WorldWideScience

Sample records for airbone trace metals

  1. Trace metals in urban soils

    OpenAIRE

    Linde, Mats

    2005-01-01

    Urban areas can be considered risk areas as regards trace metals and will continue to be so for a long time, according to predictions. The present work started as a sub-project in the urban part of the multifaceted research project Metals in Urban and Forest Environments.The overall aim of the work was to gain systematic knowledge about the amounts and behaviour of trace metals in urban soils, with Stockholm (the capital of Sweden) as the study area. The concentrations of trace metals (Cd, Cr...

  2. Trace metal speciation in environmental systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Aisling

    1996-01-01

    The adverse environmental impact of trace metals is an issue of current concern. The increasing recognition that it is the chemical form of a metal which determines its toxicity and bioavailability presents a new challenge for analytical chemists. Techniques are required which are sufficiently sensitive and selective to enable the quantitation o f metal species at lower levels than ever before. The importance of trace metal speciation in environmental samples is reviewed in Chapter 1. The eff...

  3. Trace metal transformations in gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, T.A.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; O`Keefe, C.A. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

  4. Controls of Trace Metals in Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruland, K. W.; Lohan, M. C.

    2003-12-01

    Since the early 1970s, marine chemists have gained a first-order understanding of the concentrations, distributions, and chemical behaviors of trace metals in seawater. Important factors initiating this quantum leap in knowledge were major advances in modern analytical chemistry and instrumentation, along with the development and adoption of clean techniques. An instrumental development in the mid-1970s that spurred the early research on trace metals was the availability of the sensitive graphite furnace as the sample introduction system to an atomic absorption spectrometer. More recently, the appearance of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometers has provided an even more sensitive and powerful instrumental capability to the arsenal of marine chemists. In addition to these instruments back in shore-based laboratories, there has been the development of sensitive shipboard methods such as stripping voltammetry and flow injection analysis (FIA) systems with either chemiluminescence or catalytically enhanced spectrophotometric detection. Along with the development of these highly sensitive analytical techniques came a recognition and appreciation of the importance of handling contamination issues by using clean techniques during all phases of sampling and analysis. This is necessary due to low concentrations of trace metals in seawater relative to the ubiquitousness of metals on a ship or in a laboratory (e.g., dust, steel hydrowire, rust, paint with copper and zinc antifouling agents, brass fittings, galvanized material, sacrificial zinc anodes, etc.). As a result, seawater concentrations of most trace metals have now been accurately determined in at least some parts of the oceans, and their oceanic distributions have been found to be consistent with oceanographic processes.The concentrations and distributions of trace metals in seawater are controlled by a combination of processes. These processes include external sources of trace metals delivered by

  5. Heavy metals and related trace elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of heavy metals and related trace elements in the aquatic environment. Other reviews and bibliographies are cited, dealing with the metabolism and transport of metal ions and with the toxic effects of stable and radioactive trace metals on aquatic organisms. The sources of trace elements in natural waters are discussed. It is suggested that atmospheric inputs of several trace metals comprise sizable fractions of total inputs to the Great Lakes and continental shelf waters. Information on stack emissions of trace elements from a coal-fired steam plant was used to estimate the likely range of air concentrations and inputs to a forested watershed in Tennessee. Some basic concepts of cycling of elements through aquatic communities were examined, such as the Pb, Mn and Zn concentrations in sediment and estuarine plants and animals colonizing dredge-spoil disposal areas. The use of plants as biological indicators of trace element contamination was outlined, as well as bioaccumulation in aquatic fauna. The effects of environmental factors on the kinetics of element exchange were noted, for example the influx rates of Cs 137 in tubificid worms, and Co 60 and Zn 65 in shrimp were shown to be temperature dependent. The toxicity of heavy metals on aquatic fauna was discussed, such as the histopathological lesions in the kidney and liver of fishes caused by heavy metals, and the effects of Hg and Cu on the olfactory response of rainbow trout

  6. A New Generation of Thermal Desorption Technology Incorporating Multi Mode Sampling (NRT/DAAMS/Liquid Agent) for Both on and off Line Analysis of Trace Level Airbone Chemical Warfare Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi functional, twin-trap, electrically-cooled thermal desorption (TD) system (TT24-7) will be discussed for the analysis of airborne trace level chemical warfare agents. This technology can operate in both military environments (CW stockpile, or destruction facilities) and civilian locations where it is used to monitor for accidental or terrorist release of acutely toxic substances. The TD system interfaces to GC, GCMS or direct MS analytical platforms and provides for on-line continuous air monitoring with no sampling time blind spots and within a near real time (NRT) context. Using this technology enables on-line sub ppt levels of agent detection from a vapour sample. In addition to continuous sampling the system has the capacity for off-line single (DAAMS) tube analysis and the ability to receive an external liquid agent injection. The multi mode sampling functionality provides considerable flexibility to the TD system, allowing continuous monitoring of an environment for toxic substances plus the ability to analyse calibration standards. A calibration solution can be introduced via a conventional sampling tube on to either cold trap or as a direct liquid injection using a conventional capillary split/splitless injection port within a gas chromatograph. Low level (linearity) data will be supplied showing the TT24-7 analyzing a variety of CW compounds including free (underivitised) VX using the three sampling modes described above. Stepwise changes in vapor generated agent concentrations will be shown, and this is cross referenced against direct liquid agent introduction, and the tube sampling modes. This technology is in use today in several geographies around the world in both static and mobile analytical laboratories. (author)

  7. Trace element geochemistry of CR chondrite metal

    CERN Document Server

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Alard, Olivier; Kearsley, Anton T; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    We report trace element analyses by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry of metal grains from 9 different CR chondrites, distinguishing grains from chondrule interior ("interior grains"), chondrule surficial shells ("margin grains") and the matrix ("isolated grains"). Save for a few anomalous grains, Ni-normalized trace element patterns are similar for all three petrographical settings, with largely unfractionated refractory siderophile elements and depleted volatile Au, Cu, Ag, S. All types of grains are interpreted to derive from a common precursor approximated by the least melted, fine-grained objects in CR chondrites. This also excludes recondensation of metal vapor as the origin of the bulk of margin grains. The metal precursors presumably formed by incomplete condensation, with evidence for high-temperature isolation of refractory platinum-group-element (PGE)-rich condensates before mixing with lower temperature PGE-depleted condensates. The rounded shape of the Ni-rich, interior ...

  8. Factors Controlling the Distribution of Trace Metals in Macroalgae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宝利; 刘丛强

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the concentrations of trace metals (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb) in macroalgae from five areas. Significant differences were noticed in trace metal concentration in macroalgae, and a large range of variations between the minimum and maximum concentrations of trace metals was found. Trace metals detected in macroalgae generally occur in adsorbed and absorbed forms. Environmental and biological factors jointly control the trace metal compositions and concentrations in macroalgae. The complexity and variation of these factors cause significant differences in trace metal concentrations in macroalgae. Environmental factors play a more important role in controlling trace metal compositions and concentrations when external available trace metals are beyond requirement for algal metabolism and growth, especially for non-essential trace metals; however, when the external available trace metals just satisfy the needs of algal metabolism and growth, biological factors would play a more important role, especially for essential trace metals. Interactions among the trace metals can also influence their compositions and concentrations in macroalgae. It is also discussed how to make macroalgae as an excellent biomonitor for trace metals.

  9. Trace metal speciation and bioavailability in anaerobic digestion: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Pham Minh; Ketheesan, Balachandran; Yan, Zhou; Stuckey, David

    2016-01-01

    Trace metals are essential for the growth of anaerobic microorganisms, however, in practice they are often added to anaerobic digesters in excessive amounts, which can lead to inhibition. The concept of bioavailability of metals in anaerobic digestion has been poorly understood in the past, and a lack of deep understanding of the relationship between trace metal speciation and bioavailability can result in ineffective metal dosing strategies for anaerobic digesters. Sequential extraction schemes are useful for fractionating trace metals into their different forms, and metal sulfides can serve as a store and source for trace metals during anaerobic digestion, while natural/synthetic chelating agents (soluble microbial products-SMPs, extracellular polysaccharides-EPS, and EDTA/NTA) are capable of controlling trace metal bioavailability. Nevertheless, more work is needed to: investigate the speciation and bioavailability of Ca, Mg, Mn, W, and Se; compare the bioavailability of different forms of trace metals e.g. carbonates, sulfides, phosphates to different anaerobic trophic groups; determine what factors influence metal sulfide dissolution; investigate whether chelating agents can increase trace metal bioavailability; develop and adapt specialized analytical techniques, and; determine how trace metal dynamics change in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). PMID:26707985

  10. Trace metal concentrations in tropical mangrove sediments, NE Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miola, Brígida; Morais, Jáder Onofre de; Pinheiro, Lidriana de Souza

    2016-01-15

    Sediment cores were taken from the mangroves of the Coreaú River estuary off the northeast coast of Brazil. They were analyzed for grain size, CaCO3, organic matter, and trace metal (Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu, Al, and Fe) contents. Mud texture was the predominant texture. Levels of trace metals in surface sediments indicated strong influence of anthropogenic processes, and diagenetic processes controlled the trace metal enrichment of core sediments of this estuary. The positive relationships between trace metals and Al and Fe indicate that Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd concentrations are associated mainly with Al and Fe oxy-hydroxides and have natural sources. PMID:26608507

  11. Trace metals analysis in molybdenite mineral sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DC polarography and other related techniques, viz., DPP and DPASV have been successfully used for the simultaneous determination of trace metals in molybdenite mineral sample. The polarograms and voltammograms of sample solution have been recorded in 0.1 M (NH4)2 tartrate supporting electrolyte at two different pH values i.e., 2.7±0.1 and 9.0±0.1. The results indicate the presence of Cu2+, Mo6+, Cd2+, Ni2+, In3+, Fe3+ and W6+ metal ions in the sample. For the determination of tungsten(VI), 11 M HCl has been used as supporting electrolyte. Tungsten(VI) produces a well defined wave/peak with E1/2/Ep=-0.42V/-0.48V vs SCE in 11 M HCl. The quantitative analysis by the method of standard addition shows the mineral sample to have the following composition, Cu2+ ( 14.83), Mo6+ (253.70), Cd2+ (41.36), Ni2+ (16.08), In3+(3.06), Fe3+ (83.00)and W6+ (4.14 )mg/g of the sample. Statistical treatment of the observed voltammetric data reveals high accuracy and good precision of determination. The observed voltammetric results are comparable with those obtained using AAS method. (author)

  12. Analysis of trace metals in various brands of cigarettes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work deals with the analysis of trace metals in various brands of cigarettes belonging to four different countries. In the present research seven trace elements have been determined spectrophotometrically by the use of suitable analytical reagent of the respective metal ions. The metals which has been analysed quantitatively in forty one brand of cigarettes are aluminium, copper, chromium, nickel, iron titanium and zinc. The concentration per cigarette of these metals are in tolerable range. The concentration of above mentioned metal ions is highest in Pakistani cigarettes tobacco while the concentration of nickel is highest in American cigarettes. (author) 221 refs

  13. Trace metal enrichments in Lake Tanganyika sediments: Controls on trace metal burial in lacustrine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulson Brucker, Rebecca; McManus, James; Severmann, Silke; Owens, Jeremy; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the distributions of several key diagenetic reactants (C, S, Fe) and redox-sensitive trace metals (Mo, Cd, Re, U) in sediments from Lake Tanganyika, East Africa. This study includes modern sediments from a chemocline transect, which spans oxygenated shallow waters to sulfidic conditions at depth, as well as ancient sediments from a longer core (˜2 m) taken at ˜900 m water depth. Modern sediments from depths spanning ˜70-335 m are generally characterized by increasing enrichments of C, S, Mo, Cd, and U with increasing water depth but static Fe distributions. It appears that the sedimentary enrichments of these elements are, to varying degrees, influenced by a combination of organic carbon cycling and sulfur cycling. These modern lake characteristics contrast with a period of high total organic carbon (C org), total sulfur (S Tot), and trace metal concentrations observed in the 900 m core, a period which follows the most recent deglaciation (˜18-11 ky). This interval is followed abruptly by an interval (˜11-6 ky) that is characterized by lower C, S, U, and Mo. Consistent with other work we suspect that the low concentrations of S, Mo, and U may indicate a period of intense lake mixing, during which time the lake may have been less productive and less reducing as compared to the present. An alternative, but not mutually exclusive, hypothesis is that changes in the lake's chemical inventory, driven by significant hydrological changes, could be influencing the distribution of sedimentary trace elements through time.

  14. Separation of traces of metal ions from sodium matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkisch, J.; Orlandini, K. A.

    1969-01-01

    Method for isolating metal ion traces from sodium matrices consists of two extractions and an ion exchange step. Extraction is accomplished by using 2-thenoyltrifluoracetone and dithizone followed by cation exchange.

  15. Evaluation of metal trace detachment from dosing pumps using PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano, Omar, E-mail: omar.lozanogarcia@unamur.be [Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Mejia, Jorge [Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Laloy, Julie; Alpan, Lütfiye [Namur Thrombosis and Hemostasis Centre (NTHC), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Toussaint, Olivier [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Cellular Biology (URBC), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Dogné, Jean-Michel [Namur Thrombosis and Hemostasis Centre (NTHC), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Lucas, Stéphane [Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    Metal trace detachment evaluation is essential for instruments destined for pharmaceutical applications, such as pumps. Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was used to determine and quantify metal traces originated from stainless steel and ceramic dosing pumps. Metal traces were quantified from either distilled water samples or cellulose filters in two tests: a short-term test of 16 h mimicking a daily cycle of a dosing pump for industrial applications, and a long-term test of 9 days evaluating the pump wearing. The main result is that ceramic dosing pumps present lower metal detachment than stainless steel counterparts. Traces of Si and Al were found originating from pieces around the pumps (pipes and joints)

  16. Particulate trace metals in Cochin backwaters: Distribution of seasonal indices

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sankaranarayanan, V.N.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Joseph, T.

    A seasonal analysis of particulate trace metals, viz. iron, manganese, zinc, copper, cobalt and nickel collected from 4 stations in Cochin backwaters are presented. The spatial trend for cobalt, iron and nickel was stationary at surface whereas...

  17. Evaluation of metal trace detachment from dosing pumps using PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal trace detachment evaluation is essential for instruments destined for pharmaceutical applications, such as pumps. Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was used to determine and quantify metal traces originated from stainless steel and ceramic dosing pumps. Metal traces were quantified from either distilled water samples or cellulose filters in two tests: a short-term test of 16 h mimicking a daily cycle of a dosing pump for industrial applications, and a long-term test of 9 days evaluating the pump wearing. The main result is that ceramic dosing pumps present lower metal detachment than stainless steel counterparts. Traces of Si and Al were found originating from pieces around the pumps (pipes and joints)

  18. Bibliography on cycling of trace metals in freshwater ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaRiviere, M.G.; Scott, A.J.; Woodfield, W.G.; Cushing, C.E.

    1978-07-01

    This bibliography is a listing of pertinent literature directly addressing the cycling of trace metals in freshwater ecosystems. Data on cycling, including the influences of environmental mediators, are included. 151 references.

  19. Bibliography on cycling of trace metals in freshwater ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography is a listing of pertinent literature directly addressing the cycling of trace metals in freshwater ecosystems. Data on cycling, including the influences of environmental mediators, are included. 151 references

  20. Evaluation of metal trace detachment from dosing pumps using PIXE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Omar; Mejia, Jorge; Laloy, Julie; Alpan, Lütfiye; Toussaint, Olivier; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Lucas, Stéphane

    2014-07-01

    Metal trace detachment evaluation is essential for instruments destined for pharmaceutical applications, such as pumps. Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was used to determine and quantify metal traces originated from stainless steel and ceramic dosing pumps. Metal traces were quantified from either distilled water samples or cellulose filters in two tests: a short-term test of 16 h mimicking a daily cycle of a dosing pump for industrial applications, and a long-term test of 9 days evaluating the pump wearing. The main result is that ceramic dosing pumps present lower metal detachment than stainless steel counterparts. Traces of Si and Al were found originating from pieces around the pumps (pipes and joints).

  1. Trace metal emissions from the Estonian oil shale fired power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aunela-Tapola, Leena A.; Frandsen, Flemming; Häsänen, Erkki K.

    1998-01-01

    in the flue gases of the studied oil shale plant contribute, however, to clearly higher total trace metal emission levels compared to modern coal fired power plants. Although the old electrostatic precipitators in the plant have been partly replaced by state-of-the-art electrostatic precipitators......Emission levels of selected trace metals from the Estonian oil shale fired power plant were studied. The plant is the largest single power plant in Estonia with an electricity production capacity of 1170 MWe (1995). Trace metals were sampled from the flue gases by a manual method incorporating...... a two-fraction particle sampling and subsequent absorption of the gaseous fraction. The analyses were principally performed with ICP-MS techniques. The trace metal contents of Estonian oil shale were found to be in the same order of magnitude as of coal on average. The high total particle concentrations...

  2. Mobility of trace metals in retention pond sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Durand, C.; Ruban, V.; A. AMBLES

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on tracez mobility on the sediments of several road and urban infiltration / decantation ponds in France ; the trace metal concentrations are indeed high. The potential mobility of trace metals (cadmium, nickel, chromium, copper, lead and zinc) was evaluated by application of the sequential extraction BCR protocol. Results have been compared with those from the IHSS protocol, which allows for the extraction of various form of organic matter. Cadmium ...

  3. Trace metals -- a potential threat to our fishing industry

    OpenAIRE

    Oladimeji, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Trace metals constitute a major form of water pollutant that can adversely affect fish production. The potentially toxic metals have been identified as lead, zinc, copper, arsenic, antimony, mercury beryllium, barium, cadmium, chromium, nickel, selenium among others. Preliminary laboratory studies have been directed to the determination of traces of lead in the aquatic biota and its toxicity. There are indications that the levels reported in effluents from some of the industries may be above ...

  4. Lability and solubility of trace metals in soils

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Lingchen

    2014-01-01

    The continuing need for improved assessment of risk from heavy metal contamination of the environment has prompted scientific interest in quantifying and predicting metal solubility, ‘lability’ and bioavailability. This has led to the development of new techniques to fractionate and speciate trace metals in soils. The objectives of the current study were to increase understanding of the effects of (i) soil properties, (ii) contaminant source and (iii) contact time on metal lability and solu...

  5. Influence of biochar amendments on marine sediment trace metal bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, G. E.; Hsu-Kim, H.

    2014-12-01

    Biochar has become a desirable material for use in agricultural application to enhance soil quality and in-situ soil and sediment remediation to immobilize organic contaminants. We investigated the effects of biochar sediment amendments on the bioavailability of a suite of inorganic trace metals (Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb) in contaminated sediments from multiple sites in Elizabeth River, VA. We incubated sediments in microcosms with a variety of water column redox and salinity conditions and compared sediments amended with two types of woody biochar to sediments amended with charcoal activated carbon and unamended sediments. We leached sediments in artificial gut fluid mimic of the benthic invertebrate Arenicola marina as a measure of bioavailability of the trace metals analyzed. In unamended anaerobic sediments, the gut fluid mimic leachable fraction of each trace metal is 1-4% of the total sediment concentration for each metal. Initial results indicate that in anaerobic microcosms, woody biochar sediment amendments (added to 5% dry wt) decrease the gut fluid mimic leachable fraction by 30-90% for all trace metals analyzed, and have comparable performance to charcoal activated carbon amendments. However, in microcosms without controlled redox conditions, woody biochar amendments increase the bioavailable fraction of Ni and Cu by up to 80%, while decreasing the bioavailable fraction of Co, Zn, and Pb by approximately 50%; charcoal activated carbon amendments decreased the bioavailability of all trace metals analyzed by approximately 20%. In microcosms without an overlying water column, biochar and activated carbon amendments had no significant effects on trace metal bioavailability. This research demonstrates that biochar can effectively decrease the bioavailability of trace metals in marine sediments, but its efficiency is metal-specific, and environmental conditions impact biochar performance.

  6. Trace metal accumulation in carbonate biominerals of the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demina, L. L.; Oskina, N. S.; Galkin, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    New data on trace metal (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb) distribution in carbonate biominerals formed in geochemically different oceanic environments are discussed. Calcite shells of shelf and deepwater hydrothermal vent mussels as well as planktic foraminifers and pteropods from the central Atlantic Ocean have been studied. The variability in concentrations of most trace elements between different groups of calcifying organisms are usually within one order of magnitude, except for Fe and Mn, the elevated contents of which in microfossils are caused by post-sedimentation interaction. Different groups of calcifying organisms demonstrate a biogeochemical uniformity in trace metal accumulation during the biomineralization processes.

  7. Trace metal emissions from the Estonian oil shale fired power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aunela-Tapola, Leena A.; Frandsen, Flemming; Häsänen, Erkki K.

    1998-01-01

    Emission levels of selected trace metals from the Estonian oil shale fired power plant were studied. The plant is the largest single power plant in Estonia with an electricity production capacity of 1170 MWe (1995). Trace metals were sampled from the flue gases by a manual method incorporating a...... in the flue gases of the studied oil shale plant contribute, however, to clearly higher total trace metal emission levels compared to modern coal fired power plants. Although the old electrostatic precipitators in the plant have been partly replaced by state-of-the-art electrostatic precipitators......, the majority of the boilers are currently equipped with the old precipitators. The results of the study show remarkably high concentrations of toxic heavy metals in the flue gases (e.g., Pb, Zn, Mn and As: >200 μg/m3 each) and clear accumulation of Pb, Cd, Zn, Tl and As on the fly ash. Additionally...

  8. Sedimentary input of trace metals from the Chukchi Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Islas, A. M.; Seguré, M.; Rember, R.; Nishino, S.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution of trace metals in the Arctic Ocean has implications for their global cycles, yet until recently few trace metal observations were available from this rapidly changing ocean. Profiles of dissolved Fe from recent Japanese field efforts in the Western Canada Basin (2008, 2010) indicate the broad Chukchi Shelf as a source of Fe to the halocline of the Western Canada Basin. Here we present dissolved and particulate data for crustal (Al, Mn, Fe) and non-crustal elements (Co, Cu, Zn) from the productive Chukchi Sea to characterize the sedimentary input of these metals to shelf waters contributing to the halocline layer of the Canada Basin. Water column profiles were collected in late summer 2013 onboard the R/V Mirai at 10 stations from the Bering Strait to the slope, and at a time-series (10 days) station located over the outer shelf. A narrow and variable (5-10 m) benthic boundary layer was sampled at the time-series station with highly elevated dissolved and suspended particulate metal concentrations. High metal concentrations were also observed in the subsurface at a station over Barrow Canyon where mixing is enhanced. Reactivity of suspended particulate metals was determined by the leachable vs. refractory fractions. Metal concentrations were determined by ICP-MS. Trace metal transport from the shelf to the interior will be discussed in context with shelf mechanisms contributing to this export, and to expected future changes in the Arctic Ocean.

  9. Trace metals and cancer: The case of neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouget, B. E-mail: gouget@drecam.cea.fr; Sergeant, C.; Llabador, Y.; Deves, G.; Vesvres, M.H.; Simonoff, M.; Benard, J

    2001-07-01

    N-myc oncogene amplification is one of the most established prognostic factors in neuroblastoma (NB), a young children solid tumor. Amounts of ferritin, an iron storage protein, are abnormally increased in serum of patients with advanced stage disease. N-myc amplified NB cells can synthesize zinc metalloenzymes allowing tumor invasion and metastases formation. The aim of this study was to find a relationship between N-myc amplification and trace metals in human neuroblasts. Coupling PIXE and RBS techniques, nuclear microprobe allowed to analyze elemental distributions and to determine trace metal concentrations within cultured neuroblasts characterized by various degrees of N-myc amplification. They were compared to trace metal distributions and concentrations in tumor xenograft models of human NB, after injection of cells from the same lines in athymic nude mice. Our data allowed to establish a relation between trace metal contents and mechanisms of NB oncogenesis, amplified cell lines representing more aggressive phenotypes of the disease. They should be confirmed by analysis of cultured neuroblasts and tumors issued from a non-amplified cell line transfected with the N-myc oncogene.

  10. LASER-ENHANCED IONIZATION SPECTROMETRY FOR TRACE METAL ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Turk, G; Travis, J.; Devoe, J.

    1983-01-01

    Laser-enhanced ionization spectrometry is an application of optogalvanic spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of trace concentrations of metallic elements in flames. This paper reviews the scientific literature on this subject, and summarizes the performance of the method in its present state of development.

  11. Resolving and modelling trace metal partitioning in a freshwater sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elevated concentrations of trace metals in sediments pose toxicological risks to biota and may impair water quality. the sediment-water interface is the site where gradients in physical, chemical and biological properties are the greatest. Both chemical and microbiological transformation processes are responsible for cycling elements between water and sediments. (Author)

  12. Trace metals and cancer: The case of neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouget, B.; Sergeant, C.; Llabador, Y.; Devès, G.; Vesvres, M. H.; Simonoff, M.; Bénard, J.

    2001-07-01

    N- myc oncogene amplification is one of the most established prognostic factors in neuroblastoma (NB), a young children solid tumor. Amounts of ferritin, an iron storage protein, are abnormally increased in serum of patients with advanced stage disease. N- myc amplified NB cells can synthesize zinc metalloenzymes allowing tumor invasion and metastases formation. The aim of this study was to find a relationship between N- myc amplification and trace metals in human neuroblasts. Coupling PIXE and RBS techniques, nuclear microprobe allowed to analyze elemental distributions and to determine trace metal concentrations within cultured neuroblasts characterized by various degrees of N- myc amplification. They were compared to trace metal distributions and concentrations in tumor xenograft models of human NB, after injection of cells from the same lines in athymic nude mice. Our data allowed to establish a relation between trace metal contents and mechanisms of NB oncogenesis, amplified cell lines representing more aggressive phenotypes of the disease. They should be confirmed by analysis of cultured neuroblasts and tumors issued from a non-amplified cell line transfected with the N- myc oncogene.

  13. Trace metals and cancer: The case of neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N-myc oncogene amplification is one of the most established prognostic factors in neuroblastoma (NB), a young children solid tumor. Amounts of ferritin, an iron storage protein, are abnormally increased in serum of patients with advanced stage disease. N-myc amplified NB cells can synthesize zinc metalloenzymes allowing tumor invasion and metastases formation. The aim of this study was to find a relationship between N-myc amplification and trace metals in human neuroblasts. Coupling PIXE and RBS techniques, nuclear microprobe allowed to analyze elemental distributions and to determine trace metal concentrations within cultured neuroblasts characterized by various degrees of N-myc amplification. They were compared to trace metal distributions and concentrations in tumor xenograft models of human NB, after injection of cells from the same lines in athymic nude mice. Our data allowed to establish a relation between trace metal contents and mechanisms of NB oncogenesis, amplified cell lines representing more aggressive phenotypes of the disease. They should be confirmed by analysis of cultured neuroblasts and tumors issued from a non-amplified cell line transfected with the N-myc oncogene

  14. Unexpected Consequences: Gold Mining in Peru and Trace Metal Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R. Z.; Pinedo-Gonzalez, P.; Clark, K. E.; West, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Artisanal miners in the Peruvian Amazon, especially in the Madre de Dios region, are targeting fluvial deposits along riverbanks as part of a modern-day gold rush. These miners often use mercury, causing Hg pollution and ecological damage. Research on the environmental consequences of these mines has focused primarily on the fate of Hg, and to date little work has considered whether mining river sediments affects the release and cycling of other trace metals. This project measures trace metal concentrations in soil and vegetation samples developed on fluvial sediments at one mine site and two non-mine (control) sites across gradients in natural plant succession and riverbank composition. Some metals, including Pb and Mo, showed leachable metal concentrations (determined using EPA Method 2050B and ICP-MS analysis) that were lower in mine site soils than control site soils, but higher in mine site vegetation than control site vegetation. These results held across all gradients in natural plant succession and soil composition. This suggests that metals may be preferentially mobilized from the soil and taken up by surrounding vegetation as a result of mining activities. Soils were also treated with a sequential leach to separate metals that are exchangeable, bound to carbonates, bound to Fe and Mn oxides, bound to organic matter and in the residual phase. Initial data shows that trace metal concentrations are generally lower in all phases from mine soils vs. control soils, across all gradients in natural plant succession and soil composition. Trace metal mobilization due to mining is facilitated by changing pH or redox conditions - e.g., by exposing buried minerals to water and oxygen. Fluvial sediments at these studied sites were already exposed during their erosion and transport, but anoxic conditions following deposition may allow a build-up of metals that are mobilized once sediments are re-worked by mining. It is also possible that Hg affects the mobility of other

  15. Bioavailability of metals-trace in sediments: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical association of metals in sediments provides an indication of its release by physical, chemical and biological processes, with toxic effects under certain environmental conditions. Knowing about their chemical bonds in sediments, can recognize specific sources of pollution, and speciation of trace metals is important for bioavailability and toxicity to animals and plants. The accumulation of these particles in the sediment occur by the following mechanisms: a) adsorption to the finest particles; b) precipitating of the element in the form of compounds; c) co-precipitating of the element with iron and manganese oxides; d) complexation with organic matter; e) incorporation into the crystal lattice of minerals. Currently, five phases are considered when studying the bioavailability of trace elements in sediments: a) the exchangeable phase, MgCl2 (causes saltiness change); b) leachable phase, (acetic acid causes pH change); c) reducible phase (hydroxylamine hydrochloride causes release of the bound metals linked to Fe and Mn oxides); d) oxidized phase, the peroxide hydrogen (cause the degradation of organic matter); e) the residual pseudo-phase, the aqua regia (cause release of metals associated to minerals). The first three phases are considered the most bioavailable. In the last two fractions, the metals are linked to sediment constituents and not bioavailable. The organic phase is relatively stable and the metal present therein are removed under oxidative conditions. Metals present in the pseudo-phase residual measure the degree of environmental pollution, since great amount of metals at this stage indicates a lower degree of pollution

  16. Trace metal levels in sediments of Pearl Harbor (Hawaii)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to measure the distribution of lead and other trace metals in the sediments of Pearl Harbon (Hawaii) to determine whether paint chips from vessels of the US Navy's Inactive Fleet have affected the environmental quality of Middle Loch. Sediment cores (ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 m long) were collected from Middle Loch near the Naval Inactive Ships Maintenance Facility and in an area of West Loch that is relatively isolated and unaffected by naval operations. Concentrations of copper, lead, and zinc averaged 180 μg/g, 49 μg/g, and 272 μg/g, respectively, in recent Middle Loch sediments. These concentrations are significantly higher than those in either historical Middle Loch sediments or recent West Loch sediments. However, except for lead, the concentrations in recent Middle Loch sediments are similar to those of older Middle Loch sediments, which indicates that the increase in trace metal contamination began before the onset of Inactive Fleet operations (about 1946). Increased trace metal levels in recent Middle Loch sediments might be expected to result from two potential sources: (1) sewage discharges and (2) paint from inactive vessels. Since paint contains elevated levels of lead and zinc but little copper, the elevated copper levels in Middle Loch sediments tend to implicate sewage as the source of trace metal contamination. Moreover, the lead:zinc ratio of recent Middle Loch sediments (0.18:1) is a factor of 10 lower than that measured in paint (2.1:1), and the Middle Loch lead:zinc ratio is not significantly greater than that measured in recent West Loch sediments (0.21:1). Hence, we suggest that sewage rather than paint is the major source of trace metal contamination of Middle Loch. This is consistent with the findings of a previous study by US navy personnel

  17. Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamalidis, Athanasios K; Torres, Sharon G; Hakala, J Alexandra; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J; Carroll, Susan

    2012-02-05

    Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising, however, possible CO₂ or CO₂-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define trace metal source terms from the reaction of supercritical CO₂, storage reservoir brines, reservoir and cap rocks. Storage reservoir source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, basalts and cements from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin – Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution is tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g. pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments due to the presence of CO₂. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rock exceed the MCLs by an order of magnitude while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the reservoir and caprock source term to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

  18. Trace metals in lignites and ashes of greek power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace metal analysis of lignite and its ashes originating from the two main coal fields of low energy lignite in Greece and used in power stations was carried out. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to determine the content of about 30 minor and major elements. The uranium content of southern Greek lignites was found to be exceptionally high. The present data are correlated with those of the authors' previous investigation. (author) 5 refs.; 3 tabs

  19. Radionuclides and trace metals in eastern Mediterranean Sea algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three types of sea alga distributed along the Syrian coast have been collected and analyzed for radioactivity and trace elements. Results have shown that 137Cs concentrations in all the analyzed sample were relatively low (less than 1.2 Bq kg-1 dry weight) while the levels of naturally occurring radionuclides, such as 210Po and 210Pb, were found to be high in most samples; the highest observed value (27.43 Bq kg-1 dry weight) for 210Po being in the red Jania longifurca alga. In addition, most brown alga species were also found to accumulate 210Po, which indicates their selectivity to this isotope. On the other hand, brown alga (Cystoseira and Sargassum Vulgare) have shown a clear selectivity for some trace metals such as Cr, As, Cu and Co, this selectivity may encourage their use as biomonitor for pollution by trace metals. Moreover, the red alga species were found to contain the highest levels of Mg while the brown alga species were found to concentrate Fe, Mn, Na and K and nonmetals such as Cl, I and Br

  20. Modelling trace metal partitioning in forest floors of northern soils near metal smelters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace metal (TM) mobility and toxicity varies with changing soil conditions. Geochemical models can account for the influence of soil characteristics on TM behaviour. We tested the effectiveness of the Stockholm humic model (SHM), and the NICA-Donnan model (NDM) to estimate partitioning coefficients (log Kd) in 26 forest floor horizons of podzolic soils enriched in trace metals from deposition by metal smelters. We wanted to know if a consistent approach could be applied to model metal partitioning in forest floors without optimizing each individual soil. When optimized, the SHM reproduced the partitioning of Cd, Cu and Zn but not Pb. It was necessary to revise the affinity constants for the NDM to simultaneously simulate the partitioning of the four metals. Revised affinity constants for the NDM model based on a fixed definition of soil organic carbon, i.e., a fixed ratio of fulvic and humic acids per unit carbon, reproduced metal partitioning more effectively in an independent data set of 16 soils than the use of generic affinity constants available for these models. From the perspective of the applicability of these models to risk assessment, this result suggests geochemical models using affinity constants that have been verified and/or modified against multiple soils from a region can provide good estimates of metal partitioning on a regional scale. - The solid-solution partitioning of trace metals in forest floors contaminated by smelter emissions can be modelled using a single set of model parameters for soil organic matter

  1. Trace metal transport by marine microorganisms: implications of metal coordination kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Robert J. M.; Morel, François M. M.

    1993-01-01

    Marine microorganisms have transport systems capable of accumulating essential trace metals present at low oceanic concentrations—1 pM to 1 nM. In marine phytoplankton, Fe, Mn, Zn and Ni transport has been shown to involve complexation by membrane carriers. By analysing the kinetics of the transport process and accounting for the inherently slow coordination reactions of some of these metals, we predict optimum properties and minimum numbers of sites for the transport systems. Limits to trace metal uptake, and thereby to growth rates, may arise from finite space for these transport sites in the membrane, competition from other metals and the rate of diffusion to the cell. These types of nutrient limitation should exhibit different size dependencies and therefore be important in determining ecosystem structure. The concentrations of inorganically complexed species of nutrient metals remaining in the surface ocean appear to be correlated with predicted rates of metal complexation by trace metal transport sites, suggesting that kinetic liability controls the bioavailability of these metals and their rate of removal from the surface ocean.

  2. The ALSC upstate New York ambient trace metals monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal of the monitoring program is to obtain a long-term and general rural background of ambient trace-metal concentrations in upstate New York. The resulting data will provide a baseline that may be used to track any future trends in atmospheric metallic loadings in that region. In this study, the ambient trace-metal concentrations at five rural sites will be monitored for 2 yr. Automatic dichotomous samplers with a PM10 inlet are being used to collect fine particles and coarse particles. During the 2-yr study, 7,300 samples will be collected. Of these, 1,498 fine-particle samples and 150 coarse-particle samples will be analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The remainder of the samples will be archived. Equipment has been installed at the sites, and sampling has continued since October 1, 1991. In addition to ambient particle collection, wet deposition samples are being collected weekly for a 2-yr period at the Moss Lake site. Similarly, samples will be collected at Lake Champlain starting in the spring of 1992. Portions of these samples will be freeze-dried and analyzed by INAA. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry will be used to analyze some of the samples to verify these results for certain elements. In addition, the samples will be analyzed for SO4-2 and NO3-

  3. Volatilisation and removal of trace metals at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojtahedi, W. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland). Laboratory of Fuel Processing and Lubrication Technology); Mroueh, U.-M. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland). Chemical Laboratory)

    1989-01-01

    Granular-bed filtration is investigated as an alternative to the more conventional removal systems (such as ESP and bag-filters). It is generally believed that none of these conventional devices is capable of operating at high temperatures. Moreover, a sizeable proportion of the volatilised trace metals in combustion and gasification processes will exit from the reactor in the vapour phase and these purification devices are not designned to remove the gaseous species. An inert gas such as nitrogen is heated and passed through two externally heated tubes, the first containing a metal-compound (to be investigated), volatilising some of the compound at ppm level. The gas then passes through a bed of solid particles placed on a porous plate positioned in the second tube. The gas is sampled just above and below the second tube simultaneously for the trace metal content and analysed. The removal mechanism and efficiency is investigated under varying conditions of temperature and residence time for different solid adsorbents.

  4. Trace metal concentrations in zooplankton from the eastern Arabian Sea and western Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rejomon, G.; Balachandran, K.K.; Nair, M.; Joseph, T.; DineshKumar, P.K.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Nair, K.K.C.; Pillai, N.G.K.

    : [Petrisor, Ioana] At: 06:22 9 April 2008 Environmental Forensics, 9:22–32, 2008 Copyright C© Taylor & Francis Group, LLC ISSN: 1527–5922 print / 1527–5930 online DOI: 10.1080/15275920701506193 Trace Metal Concentrations in Zooplankton from the Eastern... to the bioavailability of this metal in the seawater. Keywords: Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal, zooplankton, trace metals, bioaccumulation Introduction Trace metals in aquatic systems are distributed over different compartments, such as the dissolved state, colloidal state...

  5. Effects of gypsum on trace metals in soils and earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liming; Kost, Dave; Tian, Yongqiang; Guo, Xiaolu; Watts, Dexter; Norton, Darrell; Wolkowski, Richard P; Dick, Warren A

    2014-01-01

    Mined gypsum has been beneficially used for many years as an agricultural amendment. A large amount of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is produced by removal of SO from flue gas streams when fuels with high S content are burned. The FGD gypsum, similar to mined gypsum, can enhance crop production. However, information is lacking concerning the potential environmental impacts of trace metals, especially Hg, in the FGD gypsum. Flue gas desulfurization and mined gypsums were evaluated to determine their ability to affect concentrations of Hg and other trace elements in soils and earthworms. The study was conducted at four field sites across the United States (Ohio, Indiana, Alabama, and Wisconsin). The application rates of gypsums ranged from 2.2 Mg ha in Indiana to 20 Mg ha in Ohio and Alabama. These rates are 2 to 10 times higher than typically recommended. The lengths of time from gypsum application to soil and earthworm sampling were 5 and 18 mo in Ohio, 6 mo in Indiana, 11 mo in Alabama, and 4 mo in Wisconsin. Earthworm numbers and biomass were decreased by FGD and mined gypsums in Ohio. Among all the elements examined, Hg was slightly increased in soils and earthworms in the FGD gypsum treatments compared with the control and the mined gypsum treatments. The differences were not statistically significant except for the Hg concentration in the soil at the Wisconsin site. Selenium in earthworms in the FGD gypsum treatments was statistically higher than in the controls but not higher than in the mined gypsum treatments at the Indiana and Wisconsin sites. Bioaccumulation factors for nondepurated earthworms were statistically similar or lower for the FGD gypsum treatments compared with the controls for all elements. Use of FGD gypsum at normal recommended agricultural rates seems not to have a significant impact on concentrations of trace metals in earthworms and soils. PMID:25602559

  6. Estimation of trace metal contents in locally-baked breads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to establish base line levels, estimation of some essential trace metals (Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn) has been conducted in four brands of fifteen locally baked breads of Rawalpindi /Islamabad area employing Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS). The samples were digested in a mixture of nitric acid and perchloric acid and the analysis was done with air-acetylene flame. The reliability of the procedure employed was verify by analyzing Standard Reference Material, i.e., wheat flour (NBS-SRM-1567) for its Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn contents which were in good agreement with the certified values. The results revealed that brown breads contained higher amount of Fe 177.3 micro g g/sup -1/and Zn 19.27 micro g g/sup -1/while levels of Cu 21.90 micro g g/-sup 1/was found higher in the samples of plain bread. The determined metal concentrations in the bread samples were compared with the reported values for other countries. The effect of kneading/baking/slicing processes on the concentration levels of these metals was also studied. The daily intake of these metals through this source was calculated and compared with the recommended dietary allowance. (author)

  7. Radioactive and stable trace metals in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments designed to determine the removal rates and mechanisms of various radioactive trace metals from the water of Narragansett Bay were performed in the spring and early summer in 150-liter microcosms simulating the bay. Overall removal rates were first order for all elements studied in the spring (54Mn, 58Co, 59Fe, 65Zn, /sup 115m/Cd) and most elements studied in the summer (58Co, 65Zn, 59Fe, 134Cs, 210Po, 228Th). For those elements studied in both seasons, removal was slower in the summer than in the spring. During the summer experiment 54Mn, 51Cr, and 75Se showed rapid first order removal in the initial 1 to 2 weeks followed by much slower removal. The seasonal differences appear to be the result of the association of the metals with low molecular weight organic compounds present only during the summer. Mass balance shows that the major removal reservoirs during the spring were the tank walls, suspended sediment, and the upper layers of the sediment. The seasonal behavior of the metals in the tanks was qualitatively similar to that of some radionuclides and stable metals studied in the bay

  8. Contribution to biomonitoring of some trace metals by deciduous tree leaves in urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasević, M; Vukmirović, Z; Rajsić, S; Tasić, M; Stevanović, B

    2008-02-01

    Leaves of the deciduous tree species, horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L.) and Turkish hazel (Corylus colurna L.) were used as accumulative biomonitors of trace metal pollution in the urban area of Belgrade. Using differential pulse anodic stripping voltametry, trace metal concentrations (Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd) were determined at the single leaf level (ten leaves per species, per month), during two successive years with markedly different atmospheric level of trace metals. Increased trace metal concentrations in the leaves of A. hippocastanum reflected elevated atmospheric trace metal pollution, whereas C. colurna L. did not respond accordingly. The contents of Pb and Zn in soil over the same period also followed this trend. Anatomical analyses, in young as well as in old leaves of both species, indicated typical foliar injuries of plants exposed to stressful air conditions. Water relations that correspond to leaf age may have contributed to the considerable trace metal accumulation in leaves. PMID:17505898

  9. Monitoring trace metal contamination in salt marshes of the Westerschelde estuary

    OpenAIRE

    Beeftink, W.G.; Nieuwenhuize, J.

    1986-01-01

    Problems in monitoring trace metals in the soil subsystem are due to variations in the input of these metals, the type of estuarine circulation and the distribution of physical and chemical conditions in the salt-marsh deposits. The degree of metal enrichment and the spectrum of chemical speciation of the metals by means of a sequential extraction procedure is shortly discussed. Problems in monitoring trace metals in salt-marsh plants are discussed with respect to the bioavailability of these...

  10. Trace metal speciation? An essential aspect of biomonitoring to avoid wrong conclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Richir, Jonathan; Lepoint, Gilles; Donnay, Annick; Lejeune, Pierre; Gonzalez, Jean-louis; Bouchoucha, Marc; Chiffoleau, Jean-François; Andral, Bruno; Gobert, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is widely used as a bioindicator species in active monitoring surveys. As a filter feeder artificially maintained in the water column, it bioaccumulates trace metals from the surrounding water in their dissolved and particulate forms. However, most monitoring surveys don’t take into account that speciation aspect when studying trace metal accumulation kinetics in mussels. In the framework of the STARECAPMED project, we monitored trace metal c...

  11. Novel preconcentration techniques for the determination of trace metal ions in environmental matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Eva

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of single or multiple metal ions in trace amounts in environmental matrices is a general problem. As a result methods for the selective preconcentration of trace metals are continually investigated. Successful development and application of four novel preconcentration techniques for the determination of trace metal ions are described in the bulk of this thesis. In chapter 1 traditional and novel preconcentration approaches including their inherent advantages and disadva...

  12. Accumulation of trace metals in coastal marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ECN at Petten carries out a survey on the occurrence of trace metals in coastal marine organisms. The survey is aimed to provide an estimate of concentration factors in local marine organisms for neutron activation products released as low-level liquid radioactive waste into the North Sea. The organisms studied are red and brown seaweed, edible mussels ans shrimp. A summary of the results of analyses of iron, cobalt, zinc, silver and antimony in these organisms is presented. Concentration factors derived from mean stable-element concentrations range from about 50 for Sb in red seaweed and shrimp to about 104 for Fe in red seaweed and mussels. The largest variation is shown for zinc in seaweed, which variation is seasonal and most pronounced in brown seaweed. A discussion of the data is presented in relation to data from other West-European coastal areas and to data used for the radiological assessment of deep sea disposal of radioactive waste

  13. Relation between tobacco trace metals and soil type in Lebanon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of study was to determine the concentration of nutrients in soil and tobacco samples from different agricultural regions. We studied the influence of soil type on tobacco quality and the transfer and accumulation of trace metals in tobacco leaves. The results showed that human activities in the Nabatiyeh region had a none pronounced effect on one agricultural plot than on its neighbor. The transfer factor of elements between soil and tobacco plants showed that major constituents are leached and absorbed from the soil, whereas some trace elements are finely absorbed from the alkaline soil. Statistical analysis of the micro nutrients in soil and plants confirmed the existence of two principal factors that control the distribution of elements in different compartments. Four tobacco plots in different regions were also studied as a functions of their pedologic and geologic characteristics. The major elements varied in all regions, but were always ordered Ca > Mg > Na > K. The highest transfer factor for nutrients was found in young soil layers. In the Akkar region, clay nutrients form complexes with micronutrients. Thereby reducing their absorption by tobacco plants. (author)

  14. Heavy Metal and Trace Metal Analysis in Soil by Sequential Extraction: A Review of Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda Jo Zimmerman; David C. Weindorf

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of heavy and trace metal contamination in soil can be arduous, requiring the use of lengthy and intricate extraction procedures which may or may not give reliable results. Of the many procedures in publication, some are designed to operate within specific parameters while others are designed for more broad application. Most procedures have been modified since their inception which creates ambiguity as to which procedure is most acceptable in a given situation. For this study, t...

  15. A combined sensor for simultaneous high resolution 2-D imaging of oxygen and trace metals fluxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahl, Henrik; Warnken, Kent W.; Sochaczewski, Lukasz;

    2012-01-01

    (0.2 mu m) chelating resin and records the locally induced trace metal flux during the deployment, whereas the planar optode resolves the O-2 dynamic in near real time at the same location in the sediment. Despite its ultrathin composition, the DGT layer has high carrying capacity for trace metals...

  16. Special and seasonal variations of trace metals in PM10 in Chongqing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Qingquan; XIAN Xuefu; CHEN Gangcai; YANG Qingling

    2005-01-01

    Nineteen trace metals in PM10 were measured by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) at three sites in Chongqing. The special and seasonal variations of trace metals in PM10 samples collected in the downtown were different from those in the background area of Jinyunshan. The source identification indicated that particulate materials were contributed mainly by two sources.

  17. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musich, Mark; Swanson, Michael; Dunham, Grant; Stanislowski, Joshua

    2010-10-05

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m{sup 3} (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m{sup 3} (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most

  18. ADVANCED GASIFICATION MERCURY/TRACE METAL CONTROL WITH MONOLITH TRAPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark A. Musich; Michael L. Swanson; Grant E. Dunham; Joshua J. Stanislowski

    2010-07-31

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most effective arsine

  19. Trace metals in the estuary of the Seine and its approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution and behaviour of trace metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Ti, V and Zn) were studied in the waters and deposited or suspended sediments of the estuary and eastern bay of the Seine river. The various physico-chemical forms - hydrosoluble, exchangeable, chelated, organic forms, were determined by successive fractionations. The abundance of the ionic stock in the estuary cannot explain the decrease of trace metal contents by purely chemical processes. Mixing processes with open sea particles and release of metals induced by the erosion-sedimentation cycles resulting in sediment washing can explain the observations. Metals first trapped in the sediments are freed in the dissolved state; they can be expelled from the estuary and participate in the biological cycles. In the bay sediments, the trace metals were used as tracers of sediment masses, allowing to determine the river deposit areas. The human contribution to trace metal deposits in the Seine river bay was also estimated. (author)

  20. Trace metals distribution in environmental samples from lake Naser, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distribution of heavy metals and trace elements from anthropogenic as well as lithopogenic origin in sediment, soil and water samples from lake Naser has been investigated. The study reviles information on the characteristic lake-typical mean, value and areal pattern of the investigated variables. Soil and sediment samples were analyzed using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), whereas water samples analysis were carried out using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (Icp-Ms). The distribution Cd, Pb and Cu within water column profile - at surface, 5 m, and 40 m depth-along the lake shows proportional relation between the concentration of most of the investigated elements and the depth. The average concentrations of Cd, Pb and Cu in water from the previously selected depths along the lake were (0.13, 0.16, 0.51 ng/ml), (26, 22, 41 ng/ml) and (7.8, 19, 99 ng/ml) respectively. The most elevated elemental concentration was found in Argin bottom sediment, while the lowest concentration was found in Toshki shore sediment. The study provides a preliminary base-line data essential for the investigated area that is pre-industrialized area and represents the location of one of the greatest agricultural projects to be performed in Egypt

  1. Spectrographic determination of trace elements in aluminium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spectrographic method for the determination of twenty trace elements in aluminum metal by the carrier distillation tecnique has been developed. The following elements were considered: B, Cd, Bi, Cu, Fe, Mg, Cr, Mn, Pb, Si, Zn, Sn, Ti, Ca, Na, Ga, Ni, Sb, V and Ag. AgCl, In2O3, NaF, Ga2O3, GeO2 and CuF2 were tested as carriers. Better results were obtained by using 2% In2O3 and 6% AgCl on an alumina base. Several aluminum oxide samples with the same chemical composition but preparared by thermal decomposition of aluminum sulfate and nitrate according to a temperature program were submitted to spectrochemical analysis. The standards were prepared in two different ways: dry-mixing technique and thermal decomposition of aluminum nitrate at 8000C. Some considerations on matrix effect and the extent it affects the accuracy of the method are presented. The precision of the method varies from + - 5% to + - 27%. The accuracy was examined with the aid of X-ray fluorescence technique. (Author)

  2. Trace metal retention in mangrove ecosystems in Guanabara Bay, SE Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, W; Silva-Filho, E V; Oliveira, R R; Lacerda, L D

    2002-11-01

    Along contrasting environmental conditions (e.g., degree of trace metal contamination and mangrove forest structural development), sediments of Laguncularia racemosa-dominated mangrove stands in Guanabara Bay (SE Brazil) presented a trend of trace metal accumulation in forms with low potential of remobilization and biotic uptake. Concurrently, a relatively low transfer of sediment-bound metals to L. racemosa leaves was observed, which may moderate the metal export from the forests via leaf litter transport and the metal availability to enter in food chains based on leaf consumption. PMID:12523527

  3. Interpretation of aerosol trace metal particle size distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis is capable of rapid routine determination of 10--15 elements present in amounts greater than or equal to 1 ng simultaneously in aerosol size fractions as collected by single orifice impactors over short periods of time. This enables detailed study of complex relationships between elements detected. Since absolute elemental concentrations may be strongly influenced by meteorological and topographical conditions, it is useful to normalize to a reference element. Comparison between the ratios of concentrations with aerosol and corresponding values for anticipated sources may lead to the identification of important sources for the elements. Further geochemical insights may be found through linear correlation coefficients, regression analysis, and cluster analysis. By calculating correlations for elemental pairs, an indication of the degree of covariance between the elements is obtained. Preliminary results indicate that correlations may be particle size dependent. A high degree of covariance may be caused either by a common source or may only reflect the conservative nature of the aerosol. In a regression analysis, by plotting elemental pairs and estimating the regression coefficients, we may be able to conclude if there is more than one source operating for a given element in a certain size range. Analysis of clustering of several elements, previously investigated for aerosol filter samples, can be applied to the analysis of aerosol size fractions. Careful statistical treatment of elemental concentrations as a function of aerosol particle size may thus yield significant information on the generation, transport and deposition of trace metals in the atmosphere

  4. On nutrients and trace metals: Effects from Enhanced Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, T.; Hartmann, J.

    2015-12-01

    The application of rock flour on suitable land ("Enhanced Weathering") is one proposed strategy to reduce the increase of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. At the same time it is an old and established method to add fertiliser and influence soil properties. Investigations of this method focused on the impact on the carbonate system, as well as on engineering aspects of a large-scale application, but potential side effects were never discussed quantitatively. We analysed about 120,000 geochemically characterised volcanic rock samples from the literature. Applying basic statistics, theoretical release rates of nutrients and potential contaminants by Enhanced Weathering were evaluated for typical rock types. Applied rock material can contain significant amounts of essential or beneficial nutrients (potassium, phosphorus, micronutrients). Their release can partly cover the demand of major crops like wheat, rice or corn, thereby increasing crop yield on degraded soils. However, the concentrations of considered elements are variable within a specific rock type, depending on the geological setting. High heavy metal concentrations are found in (ultra-) basic rocks, the class with the highest CO2 drawdown potential. More acidic rocks contain less or no critical amounts, but sequester less CO2. Findings show that the rock selection determines the capability to supply significant amounts of nutrients, which could partly substitute industrial mineral fertiliser usage. At the same time, the release of harmful trace element has to be considered. Through careful selection of regionally available rocks, benefits could be maximised and drawbacks reduced. The deployment of Enhanced Weathering to sequester CO2 and to ameliorate soils necessitates an ecosystem management, considering the release and fate of weathered elements in plants, soils and water. Cropland with degraded soils would benefit while having a net negative CO2 effect, while other carbon dioxide removal strategies, like

  5. Adsorption of trace metals to plastic resin pellets in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plastic production pellets collected from beaches of south west England contain variable concentrations of trace metals (Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) that, in some cases, exceed concentrations reported for local estuarine sediments. The rates and mechanisms by which metals associate with virgin and beached polyethylene pellets were studied by adding a cocktail of 5 μg L−1 of trace metals to 10 g L−1 pellet suspensions in filtered seawater. Kinetic profiles were modelled using a pseudo-first-order equation and yielded response times of less than about 100 h and equilibrium partition coefficients of up to about 225 ml g−1 that were consistently higher for beached pellets than virgin pellets. Adsorption isotherms conformed to both the Langmuir and Freundlich equations and adsorption capacities were greater for beached pellets than for virgin pellets. Results suggest that plastics may represent an important vehicle for the transport of metals in the marine environment. - Highlights: ► Beached plastic production pellets contain considerable concentrations of trace metals. ► In laboratory experiments trace metals are shown to adsorb to both virgin and beached pellets. ► Metal adsorption is greater on aged pellets. ► Pellets may represent an important vehicle for metal transport in the marine environment. - Trace metals accumulate on plastic resin pellets in the marine environment through adsorption to the polymer and to chemical and biological attritions thereon.

  6. Trace Metal and Ancillary Data in Puget Sound, 1980 - 1986 (NODC Accession 9100153)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In first of three data reports on the trace metal and ancillary data in Puget Sound and its watershed (Paulson et al., 1991a), all water column, sediment, and...

  7. A baseline study of trace metals in a coral reef sedimentary environment, Lakshadweep Archipelago

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopinath, A.; Nair, S.M.; Kumar, N.C.; Jayalakshmi, K.V.; Pamalal, D.

    Surficial and core samples collected from the sedimentary microenvironments of Lakshadweep Archipelago were analysed for their trace metal contents. The synoptical relations in spatial distributions with respect to environmental conditions such as p...

  8. Guidelines for the determination of selected trace metals in aerosols and in wet precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication describes sampling and analytical procedures suitable for the collection and analysis of representative samples of atmospheric aerosols and wet precipitation for selected trace metals. 11 refs, 2 tabs

  9. Characterizing the Environmental Availability of Trace Metals in Savannah River Site Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkiz, S.M.

    1999-03-18

    An eight step sequential extraction technique was used to characterize the environmental availability of trace metals from background and waste site soil samples collected from the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS).

  10. Trace metal distribution in sediments of northern continental shelf of Crete Island, Eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, S. E.; Dounas, C. G.; Alexandrakis, G.; Koulouri, P.; Drakopoulos, P.

    2009-08-01

    The present study investigates the distribution of trace metals (Zn, Hg, Cd, Cu, and Pb), as indicators of pollution, in the surficial offshore shelf sediments along the northern coast of Heraklion Prefecture (Crete, Mediterranean Sea). The concentrations and the spatial distribution of the different trace metals, in relation to the sedimentological characteristics and the water circulation pattern of the entire continental shelf, are associated with human inshore sources of pollutants located along the coastline of the study area. Although the trace metal concentrations measured are higher than the background values, they are not considered to be dangerous to human health, as they are lower than the standard values given by the World Health Organisation, with only a few localised exceptions. Furthermore, results reveal the important role of local hydrodynamism that moves fine-grained material and associated trace metals offshore (seawards to wave breaking zone) and then transports them eastwards by entrapping them in the prevailing offshore shelf-water circulation.

  11. Portable Sensor for Rapid In Situ Measurement of Trace Toxic Metals in Water Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a sensor to detect select trace toxic heavy metals (Ag, Cd, Mn, Ni, and Zn) in water is proposed. Using an automatic side-stream sampling technique,...

  12. Modelling trace metal background to evaluate anthropogenic contamination in arable soils of south-western France

    OpenAIRE

    Redon, Paul-Olivier; Bur, Thomas; Guiresse, Maritxu; Probst, Jean-Luc; Toiser, Aurore; Revel, Jean-Claude; Jolivet, Claudy; Probst, Anne

    2013-01-01

    International audience The trace metal (TM) content in arable soils has been monitored across a region of France characterised by a large proportion of calcareous soils. Within this particular geological context, the objectives were to first determine the natural levels of trace metals in the soils and secondly, to assess which sites were significantly contaminated. Because no universal contamination assessment method is currently available, four different methods were applied and compared...

  13. Assessment of diffuse trace metal inputs into surface waters - Combining empirical estimates with process based simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindewolf, Marcus; Steinz, André; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    As a result of mining activities since the 13th century, surface waters of the German Mulde catchment suffer from deleterious dissolved and sediment attached lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) inputs. The leaching rate of trace metals with drainage water is a significant criterion for assessing trace metal concentrations of soils and associated risks of ground water pollution. However, the vertical transport rates of trace metals in soils are difficult to quantify. Monitoring is restricted to small lysimeter plots, which limits the transferability of results. Additionally the solid-liquid-transfer conditions in soils are highly variable, primarily due to the fluctuating retention time of percolating soil water. In contrast, lateral sediment attached trace metal inputs are mostly associated with soil erosion and resulting sediment inputs into surface waters. Since soil erosion by water is related to rare single events, monitoring and empirical estimates reveal visible shortcomings. This gap in knowledge can only be closed by process based model calculations. Concerning these calculations it has to be considered, that Pb and Zn are predominantly attached to the fine-grained soil particles (leaching rates from contaminated top soils for standardised transfer conditions and a process based modelling approach for sediment attached trace metal inputs into surface waters. Pb and Zn leaching rates amounts to 20 Mg ha-1 yr-1 resp. 114 Mg ha-1 yr-1. Deviations to observed dissolved trace metal yields at the Bad Düben gauging station are caused by plant uptake and subsoil retention. Sediment attached Pb and Zn input rates amounts to 114 Mg ha-1 yr-1 and 173 Mg ha-1 yr-1 ,which increase measurements by 10 to 25 times. This can only be caused by an inappropriate sampling regime. Routine sampling seems to reflect base load of trace metals rather than total trace metal loads.

  14. A literature review and new data of trace metals fluxes from worldwide active volcanoes

    OpenAIRE

    Calabrese, S.; Università di Palermo, Dip. DiSTeM; Scaglione, S.; Università di Palermo, Dipartimento DiSTeM, Italy; D'Alessandro, W.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Palermo, Palermo, Italia; Brusca, L.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Palermo, Palermo, Italia; Bellomo, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Palermo, Palermo, Italia; Parello, F.; Università di Palermo, Dipartimento CFTA

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic emissions are considered one of the major natural sources of several trace metals (e.g. As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) to the atmosphere [Nriagu, 1989], and the geochemical cycles of these elements have to be considered strongly influenced by volcanic input. However, the accurate estimation of the global volcanic emissions of volatile trace metals into the atmosphere is still affected by a high level of uncertainty. The latter depends on the large variability in the emission of ...

  15. Teflon chemostat for studies of trace metal metabolism in Streptococcus mutans and other bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Strachan, R C; Aranha, H; Lodge, J S; Arceneaux, J E; Byers, B R

    1982-01-01

    A teflon chemostat constructed for studies of microbial trace metal metabolism is described. The utility of this continuous culture system was demonstrated with Streptococcus mutans, in which iron and manganese stimulated growth in ranges of 0.18 to 0.45 and 18 to 54 microM, respectively. This device should facilitate studies of the effect of trace metals on a variety of physiological functions.

  16. Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determinations of some trace metals after coprecipitation with gold-APDC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. For the determination of trace metals in various samples, preconcentration is an inevitable step to overcome interferences. Among various techniques for the separation of trace metals proposed until now, coprecipitation is one of the most useful ones. Many different coprecipitation procedures including use of organic and inorganic collectors have been developed. So far, in the literature, it is reported that APDC, NaDDTC, PAN, TAR, Oxine, etc. as chelating agent for metal-chelate collector have been extensively used for coprecipitation of trace metals. However, metal chelates, especially dithocarbamates, as collectors are ideal for their sensitivities, simplicities and tolerances to interferences.Therefore, in the present work, fundamental studies on the coprecipitation with gold/APDC chelate have been carried out for determination of trace metals in environmental samples by FAAS with microinjection. According to our literature survey, gold/APDC is not used for the coprecipitation of heavy metal ions, until now. In this work, the coprecipitation was carried out in a centrifuge tube. Firstly, the main factors, such as amount of coprecipitant reagent and carrier element, pH of the solution, standing time, sample volume and diverse ions, affecting the coprecipitation of some trace metals were evaluated. Under optimized conditions, the recoveries of Cu, Ni, Pb and Cd were ≥ 95 %. R.S.D. values for ten replicates were lower than 5.0 %. Preconcentration factors were found to be 20. The coprecipitation was applied to various water samples and non-alcoholic beverage.

  17. Effects of Trace Metal Concentrations on the Growth of the Coral Endosymbiont Symbiodinium kawagutii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Irene B; Lin, Senjie; Ho, Jiaxuan; Ho, Tung-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Symbiodinium is an indispensable endosymbiont in corals and the most important primary producer in coral reef ecosystems. During the past decades, coral bleaching attributed to the disruption of the symbiosis has frequently occurred resulting in reduction of coral reef coverage globally. Growth and proliferation of corals require some specific trace metals that are essential components of pertinent biochemical processes, such as in photosynthetic systems and electron transport chains. In addition, trace metals are vital in the survival of corals against oxidative stress because these metals serve as enzymatic cofactors in antioxidative defense mechanisms. The basic knowledge about trace metal requirements of Symbiodinium is lacking. Here we show that the requirement of Symbiodinium kawagutii for antioxidant-associated trace metals exhibits the following order: Fe > Cu/Zn/Mn > Ni. In growth media with Cu, Zn, Mn, and varying Fe concentrations, we observed that Cu, Zn, and Mn cellular quotas were inversely related to Fe concentrations. In the absence of Cu, Zn, and Mn, growth rates increased with increasing inorganic Fe concentrations up to 1250 pM, indicating the relatively high Fe requirement for Symbiodinium growth and potential functional complementarity of these metals. These results demonstrate the relative importance of trace metals to sustain Symbiodinium growth and a potential metal inter replacement strategy in Symbiodinium to ensure survival of coral reefs in an oligotrophic and stressful environment. PMID:26903964

  18. Effects of trace metal concentrations on the growth of the coral endosymbiont Symbiodinium kawagutii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Barra Rodriguez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Symbiodinium is an indispensable endosymbiont in corals and the most important primary producer in coral reef ecosystems. During the past decades, coral bleaching attributed to the disruption of the symbiosis has frequently occurred resulting in reduction of coral reef coverage globally. Growth and proliferation of corals require some specific trace metals that are essential components of pertinent biochemical processes, such as in photosynthetic systems and electron transport chains. In addition, trace metals are vital in the survival of corals against oxidative stress because these metals serve as enzymatic cofactors in antioxidative defense mechanisms. The basic knowledge about trace metal requirement of Symbiodinium is lacking. Here we show that the requirement of S. kawagutii for antioxidant-associated trace metals exhibits the following order: Fe >> Cu/Zn/Mn >> Ni. In growth media with Cu, Zn, Mn and varying Fe concentrations, we observed that Cu, Zn and Mn cellular quotas were inversely related to Fe concentrations. In the absence of Cu, Zn and Mn, growth rates increased with increasing inorganic Fe concentrations up to 1250 pM, indicating the relatively high Fe requirement for Symbiodinium growth and potential functional complementarity of these metals. These results demonstrate the relative importance of trace metals to sustain Symbiodinium growth and a potential metal interreplacement strategy in Symbiodinium to ensure survival of coral reefs in an oligotrophic and stressful environment.

  19. Trace metals in water, sediment and bivalves of a tropical estuary, west coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvez Al-Usmani, S M; Jagtap, T G; Patil, D N

    2015-10-15

    Trace metal pollution was studied in water, sediment and three selected bivalves in Mandovi and Chapora estuaries of Goa. The trace metal in water and sediment of Mandovi was higher than in Chapora. The concentration in the tissues was in the range of 1205.2-2506.7 ppm for Paphia malabarica, 1906.2-2802.6 ppm for Perna viridis and 778.7-1607.5 ppm for Saccostrea cucullata in Mandovi estuary. Tha values for Chapora were 199.4-625.8 ppm for P. malabarica, 812.6-1220.2 for P. viridis and 392.5-418.6 ppm for S. cucullata. The anthropogenic input of metal in Mandovi estuary appears to be mainly responsible for the high accumulation of trace metals. These bivalves have potential to serve as indicator for metal contamination in seafood of Goa. PMID:26228069

  20. The Little Penguin (Eudyptula minor) as an indicator of coastal trace metal pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitoring trace metal and metalloid concentrations in marine animals is important for their conservation and could also reliably reflect pollution levels in their marine ecosystems. Concentrations vary across tissue types, with implications for reliable monitoring. We sampled blood and moulted feathers of the Little Penguin (Eudyptula minor) from three distinct colonies, which are subject to varying levels of anthropogenic impact. Non-essential trace metal and metalloid concentrations in Little Penguins were clearly linked to the level of industrialisation adjacent to the respective foraging zones. This trend was more distinct in blood than in moulted feathers, although we found a clear correlation between blood and feathers for mercury, lead and iron. This study represents the first reported examination of trace metals and metalloids in the blood of any penguin species and demonstrates that this high trophic feeder is an effective bioindicator of coastal pollution. - Highlights: • Trace metals measured in blood and feathers. • Arsenic, Mercury and Lead significantly higher at urban colony. • Correlations found between trace metals in feathers and blood. • Little Penguins are suitable bioindicators for coastal metal pollution. - This study confirms the suitability of the Little Penguin as a bioindicator of coastal metal pollution in coastal areas using non-destructive sampling methods

  1. Determination of trace and heavy metals in some commonly used medicinal herbs in Ayurveda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, Neelesh K; Maity, Niladri; Sarkar, Birendra K; Mukherjee, Pulok K

    2014-11-01

    Traditionally, the herbal drugs are well established for their therapeutic benefits. Depending upon their geographical sources sometimes the trace and heavy metals' content may differ, which may lead to severe toxicity. So, the toxicological and safety assessment of these herbal drugs are one of the major issues in recent days. Eight different plant species including Aloe vera, Centella asiatica, Calendula officinalis, Cucumis sativus, Camellia sinensis, Clitoria ternatea, Piper betel and Tagetes erecta were selected to determine their heavy and trace metals content and thereby to assure their safer therapeutic application. The trace and heavy metals were detected through atomic absorption spectrometry analysis. The selected medicinal plant materials were collected from the local cultivated regions of West Bengal, India, and were digested with nitric acid and hydrochloric acid as specified. Absorbance was measured through atomic absorption spectrometer (AA 303) and the concentration of different trace and heavy metals in the plant samples were calculated. The quantitative determinations were carried out using standard calibration curve obtained by the standard solutions of different metals. The contents of heavy metals were found to be within the prescribed limit. Other trace metals were found to be present in significant amount. Thus, on the basis of experimental outcome, it can be concluded that the plant materials collected from the specific region are safe and may not produce any harmful effect of metal toxicity during their therapeutic application. The investigated medicinal plants contain trace metals such as copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) as well as heavy metals such as arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg), which were present within the permissible limit. PMID:23222691

  2. Heavy Metal and Trace Metal Analysis in Soil by Sequential Extraction: A Review of Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Jo Zimmerman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of heavy and trace metal contamination in soil can be arduous, requiring the use of lengthy and intricate extraction procedures which may or may not give reliable results. Of the many procedures in publication, some are designed to operate within specific parameters while others are designed for more broad application. Most procedures have been modified since their inception which creates ambiguity as to which procedure is most acceptable in a given situation. For this study, the Tessier, Community Bureau of Reference (BCR, Short, Galán, and Geological Society of Canada (GCS procedures were examined to clarify benefits and limitations of each. Modifications of the Tessier, BCR, and GCS procedures were also examined. The efficacy of these procedures is addressed by looking at the soils used in each procedure, the limitations, applications, and future of sequential extraction.

  3. Trace metal dynamics in methanol fed anaerobic granular sludge bed reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandvoort, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Trace metals are essential for anaerobic microorganisms, because they are present as cofactor in many of their enzymes. Therefore anaerobic wastewater treatment systems using these microorganisms to perform biological conversions are dependent on these metals for their (optimal) performance. In prac

  4. Distribution and pollution assessment of trace metals in seawater and sediment in Laizhou Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Dongwei; Zheng, Bing; Fang, Yan; Shen, Ge; Liu, Huijun

    2015-07-01

    Selected trace metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Hg) and arsenic in seawater and surface sediments of Laizhou Bay were determined, to evaluate their spatial distribution, pollution risk and potential ecological risk. Concentrations of the elements were 0.56-2.07, 0.14-0.38, 12.70-18.40, 0.014-0.094, and 1.13-2.37 μg/L in the seawater and 8.94-32.2, 0.18-0.67, 4.51-30.5, 0.006-0.058, and 5.75-15.3 mg/kg in sediments for Pb, Cd, Cu, Hg and As, respectively. High concentrations of the trace metals and arsenic in seawater and surface sediments were generally observed near the river estuary. The pollution risk result of the elements showed that Cu was the prominent trace metal pollutant in seawater, followed by Hg, Pb, Cd and As. The metal complex pollution index in seawater was at a medium level. The most important trace metal pollutant in sediments was Cd, followed by As, Cu, Pb, and Hg. Our pollution assessment suggests that trace metal pollution in Laizhou Bay sediments was at a low level. The potential ecological risk was also low in surface sediment.

  5. Distribution and behavior of trace metals in the sediment and porewater of a tropical coastal wetland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Man, Kwok-Wai; Zheng Jinshu; Leung, Amy P.K.; Lam, Paul K.S.; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Yen Yufong

    2004-07-05

    Vertical profiles (0-30 cm below surface) of four trace metals--Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Lead (Pb) and Zinc (Zn)--in the sediment and sediment porewater of an ecologically important intertidal mudflat in the Mai Po and Inner Deep Bay Ramsar Site were thoroughly studied over a period of 10 months (from March 1999 to January 2000). Two surveys, one in summer and another in winter, involving a total of eight sampling stations were conducted to study the seasonal variation of the remobilization characteristics of these trace metals in the mudflat sediment. The range of depth averaged concentration of these trace metals in the mudflat sediment was: 0.3-0.8 {mu}g/g (Cd); 9.8-91.0 {mu}g/g (Cr); 7.3-69.1 {mu}g/g (Pb); and 39.5-192.0 {mu}g/g (Zn), while that in the sediment porewater was: 0.3-121.1 {mu}g/l (Cd); 3.0-2704.1 {mu}g/l (Cr); 2.6-105.6 {mu}g/l (Pb); and 32.6-4238.3 {mu}g/l (Zn). In general, levels of dissolved trace metals in the sediment porewater were much higher in the summer than in the winter while their concentrations in the sediment were more or less the same throughout the year. Enrichment of Cd, Pb and Zn in the sediment porewater of the upper oxic layer and that of Cr in the oxic-sub-oxic boundary was generally observed. Regions in the vicinity of the Mai Po mangroves and the river mouths of Shenzhen River and Shan Pui River were found to be hotspots of trace metal pollution. Benthic diffusive fluxes of trace metals from the mudflat sediment were also estimated. Of the four trace metals, cadmium showed the greatest tendency toward remobilization from the sediment phase to the more bio-available porewater phase.

  6. Assessment of dietary exposure to trace metals in Baffin Inuit food.

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, H. M.; Kim, C.; Khoday, K; Receveur, O.; Kuhnlein, H V

    1995-01-01

    Chronic metal toxicity is a concern in the Canadian Arctic because of the findings of high metal levels in wildlife animals and the fact that traditional food constitutes a major component of the diet of indigenous peoples. We examined exposure to trace metals through traditional food resources for Inuit living in the community of Qikiqtarjuaq on Baffin Island in the eastern Arctic. Mercury, cadmium, and lead were determined in local food resources as normally prepared and eaten. Elevated con...

  7. Monitoring of Trace Metal Pollution in Meenachil River at Kottayam, Kerala (India)

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Indu V.; Kailash Singh; M Arumugam; Clarson, D.

    2011-01-01

    The water quality of the Meenachil river at Kottayam has been studied with reference to toxic trace metals during pre and post monsoon seasons for 10 stations during May 2009-September 2009. The metals analyzed include Zinc, Manganese, Iron, Lead, Copper and Cadmium. Among the metals studied, iron, lead and cadmium showed higher concentrations above the permissible limit for drinking water prescribed by Bureau of Indian Standards. Iron and lead showed higher concentration during post monsoon ...

  8. Overview of trace metal contamination in the Scheldt estuary and effect of regulatory measures

    OpenAIRE

    Baeyens, W.F.J.; Leermakers, M; De Gieter, M.; Nguyen, H.L.; Parmentier, K.; Panutrakul, S.; Elskens, M.

    2005-01-01

    Seasonally, dissolved and particulate metal concentrations in the Scheldt estuary were assessed over a period of 4 years (1995–1998). High quality data were obtained following stringent analytical protocols for each step: sampling, sample treatment, sample storage and analysis. Of the 5 trace metals, Ni showed the most conservative behaviour, while Cd and Cu were clearly transferred from the particulate to the dissolved phase in the middle estuary. A substantial part of the particulate metals...

  9. Sorbent flotation in trace metal analysis: Preconcentration of uranium traces on hydrophobized hyphan-cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of flotation in analytical chemistry has established itself as a reliable technique for the separation and preconcentration of trace elements. In most of the applications in situ generated inorganic and organic precipitates were used as trace element gatherers and floated to the surface of large volumes of solution with the aid of a rising stream of gas bubbles and well selected collector surfactants. This procedure of open-quotes precipitate flotationclose quotes has been well studied and applied to many problems of preconcentration chemistry. As far as the present authors are aware of solid preformed sorbents have not yet been separated from large volumes of solution by flotation after batch type sorption of trace elements on them. That is why the authors considered it worthwhile to explore the analytical potentialities of the separation of commercial and non-commercial solid sorbents by flotation. The new procedure the authors like to call open-quotes sorbent flotationclose quotes refers to the separation of preformed solid sorbents from large volumes of solution and can be viewed as an extension to the already known flotation of in situ formed inorganic and organic precipitates

  10. Content of trace metals in medicinal plants and their extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Kostić Danijela; Mitić Snežana; Zarubica Aleksandra; Mitić Milan; Veličković Jasmina; Ranđelović Saša

    2011-01-01

    The heavy metals (Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn) contents of selected plant species, grown in Southeast region of Serbia, that are traditionally used in alternative medicine were determined. Among the considered metals, iron content was the highest one and varied from 137.53 up to 423.32 mg/kg, while the contents of Cu, Zn and Mn were remarkably lower, and ranged from 8.91 to 62.20 mg/kg. In addition, an analysis of plants extracts showed a significant transfer of heavy metals during extraction pro...

  11. Mechanisms of enhanced mobilisation of trace metals by anionic surfactants in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term applications of small concentrations of surfactants in soil via wastewater irrigation or pesticide application may enhance trace metal solubility. Mechanisms by which anionic surfactants (Aerosol 22, SDS and Biopower) affect trace metal solubility were assessed using batch, incubation and column experiments. In batch experiments on seven soils, the concentrations of Cu, Cd, Ni and Zn in the dissolved fraction of soils increased up to 100-fold at the high application rates, but increased less than 1.5-fold below the critical micelle concentration. Dissolved metal concentrations were less than 20% affected by surfactants in long-term incubations (70 days) up to the largest dose of 200 mg C kg-1 soil. Leaching soil columns with A22 (100-1000 mg C L-1) under unsaturated conditions increased trace metal concentrations in the leachates 2-4 fold over the control. Correlation analysis and speciation modelling showed that the increased solubility of metals upon surfactant application was more related to the solubilisation of soil organic matter from soil than to complexation of the metals with the surfactant. Organic matter from soil was solubilised in response to a decrease of solution Ca2+ as a result of Ca-surfactant precipitation. At environmentally relevant concentrations, surfactant application is unlikely to have a significant effect on trace metal mobility. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: →Anionic surfactants increase metal mobility by solubilising soil organic matter. → Metal complexation with surfactants is relevant only at elevated surfactant doses. → Surfactants have little effect on metal mobility at environmentally relevant doses. - Anionic surfactants mobilise metals from soil through solubilisation of soil organic matter and direct complexation.

  12. Trace Metals And Organic Matter Diagenesis At The Oman Margin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Alagarsamy, R.

    METALS AND ORGANIC MATTER DIAGENESIS AT THE OMAN MARGIN Thesis submitted in accordance with the requirements of the University of Liverpool for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy by R. ALAGARSAMY Oceanography Laboratories, Department of Earth...

  13. BASELINE LEVELS OF TRACE METALS IN BLOOD OF CAPTIVE ASIAN ELEPHANTS (ELEPHAS MAXIMUS)

    OpenAIRE

    Wiedner, Ellen B.; Takeuchi, Noel Y.; Isaza, Ramiro; Barber, David

    2011-01-01

    Whole blood from 33 healthy captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) was analyzed for 12 trace elements: aluminum, chromium, manganese, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, arsenic, selenium, cadmium, mercury, and lead for the purpose of estimating preliminary baseline population parameters for these minerals. Metals were quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Baseline ranges for all animals and for all trace elements were comparable to normal concentrations reported in other s...

  14. Enhancing the electrochemical and electronic performance of CVD-grown graphene by minimizing trace metal impurities.

    OpenAIRE

    Iost, R.; Crespilho, F.; Zuccaro, L.; Yu, H; Wodtke, A.; Kern, K; Balasubramanian, K.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of unwanted impurities in graphene is known to have a significant impact on its physical and chemical properties. Similar to carbon nanotubes, any trace metals present in graphene will affect the electrocatalytic properties of the material. Here, we show by direct electroanalysis that traces of copper still remain in transferred CVD (chemical vapor deposition)-grown graphene (even after the usual copper etching process) and strongly influence its electrochemical properties. Subse...

  15. Speciation of trace metals and their uptake by rice in paddy soils

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is the most important staple food in South and Southeast Asia and plays a crucial role in food security. However, with fast urbanization and industrialization and economic growth in these parts of the world, the production and quality of rice has become an increasing concern, because contamination of paddy soils with trace metals in industrialized areas can lead to yield reduction of rice, a decline in the nutritional quality of the rice, and an accumulation of trace me...

  16. Trace metal removal from combustion gases. Raskasmetallipaeaestoejen vaehentaemismenetelmaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mroueh, U.-M.

    1987-01-15

    This literature survey deals with alternative methods applicable for reducing heavy metal emissions released in fluidized bed combustion or gasification of fossil fuels, such as coal, heavy oil, and municipal and industrial wastes. The elements mercury, cadmium, lead, nickel, vanadium and zinc are the main concern of this study. Increasingly greater attention is being paid to heavy metal emissions from energy production because of the observation in the last few years of the enrichment of some metals into the fine particles. The detectabily range of the existing particulate control devices is usually at this particle size. Most of the investigations aiming at the development of new methods for the reduction of heavy metal emissions are still in the initial stage. Because of the limited information available concerning the problem of heavy metals, this study deals also with some alkali metal removal methods, which possibly can give useful information. The emissions of heavy metals can be reduced, e.g. by binding them to compounds which can be removed from the flue gases. The predominant binding mechanisms are chemical and physical adsorption. Several natural aluminium, calcium and magnesium silicate materials can be used as chemical sorbents. They are also the least expensive of the sorbents. High surface alumina powders are possible physical adsorbents. The reactions between heavy metals and adsorbent can take place in the combustion zone of the fluidized bed reactor or the hot flue gases can be passed through a gas clean-up device, such as granular-bed filter, dry plate scrubber, or adsorbent-smoke reactor.

  17. Trace Metals Affect Early Maternal Transfer of Immune Components in the Feral Pigeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, M; Gasparini, J; Haussy, C; Frantz, A

    2016-01-01

    Maternal early transfers of immune components influence eggs' hatching probability and nestlings' survival. They depend on females' own immunity and, because they are costly, on their physiological state. Therefore, trace metals, whether toxic and immunosuppressive (e.g., lead, cadmium, etc.) or necessary and immunostimulant (e.g., zinc, copper, iron, etc.), are likely to affect the amount of immune components transferred into the eggs. It may also vary with plumage eumelanin level, which is known to be linked to immunity, to transfer of antibodies, and to metal detoxification. In feral pigeons (Columba livia) injected with an antigen and experimentally exposed to lead and/or zinc (two highly abundant trace metals in urban areas), we measured specific antibody transfer and concentrations of two antimicrobial proteins (lysozyme and ovotransferrin) in eggs. As expected, lead had negative effects on specific antibody transfer, while zinc positively affected lysozyme egg concentrations. Moreover, eggs from lead-exposed females exhibited higher ovotransferrin concentrations; because it binds metal ions, ovotransferrin may enable egg detoxification and embryo protection. Finally, eggs' lysozyme concentrations increased with plumage darkness of females not exposed to zinc, while the relation was opposite among zinc-exposed females, suggesting that benefits and costs of plumage melanism depend on trace metal environmental levels. Overall, our study underlines the potential ecotoxicological effects of trace metals on maternal transfers of immune components and the role of plumage melanism in modulating these effects. PMID:27153130

  18. Trace metals partitioning among different sedimentary mineral phases and the deposit-feeding polychaete Armandia brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-de-Alba, Margarita; Huerta-Diaz, Miguel Angel; Delgadillo-Hinojosa, Francisco; Hare, Landis; Galindo-Riaño, M Dolores; Siqueiros-Valencia, Arturo

    2016-02-01

    Trace metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) were determined in two operationally defined fractions (HCl and pyrite) in sediments from Ensenada and El Sauzal harbors (Mexico). The HCl fraction had significantly higher metal concentrations relative to the pyrite fraction in both harbors, underlining the weak tendency of most trace metals to associate with pyrite. Exceptionally, Cu was highly pyritized, with degrees of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) >80% in both harbors. Dissolved Fe flux measurements combined with solid phase Fe sulfide data indicated that 98 mt of Fe are precipitated as iron sulfides every year in Ensenada Harbor. These Fe sulfides (and associated trace metals) will remain preserved in the sediments, unless they are perturbed by dredging or sediment resuspension. Calculations indicate that dredging activities could export to the open ocean 0.20±0.13 to (0.30±0.56)×10(3) mt of Cd and Cu, respectively, creating a potential threat to marine benthic organisms. Degrees of pyritization (DOP) values in Ensenada and El Sauzal harbors were relatively low (making it a useful biomonitor of sedimentary metal exposure. PMID:26595396

  19. Trace enrichment of metal ions in aquatic environments by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapolelo, M; Torto, N

    2004-09-01

    Sorption properties of baker's yeast cells, characterised as Saccharomyces cerevisiae were evaluated for trace enrichment of metal ions: Cd(2+), Cr(3+), Cr(6+), Cu(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) from aqueous environments. Metal concentration was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Parameters affecting metal uptake such as solution pH, incubation time, amount of yeast biomass and effect of glucose concentration (energy source) were optimised. Further studies were carried out to evaluate the effects on metal uptake after treating yeast with glucose as well as with an organic solvent. The results showed that trace enrichment of the metals under study with yeast, depends upon the amount of yeast biomass, pH and incubation time. Treatment of yeast cells with 10-20mM glucose concentration enhanced metal uptake with exception to Cr(6+), whose metal enrichment capacity decreased at glucose concentration of 60mM. Of the investigated organic solvents THF and DMSO showed the highest and lowest capacity, respectively, to enhance metal uptake by yeast cells. Trace enrichment of metal ions from stream water, dam water, treated wastewater from a sewage plant and wastewater from an electroplating plant achieved enrichment factors (EF) varying from 1 to 98, without pre-treatment of the sample. pH adjustment further enhanced the EF for all samples. The results from these studies demonstrate that yeast is a viable trace metal enrichment media that can be used freely suspended in solution to achieve very high EF in aquatic environments. PMID:18969566

  20. Assessment of Godavari estuarine mangrove ecosystem through trace metal studies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, A.K.; Tripathy, S.C; Patra, S.; Sarma, V.V.

    in an estuarine mangrove ecosystem as traced by stable isotopes, Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser., 208: 79?92, 2000. 2. Clough, B. F. Primary productivity and growth of mangrove forests. In: Robertson, A. I., Alongi, D. M. (eds.), Tropical mangrove ecosystem. American... York), pp. 265?286, 1975. 12. Ranga Rao, V., Reddy, B. S. R., Raman, A. V. & Ramana Murthy, M. V. Oceanographic features of the Bay-mangrove waterways of Coringa, East coast of India. Proc. AP Akad. Sc., 7 (2): 135-142, 2003. 13. Robertson, A. I...

  1. Comparative analysis of trace metal accumulation in forest ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wet- and dry-deposition inputs and streamflow outputs of Cd, Mn, Pb, and Zn were measured at four forested watersheds in the southeastern United States. Atmospheric inputs to each site were similar, varying by a factor of 1.1 to 2.2. Dry deposition dominated input of Mn, while wet deposition was the major process for the other metals (54 to 85% of total). Except for Mn, the metals were strongly retained by each system: only 2% of the Pb, 8 to 29% of the Cd, and 8 to 34% of the Zn inputs were transported in annual streamflow. Metal export is related to stream pH, dissolved organic carbon, and bedrock geology at each site

  2. Trace metal concentrations in marine zooplankton from the western Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rejomon, G.; Balachandran, K.K.; Nair, M.; Joseph, T.

    Rejomon et al.: Trace metal concentration in marine zooplankton from the Western Bay of Bengal - 107 - APPLIED ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH 6(1): 107-116. http://www.ecology.uni-corvinus.hu ● ISSN 1589 1623  2008, Penkala Bt., Budapest, Hungary....: Trace metal concentration in marine zooplankton from the Western Bay of Bengal - 108 - APPLIED ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH 6(1): 107-116. http://www.ecology.uni-corvinus.hu ● ISSN 1589 1623  2008, Penkala Bt., Budapest, Hungary 78 80 82 84...

  3. Trace metal content in aspirin and women's cosmetics via proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multielemental analysis to determine the trace metal content of generic and name-brand aspirins and name-brand lipsticks was done via proton induced x-ray (PIXE) measurements. The Hope College PIXE system is described as well as the target preparation methods. The trace metal content of twelve brands of aspirin and aspirin substitutes and fourteen brands of lipstick are reported. Detection limits for most elements are in the range of 100 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 parts per million

  4. Distribution and transfer of dissolved trace metals in the North Aegean Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampling for trace metal analysis in the North Aegean Sea took place from 13-25 May 1997 with the R/V Aegaeo. Samples were collected from 12 Go-flo bottles attached to the rosette-CTD system and were filtered through 0.45 μm membrane filters, on-board, under a nitrogen atmosphere. Precautions were taken during handling of samples to minimise contamination. The samples were acidified and carried back to the clean laboratory for further analysis. A preconcentration step using the chelex-100 resin followed. Trace metals were determined on a Perkin-Elmer AAS equipped with a HGA-700

  5. QUANTITATIVE AAS STIMATION OF HEAVY METALS AND TRACE ELEMENTS IN MARKETED AYURVEDIC CHURNA PREPARATIONS IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munish Garg* and Jaspreet Singh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Churna preparations are an important and widely used form of Ayurvedic herbal formulations in India. These are prepared by mixing powdered form of single or mixture of several crude drugs meant to be dispensed as such. Since the quality of raw material plays an important role in the overall quality of a herbal formulation due to common practice of collecting and processing medicinal plants from different geographical sources and the fact presence of certain trace elements and heavy metals have a great significance in this matter, the present study is based on the screening of 19 popular herbal Churna preparations sold in the Indian market for the quantitative analysis of essential trace and toxic heavy metals by atomic absorption spectrometry. Heavy metals like Pb, Cd and trace metals like Ca, Mg, Al, Cu, Zn were determined using flame atomic absorption spectrometer (FAAS and heavy metals such as As and Hg were determined by hydride generation technique (cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometery. The results reveal that among the trace (micronutrients metals Ca and Mg were found in highest amount. Sixteen samples for Hg content and eight for Pb content were exceeding the WHO permissible limits. Arsenic was found below the permissible limit while Cd was above the permissible limit in all the tested samples. In conclusion, the quality of herbal Churna preparations sold in India market is questionable and need to be regulated efficiently before launching in to the market. Besides, the present paper provides a simple, convenient and reliable AAS method for the quantitative analysis of trace and heavy metals in herbal products which can be utilized for industrial purpose.

  6. Seasonal variation and sources of dissolved trace metals in Maó Harbour, Minorca Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Soto, Marly C; Tovar-Sánchez, Antonio; Sánchez-Quiles, David; Rodellas, Valentí; Garcia-Orellana, Jordi; Basterretxea, Gotzon

    2016-09-15

    The environmental conditions of semi-enclosed coastal water-bodies are directly related to the catchment, human activities, and oceanographic setting in which they are located. As a result of low tidal forcing, and generally weak currents, waters in Mediterranean harbours are poorly renewed, leading to quality deterioration. Here, we characterise the seasonal variation of trace metals (i.e. Co, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in surface waters, and trace metal content in sediments from Maó Harbour, a semi-enclosed coastal ecosystem in the NW Mediterranean Sea. Our results show that most of the dissolved trace metals in the waters of Maó Harbour exhibit a marked inner-outer concentration gradient, suggesting a permanent input into the inner part of the harbour. In general, metal concentrations in the waters of Maó Harbour are higher than those in offshore waters. Concentration of Cu (21±8nM), Fe (9.2±3.2nM) and Pb (1.3±0.4nM) are particularly high when compared with other coastal areas of the Mediterranean Sea. The concentration of some metals such as Cu and Zn increases during summertime, when the human population and boat traffic increase during the tourism season, and when resuspension from the metal enriched sediments is higher. The evaluation of the metal sources in the harbour reveals that, compared with other putative sources such as runoff, aerosol deposition and fresh groundwater discharges, contaminated sediments are the main source of the metals found in the water column, most likely through vessel-driven resuspension events. This study contributes to the understanding of the processes that control the occurrence and distribution of trace metals in Maó Harbour, thus aiding in the effective management of the harbour, and enhancing the overall quality of the seawater ecosystem. PMID:27163484

  7. Trace metals and radionuclides in macroalgae from Moroccan coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkdad, Azzouz; Laissaoui, Abdelmourhit; Tornero, Maria Victoria; Benmansour, Moncef; Chakir, ElMahjoub; Garrido, Ignacio Moreno; Moreno, Julian Blasco

    2011-11-01

    Macroalgae species Codium sp, Bangia atropurpurea, Membranoptera alata, Plocamium cartilagineum, Dictyota dichotoma, Fucus spiralis and Stypocaulon scoparia were collected from seven stations along the north coast of Morocco. Samples were analysed to determine activities of naturally occurring radionuclides ((210)Pb, U isotopes and (40)K) and concentrations of metals (Zn, Fe, Co, Cu, Ni, Mn, Pb, Cd, As and Cr) using radiometric and ICP-OES techniques, respectively. Metal concentrations were within ranges reported in the scientific literature, and concentrations of bio-essential elements were in the order Mn>Fe> Zn>Cu in all samples. Brown algae had the highest concentrations of almost all metals, and concentrations decreased in the order brown>red>green algae. With respect to radionuclides, the red alga P. cartilagineum had the highest activities of (210)Pb, in most cases an order of magnitude higher than for the green alga Codium sp. (234)U and (238)U activities in all algae samples were in the range 0.96- 7.61 and 1.16-6.14 Bq/kg dry weight, respectively. Our analyses of radionuclide activities and metal concentrations in marine macroalgae showed large differences among taxa. These results provide insights into which algal species should be used for biomonitoring programmes. PMID:21298402

  8. Reconstructing Early Industrial Contributions to Legacy Trace Metal Contamination in Southwestern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, R.; Bain, D.; Hillman, A. L.; Pompeani, D. P.; Abbott, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    The remobilization of legacy contamination stored in floodplain sediments remains a threat to ecosystem and human health, particularly with potential changes in global precipitation patterns and flooding regimes. Vehicular and industrial emissions are often the dominant, recognized source of anthropogenic trace metal loadings to ecosystems today. However, loadings from early industrial activities are poorly characterized and potential sources of trace metal inputs. While potential trace metal contamination from these activities is recognized (e.g., the historical use of lead arsenate as a pesticide), the magnitude and distribution of legacy contamination is often unknown. This presentation reconstructs a lake sediment record of trace metal inputs from an oxbow lake in Southwestern Pennsylvania. Sediment cores were analyzed for major and trace metal chemistry, carbon to nitrogen ratios, bulk density, and magnetic susceptibility. Sediment trace metal chemistry in this approximately 250 year record (180 cm) record changes in land use and industry both in the 19th century and the 20th century. Of particular interest is early 19th century loadings of arsenic and calcium to the lake, likely attributable to pesticides and lime used in tanning processes near the lake. After this period of tanning dominated inputs, sediment barium concentrations rise, likely reflecting the onset of coal mining operations and resulting discharge of acid mine drainage to surface waters. In the 20th century portion of our record (70 -20 cm), patterns in sediment zinc, cadmium, and lead concentrations are dominated by the opening and closing of the nearby Donora Zinc Works and the American Steel & Wire Works, infamous facilities in the history of air quality regulation. The most recent sediment chemistry records periods include the enactment of air pollution legislation (~ 35 cm), and the phase out of tetraethyl leaded gasoline (~30 cm). Our study documents the impact of early industry in the

  9. Rapid and gradual modes of aerosol trace metal dissolution in seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Marie Mackey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric deposition is a major source of trace metals in marine surface waters and supplies vital micronutrients to phytoplankton, yet measured aerosol trace metal solubility values are operationally defined and there are relatively few multi-element studies on aerosol-metal solubility in seawater. Here we measure the solubility of aluminum (Al, cadmium (Cd, cobalt (Co, copper (Cu, iron (Fe, manganese (Mn, nickel (Ni, lead (Pb, and zinc (Zn from natural aerosol samples in seawater over a 7 day period to (1 evaluate the role of extraction time in trace metal dissolution behavior and (2 explore how the individual dissolution patterns could influence biota. Dissolution behavior occurs over a continuum ranging from rapid dissolution, in which the majority of soluble metal dissolved immediately upon seawater exposure (Cd and Co in our samples, to gradual dissolution, where metals dissolved slowly over time (Zn, Mn, Cu, and Al in our samples. Additionally, dissolution affected by interactions with particles was observed in which a decline in soluble metal concentration over time occurred (Fe and Pb in our samples. Natural variability in aerosol chemistry between samples can cause metals to display different dissolution kinetics in different samples, and this was particularly evident for Ni, for which samples showed a broad range of dissolution rates. The elemental molar ratio of metals in the bulk aerosols was 23,189Fe: 22,651Al: 445Mn: 348Zn: 71Cu: 48Ni: 23Pb: 9Co: 1Cd, whereas the seawater soluble molar ratio after 7 days of leaching was 11Fe: 620Al: 205Mn: 240Zn: 20Cu: 14Ni: 9Pb: 2Co: 1Cd. The different kinetics and ratios of aerosol metal dissolution have implications for phytoplankton nutrition, and highlight the need for unified extraction protocols that simulate aerosol metal dissolution in the surface ocean.

  10. Biorefine: Recovery of nutrients and metallic trace elements from different wastes by chemical and biochemical processes

    OpenAIRE

    Tarayre, Cédric; Fischer, Christophe; De Clercq, Lies; Michels, Evi; Meers, Erik; Buysse, Jeroen; Delvigne, Frank; Thonart, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    At present, most waste processing operations are not oriented towards the valorization of valuable reusable components such as nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and even Metallic Trace Elements (MTEs). Currently, sewage sludge, for example is usually used as a fertilizer in agriculture, in energy production or in the field of construction. Ashes originating from sludge incineration contain heavy metals and minerals in large quantities. Manure is mainly used in agriculture, although considerable...

  11. Influence of inorganic amendments on trace metal extractable contents in urban soils

    OpenAIRE

    Madrid Díaz, Fernando; Romero, A.S.; Madrid, Luis; Díaz-Barrientos, Encarnación

    2003-01-01

    Urban soils in medium size and big cities, have shown in many cases (Madrid et al. 2002) high contents of some trace metals, for example lead, copper, or zinc, due to traffic, industry, etc (Bullock and Gregory, 1991). The presence of these metals at high concentrations in the soils of green areas, mainly recreational areas, is a potential source of dangerous elements for human health. For that reason, the availability of these contaminant elements is an essential control parameter, because i...

  12. Trace metal dynamics in floodplain soils of the river Elbe: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Zunkel, Christiane; Krueger, Frank

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews trace metal dynamics in floodplain soils using the Elbe floodplains in Germany as an example of extraordinary importance because of the pollution level of its sediments and soils. Trace metal dynamics are determined by processes of retention and release, which are influenced by a number of soil properties including pH value, redox potential, organic matter, type and amount of clay minerals, iron-, manganese- and aluminum-oxides. Today floodplains act as important sinks for contaminants but under changing hydraulic and geochemical conditions they may also act as sources for pollutants. In floodplains such changes may be extremes in flooding or dry periods that particularly lead to altered redox potentials and that in turn influence the pH value, the mineralization of organic matter as well as the charge of the pedogenic oxides. Such reactions may affect the bioavailability of trace metals in soils and it can be clearly seen that the bioavailability of metals is an important factor for estimating trace metal remobilization in floodplain soils. However as bioavailability is not a constant factor, there is still a lack of quantification of metal mobilization particularly on the basis of changing geochemical conditions. Moreover, mobile amounts of metals in the soil solution do not indicate to which extent remobilized metals will be transported to water bodies or plants and therefore potentially have toxicological effects. Consequently, floodplain areas still need to be taken into consideration when studying the role and behavior of sediments and soils for transporting pollutants within river systems, particularly concerning the Water Framework Directive. PMID:19465710

  13. Determination of some trace metals in elsaraf dam (GEDAREF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the part of the plant analyzed was the root, while by the soil we mean the soil which is in direct contact with the plant root. This analysis was carried to find the relation between the concentrations of the free ions in water, the mobile ions in the soil in contact with the root of the plant and the ions uptake by the plant as well as the movement of these ions between different reservoirs. The nutrient elements, (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Co) showed higher concentrations than toxic elements (Cr, Ni, Cd). Because of its natural abundance, iron has the highest concentration (54900/56600, 33580/36800), manganese has shown the second highest concentration, followed by nickel and zinc. Copper, cobalt and chromium have shown relatively similar concentrations, while cadmium has shown the lowest concentration. In general, almost for all elements the soils have shown higher concentration followed by the plant and then water. Cyperus rotandus has shown high affinity towards most of the metal ions, while the rest of plants have shown almost similar affinity. Because of the generally low concentration of metal ions in water, preconcentration was used using 8-hydroxyquinoline (oxine) and ammonium pyrolidine dithiocarbamate APDC to extract (pre concentrate) the metal ions at the optimum parameters before measurement in AAS.(Author)

  14. Preliminary comparison of trace metals in coastal aerosols between Qingdao and Liverpool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Changling; ZHANG Jing; Roy CHESTER

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol samples were collected at two coastal suburban stations,Qingdao (China) in 1995-1996 and Liverpool (U.K.) in 1995,respectively.The samples were analyzed to determine the concentrations of trace metals (Cr,Zn,Cu,Co,Ni,Pb,V,and Cd) as well as Al,Fe and Mn.Data were examined to understand the difference of trace metals in aerosols between coastal zones downwind the developing area (near the Yellow Sea) and developed region (near the Irish Sea).The results show that most elements at Qingdao have levels 4-5 times higher than those at Liverpool,particularly for the crust-dominated elements (e.g.Al,Fe and Mn).Moreover,the aerosol composition at Qingdao is higher in spring than in summer,underlying the influence of westerlies and local emissions in combination,whereas seasonal change of aerosol composition is not significant at Liverpool.The enrichment factors for the crustal source elements (EFcrust) at Liverpool axe much higher than those at Qingdao.The contributions from the pollutant source (Rp) for some trace metals like Cu,Pb,Zn and Cd are 90% at Qingdao and Liverpool,suggesting overwhelming anthropogenic contributions to these metals.The contributions from crustal source (Rc) for trace metals tend to increase with higher aerosol levels and Al concentration at Qingdao,indicating a good correlation between the crust-dominated component and the air mass.At Liverpool,the Rc values for trace metals are positively correlated with Al concentrations instead of with aerosol mass,suggesting that Al in aerosols represents the crustal component even though the aerosols come from different sources.

  15. Atmospherically deposited trace metals from bulk mineral concentrate port operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Mark Patrick, E-mail: mark.taylor@mq.edu.au

    2015-05-15

    Although metal exposures in the environment have declined over the last two decades, certain activities and locations still present a risk of harm to human health. This study examines environmental dust metal and metalloid hazards (arsenic, cadmium, lead and nickel) associated with bulk mineral transport, loading and unloading port operations in public locations and children's playgrounds in the inner city of Townsville, northern Queensland. The mean increase in lead on post-play hand wipes (965 μg/m{sup 2}/day) across all sites was more than 10-times the mean pre-play loadings (95 μg/m{sup 2}/day). Maximum loading values after a 10-minute play period were 3012 μg/m{sup 2}, more than seven times the goal of 400 μg/m{sup 2} used by the Government of Western Australia (2011). Maximum daily nickel post-play hand loadings (404 μg/m{sup 2}) were more than 26 times above the German Federal Immission Control Act 2002 annual benchmark of 15 μg/m{sup 2}/day. Repeat sampling over the 5-day study period showed that hands and surfaces were re-contaminated daily from the deposition of metal-rich atmospheric dusts. Lead isotopic composition analysis of dust wipes ({sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb) showed that surface dust lead was similar to Mount Isa type ores, which are exported through the Port of Townsville. While dust metal contaminant loadings are lower than other mining and smelting towns in Australia, they exceeded national and international benchmarks for environmental quality. The lessons from this study are clear — even where operations are considered acceptable by managing authorities, targeted assessment and monitoring can be used to evaluate whether current management practices are truly best practice. Reassessment can identify opportunities for improvement and maximum environmental and human health protection. - Graphical abstract: Post-play hand wipe, Headland Park, Townsville, Australia. - Highlights: • Bulk mineral port

  16. Atmospherically deposited trace metals from bulk mineral concentrate port operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although metal exposures in the environment have declined over the last two decades, certain activities and locations still present a risk of harm to human health. This study examines environmental dust metal and metalloid hazards (arsenic, cadmium, lead and nickel) associated with bulk mineral transport, loading and unloading port operations in public locations and children's playgrounds in the inner city of Townsville, northern Queensland. The mean increase in lead on post-play hand wipes (965 μg/m2/day) across all sites was more than 10-times the mean pre-play loadings (95 μg/m2/day). Maximum loading values after a 10-minute play period were 3012 μg/m2, more than seven times the goal of 400 μg/m2 used by the Government of Western Australia (2011). Maximum daily nickel post-play hand loadings (404 μg/m2) were more than 26 times above the German Federal Immission Control Act 2002 annual benchmark of 15 μg/m2/day. Repeat sampling over the 5-day study period showed that hands and surfaces were re-contaminated daily from the deposition of metal-rich atmospheric dusts. Lead isotopic composition analysis of dust wipes (208Pb/207Pb and 206Pb/207Pb) showed that surface dust lead was similar to Mount Isa type ores, which are exported through the Port of Townsville. While dust metal contaminant loadings are lower than other mining and smelting towns in Australia, they exceeded national and international benchmarks for environmental quality. The lessons from this study are clear — even where operations are considered acceptable by managing authorities, targeted assessment and monitoring can be used to evaluate whether current management practices are truly best practice. Reassessment can identify opportunities for improvement and maximum environmental and human health protection. - Graphical abstract: Post-play hand wipe, Headland Park, Townsville, Australia. - Highlights: • Bulk mineral port operations associated with emissions of metal-rich dusts

  17. Trace metal levels in fruit juices and carbonated beverages in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Akan B; Ayejuyo, Olusegun O; Ogunyale, Adekunle F

    2009-09-01

    Trace metal levels in selected fruit juices and carbonated beverages purchased in Lagos, Nigeria were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (Unicam model 969) equipped with SOLAAR 32 windows software. Fruit juices analysed were grape, pineapple, apple, orange, lemon juices and their brand names were used. Some carbonated drinks were also evaluated for metal levels. Trace metals investigated were Cr, Cu, Pb, Mn, Ni, Zn, Sn, Fe, Cd and Co. Trace metal contents of fruit juices were found to be more than the metallic contents of carbonated beverages. Pb level in the fruit juices ranged from 0.08 to 0.57 mg/l but was not detected in the carbonated drinks. Concentrations of Pb in lemon juice and Mn in pineapple juice were relatively high. Cd and Co were not detected in the selected juices and beverages. Additionally, Pb, Cu, Cr and Fe were not detected in canned beverages but were present in bottled beverages. However, the metal levels of selected fruit juices and carbonated beverages were within permissible levels except for Mn in pineapple juice and Pb in lemon juice. PMID:18704729

  18. New method for mass spectrometric trace analysis of metals in biology and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A first survey on the basic aspects and applications of a novel method for trace analyses of metals is given. The advantages of this methodology for analyses of trace metals which was developed by our group are: small sample amount, high sensitivity and selectivity, simple sample preparation for the measurement (no ashing) and reliability and precision of the results. The time consumption for one complete quantitative analysis lies below 30 min. The concentration of monoisotopic metals, as for example aluminium, cesium, manganese etc. is determined using a calibration curve. Using stable isotope dilution analysis quantification of metals with at least two stable isotopes further improved the precision of the results. If this technique is utilized, on one hand contamination of the environment by radioactive substances is avoided, on the other even the smallest changes in concentrations of trace metals are detected unambigeously. The accuracy of the resulting quantitative data has been confirmed test measurements with other analytical methods such as atomic absorption spectroscopy and thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Although there is no doubt that the greatest analytical capacity of field desorption mass spectrometry is in the field of high-molecular weight natural products, it has been possible in the last years to modify the method for qualitative and quantitative investigations of more than 60 metals. (orig./EF)

  19. Trace metal geochemistry in mangrove sediments and their transfer to mangrove plants (New Caledonia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, C; Fernandez, J-M; Moreton, B

    2016-08-15

    Because of their physico-chemical inherent properties, mangrove sediments may act as a sink for pollutants coming from catchments. The main objective of this study was to assess the distribution of some trace metals in the tissues of various mangrove plants developing downstream highly weathered ferralsols, taking into account metals partitioning in the sediment. In New Caledonia, mangroves act as a buffer between open-cast mines and the world's largest lagoon. As a result of the erosion of lateritic soils, Ni and Fe concentrations in the sediment were substantially higher than the world average. Whatever the mangrove stand and despite low bioaccumulation and translocations factors, Fe and Ni were also the most abundant metals in the different plant tissues. This low bioaccumulation may be explained by: i) the low availability of metals, which were mainly present in the form of oxides or sulfur minerals, and ii) the root systems acting as barriers towards the transfer of metals to the plant. Conversely, Cu and Zn metals had a greater mobility in the plant, and were characterized by high bioconcentration and translocation factors compared to the other metals. Cu and Zn were also more mobile in the sediment as a result of their association with organic matter. Whatever the metal, a strong decrease of trace metal stock was observed from the landside to the seaside of the mangrove, probably as a result of the increased reactivity of the sediment due to OM enrichment. This reactivity lead to higher dissolution of bearing phases, and thus to the export of dissolved trace metals trough the tidal action. Cu and Zn were the less concerned by the phenomenon probably as a result of higher plant uptake and their restitution to the sediment with litter fall in stands where tidal flushing is limited. PMID:27100002

  20. Statistical significance of biomonitoring of marine algae for trace metal levels in a coral environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopinath, A.; Muraleedharan, N.S.; Chandramohanakumar, N.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.

    Samples of macro algae collected at random distances from the coral and near shore environment of Lakshadweep archipelago were analyzed for their trace metal content (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Co, Cr, Cd, Pb, and Ni). All the species showed an affinity...

  1. MARSH PLANTS AS VECTORS IN TRACE METAL TRANSPORT IN OREGON TIDAL MARSHES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of Pacific coast marsh plants as vectors in the flux of trace metals was studied in natural and perturbated situations. The flux of Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Sr, and Zn were studied in natural stands of Carex lyngbyei, Distichlis spicata, Potentilla pacifica, and Salicornia virgin...

  2. Behavior of trace metals in the sediment pore waters of intertidal mudflats of a tropical wetland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, K.T.; Lam, M.H.W.; Yen, Y.F.; Leung, A.P.K.

    2000-03-01

    Vertical profiles of dissolved Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe, and Mn in the sediment pore waters of the intertidal mudflats of the Mai Po and Inner Deep Bay Ramsar Site of Hong Kong, People's Republic of China, were measured using the polyacrylamide gel diffusive equilibration thin film (DET) technique. The ranges of concentrations of dissolved Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe, and Mn in the pore water of the top 0 to 20 cm of sediment were 2.2 to 10.0 nM, 346.0 to 950.0 nM 243.8 to 454.8 nM, 23.2 to 51.2 nM, 39.8 to 249.5 {micro}M, and 13.4 to 20.7 {micro}M, respectively. Enrichment of these trace metals was observed in the upper 0- to 7-cm layer. Profiles of conditional distribution coefficient, log(K{sub D}), of the trace metals and results of multiple regression analysis have revealed that reduction of Mn (hydrous) oxides was the major remobilization mechanism for Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn in the mudflats. Benthic diffusive fluxes of these trace metals from the mudflats were also estimated on the basis of the concentration gradients of trace metals between surface sediments and the overlying water column. The magnitude of the estimated diffusive fluxes followed the order Zn > Cr > Cu > Pb > Cd.

  3. Minor and trace metals levels in human milk in north western cities of Libya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levels of twelve minor and trace metals were determined by using (AAS, ES and ICP/MS) in breast milk obtained from 60 women living in north western cities of Libya. Samples were collected at one week up to two years after delivery. Women with age>21 years old to an age of <43 years old were investigated. (Author)

  4. Trace metal dynamics in zooplankton from the Bay of Bengal during summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rejomon, G.; DineshKumar, P.K.; Nair, M.; Muraleedharan, K.R.

    Trace metal (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) concentrations in zooplankton from the mixed layer were investigated at 8 coastal and 20 offshore stations in the western Bay of Bengal during the summer monsoon of 2003. The ecotoxicological importance...

  5. Changes in trace metals in hemolymph of baculovirus infected noctuid larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    We studied how biologically relevant trace metals (i.e., micronutrients) in the plasma of larvae of Heliothis virescens and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) changed in response to per os baculovirus infection, larval development, and injection of heat-killed bacteria. Concentrations of plas...

  6. Trace Metal Accumulation in Sediments and Benthic Macroinvertebrates before and after Maintenance of a Constructed Wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periodic maintenance of stormwater best management practices (BMP) includes the removal of accumulated sediment. The resulting impact on trace metal concentrations of copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in a constructed stormwater wetland BMP on Staten Island, NY was investiga...

  7. Quantitative Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction for Trace-Metal Determination: An Experiment for Analytical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavilla, Isela; Costas, Marta; Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Gil, Sandra; Bendicho, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) is introduced to upper-level analytical chemistry students as a simple strategy focused on sample preparation for trace-metal determination in biological tissues. Nickel extraction in seafood samples and quantification by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) are carried out by a team of four…

  8. Trace metal enrichments in core sediments in Muthupet mangroves, SE coast of India: Application of acid leachable technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janaki-Raman, D. [Department of Geology, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai - 600 025 (India); Jonathan, M.P. [Centro de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Tierra, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Ciudad Universitaria, Carretera Pachuca-Tulancingo Km. 4.5, Pachuca, Hidalgo, C. Postal. 42184 (Mexico)]. E-mail: mp_jonathan7@yahoo.com; Srinivasalu, S. [Department of Geology, Anna University, Chennai - 600 025 (India); Armstrong-Altrin, J.S. [Centro de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Tierra, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Ciudad Universitaria, Carretera Pachuca-Tulancingo Km. 4.5, Pachuca, Hidalgo, C. Postal. 42184 (Mexico); Mohan, S.P. [Department of Geology, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai - 600 025 (India); Ram-Mohan, V. [Department of Geology, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai - 600 025 (India)

    2007-01-15

    Core sediments from Mullipallam Creek of Muthupet mangroves on the southeast coast of India were analyzed for texture, CaCO{sub 3}, organic carbon, sulfur and acid leachable trace metals (Fe, Mn, Cr, Cu, Ni, Co, Pb, Zn and Cd). Textural analysis reveals a predominance of mud while CaCO{sub 3} indicates dissolution in the upper half of the core, and reprecipitation of carbonates in reduction zones. Trace metals are diagenetically modified and anthropogenic processes control Pb and, to some extent, Ni, Zn and Fe. A distinct event is identified at 90 cm suggesting a change in deposition. Strong relationship of trace metals with Fe indicates that they are associated with Fe-oxyhydroxides. The role of carbonates in absorbing trace metals is evident from their positive relationship with trace metals. Comparison of acid leachable trace metals indicates increase in concentrations in the study area and the sediments act as a sink for trace metals contributed from multiple sources. - Natural and anthropogenic trace metals afeecting mangrove sediments.

  9. Contamination characteristics and source apportionment of trace metals in soils around Miyun Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyang; Teng, Yanguo; Chen, Ruihui; Li, Jiao; Wang, Jinsheng

    2016-08-01

    Due to their toxicity and bioaccumulation, trace metals in soils can result in a wide range of toxic effects on animals, plants, microbes, and even humans. Recognizing the contamination characteristics of soil metals and especially apportioning their potential sources are the necessary preconditions for pollution prevention and control. Over the past decades, several receptor models have been developed for source apportionment. Among them, positive matrix factorization (PMF) has gained popularity and was recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency as a general modeling tool. In this study, an extended chemometrics model, multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares based on maximum likelihood principal component analysis (MCR-ALS/MLPCA), was proposed for source apportionment of soil metals and applied to identify the potential sources of trace metals in soils around Miyun Reservoir. Similar to PMF, the MCR-ALS/MLPCA model can incorporate measurement error information and non-negativity constraints in its calculation procedures. Model validation with synthetic dataset suggested that the MCR-ALS/MLPCA could extract acceptable recovered source profiles even considering relatively larger error levels. When applying to identify the sources of trace metals in soils around Miyun Reservoir, the MCR-ALS/MLPCA model obtained the highly similar profiles with PMF. On the other hand, the assessment results of contamination status showed that the soils around reservoir were polluted by trace metals in slightly moderate degree but potentially posed acceptable risks to the public. Mining activities, fertilizers and agrochemicals, and atmospheric deposition were identified as the potential anthropogenic sources with contributions of 24.8, 14.6, and 13.3 %, respectively. In order to protect the drinking water source of Beijing, special attention should be paid to the metal inputs to soils from mining and agricultural activities. PMID:27107989

  10. Trace metals in coastal sediments of Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine sediment samples from four coastal ecosystems in Costa Rica were taken between the years 2000-2002 and their iron, lead, copper and zinc concentrations were determined by the atomic absorption technique with flame or graphite furnace. In the Pacific coast, Culebra Bay (Papagayo Gulf), Gulf of Nicoya, and Golfito Bay (Dulce Gulf), were selected as representative sites, and Moin Bay, at the Caribbean coast. Mean metal concentrations for all ecosystems followed the same pattern: Fe> Zn> Cu> Pb. No temporal pattern was found for any metal. Iron and copper mean concentrations were higher in Golfito Bay (5.8% and 87 μg / g, respectively) and lower in Moin Bay (3.4% and 52 μg / g, respectively). Zinc mean concentration was also higher in Golfito Bay (96 μg / g), but lower in Culebra Bay (66 μg / g). Lead mean concentration was higher in Moin Bay (6.4 μg / g) and lower in Culebra Bay (3.0 μg / g). Lead highest concentrations occurred in the Caribbean and in Golfito Bay, and for the rest of the elements the maximum values were found in Golfito Bay. On the basis of data obtained in this work, Culebra Bay was considered a relatively unpolluted location; Golfito Bay was more contaminated, and Moin Bay and the Gulf of Nicoya showed an intermediate condition. (Author)

  11. Biogeochemical and hydrological controls on fate and distribution of trace metals in oiled Gulf salt marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keevan, J.; Natter, M.; Lee, M.; Keimowitz, A.; Okeke, B.; Savrda, C.; Saunders, J.

    2011-12-01

    On April 20, 2010, the drilling rig Deepwater Horizon exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, resulting in the release of approximately 5 million barrels of crude oil into the environment. Oil and its associated trace metals have been demonstrated to have a detrimental effect on coastal wetland ecosystems. Wetlands are particularly susceptible to oil contamination because they are composed largely of fine-grained sediments, which have a high capacity to adsorb organic matter and metals. The biogeochemical cycling of trace metals can be strongly influenced by microbial activity, specifically those of sulfate- and iron-reducing bacteria. Microbial activity may be enhanced by an increase in amounts of organic matter such as oil. This research incorporates an assessment of levels of trace metals and associated biogeochemical changes from ten coastal marshes in Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. These sampling sites range in their pollution levels from pristine to highly contaminated. A total digestion analysis of wetland sediments shows higher concentrations of certain trace metals (e.g., Ni, Cu, Pb, Zn, Sr, Co, V, Ba, Hg, As) in heavily-oiled areas compared to less-affected and pristine sites. Due to chemical complexation among organic compounds and metals, crude oils often contain elevated levels (up to hundreds of mg/kg) of trace metals At the heavily-oiled Louisiana sites (e.g., Bay Jimmy, Bayou Dulac, Bay Batiste), elevated levels of metals and total organic carbon have been found in sediments down to depths of 30 cm. Clearly the contamination is not limited to shallow sediments and oil, along with various associated metals, may be invading into deeper (pre-industrial) portions of the marsh sediments. Pore-waters extracted from contaminated sediments are characterized by very high levels of reduced sulfur (up to 80 mg/kg), in contrast to fairly low ferrous iron concentrations (oil into the wetlands might provide the initial substrate and carbon source for stimulating

  12. Biochemical normalization of trace metals in Arctocephalus australis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besnik Baraj

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Initially, the heart concentration data does not seem relevant for use as a bioindicator, mainly due to its low concentration level. After applying a normalizing procedure, the heart results were a better Hg bioindicator (preconcentration coefficient 43.1 than those of the kidney (preconcentration coefficient 8.6. Cadmium preconcentration coefficients were 128.1, 195.3 and 5.2 for liver, kidney and heart, respectively, demonstrating the high accumulative capacity especially for the liver and kidneys. Iron is proposed as a normalizing element for the definiton of the regional natural biochemical population of the metals. In general, positive correlation coefficients were found between Fe and other metals.Arctocephalus australis foi usado como organismo indicador para concentrações de metal traço na costa do Rio Grande do Sul. Metais foram analisados em tecidos extraídos do coração, rins e fígado. Os baixos teores encontrados no coração inicialmente poderiam indicar que este órgão não traria resultados relevantes. Porém, mediante a aplicação de um procedimento de normalização, foram encontrados coeficientes de pré-concentração de 43.1 e de 8.6 para o coração e para os rins, respectivamente, indicando o tecido do coração como o melhor bioindicador para Hg. Para Cd, os coeficientes de pré-concentração foram 128.1, 195.3 e 5.2 para fígado, rins e coração, respectivamente, demonstrando alta capacidade acumulativa especialmente para fígado e rins. Foram encontradas altas correlações positivas entre o Fe e os metais Zn, Cu, Cd, Hg, Ag, Mn, Ni, Cr e Pb, indicando ser este elemento normalizante para definição da concentração bioquímica natural de metais na população de Arctocephalus australis no extremo sul do Brasil.

  13. The concentrations of trace metals in plants from phosphogypsum waste heap in Wiślinka, northern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boryło A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was determination of trace metals (Pb, Zn, Ni, Cu and Fe in different plants collected in the vicinity of phosphogypsum waste heap in Wiślinka (northern Poland. The concentrations of trace metals were determined by two methods: AAS (atomic absorption spectrometry and OES-ICP (atomic emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma. Enhanced levels of iron were observed in all the analyzed samples. This fact can be explained by the higher content of iron in the groundwaters of Žuławy Wiślane, where concentration of iron was 60 mg/l. The trace metals concentrations in plant samples from phosphogypsum waste heap recorded in this study are generally higher than in control sites. In this study the relationship is shown between atmospheric trace metals deposition and elevated trace metals element concentrations in plants and topsoils, especially in the vicinity of phoshpogypsum waste heap.

  14. Trace metals and otolith defects in mocha mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfsen, R M; Erway, L C

    1984-01-01

    Mocha mice with pigment anomalies of the coat, eyes, and inner ears also have congenital otolith defects, and they exhibit progressive cochlear degeneration. Mocha mice were first reported to exhibit otolith defects comparable to those of pallid mice. Since manganese supplementation is effective in preventing the otolith defects in pallid mice and in pastel mink, we sought to establish whether or not manganese also might be effective in mocha mice. The otolith defects of mocha mice were prevented or reduced by supplementing the pregnant dams with manganese and/or zinc. The mocha mice also exhibited high perinatal mortality that was not reduced by the supplementary metals. Surviving mocha mice have behavioral anomalies associated with their inner ear defects. Preliminary observations of auditory-evoked brainstem responses and of cochlear degeneration in the mocha mice are discussed. PMID:6736600

  15. Bioindication of atmospheric trace metals - With special references to megacities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markert, Bernd, E-mail: markert@schlundmail.de [Fliederweg 17, D-49733 Haren/Erika (Germany); Wuenschmann, Simone [Fliederweg 17, D-49733 Haren/Erika (Germany); Fraenzle, Stefan [International Graduate School Zittau, D-02763 Zittau (Germany); Graciana Figueiredo, Ana Maria; Ribeiro, Andreza P. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Linea Prestes 2242, CEP 05508-090, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Wang Meie [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Centre for Eco-environmental Sciences, Beijing 110016 (China)

    2011-08-15

    After considering the particular problems of atmospheric pollution in megacities, i.e. agglomerations larger than 5 mio. inhabitants, with urbanization of World's population going on steadily, possibilities of active biomonitoring by means of green plants are discussed. Based on specific definitions of active and passive bioindication the chances of monitoring heavy metals in Sao Paulo megacity were demonstrated (first results published before). This is to show that there is need for increased use of bioindication to tackle the particular problems of megacities concerning environmental 'health', the data to be processed according to the Multi-Markered-Bioindication-Concept (MMBC). Comparison to other work shows this approach to be reasonable. - Highlights: > Chemical Pollution. > Bioindication. > Multi-Markered-Bioindication-Concept (MMBC). > Mega cities. - Bioindication is a relevant technique for observing the atmospheric deposition of chemical elements of the environment in megacities.

  16. Modelling trace metal extractability and solubility in French forest soils by using soil properties

    OpenAIRE

    Gandois, Laure; Probst, Anne; Dumat, Camille

    2010-01-01

    Soil/solution partitioning of trace metals (TM: Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Sb, Pb and Zn) has been investigated in six French forest sites that have been subjected to TM atmospheric inputs. Soil profiles have been sampled and analysed for major soil properties, and CaCl2-extractable and total metal content. Metal concentrations (expressed on a molar basis) in soil (total), in CaCl2 extracts and soil solution collected monthly from fresh soil by centrifugation, were in the order: Cr > Zn > Ni > Cu > ...

  17. Transplanted aquatic mosses for monitoring trace metal mobilization in acidified streams of the Vosges Mountains, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mersch, J.; Guerold, F.; Rousselle, P.; Pihan, J.C. (Univ. of Metz (France))

    1993-08-01

    As a result of acid depositions, trace metals are mobilized from the soils to the aquatic environment. Especially in poorly mineralized waters, elevated metal concentrations may rapidly have adverse effects on aquatic organisms. In particular, it has been shown that aluminium, a key element in the acidification process, is a toxic cofactor for fish and other biota. An accurate assessment of this specific form of water pollution may not be possible when only based on analyses of single water samples. On the one hand, water metal concentrations are often close to the detection limit of usual analytical techniques, and on the other hand, levels in acidified streams undergo strong temporal variations caused by acid pulses following meteorological events such as heavy rainfall and snowmelt. Compared to water analyses, indirect monitoring methods provide undeniable advantages for assessing water contamination. Aquatic bryophytes, in particular, have been regarded as interesting indicator organisms for trace metal pollution. However, their use has mainly been restricted to the lower course of streams for evaluating the impact of industrial discharges. The purpose of this study was to test the suitability of transplanted aquatic mosses for monitoring aluminium and four other trace metals (copper, iron, lead and zinc) in the particular context of acidifed streams draining a forested headwater catchment. 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Source Evaluation and Trace Metal Contamination in Benthic Sediments from Equatorial Ecosystems Using Multivariate Statistical Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Nsikak U.; Asuquo, Francis E.; Williams, Akan B.; Essien, Joseph P.; Ekong, Cyril I.; Akpabio, Otobong; Olajire, Abaas A.

    2016-01-01

    Trace metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb) concentrations in benthic sediments were analyzed through multi-step fractionation scheme to assess the levels and sources of contamination in estuarine, riverine and freshwater ecosystems in Niger Delta (Nigeria). The degree of contamination was assessed using the individual contamination factors (ICF) and global contamination factor (GCF). Multivariate statistical approaches including principal component analysis (PCA), cluster analysis and correlation test were employed to evaluate the interrelationships and associated sources of contamination. The spatial distribution of metal concentrations followed the pattern Pb>Cu>Cr>Cd>Ni. Ecological risk index by ICF showed significant potential mobility and bioavailability for Cu, Cu and Ni. The ICF contamination trend in the benthic sediments at all studied sites was Cu>Cr>Ni>Cd>Pb. The principal component and agglomerative clustering analyses indicate that trace metals contamination in the ecosystems was influenced by multiple pollution sources. PMID:27257934

  19. Variations in time and space of trace metal aerosol concentrations in urban areas and their surroundings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Moreno

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Using an unprecedentedly large geochemical database, we compare temporal and spatial variations in inhalable trace metal background concentrations in a major city (Barcelona, Spain and at a nearby mountainous site (Montseny affected by the urban plume. Both sites are contaminated by technogenic metals, with V, Pb, Cu, Zn, Mn, Sn, Bi, Sb and Cd all showing upper continental crust (UCC normalised values >1 in broadly increasing order. The highest metal concentrations usually occur during winter at Barcelona and summer in Montseny. This seasonal difference was especially marked at the remote mountain site in several elements such as Ti and Rare Earth Elements, which recorded campaign maxima, exceeding PM10 concentrations seen in Barcelona. The most common metals were Zn, Ti, Cu, Mn, Pb and V. Both V and Ni show highest concentrations in summer, and preferentially fractionate into the finest PM sizes (PM1/PM10 > 0.5 especially in Barcelona, this being attributed to regionally dispersed contamination from fuel oil combustion point sources. Within the city, hourly metal concentrations are controlled either by traffic (rush hour double peak for Cu, Sb, Sn, Ba or industrial plumes (morning peak of Ni, Mn, Cr generated outside the city overnight, whereas at Montseny metal concentrations rise during the morning to a single, prolonged afternoon peak as contaminated air transported by the sea breeze moves into the mountains. Our exceptional database, which includes hourly measurements of chemical concentrations, demonstrates in more detail than previous studies the spatial and temporal variability of urban pollution by trace metals in a given city. Technogenic metalliferous aerosols are commonly fine in size and therefore potentially bioavailable, emphasising the case for basing urban background PM characterisation not only on physical parameters such as mass but also on sample chemistry and with special emphasis on trace

  20. Macroalgae as 'sentinel' of trace and heavy metals in the management of coastal environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In continuation of the studies of the interactions of various heavy and trace metals and their radionuclides in the nearshore ecosystems of the west coast of India, the radioecology of brown seeweed Sargassum tenerrimum, a macroalgae from Tarapur coastal waters is studied and its role as a 'sentinel' of heavy and trace metals and radionuclides in controlled low level aqueous wastes from a 400 MWe BWR nuclear power plant of Tarapur is discussed. Samples of the species were detached along the holdfast, washed off detritus and epiphytes in running sea water, ovendried and homogenized. The whole thallus from holdfast to the apex was used to study the distribution and concentration of a few heavy and trace metals by atomic absorption spectroscopy and of radionuclides by gamma spectroscopy. Results of the studies on temporal distribution of trace elements, and 131I, 134Cs, 60Co, and 90Sr in thallus and its various parts are presented. Bioaccumulation of above mentioned radionuclides in the species is discussed. The turnover of 90Sr in the species was found to be a function of its alginate content and to be influenced by possible changes occurring in other constituents of the ionogenic groups and the physicochemical parameters. The biological half-life and the ecological half-life of the above four radionuclides were also determined. (M.G.B.)

  1. Trace metal anomalies in bleached Porites coral at Meiji Reef, tropical South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu; Yu, Kefu; Zhao, Jianxin; Feng, Yuexing; Chen, Tianran

    2016-04-01

    Coral bleaching has generally been recognized as the main reason for tropical coral reef degradation, but there are few long-term records of coral bleaching events. In this study, trace metals including chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), molybdenum (Mo), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), tin (Sn), titanium (Ti), vanadium (V), and yttrium (Y), were analyzed in two Porites corals collected from Meiji Reef in the tropical South China Sea (SCS) to assess differences in trace metal concentrations in bleached compared with unbleached coral growth bands. Ti, V, Cr, and Mo generally showed irregular fluctuations in both corals. Bleached layers contained high concentrations of Mn, Cu, Sn, and Pb. Unbleached layers showed moderately high concentrations of Mn and Cu only. The different distribution of trace metals in Porites may be attributable to different selectivity on the basis of vital utility or toxicity. Ti, V, Cr, and Mo are discriminated against by both coral polyps and zooxanthellae, but Mn, Cu, Sn, and Pb are accumulated by zooxanthellae and only Mn and Cu are accumulated by polyps as essential elements. The marked increase in Cu, Mn, Pb, and Sn are associated with bleaching processes, including mucus secretion, tissue retraction, and zooxanthellae expulsion and occlusion. Variation in these trace elements within the coral skeleton can be used as potential tracers of short-lived bleaching events.

  2. Trace metals in Antarctica related to climate change and increasing human impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargagli, R

    2000-01-01

    Metals are natural constituents of the abiotic and biotic components of all ecosystems, and under natural conditions they are cycled within and between the geochemical spheres--the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere--at quite steady fluxes. In the second half of the twentieth century, the huge increase in energy and mineral consumption determined anthropogenic emissions of several metals exceeding those from natural sources, e.g., volcanoes and windborne soil particles. In the Northern Hemisphere, the biogeochemical cycles of Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu, and other metals were significantly altered, even in Arctic regions. On the contrary, available data on trace metal concentrations in abiotic matrices from continental Antarctica, summarized in this review, suggest that the biogeochemical cycle of Pb is probably the only one that has been significantly altered by anthropogenic emissions in Antarctica and elsewhere in the Southern Hemisphere, especially in the period 1950-1975. Environmental contamination by other metals from anthropogenic sources in Antarctica itself can generally only be detected in snow samples taken within a range of a few kilometers or several hundred meters from scientific stations. Local metal pollution from human activities in Antarctica may compromise studies aimed at assessing the biogeochemical cycle of trace elements and the effects of global climate change. Thus, this review focuses on concentrations of metals in atmospheric particulate, snow, surface soils, and freshwater from the Antarctic continent and surface sediments and seawater from the Southern Ocean, which can plausibly be regarded as global background values of trace elements. These baselines are also necessary in view of the construction of new stations, the expansion of existing facilities to support research, and the growth of tourism and fisheries. Despite difficulties in making comparisons with data from other remote areas of the world, concentrations of trace metals

  3. Trace metal contaminants in sediments and soils: comparison between ICP and XRF quantitative determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congiu A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A mineralization method HCl-free for heavy metals analysis in sediments and soils by DRC-ICP-MS was developed. The procedure, which uses concentrated nitric, hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide, was applied for the analysis of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, nickel and vanadium. The same samples were then analyzed, as pressed pellets, by wavelength dispersive X ray fluorescence (WD-XRF using the dedicated PANalytical Pro Trace solution for the determination of trace elements. Comparison of ICP and XRF data showed good agreement for the elements under investigation, unless for chromium in soils, which recovery was not complete.

  4. Effects of using wastewater and biosolids as nutrient sources on accumulation and behaviour of trace metals in Vietnamese soils

    OpenAIRE

    Khai, Nguyen Manh

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the impacts of wastewater and biosolids application on cultivated Vietnamese Fluvisols and Acrisols. Chemical impacts, i.e. enrichment of macronutrients (N, P, K) and trace metals (mainly Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb), and solubility and mobility of trace metals were examined. Experiments were carried out in peri-urban vegetable and/or rice-dominated farming systems of Hanoi, Ha Tay, Vinh Phuc and Nam Dinh cities. Batch studies were performed in order to measure metal solubility in ...

  5. Modeling of the distribution of heavy metals and trace elements in argan forest soil and parts of argan tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Faez A E; Bchitou, Rahma; Boulmane, Mohamed; Bouhaouss, Ahmed; Guillaume, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    The transfer of heavy metals and trace elements from argan forest soil into the wood, leaves, almonds, and argan oil was studied. Analyzed metals were: chromium, cadmium, copper, zinc, lead, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, and magnesium. Correlations linking different behaviors of the studied heavy metals and trace elements observed by multidimensional analysis were attributed to partial-spatial variations. Whereas the RV-coefficient of wood, leaf, almond and oil groups was high, the soil group correlated poorly with the other groups. PMID:23472451

  6. Trace Metal Levels in Lichen Samples From Roadsides in East Black Sea Region, Turkey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OZGUR DOGAN ULUOZLU; KADIR KINALIOGLU; MUSTAFA TUZEN; MUSTAFA SOYLAK

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the metal contents of lichen species from East Black Sea region of Turkey for investigation of trace metal pollution sourced traffic.Methods The levels of copper,cadmium,lead,zinc,manganese,iron,chromium,nickel,cobalt,palladium in lichen samples collected from East Black Sea region of Turkey were determined by flame and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave digestion method.The accuracy of the method was corrected by standard reference material(NIST SRM IAEA-336 Lichen). Results The contents of investigated trace metals in lichen samples were 7.19-22.4 μg/g for copper,0.10-0.64 μg/g for cadmium,4.03-44.6 μg/g for lead,14.5-41.8 1.μg/g for zinc,25.8-208 μg/g for manganese,331-436 μg/g for iron,1.20-3.01 μg/g for chromium,1.48-3.90 μg/g for nickel,0.20-3.55 μg/g for cobalt.0.11-0.64 μg/g for palladium.The results were compared with the literature values.Conclusion Some lichen species such as Xanthoparmelia conspersa,Xanthoria calcicola,Peltigera membranacea,and Physcia adscendens are accumulated trace metals at a high ratio.

  7. Model for trace metal exposure in filter-feeding flamingos at alkaline Rift Valley Lake, Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Y.M.; DiSante, C.J.; Lion, L.W. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Thampy, R.J.; Raini, J.A. [Worldwide Fund for Nature, Nakuru (Kenya). Lake Nakuru Conservation and Development Project; Motelin, G.K. [Egerton Univ., Njoro (Kenya). Dept. of Animal Health

    1998-11-01

    Toxic trace metals have been implicated as a potential cause of recent flamingo kills at Lake Nakuru, Kenya. Chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) have accumulated in the lake sediments as a result of unregulated discharges and because this alkaline lake has no natural outlet. Lesser flamingos (Phoeniconaias minor) at Lake Nakuru feed predominantly on the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis, and because of their filter-feeding mechanism, they are susceptible to exposure to particle-bound metals. Trace metal adsorption isotherms to lake sediments and S. platensis were obtained under simulated lake conditions, and a mathematical model was developed to predict metal exposure via filter feeding based on predicted trace metal phase distribution. Metal adsorption to suspended solids followed the trend Pb {much_gt} Zn > Cr > Cu, and isotherms were linear up to 60 {micro}g/L. Adsorption to S. platensis cells followed the trend Pb {much_gt} Zn > Cu > Cr and fit Langmuir isotherms for Cr, Cu and Zn and a linear isotherm for Pb. Predicted phase distributions indicated that Cr and Pb in Lake Nakuru are predominantly associated with suspended solids, whereas Cu and Zn are distributed more evenly between the dissolved phase and particulate phases of both S. platensis and suspended solids. Based on established flamingo feeding rates and particle size selection, predicted Cr and Pb exposure occurs predominantly through ingestion of suspended solids, whereas Cu and Zn exposure occurs through ingestion of both suspended solids and S. platensis. For the lake conditions at the time of sampling, predicted ingestion rates based on measured metal concentrations in lake suspended solids were 0.71, 6.2, 0.81, and 13 mg/kg-d for Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn, respectively.

  8. Waste ashes for use in agricultural production: II. Contents of minor and trace metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fu-Shen; Yamasaki, S; Kimura, K

    2002-03-01

    The present study was carried out to examine the contents of 18 minor and trace metals in five typical municipal waste ashes in Japan. In the waste ashes, Li, Ga, Rb, Y, Zr had relatively higher concentrations, approximately 5-300 mg kg(-1), the remaining metal concentrations were generally approximately 0.05-20 mg kg(-1). A comparison of the metal concentrations in the waste ashes and in Japanese agricultural soils indicated that the ratios for Ga, Mo, Ag, Sb, W, Bi between sewage sludge ash (SSA) and the soils were approximately 10-100 and for the remaining metals approximately 0.2-2; the ratios between food scrap ash (FSA), animal waste ash (AWA), horticulture waste ash (HWA) and incinerator bottom ash (IBA) and the soils were approximately 0.2-5. Furthermore, an overall evaluation on the waste ashes was also carried out using factor analysis with the addition of the other 21 elements examined in a companion paper. In the waste ashes, the major nutrient elements and heavy metals were mainly described by four factors: factors 1 and 2 explained the main information of the minor and trace metals while factors 3 and 4 explained that of the major nutrient elements. Factor 2 in the score plots could be used to evaluate the potential risk of the waste ashes to agricultural soils. Of the five types of waste ashes, SSA and IBA were abundant with minor and trace metals; AWA was relatively abundant with major nutrient elements especially for K; FSA was relatively abundant with major nutrient elements except for K, while HWA was not abundant with either of them. PMID:11886086

  9. Trace metal contents of selected seeds and vegetables from oil producing areas of Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegwu, Matthew O; Omeodu, Stephen I

    2010-07-01

    The concentrations of accumulated trace metals in selected seeds and vegetables collected in the oil producing Rivers State of Nigeria were investigated. The values were compared with those of seeds and vegetables cultivated in Owerri, a less industrialized area in Nigeria. The lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) contents of the seeds obtained from Rivers State ranged between 0.10 and 0.23 microg/g dry weight, while those of the seeds cultivated in Owerri fell below the detection limit of 0.01 microg/g dry weight. The highest manganese (Mn) level (902 microg/g dry weight) was found in Irvingia garbonesis seeds cultivated in Rivers State. Similarly, the highest nickel (Ni) value (199 microg/g dry weight) was also obtained in I. garbonesis, however, in the seeds sampled in Owerri. The highest copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and iron (Fe) levels (16.8, 5.27, and 26.2 microg/g dry weight, resp.) were detected in seeds collected in Rivers State. With the exception of Talinum triangulae, Ocinum gratissimum, and Piper guineese, with Pb levels of 0.09, 0.10, and 0.11 microg/g dry weight, respectively, the Pb and Cd levels in the vegetables grown in Owerri fell below the detection limit of 0.01 microg/g dry weight. The trace metal with the highest levels in all the vegetables studied was Mn, followed by Fe. The highest concentrations of Ni and Cu occurred in vegetables collected from Rivers State, while the highest level of Zn was observed in Piper guineese collected in Owerri, with a value of 21.4 microg/g dry weight. Although the trace metal concentrations of the seeds and vegetables collected in Rivers State tended to be higher than those of the seeds and vegetables grown in Owerri, the average levels of trace metals obtained in this study fell far below the WHO specifications for metals in foods. PMID:20658661

  10. Characterization of trace metals on soot aerosol particles with the SP-AMS: detection and quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, S.; Onasch, T.; Saarikoski, S.; Timonen, H.; Saarnio, K.; Sueper, D.; Rönkkö, T.; Pirjola, L.; Häyrinen, A.; Worsnop, D.; Hillamo, R.

    2015-11-01

    A method to detect and quantify mass concentrations of trace metals on soot particles by the Aerodyne soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was developed and evaluated in this study. The generation of monodisperse Regal black (RB) test particles with trace amounts of 13 different metals (Na, Al, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr and Ba) allowed for the determination of the relative ionization efficiency of each metal relative to black carbon (RIEmeas). The observed RIEmeas / RIEtheory values were larger than unity for Na, Rb, Ca, Sr and Ba due to thermal surface ionization (TSI) on the surface of the laser-heated RB particles. Values closer to unity were obtained for the transition metals Zn, Cu, V and Cr. Mn, Fe, and Ni presented the lowest RIEmeas / RIEtheory ratios and highest deviation from unity. The latter discrepancy is unexplained; however it may be related to problems with our calibration method and/or the formation of metal complexes that were not successfully quantified. The response of the metals to the laser power was investigated and the results indicated that a minimum pump laser current of 0.6 A was needed in order to vaporize the metals and the refractory black carbon (rBC). Isotopic patterns of metals were resolved from high-resolution mass spectra, and the mass-weighted size distributions for each individual metal ion were obtained using the high-resolution particle time-of-flight (HR-PToF) method. The RIEmeas values obtained in this study were applied to the data of emission measurements in a heavy-fuel-oil-fired heating station. Emission measurements revealed a large number of trace metals, including evidence for metal oxides and metallic salts, such as vanadium sulfate, calcium sulfate, iron sulfate and barium sulfate, which were identified in the SP-AMS high-resolution mass spectra. SP-AMS measurements of Ba, Fe, and V agreed with ICP-MS analyzed filter samples within a factor of 2 when emitted rBC mass loadings were elevated.

  11. Sensitive neutron activation method for determination of trace impurities in Cr metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many chromium metal samples from a considerable number of suppliers were analyzed for 13-15 trace element impurities by neutron activation analysis. By use of suitable γ-ray absorber between sample and detector the overwhelming intensity of lower energy γ radiation (320 keV) produced from the matrix was reduced to a satisfactory level. In this work the (n,γ) products from the trace elements of interest have characteristic γ rays with energies above 680 keV, and the sensitivity levels were in the range of 1-100 ppb. The tabulated results show wide variations in the pattern of impurities but the powdered samples generally had considerably higher levels of iron and trace elements

  12. Transfer and mobility of trace metallic elements in the sedimentary column of continental hydro-systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In freshwater systems, trace metal pollutants are transferred into water and sedimentary columns under dissolved forms and/or fixed onto solid particles. Accumulated in the sedimentary areas, these latter ones can constitute important stocks of materials and associated pollutants and may impair water quality when environmental changes lead to increase their mobility. The mobility of the stocks of pollutants is mainly depending on the erosion, on the interstitial diffusion of the mobile phases (dissolved and colloidal) and on the bioturbation. In this context, this study involves the analysis of the mobility by interstitial diffusion. This topic consists in studying trace metal fractionation between their mobile (dissolved and colloidal) and non mobile (fixed onto the particles) forms. This point is governed by sorption/desorption processes at the particle surfaces. These processes are regulated by physico-chemical parameters (pH, redox potential, ionic strength...) and are influenced by biogeochemical reactions resulting from the oxidation of the organic matter by the microbial activity. These reactions generate vertical profiles of nutrients and metal concentrations along the sedimentary column. To understand these processes, this work is based on a mixed approach that combines in situ, analysis and modelling. In situ experimental part consists in sampling natural sediments cores collected at 4 different sites (1 site in Durance and 3 sites on the Rhone). These samples are analyzed according to an analytical protocol that provides the vertical distribution of physicochemical parameters (pH, redox potential, size distribution, porosity), nutrients and solid - liquid forms of trace metals (cobalt, copper, nickel, lead, zinc). The analysis and interpretation of these experimental results are based on a model that was developed during this study and that includes: 1) model of interstitial diffusion (Boudreau, 1997), 2) biogeochemical model (Wang and Van Cappellen

  13. BCO-DMO: Supporting the Management and Sharing of Marine Trace Metal Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, S.; Allison, M. D.; Chandler, C. L.; Copley, N. J.; Gegg, S. R.; Groman, R. C.; Kinkade, D.; Shepherd, A.; Glover, D. M.; Wiebe, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. GEOTRACES program seeks to identify processes controlling the distribution of trace elements and isotopes in the world's oceans. Quantifying marine trace elements and understanding their role in biogeochemical cycles is important for predicting the ocean's response to environmental changes, such as a changing climate and the release of elements into the ocean due to human activities. This research program is collaborative in nature and only one component within the broader International GEOTRACES program. An important part of the collaborative scientific process is having access to trustworthy, well-documented data from colleagues. The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) serves as the U.S. GEOTRACES Data Assembly Center, and facilitates the management, sharing, and long-term preservation of trace element and isotope data not only from U.S. GEOTRACES researchers, but from marine biogeochemists across the United States. The BCO-DMO data managers work closely with investigators contributing their data to ensure quality and completeness of documentation to foster data discovery and re-use by potential collaborators. The BCO-DMO system provides free and open access to data and tools for discovery, mapping, visualization, and download. Trace element and isotope datasets from the recent U.S. GEOTRACES North Atlantic Transect and Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect cruises, as well as other GEOTRACES-related projects are now available from BCO-DMO. Related data from legacy programs, including the U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS), are also freely available for use by investigators seeking to further the understanding of trace metal cycling in the oceans. This presentation will highlight relevant trace metal data managed by BCO-DMO as well as the tools and features that aid in data discovery, access, and visualization.

  14. Recovery of Trace and Heavy Metals from Coal Combustion Residues for Reuse and Safe Disposal: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashvani; Samadder, Sukha Ranjan; Elumalai, Suresh Pandian

    2016-06-01

    The safe disposal of coal combustion residues (CCRs) will remain a major public issue as long as coal is used as a fuel for energy production. Both dry and wet disposal methods of CCRs create serious environmental problems. The dry disposal method creates air pollution initially, and the wet disposal method creates water pollution as a result of the presence of trace and heavy metals. These leached heavy metals from fly ash may become more hazardous when they form toxic compounds such as arsenic sulfite (As2S3) and lead nitrate (N2O6Pb). The available studies on trace and heavy metals present in CCRs cannot ensure environmentally safe utilization. In this work, a novel approach has been offered for the retrieval of trace and heavy metals from CCRs. If the proposed method becomes successful, then the recovered trace and heavy metals may become a resource and environmentally safe use of CCRs may be possible.

  15. Geochemical Baseline and Trace Metal Pollution of Soil in Panzhihua Mining Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕彦国; 倪师军; 等

    2002-01-01

    A total of 31 topsoil samples were systematically collected from the Panzhihuaminingarea including steel smelting,coal mining ,urban and rural districts.A normalization procedure was adopted to establish the environmental geochemical baseline models for this area.By using the above baseline models,the regional geochemical baseline values of As,Cr,Cu,Ni,Pb and Zn were determined.On the basis of the baselines,the enrichment factors were used to analyze the mechanism of trace metal pollution in topsoil from anthropogenic sources,and the results showed that the serious trace metal pollution is caused by human activities in coal mine,iron mine,smelting factory,tailing dam and other industrial districts in the Panzhihua area.

  16. Geochemical Baseline and Trace Metal Pollution of Soil in Panzhihua Mining Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕彦国; 倪师军; 庹先国; 张成江; 马玉孝

    2002-01-01

    A total of 31 topsoil samples were systematically collected from the Panzhihua mining area including steel smelting, coal mining, urban and rural districts. A normalization procedure was adopted to establish the environmental geochemical baseline models for this area. By using the above baseline models, the regional geochemical baseline values of As, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined. On the basis of the baselines, the enrichment factors were used to analyze the mechanism of trace metal pollution in topsoil from anthropogenic sources, and the results showed that the serious trace metal pollution is caused by human activities in coal mine, iron mine, smelting factory, tailing dam and other industrial districts in the Panzhihua area.

  17. Soluble Nutrient and Trace Metal Fluxes from Aerosol Dry Deposition to Elkhorn Slough, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, E. T.; Paytan, A.; Haskins, J.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition has been widely recognized as a source of pollutants and nutrients to coastal ecosystems. Specifically, deposition includes nitrogen compounds, sulfur compounds, mercury, pesticides, phosphate, trace metals and other toxic compounds that can travel great distances in aerosols. These components can come from both natural (volcanoes, mineral dust, forest fires) and anthropogenic (fossil fuels, chemical byproducts, incineration of waste) sources. These pollutants may affect ecosystem health and water quality with environmental impacts such as eutrophication, contaminated fish and harmful algal blooms. In this study we focus on dry deposition to Elkhorn Slough, California. Size fractionated aerosol samples (PM 2.5 and PM 10) collected continuously over a seven day period using a cascade impactor are used along with a deposition model to determine the soluble nutrient and trace metal fluxes on the Elkhorn Slough ecosystem. Atmospheric deposition inputs will be compared to other sources and their potential impact evaluated.

  18. Carrier distillation-ICAP approach for trace metal assay of U3O8 powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach for the trace metal assay of U3O8 powder has been described. The carrier distillation technique used for selective volatilization of trace metals in U3O8 with d.c. arc excitation is adapted for the release of analytes from the solid sample into the ICAP source by inductively heating the sample. The experimental parameters have been optimised for the direct determination of Cd, Cu, K, Na, Ni and Pb. The performance of the method developed here is tested for the precision and accuracy of determinations by analysing spiked U3O8 samples and NBL U3O8 reference standards (standard deviation 2-9%). The method appears promising to be developed as a highly precise analytical optical emission spectrometric method as it adds to the ingenuity of the carrier distillation method, the advantages of ICAP. (orig.)

  19. Feedback interactions between trace metal nutrients and phytoplankton in the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eSunda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In addition to control by major nutrient elements (nitrogen, phosphorus, and silicon the productivity and species composition of marine phytoplankton communities are affected by a number of trace metal nutrients (iron, zinc, cobalt, manganese, copper, and cadmium. Of these, iron exerts the greatest limiting influence on carbon fixation rates and has the greatest effect on algal species diversity. It also plays an important role in limiting di-nitrogen (N2 fixation rates, and thus exerts an important influence on ocean inventories of biologically available fixed nitrogen. Because of these effects, iron is thought to play a key role in controlling the biological cycles of carbon and nitrogen in the ocean, including the biological transfer of carbon to the deep sea, the so-called biological CO2 pump, which helps regulate atmospheric CO2 levels and CO2-linked global warming. Other trace metal nutrients (zinc, cobalt, copper, and manganese have a lesser effect on productivity; but may exert an important influence on the species composition of algal communities because of large differences in metal requirements among algal species. The interactions between trace metals and ocean plankton are reciprocal: not only do the metals affect the plankton, but the plankton regulate the distributions, chemical speciation, and cycling of these metals through cellular uptake and regeneration processes, downward flux of biogenic particles, cellular release of organic chelators, and mediation of redox reactions. This two way interaction has influenced not only the biology and chemistry of the modern ocean, but has had a profound influence on biogeochemistry of the ocean and earth system as a whole, and on the evolution marine and terrestrial biology over geologic history.

  20. Atomic-absorption spectrometric determination of trace metals in zirconium and zircaloy by discrete sample nebulization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A discrete sample nebulization technique was employed to determine trace metals in nuclear grade zirconium and Zircaloy by flame atomic-absorption spectrometry. With 10% (w/v) sample solutions, detection limits for Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni and Pb were 0.6, 2, 1, 3, and 10 μg/g. Micro standard-addition procedures and background correction were employed to minimize matrix interferences produced by the high salt content of the aspirated solutions. (author)

  1. Rapid amperometric detection of trace metals by inhibition of an ultrathin polypyrrole-based glucose biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayenimo, Joseph G; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2016-02-01

    A sensitive and reliable inhibitive amperometric glucose biosensor is described for rapid trace metal determination. The biosensor utilises a conductive ultrathin (55 nm thick) polypyrrole (PPy) film for entrapment of glucose oxidase (GOx) to permit rapid inhibition of GOx activity in the ultrathin film upon exposure to trace metals, resulting in reduced glucose amperometric response. The biosensor demonstrates a relatively fast response time of 20s and does not require incubation. Furthermore, a complete recovery of GOx activity in the ultrathin PPy-GOx biosensor is quickly achieved by washing in 2mM EDTA for only 10s. The minimum detectable concentrations achieved with the biosensor for Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) by inhibitive amperometric detection are 0.48, 1.5, 1.6 and 4.0 µM, respectively. Also, suitable linear concentration ranges were achieved from 0.48-3.3 µM for Hg(2+), 1.5-10 µM for Cu(2+), 1.6-7.7 µM for Pb(2+) and 4-26 µM for Cd(2+). The use of Dixon and Cornish-Bowden plots revealed that the suppressive effects observed with Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) were via non-competitive inhibition, while those of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) were due to mixed and competitive inhibition. The stronger inhibition exhibited by the trace metals on GOx activity in the ultrathin PPy-GOx film was also confirmed by the low inhibition constant obtained from this analysis. The biosensor was successfully applied to the determination of trace metals in tap water samples. PMID:26653478

  2. Fate of Nutrients, Trace Metals, Bacteria, and Pesticides in Nursery Recycled Water

    OpenAIRE

    Yun-Ya Yang; Gurpal S. Toor

    2015-01-01

    Faced with rapid population growth and fresh water scarcity, reuse of reclaimed water is growing worldwide and becoming an integral part of water resource management. Our objective was to determine the fate of nutrients, trace metals, bacteria, and legacy organic compounds (organochlorine pesticides) in the recycled water from five commercial nursery ponds in Florida. The pH of recycled water at all sites was 8.1 - 9.3, except one site (6.5), while the electrical conducti...

  3. RiverPOP 2009: Measuring concentrations of persistent organic pollutants and trace metals in Norwegian rivers.

    OpenAIRE

    Allan, I; Garmo, Ø.; Harman, C.; Kringstad, A.; Bratsberg, E.

    2010-01-01

    A performance evaluation of a range of techniques for the measurement of the concentration of persistent organic pollutants and trace metals was undertaken in the Rivers Glomma and Drammen in 2009. This work focussed on further evaluating techniques that have the potential to substantially improve the reliability and limits of detection of such measurements. Passive sampling techniques were employed to measure dissolved concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphe...

  4. Trace metal effects on ectomycorrhizal growth, diversity, and colonization of host seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Belling Abler, Rebecca Alicia

    2004-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are essential to seedling establishment in disturbed sites. This dissertation examines the effects of trace metals and soil disturbance on ectomycorrhizal fungi in the laboratory and the field. The first experiment assessed Cu and Zn impact on growth of three ectomycorrhizal species in pure culture. Suillus granulatus and Pisolithus tinctorius were more tolerant to Cu than Paxillus involutus, however, none of the species grew at 250 ppm Cu. Suillus granulatus had th...

  5. Mapping human health risks from exposure to trace metal contamination of drinking water sources in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Avit Kumar; Alamdar, Ambreen; Katsoyiannis, Ioannis; Shen, Heqing; Ali, Nadeem; Ali, Syeda Maria; Bokhari, Habib; Schäfer, Ralf B; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah

    2015-12-15

    The consumption of contaminated drinking water is one of the major causes of mortality and many severe diseases in developing countries. The principal drinking water sources in Pakistan, i.e. ground and surface water, are subject to geogenic and anthropogenic trace metal contamination. However, water quality monitoring activities have been limited to a few administrative areas and a nationwide human health risk assessment from trace metal exposure is lacking. Using geographically weighted regression (GWR) and eight relevant spatial predictors, we calculated nationwide human health risk maps by predicting the concentration of 10 trace metals in the drinking water sources of Pakistan and comparing them to guideline values. GWR incorporated local variations of trace metal concentrations into prediction models and hence mitigated effects of large distances between sampled districts due to data scarcity. Predicted concentrations mostly exhibited high accuracy and low uncertainty, and were in good agreement with observed concentrations. Concentrations for Central Pakistan were predicted with higher accuracy than for the North and South. A maximum 150-200 fold exceedance of guideline values was observed for predicted cadmium concentrations in ground water and arsenic concentrations in surface water. In more than 53% (4 and 100% for the lower and upper boundaries of 95% confidence interval (CI)) of the total area of Pakistan, the drinking water was predicted to be at risk of contamination from arsenic, chromium, iron, nickel and lead. The area with elevated risks is inhabited by more than 74 million (8 and 172 million for the lower and upper boundaries of 95% CI) people. Although these predictions require further validation by field monitoring, the results can inform disease mitigation and water resources management regarding potential hot spots. PMID:26312405

  6. Contrasting behaviour of trace metals in the Scheldt estuary in 1978 compared to recent years

    OpenAIRE

    Nolting, R.F.; Helder, W.; De Baar, H. J. W.; Gerringa, L.J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Dissolved and particulate trace metals (Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, Ni, Fe and Mn) measured at six stations along the Scheldt estuary in October/November 1978 are compared with more recent data. Based on Ca content in the suspended matter, three distinct geochemical regions could be distinguished: the upper estuary (salinity 1–7) dominated by fluvial mud, mid-estuary (salinity 7–17) where the composition of the suspended matter remained relatively constant, and the lower estuary where marine mud prevaile...

  7. Study of trace metals concentration and antimicrobial properties of tropical Aloe vera plant from southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Subramani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out with an objective to investigate the antibacterial and antifungal potentials and trace metals concentrations in Aloe vera (Linn plant leaves. Fresh leaves of Aloe vera were collected from Tiruchirappalli district of Tamil Nadu during the period of February - March 2014. The 100 g of shade dried A. vera leave power was used to collect the methanol extraction of the test plant by the soxhlet apparatus. The extracted solutions were dried by hot air oven at 60 °C for 48-72 h for further analysis. The antimicrobial activity of Aloe vera methanol extract was examined with six various pathogenic microorganisms such as gram positive, gram negative and fungal strains using the disk diffusion test. The two tested concentrations such as 0.60 and 1.20 mg/disc produce zone of inhibition on muller hinton agar (MHA and potato dextrose agar (PDA plates for bacteria and fungi, respectively. In this study, higher (1.20 mg concentration got greater sensitivity than lower (0.60 mg concentration against all strains. All the microbial strains depict higher sensitivity to the higher concentration (1.2 mg / disc for the test sample when compared to the positive control except bacterial strains such as Aeromonas liquefaciens MTCC 2645 (B1. The trace metal analyses of the plants were also carried out. The mean concentration of trace metals such as cadmium (Cd, chromium (Cr, copper (Cu, iron (Fe, nickel (Ni, lead (Pb and zinc (Zn were 0.04, BDL, 0.06, 0.08, BDL, 0.02 and 0.22 mg kg-1, respectively. Therefore, it is signified that Aloe vera plant extract is safe to be used as an antimicrobial agent. Hence, throughout impoundment is needed to verify the trace metal levels in plants.

  8. Status of trace metals in surface seawater of the Gulf of Aqaba, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Taani, Ahmed A; Batayneh, Awni; Nazzal, Yousef; Ghrefat, Habes; Elawadi, Eslam; Zaman, Haider

    2014-09-15

    The Gulf of Aqaba (GoA) is of significant ecological value with unique ecosystems that host one of the most diverse coral communities in the world. However, these marine environments and biodiversity have been threatened by growing human activities. We investigated the levels and distributions of trace metals in surface seawater across the eastern coast of the Saudi GoA. Zn, Cu, Fe, B and Se in addition to total dissolved solids and seawater temperature exhibited decreasing trends northwards. While Mn, Cd, As and Pb showed higher average levels in the northern GoA. Metal input in waters is dependent on the adjacent geologic materials. The spatial variability of metals in water is also related to wave action, prevailing wind direction, and atmospheric dry deposition from adjacent arid lands. Also, water discharged from thermal desalination plants, mineral dust from fertilizer and cement factories are potential contributors of metals to seawater water, particularly, in the northern GoA. PMID:25110052

  9. Characteristic emission enhancement in the atmosphere with Rn trace using metal assisted LIBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several characteristic emission lines from the metal targets (Cu, Zn and Pb) were investigated in trace presence of radon gas in the atmospheric air, using Q-SW Nd:YAG laser induced plasma inside a control chamber. The emission lines of metal species are noticeably enhanced in (Rn+air), relative to those in the synthetic air alone. Similar spectra were also taken in various sub-atmospheric environments in order to determine the optimum pressure for enhancement. Solid-state nuclear track detectors were also employed to count the tracks due to alpha particles for the activity assessment

  10. Trace metal concentrations and their transfer from sediment to leaves of four common aquatic macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łojko, Renata; Polechońska, Ludmiła; Klink, Agnieszka; Kosiba, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, the concentrations of trace and alkali metals in leaves of four common helophytes, Sparganium erectum, Glyceria maxima, Phalaris arundinacea, and Phragmites australis, as well as in corresponding water and bottom sediments were investigated to ascertain plant bioaccumulation ability. Results showed that Mn and Fe were the most abundant trace metals in all plant species, while Co and Pb contents were the lowest. Leaves of species studied differed significantly in respect of element concentrations. The highest concentrations of Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Cu, Pb, and Ni were noted in S. erectum while the highest contents of Co, Ca, Zn, and Cr in Phalaris arundinacea. Phragmites australis contained the lowest amounts of most elements. Concentrations of Co, Cr, Fe, and Mn in all species studied and Ni in all except for Phragmites australis were higher than natural for hydrophytes. The leaves/sediment ratio was more than unity for all alkali metals as well as for Cu and Mn in Phragmites australis; Cr, Co, and Zn in Phalaris arundinacea; Cr and Mn in S. erectum; and Cr in G. maxima. High enrichment factors and high levels of toxic metals in the species studied indicated a special ability of these plants to absorb and store certain non-essential metals and, consequently, their potential for phytoremediation of contaminated aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26004561

  11. Accumulation of Trace Metals by Mangrove Plants in Indian Sundarban Wetland: Prospects for Phytoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Ranju; Favas, Paulo J C; Pratas, J; Jonathan, M P; Ganesh, P Sankar; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The work investigates on the potential of ten mangrove species for absorption, accumulation and partitioning of trace metal(loid)s in individual plant tissues (leaves, bark and root/pneumatophore) at two study sites of Indian Sundarban Wetland. The metal(loid) concentration in host sediments and their geochemical characteristics were also considered. Mangrove sediments showed unique potential in many- fold increase for most metal(loid)s than plant tissues due to their inherent physicochemical properties. The ranges of concentration of trace metal(loid)s for As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in plant tissue were 0.006-0.31, 0.02-2.97, 0.10-4.80, 0.13-6.49, 4.46-48.30, 9.2-938.1, 0.02-0.13, 9.8-1726, 11-5.41, 0.04-7.64, 3.81-52.20 μg g (-1)respectively. The bio- concentration factor (BCF) showed its maximum value (15.5) in Excoecaria agallocha for Cd, suggesting that it can be considered as a high-efficient plant for heavy metal bioaccumulation. Among all metals, Cd and Zn were highly bioaccumulated in E. agallocha (2.97 and 52.2 μg g (-1) respectively. Our findings suggest that the species may be classified as efficient metal trap for Cd in aerial parts, as indicated by higher metal accumulation in the leaves combined with BCF and translocation factor (TF) values. PMID:25581820

  12. The mobility, bioavailability, and human bioaccessibility of trace metals in urban soils of Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace metals in soils may pose risks to both ecosystem and human health, especially in an urban environment. However, only a fraction of the metal content in soil is mobile and/or available for biota uptake and human ingestion. Various environmental availabilities of trace metals (Cu, Pb and Zn) in topsoil from highly urbanized areas of Hong Kong to plants, organisms, and humans, as well as the leaching potential to groundwater were evaluated in the present study. Forty selected soil samples were extracted with 0.11 M acid acetic, 0.01 M calcium chloride, 0.005 M diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, and simplified physiologically based extraction tests (PBET) for the operationally defined mobilizable, effectively bioavailable, potentially bioavailable, and human bioaccessible metal fractions, respectively. The metals were generally in the order of Zn > Cu ∼ Pb for both mobility (24%, 7.6%, 6.7%) and effective bioavailability (2.8%, 0.9%, 0.6%), Pb (18%) > Cu (13%) > Zn (7.4%) for potential bioavailability, and Pb (59%) ∼ Cu (58%) > Zn (38%) for human bioaccessibility. Although the variations in the different available concentrations of metals could mostly be explained by total metal concentrations in soil, the regression model predictions were further improved by the incorporation of soil physicochemical properties (pH, OM, EC). The effectively bioavailable Zn and Pb were mostly related to soil pH. Anthropogenic Pb in urban soils tended to be environmentally available as indicated by Pb isotopic composition analysis. Combining various site-specific environmental availabilities might produce a more realistic estimation for the integrated ecological and human health risks of metal contamination in urban soils.

  13. Phytotoxicity of trace metals in spiked and field-contaminated soils: Linking soil-extractable metals with toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamels, Fanny; Malevé, Jasmina; Sonnet, Philippe; Kleja, Dan Berggren; Smolders, Erik

    2014-11-01

    Soil tests have been widely developed to predict trace metal uptake by plants. The prediction of metal toxicity, however, has rarely been tested. The present study was set up to compare 8 established soil tests for diagnosing phytotoxicity in contaminated soils. Nine soils contaminated with Zn or Cu by metal mining, smelting, or processing were collected. Uncontaminated reference soils with similar soil properties were sampled, and series of increasing contamination were created by mixing each with the corresponding soil. In addition, each reference soil was spiked with either ZnCl2 or CuCl2 at several concentrations. Total metal toxicity to barley seedling growth in the field-contaminated soils was up to 30 times lower than that in corresponding spiked soils. Total metal (aqua regia-soluble) toxicity thresholds of 50% effective concentrations (EC50) varied by factors up to 260 (Zn) or 6 (Cu) among soils. For Zn, variations in EC50 thresholds decreased as aqua regia > 0.43 M HNO3  > 0.05 M ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) > 1 M NH4 NO3  > cobaltihexamine > diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) > 0.001 M CaCl2 , suggesting that the last extraction is the most robust phytotoxicity index for Zn. The EDTA extraction was the most robust for Cu-contaminated soils. The isotopically exchangeable fraction of the total soil metal in the field-contaminated soils markedly explained the lower toxicity compared with spiked soils. The isotope exchange method can be used to translate soil metal limits derived from soils spiked with metal salts to site-specific soil metal limits. PMID:25053440

  14. Collection of trace metals with cationic surfactant-silica particles followed by flotation with an anionic surfactant for seawater analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Kitakata, Kengo; Hiraide, Masataka

    2012-02-01

    The analysis of seawater for trace metals is important for pollution monitoring and better understanding of marine systems. The present paper describes an efficient preconcentration method for the determination of trace metals in seawater. Trace metals [Ni(II), Cu(II), Ga(III), Cd(II), Pb(II), and Bi(III)] in 1,000 mL of seawater sample were complexed with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and sorbed onto silica particles covered with cetyltrimethylammonium chloride. After the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate, the particles were floated to the solution surface by bubbling and then collected by suction. The trace metals were desorbed with dilute nitric acid and determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The rapid 200-fold preconcentration was demonstrated with certified seawater samples. PMID:22159468

  15. Distribution pattern of trace metal pollutants in the sediments of an urban wetland in the southwest coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harikumar P.S,

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to invstigate the concentrations and spatial distribution of trace metals in the sediments of Kottuli Wetland,whuich is in the south west coast of India Eight stations were strategically positioned along the length of wetland and sampled for trace metals (Cu, Mn, Cd, Ni, Pb, Zn &Cr content. From the analysis, it was observed that the mean concentration of all the analysed trace metals exceeded the average world wide shale concentrations and average Japanese river sediment values. Pollution load index value (PLI of the studied area ranged from 0.10 to 58.78 which indicated that the wetland sediments were polluted. From the study, PLI of the downstream area of the wetland had the highest values of Cu, Mn, Cd, Zn & Cr. According to the index of Geoaccumulation, Igeo, all the sampling stations may face a severe trace metal pollution contamination problem in the future.

  16. Effect of Ocean Acidification on Organic and Inorganic Speciation of Trace Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, Anthony; Tipping, Edward; Lofts, Stephen; Mortimer, Robert J G

    2016-02-16

    Rising concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide are causing acidification of the oceans. This results in changes to the concentrations of key chemical species such as hydroxide, carbonate and bicarbonate ions. These changes will affect the distribution of different forms of trace metals. Using IPCC data for pCO2 and pH under four future emissions scenarios (to the year 2100) we use a chemical speciation model to predict changes in the distribution of organic and inorganic forms of trace metals. Under a scenario where emissions peak after the year 2100, predicted free ion Al, Fe, Cu, and Pb concentrations increase by factors of up to approximately 21, 2.4, 1.5, and 2.0 respectively. Concentrations of organically complexed metal typically have a lower sensitivity to ocean acidification induced changes. Concentrations of organically complexed Mn, Cu, Zn, and Cd fall by up to 10%, while those of organically complexed Fe, Co, and Ni rise by up to 14%. Although modest, these changes may have significance for the biological availability of metals given the close adaptation of marine microorganisms to their environment. PMID:26807813

  17. An exposure and risk assessment for fluoride and trace metals in black tea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofuoglu, Sait C. [Izmir Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Research Center, Guelbahce, Urla 35430 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: cemilsofuoglu@iyte.edu.tr; Kavcar, Pinar [Izmir Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Research Center, Guelbahce, Urla 35430 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: pinarkavcar@iyte.edu.tr

    2008-10-30

    Exposure and associated health risks for fluoride and trace metals in black tea were estimated. Fifty participants were randomly recruited to supply samples from the tea that they drink, and self-administer a questionnaire that inquired about personal characteristics and daily tea intake. Analyzed trace metals included aluminum, arsenic, barium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, manganese, nickel, strontium, and zinc. Fluoride and four metals (Al, Cr, Mn, Ni) were detected in all samples while barium was detected only in one sample. The remaining metals were detected in >60% of the samples. Fluoride and aluminum levels in instant tea bag samples were greater than in loose tea samples (p < 0.05) while the differences in elemental concentrations of loose and pot bag tea samples were not significant. Median and 90th percentile daily tea intake rates were estimated as 0.35 and 1.1 l/day, respectively. Neither fluoride nor aluminum levels in black tea were found to associate with considerable risks of fluorosis and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. However, carcinogenic risk levels for arsenic were high; R > 1.0 x 10{sup -6} even at the median level. According to sensitivity analysis, daily tea intake was the most influencing variable to the risk except for arsenic for which the concentration distribution was of more importance.

  18. Sex-associated differences in trace metals concentrations in and on the plumage of a common urban bird species

    OpenAIRE

    Frantz, Adrien; Federici, Pierre; Legoupi, Julie; Jacquin, Lisa; Gasparini, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Urban areas encompass both favorable and stressful conditions linked with human activities and pollution. Pollutants remain of major ecological importance for synanthropic organisms living in the city. Plumage of urban birds harbour trace metals, which can result from external deposition or from internal accumulation. External and internal plumage concentrations likely differ between specific trace metals, and may further differ between males and females because of potential sex-linked differ...

  19. Trace metals in water and fish (Unga species, Pungu maclareni, catfish Clarias maclareni) from Lake Barombi Mbo, Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Sone, Brice Nkwelle

    2012-01-01

    Lake Barombi Mbo is an isolated oligotrophic lake situated in the volcanic range of West Cameroon and home to several endangered endemic cichlids. A fieldwork was carried out at the lake where water and fish samples were collected as part of an investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate (i) whether studied trace metals were present at levels exceeding ambient water criteria, (ii) link uptake of trace metals in gills and liver of fish to water chemistry, (iii) ac...

  20. Review-Factors involving in fluctuation of trace metals concentrations in bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perween, Rubina

    2015-05-01

    Milk makes a significant contribution to human diet through provision of macronutrients, vitamins and minerals. The exact composition of milk varies with species among domestic animals according to their neonatal needs. It is recognized that imbalance in the quantity of minerals and trace elements is a serious health hazard especially for infants. Many studies reported the fluctuation in the level of metals in milk due to the influence of several factors such as geographical and exposure to environmental pollution caused by anthropogenic activity. Amongst all sources, industries take lion's share to alter the metal content in milk. The importance of different nutritional and toxic metals in milk from different geographical areas is discussed. PMID:26004711

  1. Epiphytic lichen Flavoparmelia caperata as a sentinel for trace metal pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Widely spread lichen specie Flavoparmelia caperata is used in a biomonitoring study for atmospheric trace metal pollution in natural ecosystems in Southeastern Serbia. The concentration and distribution pattern of 21 metals in lichens were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The difference observed between metal deposition in peripheral and central parts of lichen thalli reflected air quality changes in the last and previous years. These findings were confirmed with principal component analysis. Our study demonstrated the accumulation of Ba, K, Mg, Na, Tl and Zn in peripheral parts of thalli, while As, B, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, In, Li, Ni, Pb and Se were concentrated in central parts of thalli.

  2. Trace metals in bivalves and seagrass collected from Venezuelan coastal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ti vela mactroides and Crassostrea rhizophorae are two abundant species of bivalves along the Venezuelan coast and high local demand as seafood. The seagrass Thalassia testudinum, of interest in different parts of the world, is very abundant in coastal areas of Venezuela. The concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, V and Zn are reported in samples of soft tissue of Tivela mactroides and Crassostrea rhizophorae and tissues of Thalassia testudinum, collected along the Venezuelan coast. These metal concentrations were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Statistical analysis (one-way ANOVA) indicated that the species under consideration have different characteristics compared to metal bioaccumulation and could be used as potential indicators to investigate contamination by trace metals. (author)

  3. Changes in Trace Metal Species and Other Components of the Rhizosphere During Growth of Radish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamon, R. E.; Lorenz, S. E.; Holm, Peter Engelund;

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the properties of soil solution in the rhizosphere of developing radish plants were investigated. Variations in these properties were expected to affect the distribution and speciation of metals in the soil and soil solution. Applications of essential nutrients were linked to plant...... transpiration rates and prevented excess addition of nutrient ions, so that subtle changes in soil solution composition would not be obscured. Soil solution pH, the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the concentrations of major and trace elements in solution were found to vary over time. Strict...... existing in the uncomplexed state. Changes in the concentrations of uncomplexed Cd and Zn with time gave the best correlations with changes in plant uptake of these metals over time, supporting the hypothesis that plants mainly absorb the free metal ion from soil solution....

  4. Spatial distribution and potential sources of trace metals in insoluble particles of snow from Urumqi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolan; Jiang, Fengqing; Wang, Shaoping; Turdi, Muyesser; Zhang, Zhaoyong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize trace elements in snow in urban-suburb gradient over Urumqi city, China. The spatial distribution patterns of 11 trace metals in insoluble particulate matters of snow were revealed by using 102 snow samples collected in and around urban areas of Urumqi, a city suffering from severe wintertime air pollution in China. Similar spatial distribution for Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni, and Pb was found and their two significant high-value areas located in the west and east, respectively, and a high-value area in the south, which were correlated with factory emissions, traffic activities, and construction fugitive dust. The high-value areas of Cr, Ni, and V occurred in the northeast corner and along main traffic paths, which were linked to oil refinery and vehicular emissions. High value of Be presented in the west of the city. The high-value area of Co in the northeast could be related to local soil. Cd and U displayed relatively even spatial patterns in the urban area. In view of distance from the urban center, e.g., from the first circular belt to the fourth circular belt, except Be, V, Cd, and U, the contents of other metals generally decreased from the first circular belt to the forth circular belt, implying the effect of human activity clearly. Additionally, prevailing northwesterly winds and occasionally southeasterly winds in winter were associated with decreased, generally, concentrations of trace metal in snow from the urban center to the southern suburb along a northwest and southeast transect. The information on concentrations and spatial distributions of these metals in insoluble particles of snow in winter will be valuable for further environmental protection and planning. PMID:25412892

  5. Sources and areal distribution of trace metals in recent sediments of Middle Loch, Pearl Harbor (Hawaii)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.

    1989-05-01

    The primary objective of this project was to determine whether current operations of the Naval Inactive Ships Maintenance Facility contribute significant trace metal contamination to Middle Loch of Pearl Harbor. Secondary objectives were (1) to identify and quantify all major sources of trace metal contamination in Middle Loch and (2) to determine if trace metal concentrations in Middle Loch have declined following termination of direct discharges from the Pearl City Sewage Treatment Plant. Sediment samples from ten locations within Middle Loch and from two locations in each of the two major streams entering the loch were analyzed for radioisotopes and metals. Major elements (aluminum and calcium) as well as organic and inorganic carbon were used to help characterize sediment composition and source. High aluminum-to-calcium ratios and high organic carbon concentrations are associated with terrigenous material carried into Middle Loch by the streams. The presence of the natural, short-lived (53-d half-life) radioisotope /sup 7/Be was used to identify sites where the sedimentary material was recently deposited (i.e., within the past 3 months) and to identify patterns of recent sediment accumulation. Beryllium-7 was detected at eight of the ten sample sites within Middle Loch and in all stream samples. High /sup 7/Be inventories beneath the ships and at the mouths of the streams suggest that these are areas of rapid sediment accumulation, or sediment focusing. The concentrations of /sup 7/Be closely match the expected input based on rain-bucket data. This suggests that Middle Loch effectively traps all the /sup 7/Be through adsorption onto suspended matter and deposition to the sediments. 14 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. HAIR HEAVY METAL AND ESSENTIAL TRACE ELEMENT CONCENTRATION IN CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatadze, T; Zhorzholiani, L; Kherkheulidze, M; Kandelaki, E; Ivanashvili, T

    2015-11-01

    Our study aims evaluation of level of essential trace elements and heavy metals in the hair samples of children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and identification of changes that are associated with autistic spectrum disorders. Case-control study was conducted at Child Development Center of Iashvili Children's Central Hospital (LD).We studied 60 children aged from 4 to 5 years old. The concentrations of 28 elements among (Ca,Zn, K, Fe, Cu, Se, Mn, Cr, S, Br, Cl, Co, Ag, V, Ni, Rb, Mo, Sr, Ti, Ba, Pb, As, Hg, Cd, Sb, Zr, Sn, Bi) them trace elements and toxic metals) were determined in scalp hair samples of children (n=30) with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and from control group of healthy children (n=30) with matched sex and age. Micro-elemental status was detected in the hair, with roentgen-fluorescence spectrometer method (Method MBИ 081/12-4502-000, Apparatus ALVAX- CIP, USA - UKRAIN) .To achieve the similarity of study and control groups, pre and postnatal as well as family and social history were assessed and similar groups were selected. Children with genetic problems, malnourished children, children from families with social problems were excluded from the study. The diagnosis of ASD were performed by pediatrician and psychologist (using M-CHAT and ADOS) according to DSM IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders from the American Psychiatric association) criteria. The study was statistically analyzed using computer program SPSS 19. Deficiencies of essential trace microelements revealed in both group, but there was significant difference between control and studied groups. The most deficient element was zinc (92% in target and 20% in control), then - manganese (55% and 8%) and selenium (38% and 4%). In case of cooper study revealed excess concentration of this element only in target group in 50% of cases. The contaminations to heavy metals were detected in case of lead (78% and 16), mercury (43% and 10%) and cadmium (38% and 8%). The

  7. Trace Metal and Sulfur Dynamics in the First Meter of Buoyant Hydrothermal Vent Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, A.; Gartman, A.; Shaw, T. J.; Luther, G. W., III

    2014-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of metals and metal sulfides within the buoyant plume is critical to determining the ultimate fate of metals emitted from hydrothermal vents. The concentration, size fractionation, and partitioning of trace metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Co, Zn, Cd, Pb) were determined within the first meter of the rising plume at three vent fields (TAG, Snakepit, and Rainbow) along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. At Rainbow, total Fe concentrations exceed total sulfide concentrations by an order of magnitude, whereas at the other two sites, total Fe and total sulfide concentrations are nearly equal. At all three sites, Mn and Fe are primarily in the filtered (zinc is correlated with unfiltered cadmium and lead. At Rainbow, unfiltered zinc, cadmium and lead are correlated, but unfiltered copper and cobalt are not, indicating precipitation dynamics at Rainbow are different than those at TAG and Snakepit due to bulk geochemical differences, including a higher iron to sulfide ratio. A sequential HCl/HNO3 leaching method was used to distinguish metals present in pyrite and chalcopyrite in both unfiltered and filtered samples. Significant portions of unfiltered Cu and Co were extracted in HNO3, whereas unfiltered Zn, Cd, and Pb were extracted in HCl. Up to 95 % of filtered Cu, Co, and Zn, up to 80% Cd, and up to 60 % Pb are only extractable in HNO3, indicating that a significant portion of metals < 0.2 μm are incorporated into a recalcitrant fraction such as nanoparticulate pyrite or chalcopyrite.

  8. Enrichment of trace metals in water utilizing the coagulation of soybean protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An enrichment of trace metals in water with a coagulated soybean protein and the complex-forming character of heavy metal ions with the soybean protein were investigated by means of emission spectrography. Fixed amounts of soybean milk (collector) and delta-gluconic lactone (coagulant) were added to a sample solution containing various metal ions, and then the mixture was heated to boiling in order to coagulate the protein. The coagulum (soybean curd) separated from the suspension with a centrifuge was burned to ashes with a low temperature plasma asher. Then metals enriched in the soybean curd were determined by means of emission spectrography. The pH of the solution was adjusted to 4.4--5.0 by adding suitable amounts of delta-gluconic lactone for the complete coagulation of the soybean protein. The proposed method can be applied to the collection and enrichment of various metal ions such as gold, silver, mercury, platinum, cadmium, beryllium, palladium, antimony, gallium, indium, cerium, lanthanum, thorium, yttrium, zirconium, etc. Those metals are not detectable in the original soybean. (auth.)

  9. Temporal variation of trace metal geochemistry in floodplain lake sediment subject to dynamic hydrological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate change and land use may significantly influence metal cycling in dynamic river systems. We studied temporal variation of sediment characteristics in a floodplain lake, including concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, acid volatile sulfide and trace metals. The sampling period included a severe winter inundation and a dramatic water level drop during summer. Temporal changes were interpreted using multivariate analysis and chemical equilibrium calculations. Metal concentrations in sediment increased with depth, indicating a gradual improvement of sediment quality. In contrast, dissolved metal concentrations were highest in top layers due to mobilization from oxyhydroxides and precipitation with sulfides in deeper layers. Inundation had a mobilizing effect as it stimulated resuspension and oxygenation of sediment top layers. Water table lowering combined with organic matter decomposition led to immobilization due to sulfide formation. The chemistry of the sediments was consistent with model calculations, especially for macro-elements. The results illustrate the importance of seasonality for metal risk assessment. - There is strong seasonal variation in degree of metal mobilization from lake sediments

  10. Trace elements in zircon from rocks of the Katugin rare-metal deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashova, E. V.; Skublov, S. G.; Marin, Yu. B.; Lupashko, T. N.; Ilchenko, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Katugin deposit of economic Ta, Nb, Zr, U, REE, Y, and cryolite (Na3AlF6) ores is located in the Kalar district of the Chita region and classified as unique in Nb, Ta, and Y reserves hosted in rare-metal alkali granite. The distribution of trace elements (including REE) in zircon was studied for ore-bearing arfvedsonite-aegirine, biotite-riebeckite rocks, and zones of late recrystallization with nodular zircon clusters. The outer rims and marginal zones of zircon grains are depleted in almost all trace elements except for hafnium as compared with cores and central zones. Compositional features of zircon cores indicate their magmatic origin and do not prove metasomatic nature of the deposit. The similar REE patterns of zircon rims and cores, as well as other attributes assume postmagmatic or metamorphic origin of the rims.

  11. Distribution of trace metal concentrations in paired cancerous and non-cancerous human stomach tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehmet Yaman; Gokce Kaya; Hayrettin Yekeler

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether trace metal concentrations (which influence metabolism as both essential and non-essential elements) are increased or decreased in cancerous tissues and to understand the precise role of these metals in carcinogenesis.METHODS: Concentrations of trace metals including Cd,Ni, Cu, Zn, Fe, Mg and Ca in both cancerous and noncancerous stomach tissue samples were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Tissue samples were digested using microwave energy. Slotted tube atom trap was used to improve the sensitivity of copper and cadmium in flame AAS determinations.RESULTS: From the obtained data in this study,the concentrations of nickel, copper and iron in the cancerous human stomach were found to be significantly higher than those in the non-cancerous tissues, by using t-test for the paired samples. Furthermore, the average calcium concentrations in the cancerous stomach tissue samples were found to be significantly lower than those in the non-cancerous stomach tissue samples by using t-test. Exceedingly high Zn concentrations (207-826 mg/kg) were found in two paired stomach tissue samples from both cancerous and non-cancerous parts.CONCLUSION: In contrast to the literature data for Cu and Fe, the concentrations of copper, iron and nickel in cancerous tissue samples are higher than those in the non-cancerous samples. Furthermore, the Ca levels are lower in cancerous tissue samples than in non-cancerous tissue samples.

  12. Liquid membrane extraction techniques for trace metal analysis and speciation in environmental and biological matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndungu, Kuria

    1999-04-01

    In this thesis, liquid-membrane-based methods for the analysis of trace metal species in samples of environmental and biological origin were developed. By incorporating extracting reagents in the membrane liquid, trace metal ions were selectively separated from humic-rich natural waters and urine samples, prior to their determination using various instrumental techniques. The extractions were performed in closed flow systems thus allowing easy automation of both the sample clean-up and enrichment. An acidic organophosphorus reagent (DEHPA) and a basic tetraalkylammonium reagent (Aliquat-336) were used as extractants in the membrane liquid to selectively extract and enrich cationic and anionic metal species respectively. A speciation method for chromium species was developed that allowed the determination of cationic Cr(III) species and anionic CR(VI) species in natural water samples without the need of a chromatographic separation step prior to their detection. SLM was also coupled on-line to potentiometric stripping analysis providing a fast and sensitive method for analysis of Pb in urine samples. A microporous membrane liquid-liquid extraction (MMLLE) method was developed for the determination of organotin compounds in natural waters that reduced the number of manual steps involved in the LLE of organotin compounds prior to their CC separation. Clean extracts obtained after running unfiltered humic-rich river water samples through the MMLLE flow system allowed selective determination of all the organotin compounds in a single run using GC-MS in the selected ion monitoring mode (SIM) 171 refs, 9 figs, 4 tabs

  13. SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF TRACE METAL ACCUMULATION ON CORAL REEF IN GULF OF MANNAR, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S. Yogesh Kumar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Investication of trace metal occumulation on coral and reef environment (sediment and water of the Gulf of Mannar biosphere reserve was studied during July 2007 to June 2008. The samples were collected for analyzing from Thoothukudi and Vembar group of Islands, Gulf of Mannar. The concentration of trace metal in the water are in the order of Fe > Pb > Zn > As > Mn > Cd > Cu and in sediment in the order of Fe > Mn > Pb > Zn > Cu >Cd and in coral rubbles in the order of Fe > Mn > Pb > Zn > Cu > Cd. In the waters the iron ranks first and copper ranks last; in the sediment iron ranks first in concentration and cadmium ranks the last. In corals the iron ranks first and cadmium ranks the last in concentration and during the entire study periods. SPSS two tailed Correlation coefficients between the months and the temporal variablilities of heavy metals were assessed using the monthly data for each component in all stations and analysis of variances (f values for the water, sediment and coral rubbles between the stations and month during the study period. Conclude that the values recorded at Thoothukdi group of islands were little higher than the Vembar group of islands, and it might be due to discharges pumped from the industrial belt of Thoothukudi, domestic sewages from Thoothukudi town, harbour activities and thermal power plant operation along the southern side of the Gulf of Mannar.

  14. Determination of trace metallic impurities in plutonium bearing mixed oxide nuclear fuel using atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presently AFFF is engaged in fabrication of PFBR MOX fuel with nominal composition of (U0.79Pu0.21)O2 and (U0.72Pu0.28)O2. Chemical characterization of these fuels for trace metallic impurities is one of the pre-requisite for their use inside the reactor as trace metallic elements influence the fuel integrity and neutron economy significantly. B, Cd, Dy, Eu, Gd and Sm have large neutron absorption cross-section; their presence results in loss of neutrons. Refractory elements such as W, Mo, Ta etc. cause creep resistance resulting in clad damage. Low melting elements such as Zn may cause liquid metal embrittlement altering the fuel structure and consequently failure. Presence of alkali and alkaline earth changes the density and reduces the fissile content. Fe, Cr, Ni, Cu and Pb are the indicators for the process pickup and condition (wear/tear) of process equipment. Overall high impurity content leads to fuel dilution and deterioration of chemical and metallurgical properties of fuel

  15. Early diagenetic processes aspects controlling the mobility of dissolved trace metals in three riverine sediment columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesven, L; Gao, Y; Billon, G; Leermakers, M; Ouddane, B; Fischer, J-C; Baeyens, W

    2008-12-15

    The behaviour of Mn, Fe, Co, Zn, Cd, Pb and Ni has been studied during early diagenesis in three different riverine sediments (Spierre, Lys and Sheldt). For that purpose (1) pore waters were extracted from sediment cores by centrifugation under nitrogen and further analyzed for the determination of total dissolved metal concentrations and (2) DET and DGT probes have been deployed in situ for the determination of high resolution profiles of labile and total dissolved metal concentrations. Furthermore, sulfidization processes have been examined; they revealed a production of pyrite near the water-sediment interface at Helkijn and Wervik sampling sites, probably due to a partial re-oxidation of reduced sulphur species. In Spierre sediments, where Eh values are the most negative, pyrite production should be mainly due to strict anaerobic processes. Concentrations of AVS in Spierre sediments are also very high and result in low TI values and low trace metal concentrations in the pore waters. Otherwise, in Wervik sediments, the low pH values combined to a TI value close to 0 results in the highest observed dissolved trace metal levels. DOS remains low at the three sites, since it does not exceed 0.4. In Wervik and Helkijn, the limitation is probably due to low sedimentary inputs of sulphate. In Spierre, sulphate is never exhausted in the pore water, suggesting a limitation of the DOS by a lack of bio-degradable organic matter. Values of Cd, Cu and Pb DGT concentrations remain low in pore waters whatever the site, due to their strong affinity with the reduced sulphur pool. It has also been demonstrated that the labile fractions of Pb and Cd are the lowest and do not exceed 0.5, while Co and Ni are the most available metals. PMID:18834616

  16. Soluble trace metals in aerosols over the tropical south-east Pacific offshore of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. R.; Thomas, M.; Bange, H. W.; Plasencia Sánchez, E.

    2016-02-01

    Bulk aerosol samples collected during cruise M91 of FS Meteor off the coast of Peru in December 2012 were analysed for their soluble trace metal (Fe, Al, Mn, Ti, Zn, V, Ni, Cu, Co, Cd, Pb, Th) and major ion (including NO3- and NH4+) content. These data are among the first recorded for trace metals in this relatively poorly studied region of the global marine atmosphere. To the north of ˜ 13° S, the concentrations of several elements (Fe, Ti, Zn, V, Ni, Pb) appear to be related to distance from the coast. At the south of the transect ( ˜ 15-16° S), elevated concentrations of Fe, Cu, Co, and Ni were observed, and we calculated dry deposition fluxes of soluble Cu approximately an order of magnitude higher than a recent model-based estimate of total Cu deposition to the region. The model did not take account of emissions from the large smelting facilities in the south of Peru and northern Chile, and our results may indicate that these facilities constitute an important source of trace metals to the region. Calculated dry deposition fluxes (3370-17800 and 16-107 nmol m-2 d-1 for inorganic nitrogen and soluble Fe respectively) indicated that atmospheric input to the waters of the Peru upwelling system contains an excess of Fe over N, with respect to phytoplankton requirements. This may be significant as primary production in these waters has been reported to be limited by Fe availability, but atmospheric deposition is unlikely to be the dominant source of Fe to the system.

  17. Size-dependent concentrations of trace metals in four Mediterranean gastropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubadda, F; Conti, M E; Campanella, L

    2001-11-01

    In order to gain more information on the possible use of four gastropod species as metal biomonitors for the Mediterranean area, the influence of body weight upon Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations was studied in specimens collected at locations with different degrees of environmental pollution. The selected species were the marine snails Monodonta turbinata Born and Monodonta mutabilis Philippi, and the limpets Patella caerulea L. and Patella lusitanica Gmelin. Significant differences between metal concentrations in individuals from different stations were tested by ANCOVA on log-transformed data with log body weight as covariate. For all species a positive correlation between metal concentrations and body weight was observed, which means that the largest individuals contained the highest levels of metals. The inclusion of body weight as covariate in the statistical analysis explained from 81% to 99% of the metal variability within the organisms and enabled the achievement of improvements in the detection of differences among sites. The four selected species provided a rather univocal picture of bioavailable metal loads at the different stations of the experimental area. Except for Cd, the metal concentrations recorded at the clean stations were found to lie in the range of the lowest values reported in the literature and can be employed as useful background levels which can be referred to for intraspecific comparison within the Mediterranean area. It is concluded that in view of its distribution, unambiguous identification, resistance to pollution and accumulation patterns M. turbinata has considerable potential as a biomonitor of trace metals over the Mediterranean. PMID:11680752

  18. Understanding Changes to Interrelated Hydrologic and Trace Metal Cycles in Mountain Pine Beetle Infested Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearup, L.; Maxwell, R. M.; Clow, D. W.; McCray, J. E.; Sharp, J. O.

    2012-12-01

    Changing climate in the Rocky Mountain West and worldwide has led to insect infestation and resultant tree mortality at epidemic levels. This unprecedented change in land cover is known to impact tree-scale hydrologic processes in forested watersheds, with possible implications for water quality. In this work, soil and streamwater samples from a mountain pine beetle (MPB) infested watershed were analyzed for metals and stable isotopes to understand how the loss of forest cover over large spatial and temporal extent changes interrelated hydrologic and metal transport processes. An increase in trace metal fluxes from pine forest soils is a potential result of increases in organic matter and alterations in pH. To understand the implication for MPB-infested forests, the mobility of eight metals of interest (Al, Ba, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn) were compared from soils beneath impacted and living trees. Preliminary results from this study found significant decreases in solid - liquid partitioning coefficients among the majority of metals analyzed, particularly in organic horizon samples. These results suggest an increase in potential mobilization from deposited litter and underlying soil horizons after beetle attack. Differences were also observed between aspects, with more pronounced mobility increases on south facing slopes. Sequential extractions are underway to better elucidate the important mechanisms and possible change in metal fractionation under different tree phases. In addition to increased metal release, changes in transport processes are also possible. Stable isotopes (∂18O and ∂D) and streamwater chemistry were analyzed to distinguish potential changes of water sources. Observed increases in soil moisture under impacted trees suggest possible increases in flow through the shallow subsurface that could have implications for contaminant transport. Clarifying important metal release mechanisms at the tree scale and changes in flow processes at the watershed

  19. Synthesis and trace metal characterization of potassium plutonium sulphate: working reference material for plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt was made to prepare potassium plutonium sulphate, which is proposed to be the working reference material for analyzing plutonium based fuel samples and associated materials. X-ray diffraction was employed for phase characterization and the structure was found to be monoclinic in nature with a space group of P21/c. Trace metallic impurity analyses was carried out for the 26 elements e.g. Ag, Al, B, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Si, Sn, Sr, W, Zn, Dy, Eu, Sm and Gd using ICP-AES as well as D.C.Arc AES. (author)

  20. Distribution of particulate trace metals in the western Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Satyanarayana, D.; Murty, P.V.S.P.; Sarma, V.V.

    of particulate Fe in the bottom can be attributed either t9 its precipitation as hydrous iron oxide or asiron oxide coatings on pre-existingpa~ticIes(Murray and Gilt 1978; Aller, 1980; Lambert, Jehanno, Silverberg, Brun-Cottan and Chesse1et, 1981). Significant... of Fe and Mn. Several authors reported scavenging of dissolved trace metals (2n, Cd, Cuand Co) from seawater (Balistrieri and Murray, 1982) by hydrous oxides of Fe and .Mn. Significant positive correlations,between dissolved Zn and particulate Fe (r=O.74...

  1. Neutron activation analysis of trace metals in the livers of Japanese sika deer (cervus Nippon)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron activation analysis facilities at the JMTR reactor was used to determine the levels of trace metals in the livers of nine Japanese sika deer. The samples were cut into pieces, pulverized in liquid nitrogen, freeze-dried, and finally fractionated through a stainless steel sieve of 200 mesh. Then the samples were irradiated for 6 or 24 hours by a neutron flux of 1.0x1014 n·cm-2·sec-1. In the present work, we analysed the concentrations of six elements (Ag, Co, Fe, Rb, Se, and Zn) in the livers of nine deer. (author)

  2. Trace metals in resuspended fraction of settled bus dust and assessment of non-occupational exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Tingting; Gao, Peng; Jia, Liming; Chen, Xin; Lu, Binyu; Yang, Longhai; Feng, Yujie

    2016-08-01

    Trace metals (TMs) within urban public transportation systems have rarely been studied and information on related health risks is scant. This study measured TM (arsenic, chromium, cadmium, nickel, zinc, copper and lead) concentrations in resuspended fractions of settled bus dust in Harbin, China, and estimated the exposure and health risks. The incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) for commuters was estimated for TM exposures. The average concentration of total TMs was 559μg/g (ranges from 312 to 787) among 45 bus routes in Harbin. The hazard quotient of three selected commuter groups increased in the following order: teenagersdermal contact>inhalation. PMID:27128506

  3. Exploiting flow Injection and sequential injection schemes for trace metal determinations by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    Determination of low or trace-level amounts of metals by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) often requires the use of suitable preconcentration and/or separation procedures in order to attain the necessary sensitivity and selectivity. Such schemes are advantageously executed in...... compensated by superior performance and versatility. In fact, two approaches are conceivable: The analyte-loaded ion-exchange beads might either be transported directly into the graphite tube where they are pyrolized and the measurand is atomized and quantified; or the loaded beads can be eluted and the...

  4. TRACE Analysis for Transient Thermal-hydraulics of A Heavy Liquid Metal Cooled System

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Yiqiong

    2011-01-01

    Heavy liquid metal (HLM - lead or lead bismuth eutectic) is considered as a candidate coolant for next-generation fast reactor and accelerate-driven systems (ADS), due to its favorable chemical, thermo-physical and neutronic properties in comparison with sodium which has been used as coolant in fast breeder reactors (FBRs). To perform design-base-accident analysis for the HLM-cooled reactors, the well-known transient thermal-hydraulic analysis codes (e.g., RELAP5 and TRACE) are being applied ...

  5. Changes in Trace Metal Species and Other Components of the Rhizosphere During Growth of Radish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamon, R. E.; Lorenz, S. E.; Holm, Peter Engelund; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; McGrath, S. P.

    1995-01-01

    transpiration rates and prevented excess addition of nutrient ions, so that subtle changes in soil solution composition would not be obscured. Soil solution pH, the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the concentrations of major and trace elements in solution were found to vary over time. Strict......Changes in the properties of soil solution in the rhizosphere of developing radish plants were investigated. Variations in these properties were expected to affect the distribution and speciation of metals in the soil and soil solution. Applications of essential nutrients were linked to plant...

  6. Chemical speciation of trace metals emitted from Indonesian peat fires for health risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betha, Raghu; Pradani, Maharani; Lestari, Puji; Joshi, Umid Man; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2013-03-01

    Regional smoke-induced haze in Southeast Asia, caused by uncontrolled forest and peat fires in Indonesia, is of major environmental and health concern. In this study, we estimated carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic health risk due to exposure to fine particles (PM2.5) as emitted from peat fires at Kalimantan, Indonesia. For the health risk analysis, chemical speciation (exchangeable, reducible, oxidizable, and residual fractions) of 12 trace metals (Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Ti, V and Zn) in PM2.5 was studied. Results indicate that Al, Fe and Ti together accounted for a major fraction of total metal concentrations (~ 83%) in PM2.5 emissions in the immediate vicinity of peat fires. Chemical speciation reveals that a major proportion of most of the metals, with the exception of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Cd, was present in the residual fraction. The exchangeable fraction of metals, which represents their bioavailability, could play a major role in inducing human health effects of PM2.5. This fraction contained carcinogenic metals such as Cd (39.2 ng m- 3) and Ni (249.3 ng m- 3) that exceeded their WHO guideline values by several factors. Health risk estimates suggest that exposure to PM2.5 emissions in the vicinity of peat fires poses serious health threats.

  7. Spatial/Temporal Characterization and Risk Assessment of Trace Metals in Mangla Reservoir, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Saleem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite water samples were collected from different sites of Mangla reservoir, Pakistan, in premonsoon, monsoon, and postmonsoon seasons. The physicochemical parameters and trace/heavy metals were determined in all water samples. The results manifested significant seasonal variations among Co, Cr, Ni, and Pb and the metals exhibited highest contribution in premonsoon season except Mn. Principal component analysis (PCA and cluster analysis (CA revealed considerable anthropogenic intrusions in the reservoir. Probable risk associated with the metals levels on human health was also evaluated using hazard quotients (HQ by ingestion and dermal routes for adults and children. It was noted that Cd, Co, Cr, Ni, and Pb (HQing>1 were the most important pollutants leading to noncarcinogenic concerns. The HQderm levels of all metals were below unity, suggesting that these metals posed no hazards via dermal absorption, while the oral intake was the major exposure pathway. The largest contributors to chronic risks were Cd, Co, Cr, Ni, and Pb in all the seasons. Therefore, immediate measures should be taken for sustaining the healthy aquatic ecosystem.

  8. Trace metals in seagrass, algae and molluscs from an uncontaminated area in the Mediterranean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, L; Conti, M E; Cubadda, F; Sucapane, C

    2001-01-01

    The concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn were measured in specimens of four marine organisms--the seagrass Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile, the brown algae Padina pavonica (L.) Thivy, and the two gastropod molluscs Monodonta turbinata Born and Patella caerulea L.--selected as possible cosmopolitan biomonitors of trace metals in the Mediterranean area. The organisms were collected at five coastal sites in Favignana Island (Sicily, Italy), an area virtually uninfluenced by anthropogenic activities. In order to gain a more complete picture of both the environmental conditions of the experimental area and the bioaccumulation patterns of the selected organisms, soluble and total metal concentrations were determined in coastal water samples collected at the same stations. The picture of bioavailable metal loads in the different sites of the selected area provided by the four species was rather univocal. An overall trend of increased metal concentrations at the station in which the local harbour is located was clear. On the other hand, the metal concentrations recorded at the 'clean' stations generally fall in the range of the lowest values available in the literature and may be considered as useful background levels to which to refer for intraspecific comparison within the Mediterranean area. Implications in biomonitoring of the observed accumulation patterns, especially in the different tissues of Posidonia oceanica, are discussed. PMID:11202705

  9. Trace Metal Content of Sediments Close to Mine Sites in the Andean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Yacoub

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is a preliminary examination of heavy metal pollution in sediments close to two mine sites in the upper part of the Jequetepeque River Basin, Peru. Sediment concentrations of Al, As, Cd, Cu, Cr, Fe, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn, and Zn were analyzed. A comparative study of the trace metal content of sediments shows that the highest concentrations are found at the closest points to the mine sites in both cases. The sediment quality analysis was performed using the threshold effect level of the Canadian guidelines (TEL. The sediment samples analyzed show that potential ecological risk is caused frequently at both sites by As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn. The long-term influence of sediment metals in the environment is also assessed by sequential extraction scheme analysis (SES. The availability of metals in sediments is assessed, and it is considered a significant threat to the environment for As, Cd, and Sb close to one mine site and Cr and Hg close to the other mine site. Statistical analysis of sediment samples provides a characterization of both subbasins, showing low concentrations of a specific set of metals and identifies the main characteristics of the different pollution sources. A tentative relationship between pollution sources and possible ecological risk is established.

  10. Effects of northeast monsoon on trace metal distribution in the South China Sea off Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiana, G; Shazili, N A M; Marinah, M A; Bidai, J

    2014-01-01

    Concentrations of trace metals in the South China Sea (SCS) were determined off the coast of Terengganu during the months of May and November 2007. The concentrations of dissolved and particulate metals were in the range of 0.019-0.194 μg/L and 50-365 μg/g, respectively, for cadmium (Cd), 0.05-0.45 μg/L and 38-3,570 μg/g for chromium (Cr), 0.05-3.54 μg/L and 21-1,947 μg/g for manganese (Mn), and 0.03-0.49 μg/L and 2-56,982 μg/g for lead (Pb). The order of mean log K D found was Cd > Cr > Pb > Mn. The study suggests that the primary sources of these metals are discharges from the rivers which drain into the SCS, in particular the Dungun River, which flows in close proximity to agricultural areas and petrochemical industries. During the northeast monsoon, levels of particulate metals in the bottom water samples near the shore were found to be much higher than during the dry season, the probable result of re-suspension of the metals from the bottom sediments. PMID:23974537

  11. Phase partitioning of trace metals in a contaminated estuary influenced by industrial effluent discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenhao; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-07-01

    Severe trace metal pollution due to industrial effluents releases was found in Jiulong River Estuary, Southern China. In this study, water samples were collected during effluent release events to study the dynamic changes of environmental conditions and metal partitioning among dissolved, particulate and colloidal phases controlled by estuarine mixing. Intermittent effluent discharges during low tide caused decreasing pH and dissolved oxygen, and induced numerous suspended particulate materials and dissolved organic carbon to the estuary. Different behaviors of Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr and Pb in the dissolved fraction against the conservative index salinity indicated different sources, e.g., dissolved Ni from the intermittent effluent. Although total metal concentrations increased markedly following effluent discharges, Cu, Zn, Cr, Pb were predominated by the particulate fraction. Enhanced adsorption onto particulates in the mixing process resulted in elevated partitioning coefficient (Kd) values for Cu and Zn, and the particle concentration effect was not obvious under such anthropogenic impacts. Colloidal proportion of these metals (especially Cu and Zn) showed positive correlations with dissolved or colloidal organic carbon, suggesting the metal-organic complexation. However, the calculated colloidal partitioning coefficients were relatively constant, indicating the excess binding capacity. Overall, the intermittent effluent discharge altered the particulate/dissolved and colloidal/soluble phase partitioning process and may further influence the bioavailability and potential toxicity to aquatic organisms. PMID:27061473

  12. Concentrations and solubility of selected trace metals in leaf and bagged black teas commercialized in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Polechońska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of heavy metals in bagged and leaf black teas of the same brand and evaluate the percentage transfer of metals to tea infusion to assess the consumer exposure. Ten leaf black teas and 10 bagged black teas of the same brand available in Poland were analyzed for Zn, Mn, Cd, Pb, Ni, Co, Cr, Al, and Fe concentrations both in dry material and their infusion. The bagged teas contained higher amounts of Pb, Mn, Fe, Ni, Al, and Cr compared with leaf teas of the same brand, whereas the infusions of bagged tea contained higher levels of Mn, Ni, Al, and Cr compared with leaf tea infusions. Generally, the most abundant trace metals in both types of tea were Al and Mn. There was a wide variation in percentage transfer of elements from the dry tea materials to the infusions. The solubility of Ni and Mn was the highest, whereas Fe was insoluble and only a small portion of this metal content may leach into infusion. With respect to the acceptable daily intake of metals, the infusions of both bagged and leaf teas analyzed were found to be safe for human consumption.

  13. Accumulation of Selenium and Trace Metals on Plant Litter in a Tidal Marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawislanski, P. T.; Chau, S.; Mountford, H.; Wong, H. C.; Sears, T. C.

    2001-05-01

    Research in a San Francisco Bay intertidal marsh has shown the accumulation of Se and trace metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb, Cd, Fe) on bagged litter of five common estuarine marsh plant species, over periods of months to a year. Metal concentrations increased as much as 150-fold relative to plant tissue initially placed in mesh litter bags. Concentrations of metals increased with the amount of time litter was submerged, though mass accumulation was moderated by the concomitant decay of the litter. The association of very fine particulate matter with the litter, as determined based on Si concentrations, was the main mechanism for enrichment. Further accumulation occurs during winter months via the sorption onto or precipitation with Fe-rich phases, particularly in lower marsh plants. The resultant annual fluxes of Se and most metals to sediments via litter were estimated to be equivalent to between 1 and 16% of the primary flux on suspended particulate matter and may be an important mechanism for scavenging dissolved and colloid-associated metals. Previous studies, which ignored the particulate contribution, may have incorrectly assumed the predominance of sorption and co-precipitation mechanisms. The degree to which litter bags enhance fine sediment trapping over natural conditions needs to be evaluated.

  14. Advanced Monitoring of Trace Metals Applied to Contamination Reduction of Silicon Device Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillot, P.; Martin, C.; Planchais, A.

    2011-11-01

    The detrimental effects of metallic on certain key electrical parameters of silicon devices mandates the use of state-of-the-art characterization and metrology tools as well as appropriate control plans. Historically, this has been commonly achieved in-line on monitor wafers through a combination of Total Reflectance X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) and post anneal Surface Photo Voltage (SPV). On the other hand, VPD (Vapor Phase Decomposition) combined with ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry) or TXRF is known to provide both identification and quantification of surface trace metals at lower detection limits. Based on these considerations the description of an advanced monitoring scheme using SPV, TXRF and automated VPD ICP-MS is described.

  15. 1976 Hanford americium-exposure incident: urinary excretion of trace metals during DTPA treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urine samples from a person treated intravenously with diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DPTA) salts for 3 years to promote the excretion of 241Am were assayed for 24 elements including almost all of the trace metals currently recognized as essential for good health. Zinc was found to be the only metal excreted more rapidly than normal. An 18-mg urinary loss of body zinc was found to be associated with each 1-g injection of Na3CaDTPA. Use of either Na3ZnDTPA or Na3CaDTPA combined with oral dosages of ZnSO4 appeared to completely compensate for this loss, and it is unlikely that the patient experienced any zinc deficiency due to the DTPA treatment

  16. Solid-phase extraction of trace metal ions with magnetic nanoparticles modified with 2,6-diaminopyridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have modified silica-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles with 2,6-diaminopyridine and used these for selective magnetic solid-phase extraction of trace amounts of metal ions. The nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Quantitative extraction of trace amounts of Cu(II) and Zn(II) from mixed-ion solutions was accomplished at an optimal pH value of 6 within less than 10 min. The metal ions were eluted from the sorbent with hydrochloric acid. Common electrolytes and chemically related metal ions do not interfere. The relative standard deviations of the method are <4 %. It was successfully applied to the separation and preconcentration of trace metal ions from the certified reference materials GBW 08301 (river sediment) and GBW 08607 (water solution), in natural water, and in samples of vegetable with satisfying results. (author)

  17. Soil microbial communities as suitable bioindicators of trace metal pollution in agricultural volcanic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parelho, Carolina; dos Santos Rodrigues, Armindo; do Carmo Barreto, Maria; Gonçalo Ferreira, Nuno; Garcia, Patrícia

    2015-04-01

    Summary: The biological, chemical and physical properties of soil confer unique characteristics that enhance or influence its overall biodiversity. The adaptive character of soil microbial communities (SMCs) to metal pollution allows discriminating soil health, since changes in microbial populations and activities may function as excellent indicators of soil pollutants. Volcanic soils are unique naturally fertile resources, extensively used for agricultural purposes and with particular physicochemical properties that may result in accumulation of toxic substances, such as trace metals (TM). In our previous works, we identified priority TM affecting agricultural Andosols under different agricultural land uses. Within this particular context, the objectives of this study were to (i) assess the effect of soil TM pollution in different agricultural systems (conventional, traditional and organic) on the following soil properties: microbial biomass carbon, basal soil respiration, metabolic quotient, enzymatic activities (β-glucosidase, acid phosphatase and dehydrogenase) and RNA to DNA ratio; and (ii) evaluate the impact of TM in the soil ecosystem using the integrated biomarker response (IBR) based on a set of biochemical responses of SMCs. This multi-biomarker approach will support the development of the "Trace Metal Footprint" for different agricultural land uses in volcanic soils. Methods: The study was conducted in S. Miguel Island (Azores, Portugal). Microbial biomass carbon was measured by chloroform-fumigation-incubation-assay (Vance et al., 1987). Basal respiration was determined by the Jenkinson & Powlson (1976) technique. Metabolic quotient was calculated as the ratio of basal respiration to microbial biomass C (Sparkling & West, 1988). The enzymatic activities of β-glucosidase and acid phosphatase were determined by the Dick et al. (1996) method and dehydrogenase activity by the Rossel et al. (1997) method. The RNA and DNA were co-extracted from the same

  18. Trace metal concentrations in post-hatching cuttlefish Sepia officinalis and consequences of dissolved zinc exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pabic, Charles; Caplat, Christelle; Lehodey, Jean-Paul; Milinkovitch, Thomas; Koueta, Noussithé; Cosson, Richard Philippe; Bustamante, Paco

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the changes of 13 trace metal and metalloid concentrations (i.e. Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, V, Zn) and their subcellular fractionation in juvenile cuttlefish Sepia officinalis reared in controlled conditions between hatching and 2 months post-hatching. In parallel, metallothionein concentrations were determined. Our results highlighted contrasting changes of studied metals. Indeed, As and Fe concentrations measured in hatchlings suggested a maternal transfer of these elements in cuttlefish. The non-essential elements Ag and Cd presented the highest accumulation during our study, correlated with the digestive gland maturation. During the 6 first weeks of study, soluble fractions of most of essential trace metals (i.e. Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Se, Zn) slowly increased consistently with the progressive needs of cuttlefish metabolism during this period. In order to determine for the first time in a cephalopod how metal concentrations and their subcellular distributions are impacted when the animals are trace metal-exposed, we studied previously described parameters in juveniles exposed to dissolved Zn at environmental (i.e. 50 μg l(-1)) and sublethal (i.e. 200 μg l(-1)) levels. Moreover, oxidative stress (i.e. glutathione S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities, and lipid peroxidation (LPO)) was assessed in digestive gland and gills after 1 and 2 months exposures. Our results highlighted no or low ability of this stage of life to regulate dissolved Zn accumulation during the studied period, consistently with high sensitivity of this organism. Notably, Zn exposures caused a concentration-dependent Mn depletion in juvenile cuttlefish, and an increase of soluble fraction of Ag, Cd, Cu without accumulation modifications, suggesting substitution of these elements (i.e. Mn, Ag, Cd, Cu) by Zn. In parallel, metallothionein concentrations decreased in individuals most exposed to Zn. Finally, no

  19. Fingerprinting Marcellus Shale waste products from Pb isotope and trace metal perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Dry drilled, uncontaminated cuttings from Marcellus Shale and surrounding units. • Unoxidized and oxidized samples leached short and long term with H2O or dilute HCl. • Pb isotope ratios have distinctly different values from Marcellus Shale samples. • Mo and other trace metals can be used as Marcellus Shale environmental tracers. • Marcellus Shale leachate concentrations can exceed EPA contaminant screening levels. - Abstract: Drill cuttings generated during unconventional natural gas extraction from the Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin, U.S.A., generally contain a very large component of organic-rich black shale because of extensive lateral drilling into this target unit. In this study, element concentrations and Pb isotope ratios obtained from leached drill cuttings spanning 600 m of stratigraphic section were used to assess the potential for short and long term environmental impacts from Marcellus Shale waste materials, in comparison with material from surrounding formations. Leachates of the units above, below and within the Marcellus Shale yielded Cl/Br ratios of 100–150, similar to produced water values. Leachates from oxidized and unoxidized drill cuttings from the Marcellus Shale contain distinct suites of elevated trace metal concentrations, including Cd, Cu, Mo, Ni, Sb, U, V and Zn. The most elevated Mo, Ni, Sb, U, and V concentrations are found in leachates from the lower portion of the Marcellus Shale, the section typically exploited for natural gas production. In addition, lower 207Pb/206Pb ratios within the lower Marcellus Shale (0.661–0.733) provide a distinctive fingerprint from formations above (0.822–0.846) and below (0.796–0.810), reflecting 206Pb produced as a result of in situ 238U decay within this organic rich black shale. Trace metal concentrations from the Marcellus Shale leachates are similar to total metal concentrations from other black shales. These metal concentrations can exceed screening levels

  20. Trace metals of an acid mine drainage stream using a chemical model (WATEQ) and sediment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high metal contents common to the discharge of acid-mine drainage (AMD) from mines and mine spoils is an environmental concern to both government and industry. This paper reports the results of investigation of the behavior of metals in an AMD system at a former surface coal mine in Tuscarawas County, Oh. AMD discharges from seeps travels, in respective order through a laminar flow stream; a Typha-dominated wetland; a turbulent flow stream; and a sediment retention pond. Dissolved metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cr, Cd, Cu, and Al) major and minor components, and other parameters (pH, dissolved oxygen and Eh) were measured in the AMD water at each sample location. A chemical mineral equilibrium model (WATEQ) was used to predict the minerals which should precipitate at each site. Results suggest that the seeps are supersaturated and should be precipitating hematite, goethite and magnetite (iron oxides), and siderite (iron carbonate), whereas water of the other downstream sites were at or below equilibrium conditions for these minerals. The hydrogeochemistry of the AMD was further studied using sequential chemical attacks on the precipitate sediment surface coatings, in order to determine metal concentrations in the exchangeable, carbonate, Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide, and oxidizable fractions. The carbonate and exchangeable fractions of the precipitate are dominated by Ca and Fe, as well as Mg in the carbonate fraction. The Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide fraction contained Fe, Al, Mn, Mg, and trace metals, and also contained the greatest concentration of total elements in the system. The Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide is therefore, the major sink for metals of this AMD system. The decrease in the concentration of metals in the sediment precipitates in the downstream locations, is consistent with WATEQ and water analysis results

  1. Environmental Assessments of Trace Metals in Sediments from Dongting Lake, Central China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To examine the degree of contamination in the Dongting Lake (洞庭湖) area, surface sediments samples were collected and investigated in this study.This lake lies in the south of the middle Yangtze River, and it is the second largest fresh-water lake in China.These samples were analyzed for the concentrations of the following 6 elements (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) collected from 46 locations.The index of geo-accumulation was used to assess the degree of contamination of the total trace elements and the assessments showed that the contamination of Cd reached strong to very strong pollution.The speciation of metal in sediments was analyzed using the modified BCR (Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction technology and the water column-contamination risk was evaluated by the calculated contamination factors.The results of the speciation of metal indicated that more easily mobilized forms(exchangeable, water soluble, and acid soluble) were predominant for Cd, especially in the samples from East Dongting Lake.In contrast, the largest amount of lead was associated with the iron and manganese oxide fractions, and Cu, Zn, Cr, and Ni analyzed were mainly distributed in residual phase at an average percentage higher than 60 % of the total metals.The potential risk to the lake's water contamination was the highest in East Dongting Lake based on the calculated contamination factors.The assessment results using geo-accumulation index were compared with the information obtained by trace metal speciation and both results were consistent.

  2. Biodegradable polymer based ternary blends for removal of trace metals from simulated industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, N; Arungalai Vendan, S

    2016-02-01

    The ternary blends consisting of Chitosan (CS), Nylon 6 (Ny 6) and Montmorillonite clay (MM clay) were prepared by the solution blending method with glutaraldehyde. The prepared ternary blends were characterization by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Scanning electron microscope (SEM). The FTIR results showed that the strong intermolecular hydrogen bondings were established between chitosan, nylon 6 and montmorillonite clay. TGA showed the thermal stability of the blend is enhanced by glutaraldehyde as Crosslink agent. Results of XRD indicated that the relative crystalline of the pure chitosan film was reduced when the polymeric network was reticulated by glutaraldehyde. Finally, the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the morphology of the blend was rough and heterogenous. Further, it confirms the interaction between the functional groups of the blend components. The extent of removal of the trace metals was found to be almost the same. The removal of these metals at different pH was also done and the maximum removal of the metals was observed at pH 4.5 for both trace metals. Adsorption studies and kinetic analysis have also been made. Moreover, the protonation of amine groups is induced an electrostatic repulsion of cations. When the pH of the solution was more than 5.5, the sorption rate began to decrease. Besides, the quantity of adsorbate on absorbent was fitted as a function in Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm. The sorption kinetics was tested for pseudo first order and pseudo second order reaction. The kinetic experimental data correlated with the second order kinetic model and rate constants of sorption for kinetic models were calculated and accordingly, the correlation coefficients were obtained. PMID:26432371

  3. Sediments of the Lagoa Olho D'Agua: geochronology and accumulation of trace metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the environmental impact of anthropic activities in the Lagoa Olho D'Agua, located in Jaboatao dos Guararapes County, Brazil, was carried out by assessing the vertical distribution of some trace metals (Cd, Cr, Fe, Hg, Ni, U, Zn and Zr) in dated sediment samples. Sediment cores were collected from thirteen locations at the northern, central and southern sections of the lagoon. The metal content in the samples was determined by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). Its organic carbon content was also determined and used to characterize the environment as, either oxic or anoxic environments can bias the trace element content of sediment samples. The influence of the hydrodynamic characteristics in the sedimentation process was also studied. The results obtained for the geochronology of sediments showed a pronounced increase in sedimentation rates in the period of 1970 - 1980 and 1980 - 1990 in the sampling stations ST-09, ST-10, ST-11, ST-12 e ST-13 (ca.480% in the 80's to 90's ) compared to ca. 90% increase observed in other sampling stations. This increase can be associated to the demographic growth of ca. 500% that occurred in Jaboatao dos Guararapes County in the 80's to 90's predominantly along the shoreline. The geochemistry analyses of sediment samples, on the other hand, showed that the severe degradation process the occurred in the lagoon in the last 30 years was caused by the release of pollutants from industrial facilities as well as by the discharge of untreated domestic sewage. These domestic sewage favorable the increase of the concentration of organic material in the lagoon, accentuating the adsorption process of the metals on the sediments, mainly Fe and Zr in the suspense particles. The accentuated increase observed in both Fe and Zr concentrations is compatible with period of built industries basic steel works foundries and painting, indicating the anthropogenic origin these metals. (author)

  4. Humic substances in natural waters and their complexation with trace metals and radionuclides: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissolved humic substances (humic and fulvic acids) occur in surface waters and groundwaters in concentrations ranging from less than 1 mg(C)/L to more than 100 mg(C)/L. Humic substances are strong complexing agents for many trace metals in the environment and are also capable of forming stable soluble complexes or chelates with radionuclides. Concentrations of humic materials as low as 1 mg(C)/L can produce a detectable increase in the mobility of some actinide elements by forming soluble complexes that inhibit sorption of the radionuclides onto rock materials. The stability of trace metal- or radionuclide-organic complexes is commonly measured by an empirically determined conditional stability constant (K'), which is based on the ratio of complexed metal (radionuclide) in solution to the product concentration of uncomplexed metal and humic complexant. Larger values of stability constants indicate greater complex stability. The stability of radionuclide-organic complexes is affected both by concentration variables and envionmental factors. In general, complexing is favored by increased of radionuclide, increased pH, and decreased ionic strength. Actinide elements are generally most soluble in their higher oxidation states. Radionuclides can also form stable, insoluble complexes with humic materials that tend to reduce radionuclide mobility. These insoluble complexes may be radionuclide-humate colloids that subsequently precipitate from solution, or complexes of radionuclides and humic substances that sorb to clay minerals or other soil particulates strongly enough to immobilize the radionuclides. Colloid formation appears to be favored by increased radionuclide concentration and lowered pH; however, the conditions that favor formation of insoluble complexes that sorb to particulates are still poorly understood. 129 refs., 25 figs., 19 tabs

  5. Transport studies through peritoneal membrane: Effect of alteration in concentration of Trace Metal Ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of trace metals on thermodynamic properties of peritoneum has been examined. Membrane potential across peritoneal membrane of buffalo (Bof. Bubalis) for various 2:1, 3:1 and 1:2 electrolytes solutions have been measured with a view to examine the transport number of ions, effective fixed charge density and permselectivity of electrolyte systems. The transport number of co-ions decreased as the concentration of electrolyte is decreased. The applicability of different theories of membrane given by Kobatake et al. based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics have been tested. It has been observed that in biological systems also the fixed charged density is a constant quantity and does not vary with the concentrations of electrolytes as in the case of artificial membranes. Equations for 3:1 and 2:1 electrolytes have been derived, which will be essential for evaluating the transport number of trace material ions. This experimental model can be used to study and calculate the transport to study and calculate the transport number across biological membrane using Benventa's equation. The result of this study is valuable in understanding the influence of alteration in trace elements milieu on electrophysical behavior of all membranes. (author)

  6. Distribution and role of trace transition metals in Glycera worm jaws studied with synchrotron microbeam techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combination of position-resolved synchrotron microbeam techniques was used to explore the distribution and role of trace transition metals in the jaws of Glycera dibranchiata. The mandibles of this marine sediment worm have recently been found to be reinforced by the copper-based biomineral atacamite [Cu2(OH)3Cl]. Here we show that the system is more complex, containing zinc and iron and unmineralized copper compounds as well. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies showed that a fraction of copper is present in oxidation state, Cu(I), in contrast to the mineral that exclusively contains Cu(II). X-ray fluorescence imaging revealed traces of copper also in the jaw base devoid of mineral. Traces of iron were found as well, but occurred spatially correlated with the copper mineral, suggesting a substitution of copper atoms by iron in the atacamite mineral. Zinc was evenly dispersed throughout the jaw matrix, quite in analogy to zinc in Nereis jaw, a related worm species, where nonmineralized zinc serves to cross-link and harden the proteinaceous matrix

  7. Distribution and role of trace transition metals in Glycera worm jaws studied with synchrotron microbeam techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtenegger, Helga C.; Birkedal, Henrik; Casa, Deigo M.; Cross, Julie O.; Heald, Steve M.; Waite, J. Herbert; Stucky, Galen

    2005-05-31

    A combination of position-resolved synchrotron microbeam techniques was used to explore the distribution and role of trace transition metals in the jaws of Glycera dibranchiata. The mandibles of this marine sediment worm have recently been found to be reinforced by the copper-based biomineral atacamite [Cu2(OH)3Cl]. Here we show that the system is more complex, containing zinc and iron and unmineralized copper compounds as well. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies showed that a fraction of copper is present in oxidation state, Cu(I), in contrast to the mineral that exclusively contains Cu(II). X-ray fluorescence imaging revealed traces of copper also in the jaw base devoid of mineral. Traces of iron were found as well, but occurred spatially correlated with the copper mineral, suggesting a substitution of copper atoms by iron in the atacamite mineral. Zinc was evenly dispersed throughout the jaw matrix, quite in analogy to zinc in Nereis jaw, a related worm species, where nonmineralized zinc serves to cross-link and harden the proteinaceous matrix.

  8. Physical characteristics, inorganic constituents and trace metals determination in the street-vended samples of heroin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample of heroin collected from different parts of NWFP (North-West Frontier Province, Pakistan) were analyzed for physical characteristics, inorganic constituents (Na, K, Mg, Fe), and quantification of trace metals such as pb, Cd, Cr, Zn, Co, Mn, Ni, Ag and Al. The analytical results of the samples were compared with those of a pure heroin sample taken as standard (marked as P). The sodium content was much higher than other inorganic adulterants in almost all the samples, which might be due to the adulteration by common salt (NaCI) and other sodium bearing materials. The calcium and magnesium contents were noted to be higher in the sample from the D. I. Khan (D-I, D-2, D-3), which is an indication of the addition of marble, dolomite and calcite as the heroin adulterants. All the samples contained trace metals in varying concentrations. Samples collected from Peshawar city were found to be highly contaminated and, therefore, contained the least quantity of heroin being 84.97% and 54.54% for samples P-2 and P-3, respectively. (author)

  9. Soluble trace metals in aerosols over the tropical south east Pacific offshore of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. R.; Thomas, M.; Bange, H. W.; Plasencia Sánchez, E.

    2015-10-01

    Bulk aerosol samples collected during cruise M91 of FS Meteor off the coast of Peru in December 2012 were analysed for their soluble trace metal (Fe, Al, Mn, Ti, Zn, V, Ni, Cu, Co, Cd, Pb, Th) and major ion (including NO3- and NH4+) content. These data are among the first recorded for trace metals in this relatively poorly studied region of the global marine atmosphere. To the north of ∼ 13° S, the concentrations of several elements (Fe, Ti, Zn, V, Ni, Pb) appear to be related to distance from the coast. At the south of the transect (∼ 15-16° S), elevated concentrations of Fe, Cu, Co and Ni were observed. These may be related to the activities of the large smelting facilities in the south of Peru or northern Chile. Calculated dry deposition fluxes (3370-17 800 and 16-107 nmol m-2 d-1 for inorganic nitrogen and soluble Fe respectively) indicated that atmospheric input to the waters of the Peru upwelling system contains an excess of Fe over N, with respect to phytoplankton requirements. This may be significant as primary production in these waters has been reported to be limited by Fe availability, but atmospheric deposition is unlikely to be the dominant source of Fe to the system.

  10. Enrichment and solubility of trace metals associated with magnetic extracts in industrially derived contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, S G; Wang, H Y; Chen, Y Y

    2012-08-01

    Magnetic fractions (MFs) in industrially derived contaminated soils were extracted with a magnetic separation procedure. Total, soluble, and bioaccessible Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn in the MFs and non-magnetic fractions (NMFs) were analyzed using aqua regia and extraction tests, such as deionized water, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), and gastric juice simulation (GJST) test. Compared with the non-magnetic fractions, soil MFs were enriched with Fe, Mn, Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, and Ni. Extraction tests indicated that soil MFs contained higher water, TCLP, and GJST-extractable Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrations than the soil NMFs. The TCLP-extractable Pb concentration in the MFs exceeded the USEPA hazardous waste criteria, suggesting that soil MFs have a potentially environmental pollution risk. Solubility of trace metals was variable in the different extraction tests, which has the order of GJST > TCLP > water. TCLP test showed Cu and Zn were more mobile than Cr and Pb while bioaccessibility of trace metal defined by GJST test showed the order of Cu ≈ Cr ≈ Zn > Pb. These findings suggested that the MFs in the industrially derived contaminated soils had higher possibility of polluting water bodies, and careful environmental impact assessment was necessary. PMID:22212817

  11. Multielement trace determination in high purity advanced ceramics and high purity metals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Matschat; H-J Heinrich; M Czerwensky; S Kuxenko; H Kipphardt

    2005-07-01

    In the field of advanced ceramics two CRMs were developed in the last few years by the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, one for silicon nitride and one for silicon carbide. Besides their application by industry they are appropriate to be used for the validation of special methods used for trace determination in accordance with high purity materials. This is demonstrated, for example, on ultrapure silicon carbide which was analysed by solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS ET AAS). BAM is also certifying primary pure reference materials used as the National Standards for inorganic analysis in Germany. The crucial point of this project is the certification of the total purity of high purity materials, each representing one element of the periodic table. A variety of different analytical methods was necessary to determine the trace contents of metallic and non-metallic impurities from almost the whole periodic table in the high purity materials. The primary CRMs of copper, iron and molybdenum are used as examples to demonstrate the modus operandi, analytical effects observed by using high resolution ICP mass spectrometry (HR ICP–MS) and the results.

  12. [Study on measurement of trace heavy metal Ni in water by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huan; Zhao, Nan-jing; Wang, Chun-long; Lu, Cui-ping; Liu, Li-tuo; Chen, Dong; Ma, Ming-jun; Zhang, Yu-jun; Liu, Jian-guo; Liu, Wen-qing

    2012-01-01

    The spectroscopy emission characteristics and the detection limit of trace heavy metal nickel in water was studied based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique, with a 1,064 nm wavelength Nd : YAG laser as excitation source, and the echelle spectrometer and ICCD detector were used for spectral separation and high sensitive detection with high resolution and wide spectral range. A round flat solid state graphite as matrix was used for element enrichment for reducing water splashing, extending the plasma lifetime and improving the detection sensitivity, and the experimental sample was prepared by titrating a fixed volume of nickel nitrate solution of different concentrations on a fixed area of the graphite matrix. The results show that the better detection delay time is about 700 ns, the spectrum intensity raises with the concentration increase, a good linear relationship is presented at low concentration with a correlation coefficient 0.996 1, and the lower limit of detection of nickel in water with 0.28 mg x L(-1) was retrieved. A measurement method for further study of trace heavy metals in water is provided with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. PMID:22497119

  13. Determination of Trace Metals and Essential Minerals in Selected Fruit Juices in Minna, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Ajai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Levels of trace metals and essential minerals in selected fruit juice samples purchased from Minna were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS and Flame photometer. From the obtained result, Cu, Fe, Mn, Na, and Zn were present in all the samples, while Cd, Pb, and Cr were not detectable in all the samples. Concentrations of K range between 1.31 ± 0.10 and 41.20 ± 0.10 mg/100 mL, Na between 15.47 ± 0.15 and 3.50 ± 0.20 mg/100 mL, Mn between Nd and 0.27 ± 0.08 mg/100 mL, Fe between Nd and 0.90 ± 0.05 mg/100 mL, Cu between Nd-0.60 ± 0.00 mg/100 mL, and Zn between Nd-0.09 ± 0.01 mg/100 mL, respectively. The trace metal levels in all the samples were within permissible limit as recommended by WHO for edible foods and drinks and could therefore be taken to compliment the deficiency of these essential minerals from other food sources.

  14. ASSESMENT OF TRACE METALS, EMITTED IN THE PRODUCTION AND USE OF DIESEL, BY MONITORING THE AIR QUALITY OF IMPACTED AREAS

    OpenAIRE

    LOYOLA, Josiane; QUITERIO, Simone Lorena; ESCALEIRA, Viviane; ARBILLA, Graciela

    2009-01-01

    The petroleum industry has difficulties to assess the trace metal content in liquid fuels. In this work, it is proposed to solve this problem determining these metals by collecting particulate matter atmospheric samples and analysing their metal content. Samples of total particulate matter and of inhalable particles (PM10) were collected in a bus station in the period August 2006-February 2007. The only significant emission source in that location are the buses, fueled by diesel, since light ...

  15. Detection of trace metallic elements in oral lichenoid contact lesions using SR-XRF, PIXE, and XAFS

    OpenAIRE

    Tomoko Sugiyama; Motohiro Uo; Takahiro Wada; Daisuke Omagari; Kazuo Komiyama; Serika Miyazaki; Chiya Numako; Tadahide Noguchi; Yoshinori Jinbu; Mikio Kusama; Yoshiyuki Mori

    2015-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid contact lesions (OLCL) are chronic inflammatory mucocutaneous reactions with a risk of malignant transformation that alter the epithelium. OLP and OLCL have similar clinical and histopathological features and it is difficult to distinguish one from the other. Metallic restorations are suspected to generate OLCLs. Trace metal analysis of OLCL specimens may facilitate the discrimination of symptoms and identification of causative metallic restorations...

  16. Influence of Trichodesmium red tides on trace metal cycling at a coastal station in the Great Barrier Reef Lagoon

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, G.; Burdon-jones, C; Thomas, F.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations carried out at a coastal station in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon (GBRL) at Townsville, Australia have shown that the cycling of several trace metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd, and Pb) was significantly influenced by the presence of Trichodesmium , a blue-green alga, which throughout the year, frequently forms red tide densities along much of the Queensland coral coast. Whilst decomposition of large masses of Trichodesmium significantly affected metal concentrations, metal specia...

  17. Record of the accumulation of sediment and trace metals in a Connecticut, U. S. A. , salt marsh. [Dating deposition of trace metals from polluted air masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCaffrey, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    The nonlinear rate of accretion of a Connecticut salt marsh during the past century was estimated from the /sup 210/Pb distribution with depth by assuming a constant flux of /sup 210/Pb to the surface. This rate was found to be in general agreement with the smoothed record of relative mean sea level rise measured independently by the New York City tide gage since 1893. The rate of deposition of Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and total inorganic matter on the surface of the salt marsh may be calculated from the age and sediment properties measured at small depth increments. Changes in the inorganic matter content are attributed to variations in land use on the watershed since it was cleared for agriculture. Fe, Mn, and inorganic matter are principally derived from stream transport of eroding soil, while the observed increases in the fluxes of Cu, Zn, and Pb are largely explained as increased supply via the atmosphere during the period of industrialization since the Civil War. Salt marshes thus may supply a refined record of the deposition of trace metals from polluted air masses over long periods of time.

  18. Over one hundred years of trace metal fluxes in the sediments of the Pearl River Estuary, South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rapid economic development in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in South China in the last three decades has had a significant impact on the local environment. Estuarine sediment is a major sink for contaminants and nutrients in the surrounding ecosystem. The accumulation of trace metals in sediments may cause serious environmental problems in the aquatic system. Thirty sediment cores were collected in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) in 2000 for a study on trace metal pollution in this region. Heavy metal concentrations and Pb isotopic compositions in the four 210Pb-dated sediment cores were determined to assess the fluxes in metal deposits over the last one hundred years. The concentrations of Cu, Pb and Zn in the surface sediment layers were generally elevated when compared with the sub-surface layers. There has been a significant increase in inputs of Cu, Pb and Zn in the PRE since the 1970s. The results also showed that different sampling locations in the estuary received slightly different types of inputs. Pb isotopic composition data indicated that the increased Pb in the recent sediments was of anthropogenic origin. The results of trace metal influxes showed that about 30% of total Pb and 15% of total Zn in the sediments in the 1990s were from anthropogenic sources. The combination of trace metal analysis, Pb isotopic composition and 210Pb dating in an estuary can provide vital information on the long-term accumulation of metals in sediments

  19. Separation and determination of trace metal ions using organic chelating reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The four reagents tested were N,N-dihexylacetamide (DHA), 2,6-diacetylpyridine bis(furoylhydrazone) (H2dapf), 1,3-dimethyl-4-acetyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (DMAP) and N-methylfurohydroxamic acid (NMFHA). DHA and H2dapf were investigated for their complex formation with uranium, and DMAP and NMFHA were used as chelating agents in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Uranium(VI) is preferentially extracted from nitric acid solutions using DHA in toluene. The extraction characteristics of the U-DHA complex are studied. A 119,000 μgL-1 U solution is analyzed for twenty-six elements. The U is extracted with DHA, and the trace metal ions are then determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Uranium must be removed from the sample before analysis to prevent ionization suppression. H2dapf is synthesized and characterized. Studies of the complexation of metal ions with H2dapf is described. U(VI) forms a stable complex with H2dapf, and a procedure for selectively determining trace U by spectrophotometry is presented. DMAP complexes of Cu(II), Fe(III), Ga(III), Th(IV), U(VI), V(V), and Zr(IV) are separated using reversed phase HPLC. NMFHA complex of Al(III), Fe(III), Hf(IV), Nb(V), Sb(III), and Zr(IV) are separated using reversed phase HPLC. NMFHA is also used to separate uranium(VI) from trace lanthanide ions. 266 refs., 46 figs., 24 tabs

  20. Ostracode trace metal geochemistry from Lake Tanganyika, Africa: Towards the development of a lacustrine paleothermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, J.; Cohen, A. S.; Reiners, P. W.; Dettman, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    The development of quantitative lacustrine paleotemperature records is critical to understanding how past climate changes influenced the ecology and hydrology of lakes. Whereas paleoecological transfer functions, TEX-86 and clumped isotopes are all widely applied methods, all have their limitations. We aim to further the development of an alternative method with wider applications: ostracode trace metal geochemistry. Trace element compositions of ostracode valves reflect discriminatory element uptake that in turn reflect ambient environmental conditions and have previously shown promise for quantitative paleotemperature determination. Understanding the specific environmental controls on element concentrations and ratios is an area of active research with much attention focusing on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios and their relationships with temperature and salinity. Here, HR-ICP-MS geochemical analyses of ostracode valves are compared to an existing TEX-86 temperature record as well as gastropod stable isotopes from Lake Tanganyika, Africa. Two ostracode species (M. opaca and R. ampla) were chosen for analyses from core LT-98-58 (1759 +/- 133 AD-modern). Molar Mg/Ca ratios for M. opaca range from .04 to .16, and a trend towards increased Mg/Ca begins around 1880 AD. Molar Mg/Ca ratios for R. ampla range from .05 to .2, and no trend is discernable. Sr/Ca ratios in both species range from .003-.006 and remain relatively stable, indicating that changes in Mg/Ca are the result of temperature rather than salinity. The M. opaca Mg/Ca record closely resembles the existing TEX-86 paleotemperature record of Tierney et al. (2010) for the past ~240 yr. We intend these preliminary results to facilitate the future research and use of ostracode trace metal geochemistry in a wide range of lakes for paleotemperature reconstruction.

  1. Bacterial assisted degradation of chlorpyrifos: The key role of environmental conditions, trace metals and organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Saira; Hashmi, Imran; Khan, Sher Jamal

    2016-03-01

    Wastewater from pesticide industries, agricultural or surface runoff containing pesticides and their residues has adverse environmental impacts. Present study demonstrates effect of petrochemicals and trace metals on chlorpyrifos (CP) biotransformation often released in wastewater of agrochemical industry. Biodegradation was investigated using bacterial strain Pseudomonas kilonensis SRK1 isolated from wastewater spiked with CP. Optimal environmental conditions for CP removal were CFU (306 × 10(6)), pH (8); initial CP concentration (150 mg/L) and glucose as additional carbon source. Among various organic solvents (petrochemicals) used in this study toluene has stimulatory effect on CP degradation process using SRK1, contrary to this benzene and phenol negatively inhibited degradation process. Application of metal ions (Cu (II), Fe (II) Zn (II) at low concentration (1 mg/L) took part in biochemical reaction and positively stimulated CP degradation process. Metal ions at high concentrations have inhibitory effect on degradation process. A first order growth model was shown to fit the data. It could be concluded that both type and concentration of metal ions and petrochemicals can affect CP degradation process. PMID:26692411

  2. Comparison of methods for the measurement of trace metals in power plant waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last eight years, the Electric Power Research Institute has sponsored a project (RP 1851-1) to compile data on aqueous discharges from steam electric power plants and to validate the monitoring methods used for measuring trace metals. The validation work has consisted of a series of interlaboratory round robin validation programs using samples of known concentration prepared from typical utility matrices. Matrices that have been used for these tests include: river water, ash pond overflow, seawater, seawater with metal cleaning wastes, and treated chemical metal cleaning wastes. Techniques and metals studied include: Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Se), Cold Vapor AAS (Hg), Flame AAS (Fe, Zn) , and Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) for 14 elements (Al , Ba, Be, B, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mn, Mo, Ni, V, Zn). Results were evaluated using a statistical program developed under RP 1851-1. The resulting single operator and overall precision were used to compute limits of detection and quantitation for each of the elements in each matrix. These limits of detection were compared to published EPA detection limits and interpretations of the differences were made. The influence of matrix effects was also examined

  3. Evaluation of Trace Metals Uptake by Some Plants Close to Some Industrial Zones in Khartoum City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isam Eldin Hussein Elgailani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate the uptake of trace metals by the tissues of some plants which grow inside, or in the peripheries of, pools of water contaminated by waste water from neighboring industrial complexes in Khartoum City. It also aimed to verify the possibility of making use of this phenomenon in combating metal pollution in water and wastewater catchments. The flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS was used to find the concentration of the subject metals in waste water and algal biomass of the phyla Chlorophyta, Cyanophyta, and Bacillariophyta; and in newly grown leaves of Calotropis procera in addition to their stems and roots. The physical parameters studied were pH and electrical conductivity (EC of waste water. The metals studied in waste water, algal biomass and C. procera were Fe, Zn, Cd, Pb, Cu, Ni, and Cr. The study covered during summer and autumn 6 sites in Khartoum city industrial complexes. Samples were collected, and analyzed for TMs concentration levels. The algal biomass was found to be more efficient for TMs uptake and accumulation than the three parts of C. procera. Among the parts of C. procera, the root was more efficient for TMs uptake than the leaf, while the stem was the least efficient.

  4. Novel Sorbent-Based Process for High Temperature Trace Metal Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokhan Alptekin

    2008-09-30

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the efficacy of a novel sorbent can effectively remove trace metal contaminants (Hg, As, Se and Cd) from actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams at high temperature (above the dew point of the gas). The performance of TDA's sorbent has been evaluated in several field demonstrations using synthesis gas generated by laboratory and pilot-scale coal gasifiers in a state-of-the-art test skid that houses the absorbent and all auxiliary equipment for monitoring and data logging of critical operating parameters. The test skid was originally designed to treat 10,000 SCFH gas at 250 psig and 350 C, however, because of the limited gas handling capabilities of the test sites, the capacity was downsized to 500 SCFH gas flow. As part of the test program, we carried out four demonstrations at two different sites using the synthesis gas generated by the gasification of various lignites and a bituminous coal. Two of these tests were conducted at the Power Systems Demonstration Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama; a Falkirk (North Dakota) lignite and a high sodium lignite (the PSDF operator Southern Company did not disclose the source of this lignite) were used as the feedstock. We also carried out two other demonstrations in collaboration with the University of North Dakota Energy Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC) using synthesis gas slipstreams generated by the gasification of Sufco (Utah) bituminous coal and Oak Hills (Texas) lignite. In the PSDF tests, we showed successful operation of the test system at the conditions of interest and showed the efficacy of sorbent in removing the mercury from synthesis gas. In Test Campaign No.1, TDA sorbent reduced Hg concentration of the synthesis gas to less than 5 {micro}g/m{sup 3} and achieved over 99% Hg removal efficiency for the entire test duration. Unfortunately, due to the relatively low concentration of the trace metals in the lignite feed and as a result of the

  5. Trace metal contamination influenced by land use, soil age, and organic matter in montreal tree pit soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargar, Maryam; Jutras, Pierre; Clark, O Grant; Hendershot, William H; Prasher, Shiv O

    2013-09-01

    The short life span of many street trees in the Montreal downtown area may be due in part to higher than standard concentrations of trace metals in the tree pit soils. The effects of land use, soil organic matter, and time since tree planting in a given tree pit (soil age) were studied with respect to the total concentration of trace metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) in soil collected from tree pits on commercial and residential streets. Contingency table analysis and multiple linear regression were applied to study how these variables were related to the total concentrations of trace metals in soil. Other variables, such as pH, street width, distance of the tree pit from the curb, and tree pit volume, were also used as input to statistical analysis to increase the analysis' explanatory power. Significantly higher concentrations of Cu, Cd, Zn, and Pb were observed in soils from commercial streets, possibly as a result of heavier traffic as compared with residential streets. Soil organic matter was positively correlated with the concentrations of Cu and Pb, probably due to the ability of organic matter to retain these trace metals. Nickel, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb were positively correlated with the soil age presumably because trace metals accumulate in the tree pit soil over time. This knowledge can be helpful in providing soil quality standards aimed at improving the longevity of downtown street trees. PMID:24216430

  6. Trace metals content (contaminants as initial indicator in the quality of heat treated palm oil whole extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Akhmazillah bt Mohd Fauzi, Mohd Roji Sarmidi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was carried out on the effect of different sterilization time on the trace metals concentration of palm oil whole extract. Palm fruits were collected, cleaned and sterilized for 0, 20, 40 and 60 minutes. The kernels were then stripped from the sterilized fruits to get the pulp and later the pulp was pressed using small scale expeller. The resulting puree was centrifuge at 4000 rpm for 20 minutes. The palm oil whole extract were then collected and trace metals analysis was conducted using Inductively Couple Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS. The result showed that the highest yield was obtained at 40 minutes of sterilization with 19.9 +- 0.21 % (w/w. There was no significant different (p less than 0.5 in total trace metals content between the degrees of the heat treatment. Na+ was found as the highest trace metals content in the extract with mean concentration ranging from 1.05 ± 0.03 ppm to 2.36 ± 0.01 ppm. 40 minutes of heating time was predicted to have good oil quality due to higher content in trace metals that inhibit the lipase enzyme activity.

  7. Trace metals content (contaminants) as initial indicator in the quality of heat treated palm oil whole extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd Fauzi, Noor Akhmazillah bt [Chemical and Bioprocess Department, Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Parit Raja, Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia); Sarmidi, Mohd Roji [Chemical Engineering Pilot Plant, Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2011-07-01

    An investigation was carried out on the effect of different sterilization time on the trace metals concentration of palm oil whole extract. Palm fruits were collected, cleaned and sterilized for 0, 20, 40 and 60 minutes. The kernels were then stripped from the sterilized fruits to get the pulp and later the pulp was pressed using small scale expeller. The resulting puree was centrifuge at 4000 rpm for 20 minutes. The palm oil whole extract were then collected and trace metals analysis was conducted using Inductively Couple Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The result showed that the highest yield was obtained at 40 minutes of sterilization with 19.9 {+-} 0.21 % (w/w). There was no significant different (p < 0.5) in total trace metals content between the degrees of the heat treatment. Na+ was found as the highest trace metals content in the extract with mean concentration ranging from 1.05 {+-} 0.03 ppm to 2.36 {+-} 0.01 ppm. 40 minutes of heating time was predicted to have good oil quality due to higher content in trace metals that inhibit the lipase enzyme activity.

  8. Short-term acute hypercapnia affects cellular responses to trace metals in the hard clams Mercenaria mercenaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •PCO2 alters accumulation of Cd and Cu in clam cells. •Accumulation of Cd induces release of free Zn2+. •Accumulation of Cu induces an increase in free Cu2+ and Fe2+. •Metal-induced oxidative stress is alleviated at high PCO2. •Toxicity of Cu in likely enhanced while that of Cd alleviated by high PCO2. -- Abstract: Estuarine and coastal habitats experience large fluctuations of environmental factors such as temperature, salinity, partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) and pH; they also serve as the natural sinks for trace metals. Benthic filter-feeding organisms such as bivalves are exposed to the elevated concentrations of metals in estuarine water and sediments that can strongly affect their physiology. The effects of metals on estuarine organisms may be exacerbated by other environmental factors. Thus, a decrease in pH caused by high PCO2 (hypercapnia) can modulate the effects of trace metals by affecting metal bioavailability, accumulation or binding. To better understand the cellular mechanisms of interactions between PCO2 and trace metals in marine bivalves, we exposed isolated mantle cells of the hard clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) to different levels of PCO2 (0.05, 1.52 and 3.01 kPa) and two major trace metal pollutants – cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu). Elevated PCO2 resulted in a decrease in intracellular pH (pHi) of the isolated mantle cells from 7.8 to 7.4. Elevated PCO2 significantly but differently affected the trace metal accumulation by the cells. Cd uptake was suppressed at elevated PCO2 levels while Cu accumulation has greatly accelerated under hypercapnic conditions. Interestingly, at higher extracellular Cd levels, labile intracellular Cd2+ concentration remained the same, while intracellular levels of free Zn2+ increased suggesting that Cd2+ substitutes bound Zn2+ in these cells. In contrast, Cu exposure did not affect intracellular Zn2+ but led to a profound increase in the intracellular levels of labile Cu2+ and Fe2+. An increase

  9. Content and distribution of trace metals in pristine permafrost environments of Northeastern Siberia, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antcibor, I.; Eschenbach, A.; Kutzbach, L.; Bolshiyanov, D.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Arctic regions are one of the most sensitive areas with respect to climatic changes and human impacts. Research is required to discover how the function of permafrost soils as a buffering system for metal pollutants could change in response to the predicted changes. The goal of this work is to determine the background levels of trace metals in the pristine arctic ecosystems of the Lena River Delta in Northeastern Siberia and to evaluate the possible effect of human impacts on this arctic region. The Lena River Delta represents areas with different dominating geomorphologic processes that can generally be divided between accumulation and erosion sites. Frequent changes of the river water level create different periods of sedimentation and result in the formation of stratified soils and sediment layers which are dominated either by mineral substrates with allochthonous organic matter or pure autochthonous peat. The deposited sediments that have formed the delta islands are mostly composed of sand fractions; therefore the buffering effects of clay materials can be neglected. Samoylov Island is representative of the south-central and eastern modern delta surfaces of the Lena River Delta and is selected as a pilot study site. We determined total element contents of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cd, Ni, Cu, As, Pb, Co and Hg in soil horizons from different polygonal elevated rims, polygonal depressed centers and the middle floodplain. High gravimetric concentrations (related to dry mass of soil material) of Mn and Fe are found within all soil profiles and vary from 0.14 to 1.39 g kg-1 and from 10.7 to 41.2 g kg-1, respectively. While the trace element concentrations do not exceed typical crustal abundances, the maximum values of most of the metals are observed within the soil profile situated at the middle floodplain. This finding suggests that apart from the parent material the second potential source of trace metals is due to allochthonous substance input during annual flooding of the

  10. Health Risk Assessment for Trace Metals, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Trihalomethanes in Drinking Water of Cankiri, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Caylak, Emrah

    2012-01-01

    Lifetime exposure to trace metals, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), trihalomethanes (THMs), and the other chemicals in drinking water through ingestion, and dermal contact may pose risks to human health. In this study, drinking water samples were collected from 50 sampling sites from Cankiri and its towns during 2010. The concentrations of all pollutants were analyzed, and then compared with permissible limits set by Turkish and WHO. For health risk assessment of trace met...

  11. Evaluation of trace metal levels in tissues of two commercial fish species in Kapar and Mersing coastal waters, Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Fathi Alhashmi; Shuhaimi-Othman, Mohammad; Mazlan, A G

    2012-01-01

    This study is focused on evaluating the trace metal levels in water and tissues of two commercial fish species Arius thalassinus and Pennahia anea that were collected from Kapar and Mersing coastal waters. The concentrations of Fe, Zn, Al, As, Cd and Pb in these coastal waters and muscle, liver and gills tissues of the fishes were quantified. The relationship among the metal concentrations and the height and weight of the two species were also examined. Generally, the iron has the highest concentrations in both water and the fish species. However, Cd in both coastal waters showed high levels exceeding the international standards. The metal level concentration in the sample fishes are in the descending order livers > gills > muscles. A positive association between the trace metal concentrations and weight and length of the sample fishes was investigated. Fortunately the level of these metal concentrations in fish has not exceeded the permitted level of Malaysian and international standards. PMID:22046193

  12. Evaluation of Trace Metal Levels in Tissues of Two Commercial Fish Species in Kapar and Mersing Coastal Waters, Peninsular Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathi Alhashmi Bashir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on evaluating the trace metal levels in water and tissues of two commercial fish species Arius thalassinus and Pennahia anea that were collected from Kapar and Mersing coastal waters. The concentrations of Fe, Zn, Al, As, Cd and Pb in these coastal waters and muscle, liver and gills tissues of the fishes were quantified. The relationship among the metal concentrations and the height and weight of the two species were also examined. Generally, the iron has the highest concentrations in both water and the fish species. However, Cd in both coastal waters showed high levels exceeding the international standards. The metal level concentration in the sample fishes are in the descending order livers > gills > muscles. A positive association between the trace metal concentrations and weight and length of the sample fishes was investigated. Fortunately the level of these metal concentrations in fish has not exceeded the permitted level of Malaysian and international standards.

  13. Chemical speciation and human health risk of trace metals in urban street dusts from a metropolitan city, Nanjing, SE China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modified BCR (the European Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction procedure was applied for partitioning and evaluating the mobility, availability and persistence of trace metals (Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn) in urban street dusts collected from different areas of Nanjing, China. The mobility sequence based on the sum of the BCR sequential extraction stages was: Sr (91.65%) > Pb (79.16%) > Zn (74.26%) > Cu (68.53%) > Co (45.98%) > Al (40.01%) ≈ V (38.45%) ≈ Ni (37.88%) > Cr (29.35%) > Cd (22.68%). Almost every trace metal had its highest total concentrations in the industrial area, except for Sr which had its highest concentration in the commercial area. Contamination factors (Cf), risk assessment code (RAC) and enrichment factor (Ef) were then calculated to further assess the environmental risk and provide a preliminary estimate of the main sources of trace metals in street dusts. Non-carcinogenic effects and carcinogenic effects due to exposure to urban street dusts were assessed for both children and adults. For non-carcinogenic effects, ingestion was the main route of exposure to street dusts for these metals, followed by dermal contact and inhalation. Hazard index values for all studied metals were lower than the safe level of 1, and Pb exhibited the highest risk value (0.125) in the case of children. The carcinogenic risk for Cd, Co, Cr and Ni were all below the acceptable level (−6). - Highlights: • This study assesses a comprehensive environmental risk of urban trace metal pollution. • This study evaluates human health risk combined with the speciation of trace metals. • This study points the critical contaminated metals that need to be paid special attention. • This study supplies useful information and reference on the application of BCR SPE method

  14. Effect of orthosilicic acid on the accumulation of trace metals by the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon (Si) has a marked affinity for aluminium (Al(III)), but not other trace metals such as cadmium (Cd(II)) and zinc (Zn(II)). Exogenous orthosilicic acid (Si(OH)4) ameliorates the toxicity of Al(III) to the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis, but its mechanism of action is unclear. Here, studies were conducted to ascertain whether interaction between orthosilicic acid and Al(III) occurs in the water column to prevent Al(III) uptake, or in the tissues to reduce the toxicity of accumulated metal. Silicon did not reduce the accumulation of Al(III) by the digestive gland (the main 'sink' for trace metals in L. stagnalis) following exposure of the snail for 30 days to 500 μg l-1 added Al(III) and 13-fold molar excess of orthosilicic acid. However, Si concentrations correlated well with Al(III) levels in the digestive gland (R2=0.77), giving a ratio of 2.5:1 (Al(III):Si). Exposure to Zn(II) or Cd(II) and 13-fold molar excess of orthosilicic acid did not prevent uptake of these metals, or result in a correlation between metal and Si concentrations of the snail digestive gland. These data show that aquated orthosilicic acid does not prevent Al(III) accumulation by L. stagnalis. However, following exposure, the ratio of Al(III) to Si in the digestive gland is suggestive of the early formation of hydroxyaluminosilicates, probably proto-imogolites (2-3:1 Al(III):Si). Whether hydroxyaluminates are formed ex vivo in the water column and taken up by snails into the digestive gland, or formed in situ within the digestive gland remains to be established. Either way, orthosilicic acid clearly prevents the in vivo toxicity of Al(III) rather than reducing its uptake. Silicon appears to have an important role in the handling Al(III) by the pond snail which may also have wider relevance in understanding the role of Si in ameliorating Al(III) toxicity

  15. Trophic relationships in an Arctic food web and implications for trace metal transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehn, Larissa-A. [Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska, 99775-7000 (United States)]. E-mail: ftld@uaf.edu; Follmann, Erich H. [Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska, 99775-7000 (United States); Thomas, Dana L. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska, 99775-6660 (United States); Sheffield, Gay G. [Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Fairbanks, Division of Wildlife Conservation, Fairbanks, Alaska, 99701-1599 (United States); Rosa, Cheryl [Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska, 99775-7000 (United States); Duffy, Lawrence K. [Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska, 99775-7000 (United States); O' Hara, Todd M. [Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska, 99775-7000 (United States)

    2006-06-01

    dynamic and actively regulated trace metals.

  16. Trace metal mobilization from oil sands froth treatment thickened tailings exhibiting acid rock drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Alsu; Kuznetsov, Petr; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2016-11-15

    Froth treatment thickened tailings (TT) are a waste product of bitumen extraction from surface-mined oil sands ores. When incubated in a laboratory under simulated moist oxic environmental conditions for ~450d, two different types of TT (TT1 and TT2) exhibited the potential to generate acid rock drainage (ARD) by producing acid leachate after 250 and 50d, respectively. We report here the release of toxic metals from TT via ARD, which could pose an environmental threat if oil sands TT deposits are not properly managed. Trace metal concentrations in leachate samples collected periodically revealed that Mn and Sr were released immediately even before the onset of ARD. Spikes in Co and Ni concentrations were observed both pre-ARD and during active ARD, particularly in TT1. For most elements measured (Fe, Cr, V, As, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, and Se), leaching was associated with ARD production. Though equivalent acidification (pH2) was achieved in leachate from both TT types, greater metal release was observed from TT2 where concentrations reached 10,000ppb for Ni, 5000ppb for Co, 3000ppb for As, 2000ppb for V, and 1000ppb for Cr. Generally, metal concentrations decreased in leachate with time during ARD and became negligible by the end of incubation (~450d) despite appreciable metals remaining in the leached TT. These results suggest that using TT for land reclamation purposes or surface deposition for volume reduction may unfavorably impact the environment, and warrants application of appropriate strategies for management of pyrite-enriched oil sands tailings streams. PMID:27443453

  17. Trophic relationships in an Arctic food web and implications for trace metal transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissues of subsistence-harvested Arctic mammals were analyzed for silver (Ag), cadmium (Cd), and total mercury (THg). Muscle (or total body homogenates of potential fish and invertebrate prey) was analyzed for stable carbon (δ 13C) and nitrogen (δ 15N) isotopes to establish trophic interactions within the Arctic food chain. Food web magnification factors (FWMFs) and biomagnification factors for selected predator-prey scenarios (BMFs) were calculated to describe pathways of heavy metals in the Alaskan Arctic. FWMFs in this study indicate that magnification of selected heavy metals in the Arctic food web is not significant. Biomagnification of Cd occurs mainly in kidneys; calculated BMFs are higher for hepatic THg than renal THg for all predator-prey scenarios with the exception of polar bears (Ursus maritimus). In bears, the accumulation of renal THg is approximately 6 times higher than in liver. Magnification of hepatic Ag is minimal for all selected predator-prey scenarios. Though polar bears occupy a higher trophic level than belugas (Delphinapterus leucas), based on δ 15N, the metal concentrations are either not statistically different between the two species or lower for bears. Similarly, concentrations of renal and hepatic Cd are significantly lower or not statistically different in polar bears compared to ringed (Phoca hispida) and bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus), their primary prey. THg, on the other hand, increased significantly from seal to polar bear tissues. Mean δ 15N was lowest in muscle of Arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) and foxes also show the lowest levels of Hg, Cd and Ag in liver and kidney compared to the other species analyzed. These values are in good agreement with a diet dominated by terrestrial prey. Metal deposition in animal tissues is strongly dependent on biological factors such as diet, age, sex, body condition and health, and caution should be taken when interpreting magnification of dynamic and actively regulated trace metals

  18. Linking Environmental Magnetism to Geochemical Studies and Management of Trace Metals. Examples from Fluvial, Estuarine and Marine Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Scoullos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Among the diverse research fields and wide range of studies encompassed by environmental magnetism, the present work elaborates on critical aspects of the geochemistry of trace metals that emerged through years of original research in a variety of environmental compartments. This review aims at sharing the insights gained on (a tracing metal pollution sources; and (b identifying processes and transport pathways from sources to depositional environments. Case studies on the Elefsis Gulf (Greece and the Gulf of Lions (France demonstrate the potential of combined magnetic measurements and chemical analysis to trace pollution signals resulting from land-based sources and atmospheric deposition. Case studies on estuarine environments, namely the Louros, Acheloos, and Asopos Estuaries (Greece, address modes of trace metal behavior under the influence of different hydrological regimes and elucidate in situ processes within the transitional estuarine zone, that define their ultimate fate. As sources, transport pathways, and processes of trace metals are fundamental in environmental management assessments, the involvement of magnetic measurements in the policy cycle could facilitate the development and implementation of appropriate regulatory measures for the integrated management of river basins, coastal, and marine areas.

  19. Trace metal content in aspirin and women's cosmetics via proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hichwa, B.P.; Pun, D.D.; Wang, D.

    1981-04-01

    A multielemental analysis to determine the trace metal content of generic and name-brand aspirins and name-brand lipsticks was done via proton induced x-ray (PIXE) measurements. The Hope College PIXE system is described as well as the target preparation methods. The trace metal content of twelve brands of aspirin and aspirin substitutes and fourteen brands of lipstick are reported. Detection limits for most elements are in the range of 100 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 parts per million (ppm).

  20. Bioavailability and toxicity of trace metals to the cladoceran Daphnia magna in relation to cadmium exposure history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Rui

    The cladoceran Daphnia magna is widely used in freshwater bioassessments and ecological risk assessments. This study designed a series of experiments employing radiotracer methodology to quantify the trace metals (mainly Cd and Zn) biokinetics in D. magna under different environmental and biological conditions and to investigate the influences of different Cd exposure histories on the bioavailability and toxicity of trace metals to D. magna. A bioenergetic-based kinetic model was finally applied in predicting the Cd accumulation dynamics in D. magna and the model validity under non-steady state was assessed. Cd assimilation was found in this study to be influenced by the food characteristics (e.g., metal concentration in food particles), the metal exposure history of the animals, and the genetic characteristics. Some of these influences could be interpreted by the capacity and/or competition of those metal binding sites within the digestive tract and/or the detoxifying proteins metallothionein (MT). My study demonstrated a significant induction of MT in response to Cd exposure and it was the dominant fraction in sequestering the internal nonessential trace metals in D. magna. The ratio of Cd body burden to MT might better predict the Cd toxicity on the digestion systems of D. magna than the Cd tissue burden alone within one-generational exposure to Cd. It was found that metal elimination (rate constant and contribution of different release routes) was independent of the food concentration and the dietary metal concentration, implying that the elimination may not be metabolically controlled. The incorporation of the bioenergetic-based kinetic model, especially under non-steady state, is invaluable in helping to understand the fate of trace metals in aquatic systems and potential environmental risks. The dependence of biokinetic parameters on environmental factors rather than on genotypes implies a great potential of using biokinetics in inter-laboratory comparisons.

  1. Detection of Trace Heavy Metals Ions by Arrays of Titania Nanotubes Annealed in Nitrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhi-man; XIAO Peng; CAO Guo-zhong

    2009-01-01

    Redox response of trace heavy metals ions(THMIs) has better performance on highly ordered vertically oriented titania nanotube arrays(TNA) annealed in nitrogen. Experimental data showed that different THMIs possess different reaction peak shapes and charge and discharge capacities. Therefore, the TNA will become an important tool used for environmental protection and facilitating the rapid determination of THMIs. THMIs of 5×10~(-4) mol/L concentration were measured at a scan rate of 100 mV/s. The analytical utility of TNA is demonstrated in a neutral 0.5 mol/L Na_2SO_4 solution. The results sufficiently show that titania nanotube arrays electrodes(TNAE) will be used to measure THMIs.

  2. Distribution of particulate trace metals along Visakhapatnam coast (Bay of Bengal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particulate trace metals (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb), total suspended matter (TSM), and particulate organic carbon (POC) were analysed in the coastal waters of Visakhapatnam (Lat. 7 deg. 30 min. - 18 deg. 00 min. N, Long. 83 deg. 10 min. - 83 deg. 35 min. E) along five transacts over a period of one year (September 1986 to August 1987). Sea water samples were collected with Niskin water samplers (5- It.) at different depths 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 m respectively. An aliquot of sample (2- It.) was filtered through a pre-weighed 0.45 μm, membrane filter (Millipore HA). Filters containing particulate matter were vacuum dried, weighed and subjected to acid digestion (perchloric acid and nitric acid mixture). They were analysed by Perkin Elmer Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (model 2380)

  3. Influence of metal implants on the trace element contents in human and mammalian tissues and organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion of metal implants in human and mammalian bodies by the body fluids leads to local reactions of the surrounding tissue commonly known as metallosis. With long-term implantations the corrosion products might even influence and disturb the trace element balance of the whole body. By means of instrumental neutron activation analysis the elements Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Se, Rb, Mo and Cs were determined in 19 samples of human contact tissue and fascia lata taken at distances of 4-8 cm from the V4A steels. The tissues were dissected 6 months to 5 1/2 years after femoral intertrochanteric osteotomy. Simultaneously, the possibility of long-term changes in the balance of trace elements and that of long-distance effects on specific organs was studied in 30 rabbits with osteosynthesis of the left hind leg (the bone fragments were fixed by V4A steel plates with 3 to 4 screws). One year after implantation, 350 samples of contact tissue, muscles lymphatic tissue, kidney, liver, lung and heart were analysed for K, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Se, Rb, Mo and W. Four animals from the same breed, which were kept under identical conditions, served as controls. The results are discussed with respect to possible mechanisms of transport, catabolism and enrichment of corrosion products from V4A steel implants. (author)

  4. Presence of trace metals in aquaculture marine ecosystems of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squadrone, S; Brizio, P; Stella, C; Prearo, M; Pastorino, P; Serracca, L; Ercolini, C; Abete, M C

    2016-08-01

    Information regarding chemical pollutant levels in farmed fish and shellfish, along with the risks associated with their consumption is still scarce. This study was designed to assess levels of exposure to 21 trace elements in fish (Dicentrarchus labrax), mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and oysters (Crassostrea gigas) collected from aquaculture marine ecosystems of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. Metal concentrations showed great variability in the three species; the highest values of the nonessential elements As and Cd were found in oysters while the highest levels of Al, Pb and V were found in mussels. The essential elements Cu, Mn and Zn were highest in oysters, but Fe, Cr, Ni, Se, Co and Mo levels were highest in mussels. Fish had the lowest concentrations for all trace elements, which were at least one order of magnitude lower than in bivalves. The rare earth elements cerium and lanthanum were found at higher levels in mussels than in oysters, but undetectable in fish. The maximum values set by European regulations for Hg, Cd and Pb were never exceeded in the examined samples. However, comparing the estimated human daily intakes (EHDIs) with the suggested tolerable copper and zinc intakes suggested a potential risk for frequent consumers of oysters. Similarly, people who consume high quantities of mussels could be exposed to concentrations of Al that exceed the proposed TWI (tolerable weekly intake). PMID:27179326

  5. Sex-associated differences in trace metals concentrations in and on the plumage of a common urban bird species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, Adrien; Federici, Pierre; Legoupi, Julie; Jacquin, Lisa; Gasparini, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Urban areas encompass both favorable and stressful conditions linked with human activities and pollution. Pollutants remain of major ecological importance for synanthropic organisms living in the city. Plumage of urban birds harbour trace metals, which can result from external deposition or from internal accumulation. External and internal plumage concentrations likely differ between specific trace metals, and may further differ between males and females because of potential sex-linked differential urban use, physiology or behaviour. Here, we measured the concentrations in four trace metals (cadmium, copper, lead and zinc) in both unwashed and washed feathers of 49 male and 38 female feral pigeons (Columba livia) from Parisian agglomeration. We found that these concentrations indeed differed between unwashed and washed feathers, between males and females, and for some metals depended on the interaction between these factors. We discuss these results in the light of physiological and behavioural differences between males and females and of spatial repartition of the four trace metals in the city. PMID:26458927

  6. Assessment of trace metal contamination level and toxicity in sediments from coastal regions of West Bengal, eastern part of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antizar-Ladislao, Blanca; Mondal, Priyanka; Mitra, Soumita; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar

    2015-12-30

    The work investigated concentration of trace metals in surface sediments (0-10 cm; Mangrove Wetland (SMW), eastern coastal part of India. The trace metal concentrations in sediments exhibited an overall decreasing trend as follows: Cr (21.2-60.9)>Cu (11.60-102.47)>Ni (19.10-52.60)>Pb (7.09-183.88)>As (4.41-11.46)>Cd (0.02-4.4)>Ag (0.02-0.87). Both the geo-accumulation index (Igeo) and contamination factor (CF) values revealed significant pollution by Ag, Cd and Pb at Nurpur of HRE. Potential Ecological Risk Index (RI) (61.21 ± 112.40) showed wide range of variations from low (19.76) to serious (463.20) ecological risk. A positive significant correlation was found between metals and organic carbon in sediments. The ecological risk associated with the trace metals in sediment was considered on the consensus based Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs). The work suggests that the trace metals present in sediments posed adverse effects on the sediment-dwelling organisms. PMID:26581818

  7. Preservation of NOM-metal complexes in a modern hyperalkaline stalagmite: Implications for speleothem trace element geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartland, Adam; Fairchild, Ian J.; Müller, Wolfgang; Dominguez-Villar, David

    2014-03-01

    We report the first quantitative study of the capture of colloidal natural organic matter (NOM) and NOM-complexed trace metals (V, Co, Cu, Ni) in speleothems. This study combines published NOM-metal dripwater speciation measurements with high-resolution laser ablation ICPMS (LA-ICPMS) and sub-annual stable isotope ratio (δ18O and δ13C), fluorescence and total organic carbon (TOC) analyses of a fast-growing hyperalkaline stalagmite (pH ˜11) from Poole’s Cavern, Derbyshire UK, which formed between 1997 and 2008 AD. We suggest that the findings reported here elucidate trace element variations arising from colloidal transport and calcite precipitation rate changes observed in multiple, natural speleothems deposited at ca. pH 7-8. We find that NOM-metal(aq) complexes on the boundary between colloidal and dissolved (˜1 nm diameter) show an annual cyclicity which is inversely correlated with the alkaline earth metals and is explained by calcite precipitation rate changes (as recorded by kinetically-fractionated stable isotopes). This relates to the strength of the NOM-metal complexation reaction, resulting in very strongly bound metals (Co in this system) essentially recording NOM co-precipitation (ternary complexation). More specifically, empirical partition coefficient (Kd) values between surface-reactive metals (V, Co, Cu, Ni) [expressed as ratio of trace element to Ca ratios in calcite and in solution] arise from variations in the ‘free’ fraction of total metal in aqueous solution (fm). Hence, differences in the preservation of each metal in calcite can be explained quantitatively by their complexation behaviour with aqueous NOM. Differences between inorganic Kd values and field measurements for metal partitioning into calcite occur where [free metal] ≪ [total metal] due to complexation reactions between metals and organic ligands (and potentially inorganic colloids). It follows that where fm ≈ 0, apparent inorganic Kd app values are also ≈0, but the

  8. Leachability of trace metal elements from fly ashes, and from concrete incorporating fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, M.H. [National University of Singapore (Singapore); Blanchette, M.C. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Energy Technology Centre; Malhotra, V.M. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    Manufacturing portland cement is not environmentally desirable because for every tonne of cement produced, about one tonne of carbon dioxide is released into the atmosphere. This problem can be solved by replacing a portion of portland cement with fly ash, a mineral by-product of burning coal at power generation facilities. A study was conducted to examine the leachability of trace metal elements from a variety of fly ashes from various sources in Canada and the United States along with the concrete incorporating the fly ash. Gold, arsenic, boron, barium cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, lead and selenium are the regulated elements in leachates. In this study, each of these elements were tested from 9 fly ashes within the limits of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Canadian regulations for the Transportation of Dangerous Goods. It was shown that in general, but with some exceptions, the leaching of arsenic, boron, nickel and selenium increased with an increase in their content in the fly ash. Arsenic concentration from fly ash obtained from bituminous coal was found to be much higher than that from lignite or from sub-bituminous coal. However, the study also showed that none of the trace metals in the leachates from the fly ash concrete samples exceeded the regulated concentration limits, regardless of the type and percentage of fly ash used. It was concluded that concrete which incorporates fly ash is environmentally stable. It was also concluded that waste product utilization, in terms of using fly ash from power generating facilities, can significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions when manufacturing portland cement. Typical replacement levels of fly ash in portland cement concrete is about 20 per cent by mass of the total cementitious materials. 10 refs., 14 tabs., 4 figs.

  9. Response of radioactive trace metals to acid-base titrations in controlled experimental ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotracer experiments were carried out in 20 enclosures located in two lakes at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), northwestern Ontario, to study pathways of trace metal removal from the water column of shallow lakes. Two removal mechanisms were characterized: (1) sorption to and subsequent transport with falling particles and (2) direct adsorption to surface sediments. Our approach was to measure independently the kinetics of radiotracer sorption, fluxes and concentrations for particles, particle settling velocities, and the equivalent stagnant boundary film. Our radiotracer results enabled us to test the sensitivity of the tracer removal rates on these rate-determining processes using a numerical transport model. Acid titrations of whole ecosystems revealed that some trace metals (e.g. Mn, Co and Zn) can diffuse back to the water column as the pH is lowered from 6.5 to 4,8 after 18 d, while others remain tightly bound, (e.g. Sn, Fe, Se, Cr, Ag, and Hg isotopes). Subsequent CaCO3 additions to bring back the pH to its original value restored the initial removal conditions for acid-sensitive radiotracers, indicating that the pH sensitivity is reversible. Transport parameters for particle-related pathways or diffusive pathways across the sediment-water interface obtained from our enclosure experiments were used to predict the removal rats of particle-reactive 60Co and the diffusive pathway tracer 134Cs observed in earlier experiments where radiotracers were added to whole lakes or to larger enclosures. (Author) (19 refs., 9 tabs., 11 figs.)

  10. Polytene chromosomes of Chironomidae (Diptera as a bioassay of trace-metal-induced genome instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskeva Vladimirova Michailova

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Chironomids are a ubiquitous group of aquatic insects that are very sensitive to environmental stress. Due to the presence of polytene (‘giant’ salivary gland chromosomes, it is possible to define the genome response of several Chironomid species to various stress agents. The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic changes in populations of widely distributed chironomid species from aquatic basins in Bulgaria, Italy, Russia, U.K. and Poland, which were exposed to high concentrations of trace metals. We analyzed the structural and functional alterations of polytene chromosomes of the salivary glands of larvae belonging to three different cytocomplexes of the genus Chironomus (“thummi”, “lacunarius”, “pseudothummi”, and genera Glyptotendipes and Kiefferulus. Somatic structural chromosome rearrangements (para- and pericentric heterozygous inversions, deletions, deficiencies and amplifications were used to estimate a Somatic index (S for each population. The highest S indexes were detected in Chironomus riparius populations from locations with high concentrations of trace metals in the sediment. Each species showed specific genome responses to stress agents which we discussed in the light of the specific DNA structures and cytogenetic characteristics of the species. In larvae from polluted sediments two key structures of the salivary gland chromosomes (Balbiani Rings and Nucleolar Organizer sharply reduced their activity to levels below those observed under non-polluted conditions. It is concluded that polytene chromosomes can be used as tools for evaluating the genotoxicity of the aquatic environment. Structural and functional chromosome alterations provide cost-effective early-warning signals of genotoxic concentrations of environmental pollutants.doi: 10.5324/fn.v31i0.1355.Published online: 17 October 2012.

  11. Simultaneous estimation of trace and toxic metals through drinking water from Tarapur using ICP-AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper the contamination levels of trace and toxic metals in drinking water collected from Tarapur industrial area, Thane were investigated. The concentrations of trace and toxic metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, Se, V, Zn, Mn, Mo, Co, As and Ba) were determined simultaneously using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results were compared with international water quality guidelines (WHO, 2008) and were found within the permissible limits. The quality assurance was checked by standard addition method and spike recovery. The concentration of Pb, Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, Se, V, Zn, Mn, Mo, Co, As and Ba varies from 4.25-19.62 μg/L, 0.13-1.49 μg/L, 0.60-65.55 μg/L, 0.46-4.15 μg/L, <0.1 μg/L, 0.5- 9.35 μg/L, <0.5 μg/L, 3.41-99.64 μg/L, 0.80-9.62 μg/L, 0.30-1.48 μg/L, <0.1-0.90 μg/L, <0.63 μg/L and 0.71-9.0 μg/L respectively. Similarly Na, K, Ca and Mg varies from 8.83-61.54 mg/L, 0.40-27.66 mg/L, 14.63-223.75 mg/L and 9.56-67.06 mg/L in different places around Tarapur. (author)

  12. Alkaline phosphatase activity in the subtropical ocean: insights from nutrient, dust and trace metal addition experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire eMahaffey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for all life on earth. In the ocean, the most bioavailable form of phosphorus is inorganic phosphate, but in the extensive subtropical gyres, phosphate concentrations can be chronically low and limit primary productivity and nitrogen fixation. In these regions, organisms produce hydrolytic enzymes, such as alkaline phosphatase (AP, that enable them to utilize the more replete dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP pool to meet their cellular phosphorus demands. In this study, we synthesized data from 14 published studies and present our own findings from two research cruises (D326 and D361 in the eastern subtropical Atlantic to explore the relationship between AP activity (APA and nutrients, Saharan dust and trace metals. We found that below a threshold phosphate concentration of ~ 30 nM, APA increased with an inverse hyperbolic relationship with phosphate concentration. Meanwhile, DOP concentrations decreased with enhanced APA, indicating utilization of the DOP pool. We found APA rates were significantly higher in the subtropical Atlantic compared to the subtropical Pacific Ocean, even over the same low phosphate concentration range (0 to 50 nM. While the phosphate concentration may have a first order control on the APA rates, we speculate that other factors influence this basin scale contrast. Using bioassay experiments, we show that the addition of Saharan dust and zinc significantly increased the rate of APA. To our knowledge, our results are the first direct field-based evidence that APA is limited by zinc in the subtropical ocean. Further work is required to explore the relationship between trace metals such as iron and zinc, which are co-factors of phosphohydrolytic enzymes, specifically PhoX and PhoA, respectively, and APA in the ocean.

  13. Sediment trace metal profiles in lakes of Killarney Park, Canada from regional to continental influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lakes in Killarney Provincial Park (KPP) located 40-60 km southwest of Sudbury, Ontario are beginning to recover after decades of being severely affected by acidification and atmospheric pollutants. Detailed profiles of acid-recoverable trace elements (As. Cd, Cu, Co. Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) were obtained after aqua regia digestion and ICP-OES analysis of sediment cores taken from six Park lakes. Results permitted the identification of two types of profiles. The first type applies to elements such as Fe, Mn, As and Co for which historical deposition and recent recovery are strongly masked by diagenetic remobilization. The second type of profile applies to elements such as Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn on which the history of industrialisation in North America and mining activities in Sudbury can be superimposed. Based on sediment data of trace elements less affected by diagenetic remobilization (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn), chemical recovery indices can be estimated from depth profiles. Indices of maximum (Cp) and surface (Cs) contamination were calculated by dividing the concentration of a given metal by the pre-industrial level. The ratio of the two indices provided a simple estimation of the chemical recovery of lakes that does not consider the influence of the watershed or the lake pH. Profiles of metals in sediment of KPP complement the water quality monitoring data and tend to indicate that this area is in transition from dominant influence of regional pollution sources to becoming controlled by continental atmospheric deposition. - Lakes in Killarney Park are in transition from being impacted by regional pollution to being controlled by continental atmospheric deposition

  14. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry of microelectronically relevant heavy metal traces in high-purity cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because cobalt and its silicides are increasingly used in microelectronic devices, an isotope dilution mass spectrometric (IDMS) method has been developed for trace analysis of relevant heavy metals (U, Th, Fe, Zn, Tl, and Cd) in high-purity cobalt. The measurements of the isotope ratios were carried out with a small thermal ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer by producing positive thermal ions in a single- or double-filament ion source. For the trace/matrix separation and the isolation of the different heavy metals, anion-exchange chromatography and an extraction method for iron were applied. The detection limits obtained were (in ng/g): U = 0.007, Th = 0.017, Tl = 0.06, Cd = 1, Zn = 8, and Fe = 11, which demonstrates that the particularly critical radioactive impurities uranium and thorium could be analysed down to the low pg/g range. Three cobalt samples of different purity were analysed with concentrations ranging from about 0.1 ng/g for U and Th in an ultra high-purity material produced for microelectronic purposes, up to about 70 μg/g for Cd in a cobalt sample with declared purity of 99.8%. Because IDMS usually results in accurate analytical results, it can be used in the future for calibration of other methods like glow discharge mass spectrometry, as could be shown by analysing one cobalt sample by both methods. IDMS can also be applied for the production of urgently needed certified standard reference materials in this important field of high technology. (orig.)

  15. Risks of using membrane filtration for trace metal analysis and assessing the dissolved metal fraction of aqueous media - A study on zinc, copper and nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane filtration is commonly performed for solid-liquid separation of aqueous solutions prior to trace metal analysis and when assessing 'dissolved' metal fractions. Potential artifacts induced by filtration such as contamination and/or adsorption of metals within the membrane have been investigated for different membrane materials, metals, applied pressures and pre-cleaning steps. Measurements have been conducted on aqueous solutions including well-defined metal standards, ultrapure water, and on runoff water from corroded samples. Filtration using both non-cleaned and pre-cleaned filters revealed contamination and adsorption effects, in particular pronounced for zinc, evident for copper but non-significant for nickel. The results clearly show these artifacts to be non-systematic both for non-cleaned and pre-cleaned membranes. The applied pressure was of minor importance. Measurements of the labile fraction by means of stripping voltammetry clearly elucidate that membrane filtration followed by total metal analysis cannot accurately assess the labile or the dissolved metal fraction. - Highlights: → Membrane filtration for trace metal analysis can introduce significant artifacts. → The dissolved metal fraction cannot be assessed by membrane filtration. → Non-specified filtration procedures are inadequate for scientific studies. → Artifacts caused by membrane filtration need to be addressed by regulators. - Membrane filtration cannot be used to assess the dissolved metal fraction of aqueous media and needs to be defined in detail in standard tests.

  16. Impact of trace metals on the water structure at the calcite surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolthers, Mariette; Di Tommaso, Devis; De Leeuw, Nora

    2014-05-01

    Carbonate minerals play an important role in regulating the chemistry of aquatic environments, including the oceans, aquifers, hydrothermal systems, soils and sediments. Through mineral surface processes such as dissolution, precipitation and sorption, carbonate minerals affect the biogeochemical cycles of not only the constituent elements of carbonates, such as Ca, Mg, Fe and C, but also H, P and trace elements. Surface charging of the calcite mineral-water interface, and its reactivity towards foreign ions can be quantified using a surface structural model that includes, among others, the water structure at the interface (i.e. hydrogen bridging) [1,2] in accordance with the CD-MUSIC formalism [3]. Here we will show the impact of foreign metals such as Mg and Sr on the water structure around different surface sites present in etch pits and on growth terraces at the calcite (10-14) surface. We have performed Molecular Dynamics simulations of metal-doped calcite surfaces, using different interatomic water potentials. Results show that the local environment around the structurally distinct sites differs depending on metal presence, suggesting that metal substitutions in calcite affect its reactivity. The information obtained in this study will help in improving existing macroscopic surface model for the reactivity of calcite [2] and give more general insight in mineral surface reactivity in relation to crystal composition. [1] Wolthers, Charlet, & Van Cappellen (2008). Am. J. Sci., 308, 905-941. [2] Wolthers, Di Tommaso, Du, & de Leeuw (2012). Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 14, 15145-15157. [3] Hiemstra and Van Riemsdijk (1996) J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 179, 488-508.

  17. Heavy metal, trace element and petroleum hydrocarbon pollution in the Arabian Gulf: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afnan Mahmood Freije

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Arabian Gulf environmental status was assessed based on studies conducted in Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and United Arab Emirates (UAE during 1983–2011. This review examines all sorts of pollutions in the Arabian Gulf area over the last three decades. Approximately 50 published studies were reviewed in order to determine the pollution status in the Arabian Gulf regarding heavy metals and organic substances. Three types of environmental pollutions including marine and coastal, soil, and air were addressed in this review as well as sources of pollutants and their effect on biological systems, marine organisms, and human health. Emphasis is placed on marine pollution, particularly toxic metal, and petroleum hydrocarbon contaminations. Major parts of this review discuss the consequences of the 1991 Gulf War on the environment, and the substantial changes associated with the marine habitats. The effects of oil field fires in Kuwait following the 1991 Gulf War were evaluated through studies that investigated hydrocarbons concentration and trace metals in samples of near shore sediments, bivalves, and fish collected from Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, UAE, and Oman. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were discussed in biota (fish and various bivalves and coastal sediments from six countries in the Gulf. The review has revealed different concentrations of pollutants, low, moderately, and chronically contaminated areas from oil and metals. It has also outlined effective sustainable management measures and goals as a first step in the evaluation of coastal, marine, soil, and air environment in the Arabian Gulf area.

  18. Towards integrated environmental quality objectives for surface water, ground water, sediment and soil for nine trace metals

    OpenAIRE

    Plassche EJ van de; Bruijn JHM de

    1992-01-01

    This report is the result of the second sub-project of the project "Setting integrated environmental quality objectives", called exotic metals". These trace metals are antimony, barium, beryllium cobalt, molybdenum, selenium, thallium, tin and vanadium. This report is an integration of three activities, published in separate reports: 1. derivation of Maximum Permissible Concentrations (MPC's) and Negligible Concentrations (NC's) for water, sediment, and soil based on ecotoxicological data. 2....

  19. Electrodes modified with bismuth, antimony and tin precursor compounds for electrochemical stripping analysis of trace metals (a short review)

    OpenAIRE

    Lezi, Nikolitsa; Economou, Anastasios; Barek, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, intensive research is being carried out towards the development of “green” electrochemical sensors. Bismuth, antimony and tin electrodes have been proposed as potential substitutes of mercury electrodes in electrochemical stripping analysis of trace metals. The main advantage of these metals as electrode materials is their lower toxicity compared to mercury. Among the different configuration of bismuth, antimony and tin electrodes, one of the most attractive inv...

  20. Monitoring and flux determination of trace metals in rivers of the Seversky Donets basin (Ukraine) using DGT passive samplers

    OpenAIRE

    Vystavna, Yuliya; Huneau, Frédéric; Motelica-Heino, Mikael; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Vergeles, Yuri; Stolberg, Felix

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the in situ application of diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) passive samplers for trace metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) monitoring in transboundary Udy and Lopan rivers of the Seversky Donets watershed in the Kharkiv region (Ukraine), which has a long history of industrial development. The research discusses potential sources of DGT-measured labile metals in water and seasonal variations. Our results demonstrate the application of DGT for identif...

  1. Distribution of PAHs and trace metals in urban stormwater sediments: combination of density fractionation, mineralogy and microanalysis

    OpenAIRE

    El Mufleh, Amelène; Bechet, Béatrice; Basile Doelsch, Isabelle; GEFFROY RODIER, Claude; Gaudin, Anne; RUBAN, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Sediment management from stormwater infiltration basins represents a real environmental and economic issue for stakeholders due to the pollution load and important tonnages of these by-products. In order to reduce the sediments volumes to treat, organic and metal micropollutants bearing-phases should be identified. To do so, the distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and trace metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) within variable density fractions was evaluated for three urban stor...

  2. Anthropogenic impact on diffuse trace metal accumulation in river sediments from agricultural reclamation areas with geochemical and isotopic approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A better understanding of anthropogenic impact can help assess the diffuse trace metal accumulation in the agricultural environment. In this study, both river sediments and background soils were collected from a case study area in Northeast China and analyzed for total concentrations of six trace metals, four major elements and three lead isotopes. Results showed that Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Cr and Ni have accumulated in the river sediments after about 40 years of agricultural development, with average concentrations 1.23–1.71 times higher than local soil background values. Among them Ni, Cr and Cu were of special concern and they may pose adverse biological effects. By calculating enrichment factor (EF), it was found that the trace metal accumulation was still mainly ascribed to natural weathering processes, but anthropogenic contribution could represent up to 40.09% of total sediment content. For Pb, geochemical and isotopic approaches gave very similar anthropogenic contributions. Principal component analysis (PCA) further suggested that the anthropogenic Pb, Cu, Cr and Ni inputs were mostly related to the regional atmospheric deposition of industrial emissions and gasoline combustion, which had a strong affinity for iron oxides in the sediments. Concerning Cd, however, it mainly originated from local fertilizer applications and was controlled by sediment carbonates. - Graphical abstract: The trace metal accumulation was mainly ascribed to natural weathering processes, but anthropogenic contribution could represent up to 40.09% of total sediment content. Anthropogenic Pb, Cu, Cr and Ni mostly came from atmospheric deposition, while fertilizer application was the main anthropogenic source of Cd. - Highlights: • Trace metals have accumulated in the Naolihe sediments. • Natural weathering was still a major contributor to metal accumulation. • Anthropogenic Pb, Cu, Cr and Ni mostly came from atmospheric deposition. • Local fertilizer application was the main

  3. Trace metals, melanin-based pigmentation and their interaction influence immune parameters in feral pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, M; Gasparini, J; Frantz, A

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the effects of trace metals emitted by anthropogenic activities on wildlife is of great concern in urban ecology; yet, information on how they affect individuals, populations, communities and ecosystems remains scarce. In particular, trace metals may impact survival by altering the immune system response to parasites. Plumage melanin is assumed to influence the effects of trace metals on immunity owing to its ability to bind metal ions in feathers and its synthesis being coded by a pleiotropic gene. We thus hypothesized that trace metal exposure would interact with plumage colouration in shaping immune response. We experimentally investigated the interactive effect between exposure to an environmentally relevant range of zinc and/or lead and melanin-based plumage colouration on components of the immune system in feral pigeons (Columba livia). We found that zinc increased anti-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) IgY primary response maintenance, buffered the negative effect of lead on anti-KLH IgY secondary response maintenance and tended to increase T-cell mediated phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) skin response. Lead decreased the peak of the anti-KLH IgY secondary response. In addition, pheomelanic pigeons exhibited a higher secondary anti-KLH IgY response than did eumelanic ones. Finally, T-cell mediated PHA skin response decreased with increasing plumage eumelanin level of birds exposed to lead. Neither treatments nor plumage colouration correlated with endoparasite intensity. Overall, our study points out the effects of trace metals on some parameters of birds' immunity, independently from other confounding urbanization factors, and underlines the need to investigate their impacts on other life history traits and their consequences in the ecology and evolution of host-parasite interactions. PMID:26809976

  4. Anthropogenic impact on diffuse trace metal accumulation in river sediments from agricultural reclamation areas with geochemical and isotopic approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Wei; Ouyang, Wei, E-mail: wei@itc.nl; Hao, Fanghua; Lin, Chunye

    2015-12-01

    A better understanding of anthropogenic impact can help assess the diffuse trace metal accumulation in the agricultural environment. In this study, both river sediments and background soils were collected from a case study area in Northeast China and analyzed for total concentrations of six trace metals, four major elements and three lead isotopes. Results showed that Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Cr and Ni have accumulated in the river sediments after about 40 years of agricultural development, with average concentrations 1.23–1.71 times higher than local soil background values. Among them Ni, Cr and Cu were of special concern and they may pose adverse biological effects. By calculating enrichment factor (EF), it was found that the trace metal accumulation was still mainly ascribed to natural weathering processes, but anthropogenic contribution could represent up to 40.09% of total sediment content. For Pb, geochemical and isotopic approaches gave very similar anthropogenic contributions. Principal component analysis (PCA) further suggested that the anthropogenic Pb, Cu, Cr and Ni inputs were mostly related to the regional atmospheric deposition of industrial emissions and gasoline combustion, which had a strong affinity for iron oxides in the sediments. Concerning Cd, however, it mainly originated from local fertilizer applications and was controlled by sediment carbonates. - Graphical abstract: The trace metal accumulation was mainly ascribed to natural weathering processes, but anthropogenic contribution could represent up to 40.09% of total sediment content. Anthropogenic Pb, Cu, Cr and Ni mostly came from atmospheric deposition, while fertilizer application was the main anthropogenic source of Cd. - Highlights: • Trace metals have accumulated in the Naolihe sediments. • Natural weathering was still a major contributor to metal accumulation. • Anthropogenic Pb, Cu, Cr and Ni mostly came from atmospheric deposition. • Local fertilizer application was the main

  5. Rates of zinc and trace metal release from dissolving sphalerite at pH 2.0-4.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, M.R.; Gemery-Hill, P. A.; Shanks, Wayne C., III; Taylor, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    High-Fe and low-Fe sphalerite samples were reacted under controlled pH conditions to determine nonoxidative rates of release of Zn and trace metals from the solid-phase. The release (solubilization) of trace metals from dissolving sphalerite to the aqueous phase can be characterized by a kinetic distribution coefficient, (Dtr), which is defined as [(Rtr/X(tr)Sph)/(RZn/X(Zn) Sph)], where R is the trace metal or Zn release rate, and X is the mole fraction of the trace metal or Zn in sphalerite. This coefficient describes the relationship of the sphalerite dissolution rate to the trace metal mole fraction in the solid and its aqueous concentration. The distribution was used to determine some controls on metal release during the dissolution of sphalerite. Departures from the ideal Dtr of 1.0 suggest that some trace metals may be released via different pathways or that other processes (e.g., adsorption, solubility of trace minerals such as galena) affect the observed concentration of metals. Nonoxidative sphalerite dissolution (mediated by H+) is characterized by a "fast" stage in the first 24-30 h, followed by a "slow" stage for the remainder of the reaction. Over the pH range 2.0-4.0, and for similar extent of reaction (reaction time), sphalerite composition, and surface area, the rates of release of Zn, Fe, Cd, Cu, Mn and Pb from sphalerite generally increase with lower pH. Zinc and Fe exhibit the fastest rates of release, Mn and Pb have intermediate rates of release, and Cd and Cu show the slowest rates of release. The largest variations in metal release rates occur at pH 2.0. At pH 3.0 and 4.0, release rates show less variation and appear less dependent on the metal abundance in the solid. For the same extent of reaction (100 h), rates of Zn release range from 1.53 ?? 10-11 to 5.72 ?? 10-10 mol/m2/s; for Fe, the range is from 4.59 ?? 10-13 to 1.99 ?? 10-10 mol/m2/s. Trace metal release rates are generally 1-5 orders of magnitude slower than the Zn or Fe rates

  6. Estimation of trace metal elements in oral mucosa specimens by using SR-XRF, PIXE, and XAFS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Tomoko; Uo, Motohiro; Wada, Takahiro; Omagari, Daisuke; Komiyama, Kazuo; Noguchi, Tadahide; Jinbu, Yoshinori; Kusama, Mikio

    2015-02-01

    The effects of dissolved elements from metal dental restorations are a major concern in lesions of the oral mucosa, and the evaluation of accumulated metal elements, especially their distribution and chemical state, is essential for determining the precise effects of trace metals. In this study, X-ray fluorescence with synchrotron radiation (SR-XRF) and particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) were applied for distribution analysis of the trace metal elements contained in the oral mucosa, and the chemical states of the elements were estimated using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis. Appropriate combination of these analysis techniques, particularly SR-XRF and PIXE, to visualize the distributions of the elements in the oral mucosa allowed for the observation and evaluation of accumulated metal ions and debris. Importantly, the analyses in this study could be carried out using conventional histopathological specimens without damaging the specimens. Therefore, this method would be applicable for the detection of accumulated trace metal elements in biopsy specimens from the oral mucosa. PMID:25522792

  7. Environmental impact assessment of trace metal deposition around the petrol filling stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wide use of petroleum products causes contamination of air, water, soil and plants. The present study was conducted to monitor the trace metal deposition in road side soil around the petrol filling stations along the busy roads of Karachi, Pakistan. Total 21 road side soil samples were collected from selected locations of busy roads. The soil samples were digested using acid digestion method and atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS) was used for the elemental analysis. Results of the study showed that concentration of lead was highest in the soil samples ranging from 41.3 to 361 mg/kg, then copper from 23.0 to 101 mg/kg, manganese from 36.2 to 125.0 mg/kg and zinc from 27.5 to 213.0 mg/kg, respectively. The correlation-coefficient (r) was also calculated between the metals in soil samples. The correlation matrix showed that all the pollution is coming from the same source. The gravitational sedimentation and impact on vegetation of coarse fraction is responsible for the high lead contamination of vegetation and soils. Collected data showed that, almost all the pollution being generated by automobile exhaust in urban areas of Karachi. The soil acts as an important sink for pollutants released through different activities. (author)

  8. Tracing low-temperature aqueous metal migration in mineralized watersheds with Cu isotope fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Cu isotope fractionation of ores and waters identifies copper sulfide weathering. • Redox reactions cause isotopic shift measured in areas of sulfide weathering. • Consistent isotope signature in different deposit, climate, or concentration. - Abstract: Copper isotope signatures in waters emanating from mineralized watersheds provide evidence for the source aqueous copper in solution. Low-temperature aqueous oxidation of Cu sulfide minerals produces significant copper isotopic fractionation between solutions and residues. Abiotic experimental data of fractionation (defined as Δliquid–solid ‰ = δ65Culiquid − δ65Cusolid) are on the order of 1–3‰ and are unique for copper rich-sulfide minerals. Data presented here from ores and waters within defined boundaries of porphyry copper, massive sulfide, skarn, and epithermal ore deposits mimic abiotic experiments. Thus, the oxidation of sulfide minerals appears to cause the signatures in the waters although significant biological, temperature, and pH variations exist in the fluids. Regardless of the deposit type, water type, concentration of Cu in solution, or location, the data provide a means to trace sources of metals in solutions. This relationship allows for tracking sources and degree of metal migration in low temperature aqueous systems and has direct application to exploration geology and environmental geochemistry

  9. Trace metallic impurity analysis of Pu bearing nuclear fuels by AES and associated instrumental set up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemistry Division, BARC, has been carrying out trace metal assay of Pu bearing nuclear fuels and associated materials such as UO2, PuO2, (U,Pu)O2, (U,Pu)C etc. based on Atomic Emission Spectrometry (AES) for more than four decades. AES is used with two different excitation sources, i.e. Direct Current Arc (D.C.Arc) and Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP). In the first case, group of metallics viz. Al, B, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Si, Sn, Ta,V, W and Zn are normally determined by carrier distillation technique, wherein during excitation of the sample in D.C.Arc, the analytes get selectively volatilised leaving behind the matrix in the electrode crater. Thus the sample prior to arcing has to be only directly mixed with the carrier, therefore, resulting in minimum handling of sample, which results in least chance of contamination and greater speed of analysis

  10. Made-to-order metal-organic frameworks for trace carbon dioxide removal and air capture

    KAUST Repository

    Shekhah, Osama

    2014-06-25

    Direct air capture is regarded as a plausible alternate approach that, if economically practical, can mitigate the increasing carbon dioxide emissions associated with two of the main carbon polluting sources, namely stationary power plants and transportation. Here we show that metal-organic framework crystal chemistry permits the construction of an isostructural metal-organic framework (SIFSIX-3-Cu) based on pyrazine/copper(II) two-dimensional periodic 4 4 square grids pillared by silicon hexafluoride anions and thus allows further contraction of the pore system to 3.5 versus 3.84 for the parent zinc(II) derivative. This enhances the adsorption energetics and subsequently displays carbon dioxide uptake and selectivity at very low partial pressures relevant to air capture and trace carbon dioxide removal. The resultant SIFSIX-3-Cu exhibits uniformly distributed adsorption energetics and offers enhanced carbon dioxide physical adsorption properties, uptake and selectivity in highly diluted gas streams, a performance, to the best of our knowledge, unachievable with other classes of porous materials. 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  11. Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Reaction and Transformation of Hg and Trace Metals in Combustion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Helble; Clara Smith; David Miller

    2009-08-31

    The overall goal of this project was to produce a working dynamic model to predict the transformation and partitioning of trace metals resulting from combustion of a broad range of fuels. The information provided from this model will be instrumental in efforts to identify fuels and conditions that can be varied to reduce metal emissions. Through the course of this project, it was determined that mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) would be the focus of the experimental investigation. Experiments were therefore conducted to examine homogeneous and heterogeneous mercury oxidation pathways, and to assess potential interactions between arsenic and calcium. As described in this report, results indicated that the role of SO{sub 2} on Hg oxidation was complex and depended upon overall gas phase chemistry, that iron oxide (hematite) particles contributed directly to heterogeneous Hg oxidation, and that As-Ca interactions occurred through both gas-solid and within-char reaction pathways. Modeling based on this study indicated that, depending upon coal type and fly ash particle size, vaporization-condensation, vaporization-surface reaction, and As-CaO in-char reaction all play a role in arsenic transformations under combustion conditions.

  12. Total petroleum hydrocarbons and trace metals in tropical estuary of Todos os Santos Bay, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celino, Joil Jose; Oliveira, Olivia Maria Cordeiro de; Queiroz, Antonio Fernando de Souza [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil); Trigueis, Jorge Alberto [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil); Garcia, Karina Santos [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    As part of the environmental assessment within Todos os Santos Bay, State of Bahia - Brazil, in summer of 2005, superficial water and sediments samples of the mangrove were collected at five locations to determine the spatial distribution of anthropogenic pollutants in the Dom Joao estuary at the Sao Francisco do Conde Region. Sandy sediments with low organic matter content dominate the studied area. Trace metal levels indicated that sediments were moderately polluted with Cu (overall mean: 21.48 +/- 4.76 {mu}g.g-1 dry sediment), but not with Pb (15 +/- 8), Zn (38 +/- 10), Cr (15 +/- 7), Ni (13 +/- 6) and Cd (0.4 +/- 0.2). Depending on location, total petroleum hydrocarbons ranged from 1.6 to 10.6 {mu}g.g-1. To discriminate pattern differences and similarities among samples, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed using a correlation matrix. PCA revealed the latent relationships among all the stations investigated and confirmed our analytical results. Principal components analysis confirmed two regions according to their environmental quality. The results pointed out that almost all the area presented some substances that can cause adverse biological effects, especially in the outermost region where some metals are above TEL level. (author)

  13. Organic compounds and trace metals of anthropogenic origin in sediments from Montego Bay, Jamaica: assessment of sources and distribution pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sources and distribution pathways were identified. - Surface sediments throughout Montego Bay, Jamaica were collected in 1995 and analyzed for their trace metal and trace organic contaminant content. A variety of trace metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, coprostanol as well as chlorinated hydrocarbons such as pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls were detected and provide evidence for several anthropogenic inputs to the bay. Two main sources of these chemicals are the Montego River and the North Gully, the latter being more significant. Particle-associated pollutants were found to be distributed along the Montego River plume, as well as being transported by the prevailing water currents to the South-Western sections of the bay, probably through re-suspension of enriched fine sediments from the North Gully outfall area

  14. The mobility of radium-226 and trace metals in pre-oxidized subaqueous uranium mill tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.J.; Crusius, J.; Jay McNee, J.; Yanful, E.K

    2003-07-01

    The exchange of {sup 226}Ra and trace metals across the tailings-water interface and the mechanisms governing their mobility were assessed via sub-centimetre resolution profiling of dissolved constituents across the tailings-water interface in Cell 14 of the Quirke Waste Management Area at Rio Algom's Quirke Mine, near Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada. Shallow zones (<1.5 m water depth) are characterized by sparse filamentous vegetation, well-mixed water columns and fully oxygenated bottom waters. Profiles of dissolved O{sub 2}, Fe and Mn indicate that the tailings deposits in these areas are sub-oxic below tailings depths of {approx}3 cm. These zones exhibit minor remobilization of Ra in the upper 5 cm of the tailings deposit; {sup 226}Ra fluxes at these sites are relatively small, and contribute negligibly to the water column activity of {sup 226}Ra. The shallow areas also exhibit minor remobilization of Ni, As, Mo and U. The release of these elements to the water cover is, however, limited by scavenging mechanisms in the interfacial oxic horizons. The presence of thick vegetation (Chara sp.) in the deeper areas (>2 m water depth) fosters stagnant bottom waters and permits the development of anoxia above the benthic boundary. These anoxic tailings are characterized by substantial remobilization of {sup 226}Ra, resulting in a relatively large flux of {sup 226}Ra from the tailings to the water column. The strong correlation between the porewater profiles of {sup 226}Ra and Ba (r{sup 2}=0.99), as well as solubility calculations, indicate that the mobility of Ra is controlled by saturation with respect to a poorly ordered and/or impure barite phase [(Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4}]. In the anoxic zones, severe undersaturation with respect to barite is sustained by microbial SO{sub 4} reduction. Flux calculations suggest that the increase in {sup 226}Ra activity in the water cover since 1995 (from <0.5 to 2.5 Bq l{sup -1}) can be attributed to an increase in the spatial

  15. Metal and trace element sediment assessment from Guarapiranga reservoir, Alto Tiete Basin, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Guarapiranga Reservoir, located in Sao Paulo metropolitan region, Brazil, is responsible for supplying about 20% of the entire population's water needs of this region or approximately 3.7 million people. However, this system has shown significant degradation in water quality, due to untreated domestic sewage and industrial effluents. In this study sediment samples were collected at five points along the reservoir and total concentration of some major (Fe, K and Na), trace (As, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Hf, Hg, Rb, Sb, Sc, Ta, Tb, Th, U, V and Zn) and rare earth (Ce, Eu, La, Lu, Nd, Sm, Tb and Yb) elements were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). By inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) the concentrations of Al, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Ti, V e Zn were determined after digestion procedure following US EPA 3051 methodology. The concentrations of metals Cd and Pb were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and total Hg by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Methodology validation according to precision and accuracy was performed by reference materials analyses for the three different analytical techniques used. Multielemental results obtained by INAA were compared to NASC (North American Shale Composite), Upper Continental Crust (UCC) and soil from Guarapiranga park values. The Enrichment Factor (EF) and Geo accumulation Index (Igeo) were also evaluated for these data. Metal concentration results by ICP OES and AAS in the samples were compared to the TEL and PEL oriented values established by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment and also adopted by CETESB (Environmental Protection Agency of the Sao Paulo State). The results were also compared to regional reference values (VRR) of limnic sediments from the Alto Tiete Basin. From these data an assessment of metal and trace element accumulated in the sediments from the

  16. The mobility of radium-226 and trace metals in pre-oxidized subaqueous uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exchange of 226Ra and trace metals across the tailings-water interface and the mechanisms governing their mobility were assessed via sub-centimetre resolution profiling of dissolved constituents across the tailings-water interface in Cell 14 of the Quirke Waste Management Area at Rio Algom's Quirke Mine, near Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada. Shallow zones (2, Fe and Mn indicate that the tailings deposits in these areas are sub-oxic below tailings depths of ∼3 cm. These zones exhibit minor remobilization of Ra in the upper 5 cm of the tailings deposit; 226Ra fluxes at these sites are relatively small, and contribute negligibly to the water column activity of 226Ra. The shallow areas also exhibit minor remobilization of Ni, As, Mo and U. The release of these elements to the water cover is, however, limited by scavenging mechanisms in the interfacial oxic horizons. The presence of thick vegetation (Chara sp.) in the deeper areas (>2 m water depth) fosters stagnant bottom waters and permits the development of anoxia above the benthic boundary. These anoxic tailings are characterized by substantial remobilization of 226Ra, resulting in a relatively large flux of 226Ra from the tailings to the water column. The strong correlation between the porewater profiles of 226Ra and Ba (r2=0.99), as well as solubility calculations, indicate that the mobility of Ra is controlled by saturation with respect to a poorly ordered and/or impure barite phase [(Ra,Ba)SO4]. In the anoxic zones, severe undersaturation with respect to barite is sustained by microbial SO4 reduction. Flux calculations suggest that the increase in 226Ra activity in the water cover since 1995 (from -1) can be attributed to an increase in the spatial distribution of anoxic bottom waters caused by increased density of benthic flora. The anoxic, vegetated areas also exhibit minor remobilization with respect to dissolved As, Ni and Zn. The removal of trace metals in the anoxic bottom waters appears to be limited

  17. The importance of biomass net uptake for a trace metal budget in a forest stand in north-eastern France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trace metal (TM: Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) budget (stocks and annual fluxes) was evaluated in a forest stand (silver fir, Abies alba Miller) in north-eastern France. Trace metal concentrations were measured in different tree compartments in order to assess TM partitioning and dynamics in the trees. Inputs included bulk deposition, estimated dry deposition and weathering. Outputs were leaching and biomass exportation. Atmospheric deposition was the main input flux. The estimated dry deposition accounted for about 40% of the total trace metal deposition. The relative importance of leaching (estimated by a lumped parameter water balance model, BILJOU) and net biomass uptake (harvesting) for ecosystem exportation depended on the element. Trace metal distribution between tree compartments (stem wood and bark, branches and needles) indicated that Pb was mainly stored in the stem, whereas Zn and Ni, and to a lesser extent Cd and Cu, were translocated to aerial parts of the trees and cycled in the ecosystem. For Zn and Ni, leaching was the main output flux (> 95% of the total output) and the plot budget (input-output) was negative, whereas for Pb the biomass net exportation represented 60% of the outputs and the budget was balanced. Cadmium and Cu had intermediate behaviours, with 18% and 30% of the total output relative to biomass exportation, respectively, and the budgets were negative. The net uptake by biomass was particularly important for Pb budgets, less so for Cd and Cu and not very important for Zn and Ni in such forest stands.

  18. A new synthesis, characterization and application chelating resin for determination of some trace metals in honey samples by FAAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daşbaşı, Teslima; Saçmacı, Şerife; Çankaya, Nevin; Soykan, Cengiz

    2016-07-15

    In this study, we developed a simple and rapid solid phase extraction (SPE) method for the separation/preconcentration and determination of some trace metals by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). A new chelating resin, poly [2-(4-methoxyphenylamino)-2-oxoethyl methacrylate-co-divinylbenzene-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid] (MPAEMA-co-DVB-co-AMPS), was synthesized and characterized. This chelating resin was used as a new adsorbent material for determination of Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) ions. The parameters influential on the determination of this trace metals were examined. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limits (DL) of the method for trace metals were found to be (3s) in the range of 0.9-2.2 μg L(-1) (n=21), the preconcentration factor was calculated as 200 and the relative standard deviation was obtained achieved as ⩽2% for n=11. The method was performed for the determination of trace metals in some honey samples and standard reference materials. PMID:26948616

  19. Assessment and source identification of trace metals in the soils of greenhouse vegetable production in eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lanqin; Huang, Biao; Hu, Wenyou; Chen, Yong; Mao, Mingcui

    2013-11-01

    Worldwide concern about the occurrence of trace metals in greenhouse vegetable production soils (GVPS) is growing. In this study, a total of 385 surface GVPS samples were collected in Shouguang and four vegetable production bases in Nanjing, Eastern China, for the determination of As and Hg using atomic fluorescence spectrometry and Pb, Cu, Cd, and Zn using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Geo-accumulation indices and factor analysis were used to investigate the accumulation and sources of the trace metals in soils in Eastern China. The results revealed that greenhouse production practices increased accumulation of the trace metals, particularly Cd, Zn, and Cu in soils and their accumulation became significant with increasing years of cultivation. Accumulation of Cd and Zn was also found in soils from organic greenhouses. The GVPS was generally less polluted or moderately polluted by As, Cu, Zn, and Pb but heavily polluted by Cd and Hg in some locations. Overall, accumulation of Cd, Zn, and Cu in GVPS was primarily associated with anthropogenic activities, particularly, application of manure. The high level of Hg found in some sites was related to historical heavy application of Hg containing pesticides. However, further identification of Hg sources is needed. To reduce accumulation of the trace metals in GVPS, organic fertilizer application should be suggested through development and implementation of reasonable and sustainable strategies. PMID:23988092

  20. Accumulation of Trace Metals, Petroleum Hydrocarbons, and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Marine Copepods from the Arabian Gulf

    OpenAIRE

    El-Din, N.M. Nour; Abdel-Moati, M. A. R.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, zooplankton samples were collected from the coastal waters of Qatar during winter and summer 1998 to assess the impact of growing industrialization on the bioaccumulation of trace metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHCs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in copepods, the dominant zooplankton group and main food for fish in the Arabian Gulf.

  1. Trace elements and heavy metals in the Grand Bay National Estuarine Reserve in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve has the highest biotic diversity of habitats and offer a reserve of food resources and commercially significant species. Rapid human civilization has led to accumulation of heavy metals and trace elements in estuaries. The Grand Bay National Estuarin...

  2. Using stable isotope systematics and trace metals to constrain the dispersion of fish farm pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchinsky, A.; Shiel, A. E.; Price, M.; Weis, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Fish farming is a growing industry of great economic importance to coastal communities. Unfortunately, open-net fish farming is associated with the release of organic and metal pollution, which has the potential to adversely affect the coastal marine environment. The dispersion of fish farm pollution and its environmental impact are not well understood/quantified. Pollutants released by fish farms include organic products such as uneaten feed pellets and fish feces, as well as chemicals and pharmaceuticals, all of which may enter marine ecosystems. In this study, we took advantage of bioaccumulation in passive suspension feeding Manila Clams collected at varying distances from an open-net salmon farm located in the Discovery Islands of British Columbia. Measurements of stable C and N isotopes, as well as trace metal concentrations, in the clams were used to investigate the spread of pollutants by detecting the presence of fish farm waste in the clams’ diet. Lead isotopic measurements were used to identify other significant anthropogenic pollution sources, which may impact the study area. Clams located within the areal extent of waste discharged by a fish farm are expected to exhibit anomalous light stable isotope ratios and metal concentrations, reflecting the presence of pollutants accumulated directly from seawater and from their diet. Clams were collected in the Discovery Islands from three sites in the Octopus Islands, located 850 m, 2100 m and 3000 m north of the Cyrus Rocks salmon farm (near Quadra Island) and from a reference site on Penn Island. Light stable isotope ratios (δN = ~10‰, with little variation between sites, and δC from -14.5 to -17.3‰) of the clams suggest that the most distal site (i.e., 3000 m away) is most impacted by organic fish farm waste (i.e., food pellets and feces) and that contributions of organic waste actually decrease closer to the farm. Not surprisingly, the smallest contribution of organic waste was detected in clams

  3. Linking trace metals and agricultural land use in volcanic soils--a multivariate approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parelho, C; Rodrigues, A S; Cruz, J V; Garcia, P

    2014-10-15

    The concern about the environmental impacts caused by agriculture intensification is growing as large amounts of nutrients and contaminants are introduced into soil ecosystems. Volcanic soils are unique naturally fertile resources extensively used for agricultural purposes, with particular physical and chemical properties that may result in possible accumulation of toxic substances, such as metals. Within this particular geological context, the present study aims to evaluate the impact of different agricultural systems (conventional, traditional and organic) in trace metal (TM) soil pollution and define the tracers for each one. Physicochemical properties and TM contents in agricultural topsoils were determined. Enrichment Factors (EF) were calculated to distinguish geogenic and anthropogenic contribution to TM contents in agricultural soils. An ensemble of multivariate statistical analyses (PCA and FDA) was performed to reduce the multidimensional space of variables and samples, thus defining a set of TM as tracers of distinct agricultural farming systems. Results show that agricultural soils have low organic matter content (30%); in addition, electric conductivity in conventional farming soils is higher (262.3 ± 162.6 μS cm(-1)) while pH is lower (5.8 ± 0.3). Regarding metal inputs, V, Ba and Hg soil contents are mainly of geogenic origin, while Li, P, K, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Cd and Pb result primarily from anthropogenic inputs. Li revealed to be a tracer of agricultural pollution in conventional farming soils, whereas V allowed the discrimination of traditional farming soils. This study points to agriculture as a diffuse source of anthropogenic TM soil pollution and is the first step to identify priority chemicals affecting agricultural Andosols. PMID:25093299

  4. Organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, trace elements and metals in western pond turtle eggs from Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henny, Charles J.; Beal, K.F.; Bury, R. Bruce; Goggans, R.

    2003-01-01

    With increased concern over the status of reptile populations globally, contaminant studies should be part of species evaluations. We analyzed eggs of western pond turtles from Fern Ridge Reservoir in western Oregon for 20 organochlorine (OC) pesticides or metabolites, 42 congener-specific polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and 16 trace elements or metals. These eggs represent the first of this species analyzed. The OC pesticides and PCB residue concentrations in the western pond turtle eggs were generally low and similar to those found in eggs of snapping turtles from a remote site in Ontario, Canada. Western pond turtle eggs also contained mercury and chromium, which are metals of special concern. Although few reptilian eggs have been analyzed for metals, the 44.9 mug/g dry weight chromium in a western pond turtle egg in this study may be the highest reported in a reptilian egg. We found no significant difference in contaminant concentrations in eggs from nests in Oregon, where all turtle eggs failed to hatch compared to those where some eggs hatched. During this initial project, however, we were unable to assess fully the role of OCs, PCBs and other contaminants in the western pond turtle decline. Factors other than contaminants may be involved. In another study, snapping turtle eggs near the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River basin were much more contaminated with evidence reported of effects on sex differentiation and reproductive endocrine function. Egg hatchability, the only reproductive parameter monitored, may not be the most sensitive endpoint. Other endpoints, including endocrine function, deformity rates, growth rates, and sex determination need study.

  5. Lead and other trace metals in preeclampsia: A case-control study in Tehran, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the effects of environmental exposures to trace metals on the incidence of preeclampsia, concentrations of lead (Pb), antimony (Sb), manganese (Mn), mercury, cadmium, cobalt and zinc in umbilical cord blood (UCB) and mother whole blood (MWB) were measured in 396 postpartum women without occupational exposure to metals in Tehran, Iran, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Mother's ages ranged from 15 to 49 (mean 27) years. Preeclampsia was diagnosed in 31 subjects (7.8%). Levels of Pb, Sb and Mn in UCB were significantly higher in preeclampsia cases [mean+/-SD of 4.30+/-2.49μg/dl, 4.16+/-2.73 and 46.87+/-15.03μg/l, respectively] than in controls [3.52+/-2.09μg/dl, 3.17+/-2.68 and 40.32+/-15.19μg/l, respectively] (P<0.05). The logistic regression analysis revealed that one unit increase in the common logarithms of UCB concentration of Pb, Sb or Mn led to increase in the risk of preeclampsia several-fold; unit risks (95% CI) were 12.96 (1.57-107.03), 6.11 (1.11-33.53) and 34.2 (1.81-648.04) for Pb, Sb and Mn, respectively (P<0.05). These findings suggest that environmental exposure to Pb, Sb and Mn may increase the risk of preeclampsia in women without occupational exposure; levels of metals in UCB to be sensitive indicators of female reproductive toxicity as compared with those in mother MWB. Further studies are necessary to confirm these findings, especially on Sb and Mn

  6. Antimony powder-modified carbon paste electrodes for electrochemical stripping determination of trace heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → New antimony powder-modified carbon paste electrode. → Combination of specific properties of carbon paste substrate and metallic antimony. → No requirement of using toxic antimony(III) salts. → Electrochemical stripping determination of trace heavy metals at ppb levels. → Anodic stripping voltammetric and stripping chronopotentiometric measurements. - Abstract: A new type of the antimony electrode based on a carbon paste bulk-modified with antimony powder (Sb-CPE) is presented for the determination of cadmium(II) and lead(II) ions at the microgram-per-liter concentration level, when using square-wave anodic stripping voltammetric or stripping chronopotentiometric protocol. The Sb-CPE was prepared by mixing fine antimony powder, carbon powder, and silicon oil, thus combining typical features of the carbon paste material with specific electrochemical properties of antimony. Key-operational parameters, including the amount of antimony powder in the carbon paste mixture, effect of the deposition potential and deposition time, were optimized and electroanalytical performance of the Sb-CPE in nondeaerated solution of 0.01 M hydrochloric acid (pH 2) was compared with related bismuth powder-modified carbon paste electrode (Bi-CPE) and with in situ prepared antimony film carbon paste electrode (SbF-CPE). The electrode of interest exhibited well-developed signals and highly linear calibration plots for both metal ions tested. In addition, favorable limits of detection were achieved; namely: 1.4 μg L-1 for Cd(II) and 0.9 μg L-1 for Pb(II). The applicability of the new electrode was demonstrated on the analysis of tap water (spiked sample). Besides voltammetric measurements, the Sb-CPE was preliminary tested also under chronopotentiometric stripping mode in deoxygenated solutions, revealing also an excellent electroanalytical performance.

  7. Trace/heavy metal pollution monitoring in estuary and coastal area of Bay of Bengal, Bangladesh and implicated impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibria, Golam; Hossain, Md Maruf; Mallick, Debbrota; Lau, T C; Wu, Rudolf

    2016-04-15

    Using artificial mussels (AMs), this study reports and compares time-integrated level of eleven trace metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, U, Zn) in Karnafuli River estuary and coastal area of the Bay of Bengal, Bangladesh. Through this study, "hot spots" of metal pollution were identified. The results may demonstrate that the Karnafuli Estuary, and adjacent coastal area of Chittagong, Bangladesh are highly polluted by high risk metals (cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead, uranium). Agricultural, domestic and industrial wastes directly discharged into the waterways have been identified as the main causes of metal pollution in Chittagong, Bangladesh. The high level of metal pollution identified may impact on local water quality, and seafood catch, livelihoods of people and public health resulting from seafood consumption. There is a need for regular monitoring to ascertain that local water quality with respect to metal levels are within acceptable levels to safeguards both environmental health and public health. PMID:26917093

  8. Closed vessel microwave assisted extraction - An innovative method for determination of trace metals in plant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeztan, S.; Duering, R.-A.

    2012-04-01

    Determination of metal concentrations in plant samples is important for better understanding of effects of toxic metals that are biologically magnified through the food chain and compose a great danger to all living beings. In recent years the use of microwave assisted extraction for plant samples has shown tremendous research interest which will probably substitute conventional procedures in the future. Generally conventional procedures have disadvantages including consuming of time and solvents. The objective of this study is to investigate and compare a new closed vessel microwave extraction (MAE) method with the combination of EDTA (MAE-EDTA) for the determination of metal contents (Cd, Mn, Pb, Zn) in plant samples (Lolio-Cynosuretum) by ICP-OES. Validation of the method was done by comparison of the results with another MAE procedure (MAE-H) which is applied with the mixture of 69% nitric acid (HNO3) and 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Moreover, conventional plant extraction (CE) method, for which the dissolution of plant samples were handled in HNO3 after dry ashing at 420° C, was used as a reference method. Approximately 0.5 g of sample was digested in 5 ml HNO3, 3 ml H2O2, and 5 ml deionized H2O for MAE-H and in 8 ml EDTA solution for MAE-EDTA. Certified plant reference materials (CRMs) were used for comparison of recovery rates from different extraction protocols. Thereby, the applicability of both MAE-H and MAE-EDTA procedures could be demonstrated. For 58 plant samples MAE-H showed the same extraction yields as CE in the determination of trace metal contents of the investigated elements in plant samples. MAE-EDTA gave similar values when compared to MAE-H and highly linear relationships were found for determination of Cd, Mn, Pb and Zn amounts. The recoveries for the CRMs were within the range 89.6-115%. Finally, strategic characteristics of MAE-EDTA for determination metal contents (Cd, Mn, Pb, Zn) in plant samples are: (i) applicability to a large set

  9. Determination and analysis of trace metals and surfactant in air particulate matter during biomass burning haze episode in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Manan; Guo, Xinxin; Zhao, Xing-Min

    2016-09-01

    Trace metal species and surface active agent (surfactant) emitted into the atmosphere from natural and anthropogenic source can cause various health related and environmental problems. Limited data exists for determinations of atmospheric particulate matter particularly trace metals and surfactant concentration in Malaysia during biomass burning haze episode. We used simple and validated effective methodology for the determination of trace metals and surfactant in atmospheric particulate matter (TSP & PM2.5) collected during the biomass burning haze episode in Kampar, Malaysia from end of August to October 2015. Colorimetric method of analysis was undertaken to determine the concentration of anionic surfactant as methylene blue active substance (MBAS) and cationic surfactant as disulphine blue active substance (DBAS) using a UV-Visible spectrophotometer. Particulate samples were also analyzed for trace metals with inductive coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) followed by extraction from glass microfiber filters with close vessel microwave acid digestion. The result showed that the concentrations of surfactant in both samples (TSP & PM2.5) were dominated by MBAS (0.147-4.626 mmol/m3) rather than DBAS (0.111-0.671 mmol/m3) and higher than the other researcher found. Iron (147.31-1381.19 μg/m3) was recorded leading trace metal in PM followed by Al, Zn, Pb, Cd, Cr and others. During the haze period the highest mass concentration of TSP 313.34 μg/m3 and 191.07 μg/m3 for PM2.5 were recorded. Furthermore, the backward air trajectories from Kampar in north of peninsular Malaysia confirmed that nearly all the winds paths originate from Sumatera and Kalimantan, Indonesia.

  10. Trace Elements, Heavy Metals and Vitamin Levels in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysegul Cebi, Yuksel Kaya, Hasan Gungor, Halit Demir, Ibrahim Hakki Yoruk, Nihat Soylemez, Yilmaz Gunes, Mustafa Tuncer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In the present study, we aimed to assess serum concentrations of zinc (Zn, copper (Cu, iron (Fe, cadmium (Cd, lead (Pb, manganese (Mn, vitamins A (retinol, D (cholecalciferol and E (α-tocopherol in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD and to compare with healthy controls.Methods: A total of 30 CAD patients and 20 healthy subjects were included in this study. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry (UNICAM-929 was used to measure heavy metal and trace element concentrations. Serum α-tocopherol, retinol and cholecalciferol were measured simultaneously by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC.Results: Demographic and baseline clinical characteristics were not statistically different between the groups. Serum concentrations of retinol (0.3521±0.1319 vs. 0.4313±0.0465 mmol/I, p=0.013, tocopherol (3.8630±1.3117 vs. 6.9124±1.0577 mmol/I, p<0.001, cholecalciferol (0.0209±0.0089 vs. 0.0304±0.0059 mmol/I, p<0.001 and Fe (0.5664±0.2360 vs. 1.0689±0,4452 µg/dI, p<0.001 were significantly lower in CAD patients. In addition, while not statistically significant serum Cu (1.0164±0.2672 vs. 1.1934±0.4164 µg/dI, p=0.073 concentrations were tended to be lower in patients with CAD, whereas serum lead (0.1449±0.0886 vs. 0.1019±0.0644 µg/dI, p=0.069 concentrations tended to be higher.Conclusions: Serum level of trace elements and vitamins may be changed in patients with CAD. In this relatively small study we found that serum levels of retinol, tocopherol, cholecalciferol, iron and copper may be lower whereas serum lead concentrations may be increased in patients with CAD.

  11. Trace metal suites in Antarctic pre-industrial ice are consistent with emissions from quiescent degassing of volcanoes worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akikazu; Hinkley, Todd K.

    2001-03-01

    Trace metals are more abundant in atmospheric load and deposition material than can be due to rock and soil dusts and ocean salt. In pre-industrial ice from coastal west Antarctica, dust and salt account for only a few percent of the lead, cadmium, and indium that is present in most samples, less than half in any sample. For these trace metals, the deposition rate to the pre-industrial ice is approximately matched by the output rate to the atmosphere by quiescent (non-explosive) degassing of volcanoes worldwide, according to a new estimate. The basis of the match is the masses and proportions of the metals, and the proportions of Pb isotopes, in ice and in volcano emissions. The isotopic compositions of Pb in ice are similar to those of a suite of ocean island volcanoes, mostly in the southern hemisphere. The natural baseline values for pre-industrial atmospheric deposition fluxes of trace metal suites at Taylor Dome, and the worldwide quiescent volcano emissions fluxes to which they are linked, constitute a reasonably well-constrained baseline component for deposition fluxes of metals in modern times.

  12. Trace metal analysis in sea grasses from Mexican Caribbean Coast by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growing urban and tourist activity in the Mexican Caribbean coasts has resulted in an increase of chemical substances, metals in particular, discharged to the coastal waters. In order to reach an adequate management and conservation of these marine ecosystems it is necessary to perform an inventory of the actual conditions that reflect the vulnerability and the level of damage. Sea-grasses are considered good biological indicators of heavy metal contamination in marine systems. The goal of this preliminary work is to evaluate the concentrations of trace metals such as Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, and Pb in Thalassia testudinum, a very common sea-grass in the Mexican Caribbean Sea. Samples were collected from several locations in the coasts of the Yucatan Peninsula: Holbox, Blanquizal and Punta Allen, areas virtually uninfluenced by anthropogenic activities. Trace elements in different part plants were determined by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). This is a very suitable technique since it offers a fast, accurate and multi-element analysis. Also, the analysis by PIXE can be performed directly on powdered leaves without a laborious sample preparation. The trace metal concentration determined in sea-grasses growing in Caribbean generally fall in the range of the lowest valuables reported for sea grasses from the Gulf of Mexico. The results indicate that the studied areas do not present contamination by heavy metals. (Author)

  13. Trace Metal Bioremediation: Assessment of Model Components from Laboratory and Field Studies to Identify Critical Variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project was to gain an insight into the modeling support needed for the understanding, design, and operation of trace metal/radionuclide bioremediation. To achieve this objective, a workshop was convened to discuss the elements such a model should contain. A ''protomodel'' was developed, based on the recommendations of the workshop, and was used to perform sensitivity analysis as well as some preliminary simulations in support for bioremediation test experiments at UMTRA sites. To simulate the numerous biogeochemical processes that will occur during the bioremediation of uranium contaminated aquifers, a time-dependent one-dimensional reactive transport model has been developed. The model consists of a set of coupled, steady state mass balance equations, accounting for advection, diffusion, dispersion, and a kinetic formulation of the transformations affecting an organic substrate, electron acceptors, corresponding reduced species, and uranium. This set of equations is solved numerically, using a finite element scheme. The redox conditions of the domain are characterized by estimating the pE, based on the concentrations of the dominant terminal electron acceptor and its corresponding reduced specie. This pE and the concentrations of relevant species are passed to a modified version of MINTEQA2, which calculates the speciation and solubilities of the species of interest. Kinetics of abiotic reactions are described as being proportional to the difference between the actual and equilibrium concentration. A global uncertainty assessment, determined by Random Sampling High Dimensional Model Representation (RS-HDMR), was performed to attain a phenomenological understanding of the origins of output variability and to suggest input parameter refinements as well as to provide guidance for field experiments to improve the quality of the model predictions. Results indicated that for the usually high nitrate contents found ate many DOE sites, overall

  14. Concentrations of trace elements in human tissues and relation of ratios of mutual metals to the human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the experimental results, the concentrations and concentrations in order, of trace elements in human tissues among Changsha's People in China are reported. The authors particularly present that the ratios of mutual metals (M/N) in normal physiological tissues and fluids are very important factors which indicate the metabolic situations of trace elements in the body and as the indices which evaluate the situation of human health. (M and N mean the concentrations of different trace elements in the tissues or fluids, respectively.) Up to now, it is still an interesting field to study the functions of trace elements for the human health. There are previously some reports about the concentrations of trace elements in normal physiological tissues/ or organs and fluids of human body. These provide very valuable data for biological medicine. In the study presented atomic absorption method was adopted in order to determine the concentrations of Zn, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Cd in human tissues (liver, spleen, kidney, bone, lung, pancreas, heart and artery and muscle) at autopsy. The authors suggest that trace elements, are contained in the body in an aproportional way, in normal physiological tissues and fluids, and the ratios may directly indicate metabolic situation of trace elements in the body which further reveal the mystery of trace elements for human health. Therefore, the ratios M/N as an indicator of health is more proper than that only using concentrations of trace elements. Schroeder (1973) reported that incidence of heart disease is related to the imbalance of ration Zn/Cd and Zn/Cu rather than the concentrations of Zn, Cd, Cu, and the intellectual development also depends on the proper proportion among copper, cadmium, lead, zinc in the body

  15. A pilot test of methods for determination of trace metals bound to colloids in surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Kersti (Geosigma AB (Sweden))

    2011-01-15

    Two methods have been tested for the determination of trace metals associated with colloid species in surface waters, using test water from Eckarfjaerden (PFM000070) in Forsmark; 1) fractionation (ultra filtration) using special membrane filters with cut-offs of 1 kD and 5 kD and 2) filtration using a system of standard membrane filters with varying pore sizes connected in series. Both methods were somewhat modified compared to previous methods for colloid determination in groundwater within the site investigations at Forsmark and Laxemar (PLU). The results show that, in general, the largest amounts of metals associated with a colloid phase were recovered in the fraction between 1kD and 5 kD which indicates that the metal ions are associated with low molecular weight organic acids. Similar amounts were recovered on the filters in the filtration experiment. A minor part of the colloidal phase metals was recovered in the fraction larger than 5 kD i.e. metal ions associated with larger organic acids or colloidal size clay minerals. The metals present preferably as colloids in the fractionation experiment were: iron, thorium, cerium, uranium, neodymium, titanium, zirconium and yttrium. The filtering experiment showed larger parts of titanium and aluminum in the colloid phase than the fractionation experiment while the iron and cerium portions were equal and the uranium, yttrium and neodymium portions were lower. The results from the fractionation test showed that the dissolved parts were large for barium, manganese, strontium and rubidium. In the filtration test, uranium, yttrium and rubidium, were also present mainly as dissolved ions. The detection limit for filter analysis of thorium was high, and the part of thorium present as colloids was determined to <50%. Issues and methodological problems: - Severe contamination caused interpretation difficulties for several metal ions, especially chromium, nickel and zinc. - Both methods are time consuming and difficult to

  16. Accumulation of trace metals and PAHs in the moss Tortula muralis Hedw. in the territory of Ferrara (northern Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of trace metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in tissue of Tortula muralis, with the objective of assessing whether a common acrocarpous species could be used for monitoring pollution levels in an urban area in northern Italy and its surroundings. Based on a multivariate treatment of the data by principal component analysis (PCA) we found that trace metals and PAHs had different patterns of concentration reflecting differences in emission sources and/or transport mechanisms. Most metals had peak concentrations some km downwind from an industrial area, thus reflecting mid-distance transport as particulate. Pb was mainly derived from car engines and peaked within the urban area as an effect of slow-moving traffic. All PAHs presumably underwent short-distance transport and were, therefore, mostly concentrated close to emission sources, the latter mainly consisting in diesel engine exhausts. (author)

  17. Trace metal incorporation in otoliths of a territorial coral reef fish (Abudefduf saxatilis as an environmental monitoring tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera-Reveles A. T.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Trace metal levels in the otolith external layer of newly Abudefduf saxatilis (Pomacentridae recruits, a common fish of the Caribbean coral reef, were examined as an indicator of recently occupied habitat from the most important coral reefs of the east of Venezuela (Mochima National Park and La Tortuga Island. These otoliths were analyzed trough an Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS fixed to scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The five trace metals analyzed (Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn were found at external layer of most evaluated otoliths at all localities, in which %weight of Pb/Ca and Hg/Ca showed the highest values. These results show the bioavailability of evaluated metals at Mochima National Park and La Tortuga Island, and their significant spatial variations on otoliths make evidence of different concentration of Cd, Hg and Pb in water and/or sediments of these locations.

  18. Hydrogen as an Indicator to Assess Biological Activity During Trace-Metal Bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Komlos, J.; Brown, D. G.; Lovley, D. R.

    2002-05-01

    The design and operation of a trace-metal or radionuclide bioremediation scheme requires that specific redox conditions be achieved at given zones of an aquifer for a predetermined duration. Tools are therefore needed to identify and quantify the terminal electron acceptor processes (TEAPs) that are being achieved during bioremediation in an aquifer, and that this is done at a high spatial resolution. Hydrogen holds the promise of being a key parameter that may be used to identify TEAPs. Theoretical analysis have shown that steady-state hydrogen levels in the subsurface are solely dependent upon the physiological parameters of the hydrogen-consuming microorganisms, and that hydrogen concentrations increase as each successive TEAP yields less energy for bacterial growth. The assumptions for this statement may not hold during a bioremediation scheme in which an organic substrate is injected into the subsurface and where organisms may consume hydrogen and carbon simultaneously. The objective of the research is to gain a basic understanding of the hydrogen dynamics in an aquifer during a trace metal/radionuclide bioremediation scheme. For this purpose, a series of batch studies have been conducted during the first year of this project. In these studies the utilization of acetate and hydrogen by geobacter sulfurreducens were studied. In all cases Fe(III) was the electron acceptor. Microcosms were set up to investigate the utilization of hydrogen and acetate when either of them is the sole electron donor and when both are present and utilized simultaneously as electron donor. These experiments were conducted for varying initial conditions of the hydrogen and acetate concentration, and the disappearance of these compounds plus the evolution of Fe(II) as well as biomass was monitored over time. The results of these studies indicate that the biokinetic coefficients describing the rate of hydrogen utilization are not affected by the simultaneous utilization of acetate. While

  19. Labile trace metal contribution of the runoff collector to a semi-urban river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, J D; Granger, D; Binet, G; Litrico, X; Huneau, F; Peyraube, N; Le Coustumer, P

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the distribution of labile trace metals (LTMs; Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in a semi-urban runoff collector was examined to assess its influence to a natural aqueous system (Jalle River, Bordeaux, France). This river is of high importance as it is part of a natural reserve dedicated to conserving aquatic flora and fauna. Two sampling campaigns with a differing precipitation condition (period 1, spring season; and period 2, summer season associated with storms) were considered. Precipitation and water flow were monitored. The collector is active as it is receptive to precipitation changes. It influences the river through discharging water, contributing LTMs, and channeling the mass fluxes. During period 2 where precipitation rate is higher, 25 % of the total water volume of the river was supplied by the collector. LTMs were detected at the collector. Measurements were done by using diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) probes deployed during 1, 7, and 14 days in each period. The results showed that in an instantaneous period (day 1 or D1), most of these trace metals are above the environmental quality standards (Cd, Co, Cr, and Zn). The coefficient of determination (r (2) > 0.50) employed confirmed that the LTM concentrations in the downstream can be explained by the collector. While Co and Cr are from the upstream and the collector, Cd, Cu, and Zn are mostly provided by the collector. Ni, however, is mostly delivered by the upstream. Using the concentrations observed, the river can be affected by the collector in varying ways: (1) adding effect, resulting from the mix of the upstream and the collector (if upstream ˂ downstream); (2) diluted (if upstream ˃ downstream); and (3) conservative or unaffected (upstream ~ downstream). The range of LTM mass fluxes that the collector holds are as follows: (1) limited range or ˂10 g/day, Cd (0.04-1.75 g/day), Co (0.08-05.42 g/day), Ni (0.06-1.45 g/day), and Pb (0.08-9.89 g/day); (2) moderate

  20. The Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary Fiskeler at Stevns Klint, Denmark: the geochemistry of the major trace metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SALVADOR LOMONACO

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Trace metals in the four discrete layers of the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary (Fiskeler at Stevns Klint (Denmark are relatively well studied, yet much remains to be learned about them. Therefore, an integrated study of the trace (meteoritic Ir, partly meteoritic Cr/Ni/Co/Au and terrestrial Zn/Cu/La/Ce/Nd/Sm/Eu/Tb/Yb/Ta/Th metals in the basal black marl of Fiskeler and in its (carbonate, HCl-soluble, smectite, HCl-insoluble, silicate and kerogen fractions was undertaken. The mineralogy of the marl is comparatively simple, authigenic calcite (mainly derived from planktonic marine algae: coccoliths, detrital Mg-smectite and quartz being the principal components, with lesser amounts of kerogen, Fe3+-oxides, pyrite, ilite and feldspar. Selective leaching procedures were used to establish geochemical associations and specific mineralogical locations of the trace metals. The results identified the main locations of the major trace metals (Cr/Ni/Co/Zn/Cu/Ir/Au. They occur mainly in the smectite and, to a lesser extent, in the biogenic calcite (Ni/Co/Zn and kerogen (Ir/Au. The trace metal data are in accordance with the hypothesis that substantial proportions of Cr/Ni/Co/Zn/Cu/Ir/Au were probably contained in the detrital smectite arriving at the site of the deposition. In a general discussion of the results, a geochemical model describing the incorporation of trace metals in the smectite is presented, based on the weathering/trasport of the clay by (impact-induced acid surface waters and the adsorption of trace metal ions by the smectite particles/colloids in the acidic solution of nearby oxic soil. The distribution/enrichment patterns of Cr/Ni/Co/Zn of the basal black marl and higher Fiskeler layers indicate, on the other hand, that notable proportions of these metals were incorporated into the smectite structure during the formation of the clay. The trace metal data are also considered in light of previously published paleoecological and geochemical

  1. Tracing the cosmic metal evolution in the low-redshift intergalactic medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Shull, J. [Also at Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 OHA, UK. (United Kingdom); Danforth, Charles W.; Tilton, Evan M., E-mail: michael.shull@colorado.edu, E-mail: danforth@colorado.edu, E-mail: evan.tilton@colorado.edu [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    Using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope, we measured the abundances of six ions (C III, C IV, Si III, Si IV, N V, and O VI) in the low-redshift (z ≤ 0.4) intergalactic medium (IGM). Both C IV and Si IV have increased in abundance by a factor of ∼10 from z ≈ 5.5 to the present. We derive ion mass densities, ρ{sub ion} ≡ Ω{sub ion}ρ{sub cr}, with Ω{sub ion} expressed relative to the closure density. Our models of mass-abundance ratios, (Si III/Si IV) =0.67{sub −0.19}{sup +0.35}, (C III/C IV) =0.70{sub −0.20}{sup +0.43}, and (Ω{sub C} {sub III}+Ω{sub C} {sub IV})/(Ω{sub Si} {sub III}+Ω{sub Si} {sub IV})=4.9{sub −1.1}{sup +2.2}, are consistent with the photoionization parameter log U = –1.5 ± 0.4, hydrogen photoionization rate Γ{sub H} = (8 ± 2) × 10{sup –14} s{sup –1} at z < 0.4, and specific intensity I {sub 0} = (3 ± 1) × 10{sup –23} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} Hz{sup –1} sr{sup –1} at the Lyman limit. Consistent ionization corrections for C and Si are scaled to an ionizing photon flux Φ{sub 0} = 10{sup 4} cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}, baryon overdensity Δ {sub b} ≈ 200 ± 50, and ''alpha-enhancement'' (Si/C enhanced to three times its solar ratio). We compare these metal abundances to the expected IGM enrichment and abundances in higher photoionized states of carbon (C V) and silicon (Si V, Si VI, and Si VII). Our ionization modeling infers IGM metal densities of (5.4 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉} Mpc{sup –3} in the photoionized Lyα forest traced by the C and Si ions and (9.1 ± 0.6) × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉} Mpc{sup –3} in hotter gas traced by O VI. Combining both phases, the heavy elements in the IGM have mass density ρ {sub Z} = (1.5 ± 0.8) × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} Mpc{sup –3} or Ω {sub Z} ≈ 10{sup –5}. This represents 10% ± 5% of the metals produced by (6 ± 2) × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉} Mpc{sup –3} of integrated star formation with yield y{sub m} = 0

  2. Past 140-year environmental record in the northern South China Sea: Evidence from coral skeletal trace metal variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 140-year changes in the trace metals in Porites coral samples from two locations in the northern South China Sea were investigated. Results of PCA analyses suggest that near the coast, terrestrial input impacted behavior of trace metals by 28.4%, impact of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) was 19.0%, contribution of war and infrastructure were 14.4% and 15.6% respectively. But for a location in the open sea, contribution of War and SST reached 33.2% and 16.5%, while activities of infrastructure and guano exploration reached 13.2% and 14.7%. While the spatiotemporal change model of Cu, Cd and Pb in seawater of the north area of South China Sea during 1986–1997 were reconstructed. It was found that in the sea area Cu and Cd contaminations were distributed near the coast while areas around Sanya, Hainan had high Pb levels because of the well-developed tourism related activities. -- Highlights: • Geochemical behaviors of trace elements in corals from South China Sea were investigated. • Terrestrial input, SST, war and infrastructure explain about 77.4% of elements behaviors in coral. • Changes of trace elements in coral of Xisha Islands were mainly impacted by local activities. • Spatial change of elements in seawater by was evaluated in 1986–1997 using distribution coefficient KD of coral. -- 140-year changes in the trace metals in corals from South China Sea were investigated. The spatiotemporal change model of the metals in seawater was reconstructed using coral record

  3. Feeding ecology of five commercial shark species of the Celtic Sea through stable isotope and trace metal analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Domi, Nadège; Bouquegneau, Jean-Marie; Das, Krishna

    2005-01-01

    In order to trace their feeding habits, stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (d15N and d13C), as well as trace metal concentrations (Zn, Cd, Fe, Cu, Se and Hg) were analysed in the tissues of five commercial shark species from the Celtic Sea: the tope shark Galeorhinus galeus, the black-mouthed catshark Galeus melastomus, the starry smooth hound Mustelus asterias, the spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias and the lesser-spotted dogfish Scyliorhinus canicula. Our results were compared to previo...

  4. Trace metals in fugitive dust from unsurfaced roads in the Viburnum Trend resource mining District of Missouri--implementation of a direct-suspension sampling methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Emitt C; Wronkiewicz, David J; Pavlowsky, Robert T; Shi, Honglan

    2013-09-01

    Fugitive dust from 18 unsurfaced roadways in Missouri were sampled using a novel cyclonic fugitive dust collector that was designed to obtain suspended bulk samples for analysis. The samples were analyzed for trace metals, Fe and Al, particle sizes, and mineralogy to characterize the similarities and differences between roadways. Thirteen roads were located in the Viburnum Trend (VT) mining district, where there has been a history of contaminant metal loading of local soils; while the remaining five roads were located southwest of the VT district in a similar rural setting, but without any mining or industrial process that might contribute to trace metal enrichment. Comparison of these two groups shows that trace metal concentration is higher for dusts collected in the VT district. Lead is the dominant trace metal found in VT district dusts representing on average 79% of the total trace metal concentration, and was found moderately to strongly enriched relative to unsurfaced roads in the non-VT area. Fugitive road dust concentrations calculated for the VT area substantially exceed the 2008 Federal ambient air standard of 0.15μgm(-3) for Pb. The pattern of trace metal contamination in fugitive dust from VT district roads is similar to trace metal concentrations patterns observed for soils measured more than 40years ago indicating that Pb contamination in the region is persistent as a long-term soil contaminant. PMID:23659966

  5. Miniaturized and direct spectrophotometric multi-sample analysis of trace metals in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albendín, Gemma; López-López, José A; Pinto, Juan J

    2016-03-15

    Trends in the analysis of trace metals in natural waters are mainly based on the development of sample treatment methods to isolate and pre-concentrate the metal from the matrix in a simpler extract for further instrumental analysis. However, direct analysis is often possible using more accessible techniques such as spectrophotometry. In this case a proper ligand is required to form a complex that absorbs radiation in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrum. In this sense, the hydrazone derivative, di-2-pyridylketone benzoylhydrazone (dPKBH), forms complexes with copper (Cu) and vanadium (V) that absorb light at 370 and 395 nm, respectively. Although spectrophotometric methods are considered as time- and reagent-consuming, this work focused on its miniaturization by reducing the volume of sample as well as time and cost of analysis. In both methods, a micro-amount of sample is placed into a microplate reader with a capacity for 96 samples, which can be analyzed in times ranging from 5 to 10 min. The proposed methods have been optimized using a Box-Behnken design of experiments. For Cu determination, concentration of phosphate buffer solution at pH 8.33, masking agents (ammonium fluoride and sodium citrate), and dPKBH were optimized. For V analysis, sample (pH 4.5) was obtained using acetic acid/sodium acetate buffer, and masking agents were ammonium fluoride and 1,2-cyclohexanediaminetetraacetic acid. Under optimal conditions, both methods were applied to the analysis of certified reference materials TMDA-62 (lake water), LGC-6016 (estuarine water), and LGC-6019 (river water). In all cases, results proved the accuracy of the method. PMID:26723494

  6. Trace metal distribution in pristine permafrost-affected soils of the Lena River Delta and its Hinterland, Northern Siberia, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Antcibor

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Soils are an important compartment of ecosystems and have the ability to immobilize chemicals preventing their movement to other environment compartments. Predicted climatic changes together with other anthropogenic influences on Arctic terrestrial environments may affect biogeochemical processes enhancing leaching and migration of trace elements in permafrost-affected soils. This is especially important since the Arctic ecosystems are considered to be very sensitive to climatic changes as well as to chemical contamination. This study characterizes background levels of trace metals in permafrost-affected soils of the Lena River Delta and its hinterland in northern Siberia (73.5° N–69.5° N representing a remote region far from evident anthropogenic trace metal sources. Investigations on total element contents of iron (Fe, arsenic (As, manganese (Mn, zinc (Zn, nickel (Ni, copper (Cu, lead (Pb, cadmium (Cd, cobalt (Co and mercury (Hg in different soil types developed in different geological parent materials have been carried out. The highest concentrations of the majority of the measured elements were observed in soils belonging to ice-rich permafrost sediments formed during the Pleistocene (ice-complex in the Lena River Delta region. Correlation analyses of trace metal concentrations and soil chemical and physical properties at a Holocene estuarine terrace and two modern floodplain levels in the southern-central Lena River Delta (Samoylov Island showed that the main factors controlling the trace metal distribution in these soils are organic matter content, soil texture and contents of iron and manganese-oxides. Principal Component Analysis (PCA revealed that soil oxides play a significant role in trace metal distribution in both top and bottom horizons. Occurrence of organic matter contributes to Cd binding in top soils and Cu binding in bottom horizons. Observed ranges of the background concentrations of the majority of trace elements were

  7. Short-term acute hypercapnia affects cellular responses to trace metals in the hard clams Mercenaria mercenaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanina, Anna V. [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States); Beniash, Elia [Department of Oral Biology, University of Pittsburgh, 589 Salk Hall, 3501 Terrace Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Etzkorn, Markus; Meyers, Tiffany B. [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States); Ringwood, Amy H. [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States); Sokolova, Inna M., E-mail: isokolov@uncc.edu [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •P{sub CO{sub 2}} alters accumulation of Cd and Cu in clam cells. •Accumulation of Cd induces release of free Zn{sup 2+}. •Accumulation of Cu induces an increase in free Cu{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+}. •Metal-induced oxidative stress is alleviated at high P{sub CO{sub 2}}. •Toxicity of Cu in likely enhanced while that of Cd alleviated by high P{sub CO{sub 2}}. -- Abstract: Estuarine and coastal habitats experience large fluctuations of environmental factors such as temperature, salinity, partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (P{sub CO{sub 2}}) and pH; they also serve as the natural sinks for trace metals. Benthic filter-feeding organisms such as bivalves are exposed to the elevated concentrations of metals in estuarine water and sediments that can strongly affect their physiology. The effects of metals on estuarine organisms may be exacerbated by other environmental factors. Thus, a decrease in pH caused by high P{sub CO{sub 2}} (hypercapnia) can modulate the effects of trace metals by affecting metal bioavailability, accumulation or binding. To better understand the cellular mechanisms of interactions between P{sub CO{sub 2}} and trace metals in marine bivalves, we exposed isolated mantle cells of the hard clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) to different levels of P{sub CO{sub 2}} (0.05, 1.52 and 3.01 kPa) and two major trace metal pollutants – cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu). Elevated P{sub CO{sub 2}} resulted in a decrease in intracellular pH (pH{sub i}) of the isolated mantle cells from 7.8 to 7.4. Elevated P{sub CO{sub 2}} significantly but differently affected the trace metal accumulation by the cells. Cd uptake was suppressed at elevated P{sub CO{sub 2}} levels while Cu accumulation has greatly accelerated under hypercapnic conditions. Interestingly, at higher extracellular Cd levels, labile intracellular Cd{sup 2+} concentration remained the same, while intracellular levels of free Zn{sup 2+} increased suggesting that Cd{sup 2+} substitutes bound Zn{sup 2

  8. An evaluation of trace metals, vitamins, and taste function in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, R C; Kirschner, B; Sandstead, H H; Jacob, R A; Davis, J M

    1980-08-01

    Trace metals, vitamins, and other biochemical parameters were measured in 30 female patients hospitalized for anorexia nervosa with the aim of relating them to taste function, biochemical changes, and clinical signs found in this illness. Plasma zinc (71.9 +/- 14 microgram/100 ml; P zinc (129.5 +/- 121 microgram/24 hr), and copper (84 +/- 17 microgram/100 ml; P zinc and copper content of hair was normal. Anorexia nervosa patients showed hypogeusia, with the bitter and sour taste most severely affected, however plasma zinc levels did not correlate with taste recognition scores. Patients showed hypercarotenemia (214 +/- 129 microgram/100 ml; P zinc, copper, and total iron binding capacity levels increased whereas plasma carotene and cholesterol decreased to normal levels. It is concluded that the observed zinc, copper, and iron binding protein deficiencies, and hypogeusia, reflect the self-imposed nutritional restriction of anorexia nervosa patients. Zinc and other micronutrients released from catabolized tissue along with vitamin intake may mitigate against more severe deficiency states in anorexia nervosa. PMID:7405882

  9. Spectrographic determination of trace amounts of some elements in metallic aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spectrographic method for the determination of twenty trace elements in aluminium metal by the carrier distillation technique has been developed. The following elements were considered: B, Cd, Bi, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Cr, Pb, Si, Zn, Ti, Ca, Na, Ga, Ni, Sb, V, Sn and Ag. AgCl, In2O3, NaF, Ga2O3, GeO2 and CuF2 were tested as carriers. The best results were obtained by using 2% In2O3 and 6% AgCl on an alumina base. Several aluminum oxide samples with the same chemical composition of aluminum sulfate and nitrate, according to a temperature program, were submitted to spectrochemical analysis. The standards were prepared by means of two differet methods: dry mixing technique and thermal decomposition of aluminum nitrate at 8000C. Some considerations on matrix effects and on the extent to which it affects the accuracy of the method, are presented. The standard deviation of the method varies from + - 5% to + - 27%. The accuracy was examined with the aid of X-ray fluorescence technique. (C.L.B.)

  10. A novel recovery technology of trace precious metals from waste water by combining agglomeration and adsorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A novel and efficient technology for separating and recovering precious metals from waste water containing traces of Pd and Ag was studied by the combination of agglomeration and adsorption. The recovery process and the impacts of operating conditions such as pH value of waste water, adsorption time, additive quantity of the flocculant and adsorbent on the recovery efficiency were studied experimentally. The results show that Freundlich isothermal equation is suitable for describing the behavior of the recovery process, and the apparent first-order adsorption rate constant k at 25 ℃ is about 0.233 4 h-1 The optimum technology conditions during the recovery process are that pH value is 8-9; the volume ratio of flocculant to waste water is about 1 :(2 000-4 000); the mass ratio of adsorbent to waste water is 1 :(30-40); and processing time is 2-4 h. Finally, the field tests were done at the optimum technology conditions, which show that the total concentration of Pd and Ag in the waste water below 11 mg/L can be reduced to be less than 1 mg/L.

  11. Size-resolved trace metal characterization of aerosols emitted by four important source types in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerki, Peter R.; Gaelli, Brigitte C.; Nyffeler, Urs P.

    In central Switzerland five types of emission sources are mainly responsible for airborne trace metals: traffic, industrial plants burning heavy oil, resuspension of soil particles, residential heatings and refuse incineration plants. The particulate emissions of each of these source types except refuse incineration were sampled using Berner impactors and the mass and elemental size distributions of Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, Zn, As and Na determined. Cd, Na and Zn are not characteristic for any of these source types. As and Cu, occurring in the fine particle fractions are characteristic for heavy oil combustion, Mn for soil dust and sometimes for heavy and fuel oil combustion and Pb for traffic aerosols. The mass size distributions of aerosols originating from erosion and abrasion processes show a maximum mass fraction in the coarse particle range larger than about 1 μm aerodynamic equivalent diameters (A.E.D.). Aerosols originating from combustion processes show a second maximum mass fraction in the fine particle range below about 0.5μm A.E.D. Scanning electron microscopy combined with an EDS analyzer was used for the morphological characterization of emission and ambient aerosols.

  12. Santos estuarine sediments, Brazil - metal and trace element assessment by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Santos estuary system is an intricate pattern of tidal channels and small rivers originating from the adjacent Pre-Cambrian slopes. These two major estuaries share a common area in the upper portion of the region which interacts with each other. The largest harbor in Latin America is located at the eastern outlet of the Santos estuary. This intricate and sensitive ecosystem is highly susceptible to human impact from industrial activities, urban sewage and polluted solid wastes disposal. Due to its high vulnerability CETESB (Environmental Control Agency of the Sao Paulo State) sporadically monitors the contamination levels of water, sediment and marine organisms in this region. The present study reports results concerning the distribution of some major, trace and rare earth elements in the Santos estuarine marine sediments. Thirty two bottom sediment samples (SS0601 to SS0616 (summer) and SW0601 to SW0616 (winter) were collected in this estuary, including regions of Sao Vicente, Santos, Cubatao and Vicente de Carvalho, by a vanVeen sampler in the summer and winter of 2006. Multielemental analysis was carried out by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The concentration values obtained for As and metals Cr and Zn in the sediment samples were compared to Canadian Council of Minister of the Environment (CCME) oriented values (TEL and PEL values) and are adopted by CETESB. (author)

  13. Trace metal concentrations in lake and overbank sediments in southern Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognerud, S. [Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Ottestad (Norway); Hongve, D. [Statens Inst. for Folkehelse, Oslo (Norway); Fjeld, E. [Norsk Inst. for Vannforskning, Oslo (Norway); Ottesen, R.T. [Norges Geologiske Undersoekelse, Trondheim (Norway)

    2000-05-01

    As, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, V, Se and Zn concentrations were determined and compared in lake and overbank sediments from 33 catchments without local pollution sources in southern Norway. There were no significant differences in concentrations of Be, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, and V in overbank and pre-industrial lake sediments. In areas with shallow overburden, and significant influence from long-range atmospheric pollution, concentrations of As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Se, and Zn in overbank sediments were probably modified by vertical percolating water. In such areas, we suggest using lake sediments as a better sampling medium for mapping pre-industrial concentrations. Pre-industrial lake sediments yield natural concentrations of Hg and Se, which consist of both geogenic and natural atmospheric deposition. Important covariables like organic carbon content, Fe oxides, and fine mineral fraction were generally higher in pre-industrial lake sediments as compared to overbank sediments. By adjusting for such differences overbank sediments could be used as an alternative in mapping background concentrations of trace metals in regions with few lakes. (orig.)

  14. Emission rates of sulfur dioxide, trace gases and metals from Mount Erebus, Antartica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyle, P.R.; Meeker, K. (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro (USA)); Finnegan, D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-11-01

    SO{sub 2} emission rates have been measured annually since 1983 at Mount Erebus, Antarctica by correlation spectrometer (COSPEC V). Following a 4 month period of sustained strombolian activity in late 1984, SO{sub 2} emissions declined from 230 Mg/day in 1983 to 25 Mg/day and then slowly increased from 16 Mg/day in 1985 to 51 Mg/day in 1987. Nine sets of filter packs containing partcle and {sup 7}LiOH treated filters were collected in the plume in 1986 and analyzed by neutron activation. Using the COSPEC data and measured element/S ratios on the filters, emission rates have been determined for trace gases and metals. The authors infer HCl and HF emissions in 1983 to be about 1200 and 500 Mg/day, respectively. Mt Erebus has therefore been an important source of halogens to the Anarctic atmosphere and could be responsible for excess Cl found in Central Antarctica snow.

  15. Detection of Trace Copper Metal at Carbon Nanotube Based Electrodes Using Squarewave Anodic Stripping Voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate sensitivity and limit of detection (LOD) of trace copper (Cu) metal using pristine carbon nanotube (CNT) and acidified CNT (ACNT) electrodes. Squarewave based anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) is used to determine the stripped Cu concentration. Prior to performing the SWASV measurements, its optimal conditions are determined and with that, effects of potential scan rate and Cu2+ concentration on stripping current are evaluated. The measurements indicate that (1) ACNT electrode shows better results than CNT electrode and (2) stripping is controlled by surface reaction. In the given Cu2+ concentration range of 25-150 ppb, peak stripping current has linearity with Cu2+ concentration. Quantitatively, sensitivity and LOD of Cu in ACNT electrode are 9.36 μA μM-1 and 3 ppb, while their values are 3.99 μA μM-1 and 3 ppb with CNT electrode. We evaluate the effect of three different water solutions (deionized water, tap water and river water) on stripping current and the confirm types of water don't affect the sensitivity of Cu. It turns out by optical inspection and cyclic voltammetry that superiority of ACNT electrode to CNT electrode is attributed to exfoliation of CNT bundles and improved interfacial adhesion occurring during oxidation of CNTs

  16. Determination of trace elements and heavy metals in sediment using x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, 30 sediment samples were taken randomly from the area of Suba south of Khartoum state. Trace elements and heavy metal were determined in sediments samples using x-ray fluoresce spectroscopy (X RF). K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Rb, Sr, and Zr were determined by X RF. Standard Reference Material (SRM) from international Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA-Soil-7) has been used to achieve accuracy of X RF method. Measured values were found in agreements with certified values. The average elemental concentrations of K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Rb, Sr, and Zr were 5882.7, 20703.3, 6264.3, 460.97, 26713.3, 7.7, 43.4, 18.6, 28.6, 144.8, and 173.06, respectively. Correlation between elements was performed also cluster analysis was used to check the similarly between the samples result. The result of study were compared with previous studies and the concentrations of some elements found to be similar.(Author)

  17. Effects of Climate-Induced Hydrologic Modifications on Biogeochemical Cycling of Trace Metals in Alluvial and Coastal Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.; Natter, M. G.; Keevan, J. P.; Guerra, K.; Saunders, J.; Uddin, A.; Humayun, M.; Wang, Y.; Keimowitz, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Assessing the impacts of climate changes on water quality requires an understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of trace metals. Evidence from research on alluvial aquifers and coastal watersheds shows direct impacts of climate change on the fate and transformation of trace metals in natural environments. This study employs field data and numerical modeling techniques to test assumptions about the effects of climate change on natural arsenic contamination of groundwater in alluvial aquifers and mercury bioaccumulation in coastal saltmarshes. The results show that the rises of sea level and river base during the warm Holocene period has led to an overall increase in groundwater arsenic concentration due to the development of reducing geochemical conditions and sluggish groundwater movement. Modeling results indicate that the intrusion of seawater occurring during high sea-level stand may lead to desorption of arsenic from the surfaces of hydrous oxides due to pH effects and ionic competition for mineral sorbing sites. Our results also show that contamination and bioaccumulation of Hg and other metals in estuarine and coastal ecosystems may be influenced by climate-induced hydrologic modifications (atmospheric deposition, riverine input, salinity level, etc.). An integrated research framework consisting of numerical modeling, long-term monitoring, laboratory experiments will be necessary for building a comprehensive understanding of the complex response of biogeochemical cycling of trace metals to climate change.

  18. Accumulation of Trace Metals in Anadara granosa and Anadara inaequivalvis from Pattani Bay and the Setiu Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradit, Siriporn; Shazili, Noor Azhar Mohamed; Towatana, Prawit; Saengmanee, Wuttipong

    2016-04-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the levels of trace metals (As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) in two common species of cockles (Anadara granosa and Anadara inaequivalvis) from two coastal areas in Thailand (Pattani Bay) and Malaysia (the Setiu Wetlands). A total of 350 cockles were collected in February and September 2014. Trace metals were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. We observed that cockles in both areas had a higher accumulation of metals in September. Notably, the biota-sediment accumulation (BSAF) of Cd was highest in both areas. A strong positive correlation of Cd with the length of the cockles at Pattani Bay (r(2) = 0.597) and the Setiu Wetlands (r(2) = 0.675) was noted. It was suggested that As could be a limiting element (BSAF Malaysia Food Regulations, mean values of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn were within acceptable limits, but the maximum values of Cd and Pb exceeded the limits for both areas. Regular monitoring of trace metals in cockles from both areas is suggested for more definitive contamination determination. PMID:26725081

  19. The effect of emergent macrophytes on the dynamics of sulfur species and trace metals in wetland sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on the effect of plants on the biogeochemistry of sulfur species and the mobility of heavy metals in wetland sediments. Results showed that, in the presence of plants, sediments had elevated sulfate concentrations in the rhizosphere during the growing season, ranging from 0.2 to 6.20 mmol L-1, whereas only a small difference in the sulfate profiles between vegetated and non-vegetated sediments was observed during senescence. Based on the sulfate concentration increase, the oxygen release rate from the roots to achieve the corresponding oxidation of sulfide was estimated as 0.85 g m-2 day-1. Evapotranspiration-induced advection is a major contributor to the transport of sulfate from the water column into the sediments, and also allows dissolved trace metals (i.e. Cd, Pb, and Zn) to be transported into the sediments and react with the acid volatile sulfide pool, resulting in the immobilization of trace metals in these sediments. -- Plants affected the biogeochemistry of sulfur species and the mobility of trace metals in wetland sediments

  20. Simple in situ preconcentration of trace metals in environmental waters using Sep-Pak C18 loaded with oxine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple in situ preconcentration method for the determination of trace metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) in environmental waters using Sep-Pak C18 loaded with oxine (Oxine-SP) has been developed based on a solid phase extraction and applied to brackish lake waters to clarify the distribution and behavior of the trace metals in the brackish lake. The trace metals were simultaneously and quantitatively adsorbed onto an Oxine-SP above pH 6. The adsorbed metals were completely desorbed from the Oxine-SP with a mixture of methanol and dilute nitric acid. Tartaric acid was effective as a masking agent to prevent the precipitation of metal hydroxides in sample solutions. The preconcentration procedure is as follows: An Oxine-SP was prepared by passing oxine (8-hydroxyquinoline)-methanol solution through a Sep-Pak C18 cartridge. A 50 ml of sample solution was taken into a 50-ml syringe, and then adjusted to about pH 7 with phosphate buffer solution after adding tartaric acid solution. The resulting solution was passed through the Oxine-SP, and then the retained metals were eluted with a 70% methanol in 0.5M nitric acid solution and determined with an atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The proposed method is applicable to natural waters having salinity of 0-35. This method was applied to the brackish waters taken from brackish Lake Nalkaumi, Japan. In summer season, the metals in the lake were significantly controlled by the hydrogen sulfide generated from the lake bottom by bacterial activity. The preconcentration method established as in situ one is easy and convenient to perform at sampling site immediately after sample collection in field works. (author)

  1. [Response Mechanism of Trace Metals in the Bishuiyan Subterranean River to the Rainfall and Their Source Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yan-e; Jiang, Ping-ping; Zhang, Qiang; Tang, Qing-jia; Kang, Zhi-qiang; Gong, Xiao- ping; Chen, Chang-jie; Yu, Jian-guo

    2015-12-01

    High-frequency sampling was conducted at the outlet of Guangxi Bishuiyan karst subterranean river using an automatic sampler during the rainfall events. The hydrochemical drymanic variation characteristics of trace metals (Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd) at the outlet of Guangxi Bishuiyan karst subterranean river were analyzed, and the sources of the trace metals in the subterranean river as well as their response to rainfall were explored. The results showed that the rainfall provoked a sharp decrease in the major elements (Ca²⁺, Mg²⁺, HCO₃⁻, etc.) due to dilution and precipitation, while it also caused an increase in the concentrations of dissolved metals including Al, Mn, Cu, Zn and Cd, due to water-rock reaction, sediment remobilization, and soil erosion. The water-rock reaction was more sensitive to rainfall than the others, while the sediment remobilization and soil erosion took the main responsibility for the chemical change of the heavy metals. The curves of the heavy metal concentrations presented multiple peaks, of which the maximum was reached at 9 hours later after the largest precipitation. Different metal sources and the double-inlet structure of the subterranean river were supposed to be the reasons for the formation of multiple peaks. During the monitoring period, the average speed of the solute in the river reached about 0.47 km · h⁻¹, indicating fast migration of the pollutants. Therefore, monitoring the chemical dynamics of the karst subterranean river, mastering the sources and migration characteristics of trace metal components have great significance for the subterranean river environment pollution treatment. PMID:27011981

  2. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulphidic marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, DR. Jennifer [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Yu, DR. Hang [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Steele, Joshua [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Dawson, Katherine [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Sun, S [University of California, San Diego; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Orphan, V [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

    2013-01-01

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyse important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulphiderich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization because of decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulphide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulphidic (> 1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5 270 nM), cobalt (0.5 6 nM), molybdenum (10 5600 nM) and tungsten (0.3 8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalysing anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulphate-reducing bacteria. Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrophilic microorganisms. Overall, our data suggest that AOM consortia use specialized biochemical strategies to overcome the challenges of metal availability in sulphidic environments.

  3. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulfidic marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, DR. Jennifer [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Yu, DR. Hang [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Steele, Joshua [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Dawson, Katherine [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Sun, S [University of California, San Diego; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Orphan, V [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

    2014-01-01

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyze important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulfide-rich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization due to decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulfide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulfidic (>1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5-270 nM), cobalt (0.5-6 nM), molybdenum (10-5,600 nM) and tungsten (0.3-8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalyzing anaerobic oxidation of methane utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrotolerant microorganisms. Finally, our data suggest that chemical speciation of metals in highly sulfidic porewaters may exert a stronger influence on microbial bioavailability than total concentration

  4. High-resolution reconstruction of atmospheric deposition of trace metals and metalloids since AD 1400 recorded by ombrotrophic peat cores in Hautes-Fagnes, Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of our study was to determine the trace metal accumulation rates in the Misten bog, Hautes-Fagnes, Belgium, and assess these in relation to established histories of atmospheric emissions from anthropogenic sources. To address these aims we analyzed trace metals and metalloids (Pb, Cu, Ni, As, Sb, Cr, Co, V, Cd and Zn), as well as Pb isotopes, using XRF, Q-ICP-MS and MC-ICP-MS, respectively in two 40-cm peat sections, spanning the last 600 yr. The temporal increase of metal fluxes from the inception of the Industrial Revolution to the present varies by a factor of 5–50, with peak values found between AD 1930 and 1990. A cluster analysis combined with Pb isotopic composition allows the identification of the main sources of Pb and by inference of the other metals, which indicates that coal consumption and metallurgical activities were the predominant sources of pollution during the last 600 years. -- Highlights: •Study of trace metals and metalloids in two cores from Belgian peat bog. •Reconstruction of trace metals and metalloids deposition over last 600 years. •Maximum trace metals accumulation rates are recorded between 1930 and 1990 AD. •A cluster analysis combined with Pb isotopic composition used to identify the main sources of Pb and by inference the other metals. •The predominant anthropogenic trace metals sources were consumption and metallurgical activities. -- In this study we used trace metals concentrations and fluxes from two cores sampled in a Belgium bog to document with high resolution the history of trace metals deposition over the last 600 years

  5. Trace metal in surface water and groundwater and its transfer in a Yellow River alluvial fan: Evidence from isotopes and hydrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing; Li, Fadong, E-mail: lifadong@igsnrr.ac.cn; Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Yan

    2014-02-01

    Metals are ubiquitous in the environment. The aim of sustainable management of the agro-ecosystem includes ensuring that water continues to fulfill its function in agricultural production, cycling of elements, and as a habitat of numerous organisms. There is no doubt that the influence of large-scale irrigation projects has impacted the regional surface–groundwater interactions in the North China Plain (NCP). Given these concerns, the aim of this study is to evaluate the pollution, identify the sources of trace metals, analyze the influence of surface–groundwater interactions on trace metal distribution, and to propose urgent management strategies for trace metals in the agriculture area in China. Trace metals, hydrochemical indicators (EC, pH, concentrations of Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Cl{sup −}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, and HCO{sub 3}{sup −}) and stable isotopic composition (δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H) were determined for surface water (SW) and groundwater (GW) samples. Trace metals were detected in all samples. Concentrations of Fe, Se, B, Mn, and Zn in SW exceeded drinking water standards by 14.8%, 29.6%, 25.9%, 11.1%, and 14.8% higher, respectively, and by 3.8%, 23.1%, 11.5%, 11.5%, and 7.7% in GW. The pollution of trace metals in surface water was more serious than that in groundwater, and was also higher than in common irrigation areas in NCP. Trace metals were found to have a combined origin of geogenic and agriculture and industrial activities. Their distribution varied greatly and exhibited a certain relationship with the water flow direction, with the exception of a number of singular sites. Hydrochemical and environmental isotopic evidence indicates surface–groundwater interactions influence the spatial distribution of trace metal in the study area. Facing the ongoing serious pollution, management practices for source control, improved control technologies, and the construction of a monitoring net to warn of increased risk are

  6. Trace metal in surface water and groundwater and its transfer in a Yellow River alluvial fan: Evidence from isotopes and hydrochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metals are ubiquitous in the environment. The aim of sustainable management of the agro-ecosystem includes ensuring that water continues to fulfill its function in agricultural production, cycling of elements, and as a habitat of numerous organisms. There is no doubt that the influence of large-scale irrigation projects has impacted the regional surface–groundwater interactions in the North China Plain (NCP). Given these concerns, the aim of this study is to evaluate the pollution, identify the sources of trace metals, analyze the influence of surface–groundwater interactions on trace metal distribution, and to propose urgent management strategies for trace metals in the agriculture area in China. Trace metals, hydrochemical indicators (EC, pH, concentrations of Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl−, SO42−, and HCO3−) and stable isotopic composition (δ18O and δ2H) were determined for surface water (SW) and groundwater (GW) samples. Trace metals were detected in all samples. Concentrations of Fe, Se, B, Mn, and Zn in SW exceeded drinking water standards by 14.8%, 29.6%, 25.9%, 11.1%, and 14.8% higher, respectively, and by 3.8%, 23.1%, 11.5%, 11.5%, and 7.7% in GW. The pollution of trace metals in surface water was more serious than that in groundwater, and was also higher than in common irrigation areas in NCP. Trace metals were found to have a combined origin of geogenic and agriculture and industrial activities. Their distribution varied greatly and exhibited a certain relationship with the water flow direction, with the exception of a number of singular sites. Hydrochemical and environmental isotopic evidence indicates surface–groundwater interactions influence the spatial distribution of trace metal in the study area. Facing the ongoing serious pollution, management practices for source control, improved control technologies, and the construction of a monitoring net to warn of increased risk are urgently needed. - Highlights: • Trace metal pollution in

  7. Factors controlling the solubility of trace metals in atmospheric aerosols over the Eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Panagiota; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Kanakidou, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric input of aerosols is recognized, as an important source of nutrients, for the oceans. The chemical interactions between aerosols and varying composition of air masses lead to different coating of their surfaces with sulfate, nitrate and organic compounds, increasing their solubility and their role as a carrier of nutrients and pollutants in ecosystems. Recent works have highlighted that atmospheric inputs of nutrients and trace metals can considerably influence the marine ecosystem functioning at semi-enclosed or enclosed water bodies such as the eastern Mediterranean. The current work aims to determine the sources and the factors controlling the variability of nutrients in the eastern Mediterranean. Special focus has been given on trace elements solubility, considered either as key nutrients for phytoplankton growth such as iron (Fe), phosphorus (P) or inhibitors such as copper (Cu). This has been accomplished by analyzing size segregated aerosol samples collected at the background site of Finokalia in Crete for an entire year. Phosphorus concentrations indicate important increases in air masses influenced both by anthropogenic activities in the northeast European countries and by dust outbreaks. The last is confirmed by the correlation observed between total P and dust concentrations and by the air mass backward trajectories computed by running the NOAA Hysplit Model (Hybrid Single - Particle Langrangian Integrated Trajectory (http://www.arl.noaa.gov/ready/hysplit4.html). Overall 73% of total P has been found to be associated with anthropogenic sources. The solubility of P and Fe has been found to be closely related to the acidity (pH) and dust amount in aerosols. The aerosol pH was predicted using thermodynamic modeling (ISORROPIA-II), meteorological observations (RH, T), and gas/particle observations. More specifically P and Fe solubility appears to be inversely related to the crustal elements levels, while it increases in acidic environment. The

  8. Determination of trace metals in sea waters of the albanian coast by energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preconcentration of trace transition and heavy metal ions by precipitation with APDC has been combined with energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence for environmental sea water analysis. The preconcentration procedure implies adding of 500 μg Mo ion and 10 ml of 1 % water solution of APDC to a 500 ml water sample at pH 4, filtering off on a Millipore filter and analyzing after drying. Realistic detection limits are at 1 μg * l-1 level and precision varies between 10 - 25% at about 5 μg * l-1 level, depending on the element. Eleven sea water samples, covering Albanian Adriatic and Ionian coast, are analyzed for trace metal ions. (author) 8 refs.; 2 figs.; 5 tabs

  9. Assessment of trace metal bioaccumulation by Avicennia marina (Forsk.) in the last remaining mangrove stands in Manila Bay, the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Ana Veronica S; Salmo, Severino G

    2014-12-01

    Concentrations of lead (Pb), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and cadmium (Cd) were evaluated in the sediments, roots and leaves of a mangrove species (Avicennia marina) in Las Piñas-Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), Manila Bay. The concentrations showed a general pattern of Zn > Pb > Cu > Cd in sediments, Cu > Pb > Zn > Cd in roots and Cu > Zn > Pb > Cd in leaves. The trace metal concentrations in both sediments and plant tissues were below contamination threshold levels. Based on computed bioaccumulation indices, A. marina could be used for the phytostabilization and phytoextraction of Cu and Cd. The LPPCHEA mangrove ecosystem is an ecologically important ecosystem that will limit the spread of trace metals to the surrounding environment. PMID:25365960

  10. Leach tests on grouts made with actual and trace metal-spiked synthetic phosphate/sulfate waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted experiments to produce empirical leach rate data for phosphate-sulfate waste (PSW) grout. Effective diffusivities were measured for various radionuclides (90Sr, 99Tc, 14C, 129I, 137Cs, 60Co, 54Mn, and U), stable major components (NO3-, SO42-, H3BO3, K and Na) and the trace constituents Ag, As, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Se. Two types of leach tests were used on samples of actual PSW grout and synthetic PSW grout: the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent replacement leach test and a static leach test. Grout produced from both synthetic and real PSW showed low leach rates for the trace metal constituents and most of the waste radionuclides. Many of the spiked trace metals and radionuclides were not detected in any leachates. None of the effluents contained measurable quantities of 137Cs, 60Co, 54Mn, 109Cd, 51Cr, 210Pb, 203Hg, or As. For those trace species with detectable leach rates, 125I appeared to have the greatest leach rate, followed by 99Tc, 75Se, and finally U, 14C, and 110mAg. Leach rates for nitrate are between those for I and Tc, but there is much scatter in the nitrate data because of the very low nitrate inventory. 32 refs., 6 figs., 15 tabs

  11. Distribution, provenance and early diagenesis of major and trace metals in sediment cores from the Mandovi estuary, western India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajith, A.; Rao, V. Purnachandra; Chakraborty, P.

    2016-03-01

    Major elements and trace metals were analyzed in four sediment cores recovered along a transect in the Mandovi estuary for their distribution, provenance and early diagenesis. The sediments were clayey silts in cores from the upper/lower estuary and sand-dominated in cores from the middle estuary/bay. Organic carbon (OC) content varied from 0.5 to 4%, with higher values in fine-grained sediments. The mean Fe and Mn contents of sediments from the upper/middle estuary were 3-5 times and 8-13 times, respectively higher than the reference sediment (RS) from the same estuary. The mean Fe and Mn contents of sediments from the lower estuary/bay were close to the RS. Strong inter-metal correlation among Ti, V, Cr and Zr in all the cores indicated their contribution from a common source, probably the laterites from hinterland. Trace metals were more enriched in fine-grained sediments than in sand-dominated sediments. Early diagenetic control on the redistribution of metal is evident in core sediments from the middle estuary to Bay. The distribution of Mo, U and Pb followed that of Fe and Mn in the upper estuary and OC in the lower estuary/bay. Our results indicated strong anthropogenic contribution of metals from ore deposits in the upper/middle estuary. The Mn and Cr contents of sediment in the upper/middle estuary and Fe in the middle estuary were highly enriched suggestive of 'significant pollution signal'. More trace metals from the middle estuary were moderately enriched. Speciation studies showed Mn and Pb occurred abundantly in non-residual phases. High Mn content and its high percentage in exchangeable and reductive phases indicate that it was susceptible to be mobilized. However, Fe, Cu and Ni occurred abundantly in residual phases and less percentage of them were expected to be bio-available.

  12. Post-depositional redistribution of trace metals in reservoir sediments of a mining/smelting-impacted watershed (the Lot River, SW France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audry, Stephane, E-mail: audry@lmtg.obs-mip.fr [Universite de Bordeaux, UMR 5805 EPOC, Avenue des facultes, 33405 Talence cedex (France)] [Universite de Limoges, Groupement de Recherche Eau Sol Environnement, IFR 145 GEIST, FST, 123 Avenue, A. Thomas, 87060 Limoges cedex (France)] [Universite de Toulouse, UPS (OMP), LMTG, 14 Av., Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Grosbois, Cecile [Universite de Limoges, Groupement de Recherche Eau Sol Environnement, IFR 145 GEIST, FST, 123 Avenue, A. Thomas, 87060 Limoges cedex (France)] [Universite Francois-Rabelais de Tours, CNRS/INSU, Universite d' Orleans, UMR 6113 ISTO, FST, Parc Grandmont, F-37200 Tours (France); Bril, Hubert [Universite de Limoges, Groupement de Recherche Eau Sol Environnement, IFR 145 GEIST, FST, 123 Avenue, A. Thomas, 87060 Limoges cedex (France); Schaefer, Joerg [Universite de Bordeaux, UMR 5805 EPOC, Avenue des facultes, 33405 Talence cedex (France); Kierczak, Jakub [Universite de Limoges, Groupement de Recherche Eau Sol Environnement, IFR 145 GEIST, FST, 123 Avenue, A. Thomas, 87060 Limoges cedex (France)] [University of Wroclaw, Institute of Geological Sciences, Cybulskiego 30, 50-205 Wroclaw (Poland); Blanc, Gerard [Universite de Bordeaux, UMR 5805 EPOC, Avenue des facultes, 33405 Talence cedex (France)

    2010-06-15

    Mining/smelting wastes and reservoir sediment cores from the Lot River watershed were studied using mineralogical (XRD, SEM-EDS, EMPA) and geochemical (redox dynamics, selective extractions) approaches to characterize the main carrier phases of trace metals. These two approaches permitted determining the role of post-depositional redistribution processes in sediments and their effects on the fate and mobility of trace metals. The mining/smelting wastes showed heterogeneous mineral compositions with highly variable contents of trace metals. The main trace metal-bearing phases include spinels affected by secondary processes, silicates and sulfates. The results indicate a clear change in the chemical partitioning of trace metals between the reservoir sediments upstream and downstream of the mining/smelting activities, with the downstream sediments showing a 2-fold to 5-fold greater contribution of the oxidizable fraction. This increase was ascribed to stronger post-depositional redistribution of trace metals related to intense early diagenetic processes, including dissolution of trace metal-bearing phases and precipitation of authigenic sulfide phases through organic matter (OM) mineralization. This redistribution is due to high inputs (derived from mining/smelting waste weathering) at the water-sediment interface of (i) dissolved SO{sub 4} promoting more efficient OM mineralization, and (ii) highly reactive trace metal-bearing particles. As a result, the main trace metal-bearing phases in the downstream sediments are represented by Zn- and Fe-sulfides, with minor occurrence of detrital zincian spinels, sulfates and Fe-oxyhydroxides. Sequestration of trace metals in sulfides at depth in reservoir sediments does not represent long term sequestration owing to possible resuspension of anoxic sediments by natural (floods) and/or anthropogenic (dredging, dam flush) events that might promote trace metal mobilization through sulfide oxidation. It is estimated that, during a

  13. Clay mineralogy, grain size distribution and their correlations with trace metals in the salt marsh sediments of the Skallingen barrier spit, Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Changling; Bartholdy, Jesper; Christiansen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    1931 but decreased after 1964. This increase was contributed mainly by the grains finer than 20 µm while the fraction of 40–63 µm actually decreased soon after the invasion. The relation between most of the trace metals and grain size distributions is close in general but far from linear. The drastic...... with the other adsorbents and to low availability of the mobile trace metals in the system. Correlation between trace metals and clay minerals may therefore be used as an indicator in environmental assessment. Fine grain fractions of the sediment increased markedly after salt marsh invasion in about...

  14. Post-depositional redistribution of trace metals in reservoir sediments of a mining/smelting-impacted watershed (the Lot River, SW France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mining/smelting wastes and reservoir sediment cores from the Lot River watershed were studied using mineralogical (XRD, SEM-EDS, EMPA) and geochemical (redox dynamics, selective extractions) approaches to characterize the main carrier phases of trace metals. These two approaches permitted determining the role of post-depositional redistribution processes in sediments and their effects on the fate and mobility of trace metals. The mining/smelting wastes showed heterogeneous mineral compositions with highly variable contents of trace metals. The main trace metal-bearing phases include spinels affected by secondary processes, silicates and sulfates. The results indicate a clear change in the chemical partitioning of trace metals between the reservoir sediments upstream and downstream of the mining/smelting activities, with the downstream sediments showing a 2-fold to 5-fold greater contribution of the oxidizable fraction. This increase was ascribed to stronger post-depositional redistribution of trace metals related to intense early diagenetic processes, including dissolution of trace metal-bearing phases and precipitation of authigenic sulfide phases through organic matter (OM) mineralization. This redistribution is due to high inputs (derived from mining/smelting waste weathering) at the water-sediment interface of (i) dissolved SO4 promoting more efficient OM mineralization, and (ii) highly reactive trace metal-bearing particles. As a result, the main trace metal-bearing phases in the downstream sediments are represented by Zn- and Fe-sulfides, with minor occurrence of detrital zincian spinels, sulfates and Fe-oxyhydroxides. Sequestration of trace metals in sulfides at depth in reservoir sediments does not represent long term sequestration owing to possible resuspension of anoxic sediments by natural (floods) and/or anthropogenic (dredging, dam flush) events that might promote trace metal mobilization through sulfide oxidation. It is estimated that, during a major

  15. Assessment of an ultramicroelectrode array (UMEA) sensor for the determination of trace concentrations of heavy metals in water [online

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Xudong

    2004-01-01

    The main objectives of this book are (i) to investigate the electrochemical behavior and the analytical performance of a novel ultramicroelectrode array (UMEA); (ii) to assess the analytical parameters of square-wave anodic stripping voltammetric measurements (SWASV) using the UMEA; and (iii) to estimate the potential of the UMEA in developing decentralised analytical equipments for the determination of trace concentrations of heavy metals in natural waters. Surface analytical techniques ...

  16. Assessment of trace metals during episodic events using DGT passive sampler: A proposal for water management enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Villanueva, J.D.; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Huneau, Frédéric; Motelica-Heino, Mikael; Perez, T.; Materum, R.; Espaldon, Ma. Victoria; Stoll, S. (Silke)

    2013-01-01

    The potential of the Diffusive Gradient Thin-Films (DGT) as a supplemental method for water quality monitoring was employed has been tested through 3 sampling campaigns to measure the trace metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn) present in the surface water of a highly urbanized river. Specifically, the study done in the Pasig River (Philippines) seeks to: assess the applicability of DGT passive sampler in an urban context exhibiting highly contrasted hydrological conditions (greatly influenc...

  17. Assessment of trace metal contamination in the sea cucumber (Holothuria tubulosa) and sediments from the Dardanelles Strait (Turkey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk Culha, Saniye; Dereli, Hakkı; Karaduman, Fatma Rabia; Culha, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    This study was performed to determine the concentrations of some trace metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, Zn, and Fe) in Holothuria tubuosa (Gmelin, 1788) belonging to Echinoderm species and in sediments that they live at three different stations (Gelibolu, Umur Bey/Lapseki, and Dardanos) on Dardanelles Strait between April 2013 and March 2014. The mean trace metal concentrations determined in H. tubulosa and sediment were as follows: Cd 0.18 mg/kg, Cu 2.43 mg/kg, Pb 2.09 mg/kg, Ni 14.58 mg/kg, Zn 16.86 mg/kg, and Fe 73.46 mg/kg and Cd 0.70 mg/kg, Cu 5.03 mg/kg, Pb 14.57 mg/kg, Ni 27.15 mg/kg, Zn 54.52 mg/kg, and Fe 3779.9 mg/kg, respectively. It was detected that the statistical difference between trace metals determined seasonally in muscle tissue of H. tubulosa was significant (p > 0.05). As a result of the study, it was detected that H. tubulosa is a bioindicator species in determining Ni trace metal in sediment. The results were compared to the limit values of National and International Food Safety, and it was detected that Cd and Ni concentrations measured in sediment were above LEL of Ni and Cd concentrations according to Sediment Quality Guidelines. PMID:26931662

  18. Distribution, provenance and early diagenesis of major and trace metals in sediment cores from the Mandovi estuary, western India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prajith, A.; Rao, V.P.; Chakraborty, P.

    investigated for their organic carbon content, mineralogy, limited major and rare earth and trace metal chemistry, bio-accumulation of metals and Sr-Nd isotopes (Alagarsamy, 2006; Shynu et al., 2011, 2012, 2015; Rao et al., 2011, 2015; Kessarkar et al., 2013.... Total carbon content was determined in 254 sediment samples, using NC soil analyzer (FLASH 2000 Organic Elemental Analyzer). The total inorganic carbon content was calculated from CaCO3 content, which was measured using a coulometer (UIC, Inc-CM5130...

  19. Trace metal concentration in Great Tit (Parus major) and Greenfinch (Carduelis sinica) at the Western Mountains of Beijing, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the concentrations of 11 trace metals in tissues from 10 body parts of Great Tits and Greenfinches collected at Badachu Park in the Western Mountains of Beijing, China to assess the metal accumulation level, distribution among body parts, and species and gender related variations. The highest concentrations of Hg, Ni, Zn, and Mn were found in the feather; Pb and Co in the bone; Cd, Cr, and Se in the kidney, and Cu in the liver and heart. Metal concentrations had substantial interspecific variation with Great Tits showing higher levels of Hg, Cr, Ni, and Mn than Greenfinches in tissues of most body parts. Gender related variations were body part and species specific. Meta-analyses using data from this study and other studies suggested that metal concentrations of Great Tits at our study site were relatively low and below the toxic levels. - Trace metal concentrations of Great Tits and Greenfinches from Beijing, China, varied by body part, gender, and species, and were below toxic levels

  20. Trophic transfer of trace metals from the polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor to the polychaete N. virens and the decapod crustacean Palaemonetes varians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainbow, P.S.; Poirier, L.; Smith, B.D.; Brix, K.V.; Luoma, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    Diet is an important exposure route for the uptake of trace metals by aquatic invertebrates, with trace metal trophic transfer depending on 2 stages - assimilation and subsequent accumulation by the predator. This study investigated the trophic transfer of trace metals from the sediment-dwelling polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor from metal-rich estuarine sediments in southwestern UK to 2 predators - another polychaete N. virens (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Fe) and the decapod crustacean Palaemonetes varians (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Fe, Ag, As, Mn). N. virens showed net accumulation of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd from the prey; accumulation increased with increasing prey concentration, but a coefficient of trophic transfer decreased with increasing prey concentration, probably because a higher proportion of accumulated metal in the prey is bound in less trophically available (insoluble) detoxified forms. The trace metal accumulation patterns of P. varians apparently restricted significant net accumulation of metals from the diet of N. diversicolor to just Cd. There was significant mortality of the decapods fed on the diets of metal-rich worms. Metal-rich invertebrates that have accumulated metals from the rich historical store in the sediments of particular SW England estuaries can potentially pass these metals along food chains, with accumulation and total food chain transfer depending on the metal assimilation efficiencies and accumulation patterns of the animal at each trophic level. This trophic transfer may be significant enough to have ecotoxicological effects. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  1. The quality control of fruit juices by using the stable isotope ratios and trace metal elements concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdas, D. A.; Dehelean, A.; Puscas, R.; Cristea, G.; Tusa, F.; Voica, C.

    2012-02-01

    In the last years, a growing number of research articles detailing the use of natural abundance light stable isotopes variations and trace metal elements concentration as geographic "tracers" to determine the provenance of food have been published. These investigations exploit the systematic global variations of stable hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotope ratios in (combination) relation with trace metal element concentrations. The trace metal elements content of plants and also their light stable isotopic ratios are mainly related to the geological and pedoclimatic characteristics of the site of growth. The interpretation of such analysis requires an important number of data for authentic natural juices regarding the same seasonal and regional origin, because the isotopic analysis parameters of fruit juices show remarkable variability depending on climatologically factors. In this work was mesured H, C, O stable isotope ratios and the concentrations of 16 elements (P, K, Mg, Na, Ca, Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn, Pb, Co, As, Cd, Mn, Fe and Hg) from 12 single strength juices. The natural variations that appear due to different environmental and climatic conditions are presented and discussed.

  2. A Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis for trace metal assessment of sediments in the Gulf of Paria, Trinidad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gulf of Paria is a semi-enclosed shallow basin with increasing coastal development activities along Trinidad's west coast. Sediments present a host for trace metal pollutants from overlying waters, therefore determination of their content is critical in evaluating and detecting sources of marine pollution. This paper presents a Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis of geochemical assessment for trace metals in coastal sediments of the Gulf of Paria. This GIS approach facilitates interpretation of the spatial relationships among key environmental processes. The GIS development involves the integration of spatial and attribute data pertaining to bathymetry, current systems, topography, rivers, land use/land cover and coastal sediments. It employs spatial interpolation and retrieval operations to analyze the total trace metal concentrations of aluminum, copper and lead in the sediments and the clay-enriched sediments, to determine whether they are related to sediment type or are affected by the discharge from anthropogenic sources. Spatial distribution modeling of element concentrations are produced to indicate contamination plumes from possible anthropogenic sources such as rivers entering the Gulf of Paria, and to reveal potential hot spots and dispersion patterns. A direct spatial correlation between clay-enriched sediments and high concentrations of aluminum and lead is detected, however regions of high concentrations of copper and lead indicate a relationship to anthropogenic sources. The effectiveness of GIS for visualization, spatial query and overlay of geochemical analysis is demonstrated

  3. Insight of EDX analysis and EFTEM: are spherocrystals located in Strombidae digestive gland implied in detoxification of trace metals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volland, Jean-Marie; Lechaire, Jean-Pierre; Frebourg, Ghislaine; Aranda, Dalila Aldana; Ramdine, Gaëlle; Gros, Olivier

    2012-04-01

    Digestive tubules of Strombidae are composed by three cell types: digestive cells, vacuolated cells, and crypt cells. The last one is characterized by the presence of intracellular granules identified as spherocrystals. Such structures are known to occur in basophilic cells of gastropod digestive gland, where they are supposed to be involved in the regulation of some minerals and in detoxification. In this study, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) were used to determine the elemental content of spherocrystals in two Strombidae, Strombus gigas and Strombus pugilis. In freshly collected individuals of both species, the following elements were detected: Ca, Fe, Mg, P, and Zn. Aluminum and Mn were also detected in S. gigas. Their presence in spherocrystals indicates that, in Strombidae, spherocrystals are involved in the regulation of minerals and essential trace metals. In order to answer the question "are spherocrystals involved in nonessential trace metals scavenging?," artificial cadmium and lead exposure by both waterborne and dietary pathways was applied to S. pugilis. No evidence of cadmium (Cd(NO(3))(2)) or lead (Pb(NO(3))(2)) provided by food was found in spherocrystals. Cadmium provided in water (Cd(NO(3))(2) and CdCl(2)) causes structural modifications of the digestive gland; however, this element was not trapped in spherocrystals. These results suggest that spherocrystals are not involved in detoxification of such nonessential trace metals. PMID:21919125

  4. Impact of Phosphate, Potassium, Yeast Extract, and Trace Metals on Chitosan and Metabolite Production by Mucor indicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Zahra; Karimi, Keikhosro; Zamani, Akram

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effects of phosphate, potassium, yeast extract, and trace metals on the growth of Mucor indicus and chitosan, chitin, and metabolite production by the fungus were investigated. Maximum yield of chitosan (0.32 g/g cell wall) was obtained in a phosphate-free medium. Reversely, cell growth and ethanol formation by the fungus were positively affected in the presence of phosphate. In a phosphate-free medium, the highest chitosan content (0.42 g/g cell wall) and cell growth (0.66 g/g sugar) were obtained at 2.5 g/L of KOH. Potassium concentration had no significant effect on ethanol and glycerol yields. The presence of trace metals significantly increased the chitosan yield at an optimal phosphate and potassium concentration (0.50 g/g cell wall). By contrast, production of ethanol by the fungus was negatively affected (0.33 g/g sugars). A remarkable increase in chitin and decrease in chitosan were observed in the absence of yeast extract and concentrations lower than 2 g/L. The maximum chitosan yield of 51% cell wall was obtained at 5 g/L of yeast extract when the medium contained no phosphate, 2.5 g/L KOH, and 1 mL/L trace metal solution. PMID:27589726

  5. Bioavailability of metals-trace in sediments: a review; Biodisponibilidade de metais-traco em sedimentos: uma revisao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Rafaela E. de A.V.; Souza, Vivianne Lucia Bormann; Lima, Vanessa Lemos de; Hazin, Clovis Abrahao, E-mail: rafaelarodriguesss@hotmail.com, E-mail: vlsouza@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: lemos.nessa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: chazin@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The chemical association of metals in sediments provides an indication of its release by physical, chemical and biological processes, with toxic effects under certain environmental conditions. Knowing about their chemical bonds in sediments, can recognize specific sources of pollution, and speciation of trace metals is important for bioavailability and toxicity to animals and plants. The accumulation of these particles in the sediment occur by the following mechanisms: a) adsorption to the finest particles; b) precipitating of the element in the form of compounds; c) co-precipitating of the element with iron and manganese oxides; d) complexation with organic matter; e) incorporation into the crystal lattice of minerals. Currently, five phases are considered when studying the bioavailability of trace elements in sediments: a) the exchangeable phase, MgCl{sub 2} (causes saltiness change); b) leachable phase, (acetic acid causes pH change); c) reducible phase (hydroxylamine hydrochloride causes release of the bound metals linked to Fe and Mn oxides); d) oxidized phase, the peroxide hydrogen (cause the degradation of organic matter); e) the residual pseudo-phase, the aqua regia (cause release of metals associated to minerals). The first three phases are considered the most bioavailable. In the last two fractions, the metals are linked to sediment constituents and not bioavailable. The organic phase is relatively stable and the metal present therein are removed under oxidative conditions. Metals present in the pseudo-phase residual measure the degree of environmental pollution, since great amount of metals at this stage indicates a lower degree of pollution.

  6. Do trace metals select for darker birds in urban areas? An experimental exposure to lead and zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Marion; Gasparini, Julien; Frantz, Adrien

    2016-07-01

    Trace metals from anthropogenic activities are involved in numerous health impairments and may therefore select for detoxification mechanisms or a higher tolerance. Melanin, responsible for the black and red colourations of teguments, plays a role in metal ion chelation and its synthesis is positively linked to immunity, antioxidant capacity and stress resistance due to pleiotropic effects. Therefore, we expected darker birds to (1) store higher amounts of metals in their feathers, (2) maintain lower metal concentrations in blood and (3) suffer less from metal exposure. We exposed feral pigeons (Columba livia) exhibiting various plumage darkness levels to low, but chronic, concentrations of zinc and/or lead, two of the most abundant metals in urban areas. First, we found negative and positive effects of lead and zinc, respectively, on birds' condition and reproductive parameters. Then, we observed positive relationships between plumage darkness and both zinc and lead concentrations in feathers. Interestingly, though darker adults did not maintain lower metal concentrations in blood and did not have higher fitness parameters, darker juveniles exhibited a higher survival rate than paler ones when exposed to lead. Our results show that melanin-based plumage colouration does modulate lead effects on birds' fitness parameters but that the relationship between metals, melanin, and fitness is more complex than expected and thus stress the need for more studies. PMID:27282322

  7. Atmospheric concentrations and dry deposition fluxes of particulate trace metals in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de P. Pereira, Pedro A.; Lopes, Wilson A.; Carvalho, Luiz S.; da Rocha, Gisele O.; de Carvalho Bahia, Nei; Loyola, Josiane; Quiterio, Simone L.; Escaleira, Viviane; Arbilla, Graciela; de Andrade, Jailson B.

    Respiratory system is the major route of entry for airborne particulates, being the effect on the human organism dependent on chemical composition of the particles, exposure time and individual susceptibility. Airborne particulate trace metals are considered to represent a health hazard since they may be absorbed into human lung tissues during breathing. Fossil fuel and wood combustion, as well as waste incineration and industrial processes, are the main anthropic sources of metals to the atmosphere. In urban areas, vehicular emissions—and dust resuspension associated to road traffic—become the most important manmade source. This work investigated the atmospheric concentrations of TSP, PM 10 and elements such as iron, manganese, copper and zinc, from three different sites around Salvador Region (Bahia, Brazil), namely: (i) Lapa Bus Station, strongly impacted by heavy-duty diesel vehicles; (ii) Aratu harbor, impacted by an intense movement of goods, including metal ores and concentrates and near industrial centers and; (iii) Bananeira Village located on Maré Island, a non-vehicle-influenced site, with activities such as handcraft work and fishery, although placed near the port. Results have pointed out that TSP concentrations ranged between 16.9 (Bananeira) and 354.0 μg m -3 (Aratu#1), while for PM 10 they ranged between 30.9 and 393.0 μg m -3, both in the Lapa Bus Station. Iron was the major element in both Lapa Station and Aratu (#1 and #2), with average concentrations in the PM 10 samples of 148.9, 79.6 and 205.0 ng m -3, respectively. Zinc, on the other hand, was predominant in samples from Bananeira, with an average concentration of 145.0 ng m -3 in TSP samples, since no PM 10 sample was taken from this site. The main sources of iron in the Lapa Station and Aratu harbor were, respectively, soil resuspension by buses and discharge of solid granaries, as fertilizers and metal ores. On the other hand, zinc and copper in the bus station were mainly from

  8. Bone healing and mineralization, implant corrosion, and trace metals after nickel-titanium shape memory metal intramedullary fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryhänen, J; Kallioinen, M; Serlo, W; Perämäki, P; Junila, J; Sandvik, P; Niemelä, E; Tuukkanen, J

    1999-12-15

    Its shape memory effect, superelasticity, and good wear and damping properties make the NiTi shape memory alloy a material with fascinating potential for orthopedic surgery. It provides a possibility for making self-locking, self-expanding, and self-compressing implants. Problems, however, may arise because of its high nickel content. The purpose of this work was to determine the corrosion of NiTi in vivo and to evaluate the possible deleterious effects of NiTi on osteotomy healing, bone mineralization, and the remodeling response. Femoral osteotomies of 40 rats were fixed with either NiTi or stainless steel (StSt) intramedullary nails. The rats were killed at 2, 4, 8, 12, 26, and 60 weeks. Bone healing was examined with radiographs, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, (pQCT) and histologically. The corrosion of the retrieved implants was analyzed by electron microscopy (FESEM). Trace metals from several organs were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS) or by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). There were more healed bone unions in the NiTi than in the StSt group at early (4 and 8 weeks) time points. Callus size was equal between the groups. The total and cortical bone mineral densities did not differ between the NiTi and StSt groups. Mineral density in both groups was lower in the osteotomy area than in the other areas along the nail. Density in the nail area was lower than in the proximal part of the operated femur or the contralateral femur. Bone contact to NiTi was close. A peri-implant lamellar bone sheet formed in the metaphyseal area after 8 weeks, indicating good tissue tolerance. The FESEM assessment showed surface corrosion changes to be more evident in the StSt implants. There were no statistically significant differences in nickel concentration between the NiTi and StSt groups in any of the organs. NiTi appears to be an appropriate material for further intramedullary use because it

  9. Surface water characteristics and trace metals level of the Bonny/New Calabar River Estuary, Niger Delta, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onojake, M. C.; Sikoki, F. D.; Omokheyeke, O.; Akpiri, R. U.

    2015-07-01

    Surface water samples from three stations in the Bonny/New Calabar River Estuary were analyzed for the physicochemical characteristics and trace metal level in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Results show pH ranged from 7.56 to 7.88 mg/L; conductivity, 33,489.00 to 33,592.00 µScm-1; salinity, 15.33 to 15.50 ‰; turbidity, 4.35 to 6.65 NTU; total dissolved solids, 22111.00 to 23263.00 gm-3; dissolved oxygen, 4.53 to 6.65 mg/L; and biochemical oxygen demand, 1.72 mg/L. The level of some trace metals (Ca, Mg, K, Zn, Pb, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Na) were also analyzed by Atomic absorption spectrometry with K, Zn, and Co being statistically significant (P < 0.05). The results were compared with USEPA and WHO Permissible Limits for water quality standards. It was observed that the water quality parameters in the Bonny Estuary show seasonal variation with higher values for pH, DO, BOD, temperature, and salinity during the dry season than wet season. Concentrations of trace metals such as Pb, Cd, Zn, Ni, and Cr were higher than stipulated limits by WHO (2006). The result of the Metal Pollution Index suggests that the river was slightly affected and therefore continuous monitoring is necessary to avert possible public health implications of these metals on consumers of water and seafood from the study area.

  10. Work plan for the Schuylkill River basin, Pennsylvania; assessment of river quality as related to the distribution and transport of trace metals and organic substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, G.L.; Yorke, Thomas H.; Stamer, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is making a river-quality assessment of the Schuylkill River basin in Pennsylvania from October 1978 to March 1981. It is part of a continuing program designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of river-quality studies for basin planning and water-resource management. Study objectives include determining (1) presence of selected trace metals and organic substances in the water and sediments of the Schuylkill River between Berne and Philadelphia; (2) source, distribution, and transport of selected trace metals and organic substances in the river from Berne to Philadelphia; (3) frequency of occurrence of selected trace metals and organic substances in the river at Pottstown and Manayunk; (4) effects of low dams on the distribution and transport of selected trace metals and organic substances in the river between Pottstown and Philadelphia.

  11. Radionuclides, Trace Metals, and Organic Compounds in Shells of Native Freshwater Mussels Along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River: 6000 Years Before Present to Current Times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. L. Tiller; T. E. Marceau

    2006-01-25

    This report documents concentrations of radionuclides, trace metals, and semivolatile organic compounds measured in shell samples of the western pearl shell mussel collected along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River.

  12. Trace metal depositional patterns from an open pit mining activity as revealed by archived avian gizzard contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archived samples of blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus) gizzard contents, inclusive of grit, collected yearly between 1959 and 1970 were analyzed for cadmium, lead, zinc, and copper content. Approximately halfway through the 12-year sampling period, an open-pit copper mine began activities, then ceased operations 2 years later. Thus the archived samples provided a unique opportunity to determine if avian gizzard contents, inclusive of grit, could reveal patterns in the anthropogenic deposition of trace metals associated with mining activities. Gizzard concentrations of cadmium and copper strongly coincided with the onset of opening and the closing of the pit mining activity. Gizzard zinc and lead demonstrated significant among year variation; however, maximum concentrations did not correlate to mining activity. The archived gizzard contents did provide a useful tool for documenting trends in metal depositional patterns related to an anthropogenic activity. Further, blue grouse ingesting grit particles during the time of active mining activity would have been exposed to toxicologically significant levels of cadmium. Gizzard lead concentrations were also of toxicological significance but not related to mining activity. This type of 'pulse' toxic metal exposure as a consequence of open-pit mining activity would not necessarily have been revealed through a 'snap-shot' of soil, plant or avian tissue trace metal analysis post-mining activity. - Research Highlights: → Archived gizzard samples reveals mining history. → Grit ingestion exposes grouse to cadmium and lead. → Grit selection includes particles enriched in cadmium. → Cadmium enriched particles are of toxicological significance.

  13. Removal of trace metals and improvement of dredged sediment dewaterability by bioleaching combined with Fenton-like reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiangfeng; Twardowska, Irena; Wei, Shuhe; Sun, Lina; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Jianyu; Cai, Jianchao

    2015-05-15

    Bioleaching by Aspergillus niger strain SY1 combined with Fenton-like reaction was optimized to improve trace metal removal and dewaterability of dredged sediments. The major optimized parameters were the duration of bioleaching and H₂O₂ dose in Fenton-like process (5 days and 2g H₂O₂/L, respectively). Bioleaching resulted in the removal of ≈90% of Cd, ≈60% of Zn and Cu, ≈20% of Pb, and in decrease of sediment pH from 6.6 to 2.5 due to organic acids produced by A. niger. After addition of H₂O₂, Fenton-like reaction was initiated and further metal removal occurred. Overall efficiency of the combined process comprised: (i) reduction of Cd content in sediment by 99.5%, Cu and Zn by >70% and Pb by 39% as a result of metal release bound in all mobilizable fractions; (ii) decrease of sediment capillary suction time (CST) from 98.2s to 10.1s (by 89.8%) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF) from 37.4×10(12)m/kg to 6.2×10(12)m/kg (by 83.8%), due to reducing amount of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by 68.7% and bound water content by 79.1%. The combined process was found to be an efficient method to remove trace metals and improve dewaterability of contaminated dredged sediments. PMID:25682517

  14. Accumulation and partitioning of seven trace metals in mangroves and sediment cores from three estuarine wetlands of Hainan Island, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace metals in mangrove tissues (leaf, branch, root and fruit) of nine species and sediments of ten cores collected in 2008 from Dongzhai Harbor, Sanya Bay and Yalong Bay, Hainan Island, were analyzed. The average concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cr, Hg and As in surface sediments were 14.8, 24.1, 57.9, 0.17, 29.6, 0.08 and 9.7 μg g-1, whereas those in mangrove tissues were 2.8, 1.4, 8.7, 0.03, 1.1, 0.03, and 0.2 μg g-1, respectively. Compared to those from other typical mangrove wetlands of the world, the metal levels in Hainan were at low- to median-levels, which is consistent with the fact that Hainan Island is still in low exploitation and its mangroves suffer little impact from human activities. Metal concentrations among different tissues of mangroves were different. In general, Zn and Cu were enriched in fruit, Hg was enriched in leaf, Pb, Cd and Cr were enriched in branch, and As was enriched in root. The cycle of trace metals in mangrove species were estimated. The biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) followed the sequence of Hg (0.43) > Cu (0.27) > Cd (0.22) > Zn (0.17) > Pb (0.07) > Cr (0.06) > As (0.02).

  15. Solid state partitioning of trace metals in suspended particulate matter from a river system affected by smelting-waste drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The partitioning of particulate trace metals was investigated during one year of monthly sampling of suspended particulate matter (SPM) at eight sites along the Lot-Garonne fluvial system, known for its polymetallic pollution. The chemical partitioning in five operationally defined fractions (exchangeable/carbonate, Fe/Mn oxides, organic matter/sulfides, acid soluble, residual) was determined using a multiple single extraction approach. This approach showed that Cd, Zn, Pb and Cu were mainly associated with acid soluble phases (84-95%, 65-88%, 61-82% and 55-80% of the respective total metal content), and therefore showed a high mean potential of mobilization and bioavailability. In the Riou-Mort River, draining the smelting-wastes, Zn, Cd and Mn showed high mobility as they were little associated with the residual fraction (1-2%) and mainly bound to the 'exchangeable' fraction of SPM (60-80%), probably weakly adsorbed on amorphous freshly-precipitated sulfide and/or oxide phases. Upstream and downstream of the anthropogenic source of metallic pollution, Mn and Cd, and Zn to a lesser extent, remained highly reactive. The other trace metals were mainly associated with the residual fraction and thus less mobile. However, the multiple single extraction scheme revealed that the most reactive transport phases were non-selectively extracted by the conventional extractants used here. These selectivity problems could not have been observed if sequential extraction was used

  16. Accumulation and partitioning of seven trace metals in mangroves and sediment cores from three estuarine wetlands of Hainan Island, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Yaowen, E-mail: yqiu@scsio.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Tropic Marine Environment, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 164 West Xingang Road, Guangzhou 510301 (China); Yu Kefu [State Key Laboratory of Tropic Marine Environment, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 164 West Xingang Road, Guangzhou 510301 (China); Zhang Gan [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang Wenxiong [Section of Marine Ecology and Biotechnology, Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2011-06-15

    Trace metals in mangrove tissues (leaf, branch, root and fruit) of nine species and sediments of ten cores collected in 2008 from Dongzhai Harbor, Sanya Bay and Yalong Bay, Hainan Island, were analyzed. The average concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cr, Hg and As in surface sediments were 14.8, 24.1, 57.9, 0.17, 29.6, 0.08 and 9.7 {mu}g g{sup -1}, whereas those in mangrove tissues were 2.8, 1.4, 8.7, 0.03, 1.1, 0.03, and 0.2 {mu}g g{sup -1}, respectively. Compared to those from other typical mangrove wetlands of the world, the metal levels in Hainan were at low- to median-levels, which is consistent with the fact that Hainan Island is still in low exploitation and its mangroves suffer little impact from human activities. Metal concentrations among different tissues of mangroves were different. In general, Zn and Cu were enriched in fruit, Hg was enriched in leaf, Pb, Cd and Cr were enriched in branch, and As was enriched in root. The cycle of trace metals in mangrove species were estimated. The biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) followed the sequence of Hg (0.43) > Cu (0.27) > Cd (0.22) > Zn (0.17) > Pb (0.07) > Cr (0.06) > As (0.02).

  17. Historical trace metal accumulation in the sediments of an urbanized region of the Lake Champlain watershed, Burlington, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecray, E.L.; King, J.W.; Appleby, P.G.; Hunt, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    This study documents the history of pollution inputs in the Burlington region of Lake Champlain, Vermont using measurements of anthropogenic metals (Cu, Zn, Cr, Pb, Cd, and Ag) in four age-dated sediment cores. Sediments record a history of contamination in a region and can be used to assess the changing threat to biota over time and to evaluate the effectiveness of discharge regulations on anthropogenic inputs. Grain size, magnetic susceptibility, radiometric dating and pollen stratigraphy were combined with trace metal data to provide an assessment of the history of contamination over the last 350 yr in the Burlington region of Lake Champlain. Magnetic susceptibility was initially used to identify land-use history for each site because it is a proxy indicator of soil erosion. Historical trends in metal inputs in the Burlington region from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries are reflected in downcore variations in metal concentrations and accumulation rates. Metal concentrations increase above background values in the early to mid nineteenth century. The metal input rate to the sediments increases around 1920 and maximum concentrations and accumulation rates are observed in the late 1960s. Decreases in concentration and accumulation rate between 1970 and the present are observed, for most metals. The observed trends are primarily a function of variations in anthropogenic inputs and not variations in sediment grain size. Grain size data were used to remove texture variations from the metal profiles and results show trends in the anthropogenic metal signals remain. Radiometric dating and pollen stratigraphy provide well-constrained dates for the sediments thereby allowing the metal profiles to be interpreted in terms of land-use history.This study documents the history of pollution inputs in the Burlington region of Lake Champlain, Vermont using measurements of anthropogenic metals (Cu, Zn, Cr, Pb, Cd, and Ag) in four age-dated sediment cores. Sediments

  18. Risks of using membrane filtration for trace metal analysis and assessing the dissolved metal fraction of aqueous media--a study on zinc, copper and nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Yolanda; Herting, Gunilla; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall

    2011-05-01

    Membrane filtration is commonly performed for solid-liquid separation of aqueous solutions prior to trace metal analysis and when assessing "dissolved" metal fractions. Potential artifacts induced by filtration such as contamination and/or adsorption of metals within the membrane have been investigated for different membrane materials, metals, applied pressures and pre-cleaning steps. Measurements have been conducted on aqueous solutions including well-defined metal standards, ultrapure water, and on runoff water from corroded samples. Filtration using both non-cleaned and pre-cleaned filters revealed contamination and adsorption effects, in particular pronounced for zinc, evident for copper but non-significant for nickel. The results clearly show these artifacts to be non-systematic both for non-cleaned and pre-cleaned membranes. The applied pressure was of minor importance. Measurements of the labile fraction by means of stripping voltammetry clearly elucidate that membrane filtration followed by total metal analysis cannot accurately assess the labile or the dissolved metal fraction. PMID:21367497

  19. A preliminary study of the distribution of selected trace metals in the Besut River basin, Terengganu, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suratman, S; Hang, H C; Shazili, N A M; Mohd Tahir, N

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary result carried out in the Besut River basin, Terengganu, Malaysia to determine the selected trace metal concentrations. Concentrations of dissolved Pb, Cu, and Fe during the present study were in the range of 3.3-8.3 microg/L Pb, 0.1-0.3 microg/L Cu, and 1.1-12.3 microg/L Fe. For the particulate fraction concentrations of Pb, Cu, and Fe ranged from 1.0 to 3.6 microg/L, 0.3 to 2.8 microg/L, and 114 to 1,537 microg/L, respectively. The concentrations of metals in this study area, in general, were lower than those reported for other study areas. Higher metal concentrations measured in the wet monsoon season suggest that the input was mainly due to terrestrial runoff. PMID:18665317

  20. Assessing trace metal pollution through high spatial resolution of surface sediments along the Tunis Gulf coast (southwestern Mediterranean).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennouri, Rym; Zaaboub, Noureddine; Fertouna-Bellakhal, Mouna; Chouba, Lassad; Aleya, Lotfi

    2016-03-01

    Tunis Gulf (northern Tunisia, Mediterranean Sea) is of great economic importance due to its abundant fish resources. Rising urbanization and industrial development in the surrounding area have resulted in an increase in untreated effluents and domestic waste discharged into the gulf via its tributary streams. Metal (Cd, Pb, Hg, Cu, Zn, Fe, and Mn) and major element (Mg, Ca, Na, and K) concentrations were measured in the grain fine fraction Mg > Zn > Mn > Pb > Cu > Cd > Hg. Metals tend to be concentrated in proximity to source points, suggesting that the mineral enrichment elements come from sewage of coastal towns and pollution from industrial dumps and located along local rivers, lagoons, and on the gulf shore itself. This study showed that trace metal and major element concentrations in surface sediments along the Tunis Gulf shores were lower than those found in other coastal areas of the Mediterranean Sea. PMID:26564186

  1. An Automated Electronic Tongue for In-Situ Quick Monitoring of Trace Heavy Metals in Water Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wei; Li, Yi; Gao, Xiaoming; Guo, Hongsun; Zhao, Huixin; Wang, Ping

    2009-05-01

    An automated electronic tongue instrumentation has been developed for in-situ concentration determination of trace heavy metals in water environment. The electronic tongue contains two main parts. The sensor part consists of a silicon-based Hg-coated Au microelectrodes array (MEA) for the detection of Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) and a multiple light-addressable potentiometric sensor (MLAPS) for the detection of Fe(III) and Cr(VI). The control part employs pumps, valves and tubes to enable the pick-up and pretreatment of aqueous sample. The electronic tongue realized detection of the six metals mentioned above at part-per-billion (ppb) level without manual operation. This instrumentation will have wide application in quick monitoring and prediction the heavy metal pollution in lakes and oceans.

  2. Intelligent Simultaneous Quantitative Online Analysis of Environmental Trace Heavy Metals with Total-Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Ma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF has achieved remarkable success with the advantages of simultaneous multi-element analysis capability, decreased background noise, no matrix effects, wide dynamic range, ease of operation, and potential of trace analysis. Simultaneous quantitative online analysis of trace heavy metals is urgently required by dynamic environmental monitoring and management, and TXRF has potential in this application domain. However, it calls for an online analysis scheme based on TXRF as well as a robust and rapid quantification method, which have not been well explored yet. Besides, spectral overlapping and background effects may lead to loss of accuracy or even faulty results during practical quantitative TXRF analysis. This paper proposes an intelligent, multi-element quantification method according to the established online TXRF analysis platform. In the intelligent quantification method, collected characteristic curves of all existing elements and a pre-estimated background curve in the whole spectrum scope are used to approximate the measured spectrum. A novel hybrid algorithm, PSO-RBFN-SA, is designed to solve the curve-fitting problem, with offline global optimization and fast online computing. Experimental results verify that simultaneous quantification of trace heavy metals, including Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn, is realized on the online TXRF analysis platform, and both high measurement precision and computational efficiency are obtained.

  3. Contamination of the Marine Environment by trace metals: old and emergent elements, case studies and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Gobert, Sylvie; Richir, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Presentation of 18 trace elements (old: Cd, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cr, Pb, Fe ; emergent: Be, Al, V, Mn, Sb, As, Bi, Se, Mo, Ag, Sn studied in the laboratory of Oceanology. Study cases in the Mediterranaen Sea (Seagrass, mussel, seaurchin).

  4. Trace levels of metallic corrosion in water determined by emission spectrography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, H. H.

    1966-01-01

    Emission spectrographic method determines trace amounts of inorganic impurities in potable water. The capability of this innovation should arouse considerable interest among plant biologists, chemists working in organic synthesis, and pathologists.

  5. Isotachophoretically Assisted On-Line Complexation of Trace Metal Ions in a Highly Saline Matrix for Capillary Electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hye; Choi, Ki Hwan; Cho, Sun Young; Riaz, Asif; Chung, Doo Soo [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Trace metal ions such as Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} in a highly saline sample were subjected to on-line complexation with 4-(2-thiazolylazo) resorcinol (TAR) dissolved in a background electrolyte (BGE) under transient isotachophoresis (TITP) conditions. A long plug of the saline sample, containing the trace metal ions but devoid of TAR, was injected into a coated capillary filled with a BGE composed of 150 mM 2-(cyclohexylamino) ethanesulfonic acid (CHES) and 110 mM triethylamine (TEA) at pH 9.7. Since the electrophoretic mobility of TAR fell between the mobilities of the anionic leading electrolyte (Cl{sup -} in the sample) and the anionic terminating background electrolyte (CHES{sup -}), a highly concentrated zone of TAR from the BGE was formed at the rear of the sample matrix and then the metal cations toward the cathode were swept by isotachophoretically assisted on-line complexation (IAOC) between the metal ions and the isotachophoretically stacked TAR. As a result, anionic metal-TAR complexes were formed efficiently, which satisfy the TITP conditions between Cl. and CHES{sup -}. The enrichment factors of metal ions including Cd{sup 2+} were up to 780-fold compared to a conventional CZE mode using absorbance detection. The detection limits were 17 nM, 15 nM, and 27 nM for Ni{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Cd{sup 2+} in a 250 mM NaCl matrix, respectively. Our method was successfully applied to the analysis of urine samples without desalting

  6. Potential influence of CO2 release from a carbon capture storage site on release of trace metals from marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main risks of CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) is CO2 leakage from a storage site. The influence of CO2 leakage on trace metals leaching from contaminated marine sediment in a potential storage area (Northern Spain) is addressed using standardized leaching tests. The influence of the pH of the leaching solution on the leachates is evaluated using deionized water, natural seawater and acidified seawater at pH = 5, 6 and 7, obtained by CO2 bubbling. Equilibrium leaching tests () were performed at different liquid–solid ratios and the results of ANC/BNC leaching test () were modeled using Visual Minteq. Equilibrium tests gave values of the final pH for all seawater leachates between 7 and 8 due to the high acid neutralization capacity of the sediment. Combining leaching test results and geochemical modeling provided insight in the mechanisms and prediction of trace metals leaching in acidified seawater environment. - Highlights: ► Tier structured approach for assessment of the release of metals from sediment. ► Leaching test as useful tool to evaluate risks of a CCS site due to CO2 leakages. ► Prediction of metal release from marine sediment in contact to acidified seawater. ► Metal and DOC release in equilibrium leaching tests as function of L/S ratio and pH. ► Geochemical modeling of chemical species release from contaminated sediment. - Metal mobility from contaminated sediment under CO2 leakages in CCS sites using leaching tests.

  7. Radioactive contaminants in the subsurface: the influence of complexing ligands on trace metal speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, W

    2007-07-01

    database used in Swiss radioactive waste disposal projects. Within the scope of this TDB project I reviewed extensively thermodynamic data for Th, Pd, Al, and solubility and metal complexation of silicates, the review considering not only U, Np, Pu, Am, Tc, Ni, Se and Zr, but also the major constituents of ground and surface waters, i.e. H, Na, K, Mg and Ca. The decision to evaluate the organic ligands oxalate, citrate, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (edta) and {alpha}-isosaccharinate (isa) was based on two aspects, namely the importance of the ligands in radioactive waste problems, and the availability of experimental data. (ii) In many case studies involving inorganic and simple organic ligands a serious lack of reliable thermodynamic data is encountered. There, a new modeling approach to estimate the effects of these missing data was applied. This so called 'backdoor approach' begins with the question: 'What total concentration of a ligand is necessary to significantly influence the speciation, and hence the solubility, of a given trace metal?' Radioactive waste contains substantial amounts of ion-exchange resins from decontamination procedures. Degradation of these organic waste forms by radiolysis in a repository is a source of concern in radioactive waste management. Radiolytic degradation experiments with strong acidic ion exchange resins resulted in the formation of the complexing ligands oxalate and ligand X, whose structure could not be identified. In the case of anion exchange resins, ammonia and methylamines were detected. I assessed the influence of these ligands on radionuclide speciation in groundwater and cement pore water of a repository using the 'backdoor approach'. Prussian Blue, Fe{sup III}{sub 4} [Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}]{sub 3}, and structurally related transition metal compounds like Ni{sub 2}[Fe(CN){sub 6}] are used as cesium ion exchangers in decontamination procedures of liquid radioactive waste. The used ion exchangers

  8. Radioactive contaminants in the subsurface: the influence of complexing ligands on trace metal speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    in Swiss radioactive waste disposal projects. Within the scope of this TDB project I reviewed extensively thermodynamic data for Th, Pd, Al, and solubility and metal complexation of silicates, the review considering not only U, Np, Pu, Am, Tc, Ni, Se and Zr, but also the major constituents of ground and surface waters, i.e. H, Na, K, Mg and Ca. The decision to evaluate the organic ligands oxalate, citrate, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (edta) and α-isosaccharinate (isa) was based on two aspects, namely the importance of the ligands in radioactive waste problems, and the availability of experimental data. (ii) In many case studies involving inorganic and simple organic ligands a serious lack of reliable thermodynamic data is encountered. There, a new modeling approach to estimate the effects of these missing data was applied. This so called 'backdoor approach' begins with the question: 'What total concentration of a ligand is necessary to significantly influence the speciation, and hence the solubility, of a given trace metal?' Radioactive waste contains substantial amounts of ion-exchange resins from decontamination procedures. Degradation of these organic waste forms by radiolysis in a repository is a source of concern in radioactive waste management. Radiolytic degradation experiments with strong acidic ion exchange resins resulted in the formation of the complexing ligands oxalate and ligand X, whose structure could not be identified. In the case of anion exchange resins, ammonia and methylamines were detected. I assessed the influence of these ligands on radionuclide speciation in groundwater and cement pore water of a repository using the 'backdoor approach'. Prussian Blue, FeIII4 [FeII(CN)6]3, and structurally related transition metal compounds like Ni2[Fe(CN)6] are used as cesium ion exchangers in decontamination procedures of liquid radioactive waste. The used ion exchangers are conditioned as cementitious waste form for interim storage and finally will become

  9. Trace metal distribution in the Arosa estuary (N.W. Spain): The application of a recently developed sequential extraction procedure for metal partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the trace metal distribution in sediment samples from the Galician coast (Spain) has been performed. A multielement extraction method optimised via experimental design has been employed. The method uses centrifugation to pass the extractant solution at varying pH, through the sediment sample. The sequential leaches were collected and analysed by ICP-AES. Chemometric approaches were utilised to identify the composition of the physico-chemical components in order to characterise the sample. The samples collected at different sites could be classified according to their differences in metal bio-availability and important information regarding element distribution within the physico-chemical components is given. The method has proved to be a quick and reliable way to evaluate sediment samples for environmental geochemistry analysis. In addition, this approach has potential as fast screening method for the bio-availability of metals in the environment

  10. Development of a method for detecting trace metals in aqueous solutions based on the coordination chemistry of hexahydrotriazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtecki, Rudy J; Yuen, Alexander Y; Zimmerman, Thomas G; Jones, Gavin O; Horn, Hans W; Boday, Dylan J; Hedrick, James L; García, Jeannette M

    2015-08-01

    The detection of trace amounts (indicators and a low cost fluorimeter-based detection system. This method takes advantage of the inherent properties of HTs to coordinate strongly with metal ions in solution, a fundamental property that was studied using a combination of analytical tools (UV-Vis titrations, (1)H-NMR titrations and computational modeling). Based on these fundamental studies that show significant changes in the HT UV signature when a metal ion is present, HT compounds were used to prepare indicator strips that resulted in significant fluorescence changes when a metal was present. A portable and economical approach was adopted to test the concept of utilizing HTs to detect heavy metals using a fluorimeter system that consisted of a low-pressure mercury lamp, a photo-detector, a monolithic photodiode and an amplifier, which produces a voltage proportional to the magnitude of the visible fluorescence emission. Readings of the prepared HT test strips were evaluated by exposure to two different heavy metals at the safe threshold concentration described by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for Cr(3+) and Ag(2+) (100 μg L(-1) and 6.25, respectively). This method of detection could be used to the presence of either metal at these threshold concentrations. PMID:26035633

  11. Monitoring of trace metals in tissues of Wallago attu (lanchi) from the Indus River as an indicator of environmental pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghanim, K A; Mahboob, Shahid; Seemab, Sadia; Sultana, S; Sultana, T; Al-Misned, Fahad; Ahmed, Z

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to assess the bioaccumulation of selected four trace metals (Cd, Ni, Zn and Co) in four tissues (muscles, skin, gills and liver) of a freshwater fish Wallago attu (lanchi) from three different sites (upstream, middle stream and downstream) of the Indus River in Mianwali district of Pakistan. Heavy metal contents in water samples and from different selected tissues of fish were examined by using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The data were statistically compared to study the effects of the site and fish organs and their interaction on the bioaccumulation pattern of these metals at P  liver > skin > muscle. The order of bioaccumulation of these metals was Ni < Zn < Co < Cd. Heavy metal concentrations were increased during the dry season as compared to the wet season. The results of this study indicate that freshwater fish produced and marketed in Mianwali have concentrations below the standards of FEPA/WHO for these toxic metals. PMID:26858541

  12. Benthic flux of nutrients and trace metals in the northern component of San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, James S.; Topping, Brent R.; Parcheso, Francis; Engelstad, Anita C.; Greene, Valerie E.

    2009-01-01

    Two sets of sampling trips were coordinated in late summer 2008 (weeks of July 8 and August 6) to sample the interstitial and overlying bottom waters at 10 shallow locations (9 sites metals) that may affect the base of the food web in this part of the estuary. A nonmetallic pore-water profiler was used to obtain the first centimeter-scale estimates of the vertical solute-concentration gradients for diffusive-flux determinations. This study, performed in collaboration with scientists from San Francisco State University?s Romberg Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies, provides information to assist in developing and refining management strategies for the Bay/Delta system and supports efforts to monitor changes in food-web structure associated with regional habitat modifications directed by the California Bay-Delta Authority. On July 7, 2008, and August 5, 2008, pore-water profilers were successfully deployed at six North Bay sites per trip to measure the concentration gradient of dissolved macronutrients and trace metals near the sediment-water interface. Only two of the sites (433 and SSB009 within Honker Bay) were sampled in both series of profiler deployments. At each sampling site, profilers were deployed in triplicate, while discrete samples and dataloggers were used to collect ancillary data from both the water column and benthos to help interpret diffusive-flux measurements. Benthic flux of dissolved (0.2-micron filtered) inorganic phosphate (that is, soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP)) ranged from negligible levels (-0.003?0.005 millimole per square meter per day (mmole m-2d-1) at Site 4.1 outside Honker Bay) to 0.060?0.006 mmole m-2d-1 near the northern coast of Brown?s Island. Except for the elevated flux at Browns Island, the benthic flux of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) was consistently: (1) lower than previously reported for South Bay sites, (2) an order of magnitude lower than oligotrophic Coeur d?Alene Lake, (3) two orders of magnitude lower than

  13. Geochemical Distribution of Trace Metals and Assessment of Anthropogenic Pollution in Sediments of Old Nakagawa River, Tokyo, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Zakir

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The geochemical distributions of cadmium (Cd, copper (Cu, chromium (Cr, lead (Pb and zinc (Zn were examined in sediments collected from Old Nakagawa River (NR, Tokyo, Japan. A widely used 5-step sequential extraction procedure was employed for the fractionation of the metals and the concentrations were measured in the liquid extracts by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. The association of Cd (76-98% and Zn (48-67% were found highest with AEC (adsorbed/exchangeable/carbonate phase, Cu (45-60% and Pb (44-73% with amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide phase and the maximum fractionation of Cr was in both crystalline Fe oxide (12-60% and amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide phase (15-60%. For retention by amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide minerals, the observed stoichiometric gradient was: 1.52 for Cu, 1.23 for Pb, 2.25 for Cr and 3.09 for Zn. Corresponding values for association with crystalline oxides and sulphides and organics were an order of magnitude greater than those for amorphous oxyhydroxide, indicating a greater affinity of trace metals for these phases. The total concentration ranges of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn in NR sediments were 2.86-16.95, 551.7-3953.1, 340.6-1565.3, 136.9-385.9 and 931.4-3650.1 µg g-1, respectively. The observed order of potential trace metal mobility in the aquatic system was: Cd>Zn>Pb>Cu>Cr. Organic carbon contents in sediment samples were comparatively high (mean 5.48% and the X-ray diffraction (XRD study detected the presence of several clay minerals, those are likely to be major host of trace metals in sediments. The sediments of NR was considered to be polluted on the basis of unpolluted sediments and geochemical background values with respect to Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn. According to the enrichment factors (EFc, most of the sites have several times higher values of trace metals than the standard. The study revealed that the pollution in sediments of NR could be linked to anthropogenic activities such as industrialization

  14. Depositional record of trace metals and degree of contamination in core sediments from the Mandovi estuarine mangrove ecosystem, west coast of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Depositional trends of trace metals in Mandovi estuary were established. • Lithogenic and anthropogenic sources of metals were studied using SEM. • Degree of pollution is assessed using geo-accumulation index of trace metals. • Fe and Mn are highly enriched in the Mandovi estuary than other Indian estuaries. - Abstract: The concentrations of seven trace metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Cr, Co, Pb and Zn) in three sediment cores were analysed to assess the depositional trends of metals and their contamination level in the Mandovi estuary, west coast of India. All sediment cores showed enrichment of trace metals in the upper part of core sediments and decrease in concentration with depth, suggesting excess of anthropogenic loading (including mining activities) occurred during the recent past. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images distinguished the shape, size and structure of particles derived from lithogenic and anthropogenic sources in core sediments. The geo-accumulation index (Igeo) values indicate that Mandovi estuary is ‘moderately polluted’ with Pb, whereas ‘unpolluted to moderately polluted’ with Fe, Mn, Cu, Cr, Co and Zn. The comparative analysis of trace metals revealed that Fe and Mn were highly enriched in the Mandovi estuary compared to all other Indian estuaries

  15. Petroleum hydrocarbons and trace metals in Visakhapatnam harbour and Kakinada Bay, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.; VaraPrasad, S.J.D.; Gupta, G.V.M.; Sudhakar, U.

    ) in surficial sediments indicated higher contamination in Visakhapatnam harbour than in Kakinada Bay. Positive correlations between Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd suggest common sources of these metals. Lack of correlation between Co, Ni with the other metals indicate point...

  16. Identification and characterization of trace metals in black solid materials deposited from biomass burning at the cooking stoves in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, Mahmodul; Salam, Abdus; Alam, A.M. Shafiqul [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Dhaka, Dhaka -1000 (Bangladesh)

    2009-10-15

    In this study we have reported the emissions of trace metals from biomass burning at the cooking stoves. Black solid materials deposited from two different types of biomass (rice husk coils - type 1; mixed (straw, bamboo, cow dung, leaves and plants) biomasses - type 2) burning at the cooking stoves were collected from the top of the stoves (but inside the roof of the kitchen) in Narsingdi, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Systematic chemical analysis was done for both samples. Lead, mercury, iron and calcium were identified in sample type-1, and lead, iron and magnesium were identified in sample type-2. The concentration of the trace element was determined with an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The average concentrations of lead, iron, cadmium calcium, potassium and magnesium were 95.6, 11520, 8.33, 1635, 17.1 and 443.1 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively in sample type-1. The average concentration of lead, iron, cadmium calcium, potassium and magnesium were 125.2, 12360, 12.0, 1648, 21.5 and 534.2 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively in sample type-2. However, the average concentrations of the determined trace elements followed the sequences, Fe > Ca > Mg > Pb > K > Cd. The emission of lead, iron, cadmium, calcium, potassium and magnesium were much higher from mixed biomass (type-2) compared than the rich husk coils (type-1). The mixed biomass produced about 31% higher lead, 44% higher cadmium, 26% higher potassium, and 21% higher magnesium compared than the rice husk coils. This is the first systematic analysis for the trace metal emissions from different types of biomass burning at the cooking stoves in Bangladesh. (author)

  17. Identification and characterization of trace metals in black solid materials deposited from biomass burning at the cooking stoves in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we have reported the emissions of trace metals from biomass burning at the cooking stoves. Black solid materials deposited from two different types of biomass (rice husk coils - type 1; mixed (straw, bamboo, cow dung, leaves and plants) biomasses - type 2) burning at the cooking stoves were collected from the top of the stoves (but inside the roof of the kitchen) in Narsingdi, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Systematic chemical analysis was done for both samples. Lead, mercury, iron and calcium were identified in sample type-1, and lead, iron and magnesium were identified in sample type-2. The concentration of the trace element was determined with an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The average concentrations of lead, iron, cadmium calcium, potassium and magnesium were 95.6, 11520, 8.33, 1635, 17.1 and 443.1 mg kg-1, respectively in sample type-1. The average concentration of lead, iron, cadmium calcium, potassium and magnesium were 125.2, 12360, 12.0, 1648, 21.5 and 534.2 mg kg-1, respectively in sample type-2. However, the average concentrations of the determined trace elements followed the sequences, Fe > Ca > Mg > Pb > K > Cd. The emission of lead, iron, cadmium, calcium, potassium and magnesium were much higher from mixed biomass (type-2) compared than the rich husk coils (type-1). The mixed biomass produced about 31% higher lead, 44% higher cadmium, 26% higher potassium, and 21% higher magnesium compared than the rice husk coils. This is the first systematic analysis for the trace metal emissions from different types of biomass burning at the cooking stoves in Bangladesh.

  18. Polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides and trace metals in cultured and harvested bivalves from the eastern Adriatic coast (Croatia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milun, Vesna; Lušić, Jelena; Despalatović, Marija

    2016-06-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides and trace metals were determined in tissues of bivalve molluscs (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Ostrea edulis, Venus verrucosa, Arca noae and Callista chione), collected from 11 harvesting and 2 cultured locations along the eastern Adriatic coast, in May and November 2012. Concentrations (ng g(-1) dry weight) of organochlorines ranged from 1.53 to 21.1 for PCBs and 0.68 to 5.21 for p,p'-DDTs. HCB, lindane, heptachlor and aldrin-like compounds were found in lower levels or were not detected. Metal concentrations (mg kg(-1) dry weight) ranged from 0.23 to 4.03 for Cd, 0.87-3.43 for Cr, 3.69-202.3 for Cu, 0.06-0.26 for HgT, 0.62-9.42 for Ni, 0.95-4.64 for Pb, and 55.76-4010.3 for Zn. Established organochlorine and trace metal levels were lower than the maximum allowable levels in seafood set by the European Commission. PMID:27010163

  19. A novel in situ method for sampling urban soil dust: Particle size distribution, trace metal concentrations, and stable lead isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a novel in situ sampling method was utilized to investigate the concentrations of trace metals and Pb isotope compositions among different particle size fractions in soil dust, bulk surface soil, and corresponding road dust samples collected within an urban environment. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the feasibility of using soil dust samples to determine trace metal contamination and potential risks in urban areas in comparison with related bulk surface soil and road dust. The results of total metal loadings and Pb isotope ratios revealed that soil dust is more sensitive than bulk surface soil to anthropogenic contamination in urban areas. The new in situ method is effective at collecting different particle size fractions of soil dust from the surface of urban soils, and that soil dust is a critical indicator of anthropogenic contamination and potential human exposure in urban settings. -- Highlights: ► A novel in situ sampling method for soil dust was proposed. ► Different particle size fractions of soil dust and bulk soil were studied. ► Soil dust is critical for understanding anthropogenic pollution in urban areas. ► Soil dust can be useful to estimate potential human exposure. -- Soil dust collected by a novel in situ sampling method can provide critical information about contamination and potential human exposure in urban environments

  20. Partitioning and mobility of trace metals in the Blesbokspruit: Impact assessment of dewatering of mine waters in the East Rand, South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roychoudhury, Alakendra N. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)]. E-mail: aroy@geology.uct.ac.za; Starke, Michael F. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)

    2006-06-15

    A suite of trace metals was analyzed in water and sediment samples from the Blesbokspruit, a Ramsar certified riparian wetland, to assess the impact of mining on the sediment quality and the fate of trace metals in the environment. Limited mobility of trace metals was observed primarily because of their high partition coefficient in alkaline waters. Nickel was most mobile with a mean K {sub d} of 10{sup 3.28} L kg{sup -1} whereas Zr was least mobile with a mean K {sub d} of 10{sup 5.47} L kg{sup -1}. The overall trace metal mobility sequence, derived for the Blesbokspruit, in increasing order, is: Zr < Cr < Pb < Ba < V < Cu < Zn < Sr < Mn < U < Mo < Co < Ni. Once removed from the solution, most trace metals were preferentially associated with the carbonate and Fe-Mn oxide fraction followed by the exchangeable fraction of the sediments. Organic C played a limited role in trace metal uptake. Only Cu was primarily associated with the organic fraction whereas Ti and Zr were mostly found in the residual fraction. Compared to their regional background, Au and Ag were most enriched, at times by a factor of 20-400, in the sediments. Significant enrichment of U, Hg, V, Cr, Co, Cu and Zn was also observed in the sediments. The calculated geoaccumulation indices suggest that the sediments are very lightly to lightly polluted with respect to most trace metals and highly polluted with respect to Au and Ag. The metal pollution index (MPI) for the 20 sampled sites varied between 2.9 and 45.7. The highest MPI values were found at sites that were close to tailings dams. Sediment eco-toxicity was quantified by calculating the sediment quality guideline index (SQG-I). The calculated SQG-I values (0.09-0.69) suggest that the sediments at the study area have low to moderate potential for eco-toxicity.

  1. Partitioning and mobility of trace metals in the Blesbokspruit: Impact assessment of dewatering of mine waters in the East Rand, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A suite of trace metals was analyzed in water and sediment samples from the Blesbokspruit, a Ramsar certified riparian wetland, to assess the impact of mining on the sediment quality and the fate of trace metals in the environment. Limited mobility of trace metals was observed primarily because of their high partition coefficient in alkaline waters. Nickel was most mobile with a mean K d of 103.28 L kg-1 whereas Zr was least mobile with a mean K d of 105.47 L kg-1. The overall trace metal mobility sequence, derived for the Blesbokspruit, in increasing order, is: Zr < Cr < Pb < Ba < V < Cu < Zn < Sr < Mn < U < Mo < Co < Ni. Once removed from the solution, most trace metals were preferentially associated with the carbonate and Fe-Mn oxide fraction followed by the exchangeable fraction of the sediments. Organic C played a limited role in trace metal uptake. Only Cu was primarily associated with the organic fraction whereas Ti and Zr were mostly found in the residual fraction. Compared to their regional background, Au and Ag were most enriched, at times by a factor of 20-400, in the sediments. Significant enrichment of U, Hg, V, Cr, Co, Cu and Zn was also observed in the sediments. The calculated geoaccumulation indices suggest that the sediments are very lightly to lightly polluted with respect to most trace metals and highly polluted with respect to Au and Ag. The metal pollution index (MPI) for the 20 sampled sites varied between 2.9 and 45.7. The highest MPI values were found at sites that were close to tailings dams. Sediment eco-toxicity was quantified by calculating the sediment quality guideline index (SQG-I). The calculated SQG-I values (0.09-0.69) suggest that the sediments at the study area have low to moderate potential for eco-toxicity

  2. Elemental analyses of goundwater: demonstrated advantage of low-flow sampling and trace-metal clean techniques over standard techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasey, C. L.; Flegal, A. R.

    The combined use of both (1) low-flow purging and sampling and (2) trace-metal clean techniques provides more representative measurements of trace-element concentrations in groundwater than results derived with standard techniques. The use of low-flow purging and sampling provides relatively undisturbed groundwater samples that are more representative of in situ conditions, and the use of trace-element clean techniques limits the inadvertent introduction of contaminants during sampling, storage, and analysis. When these techniques are applied, resultant trace-element concentrations are likely to be markedly lower than results based on standard sampling techniques. In a comparison of data derived from contaminated and control groundwater wells at a site in California, USA, trace-element concentrations from this study were 2-1000 times lower than those determined by the conventional techniques used in sampling of the same wells prior to (5months) and subsequent to (1month) the collections for this study. Specifically, the cadmium and chromium concentrations derived using standard sampling techniques exceed the California Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL), whereas in this investigation concentrations of both of those elements are substantially below their MCLs. Consequently, the combined use of low-flow and trace-metal clean techniques may preclude erroneous reports of trace-element contamination in groundwater. Résumé L'utilisation simultanée de la purge et de l'échantillonnage à faible débit et des techniques sans traces de métaux permet d'obtenir des mesures de concentrations en éléments en traces dans les eaux souterraines plus représentatives que les résultats fournis par les techniques classiques. L'utilisation de la purge et de l'échantillonnage à faible débit donne des échantillons d'eau souterraine relativement peu perturbés qui sont plus représentatifs des conditions in situ, et le recours aux techniques sans éléments en traces limite l

  3. Elemental analyses of goundwater: demonstrated advantage of low-flow sampling and trace-metal clean techniques over standard techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasey, C. L.; Flegal, A. R.

    The combined use of both (1) low-flow purging and sampling and (2) trace-metal clean techniques provides more representative measurements of trace-element concentrations in groundwater than results derived with standard techniques. The use of low-flow purging and sampling provides relatively undisturbed groundwater samples that are more representative of in situ conditions, and the use of trace-element clean techniques limits the inadvertent introduction of contaminants during sampling, storage, and analysis. When these techniques are applied, resultant trace-element concentrations are likely to be markedly lower than results based on standard sampling techniques. In a comparison of data derived from contaminated and control groundwater wells at a site in California, USA, trace-element concentrations from this study were 2-1000 times lower than those determined by the conventional techniques used in sampling of the same wells prior to (5months) and subsequent to (1month) the collections for this study. Specifically, the cadmium and chromium concentrations derived using standard sampling techniques exceed the California Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL), whereas in this investigation concentrations of both of those elements are substantially below their MCLs. Consequently, the combined use of low-flow and trace-metal clean techniques may preclude erroneous reports of trace-element contamination in groundwater. Résumé L'utilisation simultanée de la purge et de l'échantillonnage à faible débit et des techniques sans traces de métaux permet d'obtenir des mesures de concentrations en éléments en traces dans les eaux souterraines plus représentatives que les résultats fournis par les techniques classiques. L'utilisation de la purge et de l'échantillonnage à faible débit donne des échantillons d'eau souterraine relativement peu perturbés qui sont plus représentatifs des conditions in situ, et le recours aux techniques sans éléments en traces limite l

  4. The stability of trace metals suspensions in heavy crudes as determined by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of trace elements in petroleum has increased, since the role of nonhydrocarbon components has been recognized in the elucidation of the mechanisms of migration and origin of crudes. Knowledge of trace elements in petroleum is also important in the refining and processing of crudes. In developing different instrumental analytical techniques for trace analysis of crudes, little attention has been devoted to the scatter of data due to poor sampling and to the proper nature of the matrix. In the present paper the results of the determination of 17 trace elements including Co, Zn, Fe, V, Ni, Mo, Ba, Cs, Au, Br, Se, Sc, As, Mn, La, Eu and Cu are presented. A multielemental neutron activation analysis in a purely instrumental form was performed on a homogenized sample and the results are compared with those obtained on the same sample after a seven-month period. The results clearly show that the crude loses its induced homogeneous nature and that a standard heavy crude can not be stocked for comparison purposes. For the heavy asphaltene fractions, results of the analysis of the same trace elements are presented and the possibility of its use as a standard is discussed. (T.G.)

  5. Insights into the chemical partitioning of trace metals in roadside and off-road agricultural soils along two major highways in Attica's region, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botsou, Fotini; Sungur, Ali; Kelepertzis, Efstratios; Soylak, Mustafa

    2016-10-01

    We report in this study the magnetic properties and partitioning patterns of selected trace metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Cd, Ni) in roadside and off-road (>200m distance from the road edge) agricultural soils collected along two major highways in Greece. Sequential extractions revealed that the examined trace metals for the entire data set were predominantly found in the residual fraction, averaging 37% for Cd up to 80% for Cu. Due to the strong influence of lithogenic factors, trace metal pseudototal contents of the roadside soils did not differ significantly to those of the off-road soils. Magnetic susceptibility and frequency dependent magnetic susceptibility determinations showed a magnetic enhancement of soils; however, it was primarily related to geogenic factors and not to traffic-derived magnetic particles. These results highlight that in areas characterized by strong geogenic backgrounds, neither pseudototal trace metal contents nor magnetic properties determinations effectively capture traffic-related contamination of topsoils. The vehicular emission signal was traced by the increased acid-soluble and reducible trace metal contents of the roadside soils compared to their off-road counterparts. In the case of Cu and Zn, changes in the partitioning patterns were also observed between the roadside and off-road soils. Environmental risks associated with agricultural lands extending at the margins of the studied highways may arise from the elevated Ni contents (both pseudototal and potentially mobile), and future studies should investigate Ni levels in the edible parts of plants grown on these agricultural soils. PMID:27288953

  6. Characterization of trace metals in airborne carbonaceous aerosols by single-particle EDX – Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrodangelo A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The presence of fine and ultrafine metal particles has been evidenced in size segregated airborne carbonaceous aerosols collected at one industrial and two background (urban and rural sites during an extended field campaign in Central Italy. Analysis of the backscattered electrons (BSE by SEM – EDX demonstrated an effective potential in evidencing main structural features of the metal content in identified carbon aerosols. Many observed ultrafine metal particles appear embedded in the skeleton of carbonaceous individual particles and aggregates in the coarse fraction, while the same is not evident in the case of mixed carbon-sulphates aerosol that has been detected in the submicron size. These carbon-sulphates formations include indeed nano-sized metal particles that appear physically combined but not embedded. Also, larger metal particles (ranging around 1 μm physical size were observed close to carbon materials, but not included in their structure. Main compositional differences of metal particles with size segregation could be evidenced by energy – dispersive X ray spectrometry (EDX. Larger particles are mainly rich in Fe, frequently in presence of Mn, Cu, Cr and Zn in variable proportions; either oxidized or elemental metals were detected. On the other hand, ultrafine particles associated with carbon–sulphates aerosol are enriched in Pb and Zn, although the presence of other trace elements not detectable by SEM – EDX technique cannot be excluded. Moreover, Ce-enriched ultrafine particles were clearly determined in cenospheres. Conversely, inclusion of fine and ultrafine metal particles was rarely or not observed in soot aggregates.

  7. Temporal and spatial variability of trace metals in suspended matter of the Mandovi estuary, central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shynu, R.; Rao, V.P.; Kessarkar, P.M.; Rao, T.G.

    riverine inputs. Trace metals, on the other hand, can be derived from the weathering of rocks and/or anthropogenic sources derived from mining, industrial and urban development and other human practices near river and estuaries (Zhang et al. 1990... from the mouth during dry season. Fishing activity comes to a stand still during the monsoon and all the mechanized fishing boats are stationed at the lower estuary. About two-thirds of the mining activities for Fe-Mn ores in Goa are located...

  8. Novel sample introduction system to reduce ICP-OES sample size for plutonium metal trace impurity determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new methodology for trace elemental analysis in plutonium metal samples was developed by interfacing the novel micro-FAST sample introduction system with an ICP-OES instrument. This integrated system, especially when coupled with a low flow rate nebulization technique, reduced the sample volume requirement significantly. Improvements to instrument sensitivity and measurement precision, as well as long term stability, were also achieved by this modified ICP-OES system. The sample size reduction, together with other instrument performance merits, is of great significance, especially to nuclear material analysis. (author)

  9. Determination of trace elements and heavy metals in agricultural products cultivated at the river Rimac in the city of Lima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are strong indications that the river Rimac valley is being contaminated with heavy metals and an excess of trace elements that come from some industrial and mining activities developed along the river Rimac valley. The agricultural products cultivated therein could be suffering the same effect. Nuclear and related analytical techniques will play an important role in the study of pollution by providing information concerning the degree of contamination in some agricultural products cultivated in the valley and consumed by the population of Lima. (author)

  10. Measurement of environmental trace-metal levels in Mediterranean coastal areas with transplanted mussels and DGT techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schintu, M; Durante, L; Maccioni, A; Meloni, P; Degetto, S; Contu, A

    2008-01-01

    Mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) devices were deployed together for three one-month periods in coastal waters of Sardinia (Italy), in order to assess the levels of Cd, Cu, Ni, and Pb in areas differently affected by anthropogenic activities. DGT devices were more sensitive than mussels in detecting differences in metal concentrations between sites, while interpretation of the biomonitoring data revealed difficulties related to the biotic and abiotic factors that can influence the measurements. Regression analysis showed a significant correlation between Cd and Pb concentrations measured in the mussel tissues and bioavailable metal levels in seawater. Moreover transplanted mussels did not accumulate Cu and Ni following pre-exposure, although DGT showed significant concentrations of bioavailable forms of these metals in seawater. The results provided an estimate of the water quality with respect to dissolved metals and pointed out the usefulness of a combination of biomonitoring and DGT techniques for a better understanding of trace metal availability in coastal waters. PMID:18396298

  11. Detection of trace metallic elements in oral lichenoid contact lesions using SR-XRF, PIXE, and XAFS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Tomoko; Uo, Motohiro; Wada, Takahiro; Omagari, Daisuke; Komiyama, Kazuo; Miyazaki, Serika; Numako, Chiya; Noguchi, Tadahide; Jinbu, Yoshinori; Kusama, Mikio; Mori, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid contact lesions (OLCL) are chronic inflammatory mucocutaneous reactions with a risk of malignant transformation that alter the epithelium. OLP and OLCL have similar clinical and histopathological features and it is difficult to distinguish one from the other. Metallic restorations are suspected to generate OLCLs. Trace metal analysis of OLCL specimens may facilitate the discrimination of symptoms and identification of causative metallic restorations. The purpose of this study was to assess OLCL tissue samples for the prevalence of metallic elements derived from dental restorations, and to discriminate OLCL from OLP by using synchrotron radiation-excited X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-XRF), particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). Typical elements of dental materials were detected in the OLCL, whereas no obvious element accumulation was detected in OLP and negative control specimens. The origin of the detected metallic elements was presumed to be dental alloys through erosion. Therefore, our findings support the feasibility of providing supporting information to distinguish OLCL from OLP by using elemental analysis. PMID:26085368

  12. Three tropical seagrasses as potential bio-indicators to trace metals in Xincun Bay, Hainan Island, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lei; HUANG Xiaoping

    2012-01-01

    Concentrations of the trace metals Cu,Cd,Pb,and Zn were measured in seawater,rhizosphere sediments,interstitial water,and the tissues of three tropical species of seagrasses (Thalassia hemprichii,Enhalus acoroides and Cymodocea rotundata) from Xincun Bay of Hainan Island,South China.We analyzed different environmental compartments and the highest concentrations of Pb and Zn were found in the interstitial and seawater.The concentrations of Cd and Zn were significantly higher in blades compared with roots or rhizomes in T.hemprichii and E.acoroides,respectively.A metal pollution index (MPI) demonstrated that sediment,interstitial water,and seagrasses in the sites located nearest anthropogenic sources of pollution had the most abundant metal concentrations.There was obvious seasonal variation of these metals in the three seagrasses with higher concentrations of Cu,Pb and Zn in January and Cd in July.Furthermore,the relationships between metal concentrations in seagrasses and environmental compartments were positively correlated significantly.The bioconcentration factors (BCF) demonstrated that Cd from the tissues of the three seagrasses might be absorbed from the sediment by the roots.However,for C.rotundata,Zn is likely to be derived from the seawater through its blades.Therefore,the blades of T.hemprichii,E.acoroides and C.rotundata are potential bio-indicators to Cd content in sediment,and additionally Zn content (C.rotundata only) in seawater.

  13. Trace metallic elements in Helix aspersa terrestrial snails of a semiarid ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of some major elements and traces in soil samples and of Helix aspersa eatable terrestrial snails were analysed at the Radioactive Wastes Storage Center (CADER) and in other reference sites. The methodology includes the use of an atomic absorption spectrophotometer, an X-ray fluorescence equipment and an Icp-mass spectroscope. The concentrations of some toxic elements (Ba, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb and V) in the soft tissue of the snails were greater than the toxic levels reported in the literature for such trace elements. The snails compared with another wild eatable foods present transfer coefficients soil-snail high relatively. (Author)

  14. USEPA METHOD STUDY 38 - SW-846 METHOD 3010, ACID DIGESTION OF AQUEOUS SAMPLES AND EXTRACTS FOR TRACE METALS BY FLAME ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    An interlaboratory collaborative study was conducted on SW-846 Method 3010, "Acid Digestion of Aqueous Samples and Extracts for Total Metals for Analysis by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy", to determine the mean recovery and precision for analyses of 21 trace metals in surf...

  15. Dynamics of trace metals in organisms and ecosystems: Prediction of metal bioconcentration in different organisms and estimation of exposure risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal ions interact with biological materials and their decomposition products by ligation (coordination complex-formation with certain moieties containing O, N, S, etc.). The extent of this interaction depends on the identities of both ligand and metal ion and can be described by some equation derived from perturbation theory. Uptake of metal ions - including highly toxic ones - from soils is controlled by a competition between root exudate components and soil organic matter (SOM) for the ions. SOM consists of a variety of potential ligands which evolve during humification towards more efficient binding (retention) of metals such as Cu, Ni, Cr but also of toxicants like U, Cd. The actual way of interaction can be inferred from stoichiometry of the involved compounds and the C/N ratio in the soil, providing predictions as to which metals will be most efficiently shuttled into green plants or fungi, respectively. The latter, selective process is crucial for closing nutrient cycles and sensitively depends on C/N ratio and the extent of 'forcing' by on falling leaf or needle litter. Therefore, analytical data on the soil can be used to predict possible risks of exposition to toxic metals also for human consumption of plant parts. - Degradation, amounts and evolution of N-free vs. nitrogenous SOM control transfer of essential and toxic metals from soil into plants, to be estimated from coordination (bio-)chemistry

  16. Distribution, enrichment, and potential toxicity of trace metals in the surface sediments of Sundarban mangrove ecosystem, Bangladesh: a baseline study before Sundarban oil spill of December, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Alok; Ramanathan, Al; Prasad, M B K; Datta, Dilip; Kumar, Manoj; Sappal, Swati Mohan

    2016-05-01

    The distribution, enrichment, and ecotoxicity potential of Bangladesh part of Sundarban mangrove was investigated for eight trace metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn) using sediment quality assessment indices. The average concentration of trace metals in the sediments exceeded the crustal abundance suggesting sources other than natural in origin. Additionally, the trace metals profile may be a reflection of socio-economic development in the vicinity of Sundarban which further attributes trace metals abundance to the anthropogenic inputs. A total of eleven surficial sediment samples were collected along a vertical transect along the freshwater-saline water gradient. The sediment samples were digested using EPA 3051 method and were analyzed on ICP-MS. Geo-accumulation index suggests moderately polluted sediment quality with respect to Ni and As and background concentrations for Al, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, Co, As, and Cd. Contamination factor analysis suggested low contamination by Zn, Cr, Co, and Cd, moderate by Fe, Mn, Cu, and Pb while Ni and As show considerable and high contamination, respectively. Enrichment factors for Ni, Pb, and As suggests high contamination from either biota or anthropogenic inputs besides natural enrichment. As per the three sediment quality guidelines, Fe, Mn, Cu, Ni, Co, and As would be more of a concern with respect to ecotoxicological risk in the Sundarban mangroves. The correlation between various physiochemical variables and trace metals suggested significant role of fine grained particles (clay) in trace metal distribution whereas owing to low organic carbon content in the region the organic complexation may not be playing significant role in trace metal distribution in the Sundarban mangroves. PMID:26822216

  17. Trace Metal Inventories and Lead Isotopic Composition Chronicle a Forest Fire’s Remobilization of Industrial Contaminants Deposited in the Angeles National Forest

    OpenAIRE

    Odigie, Kingsley O.; Flegal, A. Russell

    2014-01-01

    The amounts of labile trace metals: [Co] (3 to 11 µg g−1), [Cu] (15 to 69 µg g−1), [Ni] (6 to 15 µg g−1), [Pb] (7 to 42 µg g−1), and [Zn] (65 to 500 µg g−1) in ash collected from the 2012 Williams Fire in Los Angeles, California attest to the role of fires in remobilizing industrial metals deposited in forests. These remobilized trace metals may be dispersed by winds, increasing human exposures, and they may be deposited in water bodies, increasing exposures in aquatic ecosystems. Correlation...

  18. Physico-Chemical parameters and trace-metals concentration in effluents from various industries in vicinity of Lahore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing problem of pollution has become serious in almost all big cities of Pakistan. The industrial effluents (Liquid waste) discharged by different industries are drained into streams/nallahs, which ultimately join the waterways (streams, lakes, rivers or sea). The effluent samples from five industries, like Tanneries, Chemicals, Pharmaceuticals, Fertilizers and metal/electroplating, working in Lahore, Sheikhupura and Kalashahkaku were selected for analysis. The parameters, like Temperature, pH, conductivity, hardness, alkalinity, total dissolved solids, chemical oxygen demands, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, major cations (Na, K, Ca, Mg) and heavy/trace metals, were studied. The results were compared with National environmental Quality standards (NEQS). It was further observed that when effluents of industries join fresh water of stream, lakes or rivers, this causes severe water-pollution and damages the flora and fauna. Suggestions for effective control of water-pollution are also given. (author)

  19. Solar UV-treatment of water samples for stripping-voltammetric determination of trace heavy metals in Awash river, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldemichael, Gelaneh; Tulu, Taffa; Flechsig, Gerd-Uwe

    2016-03-01

    We report about testing a new mobile and sustainable water sample digestion method in a preliminary field trial in Ethiopia. In order to determine heavy metals at the ultra-trace level by stripping voltammetric techniques in water samples from Awash River, we applied our new method of solar UV-assisted sample pretreatment to destroy the relevant interfering dissolved organic matter. The field tests revealed that 24 h of solar UV irradiation were sufficient to achieve the same sample pretreatment results as with classic digestion method based on intense and hard UV. Analytical results of this study suggest that both a hydroelectric power station and agrichemical applications at Koka Lake have increased the levels of the investigated metals zinc, cadmium, lead, copper, cobalt, nickel, and uranium. PMID:27441266

  20. Sediment budget-based estimates of trace metal inputs to a Chesapeake estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, W. A.; Nielsen, C. C.; Cornwell, J. C.

    1993-09-01

    This article evaluates whether a sediment budget for the South River, Maryland, can be coupled with metals data from sediment cores to identify and quantify sources of historic metal inputs to marsh and subtidal sediments along the estuary. Metal inputs to estuarine marsh sediments come from fluvial runoff and atmospheric deposition. Metal inputs to subtidal sediments come from atmospheric deposition, fluvial runoff, coastal erosion, and estuarine waters. The metals budget for the estuary indicates that metal inputs from coastal erosion have remained relatively constant since 1840. Historical variations in metal contents of marsh sediments have probably resulted primarily from increasing atmospheric deposition in this century, but prior to 1900 may reflect changing fluvial sources, atmospheric inputs, or factors not quantified by the budget. Residual Pb, Cu, and Zn in the marsh sediments not accounted for by fluvial inputs was low to moderate in 1840, decreased to near zero circa 1910, and by 1987 had increased to levels that were one to ten times greater than those of 1840. Sources of variability in subtidal cores could not be clearly discerned because of geochemical fluxes, turbulent mixing, and bioturbation within the cores. The sediment-metal budgeting approach appears to be a viable method for delineating metal sources in small, relatively simple estuarine systems like the South River and in systems where recent deposition (for example, prograding marshes) prevents use of deep core analysis to identify “background” levels of metal. In larger systems or systems with more variable sources of sediment and metal input, however, assumptions and measurement errors in the metal budgeting approach suggest that deep core analysis and normalization techniques are probably preferable for identifying anthropogenic impacts.

  1. Assessment of Trace Metals Contamination of Surface Water and Sediment: A Case Study of Mvudi River, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua N. Edokpayi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Trace metals contamination of rivers and sediments remains a global threat to biodiversity and humans. This study was carried out to assess the variation pattern in trace metals contamination in Mvudi River water and sediments for the period of January–June 2014. Metal concentrations were analyzed using an inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer after nitric acid digestion. A compliance study for the water samples was performed using the guidelines of the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry (DWAF of South Africa and the World Health Organization (WHO. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA sediment quality guidelines for marine and estuarine sediments and the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment sediment guidelines (CCME for freshwater sediments were used to determine the possible toxic effects of the metals on aquatic organisms. pH (7.2–7.7 and conductivity (10.5–16.1 mS/m values complied with DWAF and WHO standards for domestic water use. Turbidity values in nephelometric turbidity units (NTU were in the range of 1.9–429 and exceeded the guideline values. The monthly average levels of trace metals in the water and sediments of Mvudi River were in the range of: Al (1.01–9.644 mg/L and 4296–5557 mg/kg, Cd (0.0003–0.002 mg/L and from below the detection limit to 2.19 mg/kg, Cr (0.015–0.357 mg/L and 44.23–149.52 mg/kg, Cu (0.024–0.185 mg/L and 13.22–1027 mg/kg, Fe (0.702–2.645 mg/L and 3840–6982 mg/kg, Mn (0.081–0.521 mg/L and 279–1638 mg/kg, Pb (0.002–0.042 mg/L and 1.775-4.157 mg/kg and Zn (0.031–0.261 mg/L and 14.481–39.88 mg/kg. The average concentrations of Al, Cr, Fe, Mn and Pb in the water samples exceeded the recommended guidelines of DWAF and WHO for domestic water use. High concentrations of Al and Fe were determined in the sediment samples. Generally, the concentrations of Cd, Cr and Cu in the sediments exceeded the corresponding effect range low

  2. Assessment of Trace Metals in Soil, Vegetation and Rodents in Relation to Metal Mining Activities in an Arid Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Rodríguez, Lia C; Alvarez-Castañeda, Sergio Ticul

    2016-07-01

    Areas where abandoned metal-extraction mines are located contain large quantities of mineral wastes derived from environmentally unsafe mining practices. These wastes contain many pollutants, such as heavy metals, which could be released to the environment through weathering and leaching, hence becoming an important source of environmental metal pollution. This study evaluates differences in the levels of lead, iron, nickel, manganese, copper and cadmium in rodents sharing the same type of diet under different microhabitat use in arid areas with past mining activities. Samples of soil, roots, branches and seeds of Palo Adán (Fouquieria diguetii) and specimens of two rodent species (Chaetodipus arenarius and C. spinatus) were collected in areas with impact from past metal mining activities as well as from areas with no mining impact. Both rodent species mirrored nickel and iron levels in soil and seeds, as well as lead levels in soil; however, C. arenarius accumulated higher levels of manganese, copper and cadmium. PMID:27207229

  3. Supercritical fluid extraction of trace metals from solid and liquid materials for analytical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal ions in solid and liquid materials can be extracted by supercritical CO2 containing a suitable ligand. Bis(trifluoroethyl)dithiocarbamate is an effective ligand for the extraction of transition metals and non-metals in supercritical CO2. Fluorinated β-diketones and tributyl phosphate in supercritical CO2 exhibit a positive synergistic extraction for the lanthanides and actinides from solid and liquid samples. Triazole containing crown ethers can also be used for selective extraction of heavy metals in supercritical CO2. (author)

  4. Effect of the FCC to HCP Phase Transition on Trace Element Partitioning Between Metal and Sulfide Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. J.; Thomas, R. B.; Fei, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Most of what we understand about the chemical behavior of iron alloys, even at high pressure, pertains to the fcc phase. However, it is widely thought that the relevant structure in the Earth's core is hcp, not fcc. In this study we aim to understand the effect of the fcc-hcp transition on siderophile element partitioning between metal and coexisting sulfide melt. This is important, for example, in evaluating models in which Re-Os-Pt isotope fractionations are attributed to partitioning between the Earth's inner and outer core. Experiments were doped with trace elements Ni, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt, which partitioned between Fe-Ru alloys and sulfide melt. Most experiments were performed at 1 bar in sealed silica tubes in a tube furnace, and some experiments were performed at 6 GPa in a multi-anvil press. The fcc-hcp transition was investigated by varying the Ru content of the experiments; the metal is fcc at Ru-poor compositions but hcp at higher Ru contents. The sulfur content of the melt varied with temperature and with bulk composition. The run products were characterized by electron microprobe, and abundances of the trace elements in both metal and melt were determined by laser ablation ICP-MS. The effect on partitioning of the phase transition can be distinguished from compositional effects because a range of Ru contents was studied. Our Ru-free dataare in good agreement with previously published data in the Fe-S system at 1 bar. However, our highest-Ru compositions show significant differences in their D values, attributable to the phase transition in the metal.

  5. Humic substances in natural waters and their complexation with trace metals and radionuclides: a review. [129 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boggs, S. Jr.; Livermore, D.; Seitz, M.G.

    1985-07-01

    Dissolved humic substances (humic and fulvic acids) occur in surface waters and groundwaters in concentrations ranging from less than 1 mg(C)/L to more than 100 mg(C)/L. Humic substances are strong complexing agents for many trace metals in the environment and are also capable of forming stable soluble complexes or chelates with radionuclides. Concentrations of humic materials as low as 1 mg(C)/L can produce a detectable increase in the mobility of some actinide elements by forming soluble complexes that inhibit sorption of the radionuclides onto rock materials. The stability of trace metal- or radionuclide-organic complexes is commonly measured by an empirically determined conditional stability constant (K'), which is based on the ratio of complexed metal (radionuclide) in solution to the product concentration of uncomplexed metal and humic complexant. Larger values of stability constants indicate greater complex stability. The stability of radionuclide-organic complexes is affected both by concentration variables and envionmental factors. In general, complexing is favored by increased of radionuclide, increased pH, and decreased ionic strength. Actinide elements are generally most soluble in their higher oxidation states. Radionuclides can also form stable, insoluble complexes with humic materials that tend to reduce radionuclide mobility. These insoluble complexes may be radionuclide-humate colloids that subsequently precipitate from solution, or complexes of radionuclides and humic substances that sorb to clay minerals or other soil particulates strongly enough to immobilize the radionuclides. Colloid formation appears to be favored by increased radionuclide concentration and lowered pH; however, the conditions that favor formation of insoluble complexes that sorb to particulates are still poorly understood. 129 refs., 25 figs., 19 tabs.

  6. Speciation and Fate of Trace Metals in Estuarine Sediments Under Reduced and Oxidized Conditions, Seaplane Lagoon, Alameda Naval Air Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, S A; Day, P A; Esser, B; Randall, S

    2002-10-18

    We have identified important chemical reactions that control the fate of metal-contaminated estuarine sediments if they are left undisturbed (in situ) or if they are dredged. We combined information on the molecular bonding of metals in solids from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with thermodynamic and kinetic driving forces obtained from dissolved metal concentrations to deduce the dominant reactions under reduced and oxidized conditions. We evaluated the in situ geochemistry of metals (cadmium, chromium, iron, lead, manganese and zinc) as a function of sediment depth (to 100 cm) from a 60-year record of contamination at the Alameda Naval Air Station, California. Results from XAS and thermodynamic modeling of porewaters show that cadmium and most of the zinc form stable sulfide phases, and that lead and chromium are associated with stable carbonate, phosphate, phyllosilicate, or oxide minerals. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the release of these trace metals from the deeper sediments contaminated prior to the Clean Water Act (1975) as long as reducing conditions are maintained. Increased concentrations of dissolved metals with depth were indicative of the formation of metal HS- complexes. The sediments also contain zinc, chromium, and manganese associated with detrital iron-rich phyllosilicates and/or oxides. These phases are recalcitrant at near-neutral pH and do not undergo reductive dissolution within the 60-year depositional history of sediments at this site. The fate of these metals during dredging was evaluated by comparing in situ geochemistry with that of sediments oxidized by seawater in laboratory experiments. Cadmium and zinc pose the greatest hazard from dredging because their sulfides were highly reactive in seawater. However, their dissolved concentrations under oxic conditions were limited eventually by sorption to or co-precipitation with an iron (oxy)hydroxide. About 50% of the reacted CdS and 80% of the reacted ZnS were

  7. Mobility of trace metals associated with urban particles exposed to natural waters of various salinities from the Gironde Estuary, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Joerg; Blanc, Gerard [Bordeaux Univ., Talence (France). UMR 5805 EPOC; Norra, Stefan [Karlsruhe Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Mineralogy and Geochemistry; Klein, Daniel [Bordeaux Univ., Talence (France). UMR 5805 EPOC; Karlsruhe Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Mineralogy and Geochemistry

    2009-08-15

    extracted by means of concentrated HNO{sub 3}, estuarine freshwaters and waters of two different salinities (S=15 and S=31). Analysis of trace elements was carried out by means of quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Furthermore, single particles from road sediments were characterised with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: SEM analysis clearly showed that some particles contained fairly high concentrations of potentially toxic trace elements. Extractions of materials investigated by varying acidities and salinities documented that the potentially bioavailable fractions extracted by concentrated HNO{sub 3} may cover wide concentration ranges. Natural estuarine waters of various salinities (S=0.5; S=15; S=31) extracted high proportions of Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd from urban particles, especially for high-salinity water (S=31). Extractions with freshwater revealed the lowest concentrations of desorbed trace elements. Particulate Mo, Pb and V showed similar or lower mobility in saline water compared with freshwater, depending on the sample type. Discussion: Trace element mobility in estuarine waters varied according to the type of urban particles and depended on salinity for Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd. This is of high importance for towns located directly at the coast or for cities like Bordeaux, where water courses crossing the agglomerations are connected to saline water masses. Since trace elements desorbed from particles in saline waters may become highly bioavailable, they bear a potential risk for organisms. Comprehensive studies on the behaviour of urban particles in estuarine waters and the related potential environmental impact are still missing. Conclusions: Saline waters mobilise relatively high amounts of Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd from urban particles suggesting considerable metal fluxes from riverine urban systems into coastal waters. Although estimates of trace metal inputs by urban bulk deposition (urban dust) and other types of urban particles

  8. Trace metal partitioning over a tidal cycle in an estuary affected by acid mine drainage (Tinto estuary, SW Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hierro, A. [Department of Physics, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Department of Applied Physics, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen, Campus de Excelencia Internacional del Mar CEIMAR, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Olías, M., E-mail: manuel.olias@dgyp.uhu.es [Department of Geodynamics and Paleontology, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen, Campus de Excelencia Internacional del Mar CEIMAR, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Cánovas, C.R. [Department of Geodynamics and Paleontology, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen, Campus de Excelencia Internacional del Mar CEIMAR, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Martín, J.E.; Bolivar, J.P. [Department of Applied Physics, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen, Campus de Excelencia Internacional del Mar CEIMAR, 21071 Huelva (Spain)

    2014-11-01

    The Tinto River estuary is highly polluted with the acid lixiviates from old sulphide mines. In this work the behaviour of dissolved and particulate trace metals under strong chemical gradients during a tidal cycle is studied. The pH values range from 4.4 with low tide to 6.9 with high tide. Precipitation of Fe and Al is intense during rising tides and As and Pb are almost exclusively found in the particulate matter (PM). Sorption processes are very important in controlling the mobility (and hence bioavailability) of some metals and particularly affect Cu below pH 6. Above pH ∼ 6 Cu is desorbed, probably by the formation of Cu(I)–chloride complexes. Although less pronounced than Cu, also Zn desorption above pH 6.5 seems to occur. Mn and Co are affected by sorption processes at pH higher than ca. 6. Cd behaves conservatively and Ni is slightly affected by sorption processes. - Highlights: • The Tinto estuary shows strong pH gradients and high trace elements concentrations. • PM has a hysteretic relationship with tides and high contents of Fe, Al, As and Pb. • Co and Mn are controlled by river and sea water mixing and sorption processes. • Sorption processes strongly affect Cu below pH 6, above this value Cu is desorpted. • Cadmium behaves conservatively along the pH range studied (4.4–6.9)

  9. Geochemistry of dissolved trace elements and heavy metals in the Dan River Drainage (China): distribution, sources, and water quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingpeng; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Zhaoyu; Wu, Tairan

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved trace elements and heavy metals in the Dan River drainage basin, which is the drinking water source area of South-to-North Water Transfer Project (China), affect large numbers of people and should therefore be carefully monitored. To investigate the distribution, sources, and quality of river water, this study integrating catchment geology and multivariate statistical techniques was carried out in the Dan River drainage from 99 river water samples collected in 2013. The distribution of trace metal concentrations in the Dan River drainage was similar to that in the Danjiangkou Reservoir, indicating that the reservoir was significantly affected by the Dan River drainage. Moreover, our results suggested that As, Sb, Cd, Mn, and Ni were the major pollutants. We revealed extremely high concentrations of As and Sb in the Laoguan River, Cd in the Qingyou River, Mn, Ni, and Cd in the Yinhua River, As and Sb in the Laojun River, and Sb in the Dan River. According to the water quality index, water in the Dan River drainage was suitable for drinking; however, an exposure risk assessment model suggests that As and Sb in the Laojun and Laoguan rivers could pose a high risk to humans in terms of adverse health and potential non-carcinogenic effects. PMID:26782327

  10. Metal and trace element assessment of sediments from Guarapiranga reservoir, Sao Paulo State, by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarapiranga Reservoir is extremely important due to the fact that it is one of the main water reservoirs for South America's largest city, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Guarapiranga Basin is located within the Metropolitan Region of Sao Paulo - RMSP, and occupies an area of approximately 630 km2, and the reservoir itself is located in the northern part of the basin occupying approximately 26 km2. This reservoir is characterized by environmental impacts from urban invasion, industrial and sewage wastes, all of which seriously affect its water quality. Due to its vulnerability CETESB (Environmental Control Agency of the Sao Paulo State) regularly monitors the contamination levels of waters and once a year sediment samples. In order to better understand geochemical and environmental processes and their possible changes due to anthropogenic activities trace metals analyses and their distribution in sediments are commonly undertaken. The present study reports results concerning the distribution of some major (Fe, K and Na), trace (As, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Hf, Hg, Rb, Sb, Sc, Ta, Tb, Th, U and Zn) and rare earth (Ce, Eu, La, Lu, Nd, Sm, Tb and Yb) elements in sediments from the Guarapiranga Reservoir. Multielementar analysis was carried out by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Multielemental concentrations in the sediment samples were compared to NASC (North American Shale Composite) values. The concentration values for metals As, Cr and Zn in the sediment samples were compared to the Canadian Council of Minister of the Environment (CCME) oriented values (TEL and PEL values) and adopted by CETESB. (author)

  11. Trace metal partitioning over a tidal cycle in an estuary affected by acid mine drainage (Tinto estuary, SW Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tinto River estuary is highly polluted with the acid lixiviates from old sulphide mines. In this work the behaviour of dissolved and particulate trace metals under strong chemical gradients during a tidal cycle is studied. The pH values range from 4.4 with low tide to 6.9 with high tide. Precipitation of Fe and Al is intense during rising tides and As and Pb are almost exclusively found in the particulate matter (PM). Sorption processes are very important in controlling the mobility (and hence bioavailability) of some metals and particularly affect Cu below pH 6. Above pH ∼ 6 Cu is desorbed, probably by the formation of Cu(I)–chloride complexes. Although less pronounced than Cu, also Zn desorption above pH 6.5 seems to occur. Mn and Co are affected by sorption processes at pH higher than ca. 6. Cd behaves conservatively and Ni is slightly affected by sorption processes. - Highlights: • The Tinto estuary shows strong pH gradients and high trace elements concentrations. • PM has a hysteretic relationship with tides and high contents of Fe, Al, As and Pb. • Co and Mn are controlled by river and sea water mixing and sorption processes. • Sorption processes strongly affect Cu below pH 6, above this value Cu is desorpted. • Cadmium behaves conservatively along the pH range studied (4.4–6.9)

  12. Pb and Sr isotopes and trace metals in molluscs: constraints on metal sources and water fluxes in a coastal lagoon (Thau, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of its unique ability to characterize the origins and quantify the fluxes of waters and their loads, isotopic geochemistry is being increasingly used in environmental problems. On the other hand, molluscs are known to concentrate metals in a very strong manner and equilibrate relatively rapidly with their environment. They are used in many programs of coastal survey (Mussel Watch, RNO,...). The originality of our work is to apply isotopic systems (Pb, Sr) to living organisms, in order to: 1- identify the metal sources; 2- determine their proportions in the lagoon and 3- to trace the water movements. The Thau lagoon (Herault, S. France) presents various potential sources of metals inputs: heavy traffic road, Sete harbour, various industries (cement factory, fertilizers...), agriculture, camping areas and leisure ports, not to mention natural (rock) sources. Our study deals with the metal and alkali, alkali-earth concentrations, Pb and Sr isotopes determined on both mussels implanted in the lagoon and wild mussels. We also compare our mussel results with those determined on clams which live at the water/sediments interface. A first study deals with the metal accumulation in laboratory experiments using mono-isotopic tracers 'spike'. It shows that the new metal is being superimposed to the metals initially present in the organisms; this effect is seen within a few days, although variable depending on elements (Zn, Cd, Pb). We have sampled the introduced mussels 4 times a year and we see that the concentration fluctuations are principally related to animal weight variations. The flesh isotopic compositions usually define nice alignments depending on season, indicative of a progressive mixing between two main components: one natural, one anthropogenic. Depending on winds,two influences of seawater entries or local water treatment plants effluents can be shown. We have compared past and present metal levels and origins in the area by analysing also ancient shells

  13. Trace metal distributions in Posidonia oceanica and sediments from Taranto Gulf (Ionian Sea, Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. DI LEO

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of metals (Hg, Pb, Sn, Cu, Cd and Zn was determined in sediments and in different tissues of Posidonia oceanica collected from San Pietro Island, Taranto Gulf (Ionian Sea, Southern Italy. In seagrass, results, compared with metal concentrations in sediments, showed that the highest concentrations of Hg, Pb, Sn and Cu were found in the roots, while in the green leaves were found the highest levels of Cd and Zn. Instead the lowest metal concentrations were found in the basal part of the leaf. Levels of  metals in the leaves were similar to those found by other authors in uncontaminated areas of the Mediterranean Sea. Mercury levels in roots were correlated to levels in sediments. This could demonstrate the plant memorizes sediments contamination . This study reinforces the usefulness and the relevance of Posidonia oceanica as an indicator of spatial metal contamination and an interesting tool for environmental quality evaluation.

  14. Trace metal determination as it relates to metallosis of orthopaedic implants: Evolution and current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Gavin; O'Mullane, John; O'Riordan, Alan; Furey, Ambrose

    2016-05-01

    In utilising metal surfaces that are in constant contact with each other, metal-on-metal (MoM) surgical implants present a unique challenge, in the sense that their necessity is accompanied by the potential risk of wear particle generation, metal ion release and subsequent patient toxicity. This is especially true of orthopaedic devices that are faulty and subject to failure, where the metal surfaces undergo atypical degradation and release even more unwanted byproducts, as was highlighted by the recent recall of orthopaedic surgical implants. The aim of this review is to examine the area of metallosis arising from the wear of MoM articulations in orthopaedic devices, including how the surgical procedures and detection methods have advanced to meet growing performance and analytical needs, respectively. PMID:26794632

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM PROJECT NUMBER 87016 CO-PRECIPITATION OF TRACE METALS IN GROUNDWATER AND VADOSE ZONE CALCITE: IN SITU CONTAINMENT AND STABILIZATION OF STRONTIUM-90 AND OTHER DIVALENT METALS AND RADIONUCLIDES AT ARID WESTERN DOE SITES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants are present in the vadose zone and groundwater throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants in vadose zones or groundwater is a cost-effective treatment strategy. Our facilitated approach relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal coprecipitation) by increasing groundwater pH and alkalinity (Fujita et al., 2000; Warren et al., 2001). Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which may be either introduced with the urea or produced in situ by ubiquitous subsurface urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation processes are irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the co-precipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from groundwater. The rate at which trace metals are incorporated into calcite is a function of calcite precipitation kinetics, adsorption interactions between the calcite surface and the trace metal in solution (Zachara et al., 1991), solid solution properties of the trace metal in calcite (Tesoriero and Pankow, 1996), and also the surfaces upon which the calcite is precipitating. A fundamental understanding of the coupling of calcite precipitation and trace metal partitioning, and how this occurs in aquifers and vadose environments is lacking. This report summarizes work undertaken during the second year of this project

  16. Volatile organic compounds and trace metal level in some beers collected from Romanian market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voica, Cezara; Kovacs, Melinda; Vadan, Marius

    2013-11-01

    Beer is one of the most popular beverages at worldwide level. Through this study fifteen different types of beer collected from Romanian market were analysed in order to evaluate their mineral, trace element as well the their organic content. Importance of such characterization of beer samples is supported by the fact that their chemical composition can affect both taste and stability of beer, as well the consumer health. Minerals and trace elements analysis were performed on ICP-MS while organic compounds analysis was done through GC-MS. Through ICP-MS analysis, elements as Ca, Na, K and Mg were evidenced at mgṡkg-1 order while elements as Cr, Ba, Co, Ni were detected at lower level. After GC-MS analysis the major volatile compounds that were detected belong to alcohols namely ethanol, propanol, isobutanol, isoamyl alcohol and linalool. Selected fatty acids and esters were evidenced also in the studied beer samples.

  17. Trace metals speciation by HPLC with plasma source mass spectrometry detection.

    OpenAIRE

    Byrdy, F A; Caruso, J A

    1995-01-01

    The analysis of environmental and biological samples often requires detection at the parts per billion (ppb) level. Plasma source mass spectrometry has potential as a method for the analysis and speciation of trace elements. This is due to the technique's highly selective nature and excellent sensitivity. In comparison to atomic emission detection, detection limits are usually two to three orders of magnitude lower for plasma MS determinations. Interfacing HPLC with plasma MS provides a means...

  18. Current Status of Trace Metal Pollution in Soils Affected by Industrial Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsanul Kabir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing public concern over the potential accumulation of heavy metals in soil, owing to rapid industrial development. In an effort to describe the status of the pollutions of soil by industrial activities, relevant data sets reported by many studies were surveyed and reviewed. The results of our analysis indicate that soils were polluted most significantly by metals such as lead, zinc, copper, and cadmium. If the dominant species are evaluated by the highest mean concentration observed for different industry types, the results were grouped into Pb, Zn, Ni, Cu, Fe, and As in smelting and metal production industries, Mn and Cd in the textile industry, and Cr in the leather industry. In most cases, metal levels in the studied areas were found to exceed the common regulation guideline levels enforced by many countries. The geoaccumulation index (Igeo, calculated to estimate the enrichment of metal concentrations in soil, showed that the level of metal pollution in most surveyed areas is significant, especially for Pb and Cd. It is thus important to keep systematic and continuous monitoring of heavy metals and their derivatives to manage and suppress such pollution.

  19. Metallothioneins and trace metals in the dogwhelk Nucella lapillus (L.) collected from Icelandic coasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Kenneth M.Y. [Sandgeroi Marine Centre, Garovegi 1, 245 Sandgeroi (Iceland)]. E-mail: kmyleung@hkucc.hku.hk; Dewhurst, Rachel E. [School of Biological Sciences, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Halldorsson, Halldor [Sandgeroi Marine Centre, Garovegi 1, 245 Sandgeroi (Iceland); Institute of Biology, University of Iceland, Sturlugata 7, 101 Reykjavik (Iceland); Svavarsson, Joerundur [Sandgeroi Marine Centre, Garovegi 1, 245 Sandgeroi (Iceland); Institute of Biology, University of Iceland, Sturlugata 7, 101 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2005-07-01

    Different sizes of the dogwhelk Nucella lapillus were collected from eight locations along the southwest and north coasts of Iceland. Concentrations of total metallothioneins (MTs) and heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Mn, Ni, and Zn) were analysed using the silver saturation method and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The level of tributyltin (TBT) contamination was also assessed using imposex indices, the vas deferens stage index (VDSI) and relative penis size index (RPSI). Gufunes N. lapillus presented the highest values of VDSI (4.0) and RPSI (11.1), followed by Grenivik individuals (VDSI = 3.0; RPSI = 0.9), while the Strandakirkja population showed the lowest VDSI (0.3) and zero RPSI. At a standardised size (0.25 g dry soft-body weight), Grenivik N. lapillus exhibited significantly higher concentrations of all metals whereas overall metal concentrations were significantly lower in individuals from Strandakirkja and Garoskagi compared to other study sites. Partial correlation analyses with size correction indicated that MT concentrations were better correlated with Cd and Cu concentrations than with other metals. At the standard size, the pattern of MT concentrations in N. lapillus from different sites was, however, very different from those of metal profiles. Such discrepancies between the patterns of MT and metals in N. lapillus might be explained by the fact that MT induction could be influenced by various factors such as temperature, dietary metal intake, growth rate and co-existence of other MT-inducing chemicals.

  20. Trace Metal Pollution From Traffic in Denizli-Turkey During Dry Season

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    UMIT DIVRIKLI; DURALI MENDIL; MUSTAFA TUZEN; MUSTAFA SOYLAK; LATIF ELCI

    2006-01-01

    To determine the metal contents of date palm (Pheonix dactylifera) samples in dry season from Denizli-Turkey for investigation of heavy metal-polluted traffic. Method The levels of iron, copper, zinc, lead, cadmium,nickel, chromium, and manganese ions in the leaves of thirty five date palm (Pheonix dactylifera) samples collected from various levels of traffic in the streets of Denizli-Turkey were determined by graphite furnace or flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The wet, dry, and microwave digestion procedures for the date palm (Pheonix dactylifera) leaves were compared.The accuracy of the digestion procedures was checked using a standard reference material (IAEA-336 Lichen, SRM). Results Microwave digestion procedure for the leaves was preferred because it was more proper with respect to both time and recovery than dry and wet digestion. The levels of the heavy metal ions investigated were the highest on the samples from high traffic level. Also correlations between metal levels and traffic volume for all the metals were investigated. Conclusion In the light of our findings, the date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) leaves are suitable as a biomonitor for atmospheric heavy metal-polluted traffic. Significant correlations can be obtained between traffic levels and heavy metal concentrations.

  1. Lac Dufault sediment core trace metal distribution, bioavailability and toxicity to Hyalella azteca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine changes in metal distribution, bioavailability and toxicity with sediment depth, two 20-cm-long replicate cores were collected from a lake historically subjected to the influence of metal mining and smelting activity. The vertical distribution of Pb, Cd and Cu in sediment was similar for all three metals, with the surface layers showing enrichment and the deeper (pre-industrial) layers showing lower concentrations. Toxicity of each sediment core section was determined in laboratory tests with the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca. Bioavailable metal in each sediment slice was estimated from metal concentrations in overlying water in these toxicity tests and, for Cd, also from metal bioaccumulation. The profile for Cd in tissue was comparable to Cd in sediment and overlying water, but relative Cd bioavailability from sediment increased with sediment depth. Survival increased with increasing sediment depth, suggesting that surface sediments were probably less or non-toxic before industrialization. - Toxicity and bioaccumulation tests with sediment cores provide more information on biological effects of metals than surface sediment tests

  2. Lac Dufault sediment core trace metal distribution, bioavailability and toxicity to Hyalella azteca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowierski, Monica [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Dixon, D. George [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Borgmann, Uwe [National Water Research Institute, Canada Centre for Inland Waters, 867 Lakeshore Road, PO Box 5050, Burlington, Ontario L7R 4A6 (Canada)]. E-mail: uwe.borgmann@ec.gc.ca

    2006-02-15

    To determine changes in metal distribution, bioavailability and toxicity with sediment depth, two 20-cm-long replicate cores were collected from a lake historically subjected to the influence of metal mining and smelting activity. The vertical distribution of Pb, Cd and Cu in sediment was similar for all three metals, with the surface layers showing enrichment and the deeper (pre-industrial) layers showing lower concentrations. Toxicity of each sediment core section was determined in laboratory tests with the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca. Bioavailable metal in each sediment slice was estimated from metal concentrations in overlying water in these toxicity tests and, for Cd, also from metal bioaccumulation. The profile for Cd in tissue was comparable to Cd in sediment and overlying water, but relative Cd bioavailability from sediment increased with sediment depth. Survival increased with increasing sediment depth, suggesting that surface sediments were probably less or non-toxic before industrialization. - Toxicity and bioaccumulation tests with sediment cores provide more information on biological effects of metals than surface sediment tests.

  3. Dissolved trace metals in the water column of Reloncaví Fjord, Chile Metales trazas disueltos en la columna de agua en el fiordo Reloncaví, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Ahumada

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the concentration of dissolved trace metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb in the water column of Reloncaví Fjord. Sampling was performed during the CIMAR 12 Fiordos cruise in 2006. A total of 36 passive samplers or DGTs (diffusion gradient in thin films were anchored at four stations along the longitudinal axis of the fjord. The DGTs were deployed at three depths per station and left there for 48 h. The metal contents on each thin film were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Concentrations were highest in the surface layer at the head of the estuary, which is directly influenced by Petrohué River. Characteristic sequences of the studied metals were defined in the area with the greatest continental influence (Z(5-25m = Cu >Mn> Fe > Ni >Pb> Cr > Cd > Co and in the area with a marine or coastal influence (Z(5-25m = Fe > Cu>Mn> Ni >Pb> Cr > Cd > Co. A similar metal sequence was found in the deepest layer: Z(40-m = Fe >Mn> Cu >Pb> Ni > Cd > Cr > Co. The passive sampling technique using DGTs to determine dissolved trace metals in the sea water provided robust information on the concentrations of the ten metals analyzed.Se analiza la concentración de metales trazas disueltos (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni y Pb, en la columna de agua del fiordo Reloncaví. El muestreo se realizó durante la campaña CIMAR 12 Fiordos, 2006. Para ello se fondeó en cuatro estaciones y en tres profundidades, un total de 36 muestreadores pasivos o DGT (láminas de gradiente de difusión a lo largo del eje longitudinal del fiordo, durante 48 h. El contenido de metales en cada lámina fue analizado mediante espectroscopía de emisión atómica con acoplamiento inductivo de plasma. Las mayores concentraciones se observaron en la superficie de la columna de agua, en la cabeza del estuario, directamente influenciada por el río Petrohué. Se definió para el área una secuencia de los metales estudiados característica, para la

  4. Lead isotopes and trace metal ratios of aerosols as tracers of Pb pollution sources in Kanpur, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Indra; Bizimis, Michael; Tripathi, Sachchida; Paul, Debajyoti; Tyagi, Swati; Sengupta, Deep

    2015-04-01

    The anthropogenic flux of Pb in the Earth's surface is almost an order of magnitude higher than its corresponding natural flux [1]. Identifying the sources and pathways of anthropogenic Pb in environment is important because Pb toxicity is known to have adverse effects on human health. Pb pollution sources for America, Europe, and China are well documented. However, sources of atmospheric Pb are unknown in India, particularly after leaded gasoline was phased out in 2000. India has a developing economy with a rapidly emerging automobile and high temperature industry, and anthropogenic Pb emission is expected to rise in the next decade. In this study, we report on the Pb- isotope compositions and trace metal ratios of airborne particulates collected in Kanpur, an industrial city in northern India. The Pb concentration in the airborne particulate matter varies between 14-216 ng/m3, while the other heavy metals vary by factor of 10 or less, e.g. Cd=0.3-3 ng/m3, As=0.4-3.5 ng/m3, Zn=36-161 ng/m3, and Cu=3-22 ng/m3. The 206Pb/207Pb, 208Pb/206Pb, and 208Pb/207Pb vary between 1.112 - 1.129, 2.123-2.141, and 2.409-2.424 respectively, and are highly correlated with each other (R2>0.9). Pb isotopes and trace metal data reveals that coal combustion is the major source of anthropogenic Pb in the atmosphere, with limited contribution from mining and smelting processes. We further conclude that combination of Pb isotope ratios and V/Pb ratios are powerful tracers for Pb source apportionment studies, which is otherwise difficult to differentiate based only on Pb systematics [1] Sen and Peucker-Ehrenbrink (2012), Environ. Sci. Technol.(46), 8601-8609

  5. Development of HPLC techniques for the analysis of trace metal species in the primary coolant of a pressurised water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need to monitor corrosion products in the primary circuit of a pressurised water reactor (PWR), at a concentration of 10pg ml-1 is discussed. A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), system was developed to determine trace metal species in simulated PWR primary coolant. An on-line preconcentration system was developed. Separations were performed on Aminex A9 and Benson BC-X10 analytical columns. Detection was by post column reaction with Eriochrome Black T and Calmagite Linear calibrations of 2.5-100ng of cobalt (the main species of interest), were achieved using up to 200ml samples. The detection limit for a 200ml sample was 10pg ml-1. In order to achieve the desired aim of on-line collection of species at 3000C, the use of inorganic ion-exchangers is essential. Titanium dioxide, zirconium dioxide, zirconium arsenophosphate and pore controlled glass beads, were used for the preconcentration of trace metal species. The performance of these exchangers, at ambient and 3000C was assessed by their inclusion in the developed analytical system and by the use of radioisotopes. The particular emphasis during the development has been upon accuracy, reproducibility of recovery, stability of reagents and system contamination, studied by the use of radioisotopes and response to post column reagents. A monitoring system that can follow changes in coolant chemistry, on deposition and release of metal species in simulated PWR water loops has been developed. On-line detection of cobalt at 11pg ml-1 was recorded. (author)

  6. Trace metals in harbour and slipway sediments from the island of Malta, central Mediterranean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntingford, Emily J; Turner, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    Sediment samples collected from large harbours and public slipways on the island of Malta have been analysed for geochemically important metals (Al, Ca, Fe, Mn) and contaminant metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sn, Zn) following fractionation (<63 μm) and digestion in aqua regia. Absolute and Al-normalised concentrations of contaminant metals exhibited relatively little dispersion both among different samples from the same location and between samples from different locations, notable exceptions including lower concentrations of Cr and Sn on the slipways than in the harbours. Sources of contaminant metals are attributed to diffuse and specific waste inputs from urban surroundings and boating and shipping activities. Overall, concentrations are similar to those reported for other large harbours in urban settings where equivalent sample fractionation-digestion has been performed. Relative to various sediment quality guidelines, Pb is predicted to exert the greatest threat to the marine environment of Malta. PMID:21665231

  7. Current Status of Trace Metal Pollution in Soils Affected by Industrial Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Ehsanul Kabir; Sharmila Ray; Ki-Hyun Kim; Hye-On Yoon; Eui-Chan Jeon; Yoon Shin Kim; Yong-Sung Cho; Seong-Taek Yun; Richard J. C. Brown

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing public concern over the potential accumulation of heavy metals in soil, owing to rapid industrial development. In an effort to describe the status of the pollutions of soil by industrial activities, relevant data sets reported by many studies were surveyed and reviewed. The results of our analysis indicate that soils were polluted most significantly by metals such as lead, zinc, copper, and cadmium. If the dominant species are evaluated by the highest mean concentration obs...

  8. The dynamics of the content and migration of trace metals in aquatic ecosystems of Moldova

    OpenAIRE

    Zubcov E.; Zubcov N.

    2013-01-01

    The current complex investigations, carried out according to well-established methods, allowed us to find the main patterns of the dynamics and migration of metals in the Dniester and Prut rivers, affected by natural and anthropogenic factors. Using a polyfactorial analysis approach, the quantitative effect of main factors (water debit, amount of suspended matter, volume of discharged wastewaters, amount of pesticides and fertilizers metals in water, suspended matter, silt sediments of rivers...

  9. Characterizing trace metal impurities in optical waveguide materials using x-ray absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray absorption measurements are described for identifying metal impurities in silica preforms, the rod-like starting materials from which hair-like optical fibers are drawn. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach as a non-destructive, quantitative, element-selective, position-sensitive, and chemical-state-specific means for characterizing transition metals in the concentration regime of parts per billion

  10. Trace metal determination in total atmospheric deposition in rural and urban areas

    OpenAIRE

    Azimi, Sam; Ludwig, Alexandre; Thevenot, Daniel,; Colin, Jean-Louis

    2003-01-01

    International audience The wet, dry and total atmospheric depositions of some metals (Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Na, Pb and Zn) were sampled at two sites and atmospheric fallout fluxes were determined for these locations. This work, led by two different research groups, allowed to reach two main goals: to define a simple analytical procedure to secure accurate shipboard sampling and analysis of atmospheric deposition, and to assess anthropogenic impacts of heavy metals to the environment. The fir...

  11. Assessment of Trace Metal Levels in Commonly Edible Vegetables from Selected Markets in Lagos State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Adu, A.A; Aderinola, O.J; Kusemiju, V

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of food contaminated with heavy metals is a major source of health problems for man and animals. Three commonly edible Leafy vegetables (Amaranthus hybridus, Celosia argentea ,Cochorus olitoris) from Agboju and Iba markets , Lagos Nigeria were sampled, identified, digested and analyzed with the aid of Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS) as directed by APHA (American Public Health Association) to determine heavy metals concentration in them with the aim of ascertaining their...

  12. Effects of Trace Metal Profiles Characteristic for Autism on Synapses in Cultured Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Various recent studies revealed that biometal dyshomeostasis plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Substantial evidence indicates that disrupted neuronal homeostasis of different metal ions such as Fe, Cu, Pb, Hg, Se, and Zn may mediate synaptic dysfunction and impair synapse formation and maturation. Here, we performed in vitro studies investigating the consequences of an imbalance of transition metals on glutamatergic syn...

  13. The Cosmic Evolution of the Metallicity Distribution of Ionized Gas Traced by Lyman Limit Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, J Christopher; Prochaska, J Xavier; Fumagalli, Michele

    2016-01-01

    We present the first results from our KODIAQ Z survey aimed to determine the metallicity distribution and physical properties of the partial and full Lyman limit systems (pLLSs and LLSs; 16.22, which probe gas in the interface regions between the intergalactic medium and galaxies. We study 31 HI-selected pLLSs and LLSs at 2.3metal-ions to N(HI) and use photoionization models to assess the total H column density and the metallicity. The metallicity distribution function (MDF) of the pLLSs/LLSs at 2.3metallicities well below those of damped Lyman alpha absorbers (DLAs) at any given z, and this fraction remains relatively constant from z<1 to z~2-4. There is therefore a reservoir of metal-poor cool gas at all z that ma...

  14. Comparing trace metal bioaccumulation characteristics of three freshwater decapods of the genus Macrobrachium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Tom; Smith, Ross E W; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Simpson, Stuart L

    2014-07-01

    Potential sources and kinetics of metal bioaccumulation by the three Macrobrachium prawn species M. australiense, M. rosenbergii and M. latidactylus were assessed in laboratory experiments. The prawns were exposed to two scenarios: cadmium in water only; and exposure to metal-rich mine tailings in the same water. The cadmium accumulation from the dissolved exposure during 7 days, followed by depuration in cadmium-free water for 7 days, was compared with predictions from a biokinetic model that had previously been developed for M. australiense. M. australiense and M. latidactylus accumulated significant tissue cadmium during the exposure phase, albeit with different uptake rates. All three species retained >95% of the bioaccumulated cadmium during the depuration phase, indicating very slow efflux rates. Following exposure to tailings, there were significant (pmine tailings, demonstrating the importance of an ingestion pathway for these metals. Copper was not bioaccumulated above control concentrations for any species. The differences between the metal accumulation of the three prawns indicated that a biokinetic model of cadmium bioaccumulation for M. australiense could potentially be used to describe the metal bioaccumulation of the other two prawn species, albeit with an over-prediction of 3-9 times. Despite these being the same genus of decapod crustacean, the study highlights the issues with using surrogate species, even under controlled laboratory conditions. It is recommended that future studies using surrogate species quantify the metal bioaccumulation characteristics of each species in order to account for any differences between species. PMID:24800868

  15. Distribution, availability, and sources of trace metals in different particle size fractions of urban soils in Hong Kong: Implications for assessing the risk to human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration and loading distribution of trace metals (Cu, Zn, Pb, Co, Ni, Cr, and Mn) and major elements (Al, Ca, Fe, and Mg) in different particle size fractions (2000-280, 280-100, 100-50, 50-10, 10-2, and 10 or PM2.5), and ingestion of adhered soils through the hand-to-mouth pathway. The mobility, bioavailability, and human bioaccessibility of Pb and Zn in bulk soils correlated significantly with metal concentrations in fine silt and/or very fine sand fractions. - Highlights: → The enrichment of trace metals in urban soils was strongly influenced by anthropogenic activities. → Trace metals primarily accumulated in clay and fine silt fractions. → Fine particles in soils contribute to the metal loadings of PM10 or PM2.5. → Potential risk to human health from the inhalation of resuspended soil particles and ingestion of soil materials. - Anthropogenic trace metals tend to accumulate in fine fractions of urban soils, and may pose potential risks to human health through the inhalation of resuspened soil particles and ingestion of soil materials.

  16. Vegetation and Cold Trapping Modulating Elevation-dependent Distribution of Trace Metals in Soils of a High Mountain in Eastern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Haijian; Wu, Yanhong; Zhou, Jun; Li, Rui; Luo, Ji; Yu, Dong

    2016-04-01

    Trace metals adsorbed onto fine particles can be transported long distances and ultimately deposited in Polar Regions via the cold condensation effect. This study indicated the possible sources of silver (Ag), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), antimony (Sb) and zinc (Zn) in soils on the eastern slope of Mt. Gongga, eastern Tibetan Plateau, and deciphered the effects of vegetation and mountain cold condensation on their distributions with elevation. The metal concentrations in the soils were comparable to other mountains worldwide except the remarkably high concentrations of Cd. Trace metals with high enrichment in the soils were influenced from anthropogenic contributions. Spatially, the concentrations of Cu and Zn in the surface horizons decreased from 2000 to 3700 m a.s.l., and then increased with elevation, whereas other metals were notably enriched in the mid-elevation area (approximately 3000 m a.s.l.). After normalization for soil organic carbon, high concentrations of Cd, Pb, Sb and Zn were observed above the timberline. Our results indicated the importance of vegetation in trace metal accumulation in an alpine ecosystem and highlighted the mountain cold trapping effect on trace metal deposition sourced from long-range atmospheric transport.

  17. Kinetics as a tool to assess the immobilization of soil trace metals by binding phase amendments for in situ remediation purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrault, Gilles; Bermond, Alain

    2011-08-30

    Many soil remediation techniques consist in decreasing the mobility of trace metals by means of adding trace metal binding phases. For this study, whose aim is to assess the efficiency of soil remediation method by binding phase amendment, a kinetic fractionation method that provides the labile and slowly labile trace metal amounts in soil has been introduced. Manganese oxides (vernadite) and insolubilized humic acids (IHA) have been used as binding phases for the remediation of four heavily polluted soils. Vernadite amendments are effective for lead and cadmium remediation, whereas IHA amendments are only effective for copper remediation. In most cases, the labile metal fractions decrease dramatically in amended soils (up to 50%); on the other hand, the amounts of total extracted metal near the point of thermodynamic equilibrium often show no significant difference between the amended soil and the control soil. These results highlight the utility of kinetic fractionation in assessing the efficiency of soil remediation techniques and, more generally, in evaluating trace metal mobility in soils and its potential advantages compared to extraction schemes performed under equilibrium conditions. In the future, this kinetic method could be considerably simplified so as to consume much less time allowing its routine use. PMID:21708424

  18. How healthy is urban horticulture in high traffic areas? Trace metal concentrations in vegetable crops from plantings within inner city neighbourhoods in Berlin, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Food production by urban dwellers is of growing importance in developing and developed countries. Urban horticulture is associated with health risks as crops in urban settings are generally exposed to higher levels of pollutants than those in rural areas. We determined the concentration of trace metals in the biomass of different horticultural crops grown in the inner city of Berlin, Germany, and analysed how the local setting shaped the concentration patterns. We revealed significant differences in trace metal concentrations depending on local traffic, crop species, planting style and building structures, but not on vegetable type. Higher overall traffic burden increased trace metal content in the biomass. The presence of buildings and large masses of vegetation as barriers between crops and roads reduced trace metal content in the biomass. Based on this we discuss consequences for urban horticulture, risk assessment, and planting and monitoring guidelines for cultivation and consumption of crops. - Highlights: ► Traffic-related pollutant deposition as important pathway for crop contamination. ► Heavy metal content often over EU standards for lead concentration in food crops. ► ‘Grow your own’ food in inner cities not always ‘healthier’ than supermarket products. ► No support for generalisations of crops as ‘risky high’ or ‘safe low’ accumulators. - Higher overall traffic burden increased, while the presence of buildings and large masses of vegetation as barriers between crops and roads reduced heavy metal content in crop biomass.

  19. The distribution and speciation of trace metals in surface sediments from the Pearl River Estuary and the Daya Bay, Southern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface sediments collected from the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) and the Daya Bay (DYB) were analyzed for total metal concentrations and chemical phase partitioning. The total concentrations of Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the PRE were obviously higher than those in DYB. The maximum concentrations of trace metals in DYB occurred in the four sub-basins, especially in Dapeng Cove, while the concentrations of these metals in the western side of the PRE were higher than those in the east side. Such distribution pattern was primarily due to the different hydraulic conditions and inputs of anthropogenic trace metals. The chemical partitioning of metals analyzed by the BCR sequential extraction method showed that Cr, Ni, and Zn of both areas were present dominantly in the residual fraction, while Pb was found mostly in the non-residual fractions. The partitioning of Cu showed a significant difference between the two areas.

  20. Surface distribution of dissolved trace metals in the oligotrophic ocean and their influence on phytoplankton biomass and productivity

    KAUST Repository

    Pinedo-González, Paulina

    2015-10-25

    The distribution of bioactive trace metals has the potential to enhance or limit primary productivity and carbon export in some regions of the world ocean. To study these connections, the concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mo, Ni, and V were determined for 110 surface water samples collected during the Malaspina 2010 Circumnavigation Expedition (MCE). Total dissolved Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mo, Ni, and V concentrations averaged 19.0 ± 5.4 pM, 21.4 ± 12 pM, 0.91 ± 0.4 nM, 0.66 ± 0.3 nM, 88.8 ± 12 nM, 1.72 ± 0.4 nM, and 23.4 ± 4.4 nM, respectively, with the lowest values detected in the Central Pacific and increased values at the extremes of all transects near coastal zones. Trace metal concentrations measured in surface waters of the Atlantic Ocean during the MCE were compared to previously published data for the same region. The comparison revealed little temporal changes in the distribution of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, and Ni over the last 30 years. We utilized a multivariable linear regression model to describe potential relationships between primary productivity and the hydrological, biological, trace nutrient and macronutrient data collected during the MCE. Our statistical analysis shows that primary productivity in the Indian Ocean is best described by chlorophyll a, NO3, Ni, temperature, SiO4, and Cd. In the Atlantic Ocean, primary productivity is correlated with chlorophyll a, NO3, PO4, mixed layer depth, Co, Fe, Cd, Cu, V, and Mo. The variables salinity, temperature, SiO4, NO3, PO4, Fe, Cd, and V were found to best predict primary productivity in the Pacific Ocean. These results suggest that some of the lesser studied trace elements (e.g., Ni, V, Mo, and Cd) may play a more important role in regulating oceanic primary productivity than previously thought and point to the need for future experiments to verify their potential biological functions.

  1. Surface distribution of dissolved trace metals in the oligotrophic ocean and their influence on phytoplankton biomass and productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo-González, Paulina; West, A. Joshua; Tovar-Sánchez, Antonio; Duarte, Carlos M.; Marañón, Emilio; Cermeño, Pedro; González, Natalia; Sobrino, Cristina; Huete-Ortega, María.; Fernández, Ana; López-Sandoval, Daffne C.; Vidal, Montserrat; Blasco, Dolors; Estrada, Marta; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A.

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of bioactive trace metals has the potential to enhance or limit primary productivity and carbon export in some regions of the world ocean. To study these connections, the concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mo, Ni, and V were determined for 110 surface water samples collected during the Malaspina 2010 Circumnavigation Expedition (MCE). Total dissolved Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mo, Ni, and V concentrations averaged 19.0 ± 5.4 pM, 21.4 ± 12 pM, 0.91 ± 0.4 nM, 0.66 ± 0.3 nM, 88.8 ± 12 nM, 1.72 ± 0.4 nM, and 23.4 ± 4.4 nM, respectively, with the lowest values detected in the Central Pacific and increased values at the extremes of all transects near coastal zones. Trace metal concentrations measured in surface waters of the Atlantic Ocean during the MCE were compared to previously published data for the same region. The comparison revealed little temporal changes in the distribution of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, and Ni over the last 30 years. We utilized a multivariable linear regression model to describe potential relationships between primary productivity and the hydrological, biological, trace nutrient and macronutrient data collected during the MCE. Our statistical analysis shows that primary productivity in the Indian Ocean is best described by chlorophyll a, NO3, Ni, temperature, SiO4, and Cd. In the Atlantic Ocean, primary productivity is correlated with chlorophyll a, NO3, PO4, mixed layer depth, Co, Fe, Cd, Cu, V, and Mo. The variables salinity, temperature, SiO4, NO3, PO4, Fe, Cd, and V were found to best predict primary productivity in the Pacific Ocean. These results suggest that some of the lesser studied trace elements (e.g., Ni, V, Mo, and Cd) may play a more important role in regulating oceanic primary productivity than previously thought and point to the need for future experiments to verify their potential biological functions.

  2. Bioaccumulation of polonium (210Po, uranium (234U, 238U isotopes and trace metals in mosses from Sobieszewo Island, northern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boryło A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was determination of the polonium (210Po, uranium (234U and 238U radionuclides and trace metals (Pb, Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd, Hg concentrations in mosses samples from Sobieszewo Island near the phosphogypsum waste dump in Wiślinka (northern Poland. The obtained results revealed that the concentrations of 210Po, 234U, and 238U in the two analyzed kinds of mosses: Pleurozium schreberi and Dicranum scoparium were similar. Among the analyzed trace metals the highest concentration in mosses was recorded for iron, while the lowest for nickel, cadmium and mercury. The obtained studies showed that the sources of polonium and uranium isotopes, as well as trace metals in analyzed mosses are air city contaminations transported from Gdańsk and from existing in the vicinity the phosphogypsum waste heap in Wiślinka (near Gdańsk.

  3. Impacts of dust deposition on dissolved trace metal concentrations (Mn, Al and Fe during a mesocosm experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Wuttig

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The deposition of atmospheric dust is the primary process supplying trace elements abundant in crustal rocks (e.g. Al, Mn and Fe to the surface ocean. Upon deposition, the residence time in surface waters for each of these elements differs according to their chemical speciation and biological utilization. Presently however their behavior after atmospheric deposition is poorly constrained, principally because of the difficulty in following natural dust events in-situ. In the present work we examined the temporal changes in the biogeochemistry of crustal metals (in particular Al, Mn and Fe after an artificial dust deposition event. The experiment was contained inside trace metal clean mesocosms (0–12.5 m depths deployed in the surface waters of the Northwestern Mediterranean, close to the coast of Corsica in the frame of the DUNE project (a DUst experiment in a low Nutrient low chlorophyll Ecosystem. Two consecutive artificial dust deposition events, each mimicking a wet deposition of 10 g m−2 of dust, were performed during the course of this DUNE-2 experiment. The changes in dissolved manganese (dMn, iron (dFe and aluminium (dAl concentrations were followed immediately and over the following week and their inventories and loss or dissolution rates were determined. The evolution of the inventories after the two consecutive additions of dust showed distinct behaviors for dMn, dAl and dFe. Even though the mixing conditions differed from one seeding to the other, dMn and dAl showed clear increases directly after both seedings due to dissolution processes. Three days after the dust additions, dAl concentrations decreased as a consequence of scavenging on sinking particles. dAl appeared to be highly affected by the concentrations of biogenic particles, with an order of magnitude difference in its loss rates related to the increase of biomass after the addition of dust. For dFe concentrations, the first dust addition decreased the

  4. Subcellular partitioning of non-essential trace metals (Ag, As, Cd, Ni, Pb, and Tl) in livers of American (Anguilla rostrata) and European (Anguilla anguilla) yellow eels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosabal, Maikel [Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Centre Eau Terre et Environnement (INRS–ETE), 490 de la Couronne, Québec (Québec) G1K 9A9 (Canada); Pierron, Fabien [Université de Bordeaux, UMR EPOC CNRS 5805, F-33400 Talence (France); CNRS, EPOC, UMR 5805, F-33400 Talence (France); Couture, Patrice [Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Centre Eau Terre et Environnement (INRS–ETE), 490 de la Couronne, Québec (Québec) G1K 9A9 (Canada); Baudrimont, Magalie [Université de Bordeaux, UMR EPOC CNRS 5805, F-33400 Talence (France); CNRS, EPOC, UMR 5805, F-33400 Talence (France); Hare, Landis [Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Centre Eau Terre et Environnement (INRS–ETE), 490 de la Couronne, Québec (Québec) G1K 9A9 (Canada); Campbell, Peter G.C., E-mail: peter.campbell@ete.inrs.ca [Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Centre Eau Terre et Environnement (INRS–ETE), 490 de la Couronne, Québec (Québec) G1K 9A9 (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Handling of hepatic metals consistently involved cytosolic, thermostable ligands. • Granule-like fractions are also involved in the detoxification of Ni, Pb, and Tl. • Despite these sequestration mechanisms, metal detoxification is incomplete. • Along the metal gradient, concentrations increase in metal-sensitive fractions. • This increase could represent a toxicological risk for the yellow eels. - Abstract: We determined the intracellular compartmentalization of the trace metals Ag, As, Cd, Ni, Pb, and Tl in the livers of yellow eels collected from the Saint Lawrence River system in Canada (Anguilla rostrata) and in the area of the Gironde estuary in France (Anguilla anguilla). Differential centrifugation, NaOH digestion and thermal shock were used to separate eel livers into putative “sensitive” fractions (heat-denatured proteins, mitochondria and microsomes + lysosomes) and detoxified metal fractions (heat-stable peptides/proteins and granules). The cytosolic heat-stable fraction (HSP) was consistently involved in the detoxification of all trace metals. In addition, granule-like structures played a complementary role in the detoxification of Ni, Pb, and Tl in both eel species. However, these detoxification mechanisms were not completely effective because increasing trace metal concentrations in whole livers were accompanied by significant increases in the concentrations of most trace metals in “sensitive” subcellular fractions, that is, mitochondria, heat-denatured cytosolic proteins and microsomes + lysosomes. Among these “sensitive” fractions, mitochondria were the major binding sites for As, Cd, Pb, and Tl. This accumulation of non-essential metals in “sensitive” fractions likely represents a health risk for eels inhabiting the Saint Lawrence and Gironde environments.

  5. Subcellular partitioning of non-essential trace metals (Ag, As, Cd, Ni, Pb, and Tl) in livers of American (Anguilla rostrata) and European (Anguilla anguilla) yellow eels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Handling of hepatic metals consistently involved cytosolic, thermostable ligands. • Granule-like fractions are also involved in the detoxification of Ni, Pb, and Tl. • Despite these sequestration mechanisms, metal detoxification is incomplete. • Along the metal gradient, concentrations increase in metal-sensitive fractions. • This increase could represent a toxicological risk for the yellow eels. - Abstract: We determined the intracellular compartmentalization of the trace metals Ag, As, Cd, Ni, Pb, and Tl in the livers of yellow eels collected from the Saint Lawrence River system in Canada (Anguilla rostrata) and in the area of the Gironde estuary in France (Anguilla anguilla). Differential centrifugation, NaOH digestion and thermal shock were used to separate eel livers into putative “sensitive” fractions (heat-denatured proteins, mitochondria and microsomes + lysosomes) and detoxified metal fractions (heat-stable peptides/proteins and granules). The cytosolic heat-stable fraction (HSP) was consistently involved in the detoxification of all trace metals. In addition, granule-like structures played a complementary role in the detoxification of Ni, Pb, and Tl in both eel species. However, these detoxification mechanisms were not completely effective because increasing trace metal concentrations in whole livers were accompanied by significant increases in the concentrations of most trace metals in “sensitive” subcellular fractions, that is, mitochondria, heat-denatured cytosolic proteins and microsomes + lysosomes. Among these “sensitive” fractions, mitochondria were the major binding sites for As, Cd, Pb, and Tl. This accumulation of non-essential metals in “sensitive” fractions likely represents a health risk for eels inhabiting the Saint Lawrence and Gironde environments

  6. Biotechnological applications of serpentine soil bacteria for phytoremediation of trace metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Mani; Vara Prasad, Majeti Narasimha; Freitas, Helena; Ae, Noriharu

    2009-01-01

    Serpentine or ultramafic soils are produced by weathering and pedogenesis of ultramafic rocks that are characterized by high levels of Ni, Cr, and sometimes Co, but contain low levels of essential nutrients such as N, P, K, and Ca. A number of plant species endemic to serpentine soils are capable of accumulating exceptionally high concentrations of Ni, Zn, and Co. These plants are known as metal "hyperaccumulators." The function of hyperaccumulation depends not only on the plant, but also on the interaction of the plant roots with rhizosphere microbes and the concentrations of bioavailable metals in the soil. The rhizosphere provides a complex and dynamic microenvironment where microorganisms, in association with roots, form unique communities that have considerable potential for the detoxification of hazardous materials. The rhizosphere bacteria play a significant role on plant growth in serpentine soils by various mechanisms, namely, fixation of atmospheric nitrogen, utilization of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) as the sole N source, production of siderophores, or production of plant growth regulators (hormones). Further, many microorganisms in serpentine soil are able to solubilize "unavailable" forms of heavy metal-bearing minerals by excreting organic acids. In addition, the metal-resistant serpentine isolates increase the efficiency of phytoextraction directly by enhancing the metal accumulation in plant tissues and indirectly by promoting the shoot and root biomass of hyperaccumulators. Hence, isolation of the indigenous and stress-adapted beneficial bacteria serve as a potential biotechnological tool for inoculation of plants for the successful restoration of metal-contaminated ecosystems. In this study, we highlight the diversity and beneficial features of serpentine bacteria and discuss their potential in phytoremediation of serpentine and anthropogenically metal-contaminated soils. PMID:19514893

  7. Trace metals and organochlorines in the bamboo shark Chiloscyllium plagiosum from the southern waters of Hong Kong, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Andrew S; Ng, W C; Ho, Valerie C M; Wong, H L; Lam, James C W; Lam, Paul K S; Leung, Kenneth M Y

    2007-04-15

    The bamboo shark Chiloscyllium plagiosum is an abundant benthic species along the shallow continental shelf of Southeast Asia. It is commonly taken by fishermen in China, India, Taiwan and Thailand for human consumption. This study measured trace metal and organochlorine concentrations in C. plagiosum collected from the southern waters of Hong Kong, China. Metals (Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) were measured in three different tissues: dorsal muscle, spleen and liver. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and chlorinated pesticides in the dorsal muscle were identified and quantified using gas chromatography. Metal concentrations varied among the three different tissues, with liver having higher levels of Ag and Cd, and spleen possessing higher levels of Cu and Mn. Both Ni and Pb in all tissues were below the detection limit. Tissue concentrations of Cr, Cu, Mn and Zn generally decreased with increasing body weight whilst no significant concentration-size relationship was found for other metals. In muscle tissues, total PCBs ranged from 1.056-4.771 ng/g (wet wt.) with a median of 1.801 ng/g, while total DDTs ranged from 0.602-23.55 ng/g with a median of 1.109 ng/g, in which p,p'-DDE was the predominant metabolite. Levels of total hexachlorohexanes and cyclodienes were low. The pesticide p,p'-DDT was the only compound found to be positively correlated with body weight, indicating temporal bioaccumulation of this compound. Zn concentrations in the muscle of C. plagiosum were comparatively higher than recorded in other shark species, however, concentrations of other metals and organochlorines were relatively low. C. plagiosum feeds primarily on polychaetes, shrimps and small fishes, and thus is unlikely to contain levels of contaminants of human health concern. PMID:17320935

  8. The determination of trace metals by INAA in cortex cerebellum and putamen of human brain and in their neuromelanins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was used for all the measurements. Irradiations were performed at the Triga Mark II (General Atomic - USA) research reactor of the University of Pavia. Depending on the elements to be determined, two different irradiation procedures were followed: Short irradiations were performed in the pneumatic irradiation facility at a neutron flux of 5x1012 n x cm-2 x s-1 . Samples and standards sealed in plastic vials were irradiated for 5 minutes. Long irradiations were carried out in the central thimble facility at a nominal neutron flux of 1013 n x cm-2 x s-1. Samples and standards were sealed in quartz vials and then neutron irradiated for 40 h. For the gamma spectra evaluation HPGe (gamma -x) detectors (ORTEC - USA) coupled to computerized multichannel analysers (ORTEC ADCAM - USA) were used. The concentrations of trace elements in Cortex, Cerebellum, Putamen and in their Neuromelanins are reported. Fe is the most abundant element in tissues, followed by Zinc. The ability of NMs to sequestrate metals is well shown, being their concentrations in NMs much higher than in their respective tissues, where some of them (Hg, Mo) were not even detectable. Strong differences are shown between the different pigments in interaction with metals. NM from SN shows a higher affinity for iron than all the other pigments isolated from other brain areas; nevertheless, the tissue that contains the highest concentration of this metal is PU and not SN. These results would confirm that NM from SN plays a protective role in neurons by quenching Fenton's reaction, so far considered the cause of the pathogenesis of PD. A protective role could be played by the other pigments as well, as the concentrations of analysed elements show that they bind large amounts of potentially toxic metals different from iron. This might be explained as the need of the neurons to defend themselves from the toxicity of this metal by the development of a specific pigment

  9. Analytical evaluation of a cup-horn sonoreactor used for ultrasound-assisted extraction of trace metals from troublesome matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Calle, Inmaculada; Cabaleiro, Noelia; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2009-09-01

    In this work, a sample preparation method based on ultrasound-assisted extraction of trace metals from a variety of biological and environmental matrices using a cup-horn sonoreactor is described. Diluted acids (HNO 3, HCl and HF) and oxidants (H 2O 2) were tried for extraction, the extracts being directly analyzed by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry. The cup-horn sonoreactor combines the advantages of probe and bath sonicators, allowing a variety of conditions to be used for metal extraction from troublesome matrices. This system facilitates the use of HF to destroy the silicate lattice, application of simultaneous treatments of up to six samples and short treatment times. Quantitative metal recoveries are achieved from different matrices (animal and vegetal tissues, soil, sediment, fly ash, sewage sludge) under a set of extraction conditions ranging from the use of 3 min sonication time and 3% volume/volume HNO 3 for some animal tissues to 40 min sonication time along with 5% volume/volume HNO 3 + 20% volume/volume HF for sediment. Vegetal matter required the use of 5% volume/volume HNO 3 + 5% volume/volume HF for extraction of some elements. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of Cd, Mn, Pb, Ni and Cr from 16 certified reference materials representing a variety of biological and environmental matrices using the cup-horn sonoreactor is evaluated. Cd, Pb and Mn are more easily extracted from most certified reference materials (CRMs) than Cr and Ni and less stringent conditions can be chosen for the former metals. Metal extractability follows the order of difficulty: animal tissue < vegetal tissue < soil, fly ash, sewage sludge < sediment.

  10. Analytical evaluation of a cup-horn sonoreactor used for ultrasound-assisted extraction of trace metals from troublesome matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, a sample preparation method based on ultrasound-assisted extraction of trace metals from a variety of biological and environmental matrices using a cup-horn sonoreactor is described. Diluted acids (HNO3, HCl and HF) and oxidants (H2O2) were tried for extraction, the extracts being directly analyzed by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry. The cup-horn sonoreactor combines the advantages of probe and bath sonicators, allowing a variety of conditions to be used for metal extraction from troublesome matrices. This system facilitates the use of HF to destroy the silicate lattice, application of simultaneous treatments of up to six samples and short treatment times. Quantitative metal recoveries are achieved from different matrices (animal and vegetal tissues, soil, sediment, fly ash, sewage sludge) under a set of extraction conditions ranging from the use of 3 min sonication time and 3% volume/volume HNO3 for some animal tissues to 40 min sonication time along with 5% volume/volume HNO3 + 20% volume/volume HF for sediment. Vegetal matter required the use of 5% volume/volume HNO3 + 5% volume/volume HF for extraction of some elements. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of Cd, Mn, Pb, Ni and Cr from 16 certified reference materials representing a variety of biological and environmental matrices using the cup-horn sonoreactor is evaluated. Cd, Pb and Mn are more easily extracted from most certified reference materials (CRMs) than Cr and Ni and less stringent conditions can be chosen for the former metals. Metal extractability follows the order of difficulty: animal tissue < vegetal tissue < soil, fly ash, sewage sludge < sediment.

  11. Volatile behavior and trace metal transport in the magmatic-geothermal system at Pūtauaki (Mt. Edgecumbe), New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norling, B.; Rowe, M. C.; Chambefort, I.; Tepley, F. J.; Morrow, S.

    2016-05-01

    The present-day hydrothermal system beneath the Kawerau Geothermal Field, in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, is likely heated from the Pūtauaki (Mt. Edgecumbe) magma system. The aim of this work, as an analog for present day processes, is to identify whether or not earlier erupted Pūtauaki magmas show evidence for volatile exsolution. This may have led to the transfer of volatile components from the magmatic to hydrothermal systems. To accomplish this, minerals and melt inclusions from volcanic products were analyzed for abundances of volatile and ore-forming elements (S, Cl, Li, Cu, Sn, Mo, W, Sb, As, and Tl). The variations in abundance of these elements were used to assess magma evolution and volatile exsolution or fluxing in the magma system. Melt inclusions suggest the evolution of Pūtauaki andesite-dacite magmas is predominantly driven by crystallization processes resulting in rhyodacite-rhyolite glass compositions (although textural and geochemical evidence still indicate a role for magma mixing). Measured mineral-melt partition coefficients for trace metals of interest indicates that, with the exception of Tl in biotite, analyzed metals are all incompatible in Pūtauaki crystallization products. Excluding Li and Cu, other volatile and ore metals recorded in melt inclusions behave incompatibly, with concentrations increasing during evolution from rhyodacitic to rhyolitic melt compositions. Li and Cu appear to have increased mobility likely resulting from diffusive exchange post-crystallization, and may be related to late volatile fluxing. Although S and Cl concentrations decrease with melt evolution, no mineralogical evidence exists to indicate the exsolution and mobility of ore-forming metals from the magma at the time of crystallization. This observation cannot rule out the potential for post-crystallization volatile exsolution and ore-forming metal mobilization, which may only be recorded as diffusive re-equilibration of more rapidly diffusing

  12. Validation of newly developed method for the determination of trace metallic impurities in reactor grade magnesium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper discusses about validation of a simple method developed for estimation of Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Si and Ti in high pure Magnesium metal by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES) through Inter Laboratory Comparison Experiment (ILCE). The method involves dissolution of Magnesium metal in nitric acid and subsequent analysis of resultant solution by ICP-AES. Synthetically prepared matrix matching standard solutions of elements are used for method calibration. Expanded Uncertainty (Ue) of < ±3% has been achieved for all the above elements by this method. Values obtained from different laboratories are subjected to two way-factor Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and found that there is no significant difference between the means obtained. (author)

  13. [Characteristics of Atmospheric Dry and Wet Deposition of Trace Metals in the Hinterland of the Three Gorges Reservoir, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liu-yi; Liu, Yuan; Qiao, Bao-qing; Fu, Chuan; Wang, Huan-bo; Huang, Yi-min; Yang, Fu-mo

    2016-02-15

    In order to investigate the characteristics of atmospheric trace metals deposition in the hinterland of the Three Gorges Reservoir, the wet and dry deposition samples were collected at an urban area sampling site in Wanzhou during January to June 2014. Besides, the samples were collected at five other sampling sites in April 2014 for comparative analysis, including factory region, town suburb, nature reserve, county suburb, and rural area. pH, conductivity, and trace metals (Al, As, B, Ba, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn, Pb, Ni, Sb, Sr, Sn, Ti, Zn, V) were analyzed. In urban area, the acid rain frequency was 48.44% , and the acid rain occurred mainly in the period of January to April. The order of acid rain frequency in various functional areas was factory region > urban area > county suburb > town suburb > nature reserve > county rural area. All of the trace metals in wet deposition during the sampling period were lower than the National Environmental Quality Standard for Surface Water Standard of Class III. Cd, Cu, Ph and Zn were found exceeding the standard of class I , and the pollution in factory region was more serious compared to other functional areas. The extract pH of dry deposition in urban area was in the range of 4.91-6.74, with an average value of 5.79. The order of dry deposition in various functional areas was factory region > county suburb > urban area > county rural area > town suburb > nature reserve, which was exactly the same as that of the wet deposition, indicating the similar sources of dry and wet deposition. In urban area, the contents of Ba, Co, Cu, Cr, Li, Mn, Ni, Sr, Zn in dry deposition were greater than those in wet deposition, but the contents of Al, As, B, Bi, Cd, Fe, Ph, Sb, Sn, Ti, V showed the opposite trend. Analysis of the enrichment factors showed that Al was in moderate enrichment, while Bi and Cd were significantly enriched. PMID:27363132

  14. Measurement techniques for trace metals in coal-plant effluents: A brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    The strong features and limitations of techniques for determining trace elements in aerosols emitted from coal plants are discussed. Techniques reviewed include atomic absorption spectroscopy, charged particle scattering and activation, instrumental neutron activation analysis, gas/liquid chromatography, gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric methods, X-ray fluorescence, and charged-particle-induced X-ray emission. The latter two methods are emphasized. They provide simultaneous, sensitive multielement analyses and lend themselves readily to depth profiling. It is recommended that whenever feasible, two or more complementary techniques should be used for analyzing environmental samples.

  15. Trace metal concentrations in edible muscle tissues of some locally marketed fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edible muscle tissues of five fish species marketed in Multan, i.e., Rohu (Labeo rohita). (Labeo calhasu). Mori (cirrina inrigala). Ichagga (Rita rita) and Singliaree (mystus (osteobagrus) nor) have been analyzed quantitatively for trace elements, essential as well as toxic, using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Dry ashing procedure has been employed to prepare sample solutions. Result indicate that edible muscle tissue of these fish, in general, contain higher amounts of potassium, calcium, sodium and magnesium, moderate quantities of zinc and iron and lessor amounts of copper and manganese. However, cadmium and lead were found to be below the limit of detection. (author)

  16. PIXE as a complement to ICP-OES trace metal analysis in Sudanese medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubark Ebrahim, Ammar; Etayeb, M A; Khalid, H; Noun, Manale; Roumie, M; Michalke, B

    2014-08-01

    This paper compares trace element concentrations (Ca, K, Sr, Fe, Mn, Zn, Ni, Cu, Co and Cr) in 27 Sudanese medical plants determined in parallel by PIXE and ICP-OES to get information on which technique is preferable at different matrices and element concentrations. PIXE correlates well to ICP-OES for Sr, Mn, Ca, K, Zn and Fe determinations. ICP-OES seems to be the superior technique over PIXE when measuring low concentrated elements (chromium, cobalt, nickel and copper) in the medicinal plants. PMID:24814608

  17. PIXE as a complement to ICP-OES trace metal analysis in Sudanese medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper compares trace element concentrations (Ca, K, Sr, Fe, Mn, Zn, Ni, Cu, Co and Cr) in 27 Sudanese medical plants determined in parallel by PIXE and ICP-OES to get information on which technique is preferable at different matrices and element concentrations. PIXE correlates well to ICP-OES for Sr, Mn, Ca, K, Zn and Fe determinations. ICP-OES seems to be the superior technique over PIXE when measuring low concentrated elements (chromium, cobalt, nickel and copper) in the medicinal plants

  18. Trace metal contamination in water from abondoned mining and non-mining areas in the Northern parts of the Ashanti Gold Belt, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey was conducted on the levels of trace metals (Ni, Cu, Hg, Pb, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cr, Cd, Mg and Ca) in ground and surface water sources from the northern parts of the Ashanti gold belt. Water samples were collected from 67 boreholes, 24 wells, and 10 streams during dry and wet seasons for trace metal analyses using Philips PU 9200 atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The main objective was to determine whether trace metal contamination in the study area was as a result of mining or geochemical and biochemical processes within the aquifer. The results showed that ground water (pH range 4.09-7.29 and mean 5.87 pH units) was slightly acidic (low pH) than surface water (pH range 5.81-7.74 and mean 7.12 pH units). The ground waters (with conductivity range 96-1553 μS/cm and mean 407.7 μS/cm) in the study area were also more mineralized than surface waters (with conductivity range 113-540 μS/cm and mean 323.30 μS/cm). Correlations between the trace metals revealed expected process-based relationship between Mg2+ and Ca2+ (r 0.76), derived mainly from the geochemical and biochemical processes within the aquifer. However, there were also other strong linear relationships between trace metals, such as Fe2+ and Ca2+ (r = 0.61); Mg2+ and Mn2+ (r = 0.72), Hg2+ and Mn2+ (r = 0.61), that are not normally expected to be linked in terms of processes. All the well and stream water sources had one or more trace metal level outside acceptable limits set by the World Health Organization for drinking water, and only three borehole water samples at Konongo (Abronikrom), Ntronang (Ahenbronoso) and Bomfa (Nkubem) were safe for human consumption. (au)

  19. Children exposure to trace levels of heavy metals at the north zone of Kifissos River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluates the exposure level of primary school children at three different towns in northern Attica, near the banks of the Kifissos River, defining referential values of toxic heavy metals. Concentrations of five toxic metals (arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead and nickel) were analyzed in water samples from the Kifissos River as well as in the scalp hair of children aged 11 to 12 years old living in the study area. Chronic low-level toxicity of lead and cadmium came into view in recent years as a problem of our civilization. Exposure to concentrations of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb) poses a potential threat to humans and can cause effects on children's renal and dopaminergic systems without clear evidence of a threshold, a fact that reinforces the need to control all the potential heavy metal emissions into the environment in order to protect children's health. The results were analyzed with the IBM SPSS Statistics 20 for Windows. The possible influence of sex and area was examined. Statistical differences were observed by t-test between the log-transformed hair concentrations of lead (p = 0.021), arsenic (p = 0.016) and nickel (p = 0.038) in children's scalp hair from the municipalities of Kifisia and Kryoneri. ANOVA one-way test confirmed the difference of Pb concentration in hair between girls and boys from the municipality of Kifisia (p = 0.038). The t-test confirms the difference of heavy metal concentrations in river samples between the municipalities Kifisia and Philadelphia in comparison with the samples from Kryoneri. The observations suggest that children living at the municipality of Kifisia are exposed to higher concentrations of heavy metals than the others. Despite all the confounding factors, hair can be used as a biomarker in order to determine the exposure to heavy metals, according to standardized protocols. - Highlights: ► The study area was the north zone of the Kifissos River which is characterized by

  20. Children exposure to trace levels of heavy metals at the north zone of Kifissos River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evrenoglou, Lefkothea [Department of Sanitary Engineering and Environmental Health, National School of Public Health, 11521 Athens (Greece); Partsinevelou, Sofia Aikaterini, E-mail: partsi@hol.gr [Department of Sanitary Engineering and Environmental Health, National School of Public Health, 11521 Athens (Greece); Stamatis, Panagiotis; Lazaris, Andreas; Patsouris, Eustratios; Kotampasi, Chrysanthi [Department of Pathology, Medical School of Athens,11527 Athens (Greece); Nicolopoulou-Stamati, Polyxeni, E-mail: pnicolopouloustamati@gmail.com [Department of Pathology, Medical School of Athens,11527 Athens (Greece)

    2013-01-15

    This study evaluates the exposure level of primary school children at three different towns in northern Attica, near the banks of the Kifissos River, defining referential values of toxic heavy metals. Concentrations of five toxic metals (arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead and nickel) were analyzed in water samples from the Kifissos River as well as in the scalp hair of children aged 11 to 12 years old living in the study area. Chronic low-level toxicity of lead and cadmium came into view in recent years as a problem of our civilization. Exposure to concentrations of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb) poses a potential threat to humans and can cause effects on children's renal and dopaminergic systems without clear evidence of a threshold, a fact that reinforces the need to control all the potential heavy metal emissions into the environment in order to protect children's health. The results were analyzed with the IBM SPSS Statistics 20 for Windows. The possible influence of sex and area was examined. Statistical differences were observed by t-test between the log-transformed hair concentrations of lead (p = 0.021), arsenic (p = 0.016) and nickel (p = 0.038) in children's scalp hair from the municipalities of Kifisia and Kryoneri. ANOVA one-way test confirmed the difference of Pb concentration in hair between girls and boys from the municipality of Kifisia (p = 0.038). The t-test confirms the difference of heavy metal concentrations in river samples between the municipalities Kifisia and Philadelphia in comparison with the samples from Kryoneri. The observations suggest that children living at the municipality of Kifisia are exposed to higher concentrations of heavy metals than the others. Despite all the confounding factors, hair can be used as a biomarker in order to determine the exposure to heavy metals, according to standardized protocols. - Highlights: ► The study area was the north zone of the Kifissos River which is

  1. Uptake of trace metals by the clam Macoma inquinata from clean and oil-contaminated detritus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years there has been increasing concern about the entry of petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) into the marine environment and the effects of such entry on the composition and functioning of the marine ecosystem. Few reports have been published on the possible effect of oil on the uptake of metals from water or sediments by animals. The possibility of such effects is indicated by the work of Fletcher et al. (1979), who showed that crude oil causes a reduction in blood plasma copper concentrations in fish, and Payne et al. (1978) who reported that petroleum affected chloride regulation in fish. Luoma and Jenne (1977) have shown that the availability of sediment-bound metals to a deposit-feeding clam depended on the metal-sediment associated and sediment-to-water desorption rate. We exposed a detritivorous clam, Macoma inquinata, to clean and oil-contaminated detritus to determine the effects of the oil on metal accumulation. To measure the uptake of metals, clams were exposed to neutron activated detritus and the uptake of several isotopes (51Cr, 60Co, 152Eu, 59Fe, 46Sc, and 65Zn) measured in the clams

  2. Risk assessment and seasonal variations of dissolved trace elements and heavy metals in the Upper Han River, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface water samples were collected from 42 sampling sites throughout the upper Han River during the time period of 2005-2006. The concentrations of trace metals were determined using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) for the seasonal variability and preliminary risk assessment. The results demonstrated that concentrations of 11 heavy metals showed significant seasonality and most variables exhibited higher levels in the rainy season. Principal component analysis (PCA) and factor analysis (FA) revealed that variables governing water quality in one season may not be important in another season. Risk of metals on human health was then evaluated using Hazard Quotient (HQ) and carcinogenic risk, and indicated that As with HQ >1 and carcinogenic risk >10-4, was the most important pollutant leading to non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic concerns, in particular for children. The first five largest elements to chronic risks were As, Pb, V, Se and Sb, in the dry season, while they were As, V, Co, Pb and Sb in the rainy season. This assessment would help establish pollutant loading reduction goal and the total maximum daily loads, and consequently contribute to preserve public health in the Han River basin and develop water conservation strategy for the interbasin water transfer project.

  3. Enhanced desorption of PCB and trace metal elements (Pb and Cu) from contaminated soils by saponin and EDDS mixed solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the simultaneous desorption of trace metal elements and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) from mixed contaminated soil with a novel combination of biosurfactant saponin and biodegradable chelant S,S-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS). Results showed significant promotion and synergy on Pb, Cu and PCB desorption with the mixed solution of saponin and EDDS. The maximal desorption of Pb, Cu and PCB were achieved 99.8%, 85.7% and 45.7%, respectively, by addition of 10 mM EDDS and 3000 mg L−1 saponin. The marked interaction between EDDS and saponin contributed to the synergy performance. The sorption of EDDS and saponin on soil was inhibited by each other. EDDS could enhance the complexation of metals with the saponin micelles and the solubilization capabilities of saponin micelles for PCB. Our study suggests the combination of saponin and EDDS would be a promising alternative for remediation of co-contaminated soils caused by hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) and metals. -- Highlights: ► A novel combination of biosurfactant saponin and EDDS was used to simultaneously remove mixed contaminations from soil. ► Significant synergy on Pb, Cu and PCB desorption were achieved with EDDS/saponin. ► The marked interaction between EDDS and saponin contributed to the synergy performance. -- Significant synergistic effect on Pb, Cu and PCB desorption were achieved with the mixed solution of saponin and EDDS

  4. Exudation of organic acids by a marsh plant and implications on trace metal availability in the rhizosphere of estuarine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucha, Ana P.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Bordalo, Adriano A.; Vasconcelos, M. Teresa S. D.

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this work was to identify a variety of low molecular weight organic acids exuded by the sea rush Juncus maritimus collected at two locations with different sediment characteristics (sandy and muddy) and to examine whether specific differences in physico-chemical sediment characteristics influenced plant exudation. Just after collection, plant roots were rinsed and put in contact with deionised water for 2 h. In the obtained solution the organic acids, exuded by the plants, were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Juncus maritimus was shown to be capable of releasing malonate and oxalate. Sediments and rhizosediments (sediment in contact with the plant roots and rhizomes, corresponding to the area of higher belowground biomass) from the areas where the plants had been collected were characterised in terms of physical and chemical composition, including acid volatile sulphide and total-recoverable metals (Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cd). It was found that the extent of exudation varied markedly between sites. The identified organic acids were used as extractants of metals from sediments and rhizosediments and the results were compared with those provided by a very commonly used sequential extraction approach, which was carried out in parallel. This work demonstrates that J. maritimus can release organic compounds that can act as complexing agents of trace metal and therefore organic exudates should be accounted for when dealing with estuarine environment quality.

  5. Evaluation of various techniques for the pretreatment of sewage sludges prior to trace metal analysis by atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six techniques were evaluated for their suitability for the pretreatment of dried sewage sludge prior to trace metal analysis by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The evaluation comprised analysis of two prepared samples of dried sludge for aluminium, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, nickel and zinc, after the following pretreatment: dry ashing at 500 degrees Celsius followed by extraction with dilute hydrochloric acid; dry ashing at 500 degrees Celsius followed by extraction with aqua regia; nitric acid digestion followed by extraction with hydrochloric acid; extraction with aqua regia; ashing with magnesium nitrate solution at 550 degrees Celsius followed by digestion with hydrochloric acid and extraction with nitric acid; extraction with nitric acid. Procedures involving the use of perchloric acid, hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide were not considered for reasons of safety. Except in the case of aluminium the direct mineral acid digestion and/or extraction methods generally gave higher recoveries than the procedures incorporating an ashing step. Direct extraction of the sample with aqua regia was recommended as a rapid and simple general method of sample pretreatment prior to analysis for all the metals investigated except aluminium. For this metal, more drastic sample pretreatment will be required, for example fusion or hydrofluoric acid digestion

  6. Preconcentration of trace metals in environmental samples by Amberlite XAD-16 coated with triazole and determination by ICP-AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A new ligand, 3-(3-nitrophenyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-5(4H)-thione (NPTT) was synthesized and used for the functionalization of amberlite XAD-16 resin. Amberlite XAD-NPTT was characterized by IR, NMR spectral studies. Application of the functionalized resin for the solid phase extraction (SPE) of Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Zn from water prior to their determination by Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was investigated. Several parameters like the effect of pH, effect of sample volume and flow rate, concentration of eluent, sorption capacity and the effect of diverse ions on the sorption of analytes were investigated. All the metal ions were quantitatively retained by the functionalized resin at pH 5.0 and sorbed metals were eluted with 1.5 M HNO3. The detection limits were 0.4, 0.4, 0.1, 0.5 μg L-1 for nickel, copper, cadmium and zinc respectively. The method was applied for the determination of trace metal ions in sea water and natural water samples

  7. On-line sample-pre-treatment schemes for trace-level determinations of metals by coupling flow injection or sequential injection with ICP-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jianhua; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2003-01-01

    polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) knotted reactor (KR), solvent extraction-back extraction and hydride/vapor generation. It also addresses a novel, robust approach, whereby the protocol of SI-LOV-bead injection (BI) on-line separation and pre-concentration of ultra-trace levels of metals by a renewable microcolumn is...... on-line matrix separation and pre-concentration of trace levels of metals with detection by ICP-MS. It highlights some of the frequently applied on-line, sample-pre-treatment schemes, including solid phase extraction (SPE), on-wall molecular sorption and precipitate/(co)-precipitate retention using a...

  8. Combining sedimentological, trace metal (Mn, Mo) and molecular evidence for reconstructing past water-column redox conditions: The example of meromictic Lake Cadagno (Swiss Alps)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirth, S. B.; Gilli, A.; Niemann, H.;

    2013-01-01

    was investigated for concentration variations of the trace metals Mn and Mo (XRF core scanning and ICP-MS measurements), and for the presence of anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria (carotenoid pigment analysis and 16S rDNA real time PCR). Our trace metal analysis documents an oxic-intermediate-sulfidic redox...... processes in a sulfidic environment, possibly depicting analogous conditions in an ancient ocean. Our study underscores the value of combining sedimentological, geochemical, and microbiological approaches to characterize paleo-environmental and -redox conditions in lacustrine and marine settings. (C) 2013...

  9. Environmental relevance of laboratory-derived kinetic models to predict trace metal bioaccumulation in gammarids: Field experimentation at a large spatial scale (France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uri