, hardness, and mechanical behavior were made. These data are used in developing a novel description of the structure of TM/sub 1-x/M/sub x/ glasses. The experimental evidence suggests that an ideal amorphous phase forms at a specific composition x/sub c/ and that this phase has a well defined atomic short range order. For metallic glasses having x x/sub c/. This novel picture can explain the variation of many properties of these glasses with metalloid concentration

  19. Structural refinement and coarsening in deformed metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N.; Huang, X.; Xing, Q.

    2005-01-01

    The microstructural refinement by plastic deformation is analysed in terms of key parameters, the spacing between and the misorientation angle across the boundaries subdividing the structure. Coarsening of such structures by annealing is also characterised. For both deformed and annealed structur......, good agreement has been found between experimental measurements of the flow stress and calculated values. Commercial purity aluminium is used as an example and deformed by cold rolling and by accumulative roll bonding....

  20. Durability and damage tolerance of Large Composite Primary Aircraft Structure (LCPAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccarty, John E.; Roeseler, William G.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis and testing addressing the key technology areas of durability and damage tolerance were completed for wing surface panels. The wing of a fuel-efficient, 200-passenger commercial transport airplane for 1990 delivery was sized using graphite-epoxy materials. Coupons of various layups used in the wing sizing were tested in tension, compression, and spectrum fatigue with typical fastener penetrations. The compression strength after barely visible impact damage was determined from coupon and structural element tests. One current material system and one toughened system were evaluated by coupon testing. The results of the coupon and element tests were used to design three distinctly different compression panels meeting the strength, stiffness, and damage-tolerance requirements of the upper wing panels. These three concepts were tested with various amounts of damage ranging from barely visible impact to through-penetration. The results of this program provide the key technology data required to assess the durability and damage-tolerance capability or advanced composites for use in commercial aircraft wing panel structure.

  1. Active vibration control by piezoceramic actuators on a jet aircraft partial frame structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecce, Leonardo; Viscardi, Massimo; Cantoni, Stefania

    1996-04-01

    During the last five years, the Dept. of Aeronautical Engineering of the University of Naples, has carried out a lot of work, especially on the experimental side, focused on assessing the feasibility of an active vibration and noise control approach, based on the use of piezoceramic actuators and sensors bonded to different structural elements. This paper concerns an application of this technique relative to a partially curved stiff frame of a medium civil transport jet aircraft. The general procedure, as previously assessed on different test articles, requires as first step, the dynamic characterization of the test article, to best point out the target of control procedure in terms of deformed shapes relative to the frequency of most interest. The use of PZT piezoactuators to be bonded on the structure guarantee at the same time high actuators forces in front of a low weight increment. The hearth of the MIMO (Multi Input Multi Output) feedforward control algorithm that is usually applied, is then represented by an ANN (Artificial Neural Network) control algorithm that use the evaluation of experimental FRF as measured by reference accelerometer, to calculate the optimum control forces to be applied to the actuators to minimize a target cost function. Experimental results provided over 32 dB of overall vibration level reduction in a single controlled mode shape, without any spillover effect.

  2. Effect of temperature on composite sandwich structures subjected to low velocity impact. [aircraft construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A. V.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of low velocity projectile impact on sandwich-type structural components was investigated. The materials used in the fabrication of the impact surface were graphite-, Kevlar-, and boron-fibers with appropriate epoxy matrices. The testing of the specimens was performed at moderately low- and high-temperatures as well as at room temperature to assess the impact-initiated strength degradation of the laminates. Eleven laminates with different stacking sequences, orientations, and thicknesses were tested. The low energy projectile impact is considered to simulate the damage caused by runway debris, the dropping of the hand tools during servicing, etc., on the secondary aircraft structures fabricated with the composite materials. The results show the preload and the impact energy combinations necessary to cause catastrophic failure in the laminates tested. A set of faired curves indicating the failure thresholds is shown separately for the tension-and compression-loaded laminates. The specific-strengths and -modulii for the various laminates tested are also given.

  3. Synthesis and structural characterization of alkali metal arsinoamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Gamer, Michael T; Roesky, Peter W

    2017-12-20

    The aminoarsane Mes 2 AsN(H)Ph was prepared from Mes 2 AsCl and aniline in good yields. Deprotonation of Mes 2 AsN(H)Ph with suitable alkali metal bases resulted in the corresponding alkali metal derivatives. Thus, reaction of Mes 2 AsN(H)Ph with nBuLi, NaN(SiMe 3 ) 2 , or KH gave the metal complexes [(Mes 2 AsNPh){Li(OEt 2 ) 2 }], [(Mes 2 AsNPh){Na(OEt 2 )}] 2 , and [(Mes 2 AsNPh){K(THF)}] 2 . These are the first metal complexes ligated by an arsinoamide. All solid-state structures were established by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The lithium compounds form a monomer in the solid-state, whereas the sodium and the potassium derivatives are dimers. In the dimeric compounds intra- and intermolecular π-interaction of the aromatic rings with the metal atoms is observed.

  4. One-Electron Theory of Metals. Cohesive and Structural Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    The work described in the report r.nd the 16 accompanying publications is based upon a one-electron theory obtained within the local approximation to density-functional theory, and deals with the ground state of metals as obtained from selfconsistent electronic-structure calculations performed...... by means of the Linear Muffin-Tin Orbital (LMTO) method. It has been the goal of the work to establish how well this one-electron approach describes physical properties such as the crystal structures of the transition metals, the structural phase transitions in the alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth...

  5. Method and apparatus for diamond wire cutting of metal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsells, Robert; Gettelfinger, Geoff; Perry, Erik; Rule, Keith

    2005-04-19

    A method and apparatus for diamond wire cutting of metal structures, such as nuclear reactor vessels, is provided. A diamond wire saw having a plurality of diamond beads with beveled or chamfered edges is provided for sawing into the walls of the metal structure. The diamond wire is guided by a plurality of support structures allowing for a multitude of different cuts. The diamond wire is cleaned and cooled by CO.sub.2 during the cutting process to prevent breakage of the wire and provide efficient cutting. Concrete can be provided within the metal structure to enhance cutting efficiency and reduce airborne contaminants. The invention can be remotely controlled to reduce exposure of workers to radioactivity and other hazards.

  6. The stellar content, metallicity and ionization structure of HII regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin-Hernandez, NL; Vermeij, R; Tielens, AGGM; van der Hulst, JM; Peeters, E

    Observations of infrared fine-structure lines provide direct information on the metallicity and ionization structure of H II regions and indirectly on the hardness of the radiation field ionizing these nebulae. We have analyzed a sample of Galactic and Magellanic Cloud H II regions observed by the

  7. Proximity effect in normal metal-multiband superconductor hybrid structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, Alexander; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch; Kupriyanov, M. Yu

    2004-01-01

    A theory of the proximity effect in normal metal¿multiband superconductor hybrid structures is formulated within the quasiclassical Green's function formalism. The quasiclassical boundary conditions for multiband hybrid structures are derived in the dirty limit. It is shown that the existence of

  8. Structural properties of low-density liquid alkali metals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The static structure factors of liquid alkali metals have been modelled at temperatures close to their melting points and a few higher temperatures using the reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method. The positions of 5000 atoms in a box, with full periodicity, were altered until the experimental diffraction data of the structure factor ...

  9. Ternary metal-rich sulfide with a layered structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Hugo F.; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    1993-08-17

    A ternary Nb-Ta-S compound is provided having the atomic formula, Nb.sub.1.72 Ta.sub.3.28 S.sub.2, and exhibiting a layered structure in the sequence S-M3-M2-M1-M2-M3-S wherein S represents sulfur layers and M1, M2, and M3 represent Nb/Ta mixed metal layers. This sequence generates seven sheets stacked along the [001] direction of an approximate body centered cubic crystal structure with relatively weak sulfur-to-sulfur van der Waals type interactions between adjacent sulfur sheets and metal-to-metal bonding within and between adjacent mixed metal sheets.

  10. An integrated approach to the probabilistic assessments of aircraft strikes and structural mode of damages to nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godbout, P.; Brais, A.

    1975-01-01

    The possibilities of an aircraft striking a Canadian nuclear power plant in the vicinity of an airport and of inducing structural failure modes have been evaluated. This evaluation, together with other studies, may enhance decisions in the development of general criteria for the siting of reactors near airports. The study made use, for assessment, of the probabilistic approach and made judicious applications of the finite Canadian, French, German, American and English resources that were available. The tools, techniques and methods used for achieving the above, form what may be called an integrated approach. This method of approach requires that the study be made in six consecutive steps as follows: the qualitative evaluation of having an aircraft strike on a site situated near an airport with the use of the logic model technique; the statistical data gathering on aircraft movements and accidents; evaluating the probability distribution and calculating the basic event probabilities; evaluating the probability of an aircraft strike and the application of the sensitivity approach; generating the probability density distribution versus strike impact energy, that is, the evaluation of the energy envelope; and the probabilistic evaluation of structural failure mode inducements

  11. T-Shaped Emitter Metal Structures for HBTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, King Man; Samoska, Lorene; Velebir, James; Muller, Richard; Echternach, Pierre; Siegel, Peter; Smith, Peter; Martin, Suzanne; Malik, Roger; Rodwell, Mark; hide

    2006-01-01

    Metal emitter structures in a class of developmental InP-based high-speed heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) have been redesigned to have T-shaped cross sections. T-cross-section metal features have been widely used in Schottky diodes and high-electron-mobility transistors, but not in HBTs. As explained, the purpose served by the present T cross-sectional shapes is to increase fabrication yields beyond those achievable with the prior cross-sectional shapes.

  12. From Metal Cluster to Metal Nanowire: A Topological Analysis of Electron Density and Band Structure Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:We investigate a theoretical model of molecular metalwire constructed from linear polynuclear metal complexes. In particular we study the linear Crn metal complex and Cr molecular metalwire. The electron density distributions of the model nanowire and the linear Crn metal complexes, with n = 3, 5, and 7, are calculated by employing CRYSTAL98 package with topological analysis. The preliminary results indicate that the bonding types between any two neighboring Cr are all the same, namely the polarized open-shell interaction. The pattern of electron density distribution in metal complexes resembles that of the model Cr nanowire as the number of metal ions increases. The conductivity of the model Cr nanowire is also tested by performing the band structure calculation.

  13. Testing and Analysis of Complex Structures to Improve CalcuRep

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Verhoeven, Stephan

    2000-01-01

    ...: The contractor shall investigate the performance of bonded composite repairs to complex metal aircraft structures in comparison with analytical predictions in order to verify new analytical models...

  14. Femtosecond differential transmission measurements on low temperature GaAs metal-semiconductor-metal structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Tautz, S.

    1997-01-01

    We report on differential transmission measurements on low temperature grown (LT)-GaAs with and without applied electrical fields at different wavelengths. Electrical fields up to 100 kV/cm can be applied via an interdigitated contact structure to our LT GaAs samples which have been removed from....... The response time of a biased metal-semiconductor-metal detector, therefore, exceeds the carrier life time of the substrate material. (C) 1997 American Institute of Physics....

  15. Crashworthiness of light aircraft fuselage structures: A numerical and experimental investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanyaro, A. P.; Tennyson, R. C.; Hansen, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of aircraft fuselage structures subject to various impact conditions was investigated. An analytical model was developed based on a self-consistent finite element (CFE) formulation utilizing shell, curved beam, and stringer type elements. Equations of motion were formulated and linearized (i.e., for small displacements), although material nonlinearity was retained to treat local plastic deformation. The equations were solved using the implicit Newmark-Beta method with a frontal solver routine. Stiffened aluminum fuselage models were also tested in free flight using the UTIAS pendulum crash test facility. Data were obtained on dynamic strains, g-loads, and transient deformations (using high speed photography in the latter case) during the impact process. Correlations between tests and predicted results are presented, together with computer graphics, based on the CFE model. These results include level and oblique angle impacts as well as the free-flight crash test. Comparisons with a hybrid, lumped mass finite element computer model demonstrate that the CFE formulation provides the test overall agreement with impact test data for comparable computing costs.

  16. The effect of material heterogeneity in curved composite beams for use in aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoole, Brendan J.; Santare, Michael H.

    1992-01-01

    A design tool is presented for predicting the effect of material heterogeneity on the performance of curved composite beams for use in aircraft fuselage structures. Material heterogeneity can be induced during processes such as sheet forming and stretch forming of thermoplastic composites. This heterogeneity can be introduced in the form of fiber realignment and spreading during the manufacturing process causing a gradient in material properties in both the radial and tangential directions. The analysis procedure uses a separate two-dimensional elasticity solution for the stresses in the flanges and web sections of the beam. The separate solutions are coupled by requiring the forces and displacements match at the section boundaries. Analysis is performed for curved beams loaded in pure bending and uniform pressure. The beams can be of any general cross-section such as a hat, T-, I-, or J-beam. Preliminary results show that geometry of the beam dictates the effect of heterogeneity on performance. Heterogeneity plays a much larger role in beams with a small average radius to depth ratio, R/t, where R is the average radius of the beam and t is the difference between the inside and outside radius. Results of the analysis are in the form of stresses and displacements, and they are compared to both mechanics of materials and numerical solutions obtained using finite element analysis.

  17. Flammability of self-extinguishing kenaf/ABS nanoclays composite for aircraft secondary structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, S.; Majid, D. L.; Mohd Tawil, M. L.

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the flammability properties of kenaf fiber reinforced acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) with nanoclays composites. Natural fiber is one of the potential materials to be used with thermoplastic as a composite due to its attractive properties such as lightweight and strong. In this paper, flammability properties of this material are evaluated through Underwriters Laboratory 94 Horizontal Burning (UL94 HB), which has been conducted for both controlled and uncontrolled conditions, smoke density and limiting oxygen index tests (LOI). These flammability tests are in compliance with the Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) requirement. The results from UL94 HB and smoke density tests show that the presence of nanoclays with effective composition of kenaf fiber reinforced ABS has enhanced the burning characteristics of the material by hindering propagation of flame spread over the surface of the material through char formation. Consequently, this decreases the burning rate and produces low amount of smoke during burning. On contrary, through LOI test, this material requires less oxygen to burn when exposed to fire, which hinders the enhancement of burning characteristics. This is due to burning mechanism exhibited by nanoclays that catalyzes barrier formation and flame propagation rate over the surface of the biocomposite material. Overall, these experimental results suggest that this biocomposite material is capable of self-extinguishing and possesses effective fire extinction. The observed novel synergism from the result obtained is promising to be implemented in secondary structures of aircraft with significant benefits such as cost-effective, lightweight and biodegradable self-extinguishing biocomposite.

  18. Temperature Effects on Mechanical Properties of Woven Thermoplastic Composites for Secondary Aircraft Structure Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of temperature on the mechanical behavior of 8-H satin woven glass fabric/polyethylene sulfide (GF/PPS was investigated in this paper. Static-tensile tests were both conducted on notched and unnotched specimens at typical temperatures (ambient, 95°C and 125°C based on the glass transition temperatures (Tg of the neat resin and composite, their strength and moduli were obtained and compared. The damage patterns of failed specimens of notched and unnotched were examined with the aid of high-definition camera and stereomicroscope. The results of stress-strain relationships showed that the slight nonlinearity of the curves were observed for these two specimens, which was associated with the plastic deformation of localized resin. The damage patterns of notched and unnotched specimens at different temperatures proved that damage and plastic deformation were two simultaneous mechanisms and it was prominent in the notched. It was the overstress accommodation mechanism that led to a relative high strength rentention for the notched and a reduction of the hole sensitivity. The results obtained in this paper indicated that GF/PPS can be used as secondary aircraft structures at elevated temperatures higher than its Tg.

  19. Metal Oxide Nano structures: Synthesis, Properties, and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, L. H.; Patil, D. S.; Yang, J.; Xiao, J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, nano structured materials have attracted wide attention due to their fascinating optical and electrical properties, which make these materials potentially suitable for applications in electronics, optics, photonics, and sensors. Some metal oxides show a wide variety of morphologies such as nano wires, nano rods, nano tubes, nano rings, and nano belts. Synthesis and investigation of these metal-oxide nano structures are beneficial not only for understanding the fundamental phenomena in low dimensional systems, but also for developing new-generation nano devices with high performance.

  20. Structural study of conventional and bulk metallic glasses during annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineda, E.; Hidalgo, I.; Bruna, P.; Pradell, T.; Labrador, A.; Crespo, D.

    2009-01-01

    Metallic glasses with conventional glass-forming ability (Al-Fe-Nd, Fe-Zr-B, Fe-B-Nb compositions) and bulk metallic glasses (Ca-Mg-Cu compositions) were studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction during annealing throughout glass transition and crystallization temperatures. The analysis of the first diffraction peak position during the annealing process allowed us to follow the free volume change during relaxation and glass transition. The structure factor and the radial distribution function of the glasses were obtained from the X-ray measurements. The structural changes occurred during annealing are analyzed and discussed.

  1. Benefit Analysis of Hybrid CNT/CFRP Composites in Future Aircraft Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During Phase I, Aurora Flight Sciences and N12 Technologies propose to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the benefits of hybrid composites in future aircraft...

  2. Conformal Load-Bearing Antenna Structure for Australian Defence Force Aircraft

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Callus, Paul J

    2007-01-01

    .... The first half of this report describes the advantages and limitations of CLAS and the factors to be considered when deciding whether to incorporate CLAS into Australian Defence Force aircraft...

  3. Structural transformations in liquid metallic glassformers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, L.; Ryltcev, R.; Sidorov, V.; Sordelet, D.

    2007-01-01

    The statistics and thermodynamics of quasi-chemical bonds in glass forming liquid alloys have been described by method used in polymer statistics. It is shown that this bonging results in structural anomalies of two types. The first corresponds to relaxation of metastable globular state, which takes place at lower temperature, while the second one represents the drastic change of mean length of quasi-polymers

  4. DISCRETE-TIME VARIABLE STRUCTURE CONTROLLER FOR AIRCRAFT FLIGHT ANGLE TRACKING

    OpenAIRE

    Iskrenovic-Momcilovic, Olivera

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the longitudinal, short-period aircraft dynamics and its application on the climb angle tracking. For the aircraft flight angle tracking the stable system centre technique is developed for controlling the output in a discrete-time non-minimum phase causal system using the sliding mode control. The developed discrete-time stable system centre technique transforms the output tracking problem to a corresponding state variable tracking problem by asymptotically identifying the ...

  5. Improved Joining of Metal Components to Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmes, Edmund

    2009-01-01

    Systems requirements for complex spacecraft drive design requirements that lead to structures, components, and/or enclosures of a multi-material and multifunctional design. The varying physical properties of aluminum, tungsten, Invar, or other high-grade aerospace metals when utilized in conjunction with lightweight composites multiply system level solutions. These multi-material designs are largely dependent upon effective joining techAn improved method of joining metal components to matrix/fiber composite material structures has been invented. The method is particularly applicable to equipping such thin-wall polymer-matrix composite (PMC) structures as tanks with flanges, ceramic matrix composite (CMC) liners for high heat engine nozzles, and other metallic-to-composite attachments. The method is oriented toward new architectures and distributing mechanical loads as widely as possible in the vicinities of attachment locations to prevent excessive concentrations of stresses that could give rise to delaminations, debonds, leaks, and other failures. The method in its most basic form can be summarized as follows: A metal component is to be joined to a designated attachment area on a composite-material structure. In preparation for joining, the metal component is fabricated to include multiple studs projecting from the aforementioned face. Also in preparation for joining, holes just wide enough to accept the studs are molded into, drilled, or otherwise formed in the corresponding locations in the designated attachment area of the uncured ("wet') composite structure. The metal component is brought together with the uncured composite structure so that the studs become firmly seated in the holes, thereby causing the composite material to become intertwined with the metal component in the joining area. Alternately, it is proposed to utilize other mechanical attachment schemes whereby the uncured composite and metallic parts are joined with "z-direction" fasteners. The

  6. Joining of Metal-Plastics-Hybrid Structures Using Laser Radiation by Considering the Surface Structure of the Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hopmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight construction is a central technology in today’s industrial production. One way to achieve the climate goals is the production of hybrid compounds of metal and plastic. The manufacturing process for these hybrid parts can be divided into in-mold assembly and postmold assembly. The postmold assembly includes thermal joining by laser, which is applied in the context of this paper. For the investigations, four plastics (MABS, PA6.6-GF35, PP, and PC, which differ in their properties, and three metals (unalloyed steel, stainless steel, and aluminum are combined and analyzed. These materials have been used, since they have a huge significance in the automotive industry. Preliminary studies showed that an adhesive bond between the two materials is achieved using metal with a structured surface. According to these studies, three structuring processes for metals (selective laser melting (SLM, NRX, and a welded metallic tissue are tested. The quality of the material/structure combinations is tested in tensile-shear-tests, microscopy images, and alternating climate tests. Compounds with SLM-Structure achieve highest strength, while compounds with aluminum are much more complex to manufacture.

  7. Effective modern methods of protecting metal road structures from corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteleeva, Margarita

    2017-10-01

    In the article the ways of protection of barrier road constructions from various external influences which cause development of irreversible corrosion processes are considered. The author studied modern methods of action on metal for corrosion protection and chose the most effective of them: a method of directly affecting the metal structures themselves. This method was studied in more detail in the framework of the experiment. As a result, the article describes the experiment of using a three-layer polymer coating, which includes a thermally activated primer, an elastomeric thermoplastic layer with a spatial structure, and a strong outer polyolefin layer. As a result of the experiment, the ratios of the ingredients for obtaining samples of the treated metal having the best parameters of corrosion resistance, elasticity, and strength were revealed. The author constructed a regression equation describing the main properties of the protective polymer coating using the simplex-lattice planning method in the composition-property diagrams.

  8. Metal–insulator–metal light absorber: a continuous structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, M

    2013-01-01

    A type of light absorber made of continuous layers of metal and dielectric films is studied. The metal films can have thicknesses close to their skin depths in the wavelength range concerned, which allows for both light transmission and reflection. Resonances induced by multiple reflections in the structure, when combined with the inherent lossy nature of metals, result in strong absorption spectral features. An eigen-mode analysis is carried out for the plasmonic multilayer nanostructures which provides a generic understanding of the absorption features. Experimentally, the calculation is verified by a reflection measurement with a representative structure. Such an absorber is simple to fabricate. The highly efficient absorption characteristics can be potentially deployed for optical filter designs, sensors, accurate photothermal temperature control in a micro-environment and even for backscattering reduction of small particles, etc. (paper)

  9. Simulation of Cu-Mg metallic glass: Thermodynamics and structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Nicholas; Schiøtz, Jakob; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2004-01-01

    We have obtained effective medium theory interatomic potential parameters suitable for studying Cu-Mg metallic glasses. We present thermodynamic and structural results from simulations of such glasses over a range of compositions. We have produced low-temperature configurations by cooling from...... may be determined. We have also carried out structural analyses using the radial distribution function (RDF) and common neighbor analysis (CNA). Our analysis suggests that the splitting of the second peak, commonly associated with metallic glasses, in fact, has little to do with the glass transition...... and the amorphous alloys of similar composition. We have also investigated the diffusivity in the supercooled regime. Its temperature dependence indicates fragile-liquid behavior, typical of binary metallic glasses. On the other hand, the relatively low specific-heat jump of around 1.5k(B)/atom indicates apparent...

  10. Development of Metal Plate with Internal Structure Utilizing the Metal Injection Molding (MIM Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangho Shin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we focus on making a double-sided metal plate with an internal structure, such as honeycomb. The stainless steel powder was used in the metal injection molding (MIM process. The preliminary studies were carried out for the measurement of the viscosity of the stainless steel feedstock and for the prediction of the filling behavior through Computer Aided Engineering (CAE simulation. PE (high density polyethylene (HDPE and low density polyethylene (LDPE and polypropylene (PP resins were used to make the sacrificed insert with a honeycomb structure using a plastic injection molding process. Additionally, these sacrificed insert parts were inserted in the metal injection mold, and the metal injection molding process was carried out to build a green part with rectangular shape. Subsequently, debinding and sintering processes were adopted to remove the sacrificed polymer insert. The insert had a suitable rigidity that was able to endure the filling pressure. The core shift analysis was conducted to predict the deformation of the insert part. The 17-4PH feedstock with a low melting temperature was applied. The glass transition temperature of the sacrificed polymer insert would be of a high grade, and this insert should be maintained during the MIM process. Through these processes, a square metal plate with a honeycomb structure was made.

  11. A model for the electric conduction in metal/poly-TiO2/metal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein-Babaei, Faramarz; Alaei-Sheini, Navid-

    2017-12-01

    Intensely studied memristive devices have M‧/MO/M″ structures, wherein MO is a nanometer-sized metal oxide crystallite sandwiched between the M‧ and M″ metal electrodes. The most widely used oxide for this purpose is TiO2 and the electrodes are of noble metals such as platinum, silver, and gold. The memristive features of the device is believed to originate from the motion of the ionized oxygen vacancies within the oxide crystal. The operation of the device is further complicated by the motion of the mobile cations originating from the metal electrodes. The complexity of the device performance increases further when the noble metal electrodes form Schottky barriers at their junctions with TiO2, as the conduction takes place through these energy barriers. In a recent publication, the authors have shown that, owing to the ohmicity of the Ti/TiO2 junctions, electronic observations on the devices with Ti/TiO2/Ti structure can be easier to model. The presented model clarified that in a Ti/poly-TiO2/Ti structure, the ionic motion and the electronic conduction take place on the TiO2 grain surfaces and grain boundaries rather than the grain interiors. Here, we show that the suggested model has important implications for chemical sensor design and fabrication.

  12. Development of Metal Plate with Internal Structure Utilizing the Metal Injection Molding (MIM) Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kwangho; Heo, Youngmoo; Park, Hyungpil; Chang, Sungho; Rhee, Byungohk

    2013-12-12

    In this study, we focus on making a double-sided metal plate with an internal structure, such as honeycomb. The stainless steel powder was used in the metal injection molding (MIM) process. The preliminary studies were carried out for the measurement of the viscosity of the stainless steel feedstock and for the prediction of the filling behavior through Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) simulation. PE (high density polyethylene (HDPE) and low density polyethylene (LDPE)) and polypropylene (PP) resins were used to make the sacrificed insert with a honeycomb structure using a plastic injection molding process. Additionally, these sacrificed insert parts were inserted in the metal injection mold, and the metal injection molding process was carried out to build a green part with rectangular shape. Subsequently, debinding and sintering processes were adopted to remove the sacrificed polymer insert. The insert had a suitable rigidity that was able to endure the filling pressure. The core shift analysis was conducted to predict the deformation of the insert part. The 17-4PH feedstock with a low melting temperature was applied. The glass transition temperature of the sacrificed polymer insert would be of a high grade, and this insert should be maintained during the MIM process. Through these processes, a square metal plate with a honeycomb structure was made.

  13. Method of manufacturing flexible metallic photonic band gap structures, and structures resulting therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandhya; Tuttle, Gary L.; Sigalas, Mihail; McCalmont, Jonathan S.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2001-08-14

    A method of manufacturing a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable in the infrared region, comprises the steps of spinning on a first layer of dielectric on a GaAs substrate, imidizing this first layer of dielectric, forming a first metal pattern on this first layer of dielectric, spinning on and imidizing a second layer of dielectric, and then removing the GaAs substrate. This method results in a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable with various filter characteristics in the infrared region. This method may be used to construct multi-layer flexible metallic photonic band gap structures. Metal grid defects and dielectric separation layer thicknesses are adjusted to control filter parameters.

  14. Structural systematics of some metal complexes with 4,5 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dafone in dimethyl formamide at 402 nm is found to be quenched in these reported dafone complexes (1-4). Keywords. Transition metal ions; imine ligand; crystal structure; fluorescence. 1. Introduction. Design and synthesis of coordination compounds of different nuclearity ... hydroxide (E Merck, India), cobalt(II) perchlorate.

  15. Structures and physical properties of gaseous metal cationized biological ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Michael B; Fridgen, Travis D

    2012-01-01

    Metal chelation can alter the activity of free biomolecules by modifying their structures or stabilizing higher energy tautomers. In recent years, mass spectrometric techniques have been used to investigate the effects of metal complexation with proteins, nucleobases and nucleotides, where small conformational changes can have significant physiological consequences. In particular, infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy has emerged as an important tool for determining the structure and reactivity of gas-phase ions. Unlike other mass spectrometric approaches, this method is able to directly resolve structural isomers using characteristic vibrational signatures. Other activation and dissociation methods, such as blackbody infrared radiative dissociation or collision-induced dissociation can also reveal information about the thermochemistry and dissociative pathways of these biological ions. This information can then be used to provide information about the structures of the ionic complexes under study. In this article, we review the use of gas-phase techniques in characterizing metal-bound biomolecules. Particular attention will be given to our own contributions, which detail the ability of metal cations to disrupt nucleobase pairs, direct the self-assembly of nucleobase clusters and stabilize non-canonical isomers of amino acids.

  16. Effect of transition metal elements on the structural and optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of transition metal elements on the structural and optical properties of ZnO nanoparticles. I KAZEMINEZHAD1, S SAADATMAND1 and RAMIN YOUSEFI2,∗. 1Nanotechnology Laboratory, Physics Department, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran. 2Department of Physics, Islamic Azad University (IAU), ...

  17. 76 FR 75435 - Fatigue Tolerance Evaluation of Metallic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ... (including crack initiation, crack growth, and final failure) with or without the influence of damage... of safety for metallic structures. Also, we added a key element to the FTE: the identification of all... example, advances in the safe-life methodology, and developments in crack growth methodology) required for...

  18. Process, structure, property and applications of metallic glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Geetha Priyadarshini

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Metallic glasses (MGs are gaining immense technological significance due to their unique structure-property relationship with renewed interest in diverse field of applications including biomedical implants, commercial products, machinery parts, and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS. Various processing routes have been adopted to fabricate MGs with short-range ordering which is believed to be the genesis of unique structure. Understanding the structure of these unique materials is a long-standing unsolved mystery. Unlike crystalline counterpart, the outstanding properties of metallic glasses owing to the absence of grain boundaries is reported to exhibit high hardness, excellent strength, high elastic strain, and anti-corrosion properties. The combination of these remarkable properties would significantly contribute to improvement of performance and reliability of these materials when incorporated as bio-implants. The nucleation and growth of metallic glasses is driven by thermodynamics and kinetics in non-equilibrium conditions. This comprehensive review article discusses the various attributes of metallic glasses with an aim to understand the fundamentals of relationship process-structure-property existing in such unique class of material.

  19. Supramolecular Assembly of Calcium Metal - Organic Frameworks with Structural Transformation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liang, P.-Ch.; Liu, H.-K.; Yeh, Ch.-T.; Lin, Ch.-H.; Zima, Vítězslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2011), 699-708 ISSN 1528-7483 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0208 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : metal - organic frameworks * calcium * structure Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.720, year: 2011

  20. Solving crystal structures of metal and chemical hydrides

    OpenAIRE

    Cerny, Radovan

    2008-01-01

    The methods of structural characterization of metal and chemical hydrides are reviewed. The existing difficulties and problems are outlined and possible solutions presented. It is shown that powder diffraction, and especially the Direct Space Method, is essential component of hydride research. Crystal structures containing as many as 55 independent atoms (including hydrogen) have been fully characterized using powder diffraction. This is of great importance, because rapid collection of powder...

  1. Ballistic Impact Simulation of Ceramic/Metal Armor Structures

    OpenAIRE

    ARSLAN, Kemal; GÜNEŞ, Recep

    2017-01-01

    The study presents a comparative numericalinvestigation on ballistic performance of ceramic/metal armor structures. 2Daxisymmetric numerical model was developed for ballistic impact simulationsusing LS-DYNA® finite element software. The armor structuresincluded combinations of boron carbide (B4C), Al6061-T6 and 4340steel constituents. The interfaces in the armor structure were modelled with anepoxy resin adhesive. In order to define proper material behavior,Johnson-Holmquist-Ceramics material...

  2. High Fidelity Aeroelasticity Simulations of Aircraft and Turbomachinery with Fully-Coupled Fluid-Structure Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jiaye

    The purpose of this research is to develop high fidelity numerical methods to investigate the complex aeroelasticity fluid-structural problems of aircraft and aircraft engine turbomachinery. Unsteady 3D compressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized coordinates are solved to simulate the complex fluid dynamic problems in aeroelasticity. An efficient and low diffusion E-CUSP (LDE) scheme designed to minimize numerical dissipation is used as a Riemann solver to capture shock waves in transonic and supersonic flows. An improved hybrid turbulence modeling, delayed detached eddy simulation (DDES), is implemented to simulate shock induced separation and rotating stall flows. High order accuracy (3rd and 5th order) weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes for inviscid flux and a conservative 2nd and 4th order viscous flux differencing are employed. To resolve the nonlinear interaction between flow and vibrating blade structures, a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) procedure that solves the structural modal equations and time accurate Navier-Stokes equations simultaneously is adopted. A rotor/stator sliding interpolation technique is developed to accurately capture the blade rows interaction at the interface with general grid distribution. Phase lag boundary conditions (BC) based on the time shift (direct store) method and the Fourier series phase lag BC are applied to consider the effect of phase difference for a sector of annulus simulation. Extensive validations are conducted to demonstrate high accuracy and robustness of the high fidelity FSI methodology. The accuracy and robustness of RANS, URANS and DDES turbulence models with high order schemes for predicting the lift and drag of the DLR-F6 configuration are verified. The DDES predicts the drag very well whereas the URANS model significantly over predicts the drag. DDES of a finned projectile base flows is conducted to further validate the high fidelity methods with vortical flow. The

  3. Impact of Acoustic Loads on Aircraft Structures (Impact des Solicitations Acoustiques sur les Structures d’Aeronefs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    requirements that will be introduced by publication of the ESDU data sheets[lJ and future aircraft projects. AFFDL design guide[2]. 3. ACOUSTIC... Espace B P 21- - 11󈧅 BLAGNAC Cedcx Presenterd at a Svmposiwn on ’Impact of Acoustic Loads on Aircraft Sntrcniires’ held in Lillehamnier, NVor..ay, May...acroacousuique dcs tuiles. en creant des Les maillages surfaciqucs de ccs niodeles acrody - dissipations d’dnergic importantes ci des -%cles liinites namiqiies

  4. Liquid structure and melting of trivalent metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.P.; Pastore, G.; Saboungi, M.L.; Price, D.L.

    1991-03-01

    Many divalent and trivalent metal ions in stoichiometric liquid mixtures of their halides with alkali halides are fourfold or sixfold coordinated by halogens into relatively long-lived ''complexes''. The stability of these local coordination states and the connectivity that arises between them in the approach to the pure polyvalent metal halide melt determines the character of its short-range and possible intermediate-range order. The available evidence on local coordination in some 140 mixtures has been successfully classified by a structure sorting method based on Pettifor's chemical scale of the elements. Within the general phenomenological frame provided by structure sorting, main attention is given in this work to the liquid structure and melting mechanisms of trivalent metal chlorides. The liquid structure of YCl 3 is first discussed on the basis of neutron diffraction measurements and of calculations within a simple ionic model, and the melting mechanisms of YCl 3 and AlCl 3 , which are structurally isomorphous in the crystalline state, are contrasted. By appeal to macroscopic melting parameters and transport coefficients and to liquid structure data on SbCl 3 , it is proposed that the melting mechanisms of these salts may be classified into three main types in correlation with the character of the chemical bond. (author). 31 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs

  5. Structural development of laminar flow control aircraft chordwise wing joint designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischler, J. E.; Jerstad, N. M.; Gallimore, F. H., Jr.; Pollard, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    For laminar flow to be achieved, any protuberances on the surface must be small enough to avoid transition to turbulent flow. However, the surface must have joints between the structural components to allow assembly or replacement of damaged parts, although large continuous surfaces can be utilized to minimize the number the number of joints. Aircraft structural joints usually have many countersunk bolts or rivets on the outer surface. To maintain no mismatch on outer surfaces, it is desirable to attach the components from the inner surface. It is also desirable for the panels to be interchangeable, without the need for shims at the joint, to avoid surface discontinuities that could cause turbulence. Fabricating components while pressing their outer surfaces against an accurate mold helps to ensure surface smoothness and continuity at joints. These items were considered in evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of the joint design concepts. After evaluating six design concepts, two of the leading candidates were fabricated and tested using many small test panels. One joint concept was also built and tested using large panels. The small and large test panel deflections for the leading candidate designs at load factors up to +1.5 g's were well within the step and waviness requirements for avoiding transition.The small panels were designed and tested for compression and tension at -65 F, at ambient conditions, and at 160 F. The small panel results for the three-rib and the sliding-joint concepts indicated that they were both acceptable. The three-rib concept, with tapered splice plates, was considered to be the most practical. A modified three-rib joint that combined the best attributes of previous candidates was designed, developed, and tested. This improved joint met all of the structural strength, surface smoothness, and waviness criteria for laminar flow control (LFC). The design eliminated all disadvantages of the initial three-rib concept except for

  6. Overview Of Structural Behavior and Occupant Responses from Crash Test of a Composite Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lisa E.; Carden, Huey D.

    1995-01-01

    As part of NASA's composite structures crash dynamics research, a general aviation aircraft with composite wing, fuselage and empennage (but with metal subfloor structure) was crash tested at the NASA Langley Research Center Impact Research Facility. The test was conducted to determine composite aircraft structural behavior for crash loading conditions and to provide a baseline for a similar aircraft test with a modified subfloor. Structural integrity and cabin volume were maintained. Lumbar loads for dummy occupants in energy absorbing seats wer substantially lower than those in standard aircraft seats; however, loads in the standard seats were much higher that those recorded under similar conditions for an all-metallic aircraft.

  7. An Advanced Open-Source Aircraft Design Platform for Personal Air Vehicle Geometry, Aerodynamics, and Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovators working to revolutionize air travel through personal aviation pioneers need innovative aircraft design tools. Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP) is an aircraft...

  8. Structural coloration of metallic surfaces with micro/nano-structures induced by elliptical vibration texturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Pan, Yayue; Guo, Ping

    2017-04-01

    Creating orderly periodic micro/nano-structures on metallic surfaces, or structural coloration, for control of surface apparent color and optical reflectivity has been an exciting research topic over the years. The direct applications of structural coloration include color marking, display devices, and invisibility cloak. This paper presents an efficient method to colorize metallic surfaces with periodic micro/nano-gratings using elliptical vibration texturing. When the tool vibration is coupled with a constant cutting velocity, controlled periodic ripples can be generated due to the overlapping tool trajectory. These periodic ripples with a wavelength near visible spectrum can act as micro-gratings to introduce iridescent colors. The proposed technique also provides a flexible method for color marking of metallic surfaces with arbitrary patterns and images by precise control of the spacing distance and orientation of induced micro/nano-ripples. Theoretical analysis and experimental results are given to demonstrate structural coloration of metals by a direct mechanical machining technique.

  9. Isogrid structures. [isosceles triangle metal skin structural stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slysh, P.; Dyer, J. E.; Furman, J. H.; Key, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Test results and related structural instability analyses are presented for a 10-foot-diameter, 37-inch-long cylinder, and a 10-foot-diameter, 40-inch-long, 45-degree conical frustum. Both structures are based upon flanged isogrids and are fabricated in 2024-T851 aluminum. Peak edge load intensities at failure were 1,654 lb/in for the cylinder and 1,457 lb/in at the small diameter of the frustum. General instability cylindrical-monocoque-structure equivalent knockdown factors for both were in good agreement (gamma = 0.48). Design analysis is also derived for estimating critical cylinder instability edge loads from the performance of two tandem isogrid members. Evaluation is made of effective skin contributing to isogrid load-carrying cross-section.

  10. Validation of metal-binding sites in macromolecular structures with the CheckMyMetal web server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Heping; Chordia, Mahendra D; Cooper, David R; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Müller, Peter; Sheldrick, George M; Minor, Wladek

    2014-01-01

    Metals have vital roles in both the mechanism and architecture of biological macromolecules. Yet structures of metal-containing macromolecules in which metals are misidentified and/or suboptimally modeled are abundant in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). This shows the need for a diagnostic tool to identify and correct such modeling problems with metal-binding environments. The CheckMyMetal (CMM) web server (http://csgid.org/csgid/metal_sites/) is a sophisticated, user-friendly web-based method to evaluate metal-binding sites in macromolecular structures using parameters derived from 7,350 metal-binding sites observed in a benchmark data set of 2,304 high-resolution crystal structures. The protocol outlines how the CMM server can be used to detect geometric and other irregularities in the structures of metal-binding sites, as well as how it can alert researchers to potential errors in metal assignment. The protocol also gives practical guidelines for correcting problematic sites by modifying the metal-binding environment and/or redefining metal identity in the PDB file. Several examples where this has led to meaningful results are described in the ANTICIPATED RESULTS section. CMM was designed for a broad audience--biomedical researchers studying metal-containing proteins and nucleic acids--but it is equally well suited for structural biologists validating new structures during modeling or refinement. The CMM server takes the coordinates of a metal-containing macromolecule structure in the PDB format as input and responds within a few seconds for a typical protein structure with 2-5 metal sites and a few hundred amino acids.

  11. Directional Emission from Metal-Dielectric-Metal Structures: Effect of Mixed Metal Layers, Dye Location and Dielectric Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Badugu, Ramachandram; Ray, Krishanu; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2015-02-12

    Metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) structures provide directional emission close to the surface normal, which offers opportunities for new design formats in fluorescence based applications. The directional emission arises due to near-field coupling of fluorophores with the optical modes present in the MDM substrate. Reflectivity simulations and dispersion diagrams provide a basic understanding of the mode profiles and the factors that affect the coupling efficiency and the spatial distribution of the coupled emission. This work reveals that the composition of the metal layers, the location of the dye in the MDM substrate and the dielectric thickness are important parameters that can be chosen to tune the color of the emission wavelength, the angle of observation, the angular divergence of the emission and the polarization of the emitted light. These features are valuable for displays and optical signage.

  12. Metallic-glass-matrix composite structures with benchmark mechanical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Joseph P.; Hofmann, Douglas C.; Demetriou, Marios D.; Johnson, William L.

    2010-12-01

    Metallic-glass-matrix composites demonstrating unusual combination of high strength, high toughness, and excellent processability are utilized to fabricate cellular structures of egg-box topology. Under compressive loading, the egg-box panels are capable of undergoing extensive plastic collapse at very high plateau stresses enabling absorption of large amounts of mechanical energy. In terms of specific mechanical energy absorbed, the present panels far outperform panels of similar topology made of aluminum or fiber-reinforced polymer composites, and even surpass steel structures of highly buckling-resistant topologies, thus emerging among the highest performance structures of any kind.

  13. On-Line Multi-Damage Scanning Spatial-Wavenumber Filter Based Imaging Method for Aircraft Composite Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqiang Ren

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring (SHM of aircraft composite structure is helpful to increase reliability and reduce maintenance costs. Due to the great effectiveness in distinguishing particular guided wave modes and identifying the propagation direction, the spatial-wavenumber filter technique has emerged as an interesting SHM topic. In this paper, a new scanning spatial-wavenumber filter (SSWF based imaging method for multiple damages is proposed to conduct on-line monitoring of aircraft composite structures. Firstly, an on-line multi-damage SSWF is established, including the fundamental principle of SSWF for multiple damages based on a linear piezoelectric (PZT sensor array, and a corresponding wavenumber-time imaging mechanism by using the multi-damage scattering signal. Secondly, through combining the on-line multi-damage SSWF and a PZT 2D cross-shaped array, an image-mapping method is proposed to conduct wavenumber synthesis and convert the two wavenumber-time images obtained by the PZT 2D cross-shaped array to an angle-distance image, from which the multiple damages can be directly recognized and located. In the experimental validation, both simulated multi-damage and real multi-damage introduced by repeated impacts are performed on a composite plate structure. The maximum localization error is less than 2 cm, which shows good performance of the multi-damage imaging method. Compared with the existing spatial-wavenumber filter based damage evaluation methods, the proposed method requires no more than the multi-damage scattering signal and can be performed without depending on any wavenumber modeling or measuring. Besides, this method locates multiple damages by imaging instead of the geometric method, which helps to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, it can be easily applied to on-line multi-damage monitoring of aircraft composite structures.

  14. On-Line Multi-Damage Scanning Spatial-Wavenumber Filter Based Imaging Method for Aircraft Composite Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuanqiang; Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Bao, Qiao

    2017-05-11

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) of aircraft composite structure is helpful to increase reliability and reduce maintenance costs. Due to the great effectiveness in distinguishing particular guided wave modes and identifying the propagation direction, the spatial-wavenumber filter technique has emerged as an interesting SHM topic. In this paper, a new scanning spatial-wavenumber filter (SSWF) based imaging method for multiple damages is proposed to conduct on-line monitoring of aircraft composite structures. Firstly, an on-line multi-damage SSWF is established, including the fundamental principle of SSWF for multiple damages based on a linear piezoelectric (PZT) sensor array, and a corresponding wavenumber-time imaging mechanism by using the multi-damage scattering signal. Secondly, through combining the on-line multi-damage SSWF and a PZT 2D cross-shaped array, an image-mapping method is proposed to conduct wavenumber synthesis and convert the two wavenumber-time images obtained by the PZT 2D cross-shaped array to an angle-distance image, from which the multiple damages can be directly recognized and located. In the experimental validation, both simulated multi-damage and real multi-damage introduced by repeated impacts are performed on a composite plate structure. The maximum localization error is less than 2 cm, which shows good performance of the multi-damage imaging method. Compared with the existing spatial-wavenumber filter based damage evaluation methods, the proposed method requires no more than the multi-damage scattering signal and can be performed without depending on any wavenumber modeling or measuring. Besides, this method locates multiple damages by imaging instead of the geometric method, which helps to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, it can be easily applied to on-line multi-damage monitoring of aircraft composite structures.

  15. Structure and properties of transition metal-metalloid glasses based on refractory metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, W.L.; Williams, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    The structure and properties of several new transition metal-metalloid (TM/sub 1-x/M/sub x/) metallic glasses based on refractory transition metals (e.g. Mo, W, Ru etc.) have been systemically investigated as a function of composition. The structure of the alloys has been investigated by x-ray diffraction methods and measurements of superconducting properties, electrical resistivity, density, hardness, and mechanical behavior were made. These data are used in developing a novel description of the structure of TM/sub 1-x/M/sub x/ glasses. The experimental evidence suggests that an ideal amorphous phase forms at a specific composition x/sub c/ and that this phase has a well defined atomic short range order. For metallic glasses having x < x/sub c/ (metalloid poor glasses) vacancy-like defects form, which are characterized by the excess volume which they contribute to the glass. Another, as yet unspecified defect appears to form in glasses with x > x/sub c/. This novel picture can explain the variation of many properties of these glasses with metalloid concentration.

  16. Manufacturing of Cast Metal Foams with Irregular Cell Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroupová I.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metallic foams are materials of which the research is still on-going, with the broad applicability in many different areas (e.g. automotive industry, building industry, medicine, etc.. These metallic materials have specific properties, such as large rigidity at low density, high thermal conductivity, capability to absorb energy, etc. The work is focused on the preparation of these materials using conventional casting technology (infiltration method, which ensures rapid and economically feasible method for production of shaped components. In the experimental part we studied conditions of casting of metallic foams with open pores and irregular cell structure made of ferrous and nonferrous alloys by use of various types of filler material (precursors.

  17. Effective L/D: A Theoretical Approach to the Measurement of Aero-Structural Efficiency in Aircraft Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guynn, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    There are many trade-offs in aircraft design that ultimately impact the overall performance and characteristics of the final design. One well recognized and well understood trade-off is that of wing weight and aerodynamic efficiency. Higher aerodynamic efficiency can be obtained by increasing wing span, usually at the expense of higher wing weight. The proper balance of these two competing factors depends on the objectives of the design. For example, aerodynamic efficiency is preeminent for sailplanes and long slender wings result. Although the wing weight-drag trade is universally recognized, aerodynamic efficiency and structural efficiency are not usually considered in combination. This paper discusses the concept of "aero-structural efficiency," which combines weight and drag characteristics. A metric to quantify aero-structural efficiency, termed effective L/D, is then derived and tested with various scenarios. Effective L/D is found to be a practical and robust means to simultaneously characterize aerodynamic and structural efficiency in the context of aircraft design. The primary value of the effective L/D metric is as a means to better communicate the combined system level impacts of drag and structural weight.

  18. Ionic structure of solutions of alkali metals and molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabrier, G.; Senatore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1982-02-01

    Neutron diffraction patterns from K-KCl and Rb-RbBr liquid solutions at various compositions are examined in an ionic-mixture model which neglects screening and aggregation due to the metallic electrons. The main feature of the observed diffraction patterns for wave number k above roughly 1A -1 are accounted for by the model. The approach to the metal-rich end of the phase diagram is analyzed in detail from different viewpoints in the K-KCl system. Short-range correlations of the potassium ions are described in this region by a metallic radius deduced from properties of the pure liquid metal, but a simple expanded-metal model must be supplemented by the assumption that considerable disorder is introduced in its structure by the halogen ions. Features of short-range ordering in the salt-rich region that are implied by a shoulder on the high-k side of the main peak in the diffraction pattern are also commented upon. (author)

  19. Testing a theory of aircraft noise annoyance : A structural equation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroesen, M.; Molin, E.J.E.; Van Wee, B.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has stressed the relevance of nonacoustical factors in the perception of aircraft noise. However, it is largely empirically driven and lacks a sound theoretical basis. In this paper, a theoretical model which explains noise annoyance based on the psychological stress theory is

  20. Structural Aspects of Flexible Aircraft Control (les Aspects structuraux du controle actif et flexible des aeronefs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Inc. Canadair Dr. E. SANCHIZ Military Aircraft Division Div. de Estructuras y Materiales 10,000 Cargo A-4 Street Laboratorio de Diseno y Analisis...Dynamics and Aeroelasticity Department CONSTRUCCIONES AERONAUTICAS S.A. Avda John Lennon Getafe, 28906 Madrid, Spain Summary Nomenclature for modal

  1. Partial and Total Annoyance Due to Road Traffic Noise Combined with Aircraft or Railway Noise: Structural Equation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gille, Laure-Anne; Marquis-Favre, Catherine; Lam, Kin-Che

    2017-01-01

    Structural equation modeling was used to analyze partial and total in situ annoyance in combined transportation noise situations. A psychophysical total annoyance model and a perceptual total annoyance model were proposed. Results show a high contribution of Noise exposure and Noise sensitivity to Noise annoyance, as well as a causal relationship between noise annoyance and lower Dwelling satisfaction. Moreover, the Visibility of noise source may increase noise annoyance, even when the visible noise source is different from the annoying source under study. With regards to total annoyance due to road traffic noise combined with railway or aircraft noise, even though in both situations road traffic noise may be considered background noise and the other noise source event noise, the contribution of road traffic noise to the models is greater than railway noise and smaller than aircraft noise. This finding may be explained by the difference in sound pressure levels between these two types of combined exposures or by the aircraft noise level, which may also indicate the city in which the respondents live. Finally, the results highlight the importance of sample size and variable distribution in the database, as different results can be observed depending on the sample or variables considered. PMID:29189751

  2. Examination of pulsed eddy current for inspection of second layer aircraft wing lap-joint structures using outlier detection methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, D.M., E-mail: Dennis.Butt@forces.gc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Underhill, P.R.; Krause, T.W., E-mail: Thomas.Krause@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Physics, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-09-15

    Ageing aircraft are susceptible to fatigue cracks at bolt hole locations in multi-layer aluminum wing lap-joints due to cyclic loading conditions experienced during typical aircraft operation, Current inspection techniques require removal of fasteners to permit inspection of the second layer from within the bolt hole. Inspection from the top layer without fastener removal is desirable in order to minimize aircraft downtime while reducing the risk of collateral damage. The ability to detect second layer cracks without fastener removal has been demonstrated using a pulsed eddy current (PEC) technique. The technique utilizes a breakdown of the measured signal response into its principal components, each of which is multiplied by a representative factor known as a score. The reduced data set of scores, which represent the measured signal, are examined for outliers using cluster analysis methods in order to detect the presence of defects. However, the cluster analysis methodology is limited by the fact that a number of representative signals, obtained from fasteners where defects are not present, are required in order to perform classification of the data. Alternatively, blind outlier detection can be achieved without having to obtain representative defect-free signals, by using a modified smallest half-volume (MSHV) approach. Results obtained using this approach suggest that self-calibrating blind detection of cyclic fatigue cracks in second layer wing structures in the presence of ferrous fasteners is possible without prior knowledge of the sample under test and without the use of costly calibration standards. (author)

  3. Examination of pulsed eddy current for inspection of second layer aircraft wing lap-joint structures using outlier detection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, D.M.; Underhill, P.R.; Krause, T.W.

    2016-01-01

    Ageing aircraft are susceptible to fatigue cracks at bolt hole locations in multi-layer aluminum wing lap-joints due to cyclic loading conditions experienced during typical aircraft operation, Current inspection techniques require removal of fasteners to permit inspection of the second layer from within the bolt hole. Inspection from the top layer without fastener removal is desirable in order to minimize aircraft downtime while reducing the risk of collateral damage. The ability to detect second layer cracks without fastener removal has been demonstrated using a pulsed eddy current (PEC) technique. The technique utilizes a breakdown of the measured signal response into its principal components, each of which is multiplied by a representative factor known as a score. The reduced data set of scores, which represent the measured signal, are examined for outliers using cluster analysis methods in order to detect the presence of defects. However, the cluster analysis methodology is limited by the fact that a number of representative signals, obtained from fasteners where defects are not present, are required in order to perform classification of the data. Alternatively, blind outlier detection can be achieved without having to obtain representative defect-free signals, by using a modified smallest half-volume (MSHV) approach. Results obtained using this approach suggest that self-calibrating blind detection of cyclic fatigue cracks in second layer wing structures in the presence of ferrous fasteners is possible without prior knowledge of the sample under test and without the use of costly calibration standards. (author)

  4. Boron: Enabling Exciting Metal-Rich Structures and Magnetic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheifers, Jan P; Zhang, Yuemei; Fokwa, Boniface P T

    2017-09-19

    Boron's unique chemical properties and its reactions with metals have yielded the large class of metal borides with compositions ranging from the most boron-rich YB 66 (used as monochromator for synchrotron radiation) up to the most metal-rich Nd 2 Fe 14 B (the best permanent magnet to date). The excellent magnetic properties of the latter compound originate from its unique crystal structure to which the presence of boron is essential. In general, knowing the crystal structure of any given extended solid is the prerequisite to understanding its physical properties and eventually predicting new synthetic targets with desirable properties. The ability of boron to form strong chemical bonds with itself and with metallic elements has enabled us to construct new structures with exciting properties. In recent years, we have discovered new boride structures containing some unprecedented boron fragments (trigonal planar B 4 units, planar B 6 rings) and low-dimensional substructures of magnetically active elements (ladders, scaffolds, chains of triangles). The new boride structures have led to new superconducting materials (e.g., NbRuB) and to new itinerant magnetic materials (e.g., Nb 6 Fe 1-x Ir 6+x B 8 ). The study of boride compounds containing chains (Fe-chains in antiferromagnetic Sc 2 FeRu 5 B 2 ), ladders (Fe-ladders in ferromagnetic Ti 9 Fe 2 Rh 18 B 8 ), and chains of triangles (Cr 3 chains in ferrimagnetic and frustrated TiCrIr 2 B 2 ) of magnetically active elements allowed us to gain a deep understanding of the factors (using density functional theory calculations) that can affect magnetic ordering of such low-dimensional magnetic units. We discovered that the magnetic properties of phases containing these magnetic subunits can be drastically tuned by chemical substitution within the metallic nonmagnetic network. For example, the small hysteresis (measure of magnetic energy storage) of Ti 2 FeRh 5 B 2 can be successively increased up to 24-times by gradually

  5. Application of an Efficient Gradient-Based Optimization Strategy for Aircraft Wing Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odeh Dababneh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a practical optimization framework and enhanced strategy within an industrial setting are proposed for solving large-scale structural optimization problems in aerospace. The goal is to eliminate the difficulties associated with optimization problems, which are mostly nonlinear with numerous mixed continuous-discrete design variables. Particular emphasis is placed on generating good initial starting points for the search process and in finding a feasible optimum solution or improving the chances of finding a better optimum solution when traditional techniques and methods have failed. The efficiency and reliability of the proposed strategy were demonstrated through the weight optimization of different metallic and composite laminated wingbox structures. The results show the effectiveness of the proposed procedures in finding an optimized solution for high-dimensional search space cases with a given level of accuracy and reasonable computational resources and user efforts. Conclusions are also inferred with regards to the sensitivity of the optimization results obtained with respect to the choice of different starting values for the design variables, as well as different optimization algorithms in the optimization process.

  6. Numerical modeling and experimental validation of the acoustic transmission of aircraft's double-wall structures including sound package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhazi, Dilal

    In the field of aeronautics, reducing the harmful effects of acoustics constitutes a major concern at the international level and justifies the call for further research, particularly in Canada where aeronautics is a key economic sector, which operates in a context of global competition. Aircraft sidewall structure is usually of a double wall construction with a curved ribbed metallic skin and a lightweight composite or sandwich trim separated by a cavity filled with a noise control treatment. The latter is of a great importance in the transport industry, and continues to be of interest in many engineering applications. However, the insertion loss noise control treatment depends on the excitation of the supporting structure. In particular, Turbulent Boundary Layer is of interest to several industries. This excitation is difficult to simulate in laboratory conditions, given the prohibiting costs and difficulties associated with wind tunnel and in-flight tests. Numerical simulation is the only practical way to predict the response to such excitations and to analyze effects of design changes to the response to such excitation. Another kinds of excitations encountered in industrial are monopole, rain on the Roof and diffuse acoustic field. Deterministic methods can calculate in each point the spectral response of the system. Most known are numerical methods such as finite elements and boundary elements methods. These methods generally apply to the low frequency where modal behavior of the structure dominates. However, the high limit of calculation in frequency of these methods cannot be defined in a strict way because it is related to the capacity of data processing and to the nature of the studied mechanical system. With these challenges in mind, and with limitations of the main numerical codes on the market, the manufacturers have expressed the need for simple models immediately available as early as the stage of preliminary drafts. This thesis represents an attempt

  7. Sustainability of Metal Structures via Spray-Clad Remanufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory M.; Sampath, Sanjay

    2018-01-01

    Structural reclamation and remanufacturing is an important future design consideration to allow sustainable recovery of degraded structural metals. Heavy machinery and infrastructure components subjected to extended use and/or environment induced degradation require costly and time-consuming replacement. If these parts can be remanufactured to original tolerances, and returned to service with "as good or better" performance, significant reductions in materials, cost, and environmental impact can be achieved. Localized additive restoration via thermal or cold spray methods is a promising approach in recovering and restoring original design strength of degraded metals. The advent of high velocity spray deposition technologies has allowed deposition of near full density materials. In this review, the fundamental scientific and technological elements of such local additive restoration is contemplated including materials, processes, and methodologies to assess the capabilities of such remanufactured systems. This points to sustainable material reclamation, as well as a route toward resource and process sustainability.

  8. Sustainability of Metal Structures via Spray-Clad Remanufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory M.; Sampath, Sanjay

    2018-04-01

    Structural reclamation and remanufacturing is an important future design consideration to allow sustainable recovery of degraded structural metals. Heavy machinery and infrastructure components subjected to extended use and/or environment induced degradation require costly and time-consuming replacement. If these parts can be remanufactured to original tolerances, and returned to service with "as good or better" performance, significant reductions in materials, cost, and environmental impact can be achieved. Localized additive restoration via thermal or cold spray methods is a promising approach in recovering and restoring original design strength of degraded metals. The advent of high velocity spray deposition technologies has allowed deposition of near full density materials. In this review, the fundamental scientific and technological elements of such local additive restoration is contemplated including materials, processes, and methodologies to assess the capabilities of such remanufactured systems. This points to sustainable material reclamation, as well as a route toward resource and process sustainability.

  9. Synthesis, Structure, and Properties of Refractory Hard-Metal Borides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Andrew Thomas

    As the limits of what can be achieved with conventional hard compounds, such as tungsten carbide, are nearing reach, super-hard materials are an area of increasing industrial interest. The refractory hard metal borides, such as ReB2 and WB4, offer an increasingly attractive alternative to diamond and cubic boron nitride as a next-generation tool material. In this Thesis, a thorough discussion is made of the progress achieved by our laboratory towards understanding the synthesis, structure, and properties of these extremely hard compounds. Particular emphasis is placed on structural manipulation, solid solution formation, and the unique crystallographic manifestations of what might also be called "super-hard metals".

  10. Resonance ultrasonic actuation and local structural rejuvenation in metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D. P.; Yang, Y.; Niu, X. R.; Lu, J.; Yang, G. N.; Wang, W. H.; Liu, C. T.

    2017-06-01

    Using the method of contact resonance ultrasonic actuation (CRUA), we observed evidence of local structural rejuvenation at the surface of metallic glasses (MGs), arising from the increase of the vibration amplitude of the atoms after the resonance actuation. By adjusting the CRUA parameters, the size, pattern, and extent of the rejuvenated zones could be tailored. Nanoindentation tests revealed suppressed nucleation of shear bands after CRUA, originating from the homogenization of the local structure induced by the ultrasonic vibration. Compared with the structural homogenization from annealing, this method will not sacrifice the concentration of the free volume for the local structural constraint. These results are useful to understand the evolution of the microstructure and local structural rejuvenation of MGs, as well as the design of MGs with improved plasticity from the nanoscale to the microscale.

  11. Structural Origins of Scintillation: Metal Organic Frameworks as a Nanolaboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    discrimination (PSD), for which the prompt component of the scintillation response is quenched for high specific energy loss (dE/dX) particles such as protons...for neutron discrimination (LDRD, $250k/year, FY10) - MOF-based scintillators (NA-22, ~600k / year, FY10-FY12) - Triplet-Harvesting doped plastic ...Structural Origins of Scintillation : Metal Organic Frameworks as a Nanolaboratory Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release

  12. Structural FEM analysis of the strut-to-fuselage joint of a two-seat composite aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas-Rojas, Erik; Camarena-Arellano, Diego; Hernández-Moreno, Hilario

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of a strut-to-fuselage joint is realized in order to evaluate the zones with a high probability of failure by means of a safety factor. The whole section is analyzed using the Finite Element Method (FEM) so as to estimate static resistance behavior, therefore it is necessary a numerical mock-up of the section, the mechanical properties of the Carbon-Epoxy (C-Ep) material, and to evaluate the applied loads. Results of the analysis show that the zones with higher probability of failure are found around the wing strut and the fuselage joint, with a safety factor lower than expected in comparison with the average safety factor used on aircrafts built mostly with metals

  13. Structural FEM analysis of the strut-to-fuselage joint of a two-seat composite aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas-Rojas, Erik, E-mail: erikvargasrojas@hotmail.com; Camarena-Arellano, Diego, E-mail: erikvargasrojas@hotmail.com; Hernández-Moreno, Hilario, E-mail: erikvargasrojas@hotmail.com [IPN, ESIME Ticomán, Av. Ticomán 600, Col. San José Ticomán 07340 (Mexico)

    2014-05-15

    An analysis of a strut-to-fuselage joint is realized in order to evaluate the zones with a high probability of failure by means of a safety factor. The whole section is analyzed using the Finite Element Method (FEM) so as to estimate static resistance behavior, therefore it is necessary a numerical mock-up of the section, the mechanical properties of the Carbon-Epoxy (C-Ep) material, and to evaluate the applied loads. Results of the analysis show that the zones with higher probability of failure are found around the wing strut and the fuselage joint, with a safety factor lower than expected in comparison with the average safety factor used on aircrafts built mostly with metals.

  14. Creating a Test Validated Structural Dynamic Finite Element Model of the Multi-Utility Technology Test Bed Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truong, Samson S.

    2014-01-01

    Small modeling errors in the finite element model will eventually induce errors in the structural flexibility and mass, thus propagating into unpredictable errors in the unsteady aerodynamics and the control law design. One of the primary objectives of Multi Utility Technology Test Bed, X-56A, aircraft is the flight demonstration of active flutter suppression, and therefore in this study, the identification of the primary and secondary modes for the structural model tuning based on the flutter analysis of X-56A. The ground vibration test validated structural dynamic finite element model of the X-56A is created in this study. The structural dynamic finite element model of the X-56A is improved using a model tuning tool. In this study, two different weight configurations of the X-56A have been improved in a single optimization run.

  15. Strengthening of old metallic structures in fatigue with CFRP materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Täljsten, Björn

    2007-01-01

    Research regarding strengthening of old metallic structures using unidirectional carbon fibre reinforced polymer(CFRP) laminates has shown very usable to lengthen the service life of structural members in tension With the basis in a 110 year old riveted beam, centre notched test specimens have been...... growth completely. A simple fracture mechanic study using linear elastic fracture mechanics has been used to show the effect of both non- and prestressed repairs, in relation to the stress intensity factor. Furthermore stresses in the bond between the steel and CFRP has been analyzed according...

  16. Innovative cellular distance structures from polymeric and metallic threads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, F.; Trümper, W.; Cherif, C.

    2017-10-01

    Knitting allows a high individual adaptability of the geometry and properties of flat-knitted spacer fabrics. This offers advantages for the specific adjustment of the mechanical properties of innovative composites based on highly viscous matrix systems such as bone cement, elastomer or foam and cellular reinforcing structures made from e. g. polymeric monofilaments or metallic wires. The prerequisite is the availability of binding solutions for highly productive production of functional, cellular, self-stabilized spacer flat knitted fabrics as supporting and functionalized structures.

  17. Which metal or ion? Identification of metals and ions in protein structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnálek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 70, Supplement /August/ (2014), C1484 ISSN 0108-7673. [Congress and General Assembly of the International Union of Crystallography /23./ - IUCr 2014. 05.08.2014-12.08.2014, Montreal] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : metal s * ions * structure validation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  18. Transport jet aircraft noise abatement in foreign countries: Growth, structure, impact. Volume 2: Pacific basin, August 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, F. A.

    1980-01-01

    Noise control measures at the international airports of Hawaii, New Zealand, Australia, Hong Kong, Japan, and Singapore were studied. Factors in noise control, such as government structure are examined. The increasing power of environmental agencies vis-a-vis aviation departments is noted. The following methods of dealing with aircraft noise are examined by type of control: noise at the source control; noise emmission controls, zoning, building codes, subsidies for relocation, insulation, loss in property values, and for TV, radio and telephone interference; and noise-related landing charges.

  19. Targeted Structural Optimization with Additive Manufacturing of Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Adam; Hull, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The recent advances in additive manufacturing (AM) of metals have now improved the state-of-the-art such that traditionally non-producible parts can be readily produced in a cost-effective way. Because of these advances in manufacturing technology, structural optimization techniques are well positioned to supplement and advance this new technology. The goal of this project is to develop a structural design, analysis, and optimization framework combined with AM to significantly light-weight the interior of metallic structures while maintaining the selected structural properties of the original solid. This is a new state-of-the-art capability to significantly reduce mass, while maintaining the structural integrity of the original design, something that can only be done with AM. In addition, this framework will couple the design, analysis, and fabrication process, meaning that what has been designed directly represents the produced part, thus closing the loop on the design cycle and removing human iteration between design and fabrication. This fundamental concept has applications from light-weighting launch vehicle components to in situ resource fabrication.

  20. Comparison of weights of 17ST and steel tubular structural members used in aircraft construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, E C

    1931-01-01

    Although the strong aluminum alloys have proved themselves to be very efficient in aircraft construction there is a growing competition from the high-strength steels for certain parts, especially for tubular members. This tendency is being reflected in research work carried on at the Bureau of Standards. This study will be based largely on data given in Technical Note No. 307 of the NACA.

  1. Fuel containment and damage tolerance for large composite primary aircraft structures. Phase 1: Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandifer, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Technical problems associated with fuel containment and damage tolerance of composite material wings for transport aircraft were identified. The major tasks are the following: (1) the preliminary design of damage tolerant wing surface using composite materials; (2) the evaluation of fuel sealing and lightning protection methods for a composite material wing; and (3) an experimental investigation of the damage tolerant characteristics of toughened resin graphite/epoxy materials. The test results, the test techniques, and the test data are presented.

  2. Raptors and aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.G.; Ellis, D.H.; Johnson, T.H.; Glinski, Richard L.; Pendleton, Beth Giron; Moss, Mary Beth; LeFranc, Maurice N.=; Millsap, Brian A.; Hoffman, Stephen W.

    1988-01-01

    Less than 5% of all bird strikes of aircraft are by raptor species, but damage to airframe structure or jet engine dysfunction are likely consequences. Beneficial aircraft-raptor interactions include the use of raptor species to frighten unwanted birds from airport areas and the use of aircraft to census raptor species. Many interactions, however, modify the raptor?s immediate behavior and some may decrease reproduction of sensitive species. Raptors may respond to aircraft stimuli by exhibiting alarm, increased heart rate, flushing or fleeing and occasionally by directly attacking intruding aircraft. To date, most studies reveal that raptor responses to aircraft are brief and do not limit reproduction; however, additional study is needed.

  3. Two-dimensional structure of mountain wave observed by aircraft during the PYREX experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Attié

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an experimental analysis from aircraft measurements above the Pyrenees chain during the PYREX experiment. The Pyrenees chain, roughly WE oriented, is a major barrier for northerly and southerly airflows. We present a case of southerly flow (15 October 1990 and three successive cases of northerly flows above the Pyrenees (14, 15 and 16 November 1990 documented by two aircraft. The aircraft have described a vertical cross section perpendicular to the Pyrenean ridge. This area is described via the thermodynamical and dynamical fields which have a horizontal resolution of 10 km. Three methods for computing the vertical velocity of the air are presented. The horizontal advection terms which play a role in the budget equations are also evaluated. The altitude turbulence zone of 15 October are shown via turbulent fluxes, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE, dissipation rate of TKE and inertial length-scale. A comparison of results obtained by eddy-correlation and inertial-dissipation method is presented. The experimental results show a warm and dry downdraft for the southerly flow with large values for advection terms. All the mountain wave cases are also shown to present an important dynamical perturbation just above the Pyrenees at upper altitudes.

  4. International conference on design, fabrication and economy of metal structures

    CERN Document Server

    Farkas, József

    2013-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the International Conference on Design, Fabrication and Economy of Metal Structures held on 24-26 April 2013 in Miskolc, Hungary which contain 99 papers covering: Structural optimization Thin-walled structures Stability Fatigue Frames Fire Fabrication Welding technology Applications Steel-concrete composite Special problems The authors are from 23 different countries, ensuring that the themes covered are of worldwide interest and importance. The International Institute of Welding (IIW), the International Society of Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization (ISSMO), the TÁMOP 4.2.1.B-10/2/KONV-2010-0001 project entitled “Increasing the quality of higher education through the development of research - development and innovation program at the University of Miskolc supported by the European Union, co-financed by the European Social Fund” and many other sponsors helped organizers to collect these valuable studies, the results of which will provoke discussion, and provide an i...

  5. Evolving Structural Diversity and Metallicity in Compressed Lithium Azide

    KAUST Repository

    Prasad, Dasari L. V. K.

    2013-10-10

    In pursuit of new stable nitrogen-rich phases and of a possible insulator-metal transition, the ground-state electronic structure of lithium azide, LiN3, is investigated from 1 atm to 300 GPa (∼2-fold compression) using evolutionary crystal structure exploration methods coupled with density functional theoretical calculations. Two new LiN3 phases, containing slightly reduced and well-separated N2 units, are found to be enthalpically competitive with the known lithium azide crystal structure at 1 atm. At pressures above 36 GPa nitrogen-rich assemblies begin to evolve. These incorporate NN bond formation beyond that in N2 or N3 -. N6 rings and infinite one-dimensional linear nitrogen chains (structural analogues to polyacetylene) appear. Above 200 GPa quasi-one- and two-dimensional extended puckered hexagonal and decagonal nitrogen layers emerge. The high-pressure phase featuring linear chains may be quenchable to P = 1 atm. With increasing pressure the progression in electrical conductivity is from insulator to metal. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  6. Method for preparing metallated filament-wound structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, George R.

    1979-01-01

    Metallated graphite filament-wound structures are prepared by coating a continuous multi-filament carbon yarn with a metal carbide, impregnating the carbide coated yarn with a polymerizable carbon precursor, winding the resulting filament about a mandrel, partially curing the impregnation in air, subjecting the wound composite to heat and pressure to cure the carbon precursor, and thereafter heating the composite in a sizing die at a pressure loading of at least 1000 psi for graphitizing the carbonaceous material in the composite. The carbide in the composite coalesces into rod-like shapes which are disposed in an end-to-end relationship parallel with the filaments to provide resistance to erosion in abrasive laden atmospheres.

  7. Electronic Structure of Rare-Earth Metals. II. Positron Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, R. W.; Mackintosh, Allan

    1968-01-01

    The angular correlation of the photons emitted when positrons annihilate with electrons has been studied in single crystals of the rare-earth metals Y, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er, and in a single crystal of an equiatomic alloy of Ho and Er. A comparison of the results for Y with the calculations...... of Loucks shows that the independent-particle model gives a good first approximation to the angular distribution, although correlation effects probably smear out some of the structure. The angular distributions from the heavy rare-earth metals are very similar to that from Y and can be understood...... qualitatively in terms of the relativistic augmented-plane-wave calculations by Keeton and Loucks. The angular distributions in the c direction in the paramagnetic phases are characterized by a rapid drop at low angles followed by a hump, and these features are associated with rather flat regions of Fermi...

  8. Simulation of Cu-Mg metallic glass: Thermodynamics and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Nicholas P.; Schioetz, Jakob; Jacobsen, Karsten W.

    2004-01-01

    We have obtained effective medium theory interatomic potential parameters suitable for studying Cu-Mg metallic glasses. We present thermodynamic and structural results from simulations of such glasses over a range of compositions. We have produced low-temperature configurations by cooling from the melt at as slow a rate as practical, using constant temperature and pressure molecular dynamics. During the cooling process we have carried out thermodynamic analyses based on the temperature dependence of the enthalpy and its derivative, the specific heat, from which the glass transition temperature may be determined. We have also carried out structural analyses using the radial distribution function (RDF) and common neighbor analysis (CNA). Our analysis suggests that the splitting of the second peak, commonly associated with metallic glasses, in fact, has little to do with the glass transition itself, but is simply a consequence of the narrowing of peaks associated with structural features present in the liquid state. In fact, the splitting temperature for the Cu-Cu RDF is well above T g . The CNA also highlights a strong similarity between the structure of the intermetallic alloys and the amorphous alloys of similar composition. We have also investigated the diffusivity in the supercooled regime. Its temperature dependence indicates fragile-liquid behavior, typical of binary metallic glasses. On the other hand, the relatively low specific-heat jump of around 1.5k B /atom indicates apparent strong-liquid behavior, but this can be explained by the width of the transition due to the high cooling rates

  9. System-on-chip integration of a new electromechanical impedance calculation method for aircraft structure health monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukabache, Hamza; Escriba, Christophe; Zedek, Sabeha; Medale, Daniel; Rolet, Sebastien; Fourniols, Jean Yves

    2012-10-11

    The work reported on this paper describes a new methodology implementation for active structural health monitoring of recent aircraft parts made from carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer. This diagnosis is based on a new embedded method that is capable of measuring the local high frequency impedance spectrum of the structure through the calculation of the electro-mechanical impedance of a piezoelectric patch pasted non-permanently onto its surface. This paper involves both the laboratory based E/M impedance method development, its implementation into a CPU with limited resources as well as a comparison with experimental testing data needed to demonstrate the feasibility of flaw detection on composite materials and answer the question of the method reliability. The different development steps are presented and the integration issues are discussed. Furthermore, we present the unique advantages that the reconfigurable electronics through System-on-Chip (SoC) technology brings to the system scaling and flexibility. At the end of this article, we demonstrate the capability of a basic network of sensors mounted onto a real composite aircraft part specimen to capture its local impedance spectrum signature and to diagnosis different delamination sizes using a comparison with a baseline.

  10. System-on-Chip Integration of a New Electromechanical Impedance Calculation Method for Aircraft Structure Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Medale

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The work reported on this paper describes a new methodology implementation for active structural health monitoring of recent aircraft parts made from carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer. This diagnosis is based on a new embedded method that is capable of measuring the local high frequency impedance spectrum of the structure through the calculation of the electro-mechanical impedance of a piezoelectric patch pasted non-permanently onto its surface. This paper involves both the laboratory based E/M impedance method development, its implementation into a CPU with limited resources as well as a comparison with experimental testing data needed to demonstrate the feasibility of flaw detection on composite materials and answer the question of the method reliability. The different development steps are presented and the integration issues are discussed. Furthermore, we present the unique advantages that the reconfigurable electronics through System-on-Chip (SoC technology brings to the system scaling and flexibility. At the end of this article, we demonstrate the capability of a basic network of sensors mounted onto a real composite aircraft part specimen to capture its local impedance spectrum signature and to diagnosis different delamination sizes using a comparison with a baseline.

  11. Biomedical application of hierarchically built structures based on metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korovin, M. S.; Fomenko, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, the use of hierarchically built structures in biology and medicine arouses much interest. The aim of this work is to review and summarize the available literature data about hierarchically organized structures in biomedical application. Nanoparticles can serve as an example of such structures. Medicine holds a special place among various application methods of similar systems. Special attention is paid to inorganic nanoparticles based on different metal oxides and hydroxides, such as iron, zinc, copper, and aluminum. Our investigations show that low-dimensional nanostructures based on aluminum oxides and hydroxides have an inhibitory effect on tumor cells and possess an antimicrobial activity. At the same time, it is obvious that the large-scale use of nanoparticles by humans needs to thoroughly study their properties. Special attention should be paid to the study of nanoparticle interaction with living biological objects. The numerous data show that there is no clear understanding of interaction mechanisms between nanoparticles and various cell types.

  12. Effects of lattice fluctuations on electronic transmission in metal/conjugated-oligomer/metal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Z.G.; Smith, D.L.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic transmission across metal/conjugated-oligomer/metal structures in the presence of lattice fluctuations is studied for short oligomer chains. The lattice fluctuations are approximated by static white noise disorder. Resonant transmission occurs when the energy of an incoming electron coincides with a discrete electronic level of the oligomer. The corresponding transmission peak diminishes in intensity with increasing disorder strength. Because of disorder there is an enhancement of the electronic transmission for energies that lie within the electronic gap of the oligomer. If fluctuations are sufficiently strong, a transmission peak within the gap is found at the midgap energy E=0 for degenerate conjugated oligomers (e.g., trans-polyacetylene) and E≠0 for AB-type degenerate oligomers. These results can be interpreted in terms of soliton-antisoliton states created by lattice fluctuations. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  13. Optimal Topology of Aircraft Rib and Spar Structures under Aeroelastic Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Dunning, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Several topology optimization problems are conducted within the ribs and spars of a wing box. It is desired to locate the best position of lightening holes, truss/cross-bracing, etc. A variety of aeroelastic metrics are isolated for each of these problems: elastic wing compliance under trim loads and taxi loads, stress distribution, and crushing loads. Aileron effectiveness under a constant roll rate is considered, as are dynamic metrics: natural vibration frequency and flutter. This approach helps uncover the relationship between topology and aeroelasticity in subsonic transport wings, and can therefore aid in understanding the complex aircraft design process which must eventually consider all these metrics and load cases simultaneously.

  14. Impact damage and residual strength analysis of composite panels with bonded stiffeners. [for primary aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Ram C.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1990-01-01

    Blade-stiffened, compression-loaded cover panels were designed, manufactured, analyzed, and tested. All panels were fabricated from IM6/1808I interleafed graphite-epoxy. An orthotropic blade stiffener and an orthotropic skin were selected to satisfy the design requirements for an advanced aircraft configuration. All specimens were impact damaged prior to testing. Experimental results were obtained for three- and five-stiffener panels. Analytical results described interlaminar forces caused by impact and predicted specimen residual strength. The analytical results compared reasonably with the experimental results for residual strength of the specimens.

  15. X-ray inspection of composite materials for aircraft structures using detectors of Medipix type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jandejsek, I; Jakubek, J; Jakubek, M; Krejci, F; Soukup, P; Turecek, D; Vavrik, D; Zemlicka, J; Prucha, P

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an overview of promising X-ray imaging techniques employed for non-destructive defectoscopy inspections of composite materials intended for the Aircraft industry. The major emphasis is placed on non-tomographic imaging techniques which do not require demanding spatial and time measurement conditions. Imaging methods for defects visualisation, delamination detection and porosity measurement of various composite materials such as carbon fibre reinforced polymers and honeycomb sendwiches are proposed. We make use of the new large area WidePix X-ray imaging camera assembled from up to 100 edgeless Medipix type detectors which is highly suitable for this type of measurements

  16. Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of small metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of metal clusters, in particular clusters of Group IIA and IIB atoms were conducted. Early in the project it became clear that electron correlation involving d orbitals plays a more important role in the binding of these clusters than had been previously anticipated. This necessitated that computer codes for calculating two electron integrals and for constructing the resulting CI Hamiltonions be replaced with newer, more efficient procedures. Program modification, interfacing and testing were performed. Results of both plans are reported.

  17. Metallization of high aspect ratio, out of plane structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazquez, Patricia; Dimaki, Maria; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2009-01-01

    This work is dedicated to developing a novel three dimensional structure for electrochemical measurements in neuronal studies. The final prototype will allow not only for the study and culture on chip of neuronal cells, but also of brain tissue. The use of out-of-plane electrodes instead of planar...... ones increases the sensitivity of the system and increases the signal-to-noise ratio in the recorded signals, due to the higher availability of surface area. The main bottleneck of the out-of-plane electrode fabrication lies in the metallization process for transforming them into active electrodes...

  18. Electronic structure of polycrystalline Cd metal using 241Am radioisotope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaka, M. S.; Sharma, G.; Mishra, M. C.; Sharma, B. K.

    2014-04-01

    Electronic structure study of the polycrystalline cadmium metal is reported. The experimental measurement is undertaken on a polycrystalline sheet sample using 59.54 keV radioisotope of 241Am. These results are compared with the ab initio calculations. The theoretical calculations are performed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method employing the density functional theories (DFT) and Hartree-Fock (HF) and augmented plane wave (APW) methods. The spherically averaged APW and LCAO based theoretical Compton profiles are in good agreement with the experimental measurement however the APW based theoretical calculations show best agreement.

  19. Electronic structure of polycrystalline Cd metal using 241Am radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhaka, M. S.; Sharma, G.; Mishra, M. C.; Sharma, B. K.

    2014-01-01

    Electronic structure study of the polycrystalline cadmium metal is reported. The experimental measurement is undertaken on a polycrystalline sheet sample using 59.54 keV radioisotope of 241 Am. These results are compared with the ab initio calculations. The theoretical calculations are performed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method employing the density functional theories (DFT) and Hartree-Fock (HF) and augmented plane wave (APW) methods. The spherically averaged APW and LCAO based theoretical Compton profiles are in good agreement with the experimental measurement however the APW based theoretical calculations show best agreement

  20. Constructing metal-based structures on nanopatterned etched silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojiang; Qiao, Yinghong; Xu, Lina; Buriak, Jillian M

    2011-06-28

    Silicon surfaces with nanoscale etched patterns were obtained using polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) block copolymer films as templates, followed by brief immersion in HF(aq). The resulting interfaces were comprised of pseudohexagonal arrays of pits on the silicon, whose shapes depended upon the chosen silicon orientation. The top unetched face of silicon remains capped by the native oxide, and the pit interiors are terminated by Si-H(x). Selective chemical functionalization via these two chemical handles was demonstrated to be a viable approach toward building nanostructured metal oxide and metal features within these silicon pits and on the top face. Using a series of interfacial chemical reactions, including oxidation (of Si-H(x)-terminated regions), hydrosilylation, and alkoxysilane-based chemistry on silicon oxide, the growth of metal-based structures can be spatially controlled. In the first approach, titania nanobowls were grown within the etch pits, and in the second, galvanic displacement was used to produce gold nanoparticles either within the etch pits, on the top silicon face, or both.

  1. Electrical, optical, and structural properties of semitransparent metallic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, S.; Varghese, R.; Bhattacharya, S.

    1983-09-01

    MOS solar cells have been fabricated with Ag and Au barrier metals on n-type silicon and with Al barrier metal on p-type silicon. The short-circuit current density Jsc was measured as a function of the average metal layer thickness tm; and the optical transmittance was measured as a function of the wavelength with tm as a parameter. It is shown that in the case of Ag and Au the film network structure attained electrical continuity at a lower value of tm than in the case of Al, and the surface covered by the film was lower. Mainly for this reason, optical transmittance was higher in the case of Ag and Au than in the case of Al. Jsc(tm) profiles were peaked with the maximum occurring around 55 angstroms for Ag and Au and around 70 angstroms for Al. A higher rate of degradation for Ag and Au than for Al MOS cells is found which is associated with the presence of large discontinuity in Ag and Au films.

  2. Statistical time series methods for damage diagnosis in a scale aircraft skeleton structure: loosened bolts damage scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsaftopoulos, Fotis P; Fassois, Spilios D

    2011-01-01

    A comparative assessment of several vibration based statistical time series methods for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is presented via their application to a scale aircraft skeleton laboratory structure. A brief overview of the methods, which are either scalar or vector type, non-parametric or parametric, and pertain to either the response-only or excitation-response cases, is provided. Damage diagnosis, including both the detection and identification subproblems, is tackled via scalar or vector vibration signals. The methods' effectiveness is assessed via repeated experiments under various damage scenarios, with each scenario corresponding to the loosening of one or more selected bolts. The results of the study confirm the 'global' damage detection capability and effectiveness of statistical time series methods for SHM.

  3. Organic/metal interfaces. Electronic and structural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duhm, Steffen

    2008-07-17

    This work addresses several important topics of the field of organic electronics. The focus lies on organic/metal interfaces, which exist in all organic electronic devices. Physical properties of such interfaces are crucial for device performance. Four main topics have been covered: (i) the impact of molecular orientation on the energy levels, (ii) energy level tuning with strong electron acceptors, (iii) the role of thermodynamic equilibrium at organic/ organic homo-interfaces and (iv) the correlation of interfacial electronic structure and bonding distance. To address these issues a broad experimental approach was necessary: mainly ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy was used, supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, metastable atom electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray standing waves, to examine vacuum sublimed thin films of conjugated organic molecules (COMs) in ultrahigh vacuum. (i) A novel approach is presented to explain the phenomenon that the ionization energy in molecular assemblies is orientation dependent. It is demonstrated that this is due to a macroscopic impact of intramolecular dipoles on the ionization energy in molecular assemblies. Furthermore, the correlation of molecular orientation and conformation has been studied in detail for COMs on various substrates. (ii) A new approach was developed to tune hole injection barriers ({delta}{sub h}) at organic/metal interfaces by adsorbing a (sub-) monolayer of an organic electron acceptor on the metal electrode. Charge transfer from the metal to the acceptor leads to a chemisorbed layer, which reduces {delta}{sub h} to the COM overlayer. This concept was tested with three acceptors and a lowering of {delta}{sub h} of up to 1.2 eV could be observed. (iii) A transition from vacuum-level alignment to molecular level pinning at the homo-interface between a lying monolayer and standing multilayers of a COM was observed, which depended on the amount of a pre-deposited acceptor. The

  4. Stability of Bulk Metallic Glass Structure. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, H.; Williams, D. B.

    2003-06-01

    The fundamental origins of the stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a prototype for a whole class of BMG formers, were explored. While much of the properties of their BMGs have been characterized, their glass-stability have not been explained in terms of the atomic and electronic structure. The local structure around all three constituent atoms was obtained, in a complementary way, using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), to probe the nearest neighbor environment of the metals, and extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS), to investigate the environment around P. The occupied electronic structure was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs receive their stability from cumulative, and interrelated, effects of both atomic and electronic origin. The stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs can be explained in terms of the stability of Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20}, glasses at the end of BMG formation. The atomic structure in these alloys is very similar to those of the binary phosphide crystals near x=0 and x=80, which are trigonal prisms of Pd or Ni atoms surrounding P atoms. Such structures are known to exist in dense, randomly-packed systems. The structure of the best glass former in this series, Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} is further described by a weighted average of those of Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20}. Bonding states present only in the ternary alloys were found and point to a further stabilization of the system through a negative heat of mixing between Pd and Ni atoms. The Nagel and Tauc criterion, correlating a decrease in the density of states at the Fermi level with an increase in the glass stability, was consistent with greater stability of the Pd{sub x}Ni{sub 80-x}P{sub 20} glasses with respect to the binary alloys of P. A valence electron concentration of 1.8 e/a, which

  5. Metal Foam Analysis: Improving Sandwich Structure Technology for Engine Fan and Propeller Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, Jessica L.

    2004-01-01

    The Life Prediction Branch of the NASA Glenn Research Center is searching for ways to construct aircraft and rotorcraft engine fan and propeller blades that are lighter and less costly. One possible design is to create a sandwich structure composed of two metal faces sheets and a metal foam core. The face sheets would carry the bending loads and the foam core would have to resist the transverse shear loads. Metal foam is ideal because of its low density and energy absorption capabilities, making the structure lighter, yet still stiff. The material chosen for the face sheets and core was 17-4PH stainless steel, which is easy to make and has appealing mechanical properties. This material can be made inexpensively compared to titanium and polymer matrix composites, the two current fan blade alternatives. Initial tests were performed on design models, including vibration and stress analysis. These tests revealed that the design is competitive with existing designs; however, some problems were apparent that must be addressed before it can be implemented in new technology. The foam did not hold up as well as expected under stress. This could be due to a number of issues, but was most likely a result of a large number of pores within the steel that weakened the structure. The brazing between the face sheets and the foam was also identified as a concern. The braze did not hold up well under shear stress causing the foam to break away from the face sheets. My role in this project was to analyze different options for improving the design. I primarily spent my time examining various foam samples, created with different sintering conditions, to see which exhibited the most favorable characteristics for our purpose. Methods of analysis that I employed included examining strut integrity under a microscope, counting the number of cells per inch, measuring the density, testing the microhardness, and testing the strength under compression. Shear testing will also be done to examine

  6. Influence of the aircraft crash induced local nonlinearities on the overall dynamic response of a RC structure through a parametric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouzaud, C.; Gatuingt, F.; Hervé, G.; Moussallam, N.; Dorival, O.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Structures could resist to the induced accelerations which they might undergo. • The characterization of non-linearities in the signal of an aircraft impact. • The non linear impact area are studied through a sensitivity analysis. • This analysis should allow to achieve a link between aircraft impact parameters. - Abstract: In the process of nuclear power plant design, the safety of structures is an important aspect. Civil engineering structures have to resist the accelerations induced by, for example, seismic loads or shaking loads resulting from the aircraft impact. This is even more important for the in-structures equipments that have also to be qualified against the vibrations generated by this kind of hazards. In the case of aircraft crash, as a large variety of scenarios has to be envisaged, it is necessary to use methods that are less CPU-time consuming and that consider appropriately the nonlinearities. The analysis presented in this paper deals with the problem of the characterization of nonlinearities (damaged area, transmitted force) in the response of a structure subjected to an aircraft impact. The purpose of our study is part of the development of a new decoupled nonlinear and elastic way for calculating the shaking of structures following an aircraft impact which could be very numerically costly if studied with classical finite element methods. The aim is to identify which parameters control the dimensions of the nonlinear zone and so will have a direct impact on the induced vibrations. In a design context, several load cases (and simulations) are analyzed in order to consider a wide range of impact (different loading surfaces, momentum) and data sets of the target (thickness, reinforcements). In this work, the nonlinear area generated by the impact is localized and studied through a parametric analysis associated with a sensitivity analysis to identify the boundaries between the elastic domain and this nonlinear area.

  7. Integrated Flight/Structural Mode Control for Very Flexible Aircraft Using L1 Adaptive Output Feedback Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Jiaxing; Cao, Chengyu; Gregory, Irene M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores application of adaptive control architecture to a light, high-aspect ratio, flexible aircraft configuration that exhibits strong rigid body/flexible mode coupling. Specifically, an L(sub 1) adaptive output feedback controller is developed for a semi-span wind tunnel model capable of motion. The wind tunnel mount allows the semi-span model to translate vertically and pitch at the wing root, resulting in better simulation of an aircraft s rigid body motion. The control objective is to design a pitch control with altitude hold while suppressing body freedom flutter. The controller is an output feedback nominal controller (LQG) augmented by an L(sub 1) adaptive loop. A modification to the L(sub 1) output feedback is proposed to make it more suitable for flexible structures. The new control law relaxes the required bounds on the unmatched uncertainty and allows dependence on the state as well as time, i.e. a more general unmatched nonlinearity. The paper presents controller development and simulated performance responses. Simulation is conducted by using full state flexible wing models derived from test data at 10 different dynamic pressure conditions. An L(sub 1) adaptive output feedback controller is designed for a single test point and is then applied to all the test cases. The simulation results show that the L(sub 1) augmented controller can stabilize and meet the performance requirements for all 10 test conditions ranging from 30 psf to 130 psf dynamic pressure.

  8. A machine-learning approach for damage detection in aircraft structures using self-powered sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Hadi; Das, Saptarshi; Chakrabartty, Shantanu; Biswas, Subir; Burgueño, Rigoberto

    2017-04-01

    This study proposes a novel strategy for damage identification in aircraft structures. The strategy was evaluated based on the simulation of the binary data generated from self-powered wireless sensors employing a pulse switching architecture. The energy-aware pulse switching communication protocol uses single pulses instead of multi-bit packets for information delivery resulting in discrete binary data. A system employing this energy-efficient technology requires dealing with time-delayed binary data due to the management of power budgets for sensing and communication. This paper presents an intelligent machine-learning framework based on combination of the low-rank matrix decomposition and pattern recognition (PR) methods. Further, data fusion is employed as part of the machine-learning framework to take into account the effect of data time delay on its interpretation. Simulated time-delayed binary data from self-powered sensors was used to determine damage indicator variables. Performance and accuracy of the damage detection strategy was examined and tested for the case of an aircraft horizontal stabilizer. Damage states were simulated on a finite element model by reducing stiffness in a region of the stabilizer's skin. The proposed strategy shows satisfactory performance to identify the presence and location of the damage, even with noisy and incomplete data. It is concluded that PR is a promising machine-learning algorithm for damage detection for time-delayed binary data from novel self-powered wireless sensors.

  9. The structure of steady shock waves in porous metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnota, Christophe; Molinari, Alain; Mercier, Sébastien

    2017-10-01

    The paper aims at developing an understanding of steady shock wave propagation in a ductile metallic material containing voids. Porosity is assumed to be less than 0.3 and voids are not connected (foams are not considered). As the shock wave is traveling in the porous medium, the voids are facing a rapid collapse. During this dynamic compaction process, material particles are subjected to very high acceleration in the vicinity of voids, thus generating acceleration forces at the microscale that influence the overall response of the porous material. Analyzing how stationary shocks are influenced by these micro-inertia effects is the main goal of this work. The focus is essentially on the shock structure, ignoring oscillatory motion of pores prevailing at the tail of the shock wave. Following the constitutive framework developed by Molinari and Ravichandran (2004) for the analysis of steady shock waves in dense metals, an analytical approach of steady state propagation of plastic shocks in porous metals is proposed. The initial void size appears as a characteristic internal length that scales the overall dynamic response, thereby contributing to the structuring of the shock front. This key feature is not captured by standard damage models where the porosity stands for the single damage parameter with no contribution of the void size. The results obtained in this work provide a new insight in the fundamental understanding of shock waves in porous media. In particular, a new scaling law relating the shock width to the initial void radius is obtained when micro-inertia effects are significant.

  10. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives. [bonding metal and composite material structures for aircraft and spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A rubber-toughened, addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber-containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride has been mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  11. Non-metallic structural wrap systems for pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, R.H.; Wesley Rowley, C.

    2001-01-01

    The use of thermoplastics and reinforcing fiber has been a long-term application of non-metallic material for structural applications. With the advent of specialized epoxies and carbon reinforcing fiber, structural strength approaching and surpassing steel has been used in a wide variety of applications, including nuclear power plants. One of those applications is a NSWS for pipe and other structural members. The NSWS is system of integrating epoxies with reinforcing fiber in a wrapped geometrical configuration. This paper specifically addresses the repair of degraded pipe in heat removal systems used in nuclear power plants, which is typically caused by corrosion, erosion, or abrasion. Loss of structural material leads to leaks, which can be arrested by a NSWS for the pipe. The technical aspects of using thermoplastics to structurally improve degraded pipe in nuclear power plants has been addressed in the ASME B and PV Code Case N-589. Using the fundamentals described in that Code Case, this paper shows how this technology can be extended to pipe repair from the outside. This NSWS has already been used extensively in non-nuclear applications and in one nuclear application. The cost to apply this NSWS is typically substantially less than replacing the pipe and may be technically superior to replacing the pipe. (author)

  12. A review of the analytical simulation of aircraft crash dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Carden, Huey D.; Boitnott, Richard L.; Hayduk, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    A large number of full scale tests of general aviation aircraft, helicopters, and one unique air-to-ground controlled impact of a transport aircraft were performed. Additionally, research was also conducted on seat dynamic performance, load-limiting seats, load limiting subfloor designs, and emergency-locator-transmitters (ELTs). Computer programs were developed to provide designers with methods for predicting accelerations, velocities, and displacements of collapsing structure and for estimating the human response to crash loads. The results of full scale aircraft and component tests were used to verify and guide the development of analytical simulation tools and to demonstrate impact load attenuating concepts. Analytical simulation of metal and composite aircraft crash dynamics are addressed. Finite element models are examined to determine their degree of corroboration by experimental data and to reveal deficiencies requiring further development.

  13. An Improved Gaussian Mixture Model for Damage Propagation Monitoring of an Aircraft Wing Spar under Changing Structural Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Fang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technology is considered to be a key technology to reduce the maintenance cost and meanwhile ensure the operational safety of aircraft structures. It has gradually developed from theoretic and fundamental research to real-world engineering applications in recent decades. The problem of reliable damage monitoring under time-varying conditions is a main issue for the aerospace engineering applications of SHM technology. Among the existing SHM methods, Guided Wave (GW) and piezoelectric sensor-based SHM technique is a promising method due to its high damage sensitivity and long monitoring range. Nevertheless the reliability problem should be addressed. Several methods including environmental parameter compensation, baseline signal dependency reduction and data normalization, have been well studied but limitations remain. This paper proposes a damage propagation monitoring method based on an improved Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM). It can be used on-line without any structural mechanical model and a priori knowledge of damage and time-varying conditions. With this method, a baseline GMM is constructed first based on the GW features obtained under time-varying conditions when the structure under monitoring is in the healthy state. When a new GW feature is obtained during the on-line damage monitoring process, the GMM can be updated by an adaptive migration mechanism including dynamic learning and Gaussian components split-merge. The mixture probability distribution structure of the GMM and the number of Gaussian components can be optimized adaptively. Then an on-line GMM can be obtained. Finally, a best match based Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence is studied to measure the migration degree between the baseline GMM and the on-line GMM to reveal the weak cumulative changes of the damage propagation mixed in the time-varying influence. A wing spar of an aircraft is used to validate the proposed method. The results indicate that the crack

  14. An Improved Gaussian Mixture Model for Damage Propagation Monitoring of an Aircraft Wing Spar under Changing Structural Boundary Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Fang, Fang

    2016-02-26

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technology is considered to be a key technology to reduce the maintenance cost and meanwhile ensure the operational safety of aircraft structures. It has gradually developed from theoretic and fundamental research to real-world engineering applications in recent decades. The problem of reliable damage monitoring under time-varying conditions is a main issue for the aerospace engineering applications of SHM technology. Among the existing SHM methods, Guided Wave (GW) and piezoelectric sensor-based SHM technique is a promising method due to its high damage sensitivity and long monitoring range. Nevertheless the reliability problem should be addressed. Several methods including environmental parameter compensation, baseline signal dependency reduction and data normalization, have been well studied but limitations remain. This paper proposes a damage propagation monitoring method based on an improved Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM). It can be used on-line without any structural mechanical model and a priori knowledge of damage and time-varying conditions. With this method, a baseline GMM is constructed first based on the GW features obtained under time-varying conditions when the structure under monitoring is in the healthy state. When a new GW feature is obtained during the on-line damage monitoring process, the GMM can be updated by an adaptive migration mechanism including dynamic learning and Gaussian components split-merge. The mixture probability distribution structure of the GMM and the number of Gaussian components can be optimized adaptively. Then an on-line GMM can be obtained. Finally, a best match based Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence is studied to measure the migration degree between the baseline GMM and the on-line GMM to reveal the weak cumulative changes of the damage propagation mixed in the time-varying influence. A wing spar of an aircraft is used to validate the proposed method. The results indicate that the crack

  15. Case Study: Structural Evaluation of Steel Truss Aircraft Hangars at Corpus Christi Army Depot, Texas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Al-Chaar, Ghassan

    1999-01-01

    .... Engineering analysis of such structures currently in use can identify structural vulnerabilities, and retrofit schemes may be developed to reduce or eliminate these vulnerabilities to severe wind loads...

  16. Excitation of Terahertz Charge Transfer Plasmons in Metallic Fractal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadivand, Arash; Gerislioglu, Burak; Sinha, Raju; Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Pala, Nezih

    2017-08-01

    There have been extensive researches on terahertz (THz) plasmonic structures supporting resonant modes to demonstrate nano and microscale devices with high efficiency and responsivity as well as frequency selectivity. Here, using antisymmetric plasmonic fractal Y-shaped (FYS) structures as building blocks, we introduce a highly tunable four-member fractal assembly to support charge transfer plasmons (CTPs) and classical dipolar resonant modes with significant absorption cross section in the THz domain. We first present that the unique geometrical nature of the FYS system and corresponding spectral response allow for supporting intensified dipolar plasmonic modes under polarised light exposure in a standalone structure. In addition to classical dipolar mode, for the very first time, we demonstrated CTPs in the THz domain due to the direct shuttling of the charges across the metallic fractal microantenna which led to sharp resonant absorption peaks. Using both numerical and experimental studies, we have investigated and confirmed the excitation of the CTP modes and highly tunable spectral response of the proposed plasmonic fractal structure. This understanding opens new and promising horizons for tightly integrated THz devices with high efficiency and functionality.

  17. Impact of spatial dimension on structural ordering in metallic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan-Chao; Tanaka, Hajime; Wang, Wei-Hua

    2017-08-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) have so far attracted considerable attention for their applications as bulk materials. However, new physics and applications often emerge by dimensional reduction from three dimensions (3D) to two dimensions (2D). Here, we study, by molecular dynamics simulations, how the liquid-to-glass transition of a binary Cu_{50}Zr_{50} MG is affected by spatial dimensionality. We find clear evidence that crystal-like structural ordering controls both dynamic heterogeneity and slow dynamics, and thus plays a crucial role in the formation of the 2DMG. Although the 2DMG reproduces the dynamical behaviors of its 3D counterpart by considering Mermin-Wagner-type fluctuations specific to 2D, this atomic-scale structural mechanism is essentially different from that for the 3DMG in which icosahedral clusters incompatible with crystallographic symmetry play a key role in glassy behaviors. Our finding provides a structural mechanism for the formation of 2DMGs, which cannot be inferred from the knowledge of 3DMGs. The results suggest a structural basis for the glass transition in 2DMG and provide possible explanations for some previous experimental observations in ultrathin film MGs.

  18. Structural and vibrational studies of clean and chemisorbed metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Qing-Tang.

    1992-01-01

    Using Medium Energy Ion Scattering, we have studied the structural and vibrational properties of a number of clean and chemisorbed metal surfaces. The work presented in this thesis is mainly of a fundamental nature. However, it is believed that an atomistic understanding of the forces that affect surface structural and vibrational properties can have a beneficial impact on a large number of areas of applied nature. We find that the surface structure of Cu(001) follows the common trend for metal surfaces, where a small oscillatory relaxation exists beginning with a slight contraction in the top layer. In addition, the surface vibrational amplitude is enhanced (as s usually the case) by ∼80%. A detailed analysis of our data shows an unexpected anisotropy of the vibrational amplitude, such that the out-of-plane vibrational amplitude is 30% smaller than the in-plane vibrational amplitude. The unexpected results may imply a large tensile stress on Cu(001). Upon adsorption of 1/4 of a monolayer of S, a p(2 x 2)-S/Cu(001) surface is created. This submonolayer amount of S atoms makes the surface bulk-like, in which the anisotropy of the surface vibrations is removed and the first interlayer contraction is lifted. By comparing our model to earlier contradictory results on this controversial system. We find excellent agreement with a recent LEED study. The presence of 0.1 monolayer of Ca atoms on the Au(113) surface induces a drastic atomic rearrangements, in which half of the top layer Au atoms are missing and a (1 x 2) symmetry results. In addition, the first interlayer spacing of Au(113) is significantly reduced. Our results are discussed in terms of the energy balance between competing surface electronic charge densities

  19. Related Structure Characters and Stability of Structural Defects in a Metallic Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Feng, Shidong; Pan, Shaopeng

    2018-03-22

    Structural defects were investigated by a recently proposed structural parameter, quasi-nearest atom (QNA), in a modeled Zr 50 Cu 50 metallic glass through molecular dynamics simulations. More QNAs around an atom usually means that more defects are located near the atom. Structural analysis reveals that the spatial distribution of the numbers of QNAs displays to be clearly heterogeneous. Furthermore, QNA is closely correlated with cluster connections, especially four-atom cluster connections. Atoms with larger coordination numbers usually have less QNAs. When two atoms have the same coordination number, the atom with larger five-fold symmetry has less QNAs. The number of QNAs around an atom changes rather frequently and the change of QNAs might be correlated with the fast relaxation metallic glasses.

  20. Transition from glass to graphite in manufacture of composite aircraft structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffum, H. E.; Thompson, V. S.

    1978-01-01

    The transition from fiberglass reinforced plastic composites to graphite reinforced plastic composites is described. Structural fiberglass design and manufacturing background are summarized. How this experience provides a technology base for moving into graphite composite secondary structure and then to composite primary structure is considered. The technical requirements that must be fulfilled in the transition from glass to graphite composite structure are also included.

  1. Extraordinary Magnetoresistance Effect in Semiconductor/Metal Hybrid Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian

    2013-06-27

    In this dissertation, the extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) effect in semiconductor/metal hybrid structures is studied to improve the performance in sensing applications. Using two-dimensional finite element simulations, the geometric dependence of the output sensitivity, which is a more relevant parameter for EMR sensors than the magnetoresistance (MR), is studied. The results show that the optimal geometry in this case is different from the geometry reported before, where the MR ratio was optimized. A device consisting of a semiconductor bar with length/width ratio of 5~10 and having only 2 contacts is found to exhibit the highest sensitivity. A newly developed three-dimensional finite element model is employed to investigate parameters that have been neglected with the two dimensional simulations utilized so far, i.e., thickness of metal shunt and arbitrary semiconductor/metal interface. The simulations show the influence of those parameters on the sensitivity is up to 10 %. The model also enables exploring the EMR effect in planar magnetic fields. In case of a bar device, the sensitivity to planar fields is about 15 % to 20 % of the one to perpendicular fields. 5 A “top-contacted” structure is proposed to reduce the complexity of fabrication, where neither patterning of the semiconductor nor precise alignment is required. A comparison of the new structure with a conventionally fabricated device shows that a similar magnetic field resolution of 24 nT/√Hz is obtained. A new 3-contact device is developed improving the poor low-field sensitivity observed in conventional EMR devices, resulting from its parabolic magnetoresistance response. The 3-contact device provides a considerable boost of the low field response by combining the Hall effect with the EMR effect, resulting in an increase of the output sensitivity by 5 times at 0.01 T compared to a 2-contact device. The results of this dissertation provide new insights into the optimization of EMR devices

  2. High gradient tests of metallic mm-wave accelerating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Forno, Massimo; Dolgashev, Valery; Bowden, Gordon; Clarke, Christine; Hogan, Mark; McCormick, Doug; Novokhatski, Alexander; O'Shea, Brendan; Spataro, Bruno; Weathersby, Stephen; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2017-08-01

    This paper explores the physics of vacuum rf breakdowns in high gradient mm-wave accelerating structures. We performed a series of experiments with 100 GHz and 200 GHz metallic accelerating structures, at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. This paper presents the experimental results of rf tests of 100 GHz travelling-wave accelerating structures, made of hard copper-silver alloy. The results are compared with pure hard copper structures. The rf fields were excited by the FACET ultra-relativistic electron beam. The accelerating structures have open geometries, 10 cm long, composed of two halves separated by a variable gap. The rf frequency of the fundamental accelerating mode depends on the gap size and can be changed from 90 GHz to 140 GHz. The measured frequency and pulse length are consistent with our simulations. When the beam travels off-axis, a deflecting field is induced in addition to the decelerating longitudinal field. We measured the deflecting forces by observing the displacement of the electron bunch and used this measurement to verify the expected accelerating gradient. We present the first quantitative measurement of rf breakdown rates in 100 GHz copper-silver accelerating structure, which was 10-3 per pulse, with peak electric field of 0.42 GV/m, an accelerating gradient of 127 MV/m, at a pulse length of 2.3 ns. The goal of our studies is to understand the physics of gradient limitations in order to increase the energy reach of future accelerators.

  3. Structural versatility of Metal-organic frameworks: Synthesis and Characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Alsadun, Norah S.

    2017-05-01

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs), an emerging class of porous crystalline materials, have shown promising properties for diverse applications such as catalysis, gas storage and separation. The high degree of tunability of MOFs vs other solid materials enable the assembly of advanced materials with fascinating properties for specific applications. Nevertheless, the precise control in the construction of MOFs at the molecular level remains challenging. Particularly, the formation of pre-targeted multi-nuclear Molecular Building Block (MBB) precursors to unveil materials with targeted structural characteristics is captivating. The aim of my master project in the continuous quest of the group of Prof. Eddaoudi in exploring different synthetic pathways to control the assembly of Rare Earth (RE) based MOF. After giving a general overview about MOFs, I will discuss in this thesis the results of my work on the use of tri-topic oriented organic carboxylate building units with the aim to explore the assembly/construction of new porous RE based MOFs. In chapter 2 will discuss the assembly of 3-c linkers with RE metals was then evaluated based on symmetry and angularity of the three connected linkers. The focus of chapter 3 is cerium based MOFs and heterometallic system, based on 3-c ligands with different length and symmetry. Overall, the incompatibility of 3-c ligands with the 12-c cuo MBB did not allow to any formation of higher neuclearity (˃6), but it has resulted in affecting the connectivity of the cluster.

  4. Resistive switching in ZrO2 based metal-oxide-metal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaerkkaenen, Irina

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this work is a deeper understanding of the influence of the (i) metal-oxide-metal (MOM) layer stacks configuration, (ii) the oxide films microstructure, (iii) and their defect structure on the appearance of different switching modes, i.e. unipolar (UP) and bipolar (BP). The first part deals with the fabrication of ZrO 2 thin films by an industrial compatible atomic layer deposition (ALD) process, the chemical, structural and morphological characterization of the films, the growth of ZrO 2 /TiO 2 bilayers, the integration of the layers into metal-oxide-metal (MOM) devices and the electrical characterization with focus on the RS behavior. In the second part the effect of the device structure, in particular the thickness of the electrochemical active electrode (EAE) and the ZrO 2 film morphology, on the RS switching polarity of Pt/ZrO 2 /(EAE) cells is discussed. ZrO 2 films and ZrO 2 /TiO 2 bilayers were grown by ALD and were carefully structurally and electrically characterized. The ZrO 2 films grown from Zr[N(CH 3 )C 2 H 5 ] 4 (TEMA-Zr) at 240 C were polycrystalline with a mixture of cubic/tetragonal phases. ALD/H 2 O-ZrO 2 films exhibited a random oriented polycrystalline structure, whereas the ALD/O 3 -ZrO 2 films consisted of preferably oriented cubic shaped grains. Pt/ZrO 2 /Ti/Pt structures with a Ti top electrode (TE) thickness of 5 to 20 nm showed unipolar type RS behavior, while by increasing the Ti TE thickness a gradual change of switching polarity from unipolar to bipolar with a completely bipolar type RS behavior for a Ti TE thickness of 40 nm is found. The switching in Pt/ZrO 2 /TiO 2 /Ti/Pt devices was unipolar, comparable to Pt/ZrO 2 /Ti/Pt cells. In contrast, bilayers with the reverse structure, Pt/TiO 2 /ZrO 2 /Ti/Pt, showed non-switching behavior. The effect of the cells stack structure on the polarity of the RS behavior was studied in detail for 20 nm thick ZrO 2 films grown by an ozone based ALD process and integrated into Pt/ZrO 2

  5. Thin-film thermomechanical sensors embedded in metallic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnas, Anastasios M.

    2000-10-01

    The ability to monitor in real time the thermo-mechanical responses of tools, equipment, and structural components has been very appealing to the aerospace, automotive, drilling, and manufacturing industries. So far, the challenge has been to instrument the tools, equipment, or structural components with a number of sensors in an economical way and also protect the sensors from the environment which the tools, etc. are exposed to. In this work, a sequence of manufacturing processes that can be used to build thin-film temperature and strain sensors on internal surfaces of metallic structures is proposed and demonstrated. The use of thin-film techniques allows the parallel fabrication of sensor arrays, whereas a layered manufacturing scheme permits the creation of sensors on the internal surfaces of metallic parts and their subsequent embedding. Thin-film sensors are deposited on an aluminum oxide film, which is grown on a stainless steel substrate. The oxide is deposited by reactive sputtering. The sensors are sputter-deposited from alloy targets, shaped via micromachining and partially covered with a passivation layer of aluminum oxide. The thin-film structure is then covered by two protective electroplated layers of copper and nickel for protection during the deposition of the embedding layers. Embedding is accomplished by using a high-power infrared laser to melt an invar powder bed on top of the protective layers. Among the issues that emerged during the definition of the fabrication sequence were: the long-term stability of reactive deposition, the presence of pinholes in the dielectric layers, the optimal combination of materials and thickness of the protective layers, the bonding at the various interfaces, and the heat input and residual stresses resulting from the high-temperature embedding process. Finally, a finite element model was constructed in order to simulate the high-temperature embedding process. The heat transfer analysis performed on the model

  6. Average and local structure of selected metal deuterides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerby, Magnus H.

    2005-07-01

    The main topic of this thesis is improved understanding of site preference and mutual interactions of deuterium (D) atoms in selected metallic metal deuterides. The work was partly motivated by reports of abnormally short D-D distances in RENiInD1.33 compounds (RE = rear-earth element; D-D {upsilon} square root 1.6 Aa) which show that the so-called Switendick criterion that demands a D-D separation of at least 2 Aa, is not a universal rule. The work is experimental and heavily based on scattering measurements using x-rays (lab and synchrotron) and neutrons. In order to enhance data quality, deuterium is almost exclusively used instead of natural hydrogen in sample preparations. The data-analyses are in some cases taken beyond ''conventional'' analysis of the Bragg scattering, as the diffuse scattering contains important information on D-D distances in disordered deuterides (Paper 3 and 4). A considerable part of this work is devoted to determination of the crystal structure of saturated Zr2Ni deuteride, Zr2NiD-4.8. The structure remained unsolved when only a few months remained of the scholarship. The route to the correct structure was found in the last moment. In Chapter II this winding road towards the structure determination is described; an interesting exercise in how to cope with triclinic superstructures of metal hydrides. The solution emerged by combining data from synchrotron radiation powder x-ray diffraction (SR-PXD), powder neutron diffraction (PND) and electron diffraction (ED). The triclinic crystal structure, described in space group P1 , is fully ordered with composition Zr4Ni2D9 (Zr2NiD4.5). The unit cell is doubled as compared to lower Zr2Ni deuterides due to a deuterium superstructure: asuper = a, bsuper = b - c, csuper = b + c. The deviation from higher symmetry is very small. The metal lattice is pseudo-I-centred tetragonal and the deuterium lattice is pseudo-C-centred monoclinic. The deuterium site preference in Zr2Ni

  7. Average and local structure of selected metal deuterides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerby, Magnus H.

    2004-01-01

    The main topic of this thesis is improved understanding of site preference and mutual interactions of deuterium (D) atoms in selected metallic metal deuterides. The work was partly motivated by reports of abnormally short D-D distances in RENiInD1.33 compounds (RE = rear-earth element; D-D Υ square root 1.6 Aa) which show that the so-called Switendick criterion that demands a D-D separation of at least 2 Aa, is not a universal rule. The work is experimental and heavily based on scattering measurements using x-rays (lab and synchrotron) and neutrons. In order to enhance data quality, deuterium is almost exclusively used instead of natural hydrogen in sample preparations. The data-analyses are in some cases taken beyond ''conventional'' analysis of the Bragg scattering, as the diffuse scattering contains important information on D-D distances in disordered deuterides (Paper 3 and 4). A considerable part of this work is devoted to determination of the crystal structure of saturated Zr2Ni deuteride, Zr2NiD-4.8. The structure remained unsolved when only a few months remained of the scholarship. The route to the correct structure was found in the last moment. In Chapter II this winding road towards the structure determination is described; an interesting exercise in how to cope with triclinic superstructures of metal hydrides. The solution emerged by combining data from synchrotron radiation powder x-ray diffraction (SR-PXD), powder neutron diffraction (PND) and electron diffraction (ED). The triclinic crystal structure, described in space group P1 , is fully ordered with composition Zr4Ni2D9 (Zr2NiD4.5). The unit cell is doubled as compared to lower Zr2Ni deuterides due to a deuterium superstructure: asuper = a, bsuper = b - c, csuper = b + c. The deviation from higher symmetry is very small. The metal lattice is pseudo-I-centred tetragonal and the deuterium lattice is pseudo-C-centred monoclinic. The deuterium site preference in Zr2Ni deuterides at 1 bar D2 and

  8. Mechanical and Structural Investigation of Porous Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baran Sarac

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic properties of advanced alloy systems can be altered by changing their microstructural features. Here, we present a highly efficient method to produce and characterize structures with systematically-designed pores embedded inside. The fabrication stage involves a combination of photolithography and deep reactive ion etching of a Si template replicated using the concept of thermoplastic forming. Pt- and Zr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs were evaluated through uniaxial tensile test, followed by scanning electron microscope (SEM fractographic and shear band analysis. Compositional investigation of the fracture surface performed via energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, as well as Auger spectroscopy (AES shows a moderate amount of interdiffusion (5 at.% maximum of the constituent elements between the deformed and undeformed regions. Furthermore, length-scale effects on the mechanical behavior of porous BMGs were explored through molecular dynamics (MD simulations, where shear band formation is observed for a material width of 18 nm.

  9. Vessel supporting structure for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahe, Armel; Jullien, Georges

    1974-01-01

    The supporting structure described is for a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor, the vessel being of the type suspended to the end slab of the reactor. It includes a ring connected at one of its two ends to a single shell and at the other end to two shells. One of these three shells connected to the lower end of the ring forms the upper part of the vessel to be supported. The two other shells are embedded in two sperate parts of the slab. The ring and shell assembly is housed in an annular space provided in the end slab and separating it into two parts, namely a central part and a peripheral part [fr

  10. Structural evolution, growth and stability of metal titanium clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauke, Hasani; Phaahla, Tshegofatso; Ngoepe, Phuti; Catlow, Richard

    The transition metals clusters such as titanium have received a significant attention due to their excellent physical and chemical properties and great technological application in many fields. A survey of small Ti clusters was performed using interatomic potentials and computational methods based on density functional theory; and the knowledge led master code with a genetic algorithm to generate the lowest energy geometries of Tin (n = 2-32) clusters. The all electron spin-unpolarized generalized gradient approximation is used to determine the ground state structures, binding energy and electronic properties. The structural evolution of titanium clusters, which favors the icosahedron structure growth pattern is observed. The energy for the ground state configurations is found to increase monotonically with the clusters size. Their relative stability results predict clusters with 5 and 7 as more stable. The energy difference for clusters n >=24 is very small, suggesting that the larger clusters could be stable at moderate temperatures. In addition to the magic numbers that are often reported i.e. Ti7 and Ti13; clusters 5, 9, 14, 17 and 26 have extra stability.

  11. Electron confinement in thin metal films. Structure, morphology and interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dil, J.H.

    2006-05-15

    This thesis investigates the interplay between reduced dimensionality, electronic structure, and interface effects in ultrathin metal layers (Pb, In, Al) on a variety of substrates (Si, Cu, graphite). These layers can be grown with such a perfection that electron confinement in the direction normal to the film leads to the occurrence of quantum well states in their valence bands. These quantum well states are studied in detail, and their behaviour with film thickness, on different substrates, and other parameters of growth are used here to characterise a variety of physical properties of such nanoscale systems. The sections of the thesis deal with a determination of quantum well state energies for a large data set on different systems, the interplay between film morphology and electronic structure, and the influence of substrate electronic structure on their band shape; finally, new ground is broken by demonstrating electron localization and correlation effects, and the possibility to measure the influence of electron-phonon coupling in bulk bands. (orig.)

  12. Structural and energetic characteristics of alkali metal hexachlorouranates (5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryashov, V.L.; Suglobova, I.G.; Chirkst, D.Eh.

    1978-01-01

    Structure types and lattice parameters of alkali metal hexachlorouranates (5) have been determined by indicating the X-ray diffraction patterns of polycrystals. α-NaVCl 6 has a cubic structure of the Csub(s)PFsub(6) type; β-NaVCl 6 -trigonal lattice of the LiSbF 6 type; KVCl 6 and RbVCl 6 crystallize in the RbPaF 6 structure type; CsVCl 6 is isomorphous to CsPF 6 . Enthalpy values of hexachlorouranates (5) dissolution in 0.5% FeCl 3 solution and in 2% HCl have been measured and the standard enthalpy values of their formation have been calculated. The energies of crystal lattices and of the uranium-uranium-chlorine bonds have been calculated. When uranium coordination number is 6 the energy of the uranium-chlorine bond is 99.6+-0.5; when this number is 8 the energy equals 101.9+-0.5 kcal/mol

  13. METAL STRUCTURES SURVIVABILITY ASSESSMENT WHEN SIMULATING SERVICE CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Gibalenko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The research is aimed at improving the quality and reliability of measures of primary and secondary protection of metal structures at manufacturing companies, to prolong the service life of cyclically loaded structures of production facilities taking into account the corrosion level of danger. Methodology. Authors proposed to use the principles of process approach for statement and realization of management problems of operational service life in corrosion environments. The principles of ensuring reliability on the level of corrosion danger include justification of stages sequence for survivability assessment of a structural metalwork based on the strategy of DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, control: definitions, measurements, analysis, improvement and monitoring of measures of primary and secondary corrosion protection. Findings. Providing control measures from corrosion according to the criterion of corrosion danger allows providing requirements of reliability of structural metalwork based on calculated provisions of the limiting conditions method and solving the problems of management in technological safety during the expected service life of structural objects. Originality. The developed strategy of maintenance of the industrial facilities on an actual state includes the process approach to resource management by creation of system for the account and the functional controlling, risk analysis and regulation of technological safety in production facilities of the enterprises. Realization of the principles of process approach to management of technological safety at the object level is directed to perfecting of tools and methods of anticorrosive protection, extension of a resource taking into account indexes of survivability (, and justification of program measures to ensure the reliability of enterprises(PER. Practical value. On the basis of process approach to quality and reliability management, generalizations of the

  14. A study of laser surface treatment in bonded repair of composite aircraft structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaolong; Sun, Ting; Liu, Chang; Yang, Wenfeng; Tang, Qingru

    2018-03-01

    Surface pre-treatment is one of the key processes in bonded repair of aircraft carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites. This paper investigates the surface modification of physical and chemical properties by laser ablation and conventional polish treatment techniques. Surface morphology analysed by laser scanning confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that a laser-treated surface displayed higher roughness than that of a polish-treated specimen. The laser-treated laminate exhibited more functional groups in the form of O 1 s/C 1 s atomic ratio of 30.89% for laser-treated and 20.14% for polish-treated as evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy observation. Contact angle goniometry demonstrated that laser treatment can provide increased surface free energy and wettability. In the light of mechanical interlocking, molecular bonding and thermodynamics theories on adhesion, laser etching process displayed enhanced bonding performance relative to the polishing surface treatment. These properties resulted in an increased single lap shear strength and a cohesive failure mode for laser etching while an adhesive failure mode occurred in polish-treated specimen.

  15. Dislocation and Structural Studies at Metal-Metallic Glass Interface at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pradeep; Yedla, Natraj

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation deformation studies on the Al (metal)-Cu50Zr50 (metallic glass) model interface is carried out based on cohesive zone model. The interface is subjected to mode-I loading at a strain rate of 109 s-1 and temperature of 100 K. The dislocations reactions and evolution of dislocation densities during the deformation have been investigated. Atomic interactions between Al, Cu and Zr atoms are modeled using EAM (embedded atom method) potential, and a timestep of 0.002 ps is used for performing the MD simulations. A circular crack and rectangular notch are introduced at the interface to investigate the effect on the deformation behavior and fracture. Further, scale size effect is also investigated. The structural changes and evolution of dislocation density are also examined. It is found that the dominant deformation mechanism is by Shockley partial dislocation nucleation. Amorphization is observed in the Al regions close to the interface and occurs at a lower strain in the presence of a crack. The total dislocation density is found to be maximum after the first yield in both the perfect and defect interface models and is highest in the case of perfect interface with a density of 6.31 × 1017 m-2. In the perfect and circular crack defect interface models, it is observed that the fraction of Shockley partial dislocation density decreases, whereas that of strain rod dislocations increases with increase in strain.

  16. Friction Stir Welding of Metal Matrix Composites for use in aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Tracie

    2014-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively nascent solid state joining technique developed at The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991. The process was first used at NASA to weld the super lightweight external tank for the Space Shuttle. Today FSW is used to join structural components of the Delta IV, Atlas V, and Falcon IX rockets as well as the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle. A current focus of FSW research is to extend the process to new materials which are difficult to weld using conventional fusion techniques. Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) consist of a metal alloy reinforced with ceramics and have a very high strength to weight ratio, a property which makes them attractive for use in aerospace and defense applications. MMCs have found use in the space shuttle orbiter's structural tubing, the Hubble Space Telescope's antenna mast, control surfaces and propulsion systems for aircraft, and tank armors. The size of MMC components is severely limited by difficulties encountered in joining these materials using fusion welding. Melting of the material results in formation of an undesirable phase (formed when molten Aluminum reacts with the reinforcement) which leaves a strength depleted region along the joint line. Since FSW occurs below the melting point of the workpiece material, this deleterious phase is absent in FSW-ed MMC joints. FSW of MMCs is, however, plagued by rapid wear of the welding tool, a consequence of the large discrepancy in hardness between the steel tool and the reinforcement material. This work characterizes the effect of process parameters (spindle speed, traverse rate, and length of joint) on the wear process. Based on the results of these experiments, a phenomenological model of the wear process was constructed based on the rotating plug model for FSW. The effectiveness of harder tool materials (such as Tungsten Carbide, high speed steel, and tools with diamond coatings) to combat abrasive wear is explored. In-process force, torque, and

  17. Evaluation on the structural soundness of the transport package for low-level radioactive waste for subsurface disposal against aircraft impact by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Chihiro

    2009-01-01

    The structural analysis of aircraft crush on the transport package for low-level radioactive waste was performed using the impact force which was already used for the evaluation of the high-level waste transport package by LSDYNA code. The transport package was deformed, and stresses due to the crush exceeded elastic range. However, plastic strains yieled in the package were far than the elongation of the materials and the body of the package did not contact the disposal packages due to the deformation of the package. Therefore, it was confirmed that the package keeps its integrity against aircraft crush. (author)

  18. Electronic states of semiconductor-metal-semiconductor quantum-well structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberman, M. L.; Maserjian, J.

    1988-01-01

    Quantum-size effects are calculated in thin layered semiconductor-metal-semiconductor structures using an ideal free-electron model for the metal layer. The results suggest new quantum-well structures having device applications. Structures with sufficiently high-quality interfaces should exhibit effects such as negative differential resistance due to tunneling between allowed states. Similarly, optical detection by intersubband absorption may be possible. Ultrathin metal layers are predicted to behave as high-density dopant sheets.

  19. Distributed, Passivity-Based, Aeroservoelastic Control (DPASC) of Structurally Efficient Aircraft in the Presence of Gusts, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Control of extremely lightweight, long endurance aircraft poses a challenging aeroservoelastic (ASE) problem due to significantly increased flexibility, and...

  20. Distributed, Passivity-Based, Aeroservoelastic Control (DPASC) of Structurally Efficient Aircraft in the Presence of Gusts, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Control of extremely lightweight, long endurance aircraft poses a challenging aeroservoelastic (ASE) problem due to significantly increased flexibility, and...

  1. 75 FR 11799 - Fatigue Tolerance Evaluation of Metallic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... civil and military transport aircraft applications. These advances in design, analytical methods, and... cannot be achieved within the limitations of geometry, inspectability, or good design practice. Amendment... achievable within the limitations of geometry, inspectability, or good design practice. Within the context of...

  2. A tabu search evalutionary algorithm for multiobjective optimization: Application to a bi-criterion aircraft structural reliability problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kim Chenming

    Real-world engineering optimization problems often require the consideration of multiple conflicting and noncommensurate objectives, subject to nonconvex constraint regions in a high-dimensional decision space. Further challenges occur for combinatorial multiobjective problems in which the decision variables are not continuous. Traditional multiobjective optimization methods of operations research, such as weighting and epsilon constraint methods, are ill-suited to solving these complex, multiobjective problems. This has given rise to the application of a wide range of metaheuristic optimization algorithms, such as evolutionary, particle swarm, simulated annealing, and ant colony methods, to multiobjective optimization. Several multiobjective evolutionary algorithms have been developed, including the strength Pareto evolutionary algorithm (SPEA) and the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA), for determining the Pareto-optimal set of non-dominated solutions. Although numerous researchers have developed a wide range of multiobjective optimization algorithms, there is a continuing need to construct computationally efficient algorithms with an improved ability to converge to globally non-dominated solutions along the Pareto-optimal front for complex, large-scale, multiobjective engineering optimization problems. This is particularly important when the multiple objective functions and constraints of the real-world system cannot be expressed in explicit mathematical representations. This research presents a novel metaheuristic evolutionary algorithm for complex multiobjective optimization problems, which combines the metaheuristic tabu search algorithm with the evolutionary algorithm (TSEA), as embodied in genetic algorithms. TSEA is successfully applied to bicriteria (i.e., structural reliability and retrofit cost) optimization of the aircraft tail structure fatigue life, which increases its reliability by prolonging fatigue life. A comparison for this

  3. (Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

  4. Impact imaging of aircraft composite structure based on a model-independent spatial-wavenumber filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Liu, Bin; Yuan, Shenfang; Su, Zhongqing

    2016-01-01

    The spatial-wavenumber filtering technique is an effective approach to distinguish the propagating direction and wave mode of Lamb wave in spatial-wavenumber domain. Therefore, it has been gradually studied for damage evaluation in recent years. But for on-line impact monitoring in practical application, the main problem is how to realize the spatial-wavenumber filtering of impact signal when the wavenumber of high spatial resolution cannot be measured or the accurate wavenumber curve cannot be modeled. In this paper, a new model-independent spatial-wavenumber filter based impact imaging method is proposed. In this method, a 2D cross-shaped array constructed by two linear piezoelectric (PZT) sensor arrays is used to acquire impact signal on-line. The continuous complex Shannon wavelet transform is adopted to extract the frequency narrowband signals from the frequency wideband impact response signals of the PZT sensors. A model-independent spatial-wavenumber filter is designed based on the spatial-wavenumber filtering technique. Based on the designed filter, a wavenumber searching and best match mechanism is proposed to implement the spatial-wavenumber filtering of the frequency narrowband signals without modeling, which can be used to obtain a wavenumber-time image of the impact relative to a linear PZT sensor array. By using the two wavenumber-time images of the 2D cross-shaped array, the impact direction can be estimated without blind angle. The impact distance relative to the 2D cross-shaped array can be calculated by using the difference of time-of-flight between the frequency narrowband signals of two different central frequencies and the corresponding group velocities. The validations performed on a carbon fiber composite laminate plate and an aircraft composite oil tank show a good impact localization accuracy of the model-independent spatial-wavenumber filter based impact imaging method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The 1s x-ray absorption pre-edge structures in transition metal oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Frank|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08747610X; Vanko, Gyoergy; Glatzel, Pieter

    2009-01-01

    We develop a general procedure to analyse the pre-edges in 1s x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) of transition metal oxides and coordination complexes. Transition metal coordination complexes can be described from a local model with one metal ion. The 1s 3d quadrupole transitions are

  6. Structural studies on metal-containing enzymes: T4 endonuclease VII and D. gigas formate dehydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, H.C.A.

    2001-01-01

    Many biological processes require metal ions, and many of these metal-ion functions involve metalloproteins. The metal ions in metalloproteins are often critical to the protein's function, structure, or stability. This thesis focuses on two of these proteins, bacteriophage T4 endonuclease

  7. Inventions in nanotechnological field provide increased strength and life span of the metal, composite and polymer, metallopolymer structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLASOV Vladimir Alexeevich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The invention «The method of dispersion of nanoparticles in epoxy resin (RU 2500706» refers to nanotechnological field and it can be applied in different areas of machine industry, transport, construction, power engineering to increase strength and life span of the structures made of metal, composite and polymer, metallopolymer materials, for glue and glue and mechanical joints in different structure elements as well as for compositions which strengthen the stress concentration zones (in the form of holes, cutouts, fillet, thickness differentials in structures, to reform defects, microcracks and other damages occurring in production and performance of structures, to eliminate and encapsulate the gaps in holes and meeting-points of bolted and riveted joints. The invention «The method to produce nanosuspension for manufacturing polymer nanocomposite (RU 2500695» refers to the area of production of polymer nanocomposites based on reactiveplastic binder for space, aircraft, construction and other types of structures (glass-fiber plastic, carbon reinforced plastic, organic plastic, etc.. The method includes preparation of nanosuspension by introducing carbon nanotubes into reactiveplastic binder under ultrasonic treatment with intensity cavity zone 15–25 kW/m². The method makes it possible to optimize the degree of dispersion of carbon nanotubes in binder and to shorten production time of nanocomposites possessing increased strength due to even distribution of nanoparticles in nanocomposite.

  8. Aircraft Fire Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    fabrics of seats, carpets, drapes, lap robes, and sound deadening insulation. Also of concern are the polymeric based plastics used in interior walls...intumescent paints and foams is considered to be feasible; cabin transparencies with improved fire resistance and structure integrity over thermoformed...aircraft fire safety as well as provide a sound basis for further : long-term imp-ovem nts in new aircraft. REFERENCES 1. Final Report of the Special

  9. Grain Structure Control of Additively Manufactured Metallic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyao Yan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Grain structure control is challenging for metal additive manufacturing (AM. Grain structure optimization requires the control of grain morphology with grain size refinement, which can improve the mechanical properties of additive manufactured components. This work summarizes methods to promote fine equiaxed grains in both the additive manufacturing process and subsequent heat treatment. Influences of temperature gradient, solidification velocity and alloy composition on grain morphology are discussed. Equiaxed solidification is greatly promoted by introducing a high density of heterogeneous nucleation sites via powder rate control in the direct energy deposition (DED technique or powder surface treatment for powder-bed techniques. Grain growth/coarsening during post-processing heat treatment can be restricted by presence of nano-scale oxide particles formed in-situ during AM. Grain refinement of martensitic steels can also be achieved by cyclic austenitizing in post-processing heat treatment. Evidently, new alloy powder design is another sustainable method enhancing the capability of AM for high-performance components with desirable microstructures.

  10. Effective carrier sweepout in a silicon waveguide by a metal-semiconductor-metal structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yunhong; Hu, Hao; Ou, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate effective carrier depletion by metal-semiconductor-metal junctions for a silicon waveguide. Photo-generated carriers are efficiently swept out by applying bias voltages, and a shortest carrier lifetime of only 55 ps is demonstrated.......We demonstrate effective carrier depletion by metal-semiconductor-metal junctions for a silicon waveguide. Photo-generated carriers are efficiently swept out by applying bias voltages, and a shortest carrier lifetime of only 55 ps is demonstrated....

  11. Amorphous metal formulations and structured coatings for corrosion and wear resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA

    2011-12-13

    A system for coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements and applying the amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements to the surface by a spray. Also a coating comprising a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements. An apparatus for producing a corrosion-resistant amorphous-metal coating on a structure comprises a deposition chamber, a deposition source in the deposition chamber that produces a deposition spray, the deposition source containing a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains more than 11 elements, and a system that directs the deposition spray onto the structure.

  12. Charge transport properties of metal/metal-phthalocyanine/n-Si structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Afzal

    2010-12-16

    In present work the charge transport properties of metal/metal-phthalocyanine/n-Si structures with low (N{sub D} = 4 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}), medium (N{sub D}=1 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}) and high (N{sub D}=2 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}) doped n-Si as injecting electrode and the effect of air exposure of the vacuum evaporated metal-phthalocyanine film in these structures is investigated. The results obtained through temperature dependent electrical characterizations of the structures suggest that in terms of dominant conduction mechanism in the corresponding devices Schottky-type conduction mechanism dominates the charge transport in low-bias region of these devices up to 0.8 V, 0.302 V and 0.15 V in case of low, medium and high doped n-Silicon devices. For higher voltages, in each case of devices, the space-charge-limited conduction, controlled by exponential trap distribution, is found to dominate the charge transport properties of the devices. The interface density of states at the CuPc/n-Si interface of the devices are found to be lower in case of lower work function difference at the CuPc/n-Si interface of the devices. The results also suggest that the work function difference at the CuPc/n-Si interface of these devices causes charge transfer at the interface and these phenomena results in formation of interface dipole. The width of the Schottky depletion region at the CuPc/n-Si interface of these devices is found to be higher with higher work function difference at the interface. The investigation of charge transport properties of Al/ZnPc/medium n-Si and Au/ZnPc/ medium n-Si devices suggest that the Schottky depletion region formed at the ZnPc/n-Si interface of these devices determines the charge transport in the low-bias region of both the devices. Therefore, the Schottky-type (injection limited) and the space-charge-limited (bulk limited) conduction are observed in the low and the high bias regions of these devices, respectively. The determined width of the

  13. Nonlinear Aerodynamics-Structure Time Simulation for HALE Aircraft Design/Analysis, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Time simulation of a nonlinear aerodynamics model (NA) developed at Virginia Tech coupled with a nonlinear structure model (NS) is proposed as a design/analysis...

  14. Cradle-to-Grave Monitoring of Composite Aircraft Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NextGen is proposing a simple yet powerful damage identification technique for advanced composite structures. We propose to develop a damage index based on vibration...

  15. Innovative Structural and Material Concepts for Low-Weight Low-Drag Aircraft Design, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of this multi-phase project is to explore, develop, integrate, and test several innovative structural design concepts and new material...

  16. Planar heterostructures of single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides: Composite structures, Schottky junctions, tunneling barriers, and half metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Mehmet; Kılıç, ćetin; Ciraci, S.

    2017-02-01

    Planar composite structures formed from the stripes of transition metal dichalcogenides joined commensurately along their zigzag or armchair edges can attain different states in a two-dimensional (2D), single-layer, such as a half metal, 2D or one-dimensional (1D) nonmagnetic metal and semiconductor. Widening of stripes induces metal-insulator transition through the confinements of electronic states to adjacent stripes, that results in the metal-semiconductor junction with a well-defined band lineup. Linear bending of the band edges of the semiconductor to form a Schottky barrier at the boundary between the metal and semiconductor is revealed. Unexpectedly, strictly 1D metallic states develop in a 2D system along the boundaries between stripes, which pins the Fermi level. Through the δ doping of a narrow metallic stripe one attains a nanowire in the 2D semiconducting sheet or narrow band semiconductor. A diverse combination of constituent stripes in either periodically repeating or finite-size heterostructures can acquire critical fundamental features and offer device capacities, such as Schottky junctions, nanocapacitors, resonant tunneling double barriers, and spin valves. These predictions are obtained from first-principles calculations performed in the framework of density functional theory.

  17. Making structured metals transparent for ultrabroadband electromagnetic waves and acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Ren-Hao; Peng, Ru-Wen; Huang, Xian-Rong; Wang, Mu

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we present our recent work on making structured metals transparent for broadband electromagnetic waves and acoustic waves via excitation of surface waves. First, we theoretically show that one-dimensional metallic gratings can become transparent and completely antireflective for extremely broadband electromagnetic waves by relying on surface plasmons or spoof surface plasmons. Second, we experimentally demonstrate that metallic gratings with narrow slits are highly transparent for broadband terahertz waves at oblique incidence and high transmission efficiency is insensitive to the metal thickness. Further, we significantly develop oblique metal gratings transparent for broadband electromagnetic waves (including optical waves and terahertz ones) under normal incidence. In the third, we find the principles of broadband transparency for structured metals can be extended from one-dimensional metallic gratings to two-dimensional cases. Moreover, similar phenomena are found in sonic artificially metallic structures, which present the transparency for broadband acoustic waves. These investigations provide guidelines to develop many novel materials and devices, such as transparent conducting panels, antireflective solar cells, and other broadband metamaterials and stealth technologies. - Highlights: • Making structured metals transparent for ultrabroadband electromagnetic waves. • Non-resonant excitation of surface plasmons or spoof surface plasmons. • Sonic artificially metallic structures transparent for broadband acoustic waves

  18. Evaluating nanoscale ultra-thin metal films by means of lateral photovoltaic effect in metal-semiconductor structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Diyuan; Yu, Chongqi; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Hui

    2017-12-15

    Nanoscale metal-semiconductor (MS) structure materials occupy an important position in semiconductor and microelectronic field due to their abundant physical phenomena and effects. The thickness of metal films is a critical factor in determining characteristics of MS devices. How to detect or evaluate the metal thickness is always a key issue for realizing high performance MS devices. In this work, we propose a direct surface detection by use of the lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) in MS structure, which can not only measure nanoscale thickness, but also detect the fluctuation of metal films. This method is based on the fact that the output of lateral photovoltaic voltage (LPV) is closely linked with the metal thickness at the laser spot. We believe this laser-based contact-free detection is a useful supplement to the traditional methods, such as AFM, SEM, TEM or step profiler. This is because these traditional methods are always incapable of directly detecting ultra-thin metal films in MS structure materials.

  19. Structural Diagnostics of CFRP Composite Aircraft Components by Ultrasonic Guided Waves and Built-In Piezoelectric Transducers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matt, Howard M. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    To monitor in-flight damage and reduce life-cycle costs associated with CFRP composite aircraft, an autonomous built-in structural health monitoring (SHM) system is preferred over conventional maintenance routines and schedules. This thesis investigates the use of ultrasonic guided waves and piezoelectric transducers for the identification and localization of damage/defects occurring within critical components of CFRP composite aircraft wings, mainly the wing skin-to-spar joints. The guided wave approach for structural diagnostics was demonstrated by the dual application of active and passive monitoring techniques. For active interrogation, the guided wave propagation problem was initially studied numerically by a semi-analytical finite element method, which accounts for viscoelastic damping, in order to identify ideal mode-frequency combinations sensitive to damage occurring within CFRP bonded joints. Active guided wave tests across three representative wing skin-to-spar joints at ambient temperature were then conducted using attached Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) transducers. Results from these experiments demonstrate the importance of intelligent feature extraction for improving the sensitivity to damage. To address the widely neglected effects of temperature on guided wave base damage identification, analytical and experimental analyses were performed to characterize the influence of temperature on guided wave signal features. In addition, statistically-robust detection of simulated damage in a CFRP bonded joint was successfully achieved under changing temperature conditions through a dimensionally-low, multivariate statistical outlier analysis. The response of piezoceramic patches and MFC transducers to ultrasonic Rayleigh and Lamb wave fields was analytically derived and experimentally validated. This theory is useful for designing sensors which possess optimal sensitivity toward a given mode-frequency combination or for predicting the frequency dependent

  20. Micro Structure and Hardness Analysis of Brass Metal Welded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukman Faris, N.; Muljadi; Djuhana

    2018-01-01

    Brass metals are widely used for plumbing fittings. High tensile brasses are more highly alloyed and find uses in marine engineering. The welding of brass metal has been done by using electrical weld machine (SMAW). The microstructure of brass metal welded was observed by optical microscope. The result can see that the microstructure has been changed due to heat from welding. The microstructure of original brass metal is seen a fine laminar stucture, but the microstructure at HAZ appears bigger grains and some area at HAZ is seen coarser microstructure. The microstructure at weld zone can be seen that it was found some of agglomeration of materials from reaction between brass metal and electrode coating wire. According the hardness measurement, it is found highest hardness value about 301.92 HV at weld zone, and hardness value at base metal is 177.84 HV

  1. High pressure metallization of Mott Insulators: Magnetic, structural and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasternak, M.P.; Hearne, G.; Sterer, E.; Taylor, R.D.; Jeanloz, R.

    1993-01-01

    High pressure studies of the insulator-metal transition in the (TM)I 2 (TM = V, Fe, Co and Ni) compounds are described. Those divalent transition-metal iodides are structurally isomorphous and classified as Mott Insulators. Resistivity, X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy were employed to investigate the electronic, structural, and magnetic properties as a function of pressure both on the highly correlated and on the metallic regimes

  2. Intracluster atomic and electronic structural heterogeneities in supported nanoscale metal catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsen, A.; Jung, U.; Vila, F.; Li, Y.; Safonova, O.V.; Thomas, R.; Tromp, M.; Rehr, J.J.; Nuzzo, R.G.; Frenkel, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    This work reveals and quantifies the inherent intracluster heterogeneity in the atomic structure and charge distribution present in supported metal catalysts. The results demonstrate that these distributions are pronounced and strongly coupled to both structural and dynamic perturbations. They also

  3. Crystal-Structure Contribution to the Solid Solubility in Transition Metal Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1998-01-01

    The solution energies of 4d metals in other 4d metals as well as the bcc-hcp structural energy differences in random 4d alloys are calculated by density functional theory. It is shown that the crystal structure of the host plays a crucial role in the solid solubility. A local virtual bond...

  4. The Aircraft Morphing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlezien, R. W.; Horner, G. C.; McGowan, A. R.; Padula, S. L.; Scott, M. A.; Silcox, R. J.; Simpson, J. O.

    1998-01-01

    In the last decade smart technologies have become enablers that cut across traditional boundaries in materials science and engineering. Here we define smart to mean embedded actuation, sensing, and control logic in a tightly coupled feedback loop. While multiple successes have been achieved in the laboratory, we have yet to see the general applicability of smart devices to real aircraft systems. The NASA Aircraft Morphing program is an attempt to couple research across a wide range of disciplines to integrate smart technologies into high payoff aircraft applications. The program bridges research in seven individual disciplines and combines the effort into activities in three primary program thrusts. System studies are used to assess the highest- payoff program objectives, and specific research activities are defined to address the technologies required for development of smart aircraft systems. In this paper we address the overall program goals and programmatic structure, and discuss the challenges associated with bringing the technologies to fruition.

  5. Essentials of aircraft armaments

    CERN Document Server

    Kaushik, Mrinal

    2017-01-01

    This book aims to provide a complete exposure about armaments from their design to launch from the combat aircraft. The book details modern ammunition and their tactical roles in warfare. The proposed book discusses aerodynamics, propulsion, structural as well as navigation, control, and guidance of aircraft armament. It also introduces the various types of ammunition developed by different countries and their changing trends. The book imparts knowledge in the field of design, and development of aircraft armaments to aerospace engineers and covers the role of the United Nations in peacekeeping and disarmament. The book will be very useful to researchers, students, and professionals working in design and manufacturing of aircraft armaments. The book will also serve air force and naval aspirants, and those interested in working on defence research and developments organizations. .

  6. Innovative fabrication processing of advanced composite materials concepts for primary aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassapoglou, Christos; Dinicola, Al J.; Chou, Jack C.

    1992-01-01

    The autoclave based THERM-X(sub R) process was evaluated by cocuring complex curved panels with frames and stiffeners. The process was shown to result in composite parts of high quality with good compaction at sharp radius regions and corners of intersecting parts. The structural properties of the postbuckled panels fabricated were found to be equivalent to those of conventionally tooled hand laid-up parts. Significant savings in bagging time over conventional tooling were documented. Structural details such as cocured shear ties and embedded stiffener flanges in the skin were found to suppress failure modes such as failure at corners of intersecting members and skin stiffeners separation.

  7. Nondestructive inspection of bonded composite doublers for aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Dennis P.; Moore, David; Walkington, Phillip D.

    1996-11-01

    One of the major thrusts established under the FAA's National Aging Aircraft Research Program is to foster new technologies associated with civil aircraft maintenance. Recent DOD and other government developments in the use of bonded composite doublers on metal structures has supported the need for research and validation of such doubler applications on US certificated airplanes. Composite doubler technology is rapidly maturing and shows promise of cost savings on aging aircraft. While there have been numerous studies and military aircraft installations of composite doublers, the technology has not been certified for use on commercial aircraft. Before the use of composite doublers can be accepted by the civil aviation industry, it is imperative that methods be developed which can quickly and reliably assess the integrity of the doubler. In this study, a specific composite application was chosen on an L-1011 aircraft in order to focus the tasks on application and operation issues. Primary among inspection requirements for these doublers is the identification of disbonds, between the composite laminate and aluminum parent material, and delaminations in the composite laminate. Surveillance of cracks or corrosion in the inspection (NDI) method can inspect for every flaw type, therefore it is important to be aware of available NDI techniques and to properly address their capabilities and limitations. This paper reports on a series of NDI tests which have been conducted on laboratory test structures and on a fuselage section cut from a retired L-1011 aircraft. Specific challenges, unique to bonded composite doubler applications, will be highlighted. In order to quickly integrate this technology into existing aircraft maintenance depots, the use of conventional NDI, ultrasonics, x-ray, and eddy current, is stressed. The application of these NDI technique to composite doublers and the results from test specimens, which were loaded to provide a changing flaw profile, are

  8. Aircraft interior noise prediction using a structural-acoustic analogy in NASTRAN modal synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Marulo, Francesco

    1988-01-01

    The noise induced inside a cylindrical fuselage model by shaker excitation is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The NASTRAN modal-synthesis program is used in the theoretical analysis, and the predictions are compared with experimental measurements in extensive graphs. Good general agreement is obtained, but the need for further refinements to account for acoustic-cavity damping and structural-acoustic interaction is indicated.

  9. Beyond Rigid Body: Integrated Structural Control of Extremely Lightweight Flexible Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Integrated structural control of extremely lightweight vehicles will open a new paradigm and allow for performance increases. The X-56A Multi-Utility Technology Testbed (MUTT) vehicle will be used to evaluate and advance the state-of-the-art in modeling and control of this new class of aerospace vehicle.

  10. MetalionRNA: computational predictor of metal-binding sites in RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Anna; Milanowska, Kaja; Lach, Grzegorz; Boniecki, Michal; Rother, Kristian; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2012-01-15

    Metal ions are essential for the folding of RNA molecules into stable tertiary structures and are often involved in the catalytic activity of ribozymes. However, the positions of metal ions in RNA 3D structures are difficult to determine experimentally. This motivated us to develop a computational predictor of metal ion sites for RNA structures. We developed a statistical potential for predicting positions of metal ions (magnesium, sodium and potassium), based on the analysis of binding sites in experimentally solved RNA structures. The MetalionRNA program is available as a web server that predicts metal ions for RNA structures submitted by the user. The MetalionRNA web server is accessible at http://metalionrna.genesilico.pl/.

  11. Relationship between the electronic structure and the glide in the hexagonal close packed metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, B.; Le Hazif, R.

    1983-06-01

    In all hexagonal close-packed metals (HCP), deformation is performed by slip on a mean glide system (MGS) and on several secondary systems. There are no reliable predictions of the MGS choice. In this paper is shown the role played by the electronic structure on the choice of glide system in HCP metals. MGS is basal for all normal metals and is a function of the electron number in HCP transition metals. The different SFE's were calculated using appropriate total energy models, for different metals. Thus pseudopotentials were used (or empirical pair potentials) for normal metals, and a tight-binding model for transition metals. The most important results are the following: prismatic SFE (PSFE) is smaller than basal SFE (BSFE) for Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, Ru and Os; BSFE is smaller than PSFE for Co and all normal metals; BSFE and PSFe and about the same for RE and Tc

  12. Understanding Metallic Bonding: Structure, Process and Interaction by Rasch Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Oon, Pey-Tee

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of 3006 Year 10-12 students on their understandings of metallic bonding. The instrument was developed based on Chi's ontological categories of scientific concepts and students' understanding of metallic bonding as reported in the literature. The instrument has two parts. Part one probed into students'…

  13. In Situ Guided Wave Structural Health Monitoring System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Corrosion and fatigue induced metal-loss and cracks are common problems for missiles and aircraft structures. A wide range of field conditions such as humidity,...

  14. Investigation on the static and dynamic structural behaviors of a regional aircraft main landing gear by a new numerical methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Caputo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new methodology supporting the design of landing gears is proposed. Generally, a preliminary step is performed with simplified FE model, usually one-dimensional, to achieve the reaction forces involving each component during all aforementioned aircraft operations. Though this approach gives a valid support to the designer, it is characterized by several problems, such as the related approximations. So, it is important, by a numerical point of view, to develop an isostatic FE model equivalent to the real one. In fact, if the landing gear is modelled as hyperstatic, the static equilibrium equations are insufficient for determining the internal forces and reactions on each sub-component; so, the modelled material properties and geometries assume an increasing importance, which gets the model too approximating. The proposed methodology consists of achieving the reaction forces by means of multibody simulations, by overcoming such problems, since each component is modelled as rigid. In this paper, also a FE model for the investigation of the structural response is proposed. Aimed to Certification by Analysis purposes, the developed multibody and the FE models have been assessed against an experimental landing gear drop test carried out by Magnaghi Aeronautica S.p.A., according to the EASA CS 25 regulations

  15. A Structural Weight Estimation Program (SWEEP) for Aircraft. Volume 1 - Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    Figure 3. Column general stability, lc;nl web, flange, and sheet crippling requirements are analyzed within specified constraints so that strength and...checked include: 1. Two-point level: a. Maximum vertical load b. Spin-up c. Springback 2. Drift landing 3. Braked roll 4. Unsymmetrical braking...structural mathematical model of the method assumes a spanwise box beam lying along the elastic axis of an aerodynamic surface. The beam is divided into

  16. Characterization and manufacture of braided composites for large commercial aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedro, Mark J.; Willden, Kurtis

    1992-01-01

    Braided composite materials, one of the advanced material forms which is under investigation in Boeing's ATCAS program, have been recognized as a potential cost-effective material form for fuselage structural elements. Consequently, there is a strong need for more knowledge in the design, manufacture, test, and analysis of textile structural composites. The overall objective of this work is to advance braided composite technology towards applications to a large commercial transport fuselage. This paper summarizes the mechanics of materials and manufacturing demonstration results which have been obtained in order to acquire an understanding of how braided composites can be applied to a commercial fuselage. Textile composites consisting of 1D, 2D triaxial, and 3D braid patterns with thermoplastic and two RTM resin systems were investigated. The structural performance of braided composites was evaluated through an extensive mechanical test program. Analytical methods were also developed and applied to predict the following: internal fiber architectures, stiffnesses, fiber stresses, failure mechanisms, notch effects, and the entire history of failure of the braided composites specimens. The applicability of braided composites to a commercial transport fuselage was further assessed through a manufacturing demonstration. Three foot fuselage circumferential hoop frames were manufactured to demonstrate the feasibility of consistently producing high quality braided/RTM composite primary structures. The manufacturing issues (tooling requirements, processing requirements, and process/quality control) addressed during the demonstration are summarized. The manufacturing demonstration in conjunction with the mechanical test results and developed analytical methods increased the confidence in the ATCAS approach to the design, manufacture, test, and analysis of braided composites.

  17. The synthesis and structural characterization of novel transition metal fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casteel, Jr., William Jack [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-09-01

    High purity KMF6 and K2MF6 salts (M = Mo,Re, Ru, Os, Ir, Pt) are obtained from reduction hexafluorides. A rhombohedral unit cell is observed for KReF6. Fluoride ion capture by Lewis acids from the hexafluorometallate (IV) salts affords high purity tetrafluorides for M = Mo, Re, Ru, Os, and Pd. The structure of RuF4 is determined from X-ray synchrotron and neutron powder data. Unit cells based on theorthorhombic PdF4 type cell are derived from X-ray powder data for ReF4 and OsF4. Fluoride ion capture from KAgF4 provides the thermally unstable trifluoride as a bright, red, diamagnetic solid. The structure solution of AgF3 and redetermination of the AuF3 structure from X-ray synchrotron and neutron powder data demonstrate that the two are isostnictural. Thermal decomposition product of AgF3 is the mixed valence compound AgIIAg2IIIF8. Several new salts containing the (Ag - F)$n+\\atop{n}$ chain cation are prepared. The first linear (Ag - F)$n+\\atop{n}$ chain is observed in AgF+BF4- which crystallizes in a tetragonal unit. AgFAuF4 has a triclinic unit cell and is isostructural with CuFAuF4. AgFAuF6 has an orthorhombic unit cell and appears to be isostructural with AgFAsF6. A second mixed valence silver fluoride, AgIIAgIIIF5, is prepared, which magnetic measurements indicate is probably an AgF+ salt. Magnetic data for all of the AgF+ salts exhibit low magnitude, temperature independent paramagnetism characteristic of metallic systems. Cationic AG(II) in acidic AHF solutions is a powerful oxidizer, capable of oxidizing Xe to Xe(II) and O2 to O2+. Reactions with C6F6 and C3F6 suggest an electron capture

  18. Development of a Probabilistic Safety Assessment Framework for an Interim Dry Storage Facility Subjected to an Aircraft Crash Using Best-Estimate Structural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belal Almomani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Using a probabilistic safety assessment, a risk evaluation framework for an aircraft crash into an interim spent fuel storage facility is presented. Damage evaluation of a detailed generic cask model in a simplified building structure under an aircraft impact is discussed through a numerical structural analysis and an analytical fragility assessment. Sequences of the impact scenario are shown in a developed event tree, with uncertainties considered in the impact analysis and failure probabilities calculated. To evaluate the influence of parameters relevant to design safety, risks are estimated for three specification levels of cask and storage facility structures. The proposed assessment procedure includes the determination of the loading parameters, reference impact scenario, structural response analyses of facility walls, cask containment, and fuel assemblies, and a radiological consequence analysis with dose–risk estimation. The risk results for the proposed scenario in this study are expected to be small relative to those of design basis accidents for best-estimated conservative values. The importance of this framework is seen in its flexibility to evaluate the capability of the facility to withstand an aircraft impact and in its ability to anticipate potential realistic risks; the framework also provides insight into epistemic uncertainty in the available data and into the sensitivity of the design parameters for future research.

  19. Development of a probabilistic safety assessment framework for an interim dry storage facility subjected to an aircraft crash using best-estimate structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almomani, Belal; Jang, Dong Chan; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kang, Hyun Gook

    2017-01-01

    Using a probabilistic safety assessment, a risk evaluation framework for an aircraft crash into an interim spent fuel storage facility is presented. Damage evaluation of a detailed generic cask model in a simplified building structure under an aircraft impact is discussed through a numerical structural analysis and an analytical fragility assessment. Sequences of the impact scenario are shown in a developed event tree, with uncertainties considered in the impact analysis and failure probabilities calculated. To evaluate the influence of parameters relevant to design safety, risks are estimated for three specification levels of cask and storage facility structures. The proposed assessment procedure includes the determination of the loading parameters, reference impact scenario, structural response analyses of facility walls, cask containment, and fuel assemblies, and a radiological consequence analysis with dose–risk estimation. The risk results for the proposed scenario in this study are expected to be small relative to those of design basis accidents for best-estimated conservative values. The importance of this framework is seen in its flexibility to evaluate the capability of the facility to withstand an aircraft impact and in its ability to anticipate potential realistic risks; the framework also provides insight into epistemic uncertainty in the available data and into the sensitivity of the design parameters for future research

  20. Multilevel probabilistic approach to evaluate manufacturing defect in composite aircraft structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caracciolo, Paola, E-mail: paola.caracciolo@airbus.com [AIRBUS INDUSTRIES Germany, Department of Airframe Architecture and Integration-Research and Technology-Kreetslag, 10, D-21129, Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    In this work it is developed a reliable approach and its feasibility to the design and analysis of a composite structures. The metric is compared the robustness and reliability designs versus the traditional design, to demonstrate the gain that can be achieved with a probabilistic approach. The use of the stochastic approach of the uncertain parameteters in combination with the multi-scale levels analysis is the main objective of this paper. The work is dedicated to analyze the uncertainties in the design, tests, manufacturing process, and key gates such as materials characteristic.

  1. Structural and Electrochemical Characterization of Lithium Transition Metal Phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashambhoy, Ayesha Maria

    The lithium ion battery has emerged as one of the most promising hybrid vehicle energy storage systems of the future. Of the potential cathode chemistries explored, lithium transition metal phosphates have generated a significant amount of interest due to their low-cost precursors, potential ease of synthesis, stability, and their environmentally friendly nature. This is in contrast to layered oxide systems such as LiCoO2, which have long been considered state of the art, but are now being reevaluated due to their structural instability at elevated temperatures, and higher cost. In particular, LiFePO4 has an operating potential comparable to those batteries available on the market (˜3.5V vs. Li/Li+), and higher theoretical specific capacity (170mAh/g vs. that of LiCoO2 which is 140mAh/g). The manganese analog to LiFePO4, LiMnPO4, exhibits a higher operating potential (˜4.1V v Li/Li+), and the same theoretical capacity, however Li-ion diffusion through this structure is much more rate limited and its theoretical capacity cannot be realized at rates suitable for commercial applications. The purpose of this work was threefold: 1) To explore the impact of Fe substitution on Mn sites in LiMnPO 4. 2) To examine the effects of alterations to the particle/electrolyte interface on rate capability. 3) To explore a novel fabrication route for LiMnPO4 using microwaves, and determine an optimal power and time combination for best performance. The coexistence of Fe and Mn on the transition metal site M, of LiMPO 4 resulted in an improved apparent Li-ion diffusivity in both Fe and Mn regimes as compared to that observed for LiFePO4 and LiMnPO 4 respectively. Calculations made from two different analysis methods, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic intermittent titration (GITT) drew this same conclusion. The signature characteristics observed from the CVs pertaining to single and dual phase reactions led to a delithiation model of LiFe0.5Mn0.5PO4 proposing the localization

  2. Study of distorted octahedral structure in 3d transition metal complexes using XAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, A.; Nitin Nair, N.; Shrivastava, B. D.; Das, B. K.; Chakrabortty, Monideepa; Jha, S. N.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2018-01-01

    Distortion in octahedral structure of 3d transition metal complexes (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) has been studied using XAFS showing divergent nature of Cu complex. EXAFS analysis showed elongated metal-oxygen bonds for Cu complex leading to more distorted structure. Derivative XANES spectrum at Cu K-edge exhibits splitting of main edge which is correlated to elongated Cu-O bond length. Using these coordination geometry around metal centers, theoretical XANES spectra have been generated and features observed have been correlated to the corresponding metals p-DOS. It has been shown that distorted octahedral field in Cu complex is responsible for splitting of p-DOS.

  3. Residual life and strength estimates of aircraft structural components with MSD/MED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Park, Jai H.; Atluri, Satya N.

    1994-01-01

    Economic and safe operation of the flight vehicles flying beyond their initial design life calls for an in-depth structural integrity evaluation of all components with potential for catastrophic damages. Fuselage panels with cracked skin and/or stiffening elements is one such example. A three level analytical approach is developed to analyze the pressurized fuselage stiffened shell panels with damaged skin or stiffening elements. A global finite element analysis is first carried out to obtain the load flow pattern through the damaged panel. As an intermediate step, the damaged zone is treated as a spatially three-dimensional structure modeled by plate and shell finite elements, with all the neighboring elements that can alter the stress state at the crack tip. This is followed by the Schwartz-Neumann alternating method for local analysis to obtain the relevant crack tip parameters that govern the onset of fracture and the crack growth. The methodology developed is generic in nature and aims at handling a large fraction of problem areas identified by the Industry Committee on Wide-Spread Fatigue Damage.

  4. Structure and Metal Loading of a Soluble Periplasm Cuproprotein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Kevin J.; Firbank, Susan J.; Dainty, Samantha J.; Pérez-Rama, Mónica; Tottey, Steve; Robinson, Nigel J.

    2010-01-01

    A copper-trafficking pathway was found to enable Cu2+ occupancy of a soluble periplasm protein, CucA, even when competing Zn2+ is abundant in the periplasm. Here, we solved the structure of CucA (a new cupin) and found that binding of Cu2+, but not Zn2+, quenches the fluorescence of Trp165, which is adjacent to the metal site. Using this fluorescence probe, we established that CucA becomes partly occupied by Zn2+ following exposure to equimolar Zn2+ and Cu2+. Cu2+-CucA is more thermodynamically stable than Zn2+-CucA but k(Zn→Cu)exchange is slow, raising questions about how the periplasm contains solely the Cu2+ form. We discovered that a copper-trafficking pathway involving two copper transporters (CtaA and PacS) and a metallochaperone (Atx1) is obligatory for Cu2+-CucA to accumulate in the periplasm. There was negligible CucA protein in the periplasm of ΔctaA cells, but the abundance of cucA transcripts was unaltered. Crucially, ΔctaA cells overaccumulate low Mr copper complexes in the periplasm, and purified apoCucA can readily acquire Cu2+ from ΔctaA periplasm extracts, but in vivo apoCucA fails to come into contact with these periplasmic copper pools. Instead, copper traffics via a cytoplasmic pathway that is coupled to CucA translocation to the periplasm. PMID:20702411

  5. Structure and metal loading of a soluble periplasm cuproprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Kevin J; Firbank, Susan J; Dainty, Samantha J; Pérez-Rama, Mónica; Tottey, Steve; Robinson, Nigel J

    2010-10-15

    A copper-trafficking pathway was found to enable Cu(2+) occupancy of a soluble periplasm protein, CucA, even when competing Zn(2+) is abundant in the periplasm. Here, we solved the structure of CucA (a new cupin) and found that binding of Cu(2+), but not Zn(2+), quenches the fluorescence of Trp(165), which is adjacent to the metal site. Using this fluorescence probe, we established that CucA becomes partly occupied by Zn(2+) following exposure to equimolar Zn(2+) and Cu(2+). Cu(2+)-CucA is more thermodynamically stable than Zn(2+)-CucA but k((Zn→Cu)exchange) is slow, raising questions about how the periplasm contains solely the Cu(2+) form. We discovered that a copper-trafficking pathway involving two copper transporters (CtaA and PacS) and a metallochaperone (Atx1) is obligatory for Cu(2+)-CucA to accumulate in the periplasm. There was negligible CucA protein in the periplasm of ΔctaA cells, but the abundance of cucA transcripts was unaltered. Crucially, ΔctaA cells overaccumulate low M(r) copper complexes in the periplasm, and purified apoCucA can readily acquire Cu(2+) from ΔctaA periplasm extracts, but in vivo apoCucA fails to come into contact with these periplasmic copper pools. Instead, copper traffics via a cytoplasmic pathway that is coupled to CucA translocation to the periplasm.

  6. Distinct atomic structures of the Ni-Nb metallic glasses formed by ion beam mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, K. P.; Wang, L. T.; Liu, B. X.

    2007-01-01

    Four Ni-Nb metallic glasses are obtained by ion beam mixing and their compositions are measured to be Ni 77 Nb 23 , Ni 55 Nb 45 , Ni 31 Nb 69 , and Ni 15 Nb 85 , respectively, suggesting that a composition range of 23-85 at. % of Nb is favored for metallic glass formation in the Ni-Nb system. Interestingly, diffraction analyses show that the structure of the Nb-based Ni 31 Nb 69 metallic glass is distinctly different from the structure of the Nb-based Ni 15 Nb 85 metallic glass, as the respective amorphous halos are located at 2θ≅38 and 39 deg. To explore an atomic scale description of the Ni-Nb metallic glasses, an n-body Ni-Nb potential is first constructed with an aid of the ab initio calculations and then applied to perform the molecular dynamics simulation. Simulation results determine not only the intrinsic glass forming range of the Ni-Nb system to be within 20-85 at. % of Nb, but also the exact atomic positions in the Ni-Nb metallic glasses. Through a statistical analysis of the determined atomic positions, a new dominant local packing unit is found in the Ni 15 Nb 85 metallic glass, i.e., an icositetrahedron with a coordination number to be around 14, while in Ni 31 Nb 69 metallic glasses, the dominant local packing unit is an icosahedron with a coordination number to be around 12, which has been reported for the other metallic glasses. In fact, with increasing the irradiation dose, the Ni 31 Nb 69 metallic glasses are formed through an intermediate state of face-centered-cubic-solid solution, whereas the Ni 15 Nb 85 metallic glass is through an intermediate state of body-centered-cubic-solid solution, suggesting that the structures of the constituent metals play an important role in governing the structural characteristics of the resultant metallic glasses

  7. Towards the role of metal ions in the structural variability of proteins: CdII speciation of a metal ion binding loop motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jancsó, Attila; Szunyogh, Dániel; Gyurcsik, Béla

    2011-01-01

    A de novo designed dodecapeptide (HS), inspired by the metal binding loops of metal-responsive transcriptional activators, was synthesized. The aim was to create a model system for structurally promiscuous and intrinsically unstructured proteins, and explore the effect of metal ions on their stru...... the peptide is exchanging between a number of structures also in its metal ion bound state(s), as indicated by NMR and PAC data. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry....

  8. Atomic-level structure and structure-property relationship in metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yongqiang

    One of the key tasks in material science is to understand the structure and structure-property relationship. The recently emerging bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have demonstrated unique properties, especially intriguing mechanical properties such as their high strength and high propensity to localize deformation in shear bands. However, a comprehensive understanding of the structure of BMGs has been hindered by the complexity of these amorphous materials. Even more challenging is the structure-property correlation, which has been well established in crystals but has been seriously lacking for BMGs. This thesis presents a systematic study of the atomic-level structures of two representative BMGs, Cu-Zr and Cu-Zr-Al. The interpenetrating Cu-centered icosahedral clusters have been identified to be the primary structural feature. The fraction of icosahedra increases with increasing Cu or Al contents, and with decreasing cooling rate. The effect of Al in improving the icosahedral order is two-fold: the geometric effect due to the atomic-size mismatch and the chemical effect originated from the Cu-Al bond shortening. The resolved structure is used to study the structure-property relationship. The full icosahedra are found to be responsible for the dynamical slowdown of the supercooled liquid, which underlies the non-Arrhenius behavior, and explains the composition dependence of glass transition temperature, glass forming ability, and the room temperature strength. By simulated deformation, the initiation of plasticity and tendency for strain localization are also investigated. The full icosahedra are found to be the most rigid and resistant cluster with solid-like character, while the unstable clusters with liquid-like character serve as the fertile sites for initiating shear transformations. In addition, the elastic moduli are calculated and analyzed, and the origins of the different configurational dependence of shear modulus (G) and bulk modulus ( B) are explained. The

  9. Full-scale flight tests of aircraft morphing structures using SMA actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabe, James H.; Calkins, Frederick T.; Ruggeri, Robert T.

    2007-04-01

    In August of 2005 The Boeing Company conducted a full-scale flight test utilizing Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) actuators to morph an engine's fan exhaust to correlate exhaust geometry with jet noise reduction. The test was conducted on a 777-300ER with GE-115B engines. The presence of chevrons, serrated aerodynamic surfaces mounted at the trailing edge of the thrust reverser, have been shown to greatly reduce jet noise by encouraging advantageous mixing of the free, and fan streams. The morphing, or Variable Geometry Chevrons (VGC), utilized compact, light weight, and robust SMA actuators to morph the chevron shape to optimize the noise reduction or meet acoustic test objectives. The VGC system was designed for two modes of operation. The entirely autonomous operation utilized changes in the ambient temperature from take-off to cruise to activate the chevron shape change. It required no internal heaters, wiring, control system, or sensing. By design this provided one tip immersion at the warmer take-off temperatures to reduce community noise and another during the cooler cruise state for more efficient engine operation, i.e. reduced specific fuel consumption. For the flight tests a powered mode was added where internal heaters were used to individually control the VGC temperatures. This enabled us to vary the immersions and test a variety of chevron configurations. The flight test demonstrated the value of SMA actuators to solve a real world aerospace problem, validated that the technology could be safely integrated into the airplane's structure and flight system, and represented a large step forward in the realization of SMA actuators for production applications. In this paper the authors describe the development of the actuator system, the steps required to integrate the morphing structure into the thrust reverser, and the analysis and testing that was required to gain approval for flight. Issues related to material strength, thermal environment, vibration

  10. Structural identification and buffet alleviation of twin-tailed fighter aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badawy, Ayman Aly

    We tackle the problem of identifying the structural dynamics of the twin tails of the F-15 fighter plane. The objective is to first investigate and identify the different possible attractors that coexist for the same operating parameters. Second is to develop a model that simulates the experimentally determined dynamics. Third is to suppress the high-amplitude vibrations of the tails due to either principal parametric or external excitations. To understand the dynamical characteristics of the twin-tails, the model is excited parametrically. For the same excitation amplitude and frequency, five different responses are observed depending on the initial conditions. The coexisting five responses are the result of the nonlinearities. After the experimental identification of the system, we develop a model to capture the dynamics realized in the experiment. We devise a nonlinear control law based on cubic velocity feedback to suppress the response of the model to a principal parametric excitation. The performance of the control law is studied by comparing the open- and closed-loop responses of the system. Furthermore, we conduct experiments to verify the theoretical analysis. The theoretical and experimental findings indicate that the control law, not only leads to effective vibration suppression, but also to effective bifurcation control. We investigate the design of a neural-network-based adaptive control system for active vibration suppression of the model when subjected to a parametric excitation. First, an emulator neural network was trained to represent the structure and thus used to predict the future responses of the model. Second, a neurocontroller is developed to determine the necessary control action. The computer-simulation studies show great promise for artificial neural networks to control the model vibrations caused by parametric excitations. We investigate the use of four different control strategies to suppress high-amplitude responses of the F-15 fighter

  11. Metal Oxide Nanomaterial QNAR Models: Available Structural Descriptors and Understanding of Toxicity Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Ying

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide nanomaterials are widely used in various areas; however, the divergent published toxicology data makes it difficult to determine whether there is a risk associated with exposure to metal oxide nanomaterials. The application of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR modeling in metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity studies can reduce the need for time-consuming and resource-intensive nanotoxicity tests. The nanostructure and inorganic composition of metal oxide nanomaterials makes this approach different from classical QSAR study; this review lists and classifies some structural descriptors, such as size, cation charge, and band gap energy, in recent metal oxide nanomaterials quantitative nanostructure activity relationship (QNAR studies and discusses the mechanism of metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity based on these descriptors and traditional nanotoxicity tests.

  12. Structural Framework for Flight: NASA's Role in Development of Advanced Composite Materials for Aircraft and Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Darrel R.; Davis, John G., Jr.; Johnston, Norman J.; Pipes, R. Byron; McGuire, Jack F.

    2011-01-01

    This serves as a source of collated information on Composite Research over the past four decades at NASA Langley Research Center, and is a key reference for readers wishing to grasp the underlying principles and challenges associated with developing and applying advanced composite materials to new aerospace vehicle concepts. Second, it identifies the major obstacles encountered in developing and applying composites on advanced flight vehicles, as well as lessons learned in overcoming these obstacles. Third, it points out current barriers and challenges to further application of composites on future vehicles. This is extremely valuable for steering research in the future, when new breakthroughs in materials or processing science may eliminate/minimize some of the barriers that have traditionally blocked the expanded application of composite to new structural or revolutionary vehicle concepts. Finally, a review of past work and identification of future challenges will hopefully inspire new research opportunities and development of revolutionary materials and structural concepts to revolutionize future flight vehicles.

  13. Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate architecture for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Todd H.

    2015-09-15

    Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate lattices, of a spinel block type, and which are resistant to carbon deposition and metal sulfide formation are provided. The catalysts are designed for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels to synthesis gas. The hexametallate lattices are doped with noble metals (Au, Pt, Rh, Ru) which are atomically dispersed as isolated sites throughout the lattice and take the place of hexametallate metal ions such as Cr, Ga, In, and/or Nb. Mirror cations in the crystal lattice are selected from alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and the lanthanide metals, so as to reduce the acidity of the catalyst crystal lattice and enhance the desorption of carbon deposit forming moieties such as aromatics. The catalysts can be used at temperatures as high as 1000.degree. C. and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. A method for producing these catalysts and applications of their use also is provided.

  14. Amphibious Aircraft

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A brief self composed research article on Amphibious Aircrafts discussing their use, origin and modern day applications along with their advantages and disadvantages...

  15. A new model of dispersion for metals leading to a more accurate modeling of plasmonic structures using the FDTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vial, A.; Dridi, M.; Cunff, L. le [Universite de Technologie de Troyes, Institut Charles Delaunay, CNRS UMR 6279, Laboratoire de Nanotechnologie et d' Instrumentation Optique, 12, rue Marie Curie, BP-2060, Troyes Cedex (France); Laroche, T. [Universite de Franche-Comte, Institut FEMTO-ST, CNRS UMR 6174, Departement de Physique et de Metrologie des Oscillateurs, Besancon Cedex (France)

    2011-06-15

    We present FDTD simulations results obtained using the Drude critical points model. This model enables spectroscopic studies of metallic structures over wider wavelength ranges than usually used, and it facilitates the study of structures made of several metals. (orig.)

  16. Manufacturing Challenges Associated with the Use of Metal Matrix Composites in Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Tracie

    2014-01-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) consist of a metal alloy reinforced with ceramic particles or fibers. These materials possess a very high strength to weight ratio, good resistance to impact and wear, and a number of other properties which make them attractive for use in aerospace and defense applications. MMCs have found use in the space shuttle orbiter's structural tubing, the Hubble Space Telescope's antenna mast, control surfaces and propulsion systems for aircraft, and tank armors. The size of MMC components is severely limited by difficulties encountered in joining these materials using fusion welding. Melting of the material results in formation of an undesirable phase (formed when molten Aluminum reacts with the reinforcement) which leaves a strength depleted region along the joint line. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively nascent solid state joining technique developed at The Welding Institute (TWI) in 1991. The process was first used at NASA to weld the super lightweight external tank for the Space Shuttle. Today FSW is used to join structural components of the Delta IV, Atlas V, and Falcon IX rockets as well as NASA's Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle and Space Launch System. A current focus of FSW research is to extend the process to new materials, such as MMCs, which are difficult to weld using conventional fusion techniques. Since Friction Stir Welding occurs below the melting point of the workpiece material, this deleterious phase is absent in FSW-ed MMC joints. FSW of MMCs is, however, plagued by rapid wear of the welding tool, a consequence of the large discrepancy in hardness between the steel tool and the reinforcement material. This chapter summarizes the challenges encountered when joining MMCs to themselves or to other materials in structures. Specific attention is paid to the influence of process variables in Friction Stir Welding on the wear process characterizes the effect of process parameters (spindle speed, traverse rate, and length

  17. Ionochromic effects and structures of metalated poly(p-phenylenevinylene) polymers incorporating 2,2'-bipyridines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.X.; Jager, W.J.H.; Gosztola, D.J.; Niemczyk, M.P.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of metal ion chelation to the 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) groups on the photophysics and exciton dynamics of two conjugated polymers 1 and 2 in solution are investigated. The structures of polymers 1 and 2 have 2,2'-bipyridyl-5-vinylene units that alternate with one and three 2,5-bis(n-decyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene monomer units, respectively. The photophysics and exciton dynamics of metalated polymers 1 and 2 are compared to those of the metal-free polymers (Chen et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 1999, 103, 4341-4351). The origins of ionochromic effects due the metal ion chelation were studied using both steady-state and transient optical spectroscopy, and the results indicate that both conformational flattening and participation of Jr electrons from the metal in the π-conjugation of the polymer backbone play important roles in metal ion binding induced red shifts in absorption and photoluminescence spectra. The photoluminescence properties of the metalated polymers are determined by the metal ion electronic structures, where the closed shell Zn 2+ -bound polymer 2 has an increased photoluminescence quantum yield and the corresponding open shell Ni 2+ - or Fe 3+ -bound polymers have quenched photoluminescence due to spin-orbit coupling. The dual character of metalated polymer 2 as a conjugated polymer and as a metal-bpy complex is discussed. In addition, the structures of metal ion binding sites are studied via X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and are related to the photophysical properties of the metalated polymers

  18. Dispersed metal cluster catalysts by design. Synthesis, characterization, structure, and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, Ilke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dixon, David A. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Gates, Bruce C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Katz, Alexander [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    To understand the class of metal cluster catalysts better and to lay a foundation for the prediction of properties leading to improved catalysts, we have synthesized metal catalysts with well-defined structures and varied the cluster structures and compositions systematically—including the ligands bonded to the metals. These ligands include supports and bulky organics that are being tuned to control both the electron transfer to or from the metal and the accessibility of reactants to influence catalytic properties. We have developed novel syntheses to prepare these well-defined catalysts with atomic-scale control the environment by choice and placement of ligands and applied state-of-the art spectroscopic, microscopic, and computational methods to determine their structures, reactivities, and catalytic properties. The ligands range from nearly flat MgO surfaces to enveloping zeolites to bulky calixarenes to provide controlled coverages of the metal clusters, while also enforcing unprecedented degrees of coordinative unsaturation at the metal site—thereby facilitating bonding and catalysis events at exposed metal atoms. With this wide range of ligand properties and our arsenal of characterization tools, we worked to achieve a deep, fundamental understanding of how to synthesize robust supported and ligand-modified metal clusters with controlled catalytic properties, thereby bridging the gap between active site structure and function in unsupported and supported metal catalysts. We used methods of organometallic and inorganic chemistry combined with surface chemistry for the precise synthesis of metal clusters and nanoparticles, characterizing them at various stages of preparation and under various conditions (including catalytic reaction conditions) and determining their structures and reactivities and how their catalytic properties depend on their compositions and structures. Key characterization methods included IR, NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopies to identify

  19. NMR Structures and Dynamics in a Prohead RNA Loop that Binds Metal Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaobo; Park, Sun-Young; Tonelli, Marco; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Xia, Tianbing; Zhong, Dongping; Schroeder, Susan J

    2016-10-06

    Metal ions are critical for RNA structure and enzymatic activity. We present the structure of an asymmetric RNA loop that binds metal ions and has an essential function in a bacteriophage packaging motor. Prohead RNA is a noncoding RNA that is required for genome packaging activity in phi29-like bacteriophage. The loops in GA1 and phi29 bacteriophage share a conserved adenine that forms a base triple, although the structural context for the base triple differs. NMR relaxation studies and femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy reveal the dynamic behavior of the loop in the metal ion bound and unbound forms. The mechanism of metal ion binding appears to be an induced conformational change between two dynamic ensembles rather than a conformational capture mechanism. These results provide experimental benchmarks for computational models of RNA-metal ion interactions.

  20. Kinetic and structural fragility—a correlation between structures and dynamics in metallic liquids and glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelton, K F

    2017-01-01

    The liquid phase remains poorly understood. In many cases, the densities of liquids and their crystallized solid phases are similar, but since they are amorphous they lack the spatial order of the solid. Their dynamical properties change remarkably over a very small temperature range. At high temperatures, near their melting temperature, liquids flow easily under shear. However, only a few hundred degrees lower flow effectively ceases, as the liquid transforms into a solid-like glass. This temperature-dependent dynamical behavior is frequently characterized by the concept of kinetic fragility (or, generally, simply fragility). Fragility is believed to be an important quantity in glass formation, making it of significant practical interest. The microscopic origin of fragility remains unclear, however, making it also of fundamental interest. It is widely (although not uniformly) believed that the dynamical behavior is linked to the atomic structure of the liquid, yet experimental studies show that although the viscosity changes by orders of magnitude with temperature, the structural change is barely perceptible. In this article the concept of fragility is discussed, building to a discussion of recent results in metallic glass-forming liquids that demonstrate the presumed connection between structural and dynamical changes. In particular, it becomes possible to define a structural fragility parameter that can be linked with the kinetic fragility. (topical review)

  1. Ferromagnetism and temperature-dependent electronic structure in metallic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, T.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the influence of the reduced translational symmetry on the magnetic properties of thin itinerant-electron films and surfaces is investigated within the strongly correlated Hubbard model. Firstly, the possibility of spontaneous ferromagnetism in the Hubbard model is discussed for the case of systems with full translational symmetry. Different approximation schemes for the solution of the many-body problem of the Hubbard model are introduced and discussed in detail. It is found that it is vital for a reasonable description of spontaneous ferromagnetism to be consistent with exact results concerning the general shape of the single-electron spectral density in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction between the electrons. The temperature dependence of the ferromagnetic solutions is discussed in detail by use of the magnetization curves as well as the spin-dependent quasi particle spectrum. For the investigation of thin films and surfaces the approximation schemes for the bulk system have to be generalized to deal with the reduced translational symmetry. The magnetic behavior of thin Hubbard films is investigated by use of the layer dependent magnetization as a function of temperature as well as the thickness of the film. The Curie-temperature is calculated as a function of the film thickness. Further, the magnetic stability at the surface is discussed in detail. Here it is found that for strong Coulomb interaction the magnetic stability at finite temperatures is reduced at the surface compared to the inner layers. This observation clearly contradicts the well-known Stoner picture of band magnetism and can be explained in terms of general arguments which are based on exact results in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction. The magnetic behavior of the Hubbard films can be analyzed in detail by inspecting the local quasi particle density of states as well as the wave vector dependent spectral density. The electronic structure is found to be strongly spin

  2. Analysis and Experimental on Aircraft Insulation Thermal Bridge Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIA Tian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Two kinds of typical aircraft insulation structures were designed for the heat bridge in the metal ribs of aircraft insulation structures. In order to study the influence of heat bridge effect on thermal insulation performance, each configuration was analyzed by the transient heat transfer FEA, check point temperature was obtained in the hot surface temperature of 100 ℃, 200 ℃, 300 ℃, 424 ℃ respectively, and the validity of FEA was proved by insulation performance experiment. The result showed that the thermal bridge has a great influence to the insulation performance of insulation structure, and the thermal bridge influence should be considered adequately when the insulation structure designed. Additionally, the blocking method for thermal bridge is also put forward.

  3. Structures of the Dehydrogenation Products of Methane Activation by 5d Transition Metal Cations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapoutre, V.J.F.; Redlich, B.; Meer, A.F.G.; Oomens, J.; Bakker, J.M.; Sweeney, A.; Mookherjee, A.; Armentrout, P.B.

    2013-01-01

    The activation of methane by gas-phase transition metal cations (M+) has been studied extensively, both experimentally and using density functional theory (DFT). Methane is exothermically dehydrogenated by several 5d metal ions to form [M,C,2H](+) and H-2. However, the structure of the

  4. Structures of the dehydrogenation products of methane activation by 5d transition metal cations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapoutre, V. J. F.; Redlich, B.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Oomens, J.; Bakker, J. M.; Sweeney, A.; Mookherjee, A.; Armentrout, P. B.

    2013-01-01

    The activation of methane by gas-phase transition metal cations (M +) has been studied extensively, both experimentally and using density functional theory (DFT). Methane is exothermically dehydrogenated by several 5d metal ions to form [M,C,2H]+ and H2. However, the structure of the dehydrogenation

  5. Half-metallic ferromagnets : From band structure to many-body effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katsnelson, M. I.; Irkhin, V. Yu.; Chioncel, L.; Lichtenstein, A. I.; de Groot, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    A review of new developments in theoretical and experimental electronic-structure investigations of half-metallic ferromagnets (HMFs) is presented. Being semiconductors for one spin projection and metals for another, these substances are promising magnetic materials for applications in spintronics

  6. Study Of The Structural Properties Of Some Liquid Metals And Their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, the electron gas energy of some liquid metals and alloys were computed based on statistical physics approach. Also, based on the solution of the Ornstein-Zernike equation for a one – component system, a model for the study of the structure factor of liquid metals and alloys were developed. The electron gas ...

  7. Predicted stability, structures, and magnetism of 3d transition metal nitrides: the M4N phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, C.M.; Koster, R.S.; Li, W.F.; van Huis, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The 3d transition metal nitrides M4N (Sc4N, Ti4N, V4N, Cr4N, Mn4N, Fe4N, Co4N, Ni4N, and Cu4N) have unique phase relationships, crystal structures, and electronic and magnetic properties. Here we present a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study on these transition metal nitrides, assessing

  8. Structural and functional studies of heavy metal ATPases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitsel, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    to handle heavy metal ions. LpCopA is then compared to its two human homologues ATP7A and ATP7B, which cause the severe Menkes and Wilson diseases when malfunctioning. The differences between the three proteins are described and disease-causing mutations in the human proteins are analyzed. The crystal......Copper and zinc are trace elements that are crucial for the well-being of all cells and are an indispensable part of many proteins. At the same time, the intracellular levels of these metals require careful regulation, as an excess or deficiency may be lethal. P1B-ATPases are key players in Cu...

  9. Metal Matrix Composite Enchanced Aluminum Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research pursues a path for reducing structural weight, increasing structural performance, and reducing fabrication cost while also minimizing...

  10. Metal Matrix Composite Enchanced Aluminum Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research pursues a path for reducing structural weight, increasing structural performance, and reducing fabrication cost while also minimizing...

  11. Apoprotein Structure and Metal Binding Characterization of a de Novo Designed Peptide, α3DIV, that Sequesters Toxic Heavy Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plegaria, Jefferson S; Dzul, Stephen P; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Stemmler, Timothy L; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2015-05-12

    De novo protein design is a biologically relevant approach that provides a novel process in elucidating protein folding and modeling the metal centers of metalloproteins in a completely unrelated or simplified fold. An integral step in de novo protein design is the establishment of a well-folded scaffold with one conformation, which is a fundamental characteristic of many native proteins. Here, we report the NMR solution structure of apo α3DIV at pH 7.0, a de novo designed three-helix bundle peptide containing a triscysteine motif (Cys18, Cys28, and Cys67) that binds toxic heavy metals. The structure comprises 1067 NOE restraints derived from multinuclear multidimensional NOESY, as well as 138 dihedral angles (ψ, φ, and χ1). The backbone and heavy atoms of the 20 lowest energy structures have a root mean square deviation from the mean structure of 0.79 (0.16) Å and 1.31 (0.15) Å, respectively. When compared to the parent structure α3D, the substitution of Leu residues to Cys enhanced the α-helical content of α3DIV while maintaining the same overall topology and fold. In addition, solution studies on the metalated species illustrated metal-induced stability. An increase in the melting temperatures was observed for Hg(II), Pb(II), or Cd(II) bound α3DIV by 18-24 °C compared to its apo counterpart. Further, the extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis on Hg(II)-α3DIV produced an average Hg(II)-S bond length at 2.36 Å, indicating a trigonal T-shaped coordination environment. Overall, the structure of apo α3DIV reveals an asymmetric distorted triscysteine metal binding site, which offers a model for native metalloregulatory proteins with thiol-rich ligands that function in regulating toxic heavy metals, such as ArsR, CadC, MerR, and PbrR.

  12. Microscopic structure of the alkali metal-alkali halide solutions in the metallic regime. A neutron-scattering investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jal, J.F.; Mathieu, C.; Dupuy, J.; Chieux, P.

    1990-01-01

    The partial structure factors have been measured for two compositions (x = 0.8; x = 0.6) in the metallic regime of the solutions K x (KCl) 1-x . The potassium-potassium partials are compared with the pure potassium structure factor measured at 700 0 C. Ionic-like characteristics are obtained for the partials, even for x = 0.8. The number of potassium atoms surrounding chlorine is about four, suggesting rather open structures. Details are given on the data analysis of this difficult experiment. (author)

  13. Automated Design and Analysis Tool for CLV/CEV Composite and Metallic Structural Components, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation of the proposed effort is a unique automated process for the analysis, design, and sizing of CLV/CEV composite and metallic structures. This developed...

  14. The dynamic properties of sandwich structures based on metal-ceramic foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The present research program has studied the fracture properties of closed pore metal-ceramic foams for their potential applications as core systems in sandwich structures. The composite foams were created at Fireline, Inc. (Youngstown, OH) using the...

  15. Single crystal particles of a mesoporous mixed transition metal oxide with a wormhole structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B; Lu, D; Kondo, J N; Domen, K

    2001-10-21

    A new type of mesoporous mixed transition metal oxide of Nb and Ta (NbTa-TIT-1) has been prepared through a two-step calcination, which consists of single crystal particles with wormhole mesoporous structure.

  16. Electrofluidics fabricated by space-selective metallization in glass microfluidic structures using femtosecond laser direct writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Wu, Dong; Hanada, Yasutaka; Chen, Chi; Wu, Sizhu; Cheng, Ya; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2013-12-07

    Space-selective metallization of the inside of glass microfluidic structures using femtosecond laser direct-write ablation followed by electroless plating is demonstrated. Femtosecond laser direct writing followed by thermal treatment and successive chemical etching allows us to fabricate three-dimensional microfluidic structures inside photosensitive glass. Then, femtosecond laser ablation followed by electroless metal plating enables flexible deposition of patterned metal films on desired locations of not only the top and bottom walls but also the sidewalls of fabricated microfluidic structures. A volume writing scheme for femtosecond laser irradiation inducing homogeneous ablation on the sidewalls of microfluidic structures is proposed for sidewall metallization. The developed technique is used to fabricate electrofluidics in which microelectric components are integrated into glass microchannels. The fabricated electrofluidics are applied to control the temperature of liquid samples in the microchannels for the enhancement of chemical reactions and to manipulate the movement of biological samples in the microscale space.

  17. Heavy metals pollution influence the community structure of Cyanobacteria in nutrient rich tropical estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anas, A.; Jasmin, C.; Sheeba V.A.; Gireeshkumar, T.R.; Nair, S.

    Anthropogenic inputs influence the community structure and activities of microorganisms, which may impinge the functioning of estuarine and coastal ecosystem. The aim of the present study was to understand the influence of dissolved heavy metals (Cr...

  18. Reliability Analysis-Based Numerical Calculation of Metal Structure of Bridge Crane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study introduced a finite element model of DQ75t-28m bridge crane metal structure and made finite element static analysis to obtain the stress response of the dangerous point of metal structure in the most extreme condition. The simulated samples of the random variable and the stress of the dangerous point were successfully obtained through the orthogonal design. Then, we utilized BP neural network nonlinear mapping function trains to get the explicit expression of stress in response to the random variable. Combined with random perturbation theory and first-order second-moment (FOSM method, the study analyzed the reliability and its sensitivity of metal structure. In conclusion, we established a novel method for accurately quantitative analysis and design of bridge crane metal structure.

  19. Metal-oxide based nanoobjects: reactivity, building blocks for polymeric structures and structural variety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.; Roy, S.

    2002-01-01

    The latest achievements in the new field of nanochemistry, i.e. investigation of reactions proceeding at selected sites of well-characterized metal-oxide based nanoobjects are reviewed. It is demonstrated that from the unique library of molybdenum-oxide based building blocks/fragments under reducing conditions in aqueous solution a huge variety of nanoobjects can be generated. Examples include the well-known molecular big-wheel of the type { Mo 176 } and big-ball of the type { Mo 132 } including their derivatives which are considered here. In addition, the by far largest structurally well-characterized cluster having 368 molybdenum atoms with the shape of a lemon is outlines and discussed [ru

  20. Guest driven structural transformation studies of a luminescent metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pune,. Maharashtra 411 008, India e-mail: sghosh@iiserpune.ac.in. MS received 10 April 2014; ... of a ligand with metal salt in low boiling solvent system at room temperature often render MOFs which gener- ally encapsulate low boiling ...

  1. Structural variations in layered alkaline earth metal cyclohexyl ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    because of the entrance of the guest molecules between the layers, there will be a change in the interlayer distance (Alberti 1978). Although M(IV) organo-phos- phonates are well documented, the chemistry of M(II) organophosphonates especially the alkaline earth metal organophosphonates has been explored marginally ...

  2. Synthesis-Structure-Performance Relationships for Supported Metal Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnik, Peter|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328228524

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysts, which consist of many metal nanoparticles supported on highly porous, mechanically strong and chemically inert supports, are at the center of many existing as well as new and more sustainable processes, such as energy conversion and storage, nanoelectronics and the catalytic

  3. Physical masking process for integrating micro metallic structures on polymer substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2009-01-01

    . The current study shows a novel approach for fabricating thin micro metallic structures on polymer substrates using a simple physical mask and a PVD equipment. The new process involves fewer process steps, it is cost effective and suitable for high volume industrial production. Current study suggests...... that physical masking process in combination with PVD can be a cost effective alternative to photolithography when thin metallic structures on a polymers substrate are concerned....

  4. Linking structure to fragility in bulk metallic glass-forming liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Shuai; Stolpe, Moritz; Gross, Oliver; Gallino, Isabella; Hembree, William; Busch, Ralf; Evenson, Zach; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kruzic, Jamie J.

    2015-01-01

    Using in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering, we show that the structural evolution of various bulk metallic glass-forming liquids can be quantitatively connected to their viscosity behavior in the supercooled liquid near T g . The structural signature of fragility is identified as the temperature dependence of local dilatation on distinct key atomic length scales. A more fragile behavior results from a more pronounced thermally induced dilatation of the structure on a length scale of about 3 to 4 atomic diameters, coupled with shallower temperature dependence of structural changes in the nearest neighbor environment. These findings shed light on the structural origin of viscous slowdown during undercooling of bulk metallic glass-forming liquids and demonstrate the promise of predicting the properties of bulk metallic glasses from the atomic scale structure

  5. Synthesis, structure and reactivity of rare-earth metal complexes containing anionic phosphorus ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianshu; Kaercher, Sabrina; Roesky, Peter W

    2014-01-07

    A comprehensive review of structurally characterized rare-earth metal complexes containing anionic phosphorus ligands is presented. Since rare-earth elements form hard ions and phosphorus is considered as a soft ligand, the rare-earth metal phosphorus coordination is regarded as a less favorite combination. Three classes of phosphorus ligands, (1) the monoanionic organophosphide ligands (PR2(-)) bearing one negative charge on the phosphorus atom; (2) the dianionic phosphinidene (PR(2-)) and P(3-) ligands; and (3) the pure inorganic polyphosphide ligands (Pn(x-)), are included here. Particular attention has been paid to the synthesis, structure, and reactivity of the rare-earth metal phosphides.

  6. Aircraft Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nødskov, Kim; Kværnø, Ole

    as their purchases of aircraft carrier systems, makes it more than likely that the country is preparing such an acquisition. China has territorial disputes in the South China Sea over the Spratly Islands and is also worried about the security of its sea lines of communications, by which China transports the majority...... of its foreign trade, as well as its oil imports, upon which the country is totally dependent. China therefore has good reasons for acquiring an aircraft carrier to enable it to protect its national interests. An aircraft carrier would also be a prominent symbol of China’s future status as a great power......, then the country will also acquire the capability to project military power into the region beyond Taiwan, which it does not possess today. In this way, China will have the military capability to permit a change of strategy from the mainly defensive, mainland, Taiwan-based strategy to a more assertive strategy...

  7. Structure Analyses of Fe-based Metallic Glasses by Electron Diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Hirata

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale structural information of amorphous structures has become obtainable by using nanobeam electron diffraction in combination with high resolution imaging. In addition, accurate radial distribution function analysis using energy filter has also become available to know averaged amorphous structures. In this paper, we introduce some applications of these techniques, especially to several Fe-based metallic glasses. On the basis of these results, we discuss a relationship between the glass structure and the glass stability in Fe-based metallic glasses

  8. Liquid metal systems development: reactor vessel support structure evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEdwards, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an evaluation of support structures for the reactor vessel are reported. The U ring, box ring, integral ring, tee ring and tangential beam supports were investigated. The U ring is the recommended vessel support structure configuration

  9. Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing for Lightweight Metallic Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this program is to demonstrate the use of UAM to additively build reinforcement structures to reinforce cut outs in larger aluminum structural...

  10. Hierarchical structures of metal micro- and nanoparticles for PIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervikov, Aleksandr; Rodkevich, Nikolay; Glazkova, Elena; Lerner, Marat

    2017-12-01

    The design of the metal nanopowder composition to prepare the feedstock for powder injection molding was researched. The treatment of aluminum nanopowders with organic compounds was studied. The organic compounds sorbed on the surface of the nanoparticles was shown to change drastically the physico-mechanical characteristics of the nanopowders. These nanopowders demonstrate enhanced characteristics, in particularly, low reactivity, high compatibility with organic binder for feedstocks.

  11. Additive Manufacturing of Metal Structures at the Micrometer Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Luca; Reiser, Alain; Spolenak, Ralph; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2017-05-01

    Currently, the focus of additive manufacturing (AM) is shifting from simple prototyping to actual production. One driving factor of this process is the ability of AM to build geometries that are not accessible by subtractive fabrication techniques. While these techniques often call for a geometry that is easiest to manufacture, AM enables the geometry required for best performance to be built by freeing the design process from restrictions imposed by traditional machining. At the micrometer scale, the design limitations of standard fabrication techniques are even more severe. Microscale AM thus holds great potential, as confirmed by the rapid success of commercial micro-stereolithography tools as an enabling technology for a broad range of scientific applications. For metals, however, there is still no established AM solution at small scales. To tackle the limited resolution of standard metal AM methods (a few tens of micrometers at best), various new techniques aimed at the micrometer scale and below are presently under development. Here, we review these recent efforts. Specifically, we feature the techniques of direct ink writing, electrohydrodynamic printing, laser-assisted electrophoretic deposition, laser-induced forward transfer, local electroplating methods, laser-induced photoreduction and focused electron or ion beam induced deposition. Although these methods have proven to facilitate the AM of metals with feature sizes in the range of 0.1-10 µm, they are still in a prototype stage and their potential is not fully explored yet. For instance, comprehensive studies of material availability and material properties are often lacking, yet compulsory for actual applications. We address these items while critically discussing and comparing the potential of current microscale metal AM techniques. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Two-Dimensionally-Modulated, Magnetic Structure of Neodymium Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, Bente; Bak, P.

    1979-01-01

    The incipient magnetic order of dhcp Nd is described by a two-dimensional, incommensurably modulated structure ("triple-q" structure). The ordering is accompanied by a lattice distortion that forms a similar pattern.......The incipient magnetic order of dhcp Nd is described by a two-dimensional, incommensurably modulated structure ("triple-q" structure). The ordering is accompanied by a lattice distortion that forms a similar pattern....

  13. Template Synthesis of Noble Metal Nanocrystals with Unusual Crystal Structures and Their Catalytic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhanxi; Zhang, Hua

    2016-12-20

    Noble metal nanocrystals own high chemical stability, unique plasmonic and distinctive catalytic properties, making them outstanding in many applications. However, their practical applications are limited by their high cost and scarcity on the earth. One promising strategy to solve these problems is to boost their catalytic performance in order to reduce their usage amount. To realize this target, great research efforts have been devoted to the size-, composition-, shape- and/or architecture-controlled syntheses of noble metal nanocrystals during the past two decades. Impressively, recent experimental studies have revealed that the crystal structure of noble metal nanocrystals can also significantly affect their physicochemical properties, such as optical, magnetic, catalytic, mechanical, electrical and electronic properties. Therefore, besides the well-established size, composition, shape, and architecture control, the rise of crystal structure-controlled synthesis of noble metal nanocrystals will open up new opportunities to further improve their functional properties, and thus promote their potential applications in energy conversion, catalysis, biosensing, information storage, surface enhanced Raman scattering, waveguide, near-infrared photothermal therapy, controlled release, bioimaging, biomedicine, and so on. In this Account, we review the recent research progress on the crystal structure control of noble metal nanocrystals with a template synthetic approach and their crystal structure-dependent catalytic properties. We first describe the template synthetic methods, such as epitaxial growth and galvanic replacement reaction methods, in which a presynthesized noble metal nanocrystal with either new or common crystal structure is used as the template to direct the growth of unusual crystal structures of other noble metals. Significantly, the template synthetic strategy described here provides an efficient, simple and straightforward way to synthesize unusual

  14. Metal-organic frameworks: structure, properties, methods of synthesis and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butova, V V; Soldatov, M A; Guda, A A; Lomachenko, K A; Lamberti, C

    2016-01-01

    This review deals with key methods of synthesis and characterization of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The modular structure affords a wide variety of MOFs with different active metal sites and organic linkers. These compounds represent a new stage of development of porous materials in which the pore size and the active site structure can be modified within wide limits. The set of experimental methods considered in this review is sufficient for studying the short-range and long-range order of the MOF crystal structure, determining the morphology of samples and elucidating the processes that occur at the active metal site in the course of chemical reactions. The interest in metal-organic frameworks results, first of all, from their numerous possible applications, ranging from gas separation and storage to chemical reactions within the pores. The bibliography includes 362 references

  15. Evaluation of mechanical properties in metal wire mesh supported selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajath, S.; Siddaraju, C.; Nandakishora, Y.; Roy, Sukumar

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate certain specific mechanical properties of certain stainless steel wire mesh supported Selective catalytic reduction catalysts structures wherein the physical properties of the metal wire mesh and also its surface treatments played vital role thereby influencing the mechanical properties. As the adhesion between the stainless steel wire mesh and the catalyst material determines the bond strength and the erosion resistance of catalyst structures, surface modifications of the metal- wire mesh structure in order to facilitate the interface bonding is therefore very important to realize enhanced level of mechanical properties. One way to enhance such adhesion properties, the stainless steel wire mesh is treated with the various acids, i.e., chromic acid, phosphoric acid including certain mineral acids and combination of all those in various molar ratios that could generate surface active groups on metal surface that promotes good interface structure between the metal- wire mesh and metal oxide-based catalyst material and then the stainless steel wire mesh is dipped in the glass powder slurry containing some amount of organic binder. As a result of which the said catalyst material adheres to the metal-wire mesh surface more effectively that improves the erosion profile of supported catalysts structure including bond strength.

  16. Optimal Shakedown of the Thin-Wall Metal Structures Under Strength and Stiffness Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alawdin Piotr

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Classical optimization problems of metal structures confined mainly with 1st class cross-sections. But in practice it is common to use the cross-sections of higher classes. In this paper, a new mathematical model for described shakedown optimization problem for metal structures, which elements are designed from 1st to 4th class cross-sections, under variable quasi-static loads is presented. The features of limited plastic redistribution of forces in the structure with thin-walled elements there are taken into account. Authors assume the elastic-plastic flexural buckling in one plane without lateral torsional buckling behavior of members. Design formulae for Methods 1 and 2 for members are analyzed. Structures stiffness constrains are also incorporated in order to satisfy the limit serviceability state requirements. With the help of mathematical programming theory and extreme principles the structure optimization algorithm is developed and justified with the numerical experiment for the metal plane frames.

  17. Spin-filter effect in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator/normal metal/superconductor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hong; Yang, Wei; Yang, Xinjian; Qin, Minghui; Guo, Jianqin

    2007-01-01

    Taking into account the thickness of the ferromagnetic insulator, the spin-filter effect in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator/normal metal/superconductor (NM/FI/NM/SC) junctions is studied based on the Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (BTK) theory. It is shown that a spin-dependent energy shift during the tunneling process induces splitting of the subgap resonance peaks. The spin polarization due to the spin-filter effect of the FI causes an imbalance of the peaks heights and can enhance the Zeeman splitting of the gap peaks caused by an applied magnetic field. The spin-filter effect has no contribution to the proximity-effect-induced superconductivity in NM interlayer

  18. Experimental Study of Structure/Behavior Relationship for a Metallized Explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovsky, Eric; Reeves, Robert; Gash, Alexander; Glumac, Nick

    2017-06-01

    Metal powders are commonly added to explosive formulations to modify the blast behavior. Although detonation velocity is typically reduced compared to the neat explosive, the metal provides other benefits. Aluminum is a common additive to increase the overall energy output and high-density metals can be useful for enhancing momentum transfer to a target. Typically, metal powder is homogeneously distributed throughout the material; in this study, controlled distributions of metal powder in explosive formulations were investigated. The powder structures were printed using powder bed printing and the porous structures were filled with explosives to create bulk explosive composites. In all cases, the overall ratio between metal and explosive was maintained, but the powder distribution was varied. Samples utilizing uniform distributions to represent typical materials, discrete pockets of metal powder, and controlled, graded powder distributions were created. Detonation experiments were performed to evaluate the influence of metal powder design on the output pressure/time and the overall impulse. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Structural study of high temperature metal-rich titanium sulfide phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    Ti/sub 2/S and Ti/sub 8/S/sub 3/ have been prepared by high temperature annealing techniques. The crystal structures of these two phases have been determined from single crystal x-ray diffraction data. Both structures were refined using a full-matrix least-squares treatment of positional parameters and isotropic temperature factor coefficients. Ti/sub 2/S crystallizes with orthorhombic symmetry, space group Pnnm, having unit cell dimensions a = 11.367A, b= 14.060A, and c = 3.326A. Ti/sub 2/S is isostructural with Ta/sub 2/P. Ti/sub 8/S/sub 3/ crystallizes with monoclinic symmetry, space group C2/m, a = 32.69A, b = 3.327A, c = 19.35A, ..beta.. = 139.9/sup 0/ (b - unique). Ti/sub 2/S and Ti/sub 8/S/sub 3/ have structural features similar to the features of a large number of metal-rich transition-metal chalcogenides and pnictides. These various structure types have been characterized in terms of nonmetal trigonal prismatic coordination polyhedra, eight different metal partial coordination polyhedra, a short (approximately equal to 3.4A) crystallographic axis, two unique layers of atoms containing both metal and nonmetal atom positions, and mirror planes coincident with the two layers of atom positions. The existence of a variety of structures with these structural features has led to their consideration as a unique structural class. The structural similarities and differences between the structure types of this class have been discussed in detail. Comparison of different structure types emphasized the importance of the metal bonding contribution in understanding the structural features and suggested limitations on qualitative bonding models used to understand the structural-chemical principles underlying structure stability.

  20. Ring and Volcano Structures Formed by a Metal Dipyrromethene Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Seung Bae; Hahn, Jae Ryang [Chonbuk National Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Miao, Qing; Shin, Jiyoung; Dolphin, David [Univ. of British Columbia, Columbia (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Dichloromethane liquid droplets containing a cobalt dipyrromethene trimer deposited on a graphite surface were found to form coffee ring, toroid ring, or volcano dot structures due to the redistribution of the solute during solvent evaporation. The shapes and size distributions of the ring structures depended on the drying temperature. The shape differences were attributed to the fact that the solvent evaporation rate controlled the self-assembly process that yielded the coffee stain and pinhole structures.