WorldWideScience

Sample records for air velocity distribution

  1. CFD Simulation of Air Velocity Distribution in Occupied Livestock Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svidt, Kjeld; Zhang, G.; Bjerg, B.

    In modem livestock buildings the design of the ventilation systems is important in order to obtain good air distribution. The use of Computational Fluid Dynamics for predicting the air flow and air quality makes it possible to include the effect of room geometry, equipment and occupants in the de......In modem livestock buildings the design of the ventilation systems is important in order to obtain good air distribution. The use of Computational Fluid Dynamics for predicting the air flow and air quality makes it possible to include the effect of room geometry, equipment and occupants...... in the design of ventilation systems. However, it is not appropriate to include the detailed geometry of a large group of lying or standing animals affecting the air flow in the building. It is necessary to have relatively simple models of the animals, which are easier to implement in the computer models....... In this study laboratory measurements in a ventilated test room with "pig simulators" are compared with CFD-simulations....

  2. Optimization and investigation of the effect of velocity distribution of air curtains on the performance of food refrigerated display cabinets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, XueHong; Chang, ZhiJuan; Ma, QiuYang; Lu, YanLi; Yin, XueMei

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on improving the performance of the vertical open refrigerated display cabinets (VORDC) by optimizing the structure of deflector, which is affected by inlet velocity and velocity distribution of air curtains. The results show that the temperature of products located at the front and at the rear reduces as the increases of inlet velocity of air curtains. The increase of the inlet velocity of air curtains can strengthen the disturbance inside the VORDC, and also decrease the temperature of products inside the VORDC; the increase of the outer velocity of air curtain will exacerbate the disturbance outside the VORDC and decrease air curtain's performance. The present study can provide a theoretical foundation for the design of VORDC.

  3. Velocity Distribution in a Room Ventilated by Displacement Ventilation and Wall-Mounted Air Terminal Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2000-01-01

    The article describes experiments with wall-mounted air terminal devices. The airflow from an air terminal device influences the occupants' thermal comfort and, therefore, it is important to develop an expression for this flow in the occupied zone. The velocity at the floor is influenced by the f...

  4. THREE-DIMENSIONAL REGULARITIES OF DISTRIBUTION OF AIR-INLET CHARACTERISTIC VELOCITY IN NATURAL-DRAFT WET COOLING TOWER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kai; SUN Feng-zhong; ZHAO Yuan-bin; GAO Ming; SHI Yue-tao

    2008-01-01

    A model for heat and mass transfer in a natural-draft wet cooling tower was established. Numerical simulation with the k-ε turbulent model was conducted. Distribution rules of air inlet aerodynamic field were studied. Field experiments were done in a cooling tower in power plant, and the test data was compared with the related results. The definition of characteristic air velocity was proposed and its influencing factors, such as the cross-wind velocity and circumferential angle, were quantitatively studied. It can be used to evaluate the performance of cooling tower and to calculate the ventilation quantity and resistance of air inlet. It is also a theoretical basis for cooling tower design and performance optimization.

  5. Retrieval of Raindrop Size Distribution, Vertical Air Velocity and Water Vapor Attenuation Using Dual-Wavelength Doppler Radar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Li, Lihua; Srivastava, C.

    2005-01-01

    Two techniques for retrieving the slope and intercept parameters of an assumed exponential raindrop size distribution (RSD), vertical air velocity, and attenuation by precipitation and water vapor in light stratiform rain using observations by airborne, nadir looking dual-wavelength (X-band, 3.2 cm and W-band, 3.2 mm) radars are presented. In both techniques, the slope parameter of the RSD and the vertical air velocity are retrieved using only the mean Doppler velocities at the two wavelengths. In the first method, the intercept of the RSD is estimated from the observed reflectivity at the longer wavelength assuming no attenuation at that wavelength. The attenuation of the shorter wavelength radiation by precipitation and water vapor are retrieved using the observed reflectivity at the shorter wavelength. In the second technique, it is assumed that the longer wavelength suffers attenuation only in the melting band. Then, assuming a distribution of water vapor, the melting band attenuation at both wavelengths and the rain attenuation at the shorter wavelength are retrieved. Results of the retrievals are discussed and several physically meaningful results are presented.

  6. Advanced air distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2011-01-01

    The aim of total volume air distribution (TVAD) involves achieving uniform temperature and velocity in the occupied zone and environment designed for an average occupant. The supply of large amounts of clean and cool air are needed to maintain temperature and pollution concentration at acceptable....... Ventilation in hospitals is essential to decrease the risk of airborne cross-infection. At present, mixing air distribution at a minimum of 12 ach is used in infection wards. Advanced air distribution has the potential to aid in achieving healthy, comfortable and productive indoor environments at levels...... higher than what can be achieved today with the commonly used total volume air distribution principles....

  7. AIR VELOCITY SENSOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘本琛

    1992-01-01

    During the last twenty years there has been rapid progress in the use of automation in a wide range of industries,as well as in military, scientific application. However, the progress in the application of automatic control is often hindered by the lack of accurate, reliable measuring apparatus. An economic thermal couple air flow sensor with better linearity (accuracy is ±5% of full scale) has been successfully made at Trolex Ltd. Many other existing sensors fail in the application of industries because of non-linearity.

  8. Building America Case Study: Standard- Versus High-Velocity Air Distribution in High-Performance Townhomes, Denver, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-06-09

    IBACOS investigated the performance of a small-diameter high velocity heat pump system compared to a conventional system in a new construction triplex townhouse. A ductless heat pump system also was installed for comparison, but the homebuyer backed out because of aesthetic concerns about that system. In total, two buildings, having identical solar orientation and comprised of six townhomes, were monitored for comfort and energy performance. Results show that the small-diameter system provides more uniform temperatures from floor to floor in the three-story townhome. No clear energy consumption benefit was observed from either system. The builder is continuing to explore the small-diameter system as its new standard system to provide better comfort and indoor air quality. The homebuilder also explored the possibility of shifting its townhome product to meet the U.S. Department of Energy Challenge Home National Program Requirements. Ultimately, the builder decided that adoption of these practices would be too disruptive midstream in the construction cycle. However, the townhomes met the ENERGY STAR Version 3.0 program requirements.

  9. The Pulsar Kick Velocity Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, B M S; Hansen, Brad M. S.

    1997-01-01

    We analyse the sample of pulsar proper motions, taking detailed account of the selection effects of the original surveys. We treat censored data using survival statistics. From a comparison of our results with Monte Carlo simulations, we find that the mean birth speed of a pulsar is 250-300 km/s, rather than the 450 km/s foundby Lyne & Lorimer (1994). The resultant distribution is consistent with a maxwellian with dispersion $ \\sigma_v = 190 km/s$. Despite the large birth velocities, we find that the pulsars with long characteristic ages show the asymmetric drift, indicating that they are dynamically old. These pulsars may result from the low velocity tail of the younger population, although modified by their origin in binaries and by evolution in the galactic potential.

  10. Building America Case Study: Standard- Versus High-Velocity Air Distribution in High-Performance Townhomes, Denver, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Poerschke, R. Beach, T. Begg

    2017-06-01

    IBACOS investigated the performance of a small-diameter high-velocity heat pump system compared to a conventional system in a new construction triplex townhouse. A ductless heat pump system also was installed for comparison, but the homebuyer backed out because of aesthetic concerns about that system. In total, two buildings, having identical solar orientation and comprised of six townhomes, were monitored for comfort and energy performance.

  11. Mathematical Models for Room Air Distribution - Addendum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    1982-01-01

    A number of different models on the air distribution in rooms are introduced. This includes the throw model, a model on penetration length of a cold wall jet and a model for maximum velocity in the dimensioning of an air distribution system in highly loaded rooms and shows that the amount of heat...

  12. Mathematical Models for Room Air Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    1982-01-01

    A number of different models on the air distribution in rooms are introduced. This includes the throw model, a model on penetration length of a cold wall jet and a model for maximum velocity in the dimensioning of an air distribution system in highly loaded rooms and shows that the amount of heat...

  13. Simulation of air velocity in a vertical perforated air distributor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngu, T. N. W.; Chu, C. M.; Janaun, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    Perforated pipes are utilized to divide a fluid flow into several smaller streams. Uniform flow distribution requirement is of great concern in engineering applications because it has significant influence on the performance of fluidic devices. For industrial applications, it is crucial to provide a uniform velocity distribution through orifices. In this research, flow distribution patterns of a closed-end multiple outlet pipe standing vertically for air delivery in the horizontal direction was simulated. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), a tool of research for enhancing and understanding design was used as the simulator and the drawing software SolidWorks was used for geometry setup. The main purpose of this work is to establish the influence of size of orifices, intervals between outlets, and the length of tube in order to attain uniformity of exit flows through a multi outlet perforated tube. However, due to the gravitational effect, the compactness of paddy increases gradually from top to bottom of dryer, uniform flow pattern was aimed for top orifices and larger flow for bottom orifices.

  14. The Velocity Distribution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Arzoumanian, Z; Cordes, J M

    2002-01-01

    (Abridged) We infer the velocity distribution of radio pulsars by modelling their birth, evolution, and detection in large-scale 0.4 GHz pulsar surveys, and by comparing model distributions of measurable pulsar properties with survey data using a likelihood function. We test models that characterize a population's birth rate, luminosity, shutoff of radio emission, birth locations, and birth velocities. We infer that the radio beam luminosity (i) is comparable to the energy flux of relativistic particles in models for spin-driven magnetospheres, signifying that radio emission losses reach nearly 100% for the oldest pulsars; and (ii) scales approximately as sqrt(Edot) which, in magnetosphere models, is proportional to the voltage drop available for acceleration of particles. We find that a two-component velocity distribution with characteristic velocities of 90 km/s and 500 km/s is greatly preferred to any one-component distribution. We explore some consequences of the preferred birth velocity distribution: (i)...

  15. Velocity distributions in dilute granular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zon, J S; MacKintosh, F C

    2005-11-01

    We investigate the idea that velocity distributions in granular gases are determined mainly by eta, the coefficient of restitution and q, which measures the relative importance of heating (or energy input) to collisions. To this end, we study by numerical simulation the properties of inelastic gases as functions of eta, concentration phi, and particle number N with various heating mechanisms. For a wide range of parameters, we find Gaussian velocity distributions for uniform heating and non-Gaussian velocity distributions for boundary heating. Comparison between these results and velocity distributions obtained by other heating mechanisms and for a simple model of a granular gas without spatial degrees of freedom, shows that uniform and boundary heating can be understood as different limits of q, with q>1 and q < or approximately 1 respectively. We review the literature for evidence of the role of q in the recent experiments.

  16. Air Distribution in Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    The research on air distribution in rooms is often done as full-size investigations, scale-model investigations or by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). New activities have taken place within all three areas and this paper draws comparisons between the different methods. The outcome of the l...

  17. Velocity Distributions in Inelastic Granular Gases with Continuous Size Distributions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Rui; ZHANG Duan-Ming; LI Zhi-Hao

    2011-01-01

    We study by numerical simulation the property of velocity distributions of granular gases with a power-law size distribution, driven by uniform heating and boundary heating. It is found that the form of velocity distribution is primarily controlled by the restitution coefficient -q and q, the ratio between the average number of heatings and the average number of collisions in the system. Furthermore, we show that uniform and boundary heating can be understood as different limits of q, with q ? 1 and q >1 and q≤1,respectively.

  18. Non-Maxwellian Molecular Velocity Distribution at Large Knudsen Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Jae Wan

    2012-01-01

    We have derived a non-Maxwellian molecular velocity distribution at large Knudsen numbers for ideal gas. This distribution approaches Maxwellian molecular velocity distribution as the Knudsen number approaches zero. We have found that the expectation value of the square of velocity is the same in the non-Maxwellian molecular velocity distribution as it is in the Maxwellian distribution; however, the expectation value of the speed is not the same.

  19. The acceptable air velocity range for local air movement in the Tropics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Nan; Tham, K.W.; Melikov, Arsen Krikor;

    2006-01-01

    and high velocity values. Most dissatisfaction with air movement is caused by thermal sensation, with air movement perception accounting for a smaller proportion. The subjects preferred air movement to be between "just right" and "slightly breezy" and preferred their thermal sensation to be between...... "neutral" and "slightly cool. The study also identified an acceptable air velocity range from 0.3 up to 0.9 m/s under the experimental conditions. This velocity range is relevant for the design of personalized ventilation in practice. This preferred velocity range is higher than the maximum velocity...

  20. Creating Non-Maxwellian Velocity Distributions in Ultracold Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, J; McQuillen, P; Pohl, T; Killian, T C

    2011-01-01

    We present techniques to perturb, measure and model the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma produced by photoionization of strontium atoms. By optical pumping with circularly polarized light we promote ions with certain velocities to a different spin ground state, and probe the resulting perturbed velocity distribution through laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. We discuss various approaches to extract the velocity distribution from our measured spectra, and assess their quality through comparisons with molecular dynamic simulations

  1. Determination of the integral characteristics of an asymmetrical thermal plume from air speed/velocity and temperature measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukowska, Daria; Popiolek, Zbigniew; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2010-01-01

    A method, named the Approximate Distributions Integration Method (ADI-method), is proposed for calculation of parameters of the asymmetrical thermal plume above a heat source, such as maximum air temperature excess and velocity, their position in the plume cross-section, the widths...... of the temperature and velocity profiles, asymmetry parameters of the plume cross-section, and the integral characteristics. The method is based on an approximation of the measured profiles of air velocity and air temperature excess in the plume cross-section. A procedure for conversion of the air speed measured...... by omnidirectional sensors into air velocity is incorporated with the ADI-method. Experiments were performed in a climate chamber with air temperature of 23 _C, radiant temperature equal to the air temperature and upward airflow with velocity of less than 0.05 m/s. Air speed and temperature in a thermal plume...

  2. Air Distribution in a Room with Ceiling-Mounted Diffusers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Heby, Thomas; Moeller-Jensen, Bertil

    2006-01-01

    Experiments with air distribution in rooms generated by a radial ceiling-mounted diffuser and a diffuser generating flow with swirl are compared with the air distribution obtained by mixing ventilation from a wall-mounted diffuser, vertical ventilation and displacement ventilation. The air....... The characteristics of the air distribution systems are addressed by analysing the acceptable conditions for the supply flow rate and the temperature difference for the different systems. The paper shows that an air distribution system with ceiling-mounted air terminal units is able to generate comfortable velocity...... and temperature conditions at the same and at slightly higher loads as can be obtained by a vertical ventilation system, a mixing ventilation system with wall-mounted diffuser and a displacement ventilation system with a low velocity wall-mounted diffuser. The comparison is extended by considering both the local...

  3. Two dimensional velocity distribution in open channels using Renyi entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhakar, Manotosh; Ghoshal, Koeli

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the entropy concept is employed for describing the two-dimensional velocity distribution in an open channel. Using the principle of maximum entropy, the velocity distribution is derived by maximizing the Renyi entropy by assuming dimensionless velocity as a random variable. The derived velocity equation is capable of describing the variation of velocity along both the vertical and transverse directions with maximum velocity occurring on or below the water surface. The developed model of velocity distribution is tested with field and laboratory observations and is also compared with existing entropy-based velocity distributions. The present model has shown good agreement with the observed data and its prediction accuracy is comparable with the other existing models.

  4. Significance of air humidity and air velocity for fungal spore release into the air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasanen, A.-L.; Pasanen, P.; Jantunen, M. J.; Kalliokoski, P.

    Our previous field studies have shown that the presence of molds in buildings does not necessarily mean elevated airborne spore counts. Therefore, we investigated the release of fungal spores from cultures of Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium sp. and Cladosporium sp. at different air velocities and air humidities. Spores of A. fumigatus and Penicillium sp. were released from conidiophores already at air velocity of 0.5 ms -1, whereas Cladosporium spores required at least a velocity of 1.0 ms -1. Airborne spore counts of A. fumigatus and Penicillium sp. were usually higher in dry than moist air, being minimal at relative humidities (r.h.) above 70%, while the effect of r.h. on the release of Cladosporium sp. was ambivalent. The geometric mean diameter of released spores increased when the r.h. exceeded a certain level which depends on fungal genus. Thus, spores of all three fungi were hygroscopic but the hygroscopicity of various spores appeared at different r.h.-ranges. This study indicates that spore release is controlled by external factors and depends on fungal genus which can be one reason for considerable variation of airborne spore counts in buildings with mold problems.

  5. Minimum detectable air velocity by thermal flow sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Safir; Lang, Walter

    2013-08-19

    Miniaturized thermal flow sensors have opened the doors for a large variety of new applications due to their small size, high sensitivity and low power consumption. Theoretically, very small detection limits of air velocity of some micrometers per second are achievable. However, the superimposed free convection is the main obstacle which prevents reaching these expected limits. Furthermore, experimental investigations are an additional challenge since it is difficult to generate very low flows. In this paper, we introduce a physical method, capable of generating very low flow values in the mixed convection region. Additionally, we present the sensor characteristic curves at the zero flow case and in the mixed convection region. Results show that the estimated minimum detectable air velocity by the presented method is 0.8 mm/s. The equivalent air velocity to the noise level of the sensor at the zero flow case is about 0.13 mm/s.

  6. 宽喷幅风送式喷雾机空间气流速度分布规律%Law of spatial airflow velocity distribution for wide-swath air-blast sprayer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋淑然; 洪添胜; 刘洪山; 阮耀灿; 陈建泽

    2013-01-01

    Spraying droplet adhesion and deposition were affected by the external flow field distribution of the air-blast sprayer. The swath of an air-blast sprayer can be expanded through expanding the duct and elongating rectangular outlet. In this paper, a wide-swath air-blast sprayer was applied as the experimental platform and its external airflow velocity field was tested. The duct of the wide-swath air-blast sprayer used in the experiment was made up of a cylindrical segment, a contractive segment, and an expanding segment. An axial fan was installed inside the cylindrical segment, and there were a semi-elliptical fluid director and distributors in the contractive segment. One end of the expanding segment was connected with contractive segment and the other was a rectangle outlet. The long side of the rectangle outlet was vertical to the ground and the axis of the duct was parallel to the ground simultaneously when testing was conducted. The airflow speed field of the wide-swath air-blast sprayer was tested indoors. The airflow speed sampling points were located with a sampling frame made up of lattices (11×11cm), and the airflow speed field and spray swath were tested in cross-sections 1m, 1.5m, 2m, and 2.5m away from the outlet. The average of ten testing wind speeds at each sample point was taken as the final speed of that point. The free turbulent jet theory was applied for data analysis. The distribution and variation mechanism of the wide-swath air-blast sprayer airflow velocity were obtained. The experimental results indicated that the relationship between the axial longitudinal time-averaged wind speed and the air blast distance of the wide-swath air-blast sprayer took on an attenuated power function with the fan power supply in different frequencies. The axial longitudinal time-averaged wind speed was in line with the attenuated power function regular pattern to which the axial longitudinal speed of the three-dimensional free turbulent jet was submitted. The

  7. Influences of the Air in Metal Powder High Velocity Compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the process of metal powder high velocity impact compaction, the air is compressed sharply and portion remains in the compacts. In order to study the Influences, a discrete density volleyball accumulation model for aluminium powder was established with the use of ABAQUS. Study found that the powder porosity air obstruct the pressing process because remaining air reduced strength and density of the compacts in the current high-speed pressing (V≤100m/s. When speed further increased (V≥100m/s, the temperature of the air increased sharply, and was even much higher than the melting point of the material. When aluminium powder was compressed at a speed of 200m/s, temperatures of air could reach 2033 K, far higher than the melting point of 877 K. Increased density of powders was a result of local softening and even melt adhesive while air between particles with high temperature and pressure flowed past.

  8. Concentration of the velocity distribution of pulsed neutron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Shimizu, Hirohiko M

    2016-01-01

    The velocity of neutrons from a pulsed neutron source is well-defined as a function of their arrival time. Electromagnetic neutron accelerator/decelerator synchronized with the neutron time-of-flight is capable of selectively changing the neutron velocity and concentrating the velocity distribution. Possible enhancement of the neutron intensity at a specific neutron velocity by orders of magnitude is discussed together with an experimental design.

  9. Influence of local air velocity from air conditioner evaluated by salivary and skin biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Masaki; Takahashi, Takayuki; Yoshino, Yuichiro; Sasaki, Makoto [Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Nishimiya, Hajime [Asahi Kasei Homes Corporation, R and D Laboratories, 2-1 Samejima, Fuji, Shizuoka 416-8501 (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    The purpose of this paper is to reveal both the psychosomatic and the physical effects of local air velocity from an air conditioner using biomarkers which can be collected noninvasively. Salivary {alpha}-amylase activity (SAA) and salivary cortisol were used as the indexes of psychosomatic effects. The total protein (TP) collected from stratum corneum was used as an index of the physical condition of dry skin. A continuous experiment over a 5 days period in summer was conducted using 8 healthy young male adults for 2-types of airflow conditioners, a whole ceiling-type air conditioner (without local air velocity) and a normal-type air conditioner (with local air velocity). The subjects felt cool, windy, dry and uncomfortable when under the normal-type air conditioner as determined in a subjective evaluation. The SAA under the normal-type air conditioner fluctuated more widely than with the whole ceiling-type air conditioner. The level of salivary cortisol decreased more in a day under the normal-type air conditioner than with the whole ceiling-type air conditioner. These results showed that reducing local air velocity may provide more healthy psychosomatic conditions over the long-term. Moreover, the TP of a drying-exposed skin area showed a significant change during this experiment whereas the TP of drying-protected area was relatively unchanged. It was indicated that one week's exposure to local air velocity conditions possibly influences the drying of facial skin. Thus, air movement at low velocity can be provides more comfortable conditions not only psychosomatically but also physically. (author)

  10. Experimental velocity distributions in a granular submonolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadillo-Martínez, Alejandra T.; Sánchez, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    Experimental speed distributions are obtained for driven granular submonolayers of binary mixtures of single spheres and dimers of spheres. The results are well-described by a distribution originally developed for a single-species one-dimensional system. This suggests that such a distribution may be extended to other mixtures such as systems exhibiting aggregation and dissociation.

  11. Temperature distribution of air source heat pump barn with different air flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X.; Li, J. C.; Zhao, G. Q.

    2016-08-01

    There are two type of airflow form in tobacco barn, one is air rising, the other is air falling. They are different in the structure layout and working principle, which affect the tobacco barn in the distribution of temperature field and velocity distribution. In order to compare the temperature and air distribution of the two, thereby obtain a tobacco barn whose temperature field and velocity distribution are more uniform. Taking the air source heat pump tobacco barn as the investigated subject and establishing relevant mathematical model, the thermodynamics of the two type of curing barn was analysed and compared based on Fluent. Provide a reasonable evidence for chamber arrangement and selection of outlet for air source heat pump tobacco barn.

  12. Comparison between Different Air Distribution Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    The aim of an air conditioning system is to remove excess heat in a room and replace room air with fresh air to obtain a high air quality. It is not sufficient to remove heat and contaminated air, it is also necessary to distribute and control the air movement in the room to create thermal comfort...

  13. Distributed Air Traffic Control Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Radovanović

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available During initial training air traffic control students acquire theoretical knowledge in various fields including air traffic management, aircraft performance, air traffic control equipment and systems, navigation and others. This paper proposes a simulator and explains its use and features that allows students to gain a practical insight into their coursework in order to complement their training. The goal of the simulator is to realistically implement all the key functionalities needed to cover the topics that were presented in class. The simulator offers a user friendly, distributed, and multi-role environment that can be deployed on regular PCs. Moreover, this paper discusses and resolves some of the main conceptual and implementational issues that were faced during simulator development.

  14. Experimental investigation of particle velocity distributions in windblown sand movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With the PDPA(Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer) measurement technology,the probability distributions of particle impact and lift-off velocities on bed surface and the particle velocity distributions at different heights are detected in a wind tunnel. The results show that the probability distribution of impact and lift-off velocities of sand grains can be expressed by a log-normal function,and that of impact and lift-off angles complies with an exponential function. The mean impact angle is between 28° and 39°,and the mean lift-off angle ranges from 30° to 44°. The mean lift-off velocity is 0.81-0.9 times the mean impact velocity. The proportion of backward-impacting particles is 0.05-0.11,and that of backward-entrained particles ranges from 0.04 to 0.13. The probability distribution of particle horizontal velocity at 4 mm height is positive skew,the horizontal velocity of particles at 20 mm height varies widely,and the variation of the particle horizontal velocity at 80 mm height is less than that at 20 mm height. The probability distribution of particle vertical velocity at different heights can be described as a normal function.

  15. The effect of air velocity on heat stress at increased air temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Bjarne Schmidt; Wang, Xiaoshuai; Zhang, Guoqiang

    to the temperature difference between the surfaces of animals and the surrounding air, and this temperature difference declines when the air temperature approaches the animal body temperature. Consequently it can it by expected that the effect of air velocity decreases at increased air temperature. The literature...... constant. Generally usable values for two of these constants were suggested but more work is required to determine how the third constant depends on different conditions including realistic farm conditions....

  16. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Keelan T.; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  17. Two-Dimensional Distributed Velocity Collision Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-11

    trigonometry . For convex polygon agents, the tangents are found by iterating over each point, calculating the z-component of the cross product between a...the modifications to the basic VO to favor the source bot’s current velocity (i.e., encourage the bot to change course as little as possible). To...the source agent on a collision course . However, if ignore factors are used, then A2 is more important (i.e., has a lower ignore factor), and so the

  18. The exit velocity of a compressed air cannon

    CERN Document Server

    Rohrbach, Z J; Madsen, M J

    2011-01-01

    The use of compressed air cannons in an undergraduate lab provides a way to illustrate the cooperation of diverse physics concepts, such as conservation of momentum, the work-kinetic energy theorem, expansion of gas, air drag, and elementary Newtonian mechanics. However, recent proposals have disagreed as to whether the expansion of the gas in the cannon should be modeled as an adiabatic or an isothermal process. We built an air cannon that utilized a diaphragm valve to release our pressurized gas and found that neither model accurately predicted the exit velocity of our projectile. We present a new model, based on the flow of air through the valve, that is in much better agreement with our data.

  19. Numerical calculation of air velocity and temperature in ice rinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellache, O.; Galanis, N. [Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada); Ouzzane, M.; Sunye, R. [Natural Resources Canada, Varennes, PQ (Canada). CANMET Energy Diversification Laboratory

    2002-07-01

    A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model was developed to predict the energy consumption at an ice rink. Ice rinks in Canada consume approximately 3500 GWh of electricity annually and generate about 300,000 tons of gases contributing to the greenhouse effect. This newly developed model also considers ice quality and comfort conditions in the arena. The typical 2D configuration includes refrigeration loads as well as heat transfer coefficients between the air and the ice. The effects of heat losses through the ice rink envelope are also determined. A comparison of prediction results from 4 different formulations confirms that there are important differences in air velocities near the walls and in the temperature gradient near the ice. The turbulent mixed convection model gives the best estimate of the refrigeration load. It was determined that a good ventilation should circulate air throughout the building to avoid stagnant areas. Air velocities must be low near the stands where the temperature should be around 20 degrees C. Air temperature near the ice should be low to preserve ice quality and to reduce the refrigeration load. The complexity of this geometry has been taken into account in a numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic and thermal fields in the ice rink. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  20. Reconstructing the three-dimensional local dark matter velocity distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Kavanagh, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    Directionally sensitive dark matter (DM) direct detection experiments present the only way to observe the full three-dimensional velocity distribution of the Milky Way halo local to Earth. In this work we compare methods for extracting information about the local DM velocity distribution from a set of recoil directions and energies in a range of hypothetical directional and non-directional experiments. We compare a model independent empirical parameterisation of the velocity distribution based on an angular discretisation with a model dependent approach which assumes knowledge of the functional form of the distribution. The methods are tested under three distinct halo models which cover a range of possible phase space structures for the local velocity distribution: a smooth Maxwellian halo, a tidal stream and a debris flow. In each case we use simulated directional data to attempt to reconstruct the shape and parameters describing each model as well as the DM particle properties. We find that the empirical pa...

  1. Behaviour of ion velocity distributions for a simple collision model

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Maurice, J.-P.; Schunk, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Calculation of the ion velocity distributions for a weakly ionized plasma subjected to crossed electric and magnetic fields. An exact solution to Boltzmann's equation has been obtained by replacing the Boltzmann collision integral with a simple relaxation model. At altitudes above about 150 km, where the ion collision frequency is much less than the ion cyclotron frequency, the ion distribution takes the shape of a torus in velocity space for electric fields greater than 40 mV/m. This shape persists for one to two hours after application of the electric field. At altitudes where the ion collision and cyclotron frequencies are approximately equal (about 120 km), the ion velocity distribution is shaped like a bean for large electric field strengths. This bean-shaped distribution persists throughout the lifetime of ionospheric electric fields. These highly non-Maxwellian ion velocity distributions may have an appreciable affect on the interpretation of ion temperature measurements.

  2. Air distribution and ventilation effectiveness in an occupied room heated by warm air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krajcik, Michal; Simone, Angela; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2012-01-01

    and at different simulated outside conditions, internal heat gains and air change rates. Floor heating was also simulated and compared with the warm air heating system. Vertical air temperature profiles, air velocity profiles and equivalent temperatures were derived in order to describe the thermal environment......Air distribution, ventilation effectiveness and thermal environment were experimentally studied in a simulated room in a low-energy building heated and ventilated by warm air supplied by a mixing ventilation system. Measurements were performed for various positions of the air terminal devices....... Contaminant removal effectiveness and air change efficiency were used to evaluate ventilation effectiveness. No significant risk of thermal discomfort due to vertical air temperature differences or draught was found. When the room was heated by warm air, buoyancy forces were important for ventilation...

  3. Reconstructing the three-dimensional local dark matter velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Bradley J.; O'Hare, Ciaran A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Directionally sensitive dark matter (DM) direct detection experiments present the only way to observe the full three-dimensional velocity distribution of the Milky Way halo local to Earth. In this work we compare methods for extracting information about the local DM velocity distribution from a set of recoil directions and energies in a range of hypothetical directional and nondirectional experiments. We compare a model-independent empirical parametrization of the velocity distribution based on an angular discretization with a model-dependent approach which assumes knowledge of the functional form of the distribution. The methods are tested under three distinct halo models which cover a range of possible phase space structures for the local velocity distribution: a smooth Maxwellian halo, a tidal stream and a debris flow. In each case we use simulated directional data to attempt to reconstruct the shape and parameters describing each model as well as the DM particle properties. We find that the empirical parametrization is able to make accurate unbiased reconstructions of the DM mass and cross section as well as capture features in the underlying velocity distribution in certain directions without any assumptions about its true functional form. We also find that by extracting directionally averaged velocity parameters with this method one can discriminate between halo models with different classes of substructure.

  4. How required reserve ratio affects distribution and velocity of money

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Ning; Ding, Ning; Wang, Yougui

    2005-11-01

    In this paper the dependence of wealth distribution and the velocity of money on the required reserve ratio is examined based on a random transfer model of money and computer simulations. A fractional reserve banking system is introduced to the model where money creation can be achieved by bank loans and the monetary aggregate is determined by the monetary base and the required reserve ratio. It is shown that monetary wealth follows asymmetric Laplace distribution and latency time of money follows exponential distribution. The expression of monetary wealth distribution and that of the velocity of money in terms of the required reserve ratio are presented in a good agreement with simulation results.

  5. How Required Reserve Ratio Affects Distribution and Velocity of Money

    CERN Document Server

    Xi, N; Wang, Y; Xi, Ning; Ding, Ning; Wang, Yougui

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the dependence of wealth distribution and the velocity of money on the required reserve ratio is examined based on a random transfer model of money and computer simulations. A fractional reserve banking system is introduced to the model where money creation can be achieved by bank loans and the monetary aggregate is determined by the monetary base and the required reserve ratio. It is shown that monetary wealth follows asymmetric Laplace distribution and latency time of money follows exponential distribution. The expression of monetary wealth distribution and that of the velocity of money in terms of the required reserve ratio are presented in a good agreement with simulation results.

  6. The velocity distribution of SDSS satellites in MOND

    CERN Document Server

    Angus, Garry; Tiret, Olivier; Combes, Francoise; Zhao, HongSheng

    2007-01-01

    The recent SDSS measured velocity distribution of satellite galaxies has been modelled in the context of MOND. We show that even when the extra constraint of adhering to the projected satellite number density profile is added, the two line of sight (los) velocity dispersion profiles presented in Klypin & Prada (2007) can be matched simply with a radially varying anisotropy. Interestingly, the anisotropies required to fit the los velocity dispersions are remarkably similar to the anisotropies generated by dissipationless collapse simulations in MOND. The mass-to-light ratios of the two host galaxies used are sensible and positivity of the distribution function is satisfied.

  7. Simulation study on the impact of air distribution on formaldehyde pollutant distribution in room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingtao; Wang, Jun; Cheng, Zhu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, physical and mathematical model of a room was established based on the Airpak software. The velocity distribution, air age distribution, formaldehyde concentration distribution and Predicted Mean Vote(PMV), Predicted Percentage Dissatisfied(PPD) distribution in the ward of a hospital were simulated. In addition, the air volume was doubled, the change of indoor pollutant concentration distribution was simulated. And further, the change of air age was simulated. Through the simulation, it can help arrange the position of the air supply port, so it is very necessary to increase the comfort of the staff in the room. Finally, through the simulation of pollutant concentration distribution, it can be seen that when concentration of indoor pollutants was high, the supply air flow rate should be increased appropriately. Indoor pollutant will be discharged as soon as possible, which is very beneficial to human body health.

  8. SPIDER - IX. Classifying galaxy groups according to their velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A. L. B.; de Carvalho, R. R.; Trevisan, M.; Capelato, H. V.; La Barbera, F.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Schilling, A. C.

    2013-09-01

    We introduce a new method to study the velocity distribution of galaxy systems, the Hellinger Distance (HD), designed for detecting departures from a Gaussian velocity distribution. Testing different approaches to measure normality of a distribution, we conclude that HD is the least vulnerable method to type I and II statistical errors. We define a relaxed galactic system as the one with unimodal velocity distribution and a normality deviation below a critical value (HD ) and the Gaussianity of the velocity distribution of the groups. Bright galaxies (Mr ≤ -20.7) residing in the inner and outer regions of groups do not show significant differences in the listed quantities regardless if the group has a Gaussian (G) or a Non-Gaussian (NG) velocity distribution. However, the situation is significantly different when we examine the faint galaxies (-20.7 < Mr ≤ -17.9). In G groups, there is a remarkable difference between the galaxy properties of the inner and outer galaxy populations, testifying how the environment is affecting the galaxies. Instead, in NG groups there is no segregation between the properties of galaxies in the inner and outer regions, showing that the properties of these galaxies still reflect the physical processes prevailing in the environment where they were found earlier.

  9. Measurement and Numerical Simulation of Air Velocity in a Tunnel-Ventilated Broiler House

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseo Bustamante

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A building needs to be designed for the whole period of its useful life according to its requirements. However, future climate predictions involve some uncertainty. Thus, several sustainable strategies of adaptation need to be incorporated after the initial design. In this sense, tunnel ventilation in broiler houses provides high air velocity values (2–3 m·s−1 at animal level to diminish their thermal stress and associated mortality. This ventilation system was experimentally incorporated into a Mediterranean climate. The aim was to resolve these thermal problems in hot seasons, as (traditional cross-mechanical ventilation does not provide enough air velocity values. Surprisingly, very little information on tunnel ventilation systems is available, especially in terms of air velocity. Using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD and a multi-sensor system, the average results are similar (at animal level: 1.59 ± 0.68 m·s−1 for CFD and 1.55 ± 0.66 m·s−1 for measurements. The ANOVA for validation concluded that the use of CFD or measurements is not significant (p-value = 0.1155. Nevertheless, some problems with air velocity distribution were found and need to be solved. To this end, CFD techniques can help by means of virtual designs and scenarios providing information for the whole indoor space.

  10. Measurement of velocity of air flow in the sinus maxillaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müsebeck, K; Rosenberg, H

    1979-03-01

    Anemometry with the hot wire and hot film technique previously described, enables the rhinologist to record slow and rapidly changing air flow in the maxillary sinus. The advantages and disadvantages of this method are considered. Anemometry together with manometry may be designated sinumetry and used as a diagnostic procedure following sinuscopy in chronic maxillary sinus disease. The value of the function from velocity of time allows the estimation of flow-volume in the sinus. Furthermore, the method is useful to evaluate the optimal therapy to restore ventilation in the case of an obstructed ostium demonstrated before and after surgical opening in the inferior meatus.

  11. Shear Profiles and Velocity Distribution in Dense Shear Granular Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Deng-Ming; ZHOU You-He

    2009-01-01

    We perform DEM simulations to investigate the influence of the packing fraction γ on the,shape of mean tan-gential velocity profile in a 2D annular dense shear granular flow. There is a critical packing fraction γc. For γ < γc, the mean tangential velocity profile shows a roughly exponential decay from the shearing boundary and is almost invariant to the imposed shear rate. However, for γ γc, the tangential velocity profile exhibits a rate-dependence feature and changes from linear to nonlinear gradually with the increasing shear rate. Fhrther-more, the distributions of normalized tangential velocities at different positions along radial direction exhibit the Gaussian or the composite Gaussian distributing features.

  12. Shaping the distribution of vertical velocities of antihydrogen in GBAR

    CERN Document Server

    Dufour, G.; Lambrecht, A.; Nesvizhevsky, V.V.; Reynaud, S.; Voronin, A.Yu.

    2014-01-30

    GBAR is a project aiming at measuring the free fall acceleration of gravity for antimatter, namely antihydrogen atoms ($\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$). Precision of this timing experiment depends crucially on the dispersion of initial vertical velocities of the atoms as well as on the reliable control of their distribution. We propose to use a new method for shaping the distribution of vertical velocities of $\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$, which improves these factors simultaneously. The method is based on quantum reflection of elastically and specularly bouncing $\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$ with small initial vertical velocity on a bottom mirror disk, and absorption of atoms with large initial vertical velocities on a top rough disk. We estimate statistical and systematic uncertainties, and show that the accuracy for measuring the free fall acceleration $\\overline{g}$ of $\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$ could be pushed below $10^{-3}$ under realistic experimental conditions.

  13. Shaping the distribution of vertical velocities of antihydrogen in GBAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, G.; Debu, P.; Lambrecht, A.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Reynaud, S.; Voronin, A. Yu.

    2014-01-01

    GBAR is a project aiming at measuring the free-fall acceleration of gravity for antimatter, namely antihydrogen atoms (). The precision of this timing experiment depends crucially on the dispersion of initial vertical velocities of the atoms as well as on the reliable control of their distribution. We propose to use a new method for shaping the distribution of the vertical velocities of , which improves these factors simultaneously. The method is based on quantum reflection of elastically and specularly bouncing with small initial vertical velocity on a bottom mirror disk, and absorption of atoms with large initial vertical velocities on a top rough disk. We estimate statistical and systematic uncertainties, and we show that the accuracy for measuring the free fall acceleration of could be pushed below under realistic experimental conditions.

  14. Motion of Euglena gracilis: Active fluctuations and velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanczuk, P.; Romensky, M.; Scholz, D.; Lobaskin, V.; Schimansky-Geier, L.

    2015-07-01

    We study the velocity distribution of unicellular swimming algae Euglena gracilis using optical microscopy and active Brownian particle theory. To characterize a peculiar feature of the experimentally observed distribution at small velocities we use the concept of active fluctuations, which was recently proposed for the description of stochastically self-propelled particles [Romanczuk, P. and Schimansky-Geier, L., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230601 (2011)]. In this concept, the fluctuating forces arise due to internal random performance of the propulsive motor. The fluctuating forces are directed in parallel to the heading direction, in which the propulsion acts. In the theory, we introduce the active motion via the depot model [Schweitzer, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80(23), 5044 (1998)]. We demonstrate that the theoretical predictions based on the depot model with active fluctuations are consistent with the experimentally observed velocity distributions. In addition to the model with additive active noise, we obtain theoretical results for a constant propulsion with multiplicative noise.

  15. Motion of Euglena Gracilis: Active Fluctuations and Velocity Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Romanczuk, Pawel; Scholz, Dimitri; Lobaskin, Vladimir; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    We study the velocity distribution of unicellular swimming algae Euglena gracilis using optical microscopy and theory. To characterize a peculiar feature of the experimentally observed distribution at small velocities we use the concept of active fluctuations, which was recently proposed for the description of stochastically self-propelled particles [Romanczuk, P. and Schimansky-Geier, L., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230601 (2011)]. In this concept, the fluctuating forces arise due to internal random performance of the propulsive motor. The fluctuating forces are directed in parallel to the heading direction, in which the propulsion acts. In the theory, we introduce the active motion via the depot model [Schweitzer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 23, 5044 (1998)]. We demonstrate that the theoretical predictions based on the depot model with active fluctuations are consistent with the experimentally observed velocity distributions. In addition to the model with additive active noise, we obtain theoretical results for a...

  16. Strategy Guideline. Compact Air Distribution Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdick, Arlan [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

  17. Power exponential velocity distributions in disordered porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Matyka, Maciej; Koza, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Velocity distribution functions link the micro- and macro-level theories of fluid flow through porous media. Here we study them for the fluid absolute velocity and its longitudinal and lateral components relative to the macroscopic flow direction in a model of a random porous medium. We claim that all distributions follow the power exponential law controlled by an exponent $\\gamma$ and a shift parameter $u_0$ and examine how these parameters depend on the porosity. We find that $\\gamma$ has a universal value $1/2$ at the percolation threshold and grows with the porosity, but never exceeds 2.

  18. Experimental study on the ejecta-velocity distributions caused by low-velocity impacts on quartz sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujido, S.; Arakawa, M.; Suzuki, A. I.; Yasui, M.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Regolith formation on asteroids is caused by successive impacts of small bodies. The ejecta velocity distribution during the crater formation process is one of the most important physical properties related to the surface-evolution process, and the distribution is also necessary to reconstruct the planetary-accretion process among planetesimals. The surface of small bodies, such as asteroids and planetesimals in the solar system, could have varying porosity, strength, and density, and the impact velocity could vary across a wide range from a few tens of m/s to several km/s. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct impact experiments by changing the physical properties of the target and the projectile in a wide velocity range in order to constrain the crater-formation process applicable to the small bodies in the solar system. Housen and Holsapple (2011) compiled the data of ejecta velocity distribution with various impact velocities, porosities, grain sizes, grain shapes, and strengths of the targets, and they improved their ejecta scaling law. But the ejecta velocity data is not enough for varying projectile densities and for impact velocities less than 1 km/s. In this study, to investigate the projectile density dependence of the ejecta velocity distribution at a low velocity region, we conducted impact experiments with projectile densities from 1.1 to 11.3 g/cm^3. Then, we try to determine the effect of projectile density on the ejecta velocity distribution by means of the observation of each individual ejecta grain. Experimental methods: We made impact cratering experiments by using a vertical-type one-stage light-gas gun (V-LGG) set at Kobe University. Targets were quartz sand (irregular shape) and glass beads (spherical shape) with the grain size of 500 μ m (porosity 44.7 %). The target container with the size of 30 cm was set in a large vacuum chamber with air pressure less than 10^3 Pa. The projectile materials that we used were lead, copper

  19. Investigation on Effect of Air Velocity in Turbulent Non-Premixed Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namazian Zafar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the turbulent non-premixed methane-air flame is simulated to determine the effect of air velocity on the length of flame, temperature distribution and mole fraction of species. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD technique is used to perform this simulation. To solve the turbulence flow, k-ε model is used. In contrast to the previous works, in this study, in each one of simulations the properties of materials are taken variable and then the results are compared. The results show that at a certain flow rate of fuel, by increasing the air velocity, similar to when the properties are constant, the width of the flame becomes thinner and the maximum temperature is higher; the penetration of oxygen into the fuel as well as fuel consumption is also increased. It is noteworthy that most of the pollutants produced are NOx, which are strongly temperature dependent. The amount of these pollutants rises when the temperature is increased. As a solution, decreasing the air velocity can decrease the amount of these pollutants. Finally, comparing the result of this study and the other work, which considers constant properties, shows that the variable properties assumption leads to obtaining more exact solution but the trends of both results are similar.

  20. The auroral O+ non-Maxwellian velocity distribution function revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Leblanc

    Full Text Available New characteristics of O+ ion velocity distribution functions in a background of atomic oxygen neutrals subjected to intense external electromagnetic forces are presented. The one dimensional (1-D distribution function along the magnetic field displays a core-halo shape which can be accurately fitted by a two Maxwellian model. The Maxwellian shape of the 1-D distribution function around a polar angle of 21 ± 1° from the magnetic field direction is confirmed, taking into account the accuracy of the Monte Carlo simulations. For the first time, the transition of the O+ 1-D distribution function from a core halo shape along the magnetic field direction to the well-known toroidal shape at large polar angles, through the Maxwellian shape at polar angle of 21 ± 1° is properly explained from a generic functional of the velocity moments at order 2 and 4.

  1. Computing a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution from first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Manuel O

    2003-01-01

    We investigate a family of single-particle anomalous velocity distribution by solving a particular class of stochastic Liouville equations. The stationary state is obtained analytically and the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution is reobtained in a particular limit. We discuss the comparison with other different methods to obtain the stationary state. Extensions when the models cannot be solved in an exact way are also pointed out in connection with the one-ficton approximation.

  2. How Required Reserve Ratio Affects Distribution and Velocity of Money

    OpenAIRE

    Ning Xi; Ning Ding; Yougui Wang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the dependence of wealth distribution and the velocity of money on the required reserve ratio is examined based on a random transfer model of money and computer simulations. A fractional reserve banking system is introduced to the model where money creation can be achieved by bank loans and the monetary aggregate is determined by the monetary base and the required reserve ratio. It is shown that monetary wealth follows asymmetric Laplace distribution and latency time of money fo...

  3. How Required Reserve Ratio Affects Distribution and Velocity of Money

    OpenAIRE

    Ning Xi; Ning Ding; Yougui Wang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the dependence of wealth distribution and the velocity of money on the required reserve ratio is examined based on a random transfer model of money and computer simulations. A fractional reserve banking system is introduced to the model where money creation can be achieved by bank loans and the monetary aggregate is determined by the monetary base and the required reserve ratio. It is shown that monetary wealth follows asymmetric Laplace distribution and latency time of money fo...

  4. Local pulsars : A note on the birth-velocity distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauw, A; Ramachandran, R

    1998-01-01

    We explore a simple model for the representation of the observed distributions of the motions, and the characteristic ages of the local population of pulsars. The principal difference from earlier models is the introduction of a unique value, S, for the kick velocity with which pulsars are born. We

  5. Statistical distributions of air pollution concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgopoulos, P.G.; Seinfeld, J.H.

    1982-07-01

    Methodologies and limitations in describing air quality through statistical distributions of pollutant are discussed, and the use of extreme statistics in the evaluation of different forms of air quality standards are explained. In addition, the interpretation of rollback calculations with regard to air quality standards is discussed. (JMT)

  6. Influences of initial velocity, diameter and Reynolds number on a circular turbulent air/air jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mi Jian-Chun; Du Cheng

    2011-01-01

    This paper assesses the suitability of the inflow Reynolds number defined by Reo ≡ UoD/v (here Uo and D are respectively the initial jet velocity and diameter while v is kinematic viscosity) for a round air/air jet.Specifically an experimental investigation is performed for the influences of U(o),D and Re(o) on the mean-velocity decay and spread coefficients (Ku,Kr) in the far field of a circular air jet into air from a smoothly contracting nozzle.Present measurements agree well with those previously obtained under similar inflow conditions.The relations Ku (oc) U(o) and Kr (oc) 1/U(o) for U(o) < 5 m/s appear to work,while each coefficient approaches asymptotically to a constant for U(o) > 6 m/s,regardless of the magnitudes of Reo and D.It is revealed that Reo may not be an appropriate dimensionless parameter to characterize the entire flow of a free air/air jet.This paper is the first paper that has challenged the suitability of Re(o) for turbulent free jets.

  7. Actin filaments on myosin beds: The velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdieu, L.; Magnasco, M. O.; Winkelmann, D. A.; Libchaber, A.

    1995-12-01

    In vitro studies of actin filaments sliding on a myosin-coated surface are analyzed, filament by filament, at a sampling rate of 30 per second. For each filament, the mean arc length coordinate is computed and histograms of instantaneous velocities, along the arc length, are established. Two types of motion are observed, depending on the experimental conditions. The first one is characterized by a homogeneous flow, with well defined velocities. In this regime, specific defects are a constitutive part of the flow. It is observed at high temperature, at high myosin coverage, and with a particular mode of attachment of myosin to the surface. The second regime shows no clear velocity selection, but a broadband distribution. It is characterized by high friction and is observed at low temperature or low myosin density. (c) 1995 The American Physical Society

  8. Experimental study on velocity characteristics of recirculation zone in humid air non-premixed flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    To examine the effect of the flow field within the recirculation zone on flame structure,the characteristic velocity fields of methane/humid air flame in nonpremixed combustion behind a disc bluff-body burner were experimentally studied by particle image velocimeter (PIV).The results show that two stagnation points exist on the centerline in the recirculation zone flame.However,the distance of the two stagnation points in humid air combustion shortens,and the minimal dimensionless velocity increases compared with the conventional nonhumid air combustion.In addition,the positional curves of the minimal velocities can be partitioned into three phases representing three different flame patterns.The analysis of axial minimal velocities on the centerline and their positions under different co-flow air velocity conditions reveals that fuel-to-air velocity ratio is the crucial parameter that governs humid air combustion flame characteristics.

  9. Fluid dynamics of air in a packed bed: velocity profiles and the continuum model assumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. NEGRINI

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Air flow through packed beds was analyzed experimentally under conditions ranging from those that reinforce the effect of the wall on the void fraction to those that minimize it. The packing was spherical particles, with a tube-to-particle diameter ratio (D/dp between 3 and 60. Air flow rates were maintained between 1.3 and 4.44 m3/min, and gas velocity was measured with a Pitot tube positioned above the bed exit. Measurements were made at various radial and angular coordinate values, allowing the distribution of air flow across the bed to be described in detail. Comparison of the experimentally observed radial profiles with those derived from published equations revealed that at high D/dp ratios the measured and calculated velocity profiles behaved similarly. At low ratios, oscillations in the velocity profiles agreed with those in the voidage profiles, signifying that treating the porous medium as a continuum medium is questionable in these cases.

  10. PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION OF NEAR-WALL TURBULENT VELOCITY FLUCTUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    By large eddy simulation (LES), turbulent databases of channel flows at different Reynolds numbers were established. Then, the probability distribution functions of the streamwise and wall-normal velocity fluctuations were obtained and compared with the corresponding normal distributions. By hypothesis test, the deviation from the normal distribution was analyzed quantitatively. The skewness and flatness factors were also calculated. And the variations of these two factors in the viscous sublayer, buffer layer and log-law layer were discussed. Still illustrated were the relations between the probability distribution functions and the burst events-sweep of high-speed fluids and ejection of low-speed fluids-in the viscous sub-layer, buffer layer and loglaw layer. Finally the variations of the probability distribution functions with Reynolds number were examined.

  11. Evaluating gas transfer velocity parameterizations using upper ocean radon distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Michael L.; Kinter, Saul; Cassar, Nicolas; Wanninkhof, Rik

    2011-02-01

    Sea-air fluxes of gases are commonly calculated from the product of the gas transfer velocity (k) and the departure of the seawater concentration from atmospheric equilibrium. Gas transfer velocities, generally parameterized in terms of wind speed, continue to have considerable uncertainties, partly because of limited field data. Here we evaluate commonly used gas transfer parameterizations using a historical data set of 222Rn measurements at 105 stations occupied on Eltanin cruises and the Geosecs program. We make this evaluation with wind speed estimates from meteorological reanalysis products (from National Centers for Environmental Prediction and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting) that were not available when the 22Rn data were originally published. We calculate gas transfer velocities from the parameterizations by taking into account winds in the period prior to the date that 222Rn profiles were sampled. Invoking prior wind speed histories leads to much better agreement than simply calculating parameterized gas transfer velocities from wind speeds on the day of sample collection. For individual samples from the Atlantic Ocean, where reanalyzed winds agree best with observations, three similar recent parameterizations give k values for individual stations with an rms difference of ˜40% from values calculated using 222Rn data. Agreement of basin averages is much better. For the global data set, the average difference between k constrained by 222Rn and calculated from the various parameterizations ranges from -0.2 to +0.9 m/d (average, 2.9 m/d). Averaging over large domains, and working with gas data collected in recent years when reanalyzed winds are more accurate, will further decrease the uncertainties in sea-air fluxes.

  12. Whistler Waves Driven by Anisotropic Strahl Velocity Distributions: Cluster Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, A.F.; Gurgiolo, C.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Gary, S. P.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    Observed properties of the strahl using high resolution 3D electron velocity distribution data obtained from the Cluster/PEACE experiment are used to investigate its linear stability. An automated method to isolate the strahl is used to allow its moments to be computed independent of the solar wind core+halo. Results show that the strahl can have a high temperature anisotropy (T(perpindicular)/T(parallell) approximately > 2). This anisotropy is shown to be an important free energy source for the excitation of high frequency whistler waves. The analysis suggests that the resultant whistler waves are strong enough to regulate the electron velocity distributions in the solar wind through pitch-angle scattering

  13. Driven phase space vortices in plasmas with nonextensive velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Pallavi; Ganesh, Rajaraman

    2017-03-01

    The evolution of chirp-driven electrostatic waves in unmagnetized plasmas is numerically investigated by using a one-dimensional (1D) Vlasov-poisson solver with periodic boundary conditions. The initial velocity distribution of the 1D plasma is assumed to be governed by nonextensive q distribution [C. Tsallis, J. Stat. Phys. 52, 479 (1988)]. For an infinitesimal amplitude of an external drive, we investigate the effects of chirp driven dynamics that leads to the formation of giant phase space vortices (PSV) for both Maxwellian (q = 1) and non-Maxwellian ( q ≠ 1 ) plasmas. For non-Maxwellian plasmas, the formation of giant PSV with multiple extrema and phase velocities is shown to be dependent on the strength of "q". Novel features such as "shark"-like and transient "honeycomb"-like structures in phase space are discussed. Wherever relevant, we compare our results with previous work.

  14. The Performance of Diffuse Ceiling Inlet and other Room Air Distribution Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Jakubowska, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses different room air distribution systems, and describes a design chart which can be used for the evaluation of variables as air quality, air velocity and temperature gradient as a function of flow rate and temperature difference in the supply system. The design chart can also be...

  15. Distributed Velocity-Dependent Protocol for Multihop Cellular Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagyasi Bhushan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cell phones are embedded with sensors form a Cellular Sensor Network which can be used to localize a moving event. The inherent mobility of the application and of the cell phone users warrants distributed structure-free data aggregation and on-the-fly routing. We propose a Distributed Velocity-Dependent (DVD protocol to localize a moving event using a Multihop Cellular Sensor Network (MCSN. DVD is based on a novel form of connectivity determined by the waiting time of nodes for a Random Waypoint (RWP distribution of cell phone users. This paper analyzes the time-stationary and spatial distribution of the proposed waiting time to explain the superior event localization and delay performances of DVD over the existing Randomized Waiting (RW protocol. A sensitivity analysis is also performed to compare the performance of DVD with RW and the existing Centralized approach.

  16. Distributed Velocity-Dependent Protocol for Multihop Cellular Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepthi Chander

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell phones are embedded with sensors form a Cellular Sensor Network which can be used to localize a moving event. The inherent mobility of the application and of the cell phone users warrants distributed structure-free data aggregation and on-the-fly routing. We propose a Distributed Velocity-Dependent (DVD protocol to localize a moving event using a Multihop Cellular Sensor Network (MCSN. DVD is based on a novel form of connectivity determined by the waiting time of nodes for a Random Waypoint (RWP distribution of cell phone users. This paper analyzes the time-stationary and spatial distribution of the proposed waiting time to explain the superior event localization and delay performances of DVD over the existing Randomized Waiting (RW protocol. A sensitivity analysis is also performed to compare the performance of DVD with RW and the existing Centralized approach.

  17. Observations of the velocity distribution of solar wind ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Bochsler, P.; Geiss, J.; Coplan, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements made by the Isee 3 ion composition experiment have been used to determine the kinetic temperatures of 3He(++), 4He(++), 16O(6+), and 16O(7+) in the solar wind. It is found that these temperatures generally obey the relation that T(i)/m(i) equals const, but fluctuations, some of which are caused by dynamical effects in the flow, are observed. The temperature of oxygen sometimes rises above 10 K, which is very strong evidence for heating outside the collisional region of the corona. The tendency toward equal temperatures per nucleon occurs everywhere where collisions are unimportant, suggesting that the temperatures are set up close to the sun rather than elsewhere in the interplanetary medium. The velocity distribution function of helium is observed to be non-Maxwellian, with a pronounced high velocity tail.

  18. Mechanism of proton anisotropic velocity distribution in the solar wind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AO; Xianzhi(敖先志); SHEN; Ji(沈迹); TU; Chuanyi(涂传诒)

    2003-01-01

    Although it has been long that spacecraft observed the anisotropy of velocity protons in the solar wind, there is still not a reasonable explanation. In this paper we try to give an explanation from the diffusion plateau of protoncyclotron resonance predicted by the quasi-linear theory for the resonance between the protons and the parallel propagating waves. We consider the effect of dispersion relation on diffusion plateau and notice that the diffusion plateau we have got by using cold plasma dispersion relation accords with the density contours in the velocity phase space detected at 0.3 AU in fast solar wind. For explaining proton distributions obtained in the fast solar wind from 0.7 AU to 1 AU hot plasma dispersion relation should be considered. We also give a theoretical relation of proton thermal anisotropy A and plasma parameter β.

  19. Measurement of air velocity in animal occupied zones using an ultrasonic anemometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenberg, van A.V.; Leeuw, de M.T.J.

    2003-01-01

    The air velocity in the animal occupied zone (AOZ) of a pig facility influences the thermal comfort of pigs and is affected by the ventilation system in the building. Little is known about the relationship between the air velocity in the AOZ and the ventilation system design. This article describes

  20. Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuecks, D J; Skiff, F; Kletzing, C A

    2012-08-01

    We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense (ω(pe) > ω(ce)). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency ω(ce). As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation ω - k([parallel])v([parallel]) = ω(ce). The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

  1. The Contaminant Distribution in a Ventilated Room with Different Air Terminal Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Nielsen, Peter V.

    of the jets and the comfort requirements applied to measured air velocities in the occupied zone. Normalized concentration distribution in the test room is determined along a vertical line through the middle of the room as a function of the air exchange rate and the density of the tracer gas. The relative......The room ventilation is investigated for three different air terminal devices under isothermal conditions. Velocity distribution in the occupied zone is measured for each air terminal device at different air exchange rates. The maximum air exchange rate is determined on the base of both the throw...... ventilation efficiency, , based on the room average concentration is also determined as a function of the air exchange rate and the density of the tracer gas. The influence from the position of the return opening on the relative ventilation efficiency is found for one air terminal device....

  2. Settling-velocity specific SOC distribution on hillslopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yaxian; Berhe, Asmeret Asefaw; Fogel, Marilyn L.;

    The net effect of soil erosion by water, as a sink or source of atmospheric CO2, is determined by the spatial (re-)distribution and stability of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC). The depositional position of eroded SOC is a function of the transport distances of soil fractions where the SOC...... is stored. In theory, the transport distances of soil fractions are related to their settling velocities under given flow conditions. Yet, very few field investigations have been conducted to examine the actual movement of eroded soil fractions along hillslopes, let alone the re-distribution pattern of SOC...... shows a coarsening effect immediately below the eroding slope, followed by a fining trend at the slope tail. The 13C values of soil fractions were more positive at the footslope than on the slope shoulder or at the slope tail, suggesting enhanced decomposition rate of fresh SOC input at the footslope...

  3. Settling-velocity specific SOC distribution on hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaxian; Asefaw Berhe, Asmeret; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Heckrath, Goswin J.; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    The net effect of soil erosion by water, as a sink or source of atmospheric CO2, is determined by the spatial (re-)distribution and stability of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC). The depositional position of eroded SOC is a function of the transport distances of soil fractions where the SOC is stored. In theory, the transport distances of soil fractions are related to their settling velocities under given flow conditions. Yet, very few field investigations have been conducted to examine the actual movement of eroded soil fractions along hillslopes, let alone the re-distribution pattern of SOC fractions. Eroding sandy soils and sediment were sampled after a series of rainfall events along a slope on a freshly seeded cropland in Jutland, Denmark. All the soil samples were fractionated into five settling classes using a settling tube apparatus. The spatial distribution of soil settling classes shows a coarsening effect immediately below the eroding slope, followed by a fining trend at the slope tail. The δ13C values of soil fractions were more positive at the footslope than on the slope shoulder or at the slope tail, suggesting enhanced decomposition rate of fresh SOC input at the footslope during or after erosion-induced transport. Overall, our results illustrate that immediate deposition of fast settling soil fractions and the associated SOC at footslopes must be appropriately accounted for in attempts to quantify the role of soil erosion in terrestrial carbon sequestration. A SOC erodibility parameter based on actual settling velocity distribution of eroded fractions is needed to better calibrate soil erosion models.

  4. The Effect of Air Velocity on the Prevention of Heat Stress in Iranian Veiled Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Some environmental factors such as the ambient temperature, radiant temperature, humidity and air velocity as well as clothing and activity level are effective to induce heat strain on the workers. Objectives The current study aimed to evaluate the effect of air velocity on Iranian veiled females at various exercise intensities and climatic conditions. Methods The current experimental study was conducted on 51 healthy veiled females with Islamic clothing (n = 30 in two hot-dry climatic chambers (wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT = 32 ± 0.1°C and WBGT = 30 ± 0.1°C, 40% relative humidity (RH without air velocity and (n = 21 with air velocity 0.31 m/s in sitting and light workload conditions, respectively, for 60 minutes. The WBGT, oral temperature and heart rate were measured simultaneously every five minutes during the heat exposure and resting state. Data were analyzed using correlation and line regression by SPSS ver. 16. Results In both groups, oral temperature and heart rate increased during heat exposure. The increase of oral temperature and heart rate were larger in the group with air velocity (sitting position, 37.05 ± 0.20°C, 98.30 ± 7.79 bpm, light workload, 37.34 ± 0.24°C, 124.08 ± 6.09 bpm compared those of the group without air velocity (sitting position, 36.70 ± 0.36°C, 69.74 ± 0.98 bpm, light workload, 36.71 ± 0.27°C, 110.78 ± 17.9 bpm. The difference in physiological strain index (PSI between resting and low workload were higher in with air velocity group than those of the group without air velocity. Conclusions The results showed that the heat stress increased by increasing air velocity and humidity in both groups. The air velocity with high humidity can be considered as a positive factor in the occurrence of heat strain. Therefore, the incidence of heat stress decreases with the increase of humidity and reduction of air velocity or with increase of air velocity and reduction of humidity in Iranian veiled

  5. Discretising the velocity distribution for directional dark matter experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Kavanagh, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter (DM) direct detection experiments which are directionally-sensitive may be the only method of probing the full velocity distribution function (VDF) of the Galactic DM halo. We present an angular basis for the DM VDF which can be used to parametrise the distribution in order to mitigate astrophysical uncertainties in future directional experiments and extract information about the DM halo. This basis consists of discretising the VDF in a series of angular bins, with the VDF being only a function of the DM speed $v$ within each bin. In contrast to other methods, such as spherical harmonic expansions, the use of this basis allows us to guarantee that the resulting VDF is everywhere positive and therefore physical. We present a recipe for calculating the event rates corresponding to the discrete VDF for an arbitrary number of angular bins $N$ and investigate the discretisation error which is introduced in this way. For smooth, Standard Halo Model-like distribution functions, only $N=3$ angular bins ar...

  6. Electron velocity distribution and lion roars in the magnetosheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Masood

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Whistler waves which are termed "lion roars" in the magnetosheath are studied using data obtained by the Spectrum Analyser (SA of the Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations (STAFF experiment aboard Cluster. Kinetic theory is then employed to obtain the theoretical expression for the whistler wave with electron temperature anisotropy which is believed to trigger lion roars in the magnetosheath. This allows us to compare theory and data. This paper for the first time studies the details of the electron velocity distribution function as measured by the Plasma Electron And Current Experiment (PEACE in order to investigate the underlying causes for the different types of lion roars found in the data. Our results show that while some instances of lion roars could be locally generated, the source of others must be more remote regions of the magnetosheath.

  7. LASER ULTRASONIC FOR MEASUREMENTS OF VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION IN PIPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Navarrete

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the development of a photoacoustic flowmeter with probe-beam deflection. A pulsedlaser beam produces an acoustic pulse, whose propagation is registered by its deflection effects on two cw probebeams. The acoustic pulse in a flowing fluid is produced by absorption of a laser pulse (30 ns, 1.1 mJ focused overa path flow line. The acoustic propagations, along and against the flow, are monitored by two cw probe beams. Inthe interaction, the probe beam undergoes a transient deflection that is detected by a fast response photodiode.The velocity distribution data profile of a square pipe is obtained by means of the acoustic pulse arrival timemeasured through its cross section applying the cylindrical shockwave model developed by Vlasses. The profilesdetermined with this experimental technique are compared with two turbulent pipe flow models.

  8. The "Family Tree" of Air Distribution Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    2011-01-01

    that all the known types of air distribution systems are interconnected in a “family tree”. The influence of supplied momentum flow versus buoyancy forces is discussed, and geometries for high ventilation effectiveness are indicated as well as geometries for fully mixed flow. The paper will also show...

  9. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and velocity of air flow over 1000°C using two color phosphor thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masatoshi; Someya, Satoshi; Munakata, Tetsuo; LCS Team

    2016-11-01

    Thermal barrier coatings were applied to the gas turbines and the internal combustion engines for the high thermal efficiency. The evaluation and the improvement of coatings require to measure transient gaseous flow near the wall with coatings. An aim of this study is to combine a two color phosphor thermometry with the PIV to measure simultaneously temperature and velocity of the gas over 1000°C. The temperature and velocity distribution of an impinging jet of high temperature air was simultaneously visualized in experiments. The temperature was estimated from an intensity ratio of luminescent in different ranges of wavelength, 500 600 nm and 400 480 nm. Uncertainty of measured temperature was less than 10°C. Temperatures measured by the developed method and by thermocouples were agreed well. The measured velocity by the PIV with phosphor particles were also agreed well with the velocity measured by a Laser Doppler Velocimeter.

  10. On the distribution of sound velocity in a section of Vzag in the Bay of Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Siva Rama Sastry

    1956-04-01

    Full Text Available The vertical sound velocity distribution in a section of Visakhapatnam in the Bay of Bengal has been computed making use of Kuwahara's tables. In an attempt to find out the corrections to the echo-sounder readings the average sound velocity distribution is computed together with the sound velocity profiles taking the spot values only. The physical oceanography of the area in relation to the sound velocity distribution is discussed.

  11. Calculation of a velocity distribution from particle trajectory end-points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lowell A.

    1983-01-01

    The longitudinal component of the velocity of a particle at or near a glacier surface is considered, its position as a function of time being termed its trajectory. Functional relationships are derived for obtaining the trajectory from the spatial distribution of velocity and for obtaining the velocity distribution from the trajectory. It is established that the trajectory end-points impose only an integral condition on the velocity distribution and that no individual point on the velocity distribution can be determined if only the end-points are known.-from Author

  12. Effects of air velocity on laying hen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermal conditions play a major role in production efficiency in commercial poultry production. Mitigation of thermal stress can improve productivity, but must be achieved economically. Weather and system design can limit effectiveness of evaporative cooling and increased air movement has been sho...

  13. Preferred Air Velocity and Local Cooling Effect of desk fans in warm environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2013-01-01

    Common experiences, standards, and laboratory studies show that increased air velocity helps to offset warm sensation due to high environmental temperatures. In warm climate regions the opening of windows and the use of desk or ceiling fans are the most common systems to generate increased airflows...... to compensate for higher environmental temperatures at the expense of no or relatively low energy consumption. When using desk fans, local air movement is generated around the occupant and a certain cooling effect is perceived. The impact of the local air movement generated by different air flow patterns....../kg. By a thermal manikin the effect of direct air movement generated by a personal desk fan at 26 °C, 28 °C, or 30 °C room temperatures and the achievable thermal comfort was also analyzed. Results show that it is possible to offset warm sensation within a range of indoor conditions using increased air velocity...

  14. The Influence of Furniture on Air Velocity in a Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J. R.; Nielsen, Peter V.; Svidt, Kjeld

    Using isothermal full-scale experiments and 3-dimensional CFD simulations it is investigated how normal office furniture influences the air movements in a mixing ventilated room. Two different types of inlets are used in the experiments and a set-up with normal office furniture is made. The set......-up is simulated with one of the inlets where a volume resistance represents the furniture....

  15. Complete velocity distribution in river cross-sections measured by acoustic instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.; ,

    2003-01-01

    To fully understand the hydraulic properties of natural rivers, velocity distribution in the river cross-section should be studied in detail. The measurement task is not straightforward because there is not an instrument that can measure the velocity distribution covering the entire cross-section. Particularly, the velocities in regions near the free surface and in the bottom boundary layer are difficult to measure, and yet the velocity properties in these regions play the most significant role in characterizing the hydraulic properties. To further characterize river hydraulics, two acoustic instruments, namely, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), and a "BoogieDopp" (BD) were used on fixed platforms to measure the detailed velocity profiles across the river. Typically, 20 to 25 stations were used to represent a river cross-section. At each station, water velocity profiles were measured independently and/or concurrently by an ADCP and a BD. The measured velocity properties were compared and used in computation of river discharge. In a tow-tank evaluation of a BD, it has been confirmed that BD is capable of measuring water velocity at about 11 cm below the free-surface. Therefore, the surface velocity distribution across the river was extracted from the BD velocity measurements and used to compute the river discharge. These detailed velocity profiles and the composite velocity distribution were used to assess the validity of the classic theories of velocity distributions, conventional river discharge measurement methods, and for estimates of channel bottom roughness.

  16. Study of the velocity distribution influence upon the pressure pulsations in draft tube model of hydro-turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonin, V.; Ustimenko, A.; Kuibin, P.; Litvinov, I.; Shtork, S.

    2016-11-01

    One of the mechanisms of generation of powerful pressure pulsations in the circuit of the turbine is a precessing vortex core, formed behind the runner at the operation points with partial or forced loads, when the flow has significant residual swirl. To study periodic pressure pulsations behind the runner the authors of this paper use approaches of experimental modeling and methods of computational fluid dynamics. The influence of velocity distributions at the output of the hydro turbine runner on pressure pulsations was studied based on analysis of the existing and possible velocity distributions in hydraulic turbines and selection of the distribution in the extended range. Preliminary numerical calculations have showed that the velocity distribution can be modeled without reproduction of the entire geometry of the circuit, using a combination of two blade cascades of the rotor and stator. Experimental verification of numerical results was carried out in an air bench, using the method of 3D-printing for fabrication of the blade cascades and the geometry of the draft tube of hydraulic turbine. Measurements of the velocity field at the input to a draft tube cone and registration of pressure pulsations due to precessing vortex core have allowed building correlations between the velocity distribution character and the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the pulsations.

  17. An Unbiased Estimator of Peculiar Velocity with Gaussian Distributed Errors for Precision Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Watkins, Richard

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new estimator of the peculiar velocity of a galaxy or group of galaxies from redshift and distance estimates. This estimator results in peculiar velocity estimates which are statistically unbiased and that have errors that are Gaussian distributed, thus meeting the assumptions of analyses that rely on individual peculiar velocities. We apply this estimator to the SFI++ and the Cosmicflows-2 catalogs of galaxy distances and, using the fact that peculiar velocity estimates of distant galaxies are error dominated, examine their error distributions, The adoption of the new estimator significantly improves the accuracy and validity of studies of the large-scale peculiar velocity field and eliminates potential systematic biases, thus helping to bring peculiar velocity analysis into the era of precision cosmology. In addition, our method of examining the distribution of velocity errors should provide a useful check of the statistics of large peculiar velocity catalogs, particularly those that are comp...

  18. Experimental analysis of the velocity field of the air flowing through the swirl diffusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszczur, M.; Branny, M.; Karch, M.; Borowski, M.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies of flow of air through diffusers. Presented laboratory model is a simplification of the real system and was made in a geometric scale 1:10. Simplifying refer both to the geometry of the object and conditions of air flow. The aim of the study is to determine the actual velocity fields of air flowing out of the swirl diffuser. The results obtained for the diffuser various settings are presented. We have tested various flow rates of air. Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) method was used to measure all velocity vector components. The experimental results allow to determine the actual penetration depth of the supply air into the room. This will allow for better definition of the conditions of ventilation in buildings.

  19. Group velocity distribution of Rayleigh waves and crustal and upper mantle velocity structure of the Chinese mainland and its vicinity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何正勤; 丁志峰; 叶太兰; 孙为国; 张乃铃

    2002-01-01

    Based on the long period digital surface wave data recorded by 11 CDSN stations and 11 IRIS stations, the dispersion curves of the group velocities of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves along 647 paths, with the periods from 10 s to 92 s, were measured by multi-filter. Their distribution at 25 central periods within the region of 18((54(N, 70(~140(E was inverted by Dimtar-Yanovskaya method. Within the period from 10 s to 15.9 s, the group velocity distribution is laterally inhomogeneous and is closely related to geotectonic units, with two low velocity zones located in the Tarim basin and the East China Sea and its north regions, respectively. From 21 s to 33 s, the framework of tectonic blocks is revealed. From 36.6 s to 40 s, the lithospheric subdivision of the Chinese mainland is obviously uncovered, with distinct boundaries among the South-North seismic belt, the Tibetan plateau, the North China, the South China and the Northeast China. Four cross-sections of group velocity distribution with period along 30(N, 38(N, 90(E and 120(E, are discussed, respectively, which display the basic features of the crust and upper mantle of the Chinese mainland and its neighboring regions. There are distinguished velocity differences among the different tectonic blocks. There are low-velocity-zones (LVZ) in the middle crust of the eastern Tibetan plateau, high velocity featured as stable platform in the Tarim basin and the Yangtze platform, shallow and thick low-velocity-zone in the upper mantle of the North China. The upper mantle LVZ in the East China Sea and the Japan Sea is related to the frictional heat from the subduction of the Philippine slab and the strong extension since the Himalayan orogenic period.

  20. Correlation of Spherical Thermistor for the Measurement of Low Velocity Air Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-GangLiang; Ying-PingZhang; 等

    1998-01-01

    A spherical thermistor,an accurate temperature sensor is employed as an air velocity sensor in this work.The measuring principle is derived and the effects of the insulation layer,air temperature,netural convection and thermal radiation are discussed.Two different correlation relations for velocity measurements are proposed based on theoretical analyses and experimental calibrations,Experiments have shown that spherical thermistor is a good velocity sensor for speed between 0.1-2.5m/s at room temperature and the insulation layer hardly influences the accuracy of the thermistor used in the present work,Modification of correlation can even further imporve measurement accuracy.Since the thermistor is small and cheap,it is possible to apply this method to multi-Point velocity measurement with a low disturbance to the flow field.

  1. A Novel Method for Saving Energy of HVAC Using Autonomous Variable Air Velocity Based On Thermal Comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auttawaitkul, Yingrak; Therdyothin, Apichit; Monyakul, Veerapol

    The tower building categories used in the energy breakdown are Electric lighting, the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) auxiliary and Office equipment. The HVAC system has the greatest energy saving potential as it is the major energy consumer. It consumes approximately 64 percent of the total building energy. A good HVAC in buildings helps reduce energy use and maintain occupant comfort. To this end, there are many systems and equipment conditions to observe HVAC systems. This paper critically examines indoor climate control technologies to reduce the HVAC system energy. The autonomous variable air volume diffusers are interconnected to simulate the responses of the system. The constrained optimal control problem is formulated and solved for increased operative temperature. The experiment results show that by increasing the operative temperature from 25°C to 27°C, the electrical energy can be saved by 11.64 percent. The proposed method feeds back the output air to input boundary conditions of the same human thermal sensation even though the air velocity distributions in the sections are different from each other. The experiment results also show that the proposed method can maintain the PMV values in an interval of -0.5 to +0.5 at an acceptable air velocity range.

  2. Using eddy covariance to estimate air-sea gas transfer velocity for oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Andreas; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik

    2016-07-01

    Air-sea gas transfer velocity for O2 is calculated using directly measured fluxes with the eddy covariance technique. It is a direct method and is frequently used to determine fluxes of heat, humidity, and CO2, but has not previously been used to estimate transfer velocities for O2, using atmospheric eddy covariance data. The measured O2 fluxes are upward directed, in agreement with the measured air-sea gradient of the O2 concentration, and opposite to the direction of the simultaneously measured CO2 fluxes. The transfer velocities estimated from measurements are compared with prominent wind speed parameterizations of the transfer velocity for CO2 and O2, previously established from various measurement techniques. Our result indicates stronger wind speed dependence for the transfer velocity of O2 compared to CO2 starting at intermediate wind speeds. This stronger wind speed dependence appears to coincide with the onset of whitecap formation in the flux footprint and the strong curvature of a cubic wind-dependent function for the transfer velocity provides the best fit to the data. Additional data using the measured O2 flux and an indirect method (based on the Photosynthetic Quotient) to estimate oxygen concentration in water, support the stronger wind dependence for the transfer velocity of O2 compared to CO2.

  3. Laminar Flame Velocity and Temperature Exponent of Diluted DME-Air Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseer Mohammed, Abdul; Anwar, Muzammil; Juhany, Khalid A.; Mohammad, Akram

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the laminar flame velocity and temperature exponent diluted dimethyl ether (DME) air mixtures are reported. Laminar premixed mixture of DME-air with volumetric dilutions of carbon dioxides (CO2) and nitrogen (N2) are considered. Experiments were conducted using a preheated mesoscale high aspect-ratio diverging channel with inlet dimensions of 25 mm × 2 mm. In this method, flame velocities are extracted from planar flames that were stabilized near adiabatic conditions inside the channel. The flame velocities are then plotted against the ratio of mixture temperature and the initial reference temperature. A non-linear power law regression is observed suitable. This regression analysis gives the laminar flame velocity at the initial reference temperature and temperature exponent. Decrease in the laminar flame velocity and increase in temperature exponent is observed for CO2 and N2 diluted mixtures. The addition of CO2 has profound influence when compared to N2 addition on both flame velocity and temperature exponent. Numerical prediction of the similar mixture using a detailed reaction mechanism is obtained. The computational mechanism predicts higher magnitudes for laminar flame velocity and smaller magnitudes of temperature exponent compared to experimental data.

  4. Empirical Study of Traffic Velocity Distribution and its Effect on VANETs Connectivity

    CERN Document Server

    Abuelenin, Sherif M

    2015-01-01

    In this article we use real traffic data to confirm that vehicle velocities follow Gaussian distribution in steady state traffic regimes (free-flow, and congestion). We also show that in the transition between free-flow and congestion, the velocity distribution is better modeled by generalized extreme value distribution (GEV). We study the effect of the different models on estimating the probability distribution of connectivity duration between vehicles in vehicular ad-hoc networks.

  5. Velocity distribution measurements in atomic beams generated using laser induced back-ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Denning, A; Lee, S; Ammonson, M; Bergeson, S D

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements of the velocity distribution of calcium atoms in an atomic beam generated using a dual-stage laser back-ablation apparatus. Distributions are measured using a velocity selective Doppler time-of-flight technique. They are Boltzmann-like with rms velocities corresponding to temperatures above the melting point for calcium. Contrary to a recent report in the literature, this method does not generate a sub-thermal atomic beam.

  6. Non-Maxwellian Electron Velocity Distributions Observed with Thomson Scattering in the Tortur Tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lammeren, A. C. A. P.; Barth, C. J.; Vanest, Q. C.; Schüller, F. C.

    1992-01-01

    The Thomson scattering spectrum represents the projection of the three-dimensional electron velocity distribution on the scattering vector. From this the local electron temperature and density can be derived. To determine the three-dimensional electron velocity distribution it is necessary to have s

  7. A possible solution to the solar neutrino problem: Relativistic corrections to the Maxwellian velocity distribution

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    The relativistic corrections to the Maxwellian velocity distribution are needed for standard solar models. Relativistic equilibrium velocity distribution, if adopted in standard solar models, will lower solar neutrino fluxes and change solar neutrino energy spectra but keep solar sound speeds. It is possibly a solution to the solar neutrino problem.

  8. Velocity Distribution in the Flow from a Wall-Mounted Diffuser in Rooms with Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    The paper describes experiments with wall-mounted air terminal devices. The airflow from an air terminal device will influence the thermal comfort of the occupants and it is therefore important to develop an expression for this flow. The velocity at the floor is influenced by the flow rate to the...

  9. Radial variation of refractive index, plasma frequency and phase velocity in laser induced air plasma

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathuthu, M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available induced air plasma to study the spatial variation of plasma parameters in the axial direction of the laser beam. In this paper, the authors report investigation on the radial variation of the refractive index, plasma frequency, and phase velocity of a...

  10. The Thermal Plume above a Standing Human Body Exposed to Different Air Distribution Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Nielsen, Peter V.; Li, Yuguo;

    2009-01-01

    This study compares the impact of air distribution on the thermal plume above a human body in indoor environment. Three sets of measurements are conducted in a full-scale test room with different ventilation conditions. One breathing thermal manikin standing in the room is used to simulate...... the human body. Long-time average air velocity profiles at locations closely above the manikin are taken to identify the wandering thermal plume....

  11. The Thermal Plume above a Standing Human Body Exposed to Different Air Distribution Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Nielsen, Peter V.; Li, Yuguo

    2009-01-01

    This study compares the impact of air distribution on the thermal plume above a human body in indoor environment. Three sets of measurements are conducted in a full-scale test room with different ventilation conditions. One breathing thermal manikin standing in the room is used to simulate the hu...... the human body. Long-time average air velocity profiles at locations closely above the manikin are taken to identify the wandering thermal plume....

  12. Measurement of the Group Velocity Dispersion of air using a femtosecond comb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al salamah, Reem

    In this thesis, the Group Velocity Dispersion (GVD) of air has been measured by using a femtosecond frequency comb at 1.5 microm. By comparing the spectra from a balanced and unbalanced Mach - Zehnder interferometer, the need for vacuum tube is eliminated. The method employs the Fast Fourier Transform of both auto- and cross correlation to find the spectral and their differences. The GVD of air is then calculated from these spectral phase differences. With twenty-five independent measurements, the GVD of air was found to be 0.0120 fs2/mm, with a standard deviation of 0.0075 fs2/mm.

  13. Ion and electron velocity distributions within flux transfer events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Stansberry, J. A.; Bame, S. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gosling, J. T.

    1987-01-01

    The detailed nature of the thermal and suprathermal ion and electron distributions within magnetic flux transfer events (FTEs) is examined. Examples of both magnetosheath FTEs and magnetospheric FTEs are discussed. The detailed distributions confirm that FTEs contain a mixture of magnetosheath and magnetospheric plasmas. To lowest order, the distributions are consistent with a simple superposition of the two interpenetrating populations, with no strong interactions between them. To first order, some interesting differences appear, especially in the electron distributions, suggesting that considerable pitch angle scattering and some electron energy diffusion are also occurring. These observations should provide a useful test of analytical and numerical studies of interpenetrating plasmas.

  14. Temperature Control of Heating Zone for Drying Process: Effect of Air Velocity Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wutthithanyawat Chananchai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a temperature control technique to adjust air temperature in a heating zone for drying process. The controller design is achieved by using an internal model control (IMC approach. When the IMC controller parameters were designed by calculating from an actual process transfer function estimated through an open-loop step response with input step change from 50% to 60% at a reference condition at air velocity of 1.20 m/s, the performance of temperature controller was experimentally tested by varying an air velocity between 1.32 m/s and 1.57 m/s, respectively. The experimental results showed that IMC controller had a high competency for controlling the drying temperature.

  15. Spanwise loading distribution and wake velocity surveys of a semi-span wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felker, F. F., III; Piziali, R. A.; Gall, J. K.

    1982-01-01

    The spanwise distribution of bound circulation on a semi-span wing and the flow velocities in its wake were measured in a wind tunnel. Particular attention was given to documenting the flow velocities in and around the development tip vortex. A two-component laser velocimeter was used to make the velocity measurements. The spanwise distribution of bound circulation, three components of the time-averaged velocities throughout the near wake their standard deviations, and the integrated forces and moments on a metric tip as measured by an internal strain gage balance are presented without discussion.

  16. Search for a Lorentz invariant velocity distribution of a relativistic gas

    CERN Document Server

    Curado, Evaldo M F; Soares, Ivano Damiao

    2016-01-01

    We examine numerically and analytically the problem of the relativistic velocity distribution in a 1-dim relativistic gas in thermal equilibrium. Our derivation is based on the special theory of relativity, the central limit theorem and the Lobachevsky structure of the velocity space of the theory, where the rapidity variable plays a crucial role. For v^2/c^2 << 1 and 1/\\beta = k_B T/ m_0 c^2 << 1 the distribution tends to the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution.

  17. Size and Velocity Characteristics of Droplets Generated by Thin Steel Slab Continuous Casting Secondary Cooling Air-Mist Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minchaca M, J. I.; Castillejos E, A. H.; Acosta G, F. A.

    2011-06-01

    Direct spray impingement of high temperature surfaces, 1473 K to 973 K (1200 °C to 700 °C), plays a critical role in the secondary cooling of continuously cast thin steel slabs. It is known that the spray parameters affecting the local heat flux are the water impact flux w as well as the droplet velocity and size. However, few works have been done to characterize the last two parameters in the case of dense mists ( i.e., mists with w in the range of 2 to 90 L/m2s). This makes it difficult to rationalize how the nozzle type and its operating conditions must be selected to control the cooling process. In the present study, particle/droplet image analysis was used to determine the droplet size and velocity distributions simultaneously at various locations along the major axis of the mist cross section at a distance where the steel strand would stand. The measurements were carried out at room temperature for two standard commercial air-assisted nozzles of fan-discharge type operating over a broad range of conditions of practical interest. To achieve statistically meaningful samples, at least 6000 drops were analyzed at each location. Measuring the droplet size revealed that the number and volume frequency distributions were fitted satisfactorily by the respective log-normal and Nukiyama-Tanasawa distributions. The correlation of the parameters of the distribution functions with the water- and air-nozzle pressures allowed for reasonable estimation of the mean values of the size of the droplets generated. The ensemble of measurements across the mist axis showed that the relationship between the droplet velocity and the diameter exhibited a weak positive correlation. Additionally, increasing the water flow rate at constant air pressure caused a decrease in the proportion of the water volume made of finer droplets, whereas the volume proportion of faster droplets augmented until the water flow reached a certain value, after which it decreased. Diminishing the air

  18. Cup anemometer calibration: effect of flow velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccato, A.; Spazzini, P. G.; Malvano, R.

    2011-10-01

    The effects of different working conditions and specifically of different velocity profiles on the output of a commercial cup anemometer were analysed experimentally. A simple mathematical model is also presented and provides results in line with the experiments. Results show that a cup anemometer with certain geometrical features can be calibrated through a rotating drag rig by correcting for the bias on the instrument output. The increase in uncertainty caused by this systematic correction was evaluated and applied to the results. The correction was validated by checking the compatibility of calibrations of a cup anemometer at the rotating rig and in a wind tunnel.

  19. An Undersea Mining Microseism Source Location Algorithm Considering Wave Velocity Probability Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The traditional mine microseism locating methods are mainly based on the assumption that the wave velocity is uniform through the space, which leads to some errors for the assumption goes against the laws of nature. In this paper, the wave velocity is regarded as a random variable, and the probability distribution information of the wave velocity is fused into the traditional locating method. This paper puts forwards the microseism source location method for the undersea mining on condition o...

  20. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a strontium atomic beam

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, F.; H. Liu; Xu, P.; X. Tian; Y. Wang; Ren, J; Haibin Wu; Hong Chang

    2014-01-01

    We measure the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam precisely by velocity-selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of an ultrastable laser system and the narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms mean that the resolution of the measured velocity can reach 0.13 m/s, corresponding to 90$\\mu K$ in energy units. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the results of theoretical calculations. Based on the spectroscopic techniques use...

  1. Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of butanol isomers-air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Xiaolei; Huang, Zuohua; Wu, Si; Li, Qianqian [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of the butanol-air premixed flames and its isomers are investigated using the spherically expanding flame with central ignition at initial temperature of 428 K and initial pressures of 0.10 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 0.75 MPa. Laminar burning velocities and sensitivity factor of n-butanol-air mixtures are computed using a newly developed kinetic mechanism. Unstretched laminar burning velocity, adiabatic temperature, Lewis number, Markstein length, critical flame radius and Peclet number are obtained over a wide range of equivalence ratios. Effect of molecular structure on laminar burning velocity of the isomers of butanol is analyzed from the aspect of C-H bond dissociation energy. Study indicates that although adiabatic flame temperatures of the isomers of butanol are the same, laminar burning velocities give an obvious difference among the isomers of butanol. This indicates that molecular structure has a large influence on laminar burning velocities of the isomers of butanol. Branching (-CH3) will decrease laminar burning velocity. Hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atoms gives higher laminar burning velocity compared to that attaching to the inner carbon atoms. Calculated dissociation bond energies show that terminal C-H bonds have larger bond energies than that of inner C-H bonds. n-Butanol, no branching and with hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atom, gives the largest laminar burning velocity. tert-Butanol, with highly branching and hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the inner carbon atom, gives the lowest laminar burning velocity. Laminar burning velocities of iso-butanol and sec-butanol are between those of n-butanol and tert-butanol. The instant of transition to cellularity is experimentally determined for the isomers of butanol and subsequently interpreted on the basis of hydrodynamic and diffusion-thermal instabilities. Little effect

  2. Measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a cold, dense Rydberg gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeson, Scott; Lyon, Mary

    2016-05-01

    We report measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a dense, cold Rydberg gas in a MOT. The Rydberg atoms are excited using a resonant two-step excitation pathway with lasers of 4 ns duration. The plasma forms spontaneously and rapidly. The rms width of the ion velocity distribution is determined by measuring laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of the ions. The measured excitation efficiency is compared with a Monte-Carlo wavefunction calculation, and significant differences are observed. We discuss the conditions for blockaded Rydberg excitation and the subsequent spatial ordering of Rydberg atom domains. While the blockade interaction is greater than the Rabi frequency in portions of the atomic sample, no evidence for spatial ordering is observed. This research is supported in part by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant No. FA9950-12- 0308) and by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. PHY-1404488).

  3. Local Pulsars; A note on the Birth-Velocity Distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauw, A.; Ramachandran, R.

    1998-01-01

    Submitted to: Astron. Astrophys. Abstract: We explore a simple model for the representation of the observed distributions of the motions, and the characteristic ages of the local population of pulsars. The principal difference from earlier models is the introduction of a unique value, S, for the kic

  4. Temporal evolution of confined fast-ion velocity distributions measured by collective Thomson scattering in TEXTOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Bindslev, Henrik; Porte, L.

    2008-01-01

    of scattering locations and different resolved velocity components can be measured. The temporal resolution is 4 ms while the spatial resolution is similar to 10 cm depending on the scattering geometry. Fast-ion velocity distributions in a variety of scenarios are measured, including the evolution...

  5. The three-dimensional distributions of tangential velocity and total- temperature in vortex tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderstrøm-Lang, C.U.

    1971-01-01

    physical requirements and which at the same time lead to realistic tangential velocity gradients. The total-temperature distribution in both the axial and radial directions is calculated from such secondary flow functions and corresponding tangential velocity results on the basis of an approximate...

  6. Structure of velocity distributions in shock waves in granular gases with extension to molecular gases

    OpenAIRE

    Vilquin, A.; Boudet, J. F.; Kellay, H.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Velocity distributions in normal shock waves obtained in dilute granular flows are studied. These distributions cannot be described by a simple functional shape and are believed to be bimodal. Our results show that these distributions are not strictly bimodal but a trimodal distribution is shown to be sufficient. The usual Mott-Smith bimodal description of these distributions, developed for molecular gases, and based on the coexistence of two subpopulations (a superson...

  7. Building a Dispersion Relation Solver for Hot Plasmas with Arbitrary Non-relativistic Parallel Velocity Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X.; Waters, T.; Gary, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Collisionless space plasmas often deviate from Maxwellian-like velocity distributions. To study kinetic waves and instabilities in such plasmas, the dispersion relation, which depends on the velocity distribution, needs to be solved numerically. Most current dispersion solvers (e.g. WHAMP) take advantage of mathematical properties of the Gaussian (or generalized Lorentzian) function, and assume that the velocity distributions can be modeled by a combination of several drift-Maxwellian (or drift-Lorentzian) components. In this study we are developing a kinetic dispersion solver that admits nearly arbitrary non-relativistic parallel velocity distributions. A key part of any dispersion solver is the evaluation of a Hilbert transform of the velocity distribution function and its derivative along Landau contours. Our new solver builds upon a recent method to compute the Hilbert transform accurately and efficiently using the fast Fourier transform, while simultaneously treating the singularities arising from resonances analytically. We have benchmarked our new solver against other codes dealing with Maxwellian distributions. As an example usage of our code, we will show results for several instabilities that occur for electron velocity distributions observed in the solar wind.

  8. Measurements of the laminar burning velocity of hydrogen-air premixed flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pareja, Jhon; Burbano, Hugo J. [Science and Technology of Gases and Rational Use of Energy Group, Faculty of Engineering, University of Antioquia, Calle 67 N 53, 108 Bloque 20, 447 Medellin (Colombia); Ogami, Yasuhiro [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Experimental and numerical studies on laminar burning velocities of hydrogen-air mixtures were performed at standard pressure and room temperature varying the equivalence ratio from 0.8 to 3.0. The flames were generated using a contoured slot-type nozzle burner (4 mm x 10 mm). Measurements of laminar burning velocity were conducted using particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) combined with Schlieren photography. This technique provides the information of instantaneous local burning velocities in the whole region of the flame front, and laminar burning velocities were determined using the mean value of local burning velocities in the region of non-stretch. Additionally, average laminar burning velocities were determined using the angle method and compared with the data obtained with the PTV method. Numerical calculations were also conducted using detailed reaction mechanisms and transport properties. The experimental results from the PTV method are in good agreement with the numerical results at every equivalence ratio of the range of study. Differences between the results obtained with the angle method and those with the PTV method are reasonably small when the effects of flame stretch and curvature are reduced by using a contoured slot-type nozzle. (author)

  9. Non-axisymmetric vertical velocity dispersion distributions produced by bars

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Min; Debattista, Victor P

    2016-01-01

    In barred galaxies, the contours of stellar velocity dispersions ($\\sigma$) are generally expected to be oval and aligned with the orientation of bars. However, many double-barred (S2B) galaxies exhibit distinct $\\sigma$ peaks on the minor axis of inner bar, which we termed "$\\sigma$-humps," while two local $\\sigma$ minima are present close to the ends of inner bars, i.e., "$\\sigma$-hollows." Analysis of numerical simulations shows that $\\sigma_z$-humps or hollows should play an important role in generating the observed $\\sigma$-humps+hollows in low-inclination galaxies. In order to systematically investigate the properties of $\\sigma_z$ in barred galaxies, we apply the vertical Jeans equation to a group of well-designed three-dimensional bar+disk(+bulge) models. A vertically thin bar can lower $\\sigma_z$ along the bar and enhance it perpendicular to the bar, thus generating $\\sigma_z$-humps+hollows. Such a result suggests that $\\sigma_z$-humps+hollows can be generated by the purely dynamical response of star...

  10. Numerical Investigation of Developing Velocity Distributions in Open Channel Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Ghani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The velocity profiles in open channel flows start developing after entering into the channel for quite some length. All types of laboratory experiments for open channel flows are carried out in the fully developed flow regions which exist at some length downstream the inlet. In this research work an attempt has been made to investigate the impact of roughness and slope of the channel bed on the length required for establishment of fully developed flow in an open channel. A range of different roughness values along with various slopes were considered for this purpose. It was observed that an increase in roughness results in reduction of development length; and development length reduces drastically when roughness reaches to the range normally encountered in open channel flows with emergent vegetation or natural river flows. However, it was observed that the change of slope did not have any noticeable effect on development length. This work suggests that CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics technique can be used for getting a reliable development length before performing an experimental work

  11. Measurement of ion and electron drift velocity and electronic attachment in air for ionization chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Boissonnat, Guillaume; Colin, Jean; Remadi, Aurelien; Salvador, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Air-ionization chambers have been used in radiotherapy and particle therapy for decades. However, fundamental parameters in action in the detector responses are sparsely studied. In this work we aimed to measure the electronic attachment, electrons and ions mobilities of an ionization chamber (IC) in air. The main idea is to extract these from the actual response of the IC to a single ionizing particle in order to insure that they were measured in the same condition they are to be used while neglecting undesired phenomena: recombination and space charge effect. The non-standard signal shape analysis performed here were also confronted to a more standard drift chamber measurements using time-of-flight. It was found that both detectors displayed compatible results concerning positive and negative ions drift velocities where literature data is well spread out. In the same time, electron attachment measurements sit in the middle of known measurements while electron drift velocities seemed to show an offset compar...

  12. Numerical Study on Laminar Burning Velocity and Flame Stability of Premixed Methane/Ethylene/Air Flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈珊珊; 蒋勇; 邱榕; 安江涛

    2012-01-01

    A numerical study on premixed methane/ethylene/air flames with various ethylene fractions and equivalence ratios was conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The effects of ethylene addition on laminar burning velocity, flame structure and flame stability under the condition of lean burning were investigated. The results show that the laminar burning velocity increases with ethylene fraction, especially at a large equivalence ratio. More ethylene addition gives rise to higher concentrations of H, O and OH radicals in the flame, which significantly promotes chemical reactions, and a linear correlation exists between the laminar burning velocity and the maximum H + OH concentration in the reaction zone. With the increase of ethylene fraction, the adiabatic flame temperature is raised, while the inner layer temperature becomes lower, contributing to the enhancement of combustion. Markstein length and Markstein number, representative of the flame stability, increase as more ethylene is added, indicating the tendency of flame stability to improve with ethylene addition.

  13. A Hypothetical Burning-Velocity Formula for Very Lean Hydrogen-Air Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Forman; Williams, Forman A; Grcar, Joseph F

    2008-06-30

    Very lean hydrogen-air mixtures experience strong diffusive-thermal types of cellular instabilities that tend to increase the laminar burning velocity above the value that applies to steady, planar laminar flames that are homogeneous in transverse directions. Flame balls constitute an extreme limit of evolution of cellular flames. To account qualitatively for the ultimate effect of diffusive-thermal instability, a model is proposed in which the flame is a steadily propagating, planar, hexagonal, close-packed array of flame balls, each burning as if it were an isolated, stationary, ideal flame ball in an infinite, quiescent atmosphere. An expression for the laminar burning velocity is derived from this model, which theoretically may provide an upper limit for the experimental burning velocity.

  14. Surface velocity divergence model of air/water interfacial gas transfer in open-channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjou, M.; Nezu, I.; Okamoto, T.

    2017-04-01

    Air/water interfacial gas transfer through a free surface plays a significant role in preserving and restoring water quality in creeks and rivers. However, direct measurements of the gas transfer velocity and reaeration coefficient are still difficult, and therefore a reliable prediction model needs to be developed. Varying systematically the bulk-mean velocity and water depth, laboratory flume experiments were conducted and we measured surface velocities and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in open-channel flows to reveal the relationship between DO transfer velocity and surface divergence (SD). Horizontal particle image velocimetry measurements provide the time-variations of surface velocity divergence. Positive and negative regions of surface velocity divergence are transferred downstream in time, as occurs in boil phenomenon on natural river free-surfaces. The result implies that interfacial gas transfer is related to bottom-situated turbulence motion and vertical mass transfer. The original SD model focuses mainly on small-scale viscous motion, and this model strongly depends on the water depth. Therefore, we modify the SD model theoretically to accommodate the effects of the water depth on gas transfer, introducing a non-dimensional parameter that includes contributions of depth-scale large-vortex motion, such as secondary currents, to surface renewal events related to DO transport. The modified SD model proved effective and reasonable without any dependence on the bulk mean velocity and water depth, and has a larger coefficient of determination than the original SD model. Furthermore, modeling of friction velocity with the Reynolds number improves the practicality of a new formula that is expected to be used in studies of natural rivers.

  15. Determination of the most economical drying schedule and air velocity in softwood drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salin, J.G.

    2001-12-01

    Simulation models for conventional softwood drying have been available and have also been used by kiln operators for many years. For instance models for Scots pine and Norway spruce, dried at temperatures below about 80 deg C, are in use in Sweden, Finland and Norway. These models predict drying rates as a function of climate (schedule) and air velocity. The models thus give a direct basis for calculation of instantaneous energy demand for moisture evaporation and ventilation. There is further a direct relationship between the air velocity in the space between the board layers in the kiln stack and the electrical power demand by the circulation fans. Finally, the smaller energy consumption associated with heat losses through kiln walls and the accumulated heat in timber etc. can be estimated with sufficient accuracy. Instantaneous energy costs can thus be calculated for each part of a drying schedule. Capital costs associated with kiln investment and maintenance, personnel, insurance etc can be accounted for as an hourly cost, which is basically independent of whether timber is dried fast or slowly. A slow drying process thus accumulates more capital costs per m 3 timber. In this way it is possible to calculate the total instantaneous drying cost (Euro/m{sup 3}/h or Euro/m3/MC%) and the overall total cost (Euro or Euro/m{sup 3}). Some results obtained with a simulation model equipped with such a cost calculation are presented in the paper. A rapidly increasing drying cost is seen when the final MC is lowered. By minimising the instantaneous cost, an optimal drying schedule can be determined for a given fixed air velocity. Finally an optimal air velocity - constant or varying - can be found in the same way.

  16. Liquid mean velocity and turbulence in a horizontal air-water bubbly flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The liquid phase turbulent structure of an air-water bubbly horizontal flow in a circular pipe has been investigated experimentally. Three-dimensional measurements were implemented with two "X" type probes oriented in different planes, and local liquid-phase velocities and turbulent stresses were simultaneously obtained. Systematic measurements were conducted covering a range of local void fraction from 0 to 11.7%. The important experiment results and parametric trends are summarized and discussed.

  17. Orthogonal Vertical Velocity Dispersion Distributions Produced by Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Min; Shen, Juntai; Debattista, Victor P.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, Adriana

    2017-02-01

    In barred galaxies, the contours of stellar velocity dispersions (σ) are generally expected to be oval and aligned with the orientation of bars. However, many double-barred (S2B) galaxies exhibit distinct σ peaks on the minor axis of the inner bar, which we termed “σ-humps,” while two local σ minima are present close to the ends of inner bars, i.e., “σ-hollows.” Analysis of numerical simulations shows that {σ }z-humps or hollows should play an important role in generating the observed σ-humps+hollows in low-inclination galaxies. In order to systematically investigate the properties of {σ }z in barred galaxies, we apply the vertical Jeans equation to a group of well-designed three-dimensional bar+disk(+bulge) models. A vertically thin bar can lower {σ }z along the bar and enhance it perpendicular to the bar, thus generating {σ }z-humps+hollows. Such a result suggests that {σ }z-humps+hollows can be generated by the purely dynamical response of stars in the presence of a sufficiently massive, vertically thin bar, even without an outer bar. Using self-consistent N-body simulations, we verify the existence of vertically thin bars in the nuclear-barred and S2B models that generate prominent σ-humps+hollows. Thus, the ubiquitous presence of σ-humps+hollows in S2Bs implies that inner bars are vertically thin. The addition of a bulge makes the {σ }z-humps more ambiguous and thus tends to somewhat hide the {σ }z-humps+hollows. We show that {σ }z may be used as a kinematic diagnostic of stellar components that have different thicknesses, providing a direct perspective on the morphology and thickness of nearly face-on bars and bulges with integral field unit spectroscopy.

  18. Energy Loss, Velocity Distribution, and Temperature Distribution for a Baffled Cylinder Model, Special Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevoort, Maurice J.

    1937-01-01

    In the design of a cowling a certain pressure drop across the cylinders of a radial air-cooled engine is made available. Baffles are designed to make use of this available pressure drop for cooling. The problem of cooling an air-cooled engine cylinder has been treated, for the most part, from considerations of a large heat-transfer coefficient. The knowledge of the precise cylinder characteristics that give a maximum heat-transfer coefficient should be the first consideration. The next problem is to distribute this ability to cool so that the cylinder cools uniformly. This report takes up the problem of the design of a baffle for a model cylinder. A study has been made of the important principles involved in the operation of a baffle for an engine cylinder and shows that the cooling can be improved 20% by using a correctly designed baffle. Such a gain is as effective in cooling the cylinder with the improved baffle as a 65% increase in pressure drop across the standard baffle and fin tips.

  19. Evaluation of an improved air distribution system for aircraft cabin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Liping; Xu, Jie; Fang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    An improved air distribution system for aircraft cabin was proposed in this paper. Personalized outlets were introduced and placed at the bottom of the baggage hold. Its ratio of fresh air to recirculation air and the conditioned temperature of different types of inlets were also designed carefully...

  20. Mixing Ventilation. Guide on mixing air distribution design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandzia, Claudia; Kosonen, Risto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    In this guidebook most of the known and used in practice methods for achieving mixing air distribution are discussed. Mixing ventilation has been applied to many different spaces providing fresh air and thermal comfort to the occupants. Today, a design engineer can choose from large selection...... of air diffusers and exhaust openings....

  1. Mixing ventilation guide on mixing air distribution design

    CERN Document Server

    Kandzia, Claudia; Kosonen, Risto; Krikor Melikov, Arsen; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2013-01-01

    In this guidebook most of the known and used in practice methods for achieving mixing air distribution are discussed. Mixing ventilation has been applied to many different spaces providing fresh air and thermal comfort to the occupants. Today, a design engineer can choose from large selection of air diffusers and exhaust openings.

  2. Breaking through: The effects of a velocity distribution on barriers to dust growth

    CERN Document Server

    Windmark, Fredrik; Ormel, Chris; Dullemond, Cornelis P

    2012-01-01

    It is unknown how far dust growth can proceed by coagulation. Obstacles to collisional growth are the fragmentation and bouncing barriers. However, in all previous simulations of the dust-size evolution in protoplanetary disks, only the mean collision velocity has been considered, neglecting that a small but possibly important fraction of the collisions will occur at both much lower and higher velocities. We study the effect of the probability distribution of impact velocities on the collisional dust growth barriers. Assuming a Maxwellian velocity distribution for colliding particles to determine the fraction of sticking, bouncing, and fragmentation, we implement this in a dust-size evolution code. We also calculate the probability of growing through the barriers and the growth timescale in these regimes. We find that the collisional growth barriers are not as sharp as previously thought. With the existence of low-velocity collisions, a small fraction of the particles manage to grow to masses orders of magnit...

  3. Electric Field-Induced Fluid Velocity Field Distribution in DNA Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ling-Yun; WANG Peng-Ye

    2008-01-01

    We present an analytical solution for fluid velocity field distribution of polyelectrolyte DNA. Both the electric field force and the viscous force in the DNA solution are considered under a suitable boundary condition. The solution of electric potential is analytically obtained by using the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The fluid velocity along the electric field is dependent on the cylindrical radius and concentration. It is shown that the electric field-induced fluid velocity will be increased with the increasing cylindrical radius, whose distribution also varies with the concentration

  4. Velocity distribution measurements in a fishway like open channel by Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayeed-Bin-Asad, S. M.; Lundström, T. S.; Andersson, A. G.; Hellström, J. G. I.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments in an open channel flume with placing a vertical half cylinder barrier have been performed in order to investigate how the upstream velocity profiles are affected by a barrier. An experimental technique using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was adopted to measure these velocity distributions in the channel for four different discharge rates. Velocity profiles were measured very close to wall and at 25, 50 and 100 mm upstream of the cylinder wall. For comparing these profiles with well-known logarithmic velocity profiles, velocity profiles were also measured in smooth open channel flow for all same four discharge rates. The results indicate that regaining the logarithmic velocity profiles upstream of the half cylindrical barrier occurs at 100 mm upstream of the cylinder wall.

  5. Velocity distribution measurements in a fishway like open channel by Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayeed-Bin-Asad S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments in an open channel flume with placing a vertical half cylinder barrier have been performed in order to investigate how the upstream velocity profiles are affected by a barrier. An experimental technique using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV was adopted to measure these velocity distributions in the channel for four different discharge rates. Velocity profiles were measured very close to wall and at 25, 50 and 100 mm upstream of the cylinder wall. For comparing these profiles with well-known logarithmic velocity profiles, velocity profiles were also measured in smooth open channel flow for all same four discharge rates. The results indicate that regaining the logarithmic velocity profiles upstream of the half cylindrical barrier occurs at 100 mm upstream of the cylinder wall.

  6. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugbee, B.; Monje, O.; Tanner, B.

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  7. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugbee, B.; Monje, O.; Tanner, B.

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  8. Asymmetric Velocity Distributions from Halo Density Profiles in the Eddington Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Vergados

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We show how to obtain the energy distribution f(E in our vicinity starting from WIMP density profiles in a self-consistent way by employing the Eddington approach and adding reasonable angular momentum dependent terms in the expression of the energy. We then show how we can obtain the velocity dispersions and the asymmetry parameter β in terms of the parameters describing the angular momentum dependence. From this expression, for f(E, we proceed to construct an axially symmetric WIMP a velocity distribution, which, for a gravitationally bound system, automatically has a velocity upper bound and is characterized by the same asymmetriy β. This approach is tested and clarified by constructing analytic expressions in a simple model, with adequate structure. We then show how such velocity distributions can be used in determining the event rates, including modulation, in both the standard and the directional WIMP searches.

  9. Human preference and acceptance of increased air velocity to offset warm sensation at increased room temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cattarin, Giulio; Simone, Angela; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    . The present climatic chamber study examined energy performance and achievable thermal comfort of traditional and bladeless desk fans. Different effects of mechanical and simulated-natural airflow patterns were also investigated. 32 Scandinavians, performing office activities and wearing light clothes , were......Previous studies have demonstrated that in summertime increased air velocities can compensate for higher room temperatures to achieve comfortable conditions. In order to increase air movement, windows opening, ceiling or desk fans can be used at the expense of relatively low energy consumption...... exposed to a increased air movement generated by a personal desk fan. The subjects could continuously regulate the fans under three fixed environmental conditions (operative temperatures equal to 26 °C, 28 °C, or 30 °C, and same absolute humidity 12.2 g/m3). The experimental study showed that increased...

  10. Mass-velocity and size-velocity distributions of ejecta cloud from shock-loaded tin surface using atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, O.; Soulard, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2015-04-28

    The mass (volume and areal densities) versus velocity as well as the size versus velocity distributions of a shock-induced cloud of particles are investigated using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. A generic three-dimensional tin crystal with a sinusoidal free surface roughness (single wavelength) is set in contact with vacuum and shock-loaded so that it melts directly on shock. At the reflection of the shock wave onto the perturbations of the free surface, two-dimensional sheets/jets of liquid metal are ejected. The simulations show that the distributions may be described by an analytical model based on the propagation of a fragmentation zone, from the tip of the sheets to the free surface, in which the kinetic energy of the atoms decreases as this zone comes closer to the free surface on late times. As this kinetic energy drives (i) the (self-similar) expansion of the zone once it has broken away from the sheet and (ii) the average size of the particles which result from fragmentation in the zone, the ejected mass and the average size of the particles progressively increase in the cloud as fragmentation occurs closer to the free surface. Though relative to nanometric scales, our model may help in the analysis of experimental profiles.

  11. Temporal Evolution of Ion Velocity Distribution Function in a Pulsed Helicon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Robert; Biloiu, Costel; Compton, Chris; Keesee, Amy; Scime, Earl; Heard, John

    2004-11-01

    We report measurements of the time resolved ion velocity distribution function (ivdf) in a pulsed helicon plasma source using laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Our LIF laser system consists of a 6 W Coherent Innova 300 argon-ion laser that pumps a Coherent 899 tunable ring dye laser tuned to 611.49 nm. The 611.49 nm (air wavelength) photons pump the Ar II 3d^2G_9/2 metastable state to the 4p^2F_7/2 state that decays to the 4s^2D_5/2 state by emitting 460.96 nm photons. The helicon plasma source is pulsed on for 100 ms with a 50% duty cycle. The background emission was subtracted from the fluorescent emission in two different ways: either the laser was mechanically chopped at with a frequency much longer than the rf pulse and lock in amplification employed or multiple acquisitions (typically 50) of pulsed emission with both the laser on and off were obtained. For most plasma conditions, both the parallel and perpendicular ivdf reach equilibrium by 5 ms into the rf pulse. Time dependent measurements of the ivdf will be presented for a range of rf powers, magnetic field strengths, and neutral pressures.

  12. The observational distribution of internal velocity dispersions in nearby galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Fadda, D; Giuricin, G; Mardirossian, F; Mezzetti, M; Fadda, Dario; Girardi, Marisa; Giuricin, Giuliano; Mardirossian, Fabio; Mezzetti, Marino

    1996-01-01

    We analyze the internal velocity dispersions of a sample of 172 nearby galaxy clusters (z 800 km/s). We estimate that our distributions is complete for at least a dispersion greater than 650 km/s. In this completeness range a power law fit is in fair agreement with results coming from the X-ray temperature distributions.

  13. Determination of variables for air distribution system with elastic valve for down-the-hole pneumatic hammer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primychkin, AYu; Kondratenko, AS; Timonin, VV

    2017-02-01

    The air distribution system of down-the-hole pneumatic hammer 105 mm in diameter is updated to enhance drilling efficiency. The design model of the down-the-hole pneumatic hammer is constructed in ITI SimulationX environment. The basic variables of the air distribution system with an elastic valve are determined so that to ensure increased impact energy at the limited pre-impact velocity and the same machine size.

  14. Non-local velocity distribution function and one-flight approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakunin, O.G. [FOM Instituut voor Plasmafysica ' Rijnhuizen' , Associate Euroatom-FOM, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands) and Russian Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute' , Nuclear Fusion Institute, sq. Kurchatova 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: oleg_bakunin@yahoo.com

    2004-09-13

    The functional equation describing the collisionless particle velocity distribution function f(V) is considered in the framework of probabilistic approach. The key element of the collisionless particles description is using the waiting time distribution {psi}(t). The solution of the considered functional is obtained for several model functions {psi}(t) and it leads to the power form tails of the velocity distribution f(V). It is possible to adopt considered functional to the Laplace transformation form that allows us to accord 'collision' and 'collisionless' description. This Laplace form of the functional yields the Levy-Smirnov velocity distribution function with the characteristic exponent aL=1/2.

  15. Healthy Buildings and Air Distribution in Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    Healthy buildings are to a great extent a question of indoor air quality. The processes involved in air quality can be looked upon as a number of links in a chain. Typical links will be emission from building materials, convection and diffusion in the room, local airflow around a person, personal...... exposure and at last the effect of the air quality on the occupant. The best results will obviously be obtained by using building materials with low emission. However, there will always exist some emission and the ventilation will consequently be an important link....

  16. Non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions associated with steep temperature gradients in the solar transition region. Paper 1: Estimate of the electron velocity distribution functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1979-01-01

    It was shown that, in the presence of the steep temperature gradients characteristic of EUV models of the solar transition region, the electron and proton velocity distribution functions are non-Maxwellian and are characterized by high energy tails. The magnitude of these tails are estimated for a model of the transition region and the heat flux is calculated at a maximum of 30 percent greater than predicted by collision-dominated theory.

  17. The effect of humidity on ionic wind velocity in ambient air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, She; Nobelen, J. C. P. Y.; Nijdam, S.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the evolution of portable electronics and LED lightning system, advances in air cooling technologies must also keep pace. Active cooling by ionic wind, which is usually generated by corona discharge, can greatly reduce the noise and lifetime issues compared to the mechanical fans. The wind is induced when a gas discharge is formed, and neutral molecules gain their energy by the momentum transfer of ion-neutral collisions. However, there is few discussion about the effect of gas composition such as humidity on the wind generation and the physical mechanism is not clear. In the experiment, a positive 5-20 kV DC voltage is applied to the needle-cylinder electrodes with separation of 20 mm. The ionic wind velocity is measured by hot wire anemometry. As the relative humidity (RH) in the ambient air increases, the velocity is found to be severely inhibited. The current is also measured between the cylinder electrode and earth. The results show that the DC component of corona current decreases when RH increases. Since both the discharge current and the ion mobility are reduced when RH increases, their combined effects determine the ionic wind velocity. This work is supported by STW project 13651.

  18. Impact of velocity distribution assumption on simplified laser speckle imaging equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-San-Juan, Julio C; Ramos-Garcia, Ruben; Guizar-Iturbide, Ileana; Martinez-Niconoff, Gabriel; Choi, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Since blood flow is tightly coupled to the health status of biological tissue, several instruments have been developed to monitor blood flow and perfusion dynamics. One such instrument is laser speckle imaging. The goal of this study was to evaluate the use of two velocity distribution assumptions (Lorentzian- and Gaussian-based) to calculate speckle flow index (SFI) values. When the normalized autocorrelation function for the Lorentzian and Gaussian velocity distributions satisfy the same definition of correlation time, then the same velocity range is predicted for low speckle contrast (0 < C < 0.6) and predict different flow velocity range for high contrast. Our derived equations form the basis for simplified calculations of SFI values. PMID:18542407

  19. SPIDER IX - Classifying Galaxy Groups SPIDER IX - Classifying Galaxy Groups according to their Velocity Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, A L B; de Carvalho, R R; La Barbera, F; Trevisan, M; Lopes, P A; Capelato, H V

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new method to study the velocity distribution of galaxy systems, the Hellinger Distance (HD) - designed for detecting departures from a Gaussian velocity distribution. We define a relaxed galactic system as the one with unimodal velocity distribution and a normality deviation below a critical value (HD= 20) systems are significantly larger than in low multiplicity ones (N) and the gaussianity of the velocity distribution of the groups. Bright galaxies (M_r <=-20.7) residing in the inner and outer regions of groups, do not show significant differences in the listed quantities regardless if the group has a Gaussian (G) or a Non-Gaussian (NG) velocity distribution. However, the situation is significantly different when we examine the faint galaxies (-20.7

  20. Velocity and pressure distributions in discharge tunnel of rotary-obstruction composite inner energy dissipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of model test and theoretical analysis of velocity and pressure distributions,an hypothesis is presented that the distribution of tangential velocity in radial direction seems to be a combinational distribution of a quasi-free vortex and a quasi-forced vortex for the discharge tunnel of rotary-obstruction composite inner energy dissipation.The variations of corresponding parameters about the hypothesis are obtained under test conditions in this paper.The formula of pressure distribution in radial direction is deduced theoretically,and the theoretical values of pressure distribution computed by the formula are well consistent with the measured ones,showing that the formula is correct and can be applied to the computation and analysis of pressure distribution of this discharge tunnel.

  1. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA COLORS AND EJECTA VELOCITIES: HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN REGRESSION WITH NON-GAUSSIAN DISTRIBUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandel, Kaisey S.; Kirshner, Robert P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Foley, Ryan J., E-mail: kmandel@cfa.harvard.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We investigate the statistical dependence of the peak intrinsic colors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) on their expansion velocities at maximum light, measured from the Si II λ6355 spectral feature. We construct a new hierarchical Bayesian regression model, accounting for the random effects of intrinsic scatter, measurement error, and reddening by host galaxy dust, and implement a Gibbs sampler and deviance information criteria to estimate the correlation. The method is applied to the apparent colors from BVRI light curves and Si II velocity data for 79 nearby SNe Ia. The apparent color distributions of high-velocity (HV) and normal velocity (NV) supernovae exhibit significant discrepancies for B – V and B – R, but not other colors. Hence, they are likely due to intrinsic color differences originating in the B band, rather than dust reddening. The mean intrinsic B – V and B – R color differences between HV and NV groups are 0.06 ± 0.02 and 0.09 ± 0.02 mag, respectively. A linear model finds significant slopes of –0.021 ± 0.006 and –0.030 ± 0.009 mag (10{sup 3} km s{sup –1}){sup –1} for intrinsic B – V and B – R colors versus velocity, respectively. Because the ejecta velocity distribution is skewed toward high velocities, these effects imply non-Gaussian intrinsic color distributions with skewness up to +0.3. Accounting for the intrinsic-color-velocity correlation results in corrections to A{sub V} extinction estimates as large as –0.12 mag for HV SNe Ia and +0.06 mag for NV events. Velocity measurements from SN Ia spectra have the potential to diminish systematic errors from the confounding of intrinsic colors and dust reddening affecting supernova distances.

  2. Air Distribution and Ventilation Effectiveness in a room with Floor/Ceiling Heating and Mixing/Displacement Ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiaozhou; Fang,Lei; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Zhao, Jianing

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated different combinations of floor/ceiling heating with mixing/displacement ventilation and their impacts on the indoor air distribution and ventilation effectiveness. Measurements were performed in a room during heating season in December. The results show that indoor vertical air temperature differences and air velocities for different hybrid systems are less than 3 C and 0.2 m/s when supply air temperature is 19 C, air change rate is 4.2 h-1, and heated surface ...

  3. Models for the Prediction of Room Air Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    The paper describes work on simplified design methods made in connection with the International Energy Agency programme" Air Flow Pattern within Buildings" , Annex 20, subtask 1. It is shown that simplified models are able to indicate design values as the maximum velocity in the occupied zone...... and penetration depth of a non-isothermal jet in a room....

  4. Validation of MCDS by comparison of predicted with experimental velocity distribution functions in rarefied normal shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham-Van-diep, Gerald C.; Erwin, Daniel A.

    1989-01-01

    Velocity distribution functions in normal shock waves in argon and helium are calculated using Monte Carlo direct simulation. These are compared with experimental results for argon at M = 7.18 and for helium at M = 1.59 and 20. For both argon and helium, the variable-hard-sphere (VHS) model is used for the elastic scattering cross section, with the velocity dependence derived from a viscosity-temperature power-law relationship in the way normally used by Bird (1976).

  5. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a Strontium atomic beam

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, F; Xu, P; Tian, X; Wang, Y; Ren, J; Wu, Haibin; Chang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    We measure precisely the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam with a velocity selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. By using the ultrastable laser system and narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms, the resolution of the velocity measured can be reached 0.13m/s, corresponding to 90$\\mu K$ in energy unit. The experimental results are agreement very well with a theoretical calculation. With the spectroscopic techniques, the absolute frequency of the intercombination transition of $^{88}$Sr is measured by an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through an H maser, which is given by 434 829 121 318(10)kHz.

  6. Galactic Subsystems on the Basis of Cumulative Distribution of Space Velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidojević, S.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A sample containing $4,614$ stars with available space velocities and high-quality kinematical data from the Arihip Catalogue is formed. For the purpose of distinguishing galactic subsystems the cumulative distribution of space velocities is studied. The fractions of the three subsystems are found to be: thin disc 92\\%, thick disc 6\\% and halo 2\\%. These results are verified by analysing the elements of velocity ellipsoids and the shape and size of the galactocentric orbits of the sample stars, i.e. the planar and vertical eccentricities of the orbits.

  7. Advanced Strategy Guideline: Air Distribution Basics and Duct Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdick, A.

    2011-12-01

    This report discusses considerations for designing an air distribution system for an energy efficient house that requires less air volume to condition the space. Considering the HVAC system early in the design process will allow adequate space for equipment and ductwork and can result in cost savings. Principles discussed that will maximize occupant comfort include delivery of the proper amount of conditioned air for appropriate temperature mixing and uniformity without drafts, minimization of system noise, the impacts of pressure loss, efficient return air duct design, and supply air outlet placement, as well as duct layout, materials, and sizing.

  8. Clustering and velocity distributions in granular gases cooling by solid friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prasenjit; Puri, Sanjay; Schwartz, Moshe

    2016-09-01

    We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to study the free evolution of granular gases. Initially, the density of particles is homogeneous and the velocity follows a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution. The system cools down due to solid friction between the granular particles. The density remains homogeneous, and the velocity distribution remains MB at early times, while the kinetic energy of the system decays with time. However, fluctuations in the density and velocity fields grow, and the system evolves via formation of clusters in the density field and the local ordering of velocity field, consistent with the onset of plug flow. This is accompanied by a transition of the velocity distribution function from MB to non-MB behavior. We used equal-time correlation functions and structure factors of the density and velocity fields to study the morphology of clustering. From the correlation functions, we obtain the cluster size, L, as a function of time, t. We show that it exhibits power law growth with L(t)∼t^{1/3}.

  9. Clustering and velocity distributions in granular gases cooling by solid friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prasenjit; Puri, Sanjay; Schwartz, Moshe

    2016-09-01

    We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to study the free evolution of granular gases. Initially, the density of particles is homogeneous and the velocity follows a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution. The system cools down due to solid friction between the granular particles. The density remains homogeneous, and the velocity distribution remains MB at early times, while the kinetic energy of the system decays with time. However, fluctuations in the density and velocity fields grow, and the system evolves via formation of clusters in the density field and the local ordering of velocity field, consistent with the onset of plug flow. This is accompanied by a transition of the velocity distribution function from MB to non-MB behavior. We used equal-time correlation functions and structure factors of the density and velocity fields to study the morphology of clustering. From the correlation functions, we obtain the cluster size, L , as a function of time, t . We show that it exhibits power law growth with L (t ) ˜t1 /3 .

  10. Global air-sea surface carbon dioxide transfer velocity and flux estimated using 17 a altimeter data and a new algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Tan; HE Yijun; YAN Xiaohai

    2013-01-01

    The global distributions of the air-sea CO2 transfer velocity and flux are retrieved from TOPEX/Poseidon and Jason altimeter data from October 1992 to December 2009 using a combined algorithm. The 17 a average global, area-weighted, Schmidt number-corrected mean gas transfer velocity is 21.26 cm/h, and the full exploration of the uncertainty of this estimate awaits further data. The average total CO2 flux (calculated by carbon) from atmosphere to ocean during the 17 a was 2.58 Pg/a. The highest transfer velocity is in the circumpolar current area, because of constant high wind speeds and currents there. This results in strong CO2 fluxes. CO2 fluxes are strong but opposite direction in the equatorial east Pacific Ocean, because the air-sea CO2 partial pressure difference is the largest in the global oceans. The results differ from the previous studies calculated using the wind speed. It is demonstrated that the air-sea transfer velocity is very important for estimating air-sea CO2 flux. It is critical to have an accurate estimation for improving calculation of CO2 flux within climate change studies.

  11. Velocity Fields of Axisymmetric Hydrogen-Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames from LDV, PIV, and Numerical Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.; Gartrell, Luther R.; Isaac, K. M.

    1995-01-01

    Laminar fuel-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) were studied using axisymmetric convergent-nozzle and straight-tube opposed jet burners (OJBs). The subject diagnostics were used to probe a systematic set of H2/N2-air CFDFs over wide ranges of fuel input (22 to 100% Ha), and input axial strain rate (130 to 1700 Us) just upstream of the airside edge, for both plug-flow and parabolic input velocity profiles. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was applied along the centerline of seeded air flows from a convergent nozzle OJB (7.2 mm i.d.), and Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) was applied on the entire airside of both nozzle and tube OJBs (7 and 5 mm i.d.) to characterize global velocity structure. Data are compared to numerical results from a one-dimensional (1-D) CFDF code based on a stream function solution for a potential flow input boundary condition. Axial strain rate inputs at the airside edge of nozzle-OJB flows, using LDV and PIV, were consistent with 1-D impingement theory, and supported earlier diagnostic studies. The LDV results also characterized a heat-release hump. Radial strain rates in the flame substantially exceeded 1-D numerical predictions. Whereas the 1-D model closely predicted the max I min axial velocity ratio in the hot layer, it overpredicted its thickness. The results also support previously measured effects of plug-flow and parabolic input strain rates on CFDF extinction limits. Finally, the submillimeter-scale LDV and PIV diagnostics were tested under severe conditions, which reinforced their use with subcentimeter OJB tools to assess effects of aerodynamic strain, and fueVair composition, on laminar CFDF properties, including extinction.

  12. Velocity fluctuations and population distribution in clusters of settling particles at low Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Boschan, A; Annichini, M; Gauthier, G

    2016-01-01

    A study on the spatial organization and velocity fluctuations of non Brownian spherical particles settling at low Reynolds number in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell is reported. The particle volume fraction ranged from 0.005 to 0.05, while the distance between cell plates ranged from 5 to 15 times the particle radius. Particle tracking revealed that particles were not uniformly distributed in space but assembled in transient settling clusters. The population distribution of these clusters followed an exponential law. The measured velocity fluctuations are in agreement with that predicted theoretically for spherical clusters, from the balance between the apparent weight and the drag force. This result suggests that particle clustering, more than a spatial distribution of particles derived from random and independent events, is at the origin of the velocity fluctuations.

  13. Spherical Harmonic Analysis of Particle Velocity Distribution Function: Comparison of Moments and Anisotropies using Cluster Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgiolo, Chris; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a spherical harmonic analysis of the plasma velocity distribution function using high-angular, energy, and time resolution Cluster data obtained from the PEACE spectrometer instrument to demonstrate how this analysis models the particle distribution function and its moments and anisotropies. The results show that spherical harmonic analysis produced a robust physical representation model of the velocity distribution function, resolving the main features of the measured distributions. From the spherical harmonic analysis, a minimum set of nine spectral coefficients was obtained from which the moment (up to the heat flux), anisotropy, and asymmetry calculations of the velocity distribution function were obtained. The spherical harmonic method provides a potentially effective "compression" technique that can be easily carried out onboard a spacecraft to determine the moments and anisotropies of the particle velocity distribution function for any species. These calculations were implemented using three different approaches, namely, the standard traditional integration, the spherical harmonic (SPH) spectral coefficients integration, and the singular value decomposition (SVD) on the spherical harmonic methods. A comparison among the various methods shows that both SPH and SVD approaches provide remarkable agreement with the standard moment integration method.

  14. Measurements of neutral and ion velocity distribution functions in a Hall thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svarnas, Panagiotis; Romadanov, Iavn; Diallo, Ahmed; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2015-11-01

    Hall thruster is a plasma device for space propulsion. It utilizes a cross-field discharge to generate a partially ionized weakly collisional plasma with magnetized electrons and non-magnetized ions. The ions are accelerated by the electric field to produce the thrust. There is a relatively large number of studies devoted to characterization of accelerated ions, including measurements of ion velocity distribution function using laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic. Interactions of these accelerated ions with neutral atoms in the thruster and the thruster plume is a subject of on-going studies, which require combined monitoring of ion and neutral velocity distributions. Herein, laser-induced fluorescence technique has been employed to study neutral and single-charged ion velocity distribution functions in a 200 W cylindrical Hall thruster operating with xenon propellant. An optical system is installed in the vacuum chamber enabling spatially resolved axial velocity measurements. The fluorescence signals are well separated from the plasma background emission by modulating the laser beam and using lock-in detectors. Measured velocity distribution functions of neutral atoms and ions at different operating parameters of the thruster are reported and analyzed. This work was supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Dynamics of Air Temperature, Velocity and Ammonia Emissions in Enclosed and Conventional Pig Housing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. I. Song

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the dynamics of air temperature and velocity under two different ventilation and housing systems during summer and winter in Korea. The NH3 concentration of both housing systems was also investigated in relation to the pig’s growth. The ventilation systems used were; negative pressure type for the enclosed pig house (EPH and natural airflow for the conventional pig house (CPH. Against a highly fluctuating outdoor temperature, the EPH was able to maintain a stable temperature at 24.8 to 29.1°C during summer and 17.9 to 23.1°C during winter whilst the CPH had a wider temperature variance during summer at 24.7 to 32.3°C. However, the temperature fluctuation of the CPH during winter was almost the same with that of EPH at 14.5 to 18.2°C. The NH3 levels in the CPH ranged from 9.31 to 16.9 mg/L during summer and 5.1 to 19.7 mg/L during winter whilst that of the EPH pig house was 7.9 to 16.1 mg/L and 3.7 to 9.6 mg/L during summer and winter, respectively. These values were less than the critical ammonia level for pigs with the EPH maintaining a lower level than the CPH in both winter and summer. The air velocity at pig nose level in the EPH during summer was 0.23 m/s, enough to provide comfort because of the unique design of the inlet feature. However, no air movement was observed in almost all the lower portions of the CPH during winter because of the absence of an inlet feature. There was a significant improvement in weight gain and feed intake of pigs reared in the EPH compared to the CPH (p<0.05. These findings proved that despite the difference in the housing systems, a stable indoor temperature was necessary to minimize the impact of an avoidable and highly fluctuating outdoor temperature. The EPH consistently maintained an effective indoor airspeed irrespective of season; however the CPH had defective and stagnant air at pig nose level during winter. Characteristics of airflow direction and pattern were

  16. Study of air flow and temperature distribution in ship's crew cabins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsafty, A.F. [Arab Academy for Science and Technology and Maritime Transport, Alexandria (Egypt). Dept. of Mechanical and Marine Engineering; Ali, A.A.; Nasr, A.N. [Arab Academy for Science and Technology and Maritime Transport, Alexandria (Egypt). Dept. of Marine Engineering Technology

    2007-07-01

    Because of low internal heights in ship's crew cabins, the supplied air is directed to the persons at low mixing ratios. However, this does not allow the mixing process between the supplied air and the indoor air to be completed before the air enters human lungs. This paper presented an experimental and numerical simulation study that used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to investigate the effect of the air supply location on thermal air diffusion in the ship's crew cabins space. The paper presented the results in terms of air diffusion performance index. The paper presented the CFD model, including selected space configurations; CFD simulation; boundary conditions; and CFD results. The CFD airflow simulation programs CFD were utilized to calculate the spatial distribution of temperature and velocity. The study focused on the typical Middle East region working vessel under thermal and boundary conditions including the high cooling load used in this region. Experimental data were also introduced to verify the CFD results package. It was concluded that the supply should be located near the high sidewall of the cabin. This gives better air distribution inside the space rather than the center of the room. 5 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  17. AIR DISTRIBUTION NOISE CONTROL IN CRITICAL AUDITORIUMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HOOVER, R.M.

    THE ACHIEVEMENT OF EXTREMELY LOW AIR-CONDITIONING NOISE LEVELS REQUIRED FOR MODERN AUDITORIUMS ARE THE RESULT OF CAREFUL PLANNING AND THOROUGH DETAILING. PROBLEMS FACED AND TECHNIQUES USED IN ARRIVING AT LEVELS AS LOW AS NC-15 FOR A SINGLE SYSTEM SERVING A HALL ARE DESCRIBED. SIX CASE HISTORIES ARE EXAMINED AND THE FOLLOWING OBSERVATIONS ARE…

  18. VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION IN TRAPEZOID-SECTION OPEN CHANNEL FLOW WITH A NEW REYNOLDS-STRESS EXPRESSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Zheng

    2003-01-01

    By considering that the coherent structure is the main cause of the Reynolds stress, a new Reynolds stress expression was given. On this basis the velocity distribution in the trapezoid-section open channel flow was worked out with the pseudo-spectral method. The results were compared with experimental data and the influence of the ratio of length to width of the cross-section and the lateral inclination on the velocity distribution was analyzed. This model can be used the large flux in rivers and open channes.

  19. Anomalous Velocity Dependence of the Friction Coefficient of an Air Supported Pulley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crismani, Matteo; Nauenberg, Michael

    2009-11-01

    A standard undergraduate lab exercise to verify Newton's law, F = ma, is to measure the acceleration a of a glider of mass m suspended on an air track. In our experiment the glider is accelerated by a thin tape attached to the glider at one end, and to a weight of mass M at the other end. The weight hangs vertically via a pulley over which the tape is suspended by air pressure. In the absence of friction, the force pulling the glider is F = (M m/(M + m)g, where g is the acceleration of gravity. To the accuracy provided by the fast electronic timers (accurate to 1/10000 second) used in our experiment to measure the velocity and the acceleration of the glider, we verified that the friction due to the air track can be neglected. But we found that this is not the case for the friction due to the air pulley which adds a component -v/T to the force F on the glider, where T is the friction coefficient. We have measured the dependence of this coefficient on v, and found an excellent analytic fit to our data. This fit deviates considerable from the conventional assumption that 1/T is a constant and/or depends linearly on v.

  20. Air conditioning system and component therefore distributing air flow from opposite directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obler, H. D.; Bauer, H. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The air conditioning system comprises a plurality of separate air conditioning units coupled to a common supply duct such that air may be introduced into the supply duct in two opposite flow directions. A plurality of outlets such as registers or auxiliary or branch ducts communicate with the supply duct and valve means are disposed in the supply duct at at least some of the outlets for automatically channelling a controllable amount of air from the supply duct to the associated outlet regardless of the direction of air flow within the supply duct. The valve means comprises an automatic air volume control apparatus for distribution within the air supply duct into which air may be introduced from two opposite directions. The apparatus incorporates a freely swinging movable vane in the supply duct to automatically channel into the associated outlet only the deflected air flow which has the higher relative pressure.

  1. Statistical Distributions of Ambient Air Pollutants in Shanghai,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAI-DONG KAN; BING-HENG CHEN

    2004-01-01

    To determine the best statistical distribution of concentration data of major air pollutants in Shanghai. Methods Four types of theoretic distributions (lognormal, gamma, Pearson V and extreme value) were chosen to fit daily average concentration data of PM10, SO2 and NO2 from June 1, 2000 to May 31, 2003 in Shanghai by using the maximum likelihood method. The fit results were evaluated by Chi-square test. Results The best-fit distributions for PM10, SO2 and NO2 concentrations in Shanghai were lognormal, Pearson V, and extreme value distributions, respectively. Conclusion The results can be further applied to local air pollution prediction and control, e.g., the probabilities exceeding the air quality standard and emission source reduction of air pollutant concentration to meet the standard.

  2. Advanced Strategy Guideline. Air Distribution Basics and Duct Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlan Burdick

    2011-12-01

    This report discusses considerations for designing an air distribution system for an energy efficient house that requires less air volume to condition the space. Considering the HVAC system early in the design process will allow adequate space for equipment and ductwork and can result in cost savings.

  3. Diffuse Ceiling Inlet Systems and the Room Air Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Rong, Li

    2010-01-01

    A diffuse ceiling inlet system is an air distribution system which is supplying the air through the whole ceiling. The system can remove a large heat load without creating draught in the room. The paper describes measurements in the case of both cooling and heating, and CFD predictions are given ...

  4. Analysis of the Velocity Distribution in Partially-Filled Circular Pipe Employing the Principle of Maximum Entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yulin; Li, Bin; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The flow velocity distribution in partially-filled circular pipe was investigated in this paper. The velocity profile is different from full-filled pipe flow, since the flow is driven by gravity, not by pressure. The research findings show that the position of maximum flow is below the water surface, and varies with the water depth. In the region of near tube wall, the fluid velocity is mainly influenced by the friction of the wall and the pipe bottom slope, and the variation of velocity is similar to full-filled pipe. But near the free water surface, the velocity distribution is mainly affected by the contractive tube wall and the secondary flow, and the variation of the velocity is relatively small. Literature retrieval results show relatively less research has been shown on the practical expression to describe the velocity distribution of partially-filled circular pipe. An expression of two-dimensional (2D) velocity distribution in partially-filled circular pipe flow was derived based on the principle of maximum entropy (POME). Different entropies were compared according to fluid knowledge, and non-extensive entropy was chosen. A new cumulative distribution function (CDF) of partially-filled circular pipe velocity in terms of flow depth was hypothesized. Combined with the CDF hypothesis, the 2D velocity distribution was derived, and the position of maximum velocity distribution was analyzed. The experimental results show that the estimated velocity values based on the principle of maximum Tsallis wavelet entropy are in good agreement with measured values.

  5. Influence of anisotropy on velocity and age distribution at Scharffenbergbotnen blue ice area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zwinger

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We use a full-Stokes thermo-mechanically coupled ice-flow model to study the dynamics of the glacier inside Scharffenbergbotnen valley, Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. The domain encompasses a high accumulation rate region and, downstream a sublimation-dominated bare ice ablation area. The ablation ice area is notable for having old ice at its surface since the vertical velocity is upwards, and horizontal velocities are almost stagnant there. We compare the model simulation with field observations of velocities and the age distribution of the surface ice. A satisfactory match with simulations using an isotropic flow law was not found because of too high horizontal velocities and too slow vertical ones. However, the existence of a pronounced ice fabric may explain the present day surface velocity distribution in the inner Scharffenbergbotnen blue ice area. Near absence of data on the temporal evolution of Scharffenbergbotnen since the Late Glacial Maximum necessitates exploration of the impact of anisotropy using prescribed ice fabrics: isotropic, single maximum, and linear variation with depth, in both two-dimensional and three dimensional flow models. The realistic velocity field simulated with a non-collinear orthotropic flow law, however produced surface ages in significant disagreement with the few reliable age measurements and suggests that the age field is not in a steady state and that the present distribution is a result of a flow reorganization at about 15 000 yr BP. In order to fully understand the surface age distribution a transient simulation starting from the Late Glacial Maximum including the correct initial conditions for geometry, age, fabric and temperature distribution would be needed. It is the first time that the importance of anisotropy has been demonstrated in the ice dynamics of a blue ice area. This is useful to understand ice flow in order to better interpret archives of ancient ice for paleoclimate research.

  6. Velocity measurements within a shock and reshock induced air/SF6 turbulent mixing zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jean-Francois; Bouzgarrou, Ghazi; Bury, Yannick; Jamme, Stephane; Joly, Laurent; Shock-induced mixing Team

    2012-11-01

    A turbulent mixing zone (TMZ) is created in a shock tube (based in ISAE, DAEP) when a Mach 1.2 shock wave in air accelerates impulsively to 70 m/s an air/SF6 interface. The gases are initially separated by a 1 μm thick plastic microfilm maintained flat and parallel to the shock by two wire grids. The upper grid of square spacing 1.8 mm imposes the nonlinear initial perturbation for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). After interaction with a reshock and a rarefaction, the TMZ remains approximately stagnant but much more turbulent. High speed Schlieren visualizations enable the choice of abscissae for Laser Doppler Velocity (LDV) measurements. For a length of the SF6 section equal to 250 mm, the LDV abscissae are 43, 135 and 150 mm from the initial position of the interface. Because of numerous microfilm fragments in the flow and a limited number of olive oil droplets as seeding particles for the LDV, statistical convergence requires the superposition of a least 50 identical runs at each abscissa. The dependence of TMZ structure and velocity field on length of the SF6 section between 100 and 300 mm will be presented. This experimental investigation is carried out in support of modeling and multidimensional simulation efforts at CEA, DAM, DIF. Financial support from CEA is thanksfully appreciated by ISAE.

  7. A generalized AZ-non-Maxwellian velocity distribution function for space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, A. A.; Khan, M. Z.; Lu, Quanming; Yap, S. L.

    2017-03-01

    A more generalized form of the non-Maxwellian distribution function, i.e., the AZ-distribution function is presented. Its fundamental properties are numerically observed by the variation of three parameters: α (rate of energetic particles on the shoulder), r (energetic particles on a broad shoulder), and q (superthermality on the tail of the velocity distribution curve of the plasma species). It has been observed that (i) the A Z - distribution function reduces to the ( r , q ) - distribution for α → 0 ; (ii) the A Z - distribution function reduces to the q - distribution for α → 0 , and r → 0 ; (iii) the A Z -distribution reduces to Cairns-distribution function for r → 0 , and q → ∞ ; (iv) the AZ-distribution reduces to Vasyliunas Cairns distribution for r → 0 , and q = κ + 1 ; (v) the AZ-distribution reduces to kappa distribution for α → 0 , r → 0 , and q = κ + 1 ; and (vi) finally, the AZ-distribution reduces to Maxwellian distribution for α → 0 , r → 0 , and q → ∞ . The uses of this more generalized A Z - distribution function in various space plasmas are briefly discussed.

  8. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  9. Shear-wave velocity of surficial geologic sediments in Northern California: Statistical distributions and depth dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, T.L.; Bennett, M.J.; Noce, T.E.; Tinsley, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    Shear-wave velocities of shallow surficial geologic units were measured at 210 sites in a 140-km2 area in the greater Oakland, California, area near the margin of San Francisco Bay. Differences between average values of shear-wave velocity for each geologic unit computed by alternative approaches were in general smaller than the observed variability. Averages estimated by arithmetic mean, geometric mean, and slowness differed by 1 to 8%, while coefficients of variation ranged from 14 to 25%. With the exception of the younger Bay mud that underlies San Francisco Bay, velocities of the geologic units are approximately constant with depth. This suggests that shear-wave velocities measured at different depths in these surficial geologic units do not need to be normalized to account for overburden stress in order to compute average values. The depth dependence of the velocity of the younger Bay mud most likely is caused by consolidation. Velocities of each geologic unit are consistent with a normal statistical distribution. Average values increase with geologic age, as has been previously reported. Velocities below the water table are about 7% less than those above it. ?? 2005, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  10. Lateral distributions of streamwise velocity in compound channels with partially vegetated floodplains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KNIGHT; Donald; W

    2009-01-01

    Natural rivers are commonly characterized by a main channel for primary flow conveyance and a floodplain, often partially covered with vegetation such as shrubs or trees, to carry extra flow during floods. The hydraulic resistance due to vegetation on the floodplain typically causes a further reduction of flow velocity and increases the velocity difference between the main channel and the floodplain. As a consequence a strong lateral shear layer leads to the exchange of mass and momentum between the main channel and floodplain, which in turn affects the overall channel conveyance and certain fluvial processes. The prediction of the lateral velocity distribution is important for many flood alleviation schemes, as well as for studies on sediment transport and dispersion in such channels. The present paper proposes a method for predicting the depth-averaged velocity in compound channels with partially vegetated floodplains, based on an analytical solution to the depth-integrated Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equation with a term included to account for the effects of vegetation. The vegetation is modelled via an additional term in the momentum equation to account for the additional drag force. The method includes the effects of bed friction, drag force, lateral turbulence and secondary flows, via four coefficients f, CD, λ & Γ respectively. The predicted lateral distributions of depth-averaged velocity agree well with the experimental data. The analytical solutions can also be used to predict the distribution of boundary shear stresses, which adds additional weight to the method proposed.

  11. Influence of bank vegetation and gravel bed on velocity and Reynolds stress distributions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hossein AFZALIMEHR; Subhasish DEY

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory flume experimental study on the interaction of bank vegetation and gravel bed on the flow velocity (primarily on the location of the maximum velocity, Umax) and the Reynolds stress distributions. The results reveal that the dip of the maximum velocity below the water surface is up to 35% of flow depth and the difference between Umax and the velocity at the water surface is considerable in the presence of vegetation on the walls. The zone of the log-law varies from y/h=2 up to 15 percent of flow depth and it does not depend on distance from the wall. Deviation of the velocity profile in the outer layer over a gravel bed with vegetation cover on the walls is much larger than the case of flow over a gravel bed without vegetation cover on the walls. The presence of vegetation on the walls changes uniform flow to non-uniform flow. This fact can be explained by considering the nonlinear Reynolds stress distribution and location of maximum velocity in each profile at different distances across the flume. The Reynolds stress distributions at the distance 0.02 m from the wall have negative values and away from the wall, they change the sign taking positive values with specific convex form with apex in higher location. Average of von Karman constant κ for this study is equal to 0.16. Based on κ=0.16, the methods of Clauser and the Reynolds stress are compatible for determination of shear velocity.

  12. Distributed tracking for networked Euler-Lagrange systems without velocity measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingkai Yang; Hao Fang; Yutian Mao; Jie Huang

    2014-01-01

    The problem of distributed coordinated tracking control for networked Euler-Lagrange systems without velocity measure-ments is investigated. Under the condition that only a portion of the fol owers have access to the leader, sliding mode estimators are developed to estimate the states of the dynamic leader in fi-nite time. To cope with the absence of velocity measurements, the distributed observers which only use position information are designed. Based on the outputs of the estimators and observers, distributed tracking control laws are proposed such that al the fol-lowers with parameter uncertainties can track the dynamic leader under a directed graph containing a spanning tree. It is shown that the distributed observer-control er guarantees asymptotical stabil-ity of the closed-loop system. Numerical simulations are worked out to il ustrate the effectiveness of the control laws.

  13. Anisotropic q-Gaussian velocity distributions in LambdaCDM halos

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, L Beraldo e; Duarte, M; Peirani, S; Boué, G

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge of the velocity distribution function (VDF) of dark matter (DM) halos is required for calibrating the direct DM detection experiments and useful for recovering the mass profile from the observed distribution of tracers in projected phase space when the VDF has unknown anisotropy. Unfortunately, the VDF of halos in LambdaCDM dissipationless cosmological simulations is still poorly known. We consider the q-Gaussian (Tsallis) family of VDFs, among which the Gaussian is a special case. We extend the q-Gaussian to anisotropic VDFs by considering the isotropic set of dimensionless spherical velocity components normalized by the velocity dispersion along that component. We test our anisotropic VDF on 90 cluster-mass halos of a dissipationless cosmological simulation. While our anisotropic q-Gaussian model adequately reproduces the VDF averaged in spherical shells with radii greater than 2 virial radii, no q-Gaussian model can adequately represent the VDF in spherical shells of radius smaller than 2 vir...

  14. Experimental Study on the Distribution of Velocity and Pressure near a Submarine Pipeline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yan; SHI Bing; REN Xingyue; JING Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    As a transport means of oil and gas the submarine pipeline has many merits, such as continuous delivery, large conveying capacity, convenient management, etc. A tube was chosen in our study to simulate the submarine pipeline in the experiments. A high accuracy instrument ADV and high precision point-type pressure sensors were used to measure the parameters of the flow field, including the pressure distribution, velocities at seven cross sections near the submarine pipeline with five different clearance ratios, and twelve dynamic pressure values around the pipeline. The pressure distributions and velocity changes around the pipe under different flow velocities and clearance ratios were analyzed. These results might be useful for further study of submarine pipeline erosion and protection.

  15. Ion velocity distributions within the LLBL and their possible implication to multiple reconnections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Vaisberg

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze two LLBL crossings made by the Interball-Tail satellite under a southward or variable magnetosheath magnetic field: one crossing on the flank of the magnetosphere, and another one closer to the subsolar point. Three different types of ion velocity distributions within the LLBL are observed: (a D-shaped distributions, (b ion velocity distributions consisting of two counter-streaming components of magnetosheath-type, and (c distributions with three components, one of which has nearly zero parallel velocity and two counter-streaming components. Only the (a type fits to the single magnetic flux tube formed by reconnection between the magnetospheric and magnetosheath magnetic fields. We argue that two counter-streaming magnetosheath-like ion components observed by Interball within the LLBL cannot be explained by the reflection of the ions from the magnetic mirror deeper within the magnetosphere. Types (b and (c ion velocity distributions would form within spiral magnetic flux tubes consisting of a mixture of alternating segments originating from the magnetosheath and from magnetospheric plasma. The shapes of ion velocity distributions and their evolution with decreasing number density in the LLBL indicate that a significant part of the LLBL is located on magnetic field lines of long spiral flux tube islands at the magnetopause, as has been proposed and found to occur in magnetopause simulations. We consider these observations as evidence for multiple reconnection Χ-lines between magnetosheath and magnetospheric flux tubes.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  16. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECTS OF AIR VELOCITY AND MOVEMENT ON THE THERMAL COMFORT INSIDE AN AUTOMOBILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer KAYNAKLI

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, heat loss from various parts of human body, generated sweat mass and skin wetness depends on this are determined and their effect on thermal comfort are investigated. In the model human body is examined as divided into 16 parts and heat and mass transfer from each parts is simulated, as air flow velocity over the surface and thermal and evaporation resistance of clothing are accounted for the model. After checking the validity of the model (in comparison with results as an experimental study heat transfer coefficients, sensible and latent heat loss, skin wetness and variations of predicted percentage of dissatisfied (PPD are investigated for various air velocities, air temperatures and clothing groups. It is included that, average skin wetness decreases with increasing air velocity and sensible and latent heat losses increase due to the increase in heat transfer coefficient with increasing air velocity. However increase in sensible heat loss is more than latent heat loss. The most sensitive parameter to the air velocity is PPD.

  17. Gas-kinetic numerical method for solving mesoscopic velocity distribution function equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhihui Li; Hanxin Zhang

    2007-01-01

    A gas-kinetic numerical method for directly solving the mesoscopic velocity distribution function equation is presented and applied to the study of three-dimensional complex flows and micro-channel flows covering various flow regimes. The unified velocity distribution function equation describing gas transport phenomena from rarefied transition to continuumflow regimes can be presented on the basis of the kinetic Boltzmann-Shakhov model equation. The gas-kinetic finite-difference schemes for the velocity distribution function are constructed by developing a discrete velocity ordinate method of gas kinetic theory and an unsteady time-splitting technique from computational fluid dynamics. Gas-kinetic boundary conditions and numerical modeling can be established by directly manipulating on the mesoscopic velocity distribution function. A new Gauss-type discrete velocity numerical integration method can be developed and adopted to attack complex flows with different Mach numbers. HPF parallel strategy suitable for the gas-kinetic numerical method is investigated and adopted to solve three-dimensional complex problems. High Mach number flows around three-dimensional bodies are computed preliminarily with massive scale parallel. It is noteworthy and of practical importance that the HPF parallel algorithm for solving three-dimensional complex problems can be effectively developed to cover various flow regimes. On the other hand, the gas-kinetic numerical method is extended and used to study micro-channel gas flows including the classical Couette flow, the Poiseuillechannel flow and pressure-driven gas flows in twodimensional short micro-channels. The numerical experience shows that the gas-kinetic algorithm may be a powerful tool in the numerical simulation of microscale gas flows occuring in the Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS).

  18. Relaxation Time of the Particle Beam with an Anisotropic Velocity Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Vechirka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The computer experiment for study of the relaxation time of the beam particles with an anisotropic velocity distribution is performed by the molecular dynamics. Obtained results agree with the characteristic times of thermal relaxation in plasma for the electronic coolers in modern storage rings.

  19. Velocity-space tomography of the fast-ion distribution function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, Benedikt;

    2013-01-01

    Fast ions play an important role in heating the plasma in a magnetic confinement fusion device. Fast-ion Dα(FIDA) spectroscopy diagnoses fast ions in small measurement volumes. Spectra measured by a FIDA diagnostic can be related to the 2D fast-ion velocity distribution function. A single FIDA vi...

  20. Electron Velocity Distributions Measured with Soft-X-Ray PHA at RTP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Da Cruz, D. F.; Meijer, J. H.; Donne, A. J. H.

    1992-01-01

    A soft x-ray pulse height analysis (PHA) system is begin used at the Rijhuizen Tokamak Project to study the electron velocity distribution. A liquid nitrogen cooled Si(Li) detector is used to view the plasma along a tangential line of sight. A gas cell in combination with Al foils is used for filter

  1. Sodium Atoms in the Lunar Exotail: Observed Velocity and Spatial Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Line, Michael R.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Oliversen, R. J.; Wilson, J. K.; Haffner, L. M.; Roesler, F. L.

    2011-01-01

    The lunar sodium tail extends long distances due to radiation pressure on sodium atoms in the lunar exosphere. Our earlier observations determined the average radial velocity of sodium atoms moving down the lunar tail beyond Earth along the Sun-Moon-Earth line (i.e., the anti-lunar point) to be 12.4 km/s. Here we use the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper to obtain the first kinematically resolved maps of the intensity and velocity distribution of this emission over a 15 x times 15 deg region on the sky near the anti-lunar point. We present both spatially and spectrally resolved observations obtained over four nights around new moon in October 2007. The spatial distribution of the sodium atoms is elongated along the ecliptic with the location of the peak intensity drifting 3 degrees east along the ecliptic per night. Preliminary modeling results suggest that the spatial and velocity distributions in the sodium exotail are sensitive to the near surface lunar sodium velocity distribution and that observations of this sort along with detailed modeling offer new opportunities to describe the time history of lunar surface sputtering over several days.

  2. Tomography of fast-ion velocity-space distributions from synthetic CTS and FIDA measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh;

    2012-01-01

    We compute tomographies of 2D fast-ion velocity distribution functions from synthetic collective Thomson scattering (CTS) and fast-ion D (FIDA) 1D measurements using a new reconstruction prescription. Contradicting conventional wisdom we demonstrate that one single 1D CTS or FIDA view suffices to...

  3. Electron Velocity Distribution Function in Magnetic Clouds in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves-Chinchil, Teresa; Vinas, Adolfo F.; Bale, Stuart D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the kinetic properties of the electron velocity distribution functions within magnetic clouds, since they are the dominant thermal component. The study is based on high time resolution data from the GSFC WIND/SWE electron spectrometer and the Berkeley 3DP electron plasma instruments. Recent studies on magnetic clouds have shown observational evidence of anti-correlation between the total electron density and electron temperature, which suggest a polytrope law P(sub e) = alpha(Nu(sub e) (sup gamma)) for electrons with the constant gamma approximates 0.5 non-Maxwellian electron distributions (i.e. non-thermal) within magnetic clouds. These works suggested that the non-thermal electrons can contribute as much as 50% of the total electron pressure within magnetic clouds. We have revisited some of the magnetic cloud events previously studied and attempted to quantify the nature of the non-thermal electrons by modeling the electron velocity distribution function using a kappa distribution function to characterize the kinetic non-thermal effects. If non-thermal tail effects are the source for the anti-correlation between the moment electron temperature and density and if the kappa distribution is a reasonable representative model of non-thermal effects, then the electron velocity distribution within magnetic clouds should show indication for small K-values when gamma < 1.

  4. Spatial distribution of emissions to air – the SPREAD model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Gyldenkærne, Steen

    The National Environmental Research Institute (NERI), Aarhus University, completes the annual national emission inventories for greenhouse gases and air pollutants according to Denmark’s obligations under international conventions, e.g. the climate convention, UNFCCC and the convention on long......-range transboundary air pollution, CLRTAP. NERI has developed a model to distribute emissions from the national emission inventories on a 1x1 km grid covering the Danish land and sea territory. The new spatial high resolution distribution model for emissions to air (SPREAD) has been developed according...... to the requirements for reporting of gridded emissions to CLRTAP. Spatial emission data is e.g. used as input for air quality modelling, which again serves as input for assessment and evaluation of health effects. For these purposes distributions with higher spatial resolution have been requested. Previously...

  5. Meteoroid velocity distribution derived from head echo data collected at Arecibo during regular world day observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Sulzer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the observation and analysis of ionization flashes associated with the decay of meteoroids (so-called head echos detected by the Arecibo 430 MHz radar during regular ionospheric observations in the spring and autumn equinoxes. These two periods allow pointing well-above and nearly-into the ecliptic plane at dawn when the event rate maximizes. The observation of many thousands of events allows a statistical interpretation of the results, which show that there is a strong tendency for the observed meteoroids to come from the apex as has been previously reported (Chau and Woodman, 2004. The velocity distributions agree with Janches et al. (2003a when they are directly comparable, but the azimuth scan used in these observations allows a new perspective. We have constructed a simple statistical model which takes meteor velocities as input and gives radar line of sight velocities as output. The intent is to explain the fastest part of the velocity distribution. Since the speeds interpreted from the measurements are distributed fairly narrowly about nearly 60 km s-1, double the speed of the earth in its orbit, is consistent with the interpretation that many of the meteoroids seen by the Arecibo radar are moving in orbits about the sun with similar parameters as the earth, but in the retrograde direction. However, it is the directional information obtained from the beam-swinging radar experiment and the speed that together provide the evidence for this interpretation. Some aspects of the measured velocity distributions suggest that this is not a complete description even for the fast part of the distribution, and it certainly says nothing about the slow part first described in Janches et al. (2003a. Furthermore, we cannot conclude anything about the entire dust population since there are probably selection effects that restrict the observations to a subset of the population.

  6. Planar Velocity Distribution of Viscous Debris Flow at Jiangjia Ravine, Yunnan, China: A Field Measurement Using Two Radar Velocimeters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Xudong; WANG Guangqian; KANG Zhicheng; FEI Xiangjun

    2007-01-01

    Characteristics of planar velocity distribution of viscous debris flow were analyzed using the measured data at Jiangjia Ravine, Yunnan, China. The velocity data were measured through using two radar velocimeters. The cross-sectional mean velocities were calculated and used to examine Kang et al's (2004) relationship, which was established for converting the flow velocity at river centerline measured by a radar velocimeter into the mean velocity based on the stop-watch method. The velocity coefficient, K, defined by the ratio of the mean velocity to the maximum velocity, ranges from 0.2 to 0.6. Kang et al's (2004) relationship was found being inapplicable to flows with K smaller than 0.43. This paper contributes to show the complexity of the planar velocity distribution of viscous debris flows and the applicability of Kang et al's relationship.

  7. Liquid concentration distribution and planar interface instability at an abruptly changing pulling velocity in directional solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ShuangMing; FU HengZhi

    2007-01-01

    Liquid concentration distribution is seriously affected by an abruptly changing pulling velocity under directional solidification. Theoretical and numerical investigations indicate that at the pulling velocity jumping from V0 to V, the solidification system does not achieve the pulling velocity V immediately, and it goes through a non-steady-state transition zone. As the pulling velocity abruptly increases (V/V0 > 1), interface liquid concentration firstly increases to the maximum and then decreases to the steady-state value. The magnitude of interface liquid concentration at the beginning increases with V/V0, the initial pulling velocity V0 and the temperature gradient GL in the liquid. At the same time, solute diffusion length reduces with V/V0 and GL. In contrast, the minimum of interface liquid concentration falls with V/V0 at the pulling velocity decreasing abruptly. As the interface liquid concentration enriched at V/V0 > 1 is more than the value required for the planar interface to keep stable, the solid/liquid interface may become unstable. The analytical results are in agreement with the numerical calculation results of Al-2%Cu alloy.

  8. Liquid concentration distribution and planar interface instability at an abruptly changing pulling velocity in directional solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Liquid concentration distribution is seriously affected by an abruptly changing pulling velocity under directional solidification. Theoretical and numerical investi-gations indicate that at the pulling velocity jumping from V0 to V, the solidification system does not achieve the pulling velocity V immediately, and it goes through a non-steady-state transition zone. As the pulling velocity abruptly increases (V/V0 > 1), interface liquid concentration firstly increases to the maximum and then de-creases to the steady-state value. The magnitude of interface liquid concentration at the beginning increases with V/V0, the initial pulling velocity V0 and the tem-perature gradient GL in the liquid. At the same time, solute diffusion length reduces with V/V0 and GL. In contrast, the minimum of interface liquid concentration falls with V/V0 at the pulling velocity decreasing abruptly. As the interface liquid con-centration enriched at V/V0 > 1 is more than the value required for the planar inter-face to keep stable, the solid/liquid interface may become unstable. The analytical results are in agreement with the numerical calculation results of Al-2%Cu alloy.

  9. Mockup Small-Diameter Air Distribution System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Poerschke and A. Rudd

    2016-05-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using a home-run manifold small-diameter duct system to provide space conditioning air to individual thermal zones in a low-load home. This compact layout allows duct systems to be brought easily within conditioned space via interior partition walls. Centrally locating the air hander unit in the house significantly reduces duct lengths. The plenum box is designed so that each connected duct receives an equal amount of airflow, regardless of the duct position on the box. Furthermore, within a reasonable set of length restrictions, each duct continues to receive similar airflow. The design method uses an additive approach to reach the total needed zonal airflow. Once the cubic feet per minute needed to satisfy the thermal load of a zone has been determined, the total number of duct runs to a zone can be calculated by dividing the required airflow by the standard airflow from each duct. The additive approach greatly simplifies the design effort and reduces the potential for duct design mistakes to be made. Measured results indicate that this plenum design can satisfy the heating load. However, the total airflow falls short of satisfying the cooling load in a hypothetical building. Static pressure inside the plenum box of 51.5 Pa limited the total airflow of the attached mini-split heat pump blower, thus limiting the total thermal capacity. Fan energy consumption is kept to 0.16 to 0.22 watt/CFM by using short duct runs and smooth duct material.

  10. Measurement of non-Maxwellian electron velocity distributions in a reflex discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, C. R., Jr.; Bershader, D.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a ruby laser Thomson scattering study of the space and time-resolved electron velocity distributions in a pulsed Penning discharge in hydrogen are presented. Electron densities were to the order of 10 to the 13th/cu cm and temperatures were roughly 3 eV. This point is just prior to the cessation of the discharge ohmic heating pulse. For magnetic strengths less than 200 G, Maxwellian distributions were found over an energy range six times thermal energy. Temperatures agreed with Langmuir probe data. For fields of 450 G, chaotic plasma potentials were observed to be unstable and the Thomson scattering showed that the electron velocity distributions had central temperatures of 2 eV and wing temperatures of 15-12 eV.

  11. Velocity Distribution Measurement Using Pixel-Pixel Cross Correlation of Electrical Tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENGXiang; PENGLihui; YAODanya; ZHANGBaofen

    2004-01-01

    Electrical tomography (ET) provides a novel means of visualizing the internal behavior of twophase flow in industrial process. Using a dual-sensingplane Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) or Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) system, the raw data of two different section images can be acquired synchronously and the two images reflecting the inner medium distribution respectively can also be reconstructed by using imaging algorithm. Further, the analysis of pixel-pixel cross correlation is able to be setup and the measurement of velocity distribution of two-phase flow could be achieved. The principle is described in the paper. The FFT algorithm for gray value computation and cross correlation function calculation is also introduced. Some experimental results of velocity distribution measurement using pixelpixel cross correlation in vertical slug flow are presented.

  12. Velocity distributions of hydrogen atoms and hydroxyl radicals produced through solar photodissociation of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. Y. R.; Chen, F. Z.

    1993-01-01

    The velocity distributions of H and OH fragments produced through solar photodissociation of gaseous H2O molecules under collisionless conditions are presented. The calculations are carried out using: the most recently available absolute partial cross sections for the production of H and OH through photodissociation of H2O from its absorption onset at 1860 A down to 500 A; the newly available vibrational and rotational energy distributions of both the excited and ground state OH photofragments; the calculated cross sections for the total dissociation processes; and the integrated solar flux in 10 A increments from 500 to 1860 A in the continuum regions and the specific wavelength and flux at the bright solar lines. The calculated results show that the H atoms and the OH radicals produced exhibit multiple velocity groups. Since most current cometary modeling uses a single velocity of 20 km/sec associated with the photodissociation of H2O, the present results may be useful in interpreting the many peaks observed in the velocity distributions of the H Lyman alpha and H alpha of comets.

  13. Velocity distributions of hydrogen atoms and hydroxyl radicals produced through solar photodissociation of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. Y. R.; Chen, F. Z.

    1993-01-01

    The velocity distributions of H and OH fragments produced through solar photodissociation of gaseous H2O molecules under collisionless conditions are presented. The calculations are carried out using: the most recently available absolute partial cross sections for the production of H and OH through photodissociation of H2O from its absorption onset at 1860 A down to 500 A; the newly available vibrational and rotational energy distributions of both the excited and ground state OH photofragments; the calculated cross sections for the total dissociation processes; and the integrated solar flux in 10 A increments from 500 to 1860 A in the continuum regions and the specific wavelength and flux at the bright solar lines. The calculated results show that the H atoms and the OH radicals produced exhibit multiple velocity groups. Since most current cometary modeling uses a single velocity of 20 km/sec associated with the photodissociation of H2O, the present results may be useful in interpreting the many peaks observed in the velocity distributions of the H Lyman alpha and H alpha of comets.

  14. Structure of velocity distributions in shock waves in granular gases with extension to molecular gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilquin, A.; Boudet, J. F.; Kellay, H.

    2016-08-01

    Velocity distributions in normal shock waves obtained in dilute granular flows are studied. These distributions cannot be described by a simple functional shape and are believed to be bimodal. Our results show that these distributions are not strictly bimodal but a trimodal distribution is shown to be sufficient. The usual Mott-Smith bimodal description of these distributions, developed for molecular gases, and based on the coexistence of two subpopulations (a supersonic and a subsonic population) in the shock front, can be modified by adding a third subpopulation. Our experiments show that this additional population results from collisions between the supersonic and subsonic subpopulations. We propose a simple approach incorporating the role of this third intermediate population to model the measured probability distributions and apply it to granular shocks as well as shocks in molecular gases.

  15. On the angular distribution of extensive air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Zotov, M Yu; Kulikov, G V; Sulakov, V P

    2009-01-01

    Angular distributions of extensive air showers with different number of charged particles in the range 2.5x10^5--4x10^7 are derived using the experimental data obtained with the EAS MSU array. Possible approximations of the obtained distributions with different empiric functions available in literature, are analysed. It is shown that the exponential function provides the best approximation of the angular distributions in the sense of the chi-squared criterion.

  16. Bayesian Reconstruction of the Velocity Distribution of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles from Direct Dark Matter Detection Data

    CERN Document Server

    Shan, Chung-Lin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we extended our earlier work on the reconstruction of the (time-averaged) one-dimensional velocity distribution of Galactic Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) and introduce the Bayesian fitting procedure to the theoretically predicted velocity distribution functions. In this reconstruction process, the (rough) velocity distribution reconstructed by using raw data from direct Dark Matter detection experiments directly, i.e. measured recoil energies, with one or more different target materials, has been used as "reconstructed-input" information. By assuming a fitting velocity distribution function and scanning the parameter space based on the Bayesian analysis, the astronomical characteristic parameters, e.g. the Solar and Earth's orbital velocities, will be pinned down as the output results. Our Monte-Carlo simulations show that this Bayesian scanning procedure could reconstruct the true (input) WIMP velocity distribution function pretty precisely with negligible systematic deviations ...

  17. Air Distribution Retrofit Strategies for Affordable Housing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dentz, J. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES), New York, NY (United States); Conlin, F. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES), New York, NY (United States); Holloway, Parker [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES), New York, NY (United States); Podorson, David [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES), New York, NY (United States); Varshney, Kapil [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES), New York, NY (United States)

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques, manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multiunit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder are two story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  18. Air Distribution Retrofit Strategies for Affordable Housing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dentz, J.; Conlin, F.; Holloway, P.; Podorson, D.; Varshney, K.

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques -- manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multi-unit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  19. Velocity distribution of flow with submerged flexible vegetations based on mixing-length approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-xin HUAI; Jie HAN; Yu-hong ZENG; Xiang AN; Zhong-dong QIAN

    2009-01-01

    By choosing a PVC slice to simulate flexible vegetation, we carried out ex-periments in an open channel with submerged flexible vegetation. A 3D acoustic Doppler velocimeter (micro ADV) was used to measure local flow velocities and Reynolds stress. The results show that hydraulic characteristics in non-vegetation and vegetation layers are totally different. In a region above the vegetation, Reynolds stress distribution is linear, and the measured velocity profile is a classical logarithmic one. Based on the concept of new-riverbed, the river compression parameter representing the impact of vegetation on river is given, and a new assumption of mixing length expression is made. The formula for time-averaged velocity derived from the expression requires less parameters and simple calculation, and is useful in applications.

  20. Late Quaternary climate-change velocity: Implications for modern distributions and communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandel, Brody Steven; Dalsgaard, Bo; Arge, Lars Allan

    a global map of climate-change velocity since the Last Glacial Maximum and used this measure of climate instability to address a number of classic hypotheses. Results/Conclusions We show that historical climate-change velocity is related to a wide range of characteristics of modern distributions......Background/Question/Methods Climate-change velocity is a measure of the rate of climate change that incorporates small-scale climate variation such as that found along topographic gradients. As a measure of climate instability, it has several advantages, including describing the minimum migration...... rate required to track changing conditions and explicitly capturing the buffering effect of topography on climate change. Variation in climate stability has long been hypothesized as a possible driver of large-scale ecological patterns including diversity and range size gradients. We calculated...

  1. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a strontium atomic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, F.; Liu, H.; Xu, P.; Tian, X.; Wang, Y.; Ren, J.; Wu, Haibin; Chang, Hong

    2014-02-01

    We measure the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam precisely by velocity-selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of an ultrastable laser system and the narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms mean that the resolution of the measured velocity can reach 0.13 m/s, corresponding to 90 μK in energy units. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the results of theoretical calculations. Based on the spectroscopic techniques used here, the absolute frequency of the intercombination transition of 88Sr is measured using an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through an H maser, and is given as 434 829 121 318(10) kHz.

  2. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a strontium atomic beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We measure the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam precisely by velocity-selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of an ultrastable laser system and the narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms mean that the resolution of the measured velocity can reach 0.13 m/s, corresponding to 90 μK in energy units. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the results of theoretical calculations. Based on the spectroscopic techniques used here, the absolute frequency of the intercombination transition of 88Sr is measured using an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through an H maser, and is given as 434 829 121 318(10 kHz.

  3. Distributed optical fiber-based theoretical and empirical methods monitoring hydraulic engineering subjected to seepage velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Huaizhi; Tian, Shiguang; Cui, Shusheng; Yang, Meng; Wen, Zhiping; Xie, Wei

    2016-09-01

    In order to systematically investigate the general principle and method of monitoring seepage velocity in the hydraulic engineering, the theoretical analysis and physical experiment were implemented based on distributed fiber-optic temperature sensing (DTS) technology. During the coupling influence analyses between seepage field and temperature field in the embankment dam or dike engineering, a simplified model was constructed to describe the coupling relationship of two fields. Different arrangement schemes of optical fiber and measuring approaches of temperature were applied on the model. The inversion analysis idea was further used. The theoretical method of monitoring seepage velocity in the hydraulic engineering was finally proposed. A new concept, namely the effective thermal conductivity, was proposed referring to the thermal conductivity coefficient in the transient hot-wire method. The influence of heat conduction and seepage could be well reflected by this new concept, which was proved to be a potential approach to develop an empirical method monitoring seepage velocity in the hydraulic engineering.

  4. Prediction of Air Flow and Temperature Distribution Inside a Yogurt Cooling Room Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Surendhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Air flow and heat transfer inside a yogurt cooling room were analysed using Computational Fluid Dynamics. Air flow and heat transfer models were based on 3D, unsteady state, incompressible, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and energy equations. Yogurt cooling room was modelled with the measured geometry using 3D design tool AutoCAD. Yogurt cooling room model was exported into the flow simulation software by specifying properties of inlet air, yogurt, pallet and walls of the room. Packing material was not considered in this study because of less thickness (cup-0.5mm, carton box-1.5mm and negligible resistance created in the conduction of heat. 3D Computational domain was meshed with hexahedral cells and governing equations were solved using explicit finite volume method. Air flow pattern inside the room and the temperature distribution in the bulk of palletized yogurt were predicted. Through validation, the variation in the temperature distribution and velocity vector from the measured value was found to be 2.0oC (maximum and 30% respectively. From the simulation and the measured value of the temperature distribution, it was observed that the temperature was non-uniform over the bulk of yogurt. This might be due to refrigeration capacity, air flow pattern, stacking of yogurt or geometry of the room. Required results were achieved by changing the location of the cooling fan.

  5. Electron velocity distribution functions from the solar wind to the corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimovic, M.; Pierrard, V.; Lemaire, J.; Larson, D.

    1999-06-01

    Typical electron velocity distribution functions observed at 1 AU from the Sun by the instrument 3DP aboard of WIND are used as boundary conditions to determine the electron velocity distribution function at 4 solar radii in the corona. The velocity distribution functions (VDF) at low altitude are obtained by solving the Fokker-Planck equation, using two different sets of boundary conditions. The first set typically corresponds to a VDF observed in a low speed solar wind flow (i.e., characterized by ``core'' and ``halo'' electrons); the second one corresponds to high speed solar wind (i.e. characterized by ``core,'' ``halo'' and ``strahl'' populations). We use the observed electron VDFs as test particles which are submitted to external forces and Coulomb collisions with a background plasma. Closer to the Sun, the relative density of the core electrons is found to increase compared to the densities of the halo population. Nevertheless, we find that in order to match the observed distributions at 1 AU, suprathermal tails have to be present in the VDF of the test electron at low altitudes in the corona. Note that the present work has been submitted to Journal of Geophysical Research [6]. This is the reason why we present here only an extended summary.

  6. Experimental and modeling study of fluidized bed granulation: Effect of binder flow rate and fluidizing air velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Vengateson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized bed granulation is a widely used technique of producing granules in pharmaceutical, food, detergent, and fertilizer industries. In this study, fluidized bed granulation of two powders – wheat flour and rice powder – with water as binder is studied experimentally and by modeling. The effects of two process parameters – binder flow rate, fluidizing air velocity – are determined. Experimental results show that increasing the binder flow rate favors the formation of bigger granules while increasing fluidizing air velocity leads to a decrease in average granule diameter. Population balance model with suitable form of coalescence kernel (β has been used to describe the granule growth. Later, this kernel is linked with process parameters – binder flow rate and fluidizing air velocity.

  7. Lateral distributions of streamwise velocity in compound channels with partially vegetated floodplains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG XiaoNan; KNIGHT Donald W

    2009-01-01

    Natural rivers are commonly characterized by a main channel for primary flow conveyance and a floodplain, often partially covered with vegetation such as shrubs or trees, to carry extra flow during floods.The hydraulic resistance due to vegetation on the floodplain typically causes a further reduction of flow velocity and increases the velocity difference between the main channel and the floodplain.As a consequence a strong lateral shear layer leads to the exchange of mass and momentum between the main channel and floodplain, which in turn affects the overall channel conveyance and certain fluvial processes.The prediction of the lateral velocity distribution is important for many flood alleviation schemes, as well as for studies on sediment transport and dispersion in such channels.The present paper proposes a method for predicting the depth-averaged velocity in compound channels with par-tially vegetated floodplains, based on an analytical solution to the depth-integrated Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equation with a term included to account for the effects of vegetation.The vegetation is modelled via an additional term in the momentum equation to account for the additional drag force.The method includes the effects of bed friction, drag force, lateral turbulence and secondary flows, via four coefficients f, C_D,λ & Г respectively.The predicted lateral distributions of depth-averaged velocity agree well with the experimental data.The analytical solutions can also be used to predict the distribu-tion of boundary shear stresses, which adds additional weight to the method proposed.

  8. Spatial distribution of emissions to air - the SPREAD model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plejdrup, M.S.; Gyldenkaerne, S.

    2011-04-15

    The National Environmental Research Institute (NERI), Aarhus University, completes the annual national emission inventories for greenhouse gases and air pollutants according to Denmark's obligations under international conventions, e.g. the climate convention, UNFCCC and the convention on long-range transboundary air pollution, CLRTAP. NERI has developed a model to distribute emissions from the national emission inventories on a 1x1 km grid covering the Danish land and sea territory. The new spatial high resolution distribution model for emissions to air (SPREAD) has been developed according to the requirements for reporting of gridded emissions to CLRTAP. Spatial emission data is e.g. used as input for air quality modelling, which again serves as input for assessment and evaluation of health effects. For these purposes distributions with higher spatial resolution have been requested. Previously, a distribution on the 17x17 km EMEP grid has been set up and used in research projects combined with detailed distributions for a few sectors or sub-sectors e.g. a distribution for emissions from road traffic on 1x1 km resolution. SPREAD is developed to generate improved spatial emission data for e.g. air quality modelling in exposure studies. SPREAD includes emission distributions for each sector in the Danish inventory system; stationary combustion, mobile sources, fugitive emissions from fuels, industrial processes, solvents and other product use, agriculture and waste. This model enables generation of distributions for single sectors and for a number of sub-sectors and single sources as well. This report documents the methodologies in this first version of SPREAD and presents selected results. Further, a number of potential improvements for later versions of SPREAD are addressed and discussed. (Author)

  9. Estimation of Lateral Distribution Function in Extensive Air Showers by Using AIRES Simulation System

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Al-Rubaiee A

    2013-01-01

    In this work the estimation of the lateral distribution function in Extensive Air showers was performed by using a system for air shower simulations which is called AIRES version 2.6 for different hadronic models like (QGSJET99, SIBYLL and SIBYLL1.6). The simulation was fulfilled in the high energy range (10^15-10^19 eV) for different primary particles like (gamma, protons and iron nuclei) for vertical showers. This simulation can be used to reconstruct the type and energy of the particle that generated Extensive Air showers for charged particles that registered with different arrays.

  10. Type Ia Supernova Colors and Ejecta Velocities: Hierarchical Bayesian Regression with Non-Gaussian Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Mandel, Kaisey S; Kirshner, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the correlations between the peak intrinsic colors of Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) and their expansion velocities at maximum light, measured from the Si II 6355 A spectral feature. We construct a new hierarchical Bayesian regression model and Gibbs sampler to estimate the dependence of the intrinsic colors of a SN Ia on its ejecta velocity, while accounting for the random effects of intrinsic scatter, measurement error, and reddening by host galaxy dust. The method is applied to the apparent color data from BVRI light curves and Si II velocity data for 79 nearby SN Ia. Comparison of the apparent color distributions of high velocity (HV) and normal velocity (NV) supernovae reveals significant discrepancies in B-V and B-R, but not other colors. Hence, they are likely due to intrinsic color differences originating in the B-band, rather than dust reddening. The mean intrinsic B-V and B-R color differences between HV and NV groups are 0.06 +/- 0.02 and 0.09 +/- 0.02 mag, respectively. Under a linear m...

  11. Study of Influence of Experimental Technique on Measured Particle Velocity Distributions in Fluidized Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Balaji; Shaffer, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Fluid flows that are loaded with high concentration of solid particles are common in oil and chemical processing industries. However, the opaque nature of the flow fields and the complex nature of the flow have hampered the experimental and computational study of these processes. This has led to the development of a number of customized experimental techniques for high concentration particle flows for evaluation and improvement of CFD models. This includes techniques that track few individual particles, measures average particle velocity over a small sample volume and those over a large sample volume. In this work novel high speed PIV (HsPIV), with individual particle tracking, was utilized to measure velocities of individual particles in gas-particle flow fields at the walls circulating and bubbling fluidized bed. The HsPIV measurement technique has the ability to simultaneously recognize and track thousands of individual particles in flows of high particle concentration. To determine the effect of the size of the sample volume on particle velocity measurements, the PDF of Lagrangian particle velocity was compared with the PDF of Eulerian for different domain sizes over a range of flow conditions. The results will show that measured particle velocity distribution can vary from technique to technique and this bias has to be accounted in comparison with CFD simulations.

  12. Influence of air velocity on droplet's wetting and evaporation conditions on a flat surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapalowicz, Z. (Technical Univ. of Szczecin (Poland). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    The paper presents results of experimental research on influence of air velocity on characteristic dimensions, spreading ratio and evaporation time of a droplet. The relation between the velocity that initiates droplet's motion and the temperature of the surface has been under research, too, and is presented in the paper as well. The research allows determination of the droplet's rest and motion areas on the wall surface.

  13. The Velocity Distribution Function of Galaxy Clusters as a Cosmological Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Ntampaka, M; Cisewski, J; Price, L C

    2016-01-01

    We present a new approach for quantifying the abundance of galaxy clusters and constraining cosmological parameters using dynamical measurements. In the standard method, galaxy line-of-sight (LOS) velocities, $v$, or velocity dispersions are used to infer cluster masses, $M$, in order to quantify the halo mass function (HMF), $dn(M)/d\\log(M)$, which is strongly affected by mass measurement errors. In our new method, the probability distribution of velocities for each cluster in the sample are summed to create a new statistic called the velocity distribution function (VDF), $dn(v)/dv$. The VDF can be measured more directly and precisely than the HMF and it can also be robustly predicted with cosmological simulations which capture the dynamics of subhalos or galaxies. We apply these two methods to mock cluster catalogs and forecast the bias and constraints on the matter density parameter $\\Omega_m$ and the amplitude of matter fluctuations $\\sigma_8$ in flat $\\Lambda$CDM cosmologies. For an example observation o...

  14. The Numerical Investigation of Temperature and Velocity Distribution in the High-Bay Depot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehong Wu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available High-bay depot plays an important role in the storage industry. Due to large and high space of high-bay depot, it is difficult to make temperature distribution uniform, which will influence the storage time of raw materials. In this paper, the aim is to find the reasonable air supply and energy-saving method; a supply-air method of high-bay depot is investigated as an example. The results show the radius and spacing of the supply-air inlet have great influence on temperature distribution. The temperature nonuniformity coefficient of summer is smaller than that of winter. The investigated results can provide a theoretical reference for the high-bay depot design and economic operation.

  15. Inversion of Seismic Velocities to obtain the Crack and Pore Aspect Ratio Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, R. W.; David, E. C.

    2010-12-01

    During a hydrostatic experiment, in the elastic regime, P and S elastic wave velocities measured on rock samples generally increase with pressure and reach asymptotic values at high pressures. This increase of seismic velocities with confining pressure is known to be caused by the closure of compliant pores, such as flat “cracks”, and therefore the high-pressure values of the velocities must reflect only the influence of stiff, “equant” pores. If the pores are assumed to be spheroids, the use of an effective medium theory, combined with a crack closure model, gives a model to relate the elastic properties to the microstructure at each pressure. Therefore, the pressure dependence of elastic velocities can be inverted to obtain the pore aspect ratio distribution. This is done more easily using data obtained in dry experiments, since pore fluids have a strong effect on velocities and to some extent mask the effect of the pore geometry. However, thus far most models have used restrictive assumptions, such as assuming that the stiff pores are spherical, or the interactions between inclusions can be neglected (such as Morlier’s method), which is unfortunately not realistic in most cases. Others methods, such as the one developed by Cheng and Toksoz (1979), assume that the rock contains a discrete distribution of crack aspect ratios, and are complicated to implement numerically. Moreover, in most work only the dry data have been inverted, or jointly the dry and wet data, but it seems that few works have tried to look in detail at a consistent pore model, that remains simple and is able to predict the dependence of Vp and Vs under saturated conditions, based on data collected on dry rocks. We assume that the rock contains a distribution of cracks with different aspect ratios, and two families of stiff pores, each with their own finite aspect ratio. We use this model to invert the wavespeeds to obtain aspect ratio distributions of some isotropic sandstones (Berea

  16. Study on Droplet Size and Velocity Distributions of a Pressure Swirl Atomizer Based on the Maximum Entropy Formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A predictive model for droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer has been proposed based on the maximum entropy formalism (MEF. The constraint conditions of the MEF model include the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy. The effects of liquid swirling strength, Weber number, gas-to-liquid axial velocity ratio and gas-to-liquid density ratio on the droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer are investigated. Results show that model based on maximum entropy formalism works well to predict droplet size and velocity distributions under different spray conditions. Liquid swirling strength, Weber number, gas-to-liquid axial velocity ratio and gas-to-liquid density ratio have different effects on droplet size and velocity distributions of a pressure swirl atomizer.

  17. Measuring OutdoorAir Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

    2008-10-01

    Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100percent, and were often greater than 25percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

  18. HADOOP-BASED DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM FOR ONLINE PREDICTION OF AIR POLLUTION BASED ON SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ghaemi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The critical impact of air pollution on human health and environment in one hand and the complexity of pollutant concentration behavior in the other hand lead the scientists to look for advance techniques for monitoring and predicting the urban air quality. Additionally, recent developments in data measurement techniques have led to collection of various types of data about air quality. Such data is extremely voluminous and to be useful it must be processed at high velocity. Due to the complexity of big data analysis especially for dynamic applications, online forecasting of pollutant concentration trends within a reasonable processing time is still an open problem. The purpose of this paper is to present an online forecasting approach based on Support Vector Machine (SVM to predict the air quality one day in advance. In order to overcome the computational requirements for large-scale data analysis, distributed computing based on the Hadoop platform has been employed to leverage the processing power of multiple processing units. The MapReduce programming model is adopted for massive parallel processing in this study. Based on the online algorithm and Hadoop framework, an online forecasting system is designed to predict the air pollution of Tehran for the next 24 hours. The results have been assessed on the basis of Processing Time and Efficiency. Quite accurate predictions of air pollutant indicator levels within an acceptable processing time prove that the presented approach is very suitable to tackle large scale air pollution prediction problems.

  19. Hadoop-Based Distributed System for Online Prediction of Air Pollution Based on Support Vector Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Z.; Farnaghi, M.; Alimohammadi, A.

    2015-12-01

    The critical impact of air pollution on human health and environment in one hand and the complexity of pollutant concentration behavior in the other hand lead the scientists to look for advance techniques for monitoring and predicting the urban air quality. Additionally, recent developments in data measurement techniques have led to collection of various types of data about air quality. Such data is extremely voluminous and to be useful it must be processed at high velocity. Due to the complexity of big data analysis especially for dynamic applications, online forecasting of pollutant concentration trends within a reasonable processing time is still an open problem. The purpose of this paper is to present an online forecasting approach based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) to predict the air quality one day in advance. In order to overcome the computational requirements for large-scale data analysis, distributed computing based on the Hadoop platform has been employed to leverage the processing power of multiple processing units. The MapReduce programming model is adopted for massive parallel processing in this study. Based on the online algorithm and Hadoop framework, an online forecasting system is designed to predict the air pollution of Tehran for the next 24 hours. The results have been assessed on the basis of Processing Time and Efficiency. Quite accurate predictions of air pollutant indicator levels within an acceptable processing time prove that the presented approach is very suitable to tackle large scale air pollution prediction problems.

  20. Non-Gaussian velocity distributions - The effect on virial mass estimates of galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, Andre L B; Trevisan, Marina

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of 9 galaxy groups with evidence for non-Gaussianity in their velocity distributions out to 4R200. This sample is taken from 57 groups selected from the 2PIGG catalog of galaxy groups. Statistical analysis indicates that non-Gaussian groups have masses significantly higher than Gaussian groups. We also have found that all non-Gaussian systems seem to be composed of multiple velocity modes. Besides, our results indicate that multimodal groups should be considered as a set of individual units with their own properties. In particular, we have found that the mass distribution of such units are similar to that of Gaussian groups. Our results reinforce the idea of non-Gaussian systems as complex structures in the phase space, likely corresponding to secondary infall aggregations at a stage before virialization. The understanding of these objects is relevant for cosmological studies using groups and clusters through the mass function evolution.

  1. Experimental study of convective heat transfer during cooling with low air velocity in a stack of objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Amara, Sami; Laguerre, Onrawee [Cemagref - Refrigeration Processes Engineering Research Unit, parc de Tourvoie, BP 44, 92163 cedex, Antony (France); Flick, Denis [National Agronomic Institute - INAPG, 16 rue Claude Bernard, 75231 cedex 05, Paris (France)

    2004-12-01

    During cooling with low air velocity (u{<=}0.2 m.s{sup -1}) of a stack of foodstuffs (a few centimeters dimension), the radiation and conduction between products can be of the same order of magnitude as convection. A method was developed to quantify these various transfer modes. The experiment was carried out using an in-line spherical arrangement; however, the same methodology can be applied to other product shapes. The results confirm that the heat transfers by radiation and conduction cannot be neglected. In addition, the convective heat transfer coefficient varies not only with air velocity but also with the product position in the stack. (authors)

  2. Temperature and air velocity effects on ethanol emission from corn silage with the characteristics of an exposed silo face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Felipe; Hafner, Sasha D.; Rotz, C. Alan; Mitloehner, Frank M.

    2010-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from agricultural sources are believed to be an important contributor to tropospheric ozone in some locations. Recent research suggests that silage is a major source of VOCs emitted from agriculture, but only limited data exist on silage emissions. Ethanol is the most abundant VOC emitted from corn silage; therefore, ethanol was used as a representative compound to characterize the pattern of emission over time and to quantify the effect of air velocity and temperature on emission rate. Ethanol emission was measured from corn silage samples removed intact from a bunker silo. Emission rate was monitored over 12 h for a range in air velocity (0.05, 0.5, and 5 m s -1) and temperature (5, 20, and 35 °C) using a wind tunnel system. Ethanol flux ranged from 0.47 to 210 g m -2 h -1 and 12 h cumulative emission ranged from 8.5 to 260 g m -2. Ethanol flux was highly dependent on exposure time, declining rapidly over the first hour and then continuing to decline more slowly over the duration of the 12 h trials. The 12 h cumulative emission increased by a factor of three with a 30 °C increase in temperature and by a factor of nine with a 100-fold increase in air velocity. Effects of air velocity, temperature, and air-filled porosity were generally consistent with a conceptual model of VOC emission from silage. Exposure duration, temperature, and air velocity should be taken into consideration when measuring emission rates of VOCs from silage, so emission rate data obtained from studies that utilize low air flow methods are not likely representative of field conditions.

  3. Measurement of Velocity Distribution in Atomic Beam by Diode Laser with Narrow Line width

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jingbiao; WANG Fengzhi; YANG Donghai; WANG YiQiu

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, by using the detecting laser beam interacts with the atomic beam at a sharp angle and the Doppler frequency shift effect, the velocity distribution in cesium atomic beam is measured with a diode laser of narrow linewidth of 1 MHz. The effects of the atomic natural line width and cycling transition detecting factor on the measured results have been analyzed. Finally, the measured results have been compared with the theoretical calculation.

  4. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation, {sigma}{sub g} of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and {sigma}{sub g} decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 {mu}m and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented.

  5. Over-the-Air Distribution (OTD) Update (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-29

    distribution of cryptokeys - DAGR S/W update released to take full advantage of OTAD and mission constellation operations - 4+ years of successful US...OTAD broadcasts • Mission constellations allow simultaneous broadcast of multiple OTAD messages - The SAASM Mission Planning System (SMPS) at the...JSpOC performs constellation optimization and assigns OTAR/OTAD keys to be broadcast from each SV 2015 04 29 _Over-the-Air Distribution (OTAD

  6. Vertical Distribution of Air Temperatures in Heated Dwelling Rooms

    OpenAIRE

    Šikula, Ondřej

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents an experimental and theoretic research on one of factors influencing the indoor climate in dwelling rooms heated by heating systems, the vertical distribution of temperatures. The paper summarizes results from simulation of the room heated by a gas space heater and a plate radiator. Among main factors causing unfavorable distribution of temperatures in a room belong insufficient elimination of cold dropping airflows and high temperature of heating air. The paper presents...

  7. Methods of Measurement of High Air Velocities by the Hot-wire Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weske, John R.

    1943-01-01

    Investigations of strengths of hot wires at high velocities were conducted with platinum, nickel, and tungsten at approximately 200 Degrees Celcius hot-wire temperature. The results appear to disqualify platinum for velocities approaching the sonic range; whereas nickel withstands sound velocity, and tungsten may be used for supersonic velocities under standard atmospheric conditions. Hot wires must be supported by rigid prolongs at high velocities to avoid wire breakage. Resting current measurements for constant temperature show agreement with King's relation.

  8. Air Distribution in a Room and Design Considerations of Mixing Ventilation by Flow Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Pedersen, D. N.

    2001-01-01

    The paper shows detailed measurements of the air distribution in a room ventilated by mixing ventilation according to the specifications given by the International Energy Agency work. (Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems Programme, Annex 20). It describes a number of flow...... elements and how they are used as design tools. The flow elements are the throw of an isothermal jet and the change in jet velocity when the jet moves from the upper to the lower part of the room. A third flow element is the penetration length of a non-isothermal wall jet....

  9. Calculation and measurement of a neutral air flow velocity impacting a high voltage capacitor with asymmetrical electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Malík

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the effects surrounding phenomenon of a mechanical force generated on a high voltage asymmetrical capacitor (the so called Biefeld-Brown effect. A method to measure this force is described and a formula to calculate its value is also given. Based on this the authors derive a formula characterising the neutral air flow velocity impacting an asymmetrical capacitor connected to high voltage. This air flow under normal circumstances lessens the generated force. In the following part this velocity is measured using Particle Image Velocimetry measuring technique and the results of the theoretically calculated velocity and the experimentally measured value are compared. The authors found a good agreement between the results of both approaches.

  10. The velocity distribution of pickup He{sup +} measured at 0.3 AU by MESSENGER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gershman, Daniel J. [Geospace Physics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Fisk, Lennard A.; Gloeckler, George; Raines, Jim M.; Slavin, James A.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Solomon, Sean C., E-mail: djgersh@umich.edu [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    During its interplanetary trajectory in 2007-2009, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvrionment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft passed through the gravitational focusing cone for interstellar helium multiple times at a heliocentric distance R ≈ 0.3 AU. Observations of He{sup +} interstellar pickup ions made by the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer sensor on MESSENGER during these transits provide a glimpse into the structure of newly formed inner heliospheric pickup-ion distributions. This close to the Sun, these ions are picked up in a nearly radial interplanetary magnetic field. Compared with the near-Earth environment, pickup ions observed near 0.3 AU will not have had sufficient time to be energized substantially. Such an environment results in a nearly pristine velocity distribution function that should depend only on pickup-ion injection velocities (related to the interstellar gas), pitch-angle scattering, and cooling processes. From measured energy-per-charge spectra obtained during multiple spacecraft observational geometries, we have deduced the phase-space density of He{sup +} as a function of magnetic pitch angle. Our measurements are most consistent with a distribution that decreases nearly monotonically with increasing pitch angle, rather than the more commonly modeled isotropic or hemispherically symmetric forms. These results imply that pitch-angle scattering of He{sup +} may not be instantaneous, as is often assumed, and instead may reflect the velocity distribution of initially injected particles. In a slow solar wind stream, we find a parallel-scattering mean free path of λ {sub ||} ∼ 0.1 AU and a He{sup +} production rate of ∼0.05 m{sup –3} s{sup –1} within 0.3 AU.

  11. The Analysis of the Moments of the Velocity Distribution in the Gaia Sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Gomez, M.; Figueras, F.; Antoja, T.; Roca-Fabrega, S.; Abedi, H.; Aguilar, L.

    2016-10-01

    The good precision in radial velocities provided by the WEAVE instrument (at ING), together with the proper motions obtained by the Gaia (ESA) mission, will allow the kinematic study of the end of the bar region. This is a rich, kinematically speaking, region that could help answer the big question regarding the one bar or two bar problem. Therefore, with Gaia and WEAVE, we are not limited to the study of the bar overdensity, but we can use all the 6D phase space. We are currently working on the analysis of the moments of the velocity distribution function in the Gaia sphere, about 4-5 kpc from the Sun, to try to obtain information on the potential of the Galaxy.

  12. Filaments from the galaxy distribution and from the velocity field in the local universe

    CERN Document Server

    Libeskind, Noam I; Hoffman, Yehuda; Tully, R Brent; Courtois, Helene

    2015-01-01

    The cosmic web that characterizes the large-scale structure of the Universe can be quantified by a variety of methods. For example, large redshift surveys can be used in combination with point process algorithms to extract long curvilinear filaments in the galaxy distribution. Alternatively, given a full 3D reconstruction of the velocity field, kinematic techniques can be used to decompose the web into voids, sheets, filaments and knots. In this paper we look at how two such algorithms - the Bisous model and the velocity shear web - compare with each other in the local Universe (within 100 Mpc), finding good agreement. This is both remarkable and comforting, given that the two methods are radically different in ideology and applied to completely independent and different data sets. Unsurprisingly, the methods are in better agreement when applied to unbiased and complete data sets, like cosmological simulations, than when applied to observational samples. We conclude that more observational data is needed to i...

  13. Large scale characterization of the stellar velocity distribution in the galactic disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero-Gómez M.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Test particle simulations of Milky Way type galactic disks are being conducted to map the evolution of the stellar large scale kinematic response to the bar and spiral structure. Second and third order moments of the velocity distribution function prove to be good indicators of both, the velocity ellipsoid misalignment near the arms and the bar, and the degree of kinematic substructure in the UV plane, that is, the presence of moving groups. A large scale analysis all through the galactic disk allows to establish the kinematic behavior near resonances and the correlation between the kinematic parameters and properties of the non-axisymmetric components, such as its transient nature or its mass overdensity. N-body simulaions are being run in order to test these results in self-consistent models.

  14. Distribution and Room Air Mixing Risks to Retrofitted Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdick, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    An energy efficiency upgrade reduces a home’s heating and cooling load. If the load reduction is great enough and the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system warrants replacement, that system is often upgraded with a more efficient, lower capacity system that meets the load of the upgraded house. For a single-story house with floor supply air diffusers, the ducts often are removed and upgraded. For houses with ducts that are embedded in walls, the cost of demolition precludes the replacement of ducts. The challenge with the use of existing ducts is that the reduced airflow creates a decreased throw at the supply registers, and the supply air and room air do not mix well, leading to potential thermal comfort complaints. This project investigates this retrofit scenario. The issues and solutions discussed here are relevant to all climate zones, with emphasis on climates that require cooling. In this project, IBACOS performed load calculations for a two-story 1960s house and characterized duct sizes and layouts based on industry “rules of thumb” (Herk et al. 2014). The team performed duct-sizing calculations for unaltered ducts and post-retrofit airflows and examined airflow velocities and pressure changes with respect to various factors. The team then used a mocked-up duct and register setup to measure the characteristics of isothermal air—to reduce the effects of buoyancy from the observations—passing through the duct and leaving the register.

  15. Crossed molecular beam studies of unimolecular reaction dynamics. [Angular and velocity distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, R.J.

    1979-04-01

    The study of seven radical-molecule reactions using the crossed molecular beam technique with supersonic nozzle beams is reported. Product angular and velocity distributions were obtained and compared with statistical calculations in order to identify dynamical features of the reactions. In the reaction of chlorine and fluorine atoms with vinyl bromide, the product energy distributions are found to deviate from predictions of the statistical model. A similar effect is observed in the reaction of chlorine atoms with 1, 2 and 3-bromopropene. The reaction of oxygen atoms with ICl and CF/sub 3/I has been used to obtain an improved value of the IO bond energy, 55.0 +- 2.0 kcal mol/sup -1/. In all reactions studied, the product energy and angular distributions are found to be coupled, and this is attributed to a kinematic effect of the conservation of angular momentum.

  16. The role of loading rate, backwashing, water and air velocities in an up-flow nitrifying tertiary filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigne, Emmanuelle; Choubert, Jean-Marc; Canler, Jean-Pierre; Heduit, Alain; Sørensen, Kim Helleshøj; Lessard, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The vertical distribution of nitrification performances in an up-flow biological aerated filter operated at tertiary nitrification stage is evaluated in this paper. Experimental data were collected from a semi-industrial pilot-plant under various operating conditions. The actual and the maximum nitrification rates were measured at different levels inside the up-flow biofilter. A nitrogen loading rate higher than 1.0 kg NH4-Nm(-3)_mediad(-1) is necessary to obtain nitrification activity over all the height of the biofilter. The increase in water and air velocities from 6 to 10 m h(-1) and 10 to 20 m h(-1) has increased the nitrification rate by 80% and 20% respectively. Backwashing decreases the maximum nitrification rate in the media by only 3-14%. The nitrification rate measured at a level of 0.5 m above the bottom of the filter is four times higher than the applied daily average volumetric nitrogen loading rate up to 1.5 kg NH4-N m(-3)_mediad(-1). Finally, it is shown that 58% of the available nitrification activity is mobilized in steady-state conditions while up to 100% is used under inflow-rate increase.

  17. The Velocity Distribution Function of Galaxy Clusters as a Cosmological Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntampaka, M.; Trac, H.; Cisewski, J.; Price, L. C.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new approach for quantifying the abundance of galaxy clusters and constraining cosmological parameters using dynamical measurements. In the standard method, galaxy line-of-sight velocities, v, or velocity dispersions are used to infer cluster masses, M, to quantify the halo mass function (HMF), {dn}(M)/d{log}(M), which is strongly affected by mass measurement errors. In our new method, the probability distributions of velocities for each cluster in the sample are summed to create a new statistic called the velocity distribution function (VDF), {dn}(v)/{dv}. The VDF can be measured more directly and precisely than the HMF and can be robustly predicted with cosmological simulations that capture the dynamics of subhalos or galaxies. We apply these two methods to realistic (ideal) mock cluster catalogs with (without) interlopers and forecast the bias and constraints on the matter density parameter Ωm and the amplitude of matter fluctuations σ8 in flat ΛCDM cosmologies. For an example observation of 200 massive clusters, the VDF with (without) interloping galaxies constrains the parameter combination {σ }8 {{{Ω }}}m0.29(0.29)=0.589+/- 0.014 (0.584+/- 0.011) and shows only minor bias. However, the HMF with interlopers is biased to low Ωm and high σ8 and the fiducial model lies well outside of the forecast constraints, prior to accounting for Eddington bias. When the VDF is combined with constraints from the cosmic microwave background, the degeneracy between cosmological parameters can be significantly reduced. Upcoming spectroscopic surveys that probe larger volumes and fainter magnitudes will provide clusters for applying the VDF as a cosmological probe.

  18. Spatial distribution of emissions to air – the SPREAD model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Gyldenkærne, Steen

    The National Environmental Research Institute (NERI), Aarhus University, completes the annual national emission inventories for greenhouse gases and air pollutants according to Denmark’s obligations under international conventions, e.g. the climate convention, UNFCCC and the convention on long...... to the requirements for reporting of gridded emissions to CLRTAP. Spatial emission data is e.g. used as input for air quality modelling, which again serves as input for assessment and evaluation of health effects. For these purposes distributions with higher spatial resolution have been requested. Previously...

  19. The velocity distribution of interstellar gas observed in strong UV absorption lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, L. L.; York, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of three strong interstellar UV absorption lines of N I (1199 A), N II (1083 A), and Si III (1206 A) in 47 stars of widely varying distance and a variety of spectral types are analyzed to obtain a velocity distribution function for the interstellar gas. A technique based on the maximum and minimum velocities observed along a line of sight is adopted because of heavy line blending, and results are discussed for both power-law and exponential distribution functions. The expected distribution of radiative-phase supernova remnants (SNRs) in the interstellar medium is calculated as a function of SNR birthrate and of the interstellar density in which they evolve. The results are combined with observed distance estimates, and it is shown that an interstellar density in excess of 0.1 per cu cm would be required to keep the SNRs sufficiently confined so that their cross sections are consistent with the observed number of components. The alternative possibility is considered that SNRs do not enter the radiative phase before escaping from the Galaxy or colliding with neighboring remnants.

  20. Observations of the He+ pickup ion torus velocity distribution function with SOHO/CELIAS/CTOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taut, Andreas; Berger, Lars; Bochsler, Peter; Drews, Christian; Klecker, Berndt; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2016-03-01

    Interstellar PickUp Ions (PUIs) are created from neutrals coming from the interstellar medium that get ionized inside the heliosphere. Once ionized, the freshly created ions are injected into the magnetized solar wind plasma with a highly anisotropic torus-shaped Velocity Distribution Function (VDF). It has been commonly assumed that wave-particle interactions rapidly destroy this torus by isotropizing the distribution in one hemisphere of velocity space. However, recent observations of a He+ torus distribution using PLASTIC on STEREO showed that the assumption of a rapid isotropization is oversimplified. The aim of this work is to complement these studies. Using He+ data from the Charge Time-Of-Flight (CTOF) sensor of the Charge, ELement, and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) on-board the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and magnetic field data from the Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) magnetometer of the WIND spacecraft, we derive the projected 1-D VDF of He+ for different magnetic field configurations. Depending on the magnetic field direction, the initial torus VDF lies inside CTOF's aperture or not. By comparing the VDFs derived under different magnetic field directions with each other we reveal an anisotropic signature of the He+ VDF.

  1. Simulations of ion velocity distribution functions taking into account both elastic and charge exchange collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huihui; Sukhomlinov, Vladimir S.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Mustafaev, Alexander S.

    2017-02-01

    Based on accurate representation of the He+-He angular differential scattering cross sections consisting of both elastic and charge exchange collisions, we performed detailed numerical simulations of the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) by Monte Carlo collision method (MCC). The results of simulations are validated by comparison with the experimental data of the ion mobility and the transverse diffusion. The IVDF simulation study shows that due to significant effect of scattering in elastic collisions IVDF cannot be separated into product of two independent IVDFs in the transverse and parallel to the electric field directions.

  2. Superstatistical velocity distributions of cold trapped ions in molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Rouse, I

    2015-01-01

    We present a realistic molecular-dynamics treatment of laser-cooled ions in radiofrequency ion traps which avoids previously made simplifications such as modeling laser cooling as a friction force and combining individual heating mechanisms into a single effective heating force. Based on this implementation, we show that infrequent energetic collisions of single ions with background gas molecules lead to pronounced heating of the entire ion ensemble and a time-varying secular ensemble temperature which manifests itself in a superstatistical time-averaged velocity distribution of the ions. The effect of this finding on the experimental determination of ion temperatures and rate constants for cold chemical reactions is discussed.

  3. Study on Strength and Ultrasonic Velocity of Air-Entrained Concrete and Plain Concrete in Cold Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-shuai Shang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nondestructive testing technology is essential in the quality inspection of repair, alteration, and renovation of the existing engineering, especially for concrete structure in severe environment. The objective of this work is to deal with the behavior of ultrasonic velocity and mechanical properties of plain concrete and air-entrained concrete subjected to freeze-thaw cycles (F-T-C. The ultrasonic velocity and mechanical properties (tensile strength, compressive strength, cubic compressive strength, and splitting strength of C30 air-entrained concrete and plain concrete with different water-cement ratio (water-cement ratio was 0.55, 0.45, and 0.50, resp. after F-T cycles were measured. The influences of F-T cycles on ultrasonic velocity and mechanical properties of C30 air-entrained concrete and plain concrete were analyzed. And the relationship between mechanical properties and ultrasonic velocity was established. The experimental results can be useful for the design of new concrete structure, maintenance and life prediction of existing concrete structure such as offshore platform and concrete dock wall.

  4. Distributed Air Traffic Control : A Human Safety Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Nikumbh, Sarvesh; Vartak, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    The issues in air traffic control have so far been addressed with the intent to improve resource utilization and achieve an optimized solution with respect to fuel comsumption of aircrafts, efficient usage of the available airspace with minimal congestion related losses under various dynamic constraints. So the focus has almost always been more on smarter management of traffic to increase profits while human safety, though achieved in the process, we believe, has remained less seriously attended. This has become all the more important given that we have overburdened and overstressed air traffic controllers managing hundreds of airports and thousands of aircrafts per day. We propose a multiagent system based distributed approach to handle air traffic ensuring complete human (passenger) safety without removing any humans (ground controllers) from the loop thereby also retaining the earlier advantages in the new solution. The detailed design of the agent system, which will be easily interfacable with the existin...

  5. Turbulence-Induced Relative Velocity of Dust Particles III: The Probability Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Liubin; Scalo, John

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by its important role in the collisional growth of dust particles in protoplanetary disks, we investigate the probability distribution function (PDF) of the relative velocity of inertial particles suspended in turbulent flows. Using the simulation from our previous work, we compute the relative velocity PDF as a function of the friction timescales, tau_p1 and tau_p2, of two particles of arbitrary sizes. The friction time of particles included in the simulation ranges from 0.1 tau_eta to 54T_L, with tau_eta and T_L the Kolmogorov time and the Lagrangian correlation time of the flow, respectively. The relative velocity PDF is generically non-Gaussian, exhibiting fat tails. For a fixed value of tau_p1, the PDF is the fattest for equal-size particles (tau_p2~tau_p1), and becomes thinner at both tau_p2tau_p1. Defining f as the friction time ratio of the smaller particle to the larger one, we find that, at a given f in 1/2>T_L). These features are successfully explained by the Pan & Padoan model. Usin...

  6. Line-of-sight velocity distributions of low-luminosity elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Halliday, C E; Kuntschner, H; Birkinshaw, M; Bender, R; Saglia, R P; Baggley, G; Davies, Roger L.; Kuntschner, Harald; Bender, Ralf; Baggley, Glenn

    2001-01-01

    The shape of the line-of-sight velocity distribution (LOSVD) is measured for a sample of 14 elliptical galaxies, predominantly low-luminosity ellipticals. The sample is dominated by galaxies in the Virgo cluster but also contains ellipticals in nearby groups and low density environments. The parameterization of the LOSVD due to Gerhard and van der Marel and Franx is adopted, which measures the asymmetrical and symmetrical deviations of the LOSVD from a Gaussian by the amplitudes h3 and h4 of the Gauss-Hermite series. Rotation, velocity dispersion, h3 and h4 are determined as a function of radius for both major and minor axes. Non-Gaussian LOSVDs are found for all galaxies along the major axes. Deviations from a Gaussian LOSVD along the minor axis are of much lower amplitude if present at all. Central decreases in velocity dispersion are found for three galaxies. Two galaxies have kinematically-decoupled cores: NGC 4458 and the well-known case of NGC 3608.

  7. Numerical Simulation of the Effect of Air Distribution on Turbulent Flow and Combustion in a Tubular Heating Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangJuan; MaoYu; LiLihong

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimension full-size numerical simulation of the effect of air distribution on turbulent flow and combustion in a tubular heating furnace was carried out. A standard k - ε turbulent model, a simplified PDF combustion model and a discrete ordinate transfer radiation model were used. The hybrid grid combining a structured and a non-structured grid was generated without any simplification of the complicated geometric configuration around the burner. It was found that the multistage combustion could reduce and control the peak value of temperature. At the same time, it was concluded that the amount of primary air had little effect on the global distribution of velocity and temperature in the furnace, but a great effect on that around the burner. It is recommended that 45%- 65% of the total amount of air be taken in in primary air inlets in the furnace. All the results are important to optimize the combustion progress.

  8. Distributed leader-follower flocking control for multi-agent dynamical systems with time-varying velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Wenwu; Chen, Guanrong; Cao, Ming

    Using tools from algebraic graph theory and nonsmooth analysis in combination with ideas of collective potential functions, velocity consensus and navigation feedback, a distributed leader-follower flocking algorithm for multi-agent dynamical systems with time-varying velocities is developed where

  9. Effects of projectile track charging on the H - secondary ion velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iza, P.; Farenzena, L. S.; da Silveira, E. F.

    2007-03-01

    The bombardment of insulating targets by MeV projectiles produces a positive track delivering secondary electrons to the solid. These electrons are eventually captured by adsorbed hydrogen-containing molecules, inducing fragmentation and initiating the H- secondary ion emission. The dynamics of this process is very sensitive to the track electric field and depends on the emission site and on the H- initial velocity. In this work, a model, based on a time-depending track potential followed by secondary electron induced desorption - SEID, is employed to describe the production and dynamics of H- secondary ion emission. It is shown that depending on how fast the track neutralization occurs, the movement of H- ions may be accelerated, decelerated or even aborted. Trajectories, angular distributions and energy distributions are predicted and compared with experimental data obtained for water ice bombarded by 1.7 MeV nitrogen ions.

  10. Sensitivity bias in the mass-radius distribution from Transit Timing Variations and Radial Velocity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by recent discussions, both in private and in the literature, we use a Monte Carlo simulation of planetary systems to investigate sources of bias in determining the mass-radius distribution of exoplanets for the two primary techniques used to measure planetary masses---Radial Velocities (RVs) and Transit Timing Variations (TTVs). We assert that mass measurements derived from these two methods are comparably reliable---as the physics underlying their respective signals is well understood. Nevertheless, their sensitivity to planet mass varies with the properties of the planets themselves. We find that for a given planet size, the RV method tends to find planets with higher mass while the sensitivity of TTVs is more uniform. This ``sensitivity bias'' implies that a complete census of TTV systems is likely to yield a more robust estimate of the mass-radius distribution provided there are not important physical differences between planets near and far from mean-motion resonance. We discuss differences in...

  11. Temperature and velocity field of the two-dimensional transverse hot-air jet in a freestream flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatom, J. W.; Cooper, M. A.; Hayden, T. K.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental investigation of the low subsonic, two-dimensional transverse hot-air jet. In the study jet-to-freestream angles of 90, 120, 135, and 150 deg and jet-to-freestream velocity ratios of 5, 10, and 20 were investigated. In the tests the jet velocity and temperature fields were measured using a temperature-compensated hot-wire anemometer. Photographs of the flowfield were also made. The tests results are compared with the available data and analysis. Results indicate a relatively minor deflection of the freestream by the jet and the presence of a large separated flow region behind the jet.

  12. Markov random field modelling for fluid distributions from the seismic velocity structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwatani, T.; Nagata, K.; Okada, M.; Toriumi, M.

    2011-12-01

    Recent development of geophysical observations, such as seismic tomography, seismic reflection method and geomagnetic method, provide us detailed images of the earth's interior. However, it has still been difficult to interpret these data geologically, including predicting lithology and fluid distributions, mainly because (1) available data usually have large noise and uncertainty, and (2) the number of observable parameters is usually smaller than the number of target parameters. Therefore, the statistical analyses of geophysical data sets are essential for the objective and quantitative geological interpretation. We propose the use of Markov random field (MRF) model to geophysical image data as an alternative to classical deterministic approaches. The MRF model is a Bayesian stochastic model using a generalized form of Markov Chains, and is often applied to the analysis of images, particularly in the detection of visual patterns or textures. The MRF model assumes that the spatial gradients of physical properties are relatively small compared to the observational noises. By hyperparameter estimation, the variances of noises can be appropriately estimated only from available data sets without prior information about observational noises. In this study, we try to image the fluid distributions based on the seismic velocity structure by using the Markov random field model. According to Nakajima et al. (2005), seismic velocities (Vp and Vs) are expressed as functions of porosity and pore geometry using the unified formulation proposed by Takei (2002). Additionally, the spatial continuity of porosity and pore geometry is incorporated by Gaussian Markov Chains as prior probabilities. The most probable estimation can be obtained by maximizing the posterior probability of the fluid distribution given the observed velocity structures. In the present study, the steepest descent method was implemented in order to minimize the free energy (i.e. maximize the posterior

  13. The AIRS Applications Pipeline, from Identification to Visualization to Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S. E.; Pagano, T. S.; Fetzer, E. J.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Teixeira, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua spacecraft has been returning daily global observations of Earth's atmospheric constituents and properties since 2002. AIRS provides observations of temperature and water vapor along the atmospheric column and is sensitive to many atmospheric constituents in the mid-troposphere, including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and ozone. With a 12-year data record and daily, global observations in near real-time, we are finding that AIRS data can play a role in applications that fall under most of the NASA Applied Sciences focus areas. Currently in development are temperature inversion maps that can potentially correlate to respiratory health problems, dengue fever and West Nile virus outbreak prediction maps, maps that can be used to make assessments of air quality, and maps of volcanic ash burden. This poster will communicate the Project's approach and efforts to date of its applications pipeline, which includes identifying applications, utilizing science expertise, hiring outside experts to assist with development and dissemination, visualization along application themes, and leveraging existing NASA data frameworks and organizations to facilitate archiving and distribution. In addition, a new web-based browse tool being developed by the AIRS Project for easy access to application product imagery will also be described.

  14. Study of the Vertical Distribution of Air Temperature in Warehouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Porras-Amores

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Warehouses are usually large, plain industrial buildings commonly used for storage of goods. Vertical distribution of air temperature is an important aspect for indoor environment design, which must be taken into account by architects and engineers in the early stages of warehouse design. The aim of this work is to analyze the vertical temperature gradients existing in warehouses, quantifying their value and analyzing their evolution along the year. To do so, the study outlines the monitoring of several warehouses with different building typology and height located in different areas of Spain for a complete annual cycle. The results obtained when applying a simple linear regression analysis to 175,200 vertical temperature profiles show that there is a strong influence of the outdoor temperature over the stratification of the indoor air. During warm months, the ceiling and the upper strata get warmer, whereas the cold air accumulates in the lower levels, increasing the stratification of indoor air (maximum values between 0.3 °C/m and 0.7 °C/m. During cold months, the ceiling gets cold due to its contact with the outdoor air, therefore, the colder, heavier air moves down to the lower strata, registering insignificant vertical temperature differences. Air conditioning of the warehouse, besides controlling the temperature, limits the influence of the outdoor environment on the stratification of temperatures. The results of the study may be of great use for warehouses for products sensitive to temperature, which may suffer a different evolution, conservation or maturation when the temperature differences are maintained for a long time.

  15. The ion velocity distribution of tokamak plasmas: Rutherford scattering at TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tammen, H.F.

    1995-01-10

    One of the most promising ways to gererate electricity in the next century on a large scale is nuclear fusion. In this process two light nuclei fuse and create a new nucleus with a smaller mass than the total mass of the original nuclei, the mass deficit is released in the form of kinetic energy. Research into this field has already been carried out for some decades now, and will have to continue for several more decades before a commercially viable fusion reactor can be build. In order to obtain fusion, fuels of extremely high temperatures are needed to overcome the repulsive force of the nuclei involved. Under these circumstances the fuel is fully ionized: it consists of ions and electrons and is in the plasma state. The problem of confining such a hot substance is solved by using strong magnetic fields. One specific magnetic configuration, in common use, is called the tokamak. The plasma in this machine has a toroidal, i.e. doughnut shaped, configuration. For understanding the physical processes which take place in the plasma, a good temporally and spatially resolved knowledge of both the ion and electron velocity distribution is required. The situation concerning the electrons is favourable, but this is not the case for the ions. To improve the existing knowledge of the ion velocity distribution in tokamak plasmas, a Rutherford scattering diagnostic (RUSC), designed and built by the FOM-Institute for Plasmaphysics `Rijnhuizen`, was installed at the TEXTOR tokamak in Juelich (D). The principle of the diagnostic is as follows. A beam of monoenergetic particles (30 keV, He) is injected vertically into the plasma. A small part of these particles collides elastically with the moving plasma ions. By determining the energy of a scattered beam particle under a certain angle (7 ), the initial velocity of the plasma ion in one direction can be computed. (orig./WL).

  16. Spatial Distribution Characteristics of Negative Air Ion Concentrations in Danqinghe Experimental Forest,Harbin City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, air ions, especially of negative air ion has received a universal attention for its health function. The density of negative air ion has become one of the important indexes that measure the air quality grade. With the air ions counter made in Japan, the spatial distribution characteristics of negative air concentrations at specific time in Danqinghe Experimental Forest were measured and studied, Harbin City, and the air quality was assessed by using ion polarity ration (q) and air ion asses...

  17. Discrete Step Sizes of Molecular Motors Lead to Bimodal Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions under Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Huong T.; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2016-08-01

    Fluctuations in the physical properties of biological machines are inextricably linked to their functions. Distributions of run lengths and velocities of processive molecular motors, like kinesin-1, are accessible through single-molecule techniques, but rigorous theoretical models for these probabilities are lacking. Here, we derive exact analytic results for a kinetic model to predict the resistive force (F )-dependent velocity [P (v )] and run length [P (n )] distribution functions of generic finitely processive molecular motors. Our theory quantitatively explains the zero force kinesin-1 data for both P (n ) and P (v ) using the detachment rate as the only parameter. In addition, we predict the F dependence of these quantities. At nonzero F , P (v ) is non-Gaussian and is bimodal with peaks at positive and negative values of v , which is due to the discrete step size of kinesin-1. Although the predictions are based on analyses of kinesin-1 data, our results are general and should hold for any processive motor, which walks on a track by taking discrete steps.

  18. Simulation of Velocity and Temperature Distributions of Displacement Ventilation System with Single or Double Heat Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenfei Wu; Xuan Wu; Yanhui Feng; Xinxin Zhang

    2007-01-01

    In order to obtain a better understanding of flow characteristics of displacement ventilation, the three-dimensional numerical models are developed using the CFD technology. The numerical simulation results are verified by experiments, based on this, the velocity and temperature distribution of three-dimensional displacement ventilation system with single and double heat sources are studied. Velocity and temperature fields under two different cases of heat source are analyzed and compared. The numerical results show that there are three layers in vertical temperature fields of displacement ventilation system with single or double heat sources, and the vertical temperature distribution of single heat source is different from that of double heat sources. When indoor load is large, the comfort requirement of people indoor can't be satisfied with displacement ventilation system only, thus an additional refrigeration system is necessary. Furthermore, under the condition of two heat sources, the displacement ventilation parameters can't be computed simply according to single heat source inlet parameters, therefore the interaction between heat sources should be considered.

  19. Revised Model of the Steady-state Solar Wind Halo Electron Velocity Distribution Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Kim, Sunjung; Choe, G. S.; moon, Y.-J.

    2016-08-01

    A recent study discussed the steady-state model for solar wind electrons during quiet time conditions. The electrons emanating from the Sun are treated in a composite three-population model—the low-energy Maxwellian core with an energy range of tens of eV, the intermediate ˜102-103 eV energy-range (“halo”) electrons, and the high ˜103-105 eV energy-range (“super-halo”) electrons. In the model, the intermediate energy halo electrons are assumed to be in resonance with transverse EM fluctuations in the whistler frequency range (˜102 Hz), while the high-energy super-halo electrons are presumed to be in steady-state wave-particle resonance with higher-frequency electrostatic fluctuations in the Langmuir frequency range (˜105 Hz). A comparison with STEREO and WIND spacecraft data was also made. However, ignoring the influence of Langmuir fluctuations on the halo population turns out to be an unjustifiable assumption. The present paper rectifies the previous approach by including both Langmuir and whistler fluctuations in the construction of the steady-state velocity distribution function for the halo population, and demonstrates that the role of whistler-range fluctuation is minimal unless the fluctuation intensity is arbitrarily raised. This implies that the Langmuir-range fluctuations, known as the quasi thermal noise, are important for both halo and super-halo electron velocity distribution.

  20. Detecting non-maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, K V; Prunty, S L; Scannell, R; Beurskens, M N; Walsh, M J; de la Luna, E

    2011-03-01

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6–7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%–20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV.

  1. Detecting non-Maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, K. V.; Prunty, S. L.; Scannell, R.; Beurskens, M. N.; Walsh, M. J.; de La Luna, E.; Jet Efda Contributors

    2011-03-01

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6-7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%-20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV

  2. Effect of velocity and temperature distribution at the hole exit on film cooling of turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1995-01-01

    An existing three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code, modified to include film cooling considerations, has been used to study the effect of coolant velocity and temperature distribution at the hole exit on the heat transfer coefficient on three-film-cooled turbine blades, namely, the C3X vane, the VKI rotor, and the ACE rotor. Results are also compared with the experimental data for all the blades. Moreover, Mayle's transition criterion, Forest's model for augmentation of leading edge heat transfer due to freestream turbulence, and Crawford's model for augmentation of eddy viscosity due to film cooling are used. Use of Mayle's and Forest's models is relevant only for the ACE rotor due to the absence of showerhead cooling on this rotor. It is found that, in some cases, the effect of distribution of coolant velocity and temperature at the hole exit can be as much as 60% on the heat transfer coefficient at the blade suction surface, and 50% at the pressure surface. Also, different effects are observed on the pressure and suction surface depending upon the blade as well as upon the hole shape, conical or cylindrical.

  3. Non-Gaussian velocity distributions - the effect on virial mass estimates of galaxy groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Trevisan, M.

    2011-05-01

    We present a study of nine galaxy groups with evidence for non-Gaussianity in their velocity distributions out to 4R200. This sample is taken from the 57 groups selected from the 2dF Percolation-Inferred Galaxy Groups (2PIGG) catalogue of galaxy groups. Statistical analysis indicates that the non-Gaussian groups have masses significantly higher than that of the Gaussian groups. We also have found that all non-Gaussian systems seem to be composed of multiple velocity modes. Besides, our results indicate that multimodal groups should be considered as a set of individual units with their own properties. In particular, we have found that the mass distributions of such units are similar to that of the Gaussian groups. Our results reinforce the idea of non-Gaussian systems as complex structures in the phase space, likely corresponding to secondary infall aggregations at a stage before virialization. The understanding of these objects is relevant for cosmological studies using groups and clusters through the mass function evolution.

  4. Production of a double-humped ion velocity distribution function in a single-ended Q-machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Michelsen, Poul

    1970-01-01

    An experimental method of producing a double-humped velocity distribution function for the ions in a Q-machine is described. The method is based on charge exchange processes between neutral ceasium and the ions in a ceasium plasma.......An experimental method of producing a double-humped velocity distribution function for the ions in a Q-machine is described. The method is based on charge exchange processes between neutral ceasium and the ions in a ceasium plasma....

  5. Measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a cold, dense Rydberg gas

    OpenAIRE

    S. D. Bergeson; Lyon, M

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a dense, cold Rydberg gas in a MOT. The Rydberg atoms are excited using a resonant two-step excitation pathway with lasers of 4 ns duration. The plasma forms spontaneously and rapidly. The rms width of the ion velocity distribution is determined by measuring laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of the ions. The measured excitation efficiency is compared with a Monte-Carlo wavefunction calculation, ...

  6. The Influence Of Initial Velocity Distribution On Ionization Dynamics Of Rydberg Atoms Approaching Solid Surfaces In The Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božnic, D. K.; Nedeljkovic, N. N.

    2010-07-01

    We analyze the ionization dynamics of slow hydrogenlike Rydberg atoms (principal quantum number n >> 1 ) approaching solid surface in a weak electric field. The recently obtained etalon-equation method results for the simulation of experimental signal are used to investigate the influence of the initial velocity distribution. It is demonstrated that an agreement with the experimental signal can be obtained with the broadened velocity distributions.

  7. Modelling the transverse distribution of velocity and suspended sediment in tidal estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijts, K. M. H.

    2011-01-01

    An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water which has a free connection with the open sea and within which sea water is measurably diluted with fresh water derived from land drainage. Examples are the Western Scheldt River Estuary and the Chesapeake Bay. Within these environments complex patterns of velocity and suspended sediments are observed in the transversal plane (across-estuary and vertical), and sediments are trapped laterally (across-estuary). The transverse structure of velocity is relevant to the transport of salt, sediment, contaminants, oxygen and other material. High sediment concentrations affect water quality, ecology and wildlife, and may cause siltation of navigation channels and harbors. This work aims at a fundamental understanding of the transverse distributions of estuarine velocity and suspended sediment. The thesis provides two-dimensional (cross-sectional) analytical models to identify the effect of individual forcing mechanisms on the transverse distribution of velocity and suspended sediment in tidally-dominated estuaries. The models are based on the shallow water equations and sediment mass balance. Considered are the residual and the semi-diurnal tidal components of the along-estuary, across-estuary and vertical velocity and of the suspended sediment concentration. The models apply to partially to well-mixed tidal estuaries, relatively uniform along-channel conditions and weakly to moderately nonlinear flow. Horizontal density gradients are prescribed based on numerical or observational data. The analytical flows are decomposed into components induced by individual mechanisms. Considered are tides, horizontal residual density gradients, river discharge, stokes return flow, wind, the earth’s rotation, tidal variations in the across-channel density gradient and channel curvature. In addition, two tidally rectified along-channel residual flow mechanisms are considered, which result from net advection of along-channel tidal

  8. Calculation of flow distribution in air reverse circulation bit interior fluid field by simplifying air flow model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuqing HAO; Hongwei HUANG; Kun YIN

    2007-01-01

    By simplifying the characters in the air reverse circulation bit interior fluid field, the authors used air dynamics and fluid mechanics to calculate the air distribution in the bit and obtained an equation of flow distribution with a unique resolution. This study will provide help for making certain the bit parameters of the bit structure effectively and study the air reverse circulation bit interior fluid field character deeply.

  9. Understanding the growth rate patterns of ion Bernstein instabilities driven by ring-like proton velocity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyungguk; Liu, Kaijun

    2016-04-01

    Fast magnetosonic waves in Earth's inner magnetosphere, which have as their source ion Bernstein instabilities, are driven by hot proton velocity distributions (fp) with ∂fp(v⊥)/∂v⊥>0. Two typical types of distributions with such features are ring and shell velocity distributions. Both have been used in studies of ion Bernstein instabilities and fast magnetosonic waves, but the differences between instabilities driven by the two types of distributions have not been thoroughly addressed. The present study uses linear kinetic theory to examine and understand these differences. It is found that the growth rate pattern is primarily determined by the cyclotron resonance condition and the structure of the velocity distribution in gyroaveraged velocity space. For ring-driven Bernstein instabilities, as the parallel wave number (k∥) increases, the discrete unstable modes approximately follow the corresponding proton cyclotron harmonic frequencies while they become broader in frequency space. At sufficiently large k∥, the neighboring discrete modes merge into a continuum. In contrast, for shell-driven Bernstein instabilities, the curved geometry of the shell velocity distribution in gyroaveraged velocity space results in a complex alternating pattern of growth and damping rates in frequency and wave number space and confines the unstable Bernstein modes to relatively small k∥. In addition, when k∥ increases, the unstable modes are no longer limited to the proton cyclotron harmonic frequencies. The local growth rate peak near an exact harmonic at small k∥ bifurcates into two local peaks on both sides of the harmonic when k∥ becomes large.

  10. Information hidden in the velocity distribution of ions and the exact kinetic Bohm criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2017-05-01

    Non-equilibrium distribution functions of electrons and ions play an important role in plasma physics. A prominent example is the kinetic Bohm criterion. Since its first introduction it has been controversial for theoretical reasons and due to the lack of experimental data, in particular on the ion distribution function. Here we resolve the theoretical as well as the experimental difficulties by an exact solution of the kinetic Boltzmann equation including charge exchange collisions and ionization. This also allows for the first time non-invasive measurement of spatially resolved ion velocity distributions, absolute values of the ion and electron densities, temperatures, and mean energies as well as the electric field and the plasma potential in the entire plasma. The non-invasive access to the spatially resolved distribution functions of electrons and ions is applied to the problem of the kinetic Bohm criterion. Theoretically a so far missing term in the criterion is derived and shown to be of key importance. With the new term the validity of the kinetic criterion at high collisionality and its agreement with the fluid picture are restored. All findings are supported by experimental data, theory and a numerical model with excellent agreement throughout.

  11. Study of the ventilation at ATLAS cavern UX15 air velocity and temperature around the muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Vigo-Castellví, E

    2000-01-01

    The Muon Chambers of ATLAS detector cannot work under temperature differences between two opposed faces above 3 K. In addition, a low velocity of the air around the Muon Chambers is essential to avoid vibration problems. The CV group at the ST division is involved in an airflow simulation inside UX15 cavern to check air temperature and velocity profiles around the ATLAS Muon Chambers. In this paper, the status and the content of the performed theoretical studies will be explained. Three simulation models, which helped to understand the Muon Spectrometer thermal environment and the efficiency of the ventilation system at ATLAS cavern, will be presented. Besides, it will be shown how these studies support the proposal of a deeper individual Muon Chamber study.

  12. Characteristics of proton velocity distribution functions in the near-lunar wake from Chandrayaan-1/SWIM observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanya, M. B.; Bhardwaj, Anil; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Alok, Abhinaw; Wieser, Martin; Holmström, Mats; Wurz, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Due to the high absorption of solar wind plasma on the lunar dayside, a large scale wake structure is formed downstream of the Moon. However, recent in-situ observations have revealed the presence of protons in the near-lunar wake (100 km to 200 km from the surface). The solar wind, either directly or after interaction with the lunar surface (including magnetic anomalies), is the source of these protons in the near-wake region. Using the entire data from the SWIM sensor of the SARA experiment onboard Chandrayaan-1, we analyzed the velocity distribution of the protons observed in the near-lunar wake. The average velocity distribution functions, computed in the solar wind rest frame, were further separated based on the angle between the upstream solar wind velocity and the IMF. Although the protons enter the wake parallel as well as perpendicular to the IMF, the velocity distribution were not identical for the different IMF orientations, indicating the control of IMF in the proton entry processes. Several proton populations were identified from the velocity distribution and their possible entry mechanism were inferred based on the characteristics of the velocity distribution. These entry mechanisms include (i) diffusion of solar wind protons into the wake along IMF, (ii) the solar wind protons with finite gyro-radii that are aided by the wake boundary electric field, (iii) solar wind protons with gyro-radii larger than lunar radii from the tail of the solar wind velocity distribution, and (iv) scattering of solar wind protons from the dayside lunar surface or from magnetic anomalies. In order to gain more insight into the entry mechanisms associated with different populations, backtracing is carried out for each of these populations. For most of the populations, the source of the protons obtained from backtracing is found to be in agreement with that inferred from the velocity distribution. There are few populations that could not be explained by the known mechanisms

  13. Influence of current velocity and wind speed on air-water gas exchange in a mangrove estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, David T.; Coffineau, Nathalie; Hickman, Benjamin; Chow, Nicholas; Koffman, Tobias; Schlosser, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of air-water gas transfer velocities and water residence times is necessary to study the fate of mangrove derived carbon exported into surrounding estuaries and ultimately to determine carbon balances in mangrove ecosystems. For the first time, the 3He/SF6 dual tracer technique, which has been proven to be a powerful tool to determine gas transfer velocities in the ocean, is applied to Shark River, an estuary situated in the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The mean gas transfer velocity was 3.3 ± 0.2 cm h-1 during the experiment, with a water residence time of 16.5 ± 2.0 days. We propose a gas exchange parameterization that takes into account the major sources of turbulence in the estuary (i.e., bottom generated shear and wind stress).

  14. Increased Air Velocity Reduces Thermal and Cardiovascular Strain in Young and Older Males during Humid Exertional Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright Beatty, Heather E; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Boulay, Pierre; Flouris, Andreas D; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    Older adults have been reported to have a lower evaporative heat loss capacity than younger adults during exercise when full sweat evaporation is permitted. However, it is unclear how conditions of restricted evaporative and convective heat loss (i.e., high humidity, clothing insulation) alter heat stress. to the purpose of this study was to examine the heat stress responses of young and older males during and following exercise in a warm/humid environment under two different levels of air velocity. Ten young (YOUNG: 24±2 yr) and 10 older (OLDER: 59±3 yr) males, matched for body surface area performed 4×15-min cycling bouts (15-min rest) at a fixed rate of heat production (400 W) in warm/humid conditions (35°C, 60% relative humidity) under 0.5 (Low) and 3.0 (High) m·s(-1) air velocity while wearing work coveralls. Rectal (Tre) and mean skin (MTsk) temperatures, heart rate (HR), local sweat rate, % max skin blood flow (SkBF) (recovery only), and blood pressure (recovery only) were measured. High air velocity reduced core and skin temperatures (p 0.05) but was more effective in reducing cardiovascular strain (absolute and % max HR; p heat loss responses (% max SkBF and cutaneous vascular conductance) were detected across time in OLDER than YOUNG males in both conditions (p heat loss responses and cardiovascular strain were attenuated during the High condition in YOUNG compared to OLDER (p heat loss differences, YOUNG and OLDER males had similar levels of heat stress during intermittent exercise in warm and humid conditions while wearing work coveralls. Increased air velocity was effective in reducing heat stress equally, and cardiovascular strain to a greater extent, in YOUNG and OLDER males, and may be useful for mitigating heat stress in all workers.

  15. Experimental Investigation on Local Air Age and Air Distribution of Stratum Ventilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Feng-hao; LI Yuan-bin; LIU Xiao-dong; WANG Xin-ke

    2009-01-01

    Because of the multiple problems on high energy consumption and unbalanced thermal comfort caused by the traditional ventilation system,a new concept of ventilation-stratum ventilation has been proposed,which sends the fresh air to the breathing zone directly.In this paper,the local air distributions of the displace-ment ventilation and the stratum ventilation in a model office were measured.The air ages in the breathing zone for the displacement ventilation and stratum ventilation were compared with the tracer gas concentration decay method.The decay curves of tracer gas concentration for these two ventilation systems in the breathing zonewere obtained, and the air ages were calculated.The experimental results show that the stratum ventilation sys-tem can offer lower air age for four mechanically ventilated cases in the breathing zone,and it can also provide better thermal comfort,which renews the air of breathing zone more quickly and reduces the energy consump-tion in some degree.The experimental investigation provides a theoretical basis for the application of stratum ventilation system.

  16. Total uncertainty of low velocity thermal anemometers for measurement of indoor air movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, F.; Popiolek, Z.; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2004-01-01

    For a specific thermal anemometer with omnidirectional velocity sensor the expanded total uncertainty in measured mean velocity Û(Vmean) and the expanded total uncertainty in measured turbulence intensity Û(Tu) due to different error sources are estimated. The values are based on a previously dev...

  17. Wind direction/velocity and current direction/velocity data from current meter casts in a world wide distribution from 1970-12-06 to 1991-10-01 (NODC Accession 9700218)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind direction/velocity and current direction/velocity data were collected using current meter casts in a world wide distribution from December 6, 1970 to October...

  18. Measurement of laminar burning velocities and analysis of flame stabilities for hydrogen-air-diluent premixed mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU ErJiang; HUANG ZuoHua; HE JiaJia; JIN Chun; MIAO HaiYan; WANG XiBin

    2009-01-01

    The laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths of the hydrogen-air-diluent mixtures were meas-ured at different equivalence ratios (0.4-1.5), different diluents (N2, CO2 and 15%CO2+85%N2) and di-lution ratios (0, 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15) by using the outwardly expanding flame. The influences of flame stretch rate on the flame propagation characteristics were analyzed. The results show that both the laminar burning velocities and the Markstein lengths of the hydrogen-air-diluent mixtures decrease with the increase of dilution ratio. The decrease in Markstein lengths means that adding diluents into the hydrogen-air mixtures will decrease the diffusional-thermal instability of the flame front. For a specified dilution ratio, the laminar burning velocities give their maximum values at an equivalence ratio of 1.8. The Markstein lengths increase with the increase of the equivalence ratio monotonously regardless of the diluents. The study shows that CO2 as the diluent has a greater impact on the laminar flame speed and the flame front stability than N2 as the diluent.

  19. Distributed Extended Kalman Filter for Position, Velocity, Time, Estimation in Satellite Navigation Receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Jakubov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Common techniques for position-velocity-time estimation in satellite navigation, iterative least squares and the extended Kalman filter, involve matrix operations. The matrix inversion and inclusion of a matrix library pose requirements on a computational power and operating platform of the navigation processor. In this paper, we introduce a novel distributed algorithm suitable for implementation in simple parallel processing units each for a tracked satellite. Such a unit performs only scalar sum, subtraction, multiplication, and division. The algorithm can be efficiently implemented in hardware logic. Given the fast position-velocity-time estimator, frequent estimates can foster dynamic performance of a vector tracking receiver. The algorithm has been designed from a factor graph representing the extended Kalman filter by splitting vector nodes into scalar ones resulting in a cyclic graph with few iterations needed. Monte Carlo simulations have been conducted to investigate convergence and accuracy. Simulation case studies for a vector tracking architecture and experimental measurements with a real-time software receiver developed at CTU in Prague were conducted. The algorithm offers compromises in stability, accuracy, and complexity depending on the number of iterations. In scenarios with a large number of tracked satellites, it can outperform the traditional methods at low complexity.

  20. Kr II and Xe II axial velocity distribution functions in a cross-field ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, A.; Bourgeois, G.; Mazouffre, S.

    2012-07-01

    Laser induced fluorescence measurements were carried out in a cross-field ion source to examine the behaviour of the axial ion velocity distribution functions (VDFs) in the expanding plasma. In the present paper, we focus on the axial VDFs of Kr II and Xe II ions. We examine the contourplots in a 1D-phase space (x,vx) representation in front of the exhaust channel and along the centerline of the ion source. The main ion beam, whose momentum corresponds to the ions that are accelerated through the whole potential drop, is observed. A secondary structure reveals the ions coming from the opposite side of the channel. We show that the formation of the neutralized ion flow is governed by the annular geometry. The assumption of a collisionless shock or a double layer due to supersonic beam interaction is not necessary. A non-negligible fraction of slow ions originates in local ionization or charge-exchange collision events between ions of the expanding plasma and atoms of the background residual gas. Slow ions that are produced near the centerline in the vicinity of the exit plane are accelerated toward the source body with a negative velocity leading to a high sputtering of front face. On the contrary, the ions that are produced in the vicinity of the channel exit plane are partially accelerated by the extended electric field.

  1. Procedure for Balancing an Air Distribution System with Decentralised Fans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunner, Amalie; Hultmark, Göran; Vorre, Anders

    2015-01-01

    of the fans. In conventional air distribution systems the fan provides the necessary pressure to overcome the resistance in the branch with the highest pressure resistance. This gives an unnecessary overpressure in the remaining branches that does not provide any useful purpose. In order to decrease the fan......This paper presents results from an on-going project concerning new design procedures for mechanical ventilation systems with low energy use. Conventional constant air volume (CAV) systems are usually balanced using flat plate dampers. The purpose of using balancing dampers is to intentionally...... pressure requirements the fan was dimensioned for the branch with the least pressure resistance. The decentralised fans then provided sufficient pressure to overcome the exact resistance in the corresponding branch. The results show that by using decentralised fans in duct systems instead of dampers...

  2. Procedure for Balancing an Air Distribution System with Decentralised Fans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunner, Amalie; Hultmark, Göran; Vorre, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results from an on-going project concerning new design procedures for mechanical ventilation systems with low energy use. Conventional constant air volume (CAV) systems are usually balanced using flat plate dampers. The purpose of using balancing dampers is to intentionally...... flawed. This paper presents a new procedure for balancing of CAV systems in combination with decentralised fans. The new system was based on replacing the balancing dampers with decentralised fans. By replacing the balancing dampers with decentralised fans, airflows can be balanced by adjusting the speed...... of the fans. In conventional air distribution systems the fan provides the necessary pressure to overcome the resistance in the branch with the highest pressure resistance. This gives an unnecessary overpressure in the remaining branches that does not provide any useful purpose. In order to decrease the fan...

  3. Systematic Variability of the He+ Pickup Ion Velocity Distribution Function Observed With SOHO/CELIAS/CTOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taut, Andreas; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Berger, Lars; Drews, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Interstellar pickup ions in the heliosphere exhibit a characteristic suprathermal Velocity Distribution Function (VDF). This is the result of their injection into the solar wind as a highly anisotropic torus distribution which is continuously modulated by pitch-angle scattering and cooling processes. As the impact of these processes on the pickup ion VDF depends on present and past solar wind conditions, the pickup ion VDF is not static but variable in shape and intensity. Using the good counting statistics of the Charge-Time-Of-Flight sensor onboard SOHO we were able to resolve a systematic variability of the He^+ VDF. On the one hand the intensity of freshly created pickup ions near the injection speed increases during magnetic field configurations in which the initial torus distribution lies inside the sensor's aperture. This complements our studies showing a persisting anisotropy of the He^+ VDF and introduces a limit for the efficiency of pitch-angle scattering. On the other hand we observe anomalous shapes of the He^+ VDF in the vicinity of stream interaction regions, where the VDF tends to be shifted towards higher speeds. These observations may be explained by a modified cooling behaviour in these regions. Furthermore we observe an enhancement of ions above the injection speed that were likely accelerated in compression regions. Here, we present our observations and discuss the implications on the processes named above.

  4. Extracting kinetic freeze-out temperature and radial flow velocity from an improved Tsallis distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Lao, Hai-Ling; Lacey, Roy A

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the transverse momentum ($p_T$) spectra of identified particles ($\\pi^{\\pm}$, $K^{\\pm}$, $p$, and $\\bar p$) produced in gold-gold (Au-Au) and lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions over a $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ (center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair) range from 14.5 GeV [one of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energies] to 2.76 TeV [one of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies]. For the spectra with a narrow $p_T$ range, an improved Tsallis distribution which is in fact the Tsallis distribution with radial flow is used. For the spectra with a wide $p_T$ range, a superposition of the improved Tsallis distribution and an inverse power-law is used. Both the extracted kinetic freeze-out temperature ($T_0$) and radial flow velocity ($\\beta_T$) increase with the increase of $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$, which indicate a higher excitation and larger expansion of the interesting system at the LHC. Both the values of $T_0$ and $\\beta_T$ in central collisions are slightly larger than those in peripheral collisions, and they...

  5. Wave solutions of ion cyclotron heated plasmas with self-consistent velocity distributions in a tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungpyo; Wright, John; Bonoli, Paul; Harvey, Robert

    2015-11-01

    We describe a numerical model for the propagation and absorption of ion cyclotron waves in a tokamak with a non-Maxwellian velocity space distribution function. The non-Maxwellian distribution is calculated by solving Maxwell's equations and the Fokker-Plank equation self-consistently. This approach will be useful to interpret measurements of minority hydrogen tail formation during ICRF heating experiments in Alcator C-Mod. To couple the Maxwell equation solver with Fokker-Plank equation solver, the quasilinear diffusion coefficients for the fundamental ion cyclotron absorption and the first harmonic absorption are calculated. In a previous study, the all-orders spectral algorithm wave solver (AORSA) was coupled with the Fokker-Plank code (CQL3D) to find the self-consistent non-Maxwellian distribution. We derive the modified quasilinear diffusion coefficients for the finite Larmor radius (FLR) approximation using a significantly faster wave solver (TORIC) following the approach by Jaeger. The coupled TORIC-CQL3D model will be compared against results from AORSA-CQL3D in order to verify the accuracy of the reduced FLR physics in TORIC. Work supported by US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-FC02-01ER54648.

  6. The complex velocity distribution of galaxies in Abell 1689: implications for CDM mass modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Lokas, E L; Wojtak, R; Moles, M; Gottlöber, S; Lokas, Ewa L.; Prada, Francisco; Wojtak, Radoslaw; Moles, Mariano; Gottloeber, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The Abell 1689 galaxy cluster has recently become a subject of intensive study. Thanks to its intermediate redshift (z=0.183) its mass distribution can be reconstructed using numerous methods including gravitational lensing, galaxy kinematics and X-ray imaging. The methods used to yield conflicting mass estimates in the past and recently the cluster mass distribution has been claimed to be in conflict with standard CDM scenarios due to rather large concentration and steep mass profile obtained from detailed studies of Broadhurst et al. using lensing. By studying in detail the kinematics of about 200 galaxies with measured redshifts in the vicinity of the cluster we show that the cluster is probably surrounded by a few structures, quite distant from each other, but aligned along the line of sight. We support our arguments by referring to cosmological N-body simulations and showing explicitly that distant, non-interacting haloes can produce entangled multi-peak line-of-sight velocity distributions similar to th...

  7. Spectroscopic measurement of ion temperature and ion velocity distributions in the flux-coil generated FRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, D.; Gota, H.; Hayashi, R.; Kiyashko, V.; Morehouse, M.; Primavera, S. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Bolte, N. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Marsili, P. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Roche, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Wessel, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    One aim of the flux-coil generated field reversed configuration at Tri Alpha Energy (TAE) is to establish the plasma where the ion rotational energy is greater than the ion thermal energy. To verify this, an optical diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure the Doppler velocity-shift and line-broadening using a 0.75 m, 1800 groves/mm, spectrometer. The output spectrum is magnified and imaged onto a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. The individual PMT outputs are coupled to high-gain, high-frequency, transimpedance amplifiers, providing fast-time response. The Doppler spectroscopy measurements, along with a survey spectrometer and photodiode-light detector, form a suite of diagnostics that provide insights into the time evolution of the plasma-ion distribution and current when accelerated by an azimuthal-electric field.

  8. Particle Paths of Lagrangian Velocity Distribution Simulating the Spiral Arms of Galaxy M51

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tzu-Fang Chen; Georgios H. Vatistas; Sui Lin

    2008-01-01

    Galaxies are huge families of stars held together by their own gravities. The system M51 is a spiral galaxy. It possesses billions of stars. The range of the spiral arms extends hundred thousand light years. The present study is in an attempt in using the particle paths of the Lagrangian flow field to simulate the spiral arms of Galaxy M51.The Lagrangian flow field is introduced. The initial locations of fluid particles in the space between two concentric cylinders are first specified. Then a linear velocity distribution of the fluid particles is used with different angle rotations of the particles to obtain the particle paths in the Lagrangian diagram. For simulating the spiral arms of Galaxy M51, the Lagrangian M51 diagram is developed. The particle paths of the Lagrangian M51 diagram agree quite well with the spiral arms of Galaxy M51.

  9. Velocity distribution of carbon and oxygen atoms in front of a tokamak limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogen, P.; Rusbüldt, D.

    1992-12-01

    From the Doppler-broadened emission profiles of a CI line ( 3P 2→ 3P 20, λ=909.5 nm) and of an OI line ( 3P 2,1,0→ 3S 10, λ=844.6 nm), the velocity distribution of carbon and oxygen atoms in front of a graphite limiter has been deduced. For the π-component of the CI line, the Zeeman splitting is negligible, but for the π-components of the OI line, the Paschen-Back effect has to be taken into account. The contribution of chemical and physical sputtering to the release of impurities under various experimental conditions has been investigated at the tip of the limiter. For C atoms, chemical sputtering dominates at low boundary temperatures, and physical sputtering at high temperature. For oxygen, chemical sputtering is always indicated to be the more efficient process.

  10. Spectroscopic measurement of ion temperature and ion velocity distributions in the flux-coil generated FRC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D; Bolte, N; Gota, H; Hayashi, R; Kiyashko, V; Marsili, P; Morehouse, M; Primavera, S; Roche, T; Wessel, F

    2010-10-01

    One aim of the flux-coil generated field reversed configuration at Tri Alpha Energy (TAE) is to establish the plasma where the ion rotational energy is greater than the ion thermal energy. To verify this, an optical diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure the Doppler velocity-shift and line-broadening using a 0.75 m, 1800 groves/mm, spectrometer. The output spectrum is magnified and imaged onto a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. The individual PMT outputs are coupled to high-gain, high-frequency, transimpedance amplifiers, providing fast-time response. The Doppler spectroscopy measurements, along with a survey spectrometer and photodiode-light detector, form a suite of diagnostics that provide insights into the time evolution of the plasma-ion distribution and current when accelerated by an azimuthal-electric field.

  11. An Experimental Measurement on Laminar Burning Velocities and Markstein Length of Iso-Butane-Air Mixtures at Ambient Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousif Alaeldeen Altag

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, experimental investigation on laminar combustion of iso-butane-air mixtures was conducted in constant volume explosion vessel. The experiments were conducted at wide range of equivalence ratios ranging between Ф = 0.6 and 1.4 and atmospheric pressure of 0.1 MPa and ambient temperature of 303K. Using spherically expanding flame method, flame parameters including stretched, unstretched flame propagation speeds, laminar burning velocities and Markstein length were calculated. For laminar burning velocities the method of error bars of 95% confidence level was applied. In addition, values of Markstein lengths were measured in wide range of equivalence ratios to study the influence of stretch rate on flame instability and burning velocity. It was found that the stretched flame speed and laminar burning velocities increased with equivalence ratios and the peak value was obtained at equivalence ratio of Ф = 1.1. The Markstein length decreased with the increases in equivalence ratios, which indicates that the diffusion thermal flame instability increased at high equivalence ratios in richer mixture side. However, the total deviations in the laminar burning velocities have discrepancies of 1.2-2.9% for all investigated mixtures.

  12. Exploring the velocity distribution of debris flows: An iteration algorithm based approach for complex cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zheng; Chen, Guangqi; Li, Yange; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    The estimation of debris-flow velocity in a cross-section is of primary importance due to its correlation to impact force, run up and superelevation. However, previous methods sometimes neglect the observed asymmetric velocity distribution, and consequently underestimate the debris-flow velocity. This paper presents a new approach for exploring the debris-flow velocity distribution in a cross-section. The presented approach uses an iteration algorithm based on the Riemann integral method to search an approximate solution to the unknown flow surface. The established laws for vertical velocity profile are compared and subsequently integrated to analyze the velocity distribution in the cross-section. The major benefit of the presented approach is that natural channels typically with irregular beds and superelevations can be taken into account, and the resulting approximation by the approach well replicates the direct integral solution. The approach is programmed in MATLAB environment, and the code is open to the public. A well-documented debris-flow event in Sichuan Province, China, is used to demonstrate the presented approach. Results show that the solutions of the flow surface and the mean velocity well reproduce the investigated results. Discussion regarding the model sensitivity and the source of errors concludes the paper.

  13. The relationship between ocean surface turbulence and air-sea gas transfer velocity: An in-situ evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esters, L.; Landwehr, S.; Sutherland, G.; Bell, T. G.; Saltzman, E. S.; Christensen, K. H.; Miller, S. D.; Ward, B.

    2016-05-01

    Although the air-sea gas transfer velocity k is usually parameterized with wind speed, the so-called small-eddy model suggests a relationship between k and ocean surface dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy ɛ. Laboratory and field measurements of k and ɛ have shown that this model holds in various ecosystems. Here, field observations are presented supporting the theoretical model in the open ocean. These observations are based on measurements from the Air-Sea Interaction Profiler and eddy covariance CO2 and DMS air-sea flux data collected during the Knorr11 cruise. We show that the model results can be improved when applying a variable Schmidt number exponent compared to a commonly used constant value of 1/2. Scaling ɛ to the viscous sublayer allows us to investigate the model at different depths and to expand its applicability for more extensive data sets.

  14. A pulsed wire probe for the measurement of velocity and flow direction in slowly moving air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D E; Parker, K H; Snyder, B

    1984-02-01

    This report describes the theory and operation of a pulsed-probe anemometer designed to measure steady three-dimensional velocity fields typical of pulmonary tracheo-bronchial airflows. Local velocities are determined by measuring the transport time and orientation of a thermal pulse initiated at an upstream wire and sensed at a downstream wire. The transport time is a reproducible function of velocity and the probe wire spacing, as verified by a theoretical model of convective heat transfer. When calibrated the anemometer yields measurements of velocity accurate to +/- 5 percent and resolves flow direction to within 1 deg at airspeeds greater than or equal to 10 cm/s. Spatial resolution is +/- 0.5 mm. Measured flow patterns typical of curved circular pipes are included as examples of its application.

  15. Diffusion air effects on the soot axial distribution concentration in a premixed acetylene/air flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fassani, Fabio Luis; Santos, Alex Alisson Bandeira; Goldstein Junior, Leonardo [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia Termica e de Fluidos]. E-mails: fassani@fem.unicamp.br; absantos@fem.unicamp.br; leonardo@fem.unicamp.br; Ferrari, Carlos Alberto [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Eletronica Quantica]. E-mail: ferrari@ifi.unicamp.br

    2000-07-01

    Soot particles are produced during the high temperature pyrolysis or combustion of hydrocarbons. The emission of soot from a combustor, or from a flame, is determined by the competition between soot formation and its oxidation. Several factors affect these processes, including the type of fuel, the air-to-fuel ratio, flame temperature, pressure, and flow pattern. In this paper, the influence of the induced air diffusion on the soot axial distribution concentration in a premixed acetylene/air flame was studied. The flame was generated in a vertical axis burner in which the fuel - oxidant mixture flow was surrounded by a nitrogen discharge coming from the annular region between the burner tube and an external concentric tube. The nitrogen flow provided a shield that protected the flame from the diffusion of external air, enabling its control. The burner was mounted on a step-motor driven, vertical translation table. The use of several air-to-fuel ratios made possible to establish the sooting characteristics of this flame, by measuring soot concentration along the flame height with a non-intrusive laser light absorption technique. (author)

  16. Arrival time distribution of muons in extensive air showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villiers, E.J. de; Walt, D.J. van der; Urk, G. van; Grieder, P.K.F.

    1986-06-01

    The longitudinal structure of the muon disc has been studied up to distances of 60 m from the shower axis by measuring the relative arrival times between single muons in extensive air showers with particle numbers of 1 x 10/sup 5/ to 2 x 10/sup 7/. A rather constant thickness of the shower disc was found up to 60 m from the shower axis. The longitudinal distribution up to 30 m from the shower axis is not in agreement with the results from a shower model with a fairly high multiplicity rule for secondary particle formation in hadron interactions.

  17. Air traffic control by distributed management in a MLS environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreifeldt, J. G.; Parkin, L.; Hart, S.

    1977-01-01

    The microwave landing system (MLS) is a technically feasible means for increasing runway capacity since it could support curved approaches to a short final. The shorter the final segment of the approach, the wider the variety of speed mixes possible so that theoretically, capacity would ultimately be limited by runway occupance time only. An experiment contrasted air traffic control in a MLS environment under a centralized form of management and under distributed management which was supported by a traffic situation display in each of the 3 piloted simulators. Objective flight data, verbal communication and subjective responses were recorded on 18 trial runs lasting about 20 minutes each. The results were in general agreement with previous distributed management research. In particular, distributed management permitted a smaller spread of intercrossing times and both pilots and controllers perceived distributed management as the more 'ideal' system in this task. It is concluded from this and previous research that distributed management offers a viable alternative to centralized management with definite potential for dealing with dense traffic in a safe, orderly and expeditious manner.

  18. Asymmetric Orbital Distribution near Mean Motion Resonance: Application to Planets Observed by Kepler and Radial Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Ji-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Many multiple-planet systems have been found by the Kepler transit survey and various radial velocity (RV) surveys. Kepler planets show an asymmetric feature, namely, there are small but significant deficits/excesses of planet pairs with orbital period spacing slightly narrow/wide of the exact resonance, particularly near the first order mean motion resonance (MMR), such as 2:1 and 3:2 MMR. Similarly, if not exactly the same, an asymmetric feature (pileup wide of 2:1 MMR) is also seen in RV planets, but only for massive ones. We analytically and numerically study planets' orbital evolutions near and in the MMR. We find that their orbital period ratios could be asymmetrically distributed around the MMR center regardless of dissipation. In the case of no dissipation, Kepler planets' asymmetric orbital distribution could be partly reproduced for 3:2 MMR but not for 2:1 MMR, implying that dissipation might be more important to the latter. The pileup of massive RV planets just wide of 2:1 MMR is found to be consis...

  19. Sensitivity bias in the mass-radius distribution from transit timing variations and radial velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Jason H.

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by recent discussions, both in private and in the literature, we use a Monte Carlo simulation of planetary systems to investigate sources of bias in determining the mass-radius distribution of exoplanets for the two primary techniques used to measure planetary masses - radial velocities (RVs) and transit timing variations (TTVs). We assert that mass measurements derived from these two methods are comparably reliable - as the physics underlying their respective signals is well understood. Nevertheless, their sensitivity to planet mass varies with the properties of the planets themselves. We find that for a given planet size, the RV method tends to find planets with higher mass while the sensitivity of TTVs is more uniform. This `sensitivity bias' implies that a complete census of TTV systems is likely to yield a more robust estimate of the mass-radius distribution provided there are not important physical differences between planets near and far from mean-motion resonance. We discuss differences in the sensitivity of the two methods with orbital period and system architecture, which may compound the discrepancies between them (e.g. short-period planets detectable by RVs may be more dense due to atmospheric loss). We advocate for continued mass measurements using both approaches as a means both to measure the masses of more planets and to identify potential differences in planet structure that may result from their dynamical and environmental histories.

  20. One- and two-point velocity distribution functions and velocity autocorrelation functions for various Reynolds numbers in decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Iwao

    2007-01-01

    A decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence is treated on the combined bases of the Kolmogorov hypothesis and the cross-independence hypothesis (for a closure of the Monin-Lundgren (ML) hierarchy of many-point velocity distributions) in turbulence. Similarity solutions for one- and two-point velocity distributions are obtained in the viscous, inertial and large-scale ranges of separation distance, from which we can give a reasonable picture of longitudinal and transverse velocity autocorrelation functions for any Reynolds number, even though they are distant from exact solutions of the infinite ML hierarchy. Possibility of non-similarity solutions with other reasonable and more realistic features is unveiled within the same theoretical framework. The cross-independence hypothesis is proved to be inconsistent with the Kolmogorov [1941b. Dissipation of energy in locally isotropic turbulence. Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 32, 16-18.] theory in the inertial range. This is the main factor by which our special strategy (described in Introduction) is taken for solving this problem.

  1. Imaging water velocity and volume fraction distributions in water continuous multiphase flows using inductive flow tomography and electrical resistance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yiqing; Lucas, Gary P.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an inductive flow tomography (IFT) system, employing a multi-electrode electromagnetic flow meter (EMFM) and novel reconstruction techniques, for measuring the local water velocity distribution in water continuous single and multiphase flows. A series of experiments were carried out in vertical-upward and upward-inclined single phase water flows and ‘water continuous’ gas-water and oil-gas-water flows in which the velocity profiles ranged from axisymmetric (single phase and vertical-upward multiphase flows) to highly asymmetric (upward-inclined multiphase flows). Using potential difference measurements obtained from the electrode array of the EMFM, local axial velocity distributions of the continuous water phase were reconstructed using two different IFT reconstruction algorithms denoted RT#1, which assumes that the overall water velocity profile comprises the sum of a series of polynomial velocity components, and RT#2, which is similar to RT#1 but which assumes that the zero’th order velocity component may be replaced by an axisymmetric ‘power law’ velocity distribution. During each experiment, measurement of the local water volume fraction distribution was also made using the well-established technique of electrical resistance tomography (ERT). By integrating the product of the local axial water velocity and the local water volume fraction in the cross section an estimate of the water volumetric flow rate was made which was compared with a reference measurement of the water volumetric flow rate. In vertical upward flows RT#2 was found to give rise to water velocity profiles which are consistent with the previous literature although the profiles obtained in the multiphase flows had relatively higher central velocity peaks than was observed for the single phase profiles. This observation was almost certainly a result of the transfer of axial momentum from the less dense dispersed phases to the water

  2. Systematic Variability of the He+ Pickup Ion Velocity Distribution Function Observed with SOHO/CELIAS/CTOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taut, A.; Drews, C.; Berger, L.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    The 1D Velocity Distribution Function (VDF) of He+ pickup ions shows two distinct populations that reflect the sources of these ions. The highly suprathermal population is the result of the ionization and pickup of almost resting interstellar neutrals that are injected into the solar wind as a highly anisotropic torus distribution. The nearly thermalized population is centered around the solar wind bulk speed and is mainly attributed to inner-source pickup ions that originate in the inner heliosphere. It is generally believed that the initial torus distribution of interstellar pickup ions is rapidly isotropized by resonant wave-particle interactions, but recent observations by Drews et al. (2015) of a torus-like VDF strongly limit this isotropization. This in turn means that more observational data is needed to further characterize the kinetic behavior of pickup ions. In this study we use data from the Charge-Time-Of-Flight sensor on-board SOHO. As this sensor offers unrivaled counting statistics for He+ together with a sufficient mass-per-charge resolution it is well-suited for investigating the He+ VDF on comparatively short timescales. We combine this data with the high resolution magnetic field data from WIND via an extrapolation to the location of SOHO. With this combination of instruments we investigate the He+ VDF for time periods of different solar wind speeds, magnetic field directions, and wave power. We find a systematic trend of the short-term He+ VDF with these parameters. Especially by varying the considered magnetic field directions we observe a 1D projection of the anisotropic torus-like VDF. In addition, we investigate stream interaction regions and coronal mass ejections. In the latter we observe an excess of inner-source He+ that is accompanied by a significant increase of heavy pickup ion count rates. This may be linked to the as yet ill understood production mechanism of inner-source pickup ions.

  3. Airborne nanoparticle exposures while using constant-flow, constant-velocity, and air-curtain-isolated fume hoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Su-Jung Candace; Huang, Rong Fung; Ellenbecker, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Tsai et al. (Airborne nanoparticle exposures associated with the manual handling of nanoalumina and nanosilver in fume hoods. J Nanopart Res 2009; 11: 147-61) found that the handling of dry nanoalumina and nanosilver inside laboratory fume hoods can cause a significant release of airborne nanoparticles from the hood. Hood design affects the magnitude of release. With traditionally designed fume hoods, the airflow moves horizontally toward the hood cupboard; the turbulent airflow formed in the worker wake region interacts with the vortex in the constant-flow fume hood and this can cause nanoparticles to be carried out with the circulating airflow. Airborne particle concentrations were measured for three hood designs (constant-flow, constant-velocity, and air-curtain hoods) using manual handling of nanoalumina particles. The hood operator's airborne nanoparticle breathing zone exposure was measured over the size range from 5 nm to 20 mum. Experiments showed that the exposure magnitude for a constant-flow hood had high variability. The results for the constant-velocity hood varied by operating conditions, but were usually very low. The performance of the air-curtain hood, a new design with significantly different airflow pattern from traditional hoods, was consistent under all operating conditions and release was barely detected. Fog tests showed more intense turbulent airflow in traditional hoods and that the downward airflow from the double-layered sash to the suction slot of the air-curtain hood did not cause turbulence seen in other hoods.

  4. Numerical characterization of the hydrodynamics and thermal behavior of air flow in flexible air distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharehdaghi, Samad; Moujaes, Samir

    2013-10-01

    Flexible duct air distribution systems are used in a large percentage of residential and small commercial buildings in the United States . Very few empirical or predictive data are available though to help provide the HVAC design engineer with reliable information . Moreover, because of the ducts flexibility, the shapes of these ducts offer a different set of operating fluid flow and thermal conditions from traditional smooth metal ducts. Hence, both the flow field and heat transfer through this kind of ducts are much more complex and merit to be analyzed from a numerical predictive approach. The aim of this research paper is to compute some of the hydrodynamic and heat transfer characteristics of the air flow inside these ducts over a range of Re numbers commonly used in the flow conditions of these air distribution systems. The information resulting from this CFD simulation, where a κ-ɛ turbulent model is used to predict the flow conditions, provide pressure drop and average convective heat transfer coefficients that exist in these ducts and was compared to previously found data. Circulation zones in the depressions of these ducts are found to exist which are suspected of influencing the pressured drop and heat transfer coefficients as compared to smooth ducts. The results show that fully developed conditions exist much earlier with regard to the inlet for both hydrodynamic and thermal entrance regions than what would be expected in smooth ducts under the same turbulent conditions.

  5. Fabry-Perot spectroscopy for kinetic temperature and velocity measurements of a high enthalpy air plasma flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Fabian; Löhle, Stefan; Hermann, Tobias; Fulge, Hannes

    2017-08-01

    The atomic translational temperatures and velocities of a low pressure, high enthalpy air plasma are measured using Fabry-Perot spectroscopy. The measurements presented here are the first measurements using this system at this enthalpy level. The sub-picometre resolution of the unique system has allowed accurate translational temperature and velocity measurements of the atomic species in the plasma. The detection system allows the Doppler broadening of multiple atomic nitrogen and oxygen lines to be measured simultaneously. Additionally, having two optical paths, one perpendicular to the flow and one at 45 deg. allows the Doppler shift to be measured. Measurements were taken during three different plasma wind tunnel tests. Mean atomic nitrogen temperatures of 1.08+/- 0.11 × 104 K and atomic oxygen translational temperatures of 1.23+/- 0.12 ×104 K were measured. The thermal non-equilibrium determined verified earlier measurements of the same phenomena, however, the mechanism behind this has not yet been determined. The mean measured flow velocity was 3350+/- 840~m~s-1 and was consistent between the atomic species. The translational temperature and velocity contribute approximately 35% of the local enthalpy of the flow. The direct measurement of these parameters, removing previously required assumptions, increases the fidelity of the flow characterisation significantly. This allows high quality testing to be conducted in this flow field.

  6. Calculation of the Arc Velocity Along the Polluted Surface of Short Glass Plates Considering the Air Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the microphysics mechanism and the factors that influence arc development along a polluted surface, the arc was considered as a plasma fluid. Based on the image method and the collision ionization theory, the electric field of the arc needed to maintain movement with different degrees of pollution was calculated. According to the force of the charged particle in an arc plasma stressed under an electric field, a calculation model of arc velocity, which is dependent on the electric field of the arc head that incorporated the effects of airflow around the electrode and air resistance is presented. An experiment was carried out to measure the arc velocity, which was then compared with the calculated value. The results of the experiment indicated that the lighter the pollution is, the larger the electric field of the arc head and arc velocity is; when the pollution is heavy, the effect of thermal buoyancy that hinders arc movement increases, which greatly reduces the arc velocity.

  7. An analytical solution describing the propagation of positive injury signals in an axon: effect of dynein velocity distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A V

    2013-01-01

    A model describing the propagation of positive injury signals from the lesion site in an axon towards the neuron soma is described. It is assumed that these signals are driven by dynein molecular motors. An analytical solution that accounts for the probability density function (pdf) of a dynein velocity distribution is obtained. Two examples of pdf of dynein velocity distributions that follow from the results published in Ross et al. (2006, Processive bidirectional motion of dynein-dynactin complexes in vitro. Nat Cell Biol. 8:562-570) and Deinhardt et al. (2006, Rab5 and Rab7 control endocytic sorting along the axonal retrograde transport pathway. Neuron 52:293-305) are considered. The effect of dynein velocity distribution on the rate of spreading of the signal wave is discussed. It is demonstrated that the obtained solution can be applied to the problem of how neurons measure the distance between the lesion site and the neuron soma.

  8. Characteristics of proton velocity distribution functions in the near-lunar wake from Chandrayaan-1/SWIM observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dhanya, M B; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Alok, Abhinaw; Wieser, Martin; Holmström, Mats; Wurz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high absorption of solar wind plasma on the lunar dayside, a large scale wake structure is formed downstream of the Moon. However, recent in-situ observations have revealed the presence of protons in the near-lunar wake (100 km to 200 km from the surface). The solar wind, either directly or after interaction with the lunar surface (including magnetic anomalies), is the source of these protons in the near-wake region. Using the entire data from the SWIM sensor of the SARA experiment onboard Chandrayaan-1, we analysed the velocity distribution of the protons observed in the near-lunar wake. The average velocity distribution functions, computed in the solar wind rest frame, were further separated based on the angle between the upstream solar wind velocity and the IMF. Several proton populations were identified from the velocity distribution and their possible entry mechanism were inferred based on the characteristics of the velocity distribution. These entry mechanisms include (i) diffusion of solar w...

  9. Simultaneous measurements of air-sea gas transfer velocity and near surface turbulence at low to moderate winds (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Liao, Q.; Fillingham, J. H.; Bootsma, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Parameterization of air-sea gas transfer velocity was routinely made with wind speed. Near surface turbulent dissipation rate has been shown to have better correlation with the gas transfer velocity in a variety of aquatic environments (i.e., the small eddy model) while wind speed is low to moderate. Wind speed model may underestimate gas transfer velocity at low to moderate winds when the near surface turbulence is produced by other environmental forcing. We performed a series of field experiments to measure the CO2 transfer velocity, and the statistics of turbulence immediately below the air-water interface using a novel floating PIV and chamber system. The small eddy model was evaluated and the model coefficient was found to be a non-constant, and it varies with the local turbulent level (figure 1). Measure results also suggested an appropriate scaling of the vertical dissipation profile immediately below the interface under non-breaking conditions, which can be parameterized by the wind shear, wave height and wave age (figure 2). Figure 1. Relation between the coefficient of the small eddy model and dissipation rate. The data also include Chu & Jirka (2003) and Vachon et al. (2010). The solid regression line: α = 0.188log(ɛ)+1.158 Figure 2. Non-dimensional dissipation profiles. Symbols: measured data with the floating PIV. Solid line: regression of measured data with a -0.79 decaying rate. Dash line with -2 slope: Terray et al. (1996) relation. Dash line with two layer structure: Siddiqui & Loewen (2007) relation.

  10. Angular and Linear Velocity Estimation for a Re-Entry Vehicle Using Six Distributed Accelerometers: Theory, Simulation and Feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G

    2003-04-28

    This report describes a feasibility study. We are interested in calculating the angular and linear velocities of a re-entry vehicle using six acceleration signals from a distributed accelerometer inertial measurement unit (DAIMU). Earlier work showed that angular and linear velocity calculation using classic nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) solvers is not practically feasible, due to mathematical and numerical difficulties. This report demonstrates the theoretical feasibility of using model-based nonlinear state estimation techniques to obtain the angular and linear velocities in this problem. Practical numerical and calibration issues require additional work to resolve. We show that the six accelerometers in the DAIMU are not sufficient to provide observability, so additional measurements of the system states are required (e.g. from a Global Positioning System (GPS) unit). Given the constraint that our system cannot use GPS, we propose using the existing on-board 3-axis magnetometer to measure angular velocity. We further show that the six nonlinear ODE's for the vehicle kinematics can be decoupled into three ODE's in the angular velocity and three ODE's in the linear velocity. This allows us to formulate a three-state Gauss-Markov system model for the angular velocities, using the magnetometer signals in the measurement model. This re-formulated model is observable, allowing us to build an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) for estimating the angular velocities. Given the angular velocity estimates from the EKF, the three ODE's for the linear velocity become algebraic, and the linear velocity can be calculated by numerical integration. Thus, we do not need direct measurements of the linear velocity to provide observability, and the technique is mathematically feasible. Using a simulation example, we show that the estimator adds value over the numerical ODE solver in the presence of measurement noise. Calculating the velocities in the

  11. Metallicity Distribution Functions, Radial Velocities, and Alpha Element Abundances in Three Off-Axis Bulge Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Christian I; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Kunder, Andrea; Pilachowski, Catherine A; Koch, Andreas; De Propris, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundance ratios of [Fe/H], [O/Fe], [Si/Fe], and [Ca/Fe] for 264 red giant branch (RGB) stars in three Galactic bulge off-axis fields located near (l,b)=(-5.5,-7), (-4,-9), and (+8.5,+9). The results are based on equivalent width and spectrum synthesis analyses of moderate resolution (R~18,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N~75-300) spectra obtained with the Hydra spectrographs on the Blanco 4m and WIYN 3.5m telescopes. The targets were selected from the blue side of the giant branch to avoid cool stars that would be strongly affected by CN and TiO; however, a comparison of the color-metallicity distribution in literature samples suggests our selection of bluer targets should not present a significant bias against metal-rich stars. We find a full range in metallicity that spans [Fe/H]\\approx-1.5 to +0.5, and that, in accordance with the previously observed minor-axis vertical metallicity gradient, the median [Fe/H] also declines with increasing Galactic latitude in ...

  12. Measuring ion velocity distribution functions through high-aspect ratio holes in inductively coupled plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunge, G., E-mail: gilles.cunge@cea.fr; Darnon, M.; Dubois, J.; Bezard, P.; Mourey, O.; Petit-Etienne, C.; Vallier, L.; Despiau-Pujo, E.; Sadeghi, N. [Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microélectronique, CNRS, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2016-02-29

    Several issues associated with plasma etching of high aspect ratio structures originate from the ions' bombardment of the sidewalls of the feature. The off normal angle incident ions are primarily due to their temperature at the sheath edge and possibly to charging effects. We have measured the ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) at the wafer surface in an industrial inductively coupled plasma reactor by using multigrid retarding field analyzers (RFA) in front of which we place 400 μm thick capillary plates with holes of 25, 50, and 100 μm diameters. The RFA then probes IVDF at the exit of the holes with Aspect Ratios (AR) of 16, 8, and 4, respectively. The results show that the ion flux dramatically drops with the increase in AR. By comparing the measured IVDF with an analytical model, we concluded that the ion temperature is 0.27 eV in our plasma conditions. The charging effects are also observed and are shown to significantly reduce the ion energy at the bottom of the feature but only with a “minor” effect on the ion flux and the shape of the IVDF.

  13. Depth Distribution Of The Maxima Of Extensive Air Shower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. H.; Howell, L. W.

    2003-01-01

    Observations of the extensive air showers from space can be free from interference by low altitude clouds and aerosols if the showers develop at a sufficiently high altitude. In this paper we explore the altitude distribution of shower maxima to determine the fraction of all showers that will reach their maxima at sufficient altitudes to avoid interference from these lower atmosphere phenomena. Typically the aerosols are confined within a planetary boundary layer that extends from only 2-3 km above the Earth's surface. Cloud top altitudes extend above 15 km but most are below 4 km. The results reported here show that more than 75% of the showers that will be observed by EUSO have maxima above the planetary boundary layer. The results also show that more than 50% of the showers that occur on cloudy days have their maxima above the cloud tops.

  14. High-resolution observations of the spatial and velocity distribution of cometary hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael E.; Spinrad, Hyron

    1992-01-01

    We have obtained high velocity and spatial resolution long-slit H alpha spectra of comets Austin (1989c1) and Levy (1990c). Spectra of both comets clearly show the existence of a low velocity thermalized component of hydrogen gas. The amount of slow hydrogen is estimated for comet Austin. The Levy spectrum shows an unusual high-velocity spatially-confined blob of hydrogen emission of unknown origin.

  15. Velocity and suspended solids distributions in an oval-shaped channel with a side bank

    OpenAIRE

    Larrarte, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on field measurements of both the velocity and total suspended solids within a combined sewer through use of a two-dimensional sampler called Hydre. The paper begins by presenting this instrument and its experimental applications. The discussion centers on the recorded velocities and concentrations; moreover, analyses of results demonstrate the ability of this Hydre device to provide robust suspended solids and velocity profiles in sewers for a range of flow conditions.

  16. Effect of Air Velocity on Thermal Comfort under Thermal Environment Ramp Changing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    嵇赟喆; 涂光备; 孙琳

    2004-01-01

    Set points of the indoor air temperature and relative humidity in short-term staying location were studied. In this condition, the thermal reaction of human body varied with the ramp changes of the environmental thermal parameters.The change rules of about 60 subjects'thermal reaction to the ramp change of environment were surveyed, and the effect of air movement on the thermal reaction during transient condition was considered by using a questionnaire. With the experimental results and research findings under stable condition, a way to set environmental parameters of short-time staying location was recommended.

  17. The universal distribution of halo interlopers in projected phase space. Bias in galaxy cluster concentration and velocity anisotropy?

    CERN Document Server

    Mamon, Gary A; Murante, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    When clusters of galaxies are viewed in projection, one cannot avoid picking up foreground/background interlopers, that lie within the virial cone (VC), but outside the virial sphere. Structural and kinematic deprojection equations are not known for an expanding Universe, where the Hubble flow (HF) stretches the line-of-sight distribution of velocities. We analyze 93 mock relaxed clusters, built from a cosmological simulation. The stacked mock cluster is well fit by an m=5 Einasto DM density profile, with velocity anisotropy (VA) close to the Mamon-Lokas model with anisotropy radius equal to that of density slope -2. The surface density of interlopers is nearly flat out to the virial radius, while their velocity distribution shows a dominant gaussian cluster-outskirts component and a flat field component. This distribution of interlopers in PPS is nearly universal in mass. A local kappa=2.7 sigma velocity cut returns the line-of-sight velocity dispersion profile (LOSVDP) expected from the NFW density and VA p...

  18. Velocity and turbulence distributions in wall subchannels of a road bundle in three axial planes downstream of a spacer grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehme, K.

    1987-03-01

    The velocity, turbulence, and temperature distributions in nuclear fuel element bundles of nuclear reactors were investigated. The mean velocity, the wall shear stresses, and the turbulence were measured in two wall subchannels of a rod bundle of four parallel rods, arranged in a rectangular channel, for three axial planes. A spacer grid was inserted in the rod bundle, for ratios between the distance spacer grid/measuring plane and the hydraulic diameter (LIDh) of 40.4, 32.8 and 16.9. The Reynolds number was 145,000. The results show that the distributions of the velocity and the turbulence are affected by the spacer grid, already for LIDh = 40.4. The effects of the spacer grid increase with decreasing distance to the spacer grid.

  19. Gas dispersion and immobile gas volume in solid and porous particle biofilter materials at low air flow velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Poulsen, Tjalfe G

    2010-07-01

    Gas-phase dispersion in granular biofilter materials with a wide range of particle sizes was investigated using atmospheric air and nitrogen as tracer gases. Two types of materials were used: (1) light extended clay aggregates (LECA), consisting of highly porous particles, and (2) gravel, consisting of solid particles. LECA is a commercial material that is used for insulation, as a soil conditioner, and as a carrier material in biofilters for air cleaning. These two materials were selected to have approximately the same particle shape. Column gas transport experiments were conducted for both materials using different mean particle diameters, different particle size ranges, and different gas flow velocities. Measured breakthrough curves were modeled using the advection-dispersion equation modified for mass transfer between mobile and immobile gas phases. The results showed that gas dispersivity increased with increasing mean particle diameter for LECA but was independent of mean particle diameter for gravel. Gas dispersivity also increased with increasing particle size range for both media. Dispersivities in LECA were generally higher than for gravel. The mobile gas content in both materials increased with increasing gas flow velocity but it did not show any strong dependency on mean particle diameter or particle size range. The relative fraction of mobile gas compared with total porosity was highest for gravel and lowest for LECA likely because of its high internal porosity.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Transient Development of Flame, Temperature and Velocity under Reduced Gravity in a Methane Air Diffusion Flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowal, Arup Jyoti; Mandal, Bijan Kumar

    2017-02-01

    A methane air co flow diffusion flame has been numerically simulated with the help of an in-house developed code at normal gravity, 0.5 G, and 0.0001 G (microgravity) for the study of transient behavior of the flame in terms of flame shape, temperature profile and velocity (streamlines). The study indicates that lower is the gravity level, the higher is the time of early transience. The flame developments during transience are marked by the formation of a secondary flamelet at different heights above the primary flame at all gravity levels. The development of temperature profile at microgravity takes a much longer time to stabilize than the flame development. At normal gravity and 0.5 G gravity level, streamlines, during transience, show intermediate vortices which are finally replaced by recirculation of ambient air from the exit plane. At microgravity, neither any vortex nor any recirculation at any stage is observed. Centerline temperature plots, at all gravity levels during transience, demonstrate a secondary peak at some instants as a consequence of the secondary flamelet formation. The centerline velocity at microgravity decreases gradually during transience, unlike at other two gravity levels where the fall is very sharp and is indicative of negligible buoyancy at microgravity.

  1. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles. [for combustion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  2. Determination and shaping of the ion-velocity distribution function in a single-ended Q machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Michelsen, Poul

    1971-01-01

    An electrostatic energy analyzer with a resolution better than 0.03 eV was constructed. This analyzer was used to determine the ion-velocity distribution function at different densities and plate temperatures in a single-ended Q machine. In all regions good agreement with theoretical predictions......% in single-ended Q machines...

  3. Velocity and Temperature Distribution in Flow from an Inlet Device in Rooms with Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, T.V.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    Measurements are performed in a full-scale test room with displacement ventilation with focus on the velocity and temperature field in the region close to the inlet device. Investigations based on these detailed measurements have been made in order to see if it is possible to describe the velocity...

  4. Sensation of draft at ankles for displacement ventilation and underfloor air distribution systems

    OpenAIRE

    Schiavon, Stefano; Rim, Donghyun; Pasut, Wilmer; Nazaroff, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Draft is defined as an unwanted local convective cooling of the body caused by air movement (Fanger, 1977). The main factors that affect draft are air temperature and velocity (Houghten et al., 1938), air turbulence (Fanger et al., 1988), body parts exposed and clothing insulation level, and overall thermal comfort (Toftum et al., 2003). Historically, the literature on draft has focused on thermal discomfort at the neck, which was considered the most sensitive part of the body, especially as ...

  5. Study of Air Velocity and Temperature Gradient in Lecture Room Through Mixed and Displacement Ventilation Systems to Improve the Thermal Comfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Iskandriawan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Air ventilation system is considered crucial in the target of maintaining clean and fresh room air at all times. It will improve the thermal comfort and indoor air quality along with the activities of occupant. This investigation explores the influence of fresh air diffuser location to the thermal comfort factor especially in the lecture room. It will contrast two types of ventilation: the mixed and the displacement ventilation. The thermal comfort factor is represented by means of air velocity and temperature. Using Fluent 6.2 as CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation program, all the variables will be exploited. The specific boundary type’s room model is verified in GAMBIT software generating such a specific lecture room. The finding shows that the displacement ventilation system has benefit in the propensity of controlling the heat and air velocity compare to the mixed ventilation

  6. Probability distributions of bed load particle velocities, accelerations, hop distances, and travel times informed by Jaynes's principle of maximum entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbish, David J.; Schmeeckle, Mark; Schumer, Rina; Fathel, Siobhan L.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the most likely forms of the probability distributions of bed load particle velocities, accelerations, hop distances, and travel times, in a manner that formally appeals to inferential statistics while honoring mechanical and kinematic constraints imposed by equilibrium transport conditions. The analysis is based on E. Jaynes's elaboration of the implications of the similarity between the Gibbs entropy in statistical mechanics and the Shannon entropy in information theory. By maximizing the information entropy of a distribution subject to known constraints on its moments, our choice of the form of the distribution is unbiased. The analysis suggests that particle velocities and travel times are exponentially distributed and that particle accelerations follow a Laplace distribution with zero mean. Particle hop distances, viewed alone, ought to be distributed exponentially. However, the covariance between hop distances and travel times precludes this result. Instead, the covariance structure suggests that hop distances follow a Weibull distribution. These distributions are consistent with high-resolution measurements obtained from high-speed imaging of bed load particle motions. The analysis brings us closer to choosing distributions based on our mechanical insight.

  7. High velocity air microabrasion for conservative tooth preparation: the principle and the clinical procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, R A

    1995-10-01

    Various technologies within the dental armamentarium are applied to achieve the precise tooth preparations required for the different types of restorations. This article reintroduces the air microabrasion technique, which was first presented in 1945. The popular use of this technique had been postponed, pending the decrease in cost and development of compatible restorative materials to repair the tooth structure. With increased patient demand for less invasive preparation techniques and the decrease of the equipment cost, the use of air microbrasion for tooth preparation has been recognized. The history of the technology, its function, indications, advantages, and limitations are discussed, and a step-by-step clinical procedure is presented. The learning objective of this article is to familiarize the readers with this preparation procedure, enhancing the knowledge of preparation options.

  8. Experimental and numerical simulation of air distribution and microorganism pollutant dispersion in gymnasium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马飞; 霍廖然; 谢慧; 范慧芳

    2009-01-01

    By conducting experimental measurements and numerical simulations of air distribution and microorganism pollutant distribution in the auditorium and game area in a gymnasium,pollutant dispersion control and indoor air quality improvement methods were put forward. The results show that the fungi and bacteria concentration levels are less than the magnitude of 103 CFU (colony-forming units) which meets the requirements of indoor air quality standard. The numerical simulation results quantitatively agree with the experimental data while some differences between theoretical data and experimental data exist in air distributions. People number in gymnasium plays an important role in affecting indoor air quality and the environmental parameters attained the standard.

  9. DETECTION OF THE VELOCITY SHEAR EFFECT ON THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE GALACTIC SATELLITES IN ISOLATED SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jounghun [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yun-Young, E-mail: jounghun@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: yy.choi@khu.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    We report a detection of the effect of the large-scale velocity shear on the spatial distributions of the galactic satellites around the isolated hosts. Identifying the isolated galactic systems, each of which consists of a single host galaxy and its satellites, from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and reconstructing linearly the velocity shear field in the local universe, we measure the alignments between the relative positions of the satellites from their isolated hosts and the principal axes of the local velocity shear tensors projected onto the plane of sky. We find a clear signal that the galactic satellites in isolated systems are located preferentially along the directions of the minor principal axes of the large-scale velocity shear field. Those galactic satellites that are spirals, are brighter, are located at distances larger than the projected virial radii of the hosts, and belong to the spiral hosts yield stronger alignment signals, which implies that the alignment strength depends on the formation and accretion epochs of the galactic satellites. It is also shown that the alignment strength is quite insensitive to the cosmic web environment, as well as the size and luminosity of the isolated hosts. Although this result is consistent with the numerical finding of Libeskind et al. based on an N-body experiment, owing to the very low significance of the observed signals, it remains inconclusive whether or not the velocity shear effect on the satellite distribution is truly universal.

  10. Prediction of Fluid Velocity Distribution near a Rising Bubble%上升气泡附近液体速度分布的预测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成弘; 周明

    2002-01-01

    A model is presented for predicting the fluid velocity distribution around a rising bubble which startsfrom rest on a distillation column tray by considering the unsteady fluid flow based on the method of streamfunction. Experimental measurement of the velocity distribution by using whole field digitized PIV (particle imagevelocimetry) method is briefly described. The velocity distribution predicted by the present model is in betteragreement with the measurements than the others models published in literature.

  11. Measurements and predictions of the air distribution systems in high compute density (Internet) data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jinkyun [HIMEC (Hanil Mechanical Electrical Consultants) Ltd., Seoul 150-103 (Korea); Department of Architectural Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea); Lim, Taesub; Kim, Byungseon Sean [Department of Architectural Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea)

    2009-10-15

    When equipment power density increases, a critical goal of a data center cooling system is to separate the equipment exhaust air from the equipment intake air in order to prevent the IT server from overheating. Cooling systems for data centers are primarily differentiated according to the way they distribute air. The six combinations of flooded and locally ducted air distribution make up the vast majority of all installations, except fully ducted air distribution methods. Once the air distribution system (ADS) is selected, there are other elements that must be integrated into the system design. In this research, the design parameters and IT environmental aspects of the cooling system were studied with a high heat density data center. CFD simulation analysis was carried out in order to compare the heat removal efficiencies of various air distribution systems. The IT environment of an actual operating data center is measured to validate a model for predicting the effect of different air distribution systems. A method for planning and design of the appropriate air distribution system is described. IT professionals versed in precision air distribution mechanisms, components, and configurations can work more effectively with mechanical engineers to ensure the specification and design of optimized cooling solutions. (author)

  12. Air Pollutant Distribution and Mesoscale Circulation Systems During Escompte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottmeier, Ch.; Kalthoff, N.; Corsmeier, U.; Robin, D.; Thürauf, J.; Hofherr, T.; Hasel, M.

    The distribution of pollutants observed with an Dornier 128 instrumented aircraft and from AIRMARAIX ground stations during one day of the Escompte experiment (June 25, 2001) is analysed in relation to the mesoscale wind systems and vertical mixing from aircraft and radiosonde data. The ESCOMPTE-experiment (http://medias.obs- mip.fr/escompte) was carried out in June and July 2001 in the urban area of Marseille and its rural surroundings to investigate periods with photosmog conditions. The over- all aim is to produce an appropriate high quality 3-D data set which includes emission, meteorological, and chemical data. The data is used for the validation of mesoscale models and for chemical and meteorological process studies. The evolution of pho- tosmog episodes with high ozone concentrations depends on both chemical transfor- mation processes and meteorological conditions. As Marseille is situated between the Mediterranean Sea in the south and mountainous sites in the north, under weak large- scale flow the meteorological conditions are dominated by thermally driven circula- tion systems which strongly influence the horizontal transport of air pollutants. Ad- ditionally, vertically exchange processes like mountain venting and slope winds may contribute in the temporal evolution of the trace gas concentration of the city plume in the atmospheric boundary layer and are particularly studied by the Dornier flight measurements. Therefore the experiment was designed to measure both, the chemi- cal species and meteorological parameters with high resolution in space and time by surface stations, aircraft and vertical profiling systems like radiosondes, sodars and lidars. Results are shown (a) on the evolution of the wind field and the ozone concen- trations during June 25, when an ozone maximum develops about 60 km in the lee site of Marseille and (b) the vertical transport of air pollutants between the boundary layer and the free troposphere.

  13. Thermal comfort and indoor air quality in rooms with integrated personalized ventilation and under-floor air distribution systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ruixin; Sekhar ., S. C.; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive study comprising physical measurements and human subject experiments was conducted to explore the potential for improving occupants' thermal comfort and indoor air quality (IAQ) using a personalized ventilation (PV) system combined with an under-floor air distribution(UFAD) system...

  14. Late Quaternary climate-change velocity: Implications for modern distributions and communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandel, Brody Steven; Dalsgaard, Bo; Arge, Lars Allan;

    Background/Question/Methods Climate-change velocity is a measure of the rate of climate change that incorporates small-scale climate variation such as that found along topographic gradients. As a measure of climate instability, it has several advantages, including describing the minimum migration...... and communities, typically more so than traditionally used climate anomalies. Some key results include apparent extinctions of small-ranged and weakly-dispersing species from high-velocity regions, more specialized mutualistic networks in low-velocity regions and an increased importance of stability where current...

  15. Mean droplet size and local velocity in horizontal isothermal free jets of air and water, respectively, viscous liquid in quiescent ambient air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Rabadi, S.; Friedel, L. [Fluid Mechanics Institute, Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg (Germany); Al Salaymeh, A. [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Jordan (Jordan)

    2007-01-15

    Measurements using two-dimensional Phase Doppler Anemometry as well as high speed cinematography in free jets at several nozzle exit pressures and mass flow rates, show that the Sauter mean droplet diameter decreases with increasing air and liquid-phase mass flow ratio due to the increase of the air stream impact on the liquid phase. This leads to substantial liquid fragmentation, respectively primary droplet breakup, and hence, satellite droplet formation with small sizes. This trend is also significant in the case of a liquid viscosity higher than that of water. The increased liquid viscosity stabilizes the droplet formation and breakup by reducing the rate of surface perturbations and consequently droplet distortions, ultimately also leading, in total, to the formation of smaller droplets. The droplet velocity decreases with the nozzle downstream distance, basically due to the continual air entrainment and due to the collisions between the droplets. The droplet collisions may induce further liquid fragmentation and, hence, formation of a number of relatively smaller droplets respectively secondary breakup, or may induce agglomeration to comparatively larger liquid fragments that may rain out of the free jet. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Effect of Coulomb friction on orientational correlation and velocity distribution functions in a sheared dilute granular gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Bishakhdatta; Alam, Meheboob

    2011-08-01

    From particle simulations of a sheared frictional granular gas, we show that the Coulomb friction can have dramatic effects on orientational correlation as well as on both the translational and angular velocity distribution functions even in the Boltzmann (dilute) limit. The dependence of orientational correlation on friction coefficient (μ) is found to be nonmonotonic, and the Coulomb friction plays a dual role of enhancing or diminishing the orientational correlation, depending on the value of the tangential restitution coefficient (which characterizes the roughness of particles). From the sticking limit (i.e., with no sliding contact) of rough particles, decreasing the Coulomb friction is found to reduce the density and spatial velocity correlations which, together with diminished orientational correlation for small enough μ, are responsible for the transition from non-gaussian to gaussian distribution functions in the double limit of small friction (μ→0) and nearly elastic particles (e→1). This double limit in fact corresponds to perfectly smooth particles, and hence the maxwellian (gaussian) is indeed a solution of the Boltzmann equation for a frictional granular gas in the limit of elastic collisions and zero Coulomb friction at any roughness. The high-velocity tails of both distribution functions seem to follow stretched exponentials even in the presence of Coulomb friction, and the related velocity exponents deviate strongly from a gaussian with increasing friction.

  17. Atmospheric velocity spectral width measurements using the statistical distribution of pulsed CO2 lidar return signal intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancellet, Gerard M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Grant, William B.

    1989-01-01

    A pulsed CO2 lidar with coherent detection has been used to measure the correlation time of backscatter from an ensemble of atmospheric aerosol particles which are illuminated by the pulsed radiation. The correlation time of the backscatter of the return signal, which is directly related to the velocity spectral width, can be used to study the velocity structure constant of atmospheric turbulence and wind shear. Various techniques for correlation time measurement are discussed, and several measurement results are presented for the technique using the information contained in the statistical distribution of a set of lidar return signal intensities.

  18. Estimation of the Radial Distribution of the Tangential Velocity in a Vortex Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira OGAWA; Tsuyoshi IKARI; Hiroyuki MURAKAMI; Kouhei SATHO

    2009-01-01

    The estimation of maximum tangential velocity becomes a very important factor for the estimation of performances of the vortex chamber. In this paper, a proposed flow model of how to estimate the maximum tangential velocity in the special form of the vortex chamber is described in detail. The pressure drop basing upon the rapid expansion by flowing from the inlet pipe into the cyclone body is estimated as half of the dynamic pressure in the inlet pipe.

  19. Average velocity field of the air flow over the water surface in a laboratory modeling of storm and hurricane conditions in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaurov, A. A.; Troitskaya, Yu. I.; Sergeev, D. A.; Vdovin, M. I.; Baidakov, G. A.

    2014-07-01

    Laboratory experiments on studying the structure of the turbulent air boundary layer over waves were carried out at the Wind-Wave Channel of the Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS), in conditions modeling the near-water boundary layer of the atmosphere under strong and hurricane winds and the equivalent wind velocities from 10 to 48 m/s at the standard height of 10 m. A modified technique of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to obtain turbulent pulsation averaged velocity fields of the air flow over the water surface curved by a wave and average profiles of the wind velocity. The measurements showed that the logarithmic part of the velocity profile of the air flow in the channel was observed in the immediate vicinity from the water surface (at a distance of 30 mm) and could be detected only using remote methods (PIV). According to the measured velocity profiles, dependences of aerodynamic drag factors of the water surface on the wind velocity at a height of 10 m were retrieved; they were compared with results of contact measurements carried out earlier on the same setup. It is shown that they agree with an accuracy of up to 20%; at moderate and strong wind velocities the coincidence falls within the experimental accuracy.

  20. A Scanning laser-velocimeter technique for measuring two-dimensional wake-vortex velocity distributions. [Langley Vortex Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, L. R.; Rhodes, D. B.

    1980-01-01

    A rapid scanning two dimensional laser velocimeter (LV) has been used to measure simultaneously the vortex vertical and axial velocity distributions in the Langley Vortex Research Facility. This system utilized a two dimensional Bragg cell for removing flow direction ambiguity by translating the optical frequency for each velocity component, which was separated by band-pass filters. A rotational scan mechanism provided an incremental rapid scan to compensate for the large displacement of the vortex with time. The data were processed with a digital counter and an on-line minicomputer. Vaporized kerosene (0.5 micron to 5 micron particle sizes) was used for flow visualization and LV scattering centers. The overall measured mean-velocity uncertainity is less than 2 percent. These measurements were obtained from ensemble averaging of individual realizations.

  1. Product kinetic and internal energy distributions via velocity-aligned Doppler spectroscopy: Technical report, May 1985-January 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittig, C.

    1987-01-01

    We developed a method of sub-Doppler resolution spectroscopy that is useful for determining kinetic energy distributions. With 'conventional' Doppler spectroscopy, it is almost impossible to obtain an accurate distribution from a line profile, even with the highest resolution, except when the distribution is quite simple (e.g., a delta function). This is due to the lineshape deriving from velocity components along the wave-vector of the probe radiation, k/sub probe/. However, by choosing only those species whose velocities are essentially parallel (or antiparallel) to k/sub probe/, this handicap is overcome. Here, one obtains the kinetic energy distribution along k/sub probe/, and the resolution is limited only by our ability to reject species with velocity components perpendicular to k/sub probe/. This rejection is done by spatial and temporal discrimination, using counterpropagating, overlapped, pulsed photolysis and probe sources. At long delays, molecules are detected which are aligned with k/sub probe/. We call the method velocity-aligned Doppler spectroscopy (VADS). We have perused several cases involving photodissociation of small molecules, in each case detecting H-atoms using sequential 2-photon ionization via Lyman-..cap alpha... We discern structure in the kinetic energy distribution which is attributed to internal excitation of the 'other' fragment, and resolution is limited by the dye laser bandwidth. In the case of HBr, we resolve the Br spin-orbit states, and with H/sub 2/S, we resolve the SH vibrational levels. 38 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Test of Different Air Distribution Concepts for a Single-Aisle Aircraft Cabin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Damsgaard, Charlotte; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, air is supplied to the aircraft cabin either by individual nozzles or by supply slots. The air is expected to be fully mixed in the cabin, and the system is considered to be a mixing ventilation system. This paper will describe different air distribution systems known from other...

  3. Test of Different Air Distribution Concepts for a Single-Aisle Aircraft Cabin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Damsgaard, Charlotte; Liu, Li;

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, air is supplied to the aircraft cabin either by individual nozzles or by supply slots. The air is expected to be fully mixed in the cabin, and the system is considered to be a mixing ventilation system. This paper will describe different air distribution systems known from other...

  4. Advanced air distribution: Improving health and comfort while reducing energy use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2015-01-01

    -quality indoor environments at the same time as low-energy consumption. Advanced air distribution, designed to supply clean air where, when, and as much as needed, makes it possible to efficiently achieve thermal comfort, control exposure to contaminants, provide high-quality air for breathing and minimizing...

  5. Application of TiC reinforced Fe-based coatings by means of High Velocity Air Fuel Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Knoch, M. A.; Liao, X.; Sommer, J.

    2017-03-01

    In the field of hydraulic applications, different development trends can cause problems for coatings currently used as wear and corrosion protection for piston rods. Aqueous hydraulic fluids and rising raw material prices necessitate the search for alternatives to conventional coatings like galvanic hard chrome or High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF)-sprayed WC/Co coatings. In a previous study, Fe/TiC coatings sprayed by a HVOF-process, were identified to be promising coating systems for wear and corrosion protection in hydraulic systems. In this feasibility study, the novel High Velocity Air Fuel (HVAF)-process, a modification of the HVOF-process, is investigated using the same feedstock material, which means the powder is not optimized for the HVAF-process. The asserted benefits of the HVAF-process are higher particle velocities and lower process temperatures, which can result in a lower porosity and oxidation of the coating. Further benefits of the HVAF process are claimed to be lower process costs and higher deposition rates. In this study, the focus is set on to the applicability of Fe/TiC coatings by HVAF in general. The Fe/TiC HVAF coating could be produced, successfully. The HVAF- and HVOF-coatings, produced with the same powder, were investigated using micro-hardness, porosity, wear and corrosion tests. A similar wear coefficient and micro-hardness for both processes could be achieved. Furthermore the propane/hydrogen proportion of the HVAF process and its influence on the coating thickness and the porosity was investigated.

  6. Velocity distribution of the flow field in the cyclonic zone of cyclone-static micro-bubble flotation column

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Xiao-wei; Liu Jiong-tian; Wang Yong-tian; Cao Yi-jun

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been conducted to study the flow field in a cyclone static micro-bubble flotation column.The method of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used.The flow field velocity distribution in both cross section and longitudinal section within cyclonic zone was studied for different circulating volumes.The cross sectional vortex was also analyzed.The results show that in cross section as the circulating volume increases from 0.187 to 0.350 m3/h,the flow velocity ranges from 0 to 0.68 m/s.The flow field is mainly a non-vortex potential flow that forms a free vortex without outside energy input.In the cyclonic region the vortex deviates from the center of the flotation column because a single tangential opening introduces circulating fluid into the column.The tangential component of the velocity plays a defining role in the cross section.In the longitudinal section the velocity ranges from 0 to 0.08 m/s.The flow velocity increases as does the circulating volume.Advantageous mineral separation conditions arise from the combined effects of cyclonic flow in cross and longitudinal section.

  7. Experimental study on upward bubble velocity and pierce length distributions in a water model of copper converter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Du; Jiayun Zhang; Tuping Zhou; Qifeng Shu

    2003-01-01

    The upward bubble velocity and the pierce length distributions in a sectional water model of the copper convener in Guixi Smelter in Jiangxi, China, were measured using a two-contact electro-resistivity probe. In the case of using a single tuyere, the bubble velocity distribution along longitudinal direction was similar to that derived from Guassian function. Beyond the center of the longitudinal range, the bubble pierce length exhibited a sudden increase. The upward bubble velocity at a specified location could go up to meters per second. Its probability at a fixed location obeys a lognormal function; the bubble pierce length there varies bellow a few centimeters. In the case of using multi-tuyeres, the upward bubble velocity was roughly uniform right above the tuyeres and showed a slow decrease beyond this region. The bubble pierce length within both of these two regions was roughly uniform. Its average value in the former region, however, was found to be somewhat lower than that in the later.

  8. Determination of the Ion Velocity Distribution in a Rotating Plasma from Measurements of Doppler Broadening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard

    1979-01-01

    The Doppler-broadened profile of the He II 4685.75 AA line was measured along a chord in a rotating plasma, transverse to the magnetic field. Using a single-particle orbit picture, the corresponding velocity spectrum of ions confirm the measurements, so it can be concluded that the single......-particle orbit picture is valid for the discharge period under investigation, except for the first few microseconds during breakdown when a strong interaction between plasma and remaining neutral gas takes place by Alfvens critical velocity mechanism. A simple relation is given between the measured half......-width and shift of the Doppler profile and the macroscopic quantities of ion velocity and energy. Several Doppler-broadened profiles are shown for different plasma parameters....

  9. Simulation of particle distribution in a room with air cleaner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardkapan, Siamak Rahimi; Afshari, Alireza; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2012-01-01

    gas and particles with different sizes.The proper turbulence model was selected after comparing the results with the behaviour of the gass in the test room. The simulations showed the effect that the location of an air cleaner had on the particle level. The results showed that the location of the air...... and particle phase model for simulating an air cleaner in a room. In addition, the aim is to study the impact of location of an air cleaner in a room. The dynamics of the particle inside a room was simulated by computational fluid dynamics software. Furthermore, the air change rate was measured by both tracer...... cleaner in relation to inlet, outlet and particle source had a significant effect on the effectiveness of the air cleaner....

  10. Experimental evaluation of air distribution in mechanically ventilated residential rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomasi, R.; Krajčík, M.; Simone, A.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of low ventilation rates (1 or 0.5 air change per hour) on thermal comfort and ventilation effectiveness was experimentally studied in a simulated residential room equipped with radiant floor heating/cooling and mixing ventilation systems. The tests were performed for various positions...... removal effectiveness (CRE) and local air change index was measured in order to characterize ventilation effectiveness in the occupied zone. Acceptable thermal comfort was found in most experiments; however, air temperature differences higher than 3 °C occurred when floor cooling was combined...... with unconditioned outdoor air supply, i.e. at the supply air temperatures higher than the room air temperature. Moreover, low floor temperatures were needed to maintain the desired reference temperature in the stratified thermal environment. Mainly in cooling conditions the ventilation effectiveness depended...

  11. The Effect of Atmospheric Cooling on Vertical Velocity Dispersion and Density Distribution of Brown Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Russell E., Jr.; Thorman, Paul A.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Cohen, Seth H.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Pirzkal, Nor; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Young, Erick

    2017-09-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation designed to predict the vertical velocity dispersion of brown dwarfs in the Milky Way. We show that since these stars are constantly cooling, the velocity dispersion has a noticeable trend with the spectral type. With realistic assumptions for the initial mass function, star formation history, and the cooling models, we show that the velocity dispersion is roughly consistent with what is observed for M dwarfs, decreases to cooler spectral types, and increases again for the coolest types in our study (∼T9). We predict a minimum in the velocity dispersions for L/T transition objects, however, the detailed properties of the minimum predominately depend on the star formation history. Since this trend is due to brown dwarf cooling, we expect that the velocity dispersion as a function of spectral type should deviate from the constancy around the hydrogen-burning limit. We convert from velocity dispersion to vertical scale height using standard disk models and present similar trends in disk thickness as a function of spectral type. We suggest that future, wide-field photometric and/or spectroscopic missions may collect sizable samples of distant (∼ 1 kpc) dwarfs that span the hydrogen-burning limit. As such, we speculate that such observations may provide a unique way of constraining the average spectral type of hydrogen burning. Support for program #13266 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under the NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  12. Measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a cold, dense Rydberg gas

    CERN Document Server

    Bergeson, S D

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a dense, cold Rydberg gas in a MOT. The Rydberg atoms are excited using a resonant two-step excitation pathway with lasers of 4 ns duration. The plasma forms spontaneously and rapidly. The rms width of the ion velocity distribution is determined by measuring laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of the ions. The measured excitation efficiency is compared with a Monte-Carlo wavefunction calculation, and significant differences are observed. We discuss the conditions for blockaded Rydberg excitation and the subsequent spatial ordering of Rydberg atom domains. While the blockade interaction is greater than the Rabi frequency in portions of the atomic sample, no evidence for spatial ordering is observed.

  13. The probability distribution model of air pollution index and its dominants in Kuala Lumpur

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Dhurafi, Nasr Ahmed; Razali, Ahmad Mahir; Masseran, Nurulkamal; Zamzuri, Zamira Hasanah

    2016-11-01

    This paper focuses on the statistical modeling for the distributions of air pollution index (API) and its sub-indexes data observed at Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia. Five pollutants or sub-indexes are measured including, carbon monoxide (CO); sulphur dioxide (SO2); nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and; particulate matter (PM10). Four probability distributions are considered, namely log-normal, exponential, Gamma and Weibull in search for the best fit distribution to the Malaysian air pollutants data. In order to determine the best distribution for describing the air pollutants data, five goodness-of-fit criteria's are applied. This will help in minimizing the uncertainty in pollution resource estimates and improving the assessment phase of planning. The conflict in criterion results for selecting the best distribution was overcome by using the weight of ranks method. We found that the Gamma distribution is the best distribution for the majority of air pollutants data in Kuala Lumpur.

  14. Robust Terminal Guidance Law for Air-to-Air Missile of Adjustable Velocity%速度可调空空导弹鲁棒末制导律

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史鲲; 梁晓庚

    2013-01-01

    针对采用变流量固体火箭冲压发动机的空空导弹速度可调的特点,提出了一种非线性鲁棒末制导律.将弹目相对速度与视线角速度一起作为被控状态,基于准平行接近原理,通过选择合适的李雅普诺夫函数,在保证了制导系统大范围渐近稳定的同时,结合非线性H∞鲁棒控制理论,推导出了鲁棒末制导律的表达式.数字仿真结果表明,该制导律不仅对目标的大范围机动具有较强的鲁棒性,命中精度较高,并且与传统末制导律相比,能够明显缩短导弹拦截时间,具有较大优势.%According to adjustable character of the velocity of air-to-air missile with variable-flow ducted rockets,a nonlinear terminal guidance law with robustness was proposed.The relative velocity of the missile and the target was taken as controlled state as well as the line-of-sight angular-velocity.Based on the principle of quasi constant bearing navigation,a proper Lyapunov function was chosen.The global asymptotic stability of the guidance system was ensured,and the expression of the robust terminal guidance law was obtained by means of the nonlinear H∞ robust control theory.Simulation results show that,for the missile intercepting a target with high maneuverability,the proposed terminal guidance law not only has strong robustness and excellent guidance precision,but also can shorten the interception time compared with the traditional one.

  15. Laboratory testing of a displacement ventilation diffuser for underfloor air distribution systems

    OpenAIRE

    Raftery, Paul; Bauman, Fred; Schiavon, Stefano; Epp, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems use the underfloorplenum beneath a raised floor to provide conditioned air through floor-mounted diffusers, which typically discharge cool air with bothhorizontal and vertical momentum components. These systems usually createa vertical temperature stratification when in cooling mode and this hasan impact on energy, indoor air quality and thermal comfort. The purposeof this study was to characterize the stratification performance of apreviously unstud...

  16. DISTRIBUTION AND ORIGIN OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS .3. CLOUDS, COMPLEXES AND POPULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP; VANWOERDEN, H

    1991-01-01

    We present the first complete catalogue of high-velocity clouds (HVCs), followed by a classification of these clouds into complexes and populations. The catalogue will form the basis for comparisons with theoretical models. The study described here yields the following conclusions: (1) Differential

  17. Velocity Distributions of Runaway Stars Produced by Supernovae in the Galaxy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abudusaimaitijiang Yisikandeer; Chunhua Zhu; Zhaojun Wang; Guoliang Lu

    2016-09-01

    Using a method of population synthesis, we investigate the runaway stars produced by disrupted binaries via asymmetric core collapse supernova explosions (CC-RASs) and thermonuclear supernova explosions (TN-RASs). We find the velocities of CC-RASs in the range of about 30--100 km s$^{−1}$. The runaway stars observed in the galaxy are possibly CC-RASs. Due to differences in stellar chemical components and structures, TN-RASs are divided into hydrogen-rich TN-RASs and helium-rich TN-RASs. The velocities of the former are about 100–500 km s$^{−1}$, while the velocities of the latter are mainly between 600 and 1100 km s$^{−1}$. The hypervelocity stars observed in the galaxy may originate from thermonuclear supernova explosions. Our results possibly cover the US 708 which is a compact helium star and travels with a velocity of 1157$\\pm$53 km s$^{−1}$ in our galaxy.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE TRANSITION REGION OF PIPES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong-hui; DU Guang-sheng; LIU Li-ping; SHAO Zhu-feng; ZHAI Cheng-yuan

    2011-01-01

    The accuracy of an ultrasonic flowmeter meaurement depends on the profile-linear average velocity.But this velocity in the transition region is not available at the present.In this article,the velocity in the transition region in pipes is studied by experimental methods.The Particle Image Velocimetry ( PIV ) is used to measure the flow field in the transition region in pipes,and the measured results from PIV are in good agreement with the Westerwell's experimental data.Based on the experimental data of PIV,the curves of the profile-linear average velocity in the transition region against the Reynolds number in the range from 2 000 to 20 000 are obtained,and it is shown that the coefficient k is constant when the Reynolds number is in the range of 2 000-2 400 and 6 000-20 000,and the coefficient k is increasing when the Reynolds number is in the range of 2 400-6 000.The results of this article can be used to improve the measurement accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeters and as a theoretical basis for the research on the transition flow.

  19. DISTRIBUTION AND ORIGIN OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS .3. CLOUDS, COMPLEXES AND POPULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP; VANWOERDEN, H

    1991-01-01

    We present the first complete catalogue of high-velocity clouds (HVCs), followed by a classification of these clouds into complexes and populations. The catalogue will form the basis for comparisons with theoretical models. The study described here yields the following conclusions: (1) Differential

  20. Advanced air distribution: improving health and comfort while reducing energy use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikov, A K

    2016-02-01

    Indoor environment affects the health, comfort, and performance of building occupants. The energy used for heating, cooling, ventilating, and air conditioning of buildings is substantial. Ventilation based on total volume air distribution in spaces is not always an efficient way to provide high-quality indoor environments at the same time as low-energy consumption. Advanced air distribution, designed to supply clean air where, when, and as much as needed, makes it possible to efficiently achieve thermal comfort, control exposure to contaminants, provide high-quality air for breathing and minimizing the risk of airborne cross-infection while reducing energy use. This study justifies the need for improving the present air distribution design in occupied spaces, and in general the need for a paradigm shift from the design of collective environments to the design of individually controlled environments. The focus is on advanced air distribution in spaces, its guiding principles and its advantages and disadvantages. Examples of advanced air distribution solutions in spaces for different use, such as offices, hospital rooms, vehicle compartments, are presented. The potential of advanced air distribution, and individually controlled macro-environment in general, for achieving shared values, that is, improved health, comfort, and performance, energy saving, reduction of healthcare costs and improved well-being is demonstrated. Performance criteria are defined and further research in the field is outlined. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Reconstruction of spatial distributions of sound velocity and absorption in soft biological tissues using model ultrasonic tomographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, V. A.; Zotov, D. I.; Rumyantseva, O. D.

    2014-07-01

    A two-step algorithm is used to reconstruct the spatial distributions of the acoustic characteristics of soft biological tissues-the sound velocity and absorption coefficient. Knowing these distributions is urgent for early detection of benign and malignant neoplasms in biological tissues, primarily in the breast. At the first stage, large-scale distributions are estimated; at the second step, they are refined with a high resolution. Results of reconstruction on the base of model initial data are presented. The principal necessity of preliminary reconstruction of large-scale distributions followed by their being taken into account at the second step is illustrated. The use of CUDA technology for processing makes it possible to obtain final images of 1024 × 1024 samples in only a few minutes.

  2. An approximate estimation of velocity profiles and turbulence factor models for air-flows along the exterior of TEFC induction motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimenta Dardan O.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared to a number of other existing correlations for heat transfer, the empirical correlations for forced convection from a short horizontal cylinder in axial air-flows usually do not involve the effects of changes in air-flow velocity and/or air-flow turbulence. Therefore, a common analysis of the heat transfer by using only one energy balance equation for entire outer surface of a solid is considered insufficient for induction motor applications because it fails to include aforementioned effects. This paper presents a novel, empirically-based methodology to estimate approximately the values of air-flow velocities and turbulence factors, that is, velocity profiles and turbulence factor models for stationary horizontal cylinders with and without fins (frame and two end-shields in axial air-flows. These velocity profiles and turbulence factor models can then be used in analytical modelling of steady-state heat transfer from the exterior of totally enclosed fan-cooled induction motors.

  3. Air distribution in a multi-occupant room with mixing or displacement ventilation with or without floor or ceiling heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaozhou; Fang, Lei; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2015-01-01

    This study performed a comparative analysis of the air distribution in a multi-occupant room with mixing or displacement ventilation and the effect of adding floor or ceiling heating to each of them. The vertical distribution of indoor air temperature and velocity in the occupied zone......; the mean local turbulence intensity varied from 12.0% to 14.1% with mixing ventilation with or without floor or ceiling heating, and the corresponding values were 1.5°C to 2.5°C and 7.3% to 9.8% with displacement ventilation with or without floor or ceiling heating. Mean air distribution effectiveness...... varied from 0.93 to 1.0 for mixing ventilation and from 1.06 to 1.14 for displacement ventilation with or without floor or ceiling heating. The results are relevant to the design and control of mixing and displacement ventilation with or without floor or ceiling heating in a multi-occupant room....

  4. A microscopic "social norm" model to obtain realistic macroscopic velocity and density pedestrian distributions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Zanlungo

    Full Text Available We propose a way to introduce in microscopic pedestrian models a "social norm" in collision avoiding and overtaking, i.e. the tendency, shared by pedestrians belonging to the same culture, to avoid collisions and perform overtaking in a preferred direction. The "social norm" is implemented, regardless of the specific collision avoiding model, as a rotation in the perceived velocity vector of the opponent at the moment of computation of the collision avoiding strategy, and justified as an expectation that the opponent will follow the same "social norm" (for example a tendency to avoid on the left and overtake on the right, as proposed in this work for Japanese pedestrians. By comparing with real world data, we show that the introduction of this norm allows for a better reproduction of macroscopic pedestrian density and velocity patterns.

  5. The Three-Dimensional Velocity Distribution of Wide Gap Taylor-Couette Flow Modelled by CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Shina Adebayo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation is conducted for the flow between two concentric cylinders with a wide gap, relevant to bearing chamber applications. This wide gap configuration has received comparatively less attention than narrow gap journal bearing type geometries. The flow in the gap between an inner rotating cylinder and an outer stationary cylinder has been modelled as an incompressible flow using an implicit finite volume RANS scheme with the realisable k-ε model. The model flow is above the critical Taylor number at which axisymmetric counterrotating Taylor vortices are formed. The tangential velocity profiles at all axial locations are different from typical journal bearing applications, where the velocity profiles are quasilinear. The predicted results led to two significant findings of impact in rotating machinery operations. Firstly, the axial variation of the tangential velocity gradient induces an axially varying shear stress, resulting in local bands of enhanced work input to the working fluid. This is likely to cause unwanted heat transfer on the surface in high torque turbomachinery applications. Secondly, the radial inflow at the axial end-wall boundaries is likely to promote the transport of debris to the junction between the end-collar and the rotating cylinder, causing the build-up of fouling in the seal.

  6. Air Distribution in Rooms with Ceiling-mounted Obstacles and Three-Dimensional Isothermal Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Evensen, Louis; Grabau, Peter;

    The air supply openings in ventilated rooms are often placed close to the ceiling. A recirculating flow is generated in the room, and the region between the ceiling and the occupied zone serves as an entrainment and velocity decay area for the wall jets. Ceiling-mounted obstacles may disturb...

  7. A one-dimensional numerical model for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y.; Leon, A.; Apte, S.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of pressurized air pockets in combined sewer systems is argued to produce geyser flows, which is an oscillating jetting of a mixture of gas-liquid flows through vertical shafts. A 1D numerical model is developed for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft which in turn attempts to simulate geyser like flows. The vertical shaft is closed at the bottom and open to ambient pressure at the top. Initially, the lower section of the vertical shaft is filled with compressed air and the upper section with water. The interaction between the pressurized air pocket and the water column in the vertical shaft exhibits an oscillatory motion of the water column that decays over time. The model accounts for steady and unsteady friction to estimate the energy dissipation. The model also includes the falling flow of water around the external perimeter of the pressurized air pocket by assuming that any expansion in the pressurized air pocket would result in the falling volume of water. The acceleration of air-water interface is predicted through a force balance between the pressurized air pocket and the water column combined with the Method of Characteristics that resolves pressure and velocity within the water column. The expansion and compression of the pressurized air pocket is assumed to follow either isothermal process or adiabatic process. Results for both assumptions; isothermal and adiabatic processes, are presented. The performance of the developed 1D numerical model is compared with that of a commercial 3D CFD model. Overall, a good agreement between both models is obtained for pressure and velocity oscillations. The paper will also present a sensitivity analysis of the 3D CFD model.

  8. Electron velocity distribution function in a plasma with temperature gradient and in the presence of suprathermal electrons: application to incoherent-scatter plasma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guio

    Full Text Available The plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution function are calculated numerically for any arbitrary velocity distribution function with cylindrical symmetry along the magnetic field. The electron velocity distribution is separated into two distributions representing the distribution of the ambient electrons and the suprathermal electrons. The velocity distribution function of the ambient electrons is modelled by a near-Maxwellian distribution function in presence of a temperature gradient and a potential electric field. The velocity distribution function of the suprathermal electrons is derived from a numerical model of the angular energy flux spectrum obtained by solving the transport equation of electrons. The numerical method used to calculate the plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution is described. The numerical code is used with simulated data to evaluate the Doppler frequency asymmetry between the up- and downshifted plasma lines of the incoherent-scatter plasma lines at different wave vectors. It is shown that the observed Doppler asymmetry is more dependent on deviation from the Maxwellian through the thermal part for high-frequency radars, while for low-frequency radars the Doppler asymmetry depends more on the presence of a suprathermal population. It is also seen that the full evaluation of the plasma dispersion function gives larger Doppler asymmetry than the heat flow approximation for Langmuir waves with phase velocity about three to six times the mean thermal velocity. For such waves the moment expansion of the dispersion function is not fully valid and the full calculation of the dispersion function is needed.

    Key words. Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution · Incoherent scatter plasma lines · EISCAT · Dielectric response function

  9. Stereoscopy of dust density waves under microgravity: Velocity distributions and phase-resolved single-particle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himpel, Michael, E-mail: himpel@physik.uni-greifswald.de; Killer, Carsten; Melzer, André [Institute of Physics, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Bockwoldt, Tim; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Ole Menzel, Kristoffer [ABB Switzerland Ltd, Corporate Research Center, 5405 Dättwil (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on dust-density waves have been performed in dusty plasmas under the microgravity conditions of parabolic flights. Three-dimensional measurements of a dust density wave on a single particle level are presented. The dust particles have been tracked for many oscillation periods. A Hilbert analysis is applied to obtain trajectory parameters such as oscillation amplitude and three-dimensional velocity amplitude. While the transverse motion is found to be thermal, the velocity distribution in wave propagation direction can be explained by harmonic oscillations with added Gaussian (thermal) noise. Additionally, it is shown that the wave properties can be reconstructed by means of a pseudo-stroboscopic approach. Finally, the energy dissipation mechanism from the kinetic oscillation energy to thermal motion is discussed and presented using phase-resolved analysis.

  10. Nonlinear development of stimulated Raman scattering from electrostatic modes excited by self-consistent non-Maxwellian velocity distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L; Daughton, W; Albright, B J; Bezzerides, B; DuBois, D F; Kindel, J M; Vu, H X

    2006-02-01

    The parametric coupling involving backward stimulated scattering of a laser and electron beam acoustic modes (BAM) is described as observed in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The BAM modes evolve from Langmuir waves (LW) as the electron velocity distribution is nonlinearly modified to be non-Maxwellian by backward stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS). With a marginal damping rate, BAM can be easily excited and allow an extended chirping in frequency to occur as later SRS pulses encounter modified distributions. Coincident with the emergence of this non-Maxwellian distribution is a rapid increase in BSRS reflectivities with laser intensities. Both the reflectivity scaling with laser intensity and the observed spectral features from PIC simulations are consistent with recent Trident experiments.

  11. Shells, holes, worms, high-velocity gas and the z-distribution of gas in galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, R. J.

    The author gives an overview of the current observational understanding of vertically extended gas components in spiral galaxies and the various phenomena which come under such names as shells, holes, worms, and high-velocity gas. For the most part, the focus is on recent high-resolution interferometric studies. The author concentrates on cold gas, and briefly on warm ionized gas, in the Milky Way and a few nearby spirals. Along the way, it is seen how phenomena such as worms and shells may be related to the formation and maintenance of the vertically extended components.

  12. Phase Velocity and Full-Waveform Analysis of Co-located Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) Channels and Geophone Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, L.; Mellors, R. J.; Thurber, C. H.; Wang, H. F.; Zeng, X.

    2015-12-01

    A 762-meter Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) array with a channel spacing of one meter was deployed at the Garner Valley Downhole Array in Southern California. The array was approximately rectangular with dimensions of 180 meters by 80 meters. The array also included two subdiagonals within the rectangle along which three-component geophones were co-located. Several active sources were deployed, including a 45-kN, swept-frequency, shear-mass shaker, which produced strong Rayleigh waves across the array. Both DAS and geophone traces were filtered in 2-Hz steps between 4 and 20 Hz to obtain phase velocities as a function of frequency from fitting the moveout of travel times over distances of 35 meters or longer. As an alternative to this traditional means of finding phase velocity, it is theoretically possible to find the Rayleigh-wave phase velocity at each point of co-location as the ratio of DAS and geophone responses, because DAS is sensitive to ground strain and geophones are sensitive to ground velocity, after suitable corrections for instrument response (Mikumo & Aki, 1964). The concept was tested in WPP, a seismic wave propagation program, by first validating and then using a 3D synthetic, full-waveform seismic model to simulate the effect of increased levels of noise and uncertainty as data go from ideal to more realistic. The results obtained from this study provide a better understanding of the DAS response and its potential for being combined with traditional seismometers for obtaining phase velocity at a single location. This analysis is part of the PoroTomo project (Poroelastic Tomography by Adjoint Inverse Modeling of Data from Seismology, Geodesy, and Hydrology, http://geoscience.wisc.edu/feigl/porotomo).

  13. Distributional Benefit Analysis of a National Air Quality Rule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Huang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Under Executive Order 12898, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA must perform environmental justice (EJ reviews of its rules and regulations. EJ analyses address the hypothesis that environmental disamenities are experienced disproportionately by poor and/or minority subgroups. Such analyses typically use communities as the unit of analysis. While community-based approaches make sense when considering where polluting sources locate, they are less appropriate for national air quality rules affecting many sources and pollutants that can travel thousands of miles. We compare exposures and health risks of EJ-identified individuals rather than communities to analyze EPA’s Heavy Duty Diesel (HDD rule as an example national air quality rule. Air pollutant exposures are estimated within grid cells by air quality models; all individuals in the same grid cell are assigned the same exposure. Using an inequality index, we find that inequality within racial/ethnic subgroups far outweighs inequality between them. We find, moreover, that the HDD rule leaves between-subgroup inequality essentially unchanged. Changes in health risks depend also on subgroups’ baseline incidence rates, which differ across subgroups. Thus, health risk reductions may not follow the same pattern as reductions in exposure. These results are likely representative of other national air quality rules as well.

  14. Starspot distributions on fully convective M dwarfs: implications for radial velocity planet searches

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, J R; Jones, H R A; Pavlenko, Ya V; Jenkins, J S; Haswell, C A; Lohr, M E

    2015-01-01

    Since M4.5 - M9 dwarfs exhibit equatorial rotation velocities of order 10 km/s on average, radial velocity surveys targeting this stellar population will likely need to find methods to effectively remove starspot jitter. We present the first high resolution Doppler images of the M4.5 dwarf, GJ 791.2A, and the M9 dwarf, LP 944-20. The time series spectra of both objects reveal numerous line profile distortions over the rotation period of each star which we interpret as starspots. The transient distortions are modelled with spot/photosphere contrast ratios that correspond to model atmosphere temperature differences of Tphot-Tspot = 200 and 300 K. GJ 791.2A is a fully convective star with vsini = 35.1 km/s. Although we find more starspot structure at high latitudes, we reconstruct spots at a range of phases and latitudes with a mean spot filling of ~3%. LP 944-20 is one of the brightest known late-M dwarfs, with spectral type M9V and vsini = 30.8 km/s. Its spectral time series exhibits two dominant transient lin...

  15. Distribution and Room Air Mixing Risks to Retrofitted Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdick, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Energy efficiency upgrades reduce heating and cooling loads on a house. With enough load reduction and if the HVAC system warrants replacement, the HVAC system is often upgraded with a more efficient, lower capacity system that meets the loads of the upgraded house. For a single-story house with ceiling supply air diffusers, ducts are often removed and upgraded. For houses with ducts that are embedded in walls, the cost of demolition precludes the replacement of ducts. The challenge with the use of existing ducts is that the reduced airflow creates a decreased throw at the supply registers, and the supply air and room air do not mix well, leading to potential thermal comfort complaints. This project investigates this retrofit scenario. The issues and solutions discussed here are relevant to all climate zones, with emphasis on climates that require cooling.

  16. Air Distribution in Rooms with a Fan-Driven Convector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen; Bindels, Rob H.W.; Michalak, Lukasz

    2007-01-01

    Experiments with a fan-driven convector used for both heating and cooling are de.scribed in this paper. Only the cooling situation is considered. The convector is positioned in the upper corner ofthe room, and from there the cold air is let out through the device along the ceiling. The airflow...... coming from the dijfuser is partly controlled by the momentum flow and partly from gravity forces, where the thermal load in the room and the temperature difference between room air and supply air affect the airflow from the convector. The convector system was tested in the same test room in which many...... regular ventilation systems were tested earlier to be ahle to compare airflow from the convector .system with regular ventilation ,systems at a later stage of this research. The heat load in the room consists of a thermal manikin sitting at a desk, a computer, and a desk lamp producing a total heat load...

  17. Air Distribution in a Furnished Room Ventilated by Mixing Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, June Richter; Nielsen, Peter V.; Svidt, Kjeld

    Using isothermal full-scale experiments and two-dimensional isothermal CFD simulations it is investigated how normal office furniture influences the air movements in a room with mixing ventilation. Three different set-ups are made in the experiments and different sizes and locations of the furnit......Using isothermal full-scale experiments and two-dimensional isothermal CFD simulations it is investigated how normal office furniture influences the air movements in a room with mixing ventilation. Three different set-ups are made in the experiments and different sizes and locations...

  18. Device for improved air and fuel distribution to a combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laster, Walter R.; Schilp, Reinhard

    2016-05-31

    A flow conditioning device (30, 50, 70, 100, 150) for a can annular gas turbine engine, including a plurality of flow elements (32, 34, 52, 54, 72, 74, 102) disposed in a compressed air flow path (42, 60, 80, 114, 122) leading to a combustor (12), configured such that relative adjustment of at least one flow directing element (32, 52, 72, 110) with respect to an adjacent flow directing element (34, 54, 74, 112, 120) during operation of the gas turbine engine is effective to adjust a level of choking of the compressed air flow path (42, 60, 80, 114, 122).

  19. Some evidence on the distribution of air quality. [Correlations with income

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asch, P.; Seneca, J.J.

    1978-08-01

    This paper addresses the question: is exposure to air pollution in the U.S. related systematically to economic and social characteristics of the population. The evidence examined (based on micro data) indicates that air pollution in urban areas appears to be regressively distributed; and that recent air-quality changes have followed a progressive pattern. Although these findings must be treated with caution, they are in accord with some evidence reported elsewhere. Section I briefly reviews the literature dealing with the distribution of air quality and associated benefits. Section II describes new evidence on current air-quality distribution, while Section III presents some direct measures of the incidence of distribution. In Section IV some direct tests of the distribution of recent air-quality change are presented. Problems of interpretation are examined in Section V. It is concluded that both the inter- and intra-city distributions examined indicate that air-pollution exposure is inversely related to income and income-related variables. 61 references, 47 footnotes.

  20. Secondary Craters and the Size-Velocity Distribution of Ejected Fragments around Lunar Craters Measured Using LROC Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, K. N.; Jolliff, B. L.; McKinnon, W. B.

    2013-12-01

    Title: Secondary Craters and the Size-Velocity Distribution of Ejected Fragments around Lunar Craters Measured Using LROC Images Authors: Kelsi N. Singer1, Bradley L. Jolliff1, and William B. McKinnon1 Affiliations: 1. Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University in St Louis, St. Louis, MO, United States. We report results from analyzing the size-velocity distribution (SVD) of secondary crater forming fragments from the 93 km diameter Copernicus impact. We measured the diameters of secondary craters and their distances from Copernicus using LROC Wide Angle Camera (WAC) and Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) image data. We then estimated the velocity and size of the ejecta fragment that formed each secondary crater from the range equation for a ballistic trajectory on a sphere and Schmidt-Holsapple scaling relations. Size scaling was carried out in the gravity regime for both non-porous and porous target material properties. We focus on the largest ejecta fragments (dfmax) at a given ejection velocity (υej) and fit the upper envelope of the SVD using quantile regression to an equation of the form dfmax = A*υej ^- β. The velocity exponent, β, describes how quickly fragment sizes fall off with increasing ejection velocity during crater excavation. For Copernicus, we measured 5800 secondary craters, at distances of up to 700 km (15 crater radii), corresponding to an ejecta fragment velocity of approximately 950 m/s. This mapping only includes secondary craters that are part of a radial chain or cluster. The two largest craters in chains near Copernicus that are likely to be secondaries are 6.4 and 5.2 km in diameter. We obtained a velocity exponent, β, of 2.2 × 0.1 for a non-porous surface. This result is similar to Vickery's [1987, GRL 14] determination of β = 1.9 × 0.2 for Copernicus using Lunar Orbiter IV data. The availability of WAC 100 m/pix global mosaics with illumination geometry optimized for morphology allows us to update and extend the work of Vickery

  1. The Velocity and Density Distribution of Earth-Intersecting Meteoroids: Implications for Environment Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, A. V.; Brown, P. G.; Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Moser, D. E.; Blaauw, R. C.; Cooke, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    Meteoroids are known to damage spacecraft: they can crater or puncture components, disturb a spacecraft's attitude, and potentially create secondary electrical effects. Because the damage done depends on the speed, size, density, and direction of the impactor, accurate environment models are critical for mitigating meteoroid-related risks. Yet because meteoroid properties are derived from indirect observations such as meteors and impact craters, many characteristics of the meteoroid environment are uncertain. In this work, we present recent improvements to the meteoroid speed and density distributions. Our speed distribution is derived from observations made by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar. These observations are de-biased using modern descriptions of the ionization efficiency. Our approach yields a slower meteoroid population than previous analyses (see Fig. 1 for an example) and we compute the uncertainties associated with our derived distribution. We adopt a higher fidelity density distribution than that used by many older models. In our distribution, meteoroids with TJ less than 2 are assigned to a low-density population, while those with TJ greater than 2 have higher densities (see Fig. 2). This division and the distributions themselves are derived from the densities reported by Kikwaya et al. These changes have implications for the environment: for instance, the helion/antihelion sporadic sources have lower speeds than the apex and toroidal sources and originate from high-T(sub J) parent bodies. Our on-average slower and denser distributions thus imply that the helion and antihelion sources dominate the meteoroid environment even more completely than previously thought. Finally, for a given near-Earth meteoroid cratering rate, a slower meteoroid population produces a comparatively higher rate of satellite attitude disturbances.

  2. Fifty years of CFD for room air distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2015-01-01

    , and to addressing situations with more steady-state solutions. The article finishes with a number of different case studies such as design of air supply openings, smoke management in buildings, cross-infection risks from the exhalation of particles and calculation of people moving in a room. The use of benchmark...

  3. On the Anisotropy of the He+, C+, O+, and Ne+ Pickup Ion Velocity Distribution Function: STEREO PLASTIC Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taut, A.; Drews, C.; Berger, L.; Peleikis, T.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    PickUp Ions (PUIs) are typically characterized by (1) their almost exclusively single charge state, (2) a highly non-thermal and anisotropic Velocity Distribution Function (VDF) [Drews et al., 2015], and (3) an extended source population of neutral atoms somewhere between the observer and the Sun. The origin of pickup ions ranges from sources only several solar radii away from the Sun, the so-called inner-source of pickup ions, up to a distance of several hundreds of astronomical units, the local interstellar medium. Their continuous production inside the heliosphere and complex interactions with the magnetized solar wind plasma leads to the development of non-thermal, anisotropic features of both the solar wind and pickup ion velocity distribution functions. In this study, we present observations of the VDF of He+, C+, N+, O+ and Ne+ pickup ions with PLASTIC on STEREO A. We have found a PUI flux increase during perpendicular configurations of the local magnetic field that is generally linked to the existence of a so-called torus-distribution [Drews et al., 2015] which is attributed to the production of PUIs close to the observer. A comparison of the PUI VDF between radial and perpendicular configurations of the local magnetic field vector is used to quantify the anisotropy of the PUI VDF and thereby enables us to estimate the mean free path for pitch-angle scattering of He, C, N, O and Ne pickup ions without the necessity of an over-simplified heliospheric model to describe the PUI phase space transport. Our results show a clear signature of a C+ torus signature at 1 AU as well as significant differences between the anisotropies of the He+ and O+ VDF. We will discuss our results in the light of recent studies about the nature of the inner-source of PUIs [Berger et al., 2015] and observations of the 2D VDF of He+[Drews et al., 2015]. Figure Caption: Velocity space diagrams of a pickup ion torus distribution as a (vx-vy)-projection (top left panel) and in the vz = 0

  4. Impact of temperature-velocity distribution on fusion neutron peak shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, D. H.; Field, J. E.; Hatarik, R.; Peterson, J. L.; Hartouni, E. P.; Spears, B. K.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2017-05-01

    Doppler broadening of the 14 MeV DT and 2.45 MeV DD fusion neutron lines has long been our best measure of temperature in a burning plasma. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), yields are high enough and our neutron spectrometers accurate enough that we see finer details of the peak shape. For example, we can measure the shift of the peak due to the bulk motion of the plasma, and we see indications of non-thermal broadening, skew, and kurtosis of the peak caused by the variations of temperature and fluid velocity during burn. We can also distinguish spectral differences among several lines of sight. This paper will review the theory of fusion neutron line shape, show examples of non-Gaussian line shapes and directional variations in NIF data, and describe detailed spectral shapes we see in radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of implosions.

  5. Velocity Distribution of Slurry in Horizontal Pipe When Solid Particles Sliding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangShilin; XuZhenliang; Shaolongtan

    2004-01-01

    Based on the laws of momentum conservation and impulse in accelerating process, the distribution on speed of ununiform slurry flow in a horizontal pipe was studied. According to the momentum change of solid particles and conveying liquid of slurry flow during accelerating, and some effect factors, the relationship between the speed of solid particles and the speed of conveying liquid was obtained.When dealing with the friction between sliding solid particles and pipe, it is pivotal to reasonably distribute component of friction to each solid particle. The friction coefficient between solid particles was obtained by forces analysis and theoretic calculation, and can be used to calculate the friction force on every solid particle. The effect of friction on speed of ever), solid particle was investigated through the impulse law. The result is more accurate than that by using uniform friction on solid particles. It is completely new method to use above theory to get solid particles speed distribution, conveying liquid speed distribution and slurry speed distribution.

  6. Axial dispersion, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase in a pulsed sieve plate extraction column by radiotracer residence time distribution analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Din, Ghiyas Ud [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Isotope Applications Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: fac192@pieas.edu.pk; Chughtai, Imran Rafiq; Inayat, Mansoor Hameed [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, Iqbal Hussain [Isotope Applications Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-12-15

    Axial dispersion, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase have been investigated for a range of dispersed and continuous phase superficial velocities in a pulsed sieve plate extraction column using radiotracer residence time distribution (RTD) analysis. Axial dispersion model (ADM) was used to simulate the hydrodynamics of the system. It has been observed that increase in dispersed phase superficial velocity results in a decrease in its axial dispersion and increase in its slip velocity while its holdup increases till a maximum asymptotic value is achieved. An increase in superficial velocity of continuous phase increases the axial dispersion and holdup of dispersed phase until a maximum value is obtained, while slip velocity of dispersed phase is found to decrease in the beginning and then it increases with increase in superficial velocity of continuous phase.

  7. The Step-wise Velocity of an Air Bubble Rising in a Vertical Tube Filled with a Liquid Dispersion of Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Heon Ki; Nikolov, Alex D; Wasan, Darsh T

    2017-03-02

    The motion of air bubbles in tubes filled with aqueous suspensions of nanoparticles (nanofluids) is of practical interest for bubblejets, lab-on-a-chip, and transporting media. Therefore, the focus of this study is the dynamics of air bubbles rising in a tube in a nanofluid. Many authors experimentally and analytically proposed that the velocity of rising air bubbles is constant for long air bubbles suspended in a vertical tube in common liquids (e.g. an aqueous glycerol solution) when the capillary number is larger than 10-4. For the first time, we report here a systematic study of an air bubble rising in a vertical tube in a nanofluid (e.g. an aqueous silica dioxide nanoparticle suspension, nominal particle size, 19nm). We varied the bubble length scaled by the diameter of the tubes (L/D), the concentration of the nanofluid (10, and 12.5 v%) and the tube diameter (0.45cm, 0.47cm, and 0.50cm). The presence of the nanoparticles creates a significant change in the bubble velocity compared with the bubble rising in the common liquid with the same bulk viscosity. We observed a novel phenomenon of a step-wise increase in the air bubble rising velocity vs. bubble length for small capillary numbers less than 10-7. This step-wise velocity increase vs. the bubble length was not observed in a common fluid. The step-wise velocity increase is attributed to the nanoparticle self-layering phenomenon in the film adjacent to the tube wall. In order to elucidate the role of the nanoparticle film self-layering on the bubble rising velocity, the effect of the capillary number, the tube diameter (e.g, the capillary pressure), and nanofilm viscosity are investigated. We propose a model that takes into consideration the nanoparticle layering in the film confinement to explain the step-wise velocity phenomenon versus the length of the bubble. The oscillatory film interaction energy isotherm is calculated and the Frenkel approach is used to estimate the film viscosity.

  8. Air Distribution Systems and Cross-Infection Risk in the Hospital Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    2012-01-01

    We protect ourselves from airborne cross-infection in our indoor environment by supplying fresh air to the room by natural or mechanical ventilation. The air is distributed in the room according to different principles as e.g. mixing ventilation, downward ventilation, displacement ventilation, et...

  9. Polymer membrane-based thermo-pneumatic actuation for distributed air-jet planar micromanipulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapuis, Y.-A.; Jalabert, L.; Sarajlic, E.; Vermeer, R.; Collard, D.; Fujita, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present latest results of a thermopneumatic microactuator based on polymer membrane and silicon technology. This device has application in distributed air-jet planar micromanipulation to levitate and convey small objects by changing air-flow direction on the surface. Our technology

  10. Anomalous Discharge Product Distribution in Lithium-Air Cathodes: A Three Dimensional View

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Jagjit [ORNL; Allu, Srikanth [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Walker, Lakeisha MH [ORNL; Archibald, Richard K [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Using neutron tomographic imaging we report for the first time three dimensional spatial distribution of lithium product distribution in electrochemically discharged Lithium-Air cathodes. Neutron imaging finds a non-uniform lithium product distribution across the electrode thickness; the lithium species concentration being higher near the edges of the Li-air electrode and relatively uniform in the center of the electrode. The experimental neutron images were analyzed in context of results obtained from 3D modeling of the spatial lithium product distribution using a kinetically coupled diffusion based transport model that accounts for the dynamical reaction rate dependence on the discharge product formation, porosity changes and mass transfer.

  11. Ion velocity distribution functions in argon and helium discharges: detailed comparison of numerical simulation results and experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huihui; Sukhomlinov, Vladimir S.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Mustafaev, Alexander S.

    2017-02-01

    Using the Monte Carlo collision method, we have performed simulations of ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) taking into account both elastic collisions and charge exchange collisions of ions with atoms in uniform electric fields for argon and helium background gases. The simulation results are verified by comparison with the experiment data of the ion mobilities and the ion transverse diffusion coefficients in argon and helium. The recently published experimental data for the first seven coefficients of the Legendre polynomial expansion of the ion energy and angular distribution functions are used to validate simulation results for IVDF. Good agreement between measured and simulated IVDFs shows that the developed simulation model can be used for accurate calculations of IVDFs.

  12. The effect of wind velocity, air temperature and humidity on NH 3 and SO 2 transfer into bean leaves ( phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hove, L. W. A.; Vredenberg, W. J.; Adema, E. H.

    The influence of wind velocity, air temperature and vapour pressure deficit of the air (VPD) on NH 3 and SO 2 transfer into bean leaves ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was examined using a leaf chamber. The measurements suggested a transition in the properties of the leaf boundary layer at a wind velocity of 0.3-0.4 ms -1 which corresponds to a Recrit value of about 2000. At higher wind velocities the leaf boundary layer resistance ( rb) was 1.5-2 times lower than can be calculated from the theory. Nevertheless, the assessed relationships between rb and wind velocity appeared to be similar to the theoretical derived relationship for rb. The NH 3 flux and in particular the SO 2 flux into the leaf strongly increased at a VPD decline. The increase of the NH 3 flux could be attributed to an increase of the stomatal conductance ( gs). However, the increase of the SO 2 flux could only partly be explained by an increase of gs. An apparent additional uptake was also observed for the NH 3 uptake at a low temperature and VPD. The SO 2 flux was also influenced by air temperature which could be explained by a temperature effect on gs. The results suggest that calculation of the NH 3 and SO 2 flux using data of gs gives a serious understimation of the real flux of these gases into leaves at a low temperature and VPD.

  13. INTRA URBAN AIR TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS IN HISTORIC URBAN CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmira Jamei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the urban heat island effect in Malaysian historic town Malacca through seven mobile traverses, as carried out on 10 December 2011. It aims to identify the intra-urban air temperature differences between heritage core zone, new development area and outskirts of the city. Air temperature variations were also analyzed across three different zones; namely the outskirts, the heritage site and the city center district. Heat index values were then calculated based on air temperature and relative humidity to gauge the level of outdoor thermal comfort within the study area. Based on the indications, one may conclude that the heritage place’s core zone is currently threatened by escalating temperatures and that its current temperature range falls within the “caution” and “extreme caution” categories. Furthermore, no significant difference was observed between the peak temperatures of the old city quarters and newer areas; despite the disparities in their urban forms. Therefore, it is hoped that the study, with its implications, will be able to influence future environmental consideration in heritage city of Melaka.

  14. Global Distribution and Variability of Surface Skin and Surface Air Temperatures as Depicted in the AIRS Version-6 Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susskind, Joel; Lee, Jae N.; Iredell, Lena

    2014-01-01

    In this presentation, we will briefly describe the significant improvements made in the AIRS Version-6 retrieval algorithm, especially as to how they affect retrieved surface skin and surface air temperatures. The global distribution of seasonal 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM local time 12 year climatologies of Ts,a will be presented for the first time. We will also present the spatial distribution of short term 12 year anomaly trends of Ts,a at 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM, as well as the spatial distribution of temporal correlations of Ts,a with the El Nino Index. It will be shown that there are significant differences between the behavior of 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM Ts,a anomalies in some arid land areas.

  15. Catalog of fine-structured electron velocity distribution functions - Part 1: Antiparallel magnetic-field reconnection (Geospace Environmental Modeling case)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdin, Philippe-A.

    2017-09-01

    To understand the essential physics needed to reproduce magnetic reconnection events in 2.5-D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we revisit the Geospace Environmental Modeling (GEM) setup. We set up a 2-D Harris current sheet (that also specifies the initial conditions) to evolve the reconnection of antiparallel magnetic fields. In contrast to the GEM setup, we use a much smaller initial perturbation to trigger the reconnection and evolve it more self-consistently. From PIC simulation data with high-quality particle statistics, we study a symmetric reconnection site, including separatrix layers, as well as the inflow and the outflow regions. The velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of electrons have a fine structure and vary strongly depending on their location within the reconnection setup. The goal is to start cataloging multidimensional fine-structured electron velocity distributions showing different reconnection processes in the Earth's magnetotail under various conditions. This will enable a direct comparison with observations from, e.g., the NASA Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission, to identify reconnection-related events. We find regions with strong non-gyrotropy also near the separatrix layer and provide a refined criterion to identify an electron diffusion region in the magnetotail. The good statistical significance of this work for relatively small analysis areas reveals the gradual changes within the fine structure of electron VDFs depending on their sampling site.

  16. Impact of temperature-velocity distribution on fusion neutron peak shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, David

    2016-10-01

    Doppler broadening of the 14 MeV DT and 2.45 MeV DD fusion neutron lines has long been our best measure of temperature in a burning plasma. At the National Ignition Facility yields are high enough and our neutron spectrometers accurate enough that we see finer details of the peak shape. For example, we can measure the shift of the peak due to bulk motion of the plasma, and we see indications of non-thermal broadening, skew, and kurtosis of the peak caused by the variations of temperature and fluid velocity during burn. We can also distinguish spectral differences among several lines of sight. This talk will review the theory of fusion neutron line shape, show examples of non-Gaussian line shapes and directional variations in NIF data, and describe detailed spectral shapes we see in radhydro implosion simulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Modeling the global levels and distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls in air under a climate change scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamon, Lara; Von Waldow, Harald; Macleod, Matthew; Scheringer, Martin; Marcomini, Antonio; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2009-08-01

    We used the multimedia chemical fate model BETR Global to evaluate changes in the global distribution of two polychlorinated biphenyls, PCB 28 and PCB 153, under the influence of climate change. This was achieved by defining two climate scenarios based on results from a general circulation model, one scenario representing the last twenty years of the 20th century (20CE scenario) and another representing the global climate under the assumption of strong future greenhouse gas emissions (A2 scenario). The two climate scenarios are defined by four groups of environmental parameters: (1) temperature in the planetary boundary layer and the free atmosphere, (2) wind speeds and directions in the atmosphere, (3) current velocities and directions in the surface mixed layer of the oceans, and (4) rate and geographical pattern of precipitation. As a fifth parameter in our scenarios, we considerthe effect of temperature on primary volatilization emissions of PCBs. Comparison of dynamic model results using environmental parameters from the 20CE scenario against historical long-term monitoring data of concentrations of PCB 28 and PCB 153 in air from 16 different sites shows satisfactory agreement between modeled and measured PCBs concentrations. The 20CE scenario and A2 scenario were compared using steady-state calculations and assuming the same source characteristics of PCBs. Temperature differences between the two scenarios is the dominant factor that determines the difference in PCB concentrations in air. The higher temperatures in the A2 scenario drive increased primary and secondary volatilization emissions of PCBs, and enhance transport from temperate regions to the Arctic. The largest relative increase in concentrations of both PCB congeners in air under the A2 scenario occurs in the high Arctic and the remote Pacific Ocean. Generally, higher wind speeds under the A2 scenario result in more efficient intercontinental transport of PCB 28 and PCB 153 compared to the 20CE

  18. Direct Measuring Methods of Water Vapor Content and Air Velocity at High Temperature using ZrO2-MgO Gas Chemisorption Type Ceramic Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Nobuya; Shiba, Tooru; Hyodo, Tsutomu

    The control of humidity or air velocity as well as temperature is imperative for industrial process equipment such as air conditioners, dryers. At present, much about humidity sensors has been reported, and recently, ceramic sensors have been used with improved results. However, the effective operating temperature of these sensors for a direct measurement of the humidity is about 423 K at the highest. From the various ceramic sensors so far investigated, the authors selected composite ceramics ZrO2-MgO with porous structure and n-type semiconductor for humidity sensing at high temperature. This is because, when the working temperature of the ceramic sensor is between 673 and 973K, the sensor detects the presence of water vapor and gas velocity by the variations in the electronic condition caused by the reversible of the water vapor. From the test, the sensor that use a single sensing ceramic element can detect directly both the water vapor content in a mixed gas of air and superheated vapor in the temperature range 373-773 K and the air velocity(O.5-4m/s) in the range 373-573K.

  19. Molecular beam studies of unimolecular reactions: Cl, F + C/sub 2/H/sub 3/Br. [Angular and velocity distributions, mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, R.J.; Coggiola, M.J.; Lee, Y.T.

    1978-12-01

    Several methods currently used to study unimolecular decomposition in molecular beams are discussed. Experimental product angular and velocity distributions obtained for the reaction of F, Cl with C/sub 2/H/sub 3/Br are presented. The mechanism by which conservation of angular momemtum can cause coupling of the product angular and velocity distributions in dissociation of long-lived complexes is introduced. 14 references.

  20. Influence of constricted air distribution on NOx emissions in pulverized coal combustion boiler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Feng(魏风); ZHANG Jun-ying(张军营); TANG Bi-guang(唐必光); ZHENG Chu-guang(郑楚光)

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports a field testing of full scale PCC (Pulverized Coal Combustion) boiler study into the influence of constricted air distribution on NOx emissions at unit 3 (125 MW power units, 420 t/h boiler) of Guixi power station, Jiangxi and puts forward the methods to decrease NOx emissions and the principle of boiler operation and regulation through analyzing NOx emissions state under real running condition. Based on boiler constricted air distribution, the experiment mainly tested the influence of primary air, excessive air, boiler load and milling sets (tertiary air) on NOx emissions and found its influence characteristics. A degraded bituminous coal is simply adopted to avoid the test results from other factors.

  1. Optimization of the imported air express cargo distribution problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang, T.L.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the delivering network of imported air express cargo as an integrated multi-depot vehicle routing problem. Integrated multi-depot vehicle routing problem attempts to decide which service centers should be used and how much freight should be unloaded in each service center. The role of an exchange point which is allowing the delivery vans and shuttles to exchange imported and exported goods is also addressed. Test results demonstrate the feasibility of the four models so these are highly promising for use in a diverse array of applications, such as in home delivery and reverse logistics.

  2. Reflection of electromagnetic radiation from plasma with an anisotropic electron velocity distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagin, K. Yu., E-mail: vagin@sci.lebedev.ru; Uryupin, S. A., E-mail: uryupin@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15

    The reflection of a test electromagnetic pulse from the plasma formed as a result of tunnel ionization of atoms in the field of a circularly polarized high-power radiation pulse is analyzed using the kinetic approach to describe electron motion. It is shown that the reflected pulse is significantly amplified due to the development of Weibel instability. The amplification efficiency is determined by the maximum value of the instability growth rate, which depends on the degree of anisotropy of the photoelectron distribution function.

  3. Method for acquiring part load distribution coefficient of air conditioning system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁勇; 李百战; 谭颖

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a method to acquire runtime distribution ratio of building air conditioning system under part load condition (part load coefficient of system) through practical energy consumption data. By utilizing monthly energy consumption data of the entire year as the analysis object,this paper identifies data distribution,verifies distribution characteristics and analyzes distribution probability density for the issue of running time distribution ratio of air conditioning system in part load zones in the whole operation period,thus providing a basic calculation basis for an overall analysis of energy efficiency of air conditioning system. In view of the general survey of public building energy consumption carried by the government of Chongqing,this paper takes the governmental office building as an example,the part load ratio coefficient corresponding to practical running of air conditioning system of governmental office building in Chongqing is obtained by utilizing the above probability analysis and the solving method of probability density function. By utilizing the ratio coefficient obtained using this method,the part load coefficient with any running ratio of air conditioning system can be obtained according to the requirement of analysis,which can be used in any load ratio for analyzing running energy efficiency of air conditioning system.

  4. Ejecta velocity distribution of impact craters formed on quartz sand: Effect of projectile density on crater scaling law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujido, Sayaka; Arakawa, Masahiko; Suzuki, Ayako I.; Yasui, Minami

    2015-12-01

    In order to clarify the effects of projectile density on ejecta velocity distributions for a granular target, impact cratering experiments on a quartz sand target were conducted by using eight types of projectiles with different densities ranging from 11 g cm-3 to 1.1 g cm-3, which were launched at about 200 m s-1 from a vertical gas gun at Kobe University. The scaling law of crater size, the ejection angle of ejecta grains, and the angle of the ejecta curtain were also investigated. The ejecta velocity distribution obtained from each projectile was well described by the π-scaling theory of v0/√{gR} =k2(x0/R)-1/μ, where v0, g, R and x0 are the ejection velocity, gravitational acceleration, crater radius and ejection position, respectively, and k2 and μ are constants mostly depending on target material properties (Housen, K.R., Holsapple, K.A. [2011]. Icarus 211, 856-875). The value of k2 was found to be almost constant at 0.7 for all projectiles except for the nylon projectile, while μ increased with the projectile density, from 0.43 for the low-density projectile to 0.6-0.7 for the high-density projectile. On the other hand, the π-scaling theory for crater size gave a μ value of 0.57, which was close to the average of the μ values obtained from ejecta velocity distributions. The ejection angle, θ, of each grain decreased slightly with distance, from higher than 45° near the impact point to 30-40° at 0.6 R. The ejecta curtain angle is controlled by the two elementary processes of ejecta velocity distribution and ejection angle; it gradually increased from 52° to 63° with the increase of the projectile density. The comparison of our experimental results with the theoretical model of the crater excavation flow known as the Z-model revealed that the relationship between μ and θ obtained by our experiments could not be described by the Z-model (Maxwell, D.E. [1977]. In: Roddy, D.J., Pepin, R.O., Merrill, R.B. (Eds.), Impact and Explosion Cratering

  5. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey X: Evidence for a bimodal distribution of rotational velocities for the single early B-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Dufton, P L; Dunstall, P R; Evans, C J; Brott, I; de Mink, S E; Howarth, I D; Kennedy, M; McEvoy, C; Potter, A T; Ramírez-Agudelo, O H; Sana, H; Simón-Díaz, S; Taylor, W; Vink, J S

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Projected rotational velocities (\\vsini) have been estimated for 334 targets in the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula survey that do not manifest significant radial velocity variations and are not supergiants. They have spectral types from approximately O9.5 to B3. The estimates have been analysed to infer the underlying rotational velocity distribution, which is critical for understanding the evolution of massive stars. Methods: Projected rotational velocities were deduced from the Fourier transforms of spectral lines, with upper limits also being obtained from profile fitting. For the narrower lined stars, metal and non-diffuse helium lines were adopted, and for the broader lined stars, both non-diffuse and diffuse helium lines; the estimates obtained using the different sets of lines are in good agreement. The uncertainty in the mean estimates is typically 4% for most targets. The iterative deconvolution procedure of Lucy has been used to deduce the probability density distribution of the rotational velocities. R...

  6. NIHAO project II: halo shape, phase-space density and velocity distribution of dark matter in galaxy formation simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butsky, Iryna; Macciò, Andrea V.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Wang, Liang; Obreja, Aura; Stinson, Greg S.; Penzo, Camilla; Kang, Xi; Keller, Ben W.; Wadsley, James

    2016-10-01

    We use the NIHAO (Numerical Investigation of Hundred Astrophysical Objects) cosmological simulations to study the effects of galaxy formation on key properties of dark matter (DM) haloes. NIHAO consists of ≈90 high-resolution smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations that include (metal-line) cooling, star formation, and feedback from massive stars and supernovae, and cover a wide stellar and halo mass range: 106 ≲ M*/M⊙ ≲ 1011(109.5 ≲ Mhalo/M⊙ ≲ 1012.5). When compared to DM-only simulations, the NIHAO haloes have similar shapes at the virial radius, Rvir, but are substantially rounder inside ≈0.1Rvir. In NIHAO simulations, c/a increases with halo mass and integrated star formation efficiency, reaching ˜0.8 at the Milky Way mass (compared to 0.5 in DM-only), providing a plausible solution to the long-standing conflict between observations and DM-only simulations. The radial profile of the phase-space Q parameter (ρ/σ3) is best fit with a single power law in DM-only simulations, but shows a flattening within ≈0.1Rvir for NIHAO for total masses M > 1011 M⊙. Finally, the global velocity distribution of DM is similar in both DM-only and NIHAO simulations, but in the solar neighbourhood, NIHAO galaxies deviate substantially from Maxwellian. The distribution is more symmetric, roughly Gaussian, with a peak that shifts to higher velocities for Milky Way mass haloes. We provide the distribution parameters which can be used for predictions for direct DM detection experiments. Our results underline the ability of the galaxy formation processes to modify the properties of DM haloes.

  7. Comparison of predicted and experimental real-gas pressure distributions on space shuttle orbiter nose for shuttle entry air data system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental investigation of inviscid real-gas effects on the pressure distribution along the Space Shuttle Orbiter nose center line up to an angle of attack of 32 deg was performed in support of the Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS). Free-stream velocities from 4.8 to 6.6 kn/s were generated at hypersonic conditions with helium, air, and CO2, resulting in normal-shock density ratios from 3.7 to 18.4. The experimental results for pressure distribution agreed closely with numerical results. Modified Newtonian theory deviates from both experiment and the numerical results as angle of attack increases or shock density ratio decreases. An evaluation of the use of modified Newtonian theory for predicting SEADS pressure distributions in actual flight conditions was made through comparison with numerical predictions.

  8. Displacement and air distribution ventilation systems; Verdringingsventilatie- en luchtverdeelsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Holten, P. [Solid Air, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-15

    Since an evaporative cooling system uses 100% clean outdoor air; it is ideal for positive displacement ventilation. By using the overpressure inside the building or room, windows and doors can be opened without affecting the controlled room temperature. The combination of positive displacement ventilation/balance ventilation with heat recovery is a very attractive solution. In this article you will find a brief explanation of the operation, application and basic principles of positive displacement ventilation. [Dutch] Verdampingskoeling leent zich in het bijzonder voor verdringingsventilatie dankzij het gebruik van 100% buitenlucht. Gebruikmakend van overdruk kunnen daarbij ramen en deuren worden geopend zonder dat de temperatuur hierdoor sterk wordt beinvloed. De combinatie verdringingsventilatie/balansventilatie met WTW, zoals in De Vijfhoek, is daarbij een voor de hand liggende optie. In dit artikel worden de basisprincipes van verdringingsventilatie, alsmede de werking en toepassing hiervan, toegelicht.

  9. Groundwater remediation engineering--Study on the flow distribution of air sparging using acetylene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yan-mei; ZHANG Ying; HUANG Guo-qiang; JIANG Bin; LI Xin-gang

    2005-01-01

    Air sparging(AS) is an emerging method to remove VOCs from saturated soils and groundwater. Air sparging performance highly depends on the air distribution resulting in the aquifer. In order to study gas flow characterization, a two-dimensional experimental chamber was designed and installed. In addition, the method by using acetylene as the tracer to directly image the gas distribution results of AS process has been put forward. Experiments were performed with different injected gas flow rates. The gas flow patterns were found to depend significantly on the injected gas flow rate, and the characterization of gas flow distributions in porous media was very different from the acetylene tracing study. Lower and higher gas flow rates generally yield more irregular in shape and less effective gas distributions.

  10. Marine Air Ground Task Force Distribution In The Battlespace

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    4081: MAGTF Logistics Support Systems (MLS2), MCO 4000.51: Automatic Identification Technology (AIT), MCO 4470.1A: United States Marine Corps (USMC...systems to communicate and perform logistical functions in support of operations. 12 3. MCO 4000.51: Automatic Identification Technology (AIT) MCO...Corps order (MCO) 4000.51: Automatic Identification Technology (AIT), MCO 4470.1A: USMC MAGTF Deployment and Distribution Policy (MDDP), and Logistics

  11. Measurements of the Diameter and Velocity Distributions of Atomized Tablet-Coating Solutions for Pharmaceutical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterday, Kathryn; Aliseda, Alberto; Lasheras, Juan

    2009-11-01

    The atomization of colloidal suspensions is of particular interest to the manufacturing of tablets and pills used as drug delivery systems by the pharmaceutical industry. At various stages in the manufacturing process, the tablets are coated with a spray of droplets produced by co-axial atomizers. The mechanisms of droplet size and spray formation in these types of atomizers are dominated by Kelvin-Helmholtz and Raleigh-Taylor instabilities for both low[1] and high[2] Ohnesorge numbers. We present detailed phase Doppler measurements of the Sauter Mean Diameter of the droplets produced by co-axial spray atomizers using water-based colloidal suspensions with solid concentrations ranging from fifteen to twenty percent and acetone-based colloidal suspensions with solid concentrations ranging from five to ten percent. Our results compare favorably with predictions by Aliseda's model. This suggests that the final size distribution is mainly determined by the instabilities caused by the sudden acceleration of the liquid interface. [1]Varga, C. M., et al. (2003) J. Fluid Mech. 497:405-434 [2]Aliseda, A. et al. (2008). J. Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 34(2), 161-175.

  12. Multi-channel laser Doppler velocimetry using a two-dimensional optical fiber array for obtaining instantaneous velocity distribution characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoden, Tomoaki; Yasue, Youichi; Ishida, Hiroki; Akiguchi, Shunsuke; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Takada, Yogo; Teranishi, Tsunenobu; Hachiga, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) has been developed that is capable of performing two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional measurements. It employs two horizontal laser light sheets that intersect at an angle of 13.3°. Since the intersection region is thin, it can be used to approximately determine the 2D flow field. An 8 × 8 array of optical fibers is used to simultaneously measure Doppler frequencies at 64 points. Experiments were conducted to assess the performance of the LDV, and it was found to be capable of obtaining spatial and temporal velocity information at multiple points in a flow field. The technique is fast, noninvasive, and accurate over long sampling periods. Furthermore, its applicability to an actual flow field was confirmed by measuring the temporal velocity distribution of a pulsatile flow in a rectangular flow channel with an obstruction. The proposed device is thus a useful, compact optical instrument for conducting simultaneous 2D cross-sectional multipoint measurements.

  13. Measurement of the Lick Indices in Early-Type Galaxies: Line-of-Sight Velocity Distribution Corrections for IC 1459

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samurović, S.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse the measurements of the absorption line-strength Lick indices in the early-type galaxy IC 1459. We use thelong-slit spectra of the elliptical galaxy IC 1459 from which its kinematicshad previously been extracted to calculate the Lick indices forthe observed spectral region (Mg$_2$, Fe5270, Fe5335 and H$_beta$. Weapply the usual procedure and correct the indices to the Lick spectralresolution and for the zero velocity dispersion. The procedure applied in thispaper also corrects to non-Gaussian line-of-sight velocity distribution(LOSVD observed in this galaxy, especially in its outer parts. The findingsof Kuntschner (2004 were tested and it is shown that the departures from theGaussian LOSVD may indeed cause erroneous determinations of the Lick indices. The impact of the introduction of non-Gaussian LOSVD differs for differentindices. For the galaxy IC~1459 it is shown that the iron indices areespecially sensitive when the correction due to anistropies is introduced: thecorrections for Fe5270 and Fe5335 are $sim 10$ and $sim 19$ percentlarger, respectively, than the corrections obtained in case of a pure Gaussian. The corrections for Mg$_2$ index are shown to be negligible and thecorrections of the H$_beta$ index due to anisotropies are also small (below$sim 4$ per cent at most.

  14. Measurement of the Lick indices in early-type galaxies: Line-of-sight velocity distribution corrections for IC 1459

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samurović Srđan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze the measurements of the absorption line-strength Lick indices in the early-type galaxy IC 1459. We use the long-slit spectra of the elliptical galaxy IC 1459 from which its kinematics had previously been extracted to calculate the Lick indices for the observed spectral region (Mg2, Fe5270, Fe5335 and Hβ. We apply the usual procedure and correct the indices to the Lick spectral resolution and for the zero velocity dispersion. The procedure applied in this paper also corrects to non-Gaussian line-of-sight velocity distribution (LOSVD observed in this galaxy, especially in its outer parts. The findings of Kuntschner (2004 were tested and it is shown that the departures from the Gaussian LOSVD may indeed cause erroneous determinations of the Lick indices. The impact of the introduction of non-Gaussian LOSVD differs for different indices. For the galaxy IC 1459 it is shown that the iron indices are especially sensitive when the correction due to anistropies is introduced: the corrections for Fe5270 and Fe5335 are ~10 and ~19 percent larger, respectively, than the corrections obtained in case of a pure Gaussian. The corrections for Mg2 index are shown to be negligible and the corrections of the Hβ index due to anisotropies are also small (below ~ 4 per cent at most.

  15. Distributed modeling of monthly air temperatures over the rugged terrain of the Yellow River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Our analyses of the monthly mean air temperature of meteorological stations show that altitude,global solar radiation and surface effective radiation have a significant impact on air temperature.We set up a physically-based empirical model for monthly air temperature simulation.Combined the proposed model with the distributed modeling results of global solar radiation and routine meteorological observation data,we also developed a method for the distributed simulation of monthly air temperatures over rugged terrain.Spatial distribution maps are generated at a resolution of 1 km×1 km for the monthly mean,the monthly mean maximum and the monthly mean minimum air temperatures for the Yellow River Basin.Analysis shows that the simulation results reflect to a considerable extent the macro and local distribution characteristics of air temperature.Cross-validation shows that the proposed model displays good stability with mean absolute bias errors of 0.19℃-0.35℃.Tests carried out on local meteorological station data and case year data show that the model has good spatial and temporal simulation capacity.The proposed model solely uses routine meteorological data and can be applied easily to other regions.

  16. NIHAO project II: Halo shape, phase-space density and velocity distribution of dark matter in galaxy formation simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Butsky, Iryna; Dutton, Aaron A; Wang, Liang; Stinson, Greg S; Penzo, Camilla; Kang, Xi; Keller, Ben W; Wadsley, James

    2015-01-01

    We show the effect of galaxy formation on the dark matter (DM) distribution across a wide range of halo masses. We focus on how baryon physics changes the dark matter halo shape, the so called "pseudo phase-space density distribution" and the velocity distribution within the virial radius, Rvir and in the solar neighborhood. This study is based on the NIHAO galaxy formation simulations, a large suite of cosmological zoom-in simulations. The galaxies reproduce key properties of observed galaxies, and hence offer unique insight into how baryons change the dark matter morphology and kinematics. When compared to dark matter only simulations, the NIHAO haloes have similar shapes at Rvir, but are substantially rounder inside ~0.1 Rvir. In DM-only simulations the inner halo has a minor-to-major axis ratio of c/a~0.5. In hydro simulations c/a increases with halo mass and integrated star formation efficiency, reaching ~0.8 at the Milky Way mass, reconciling a long-standing conflict between observations and DM only sim...

  17. Spanwise lift distributions and wake velocity surveys of a semi-span wing with a discontinuous twist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki

    1989-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted in the NASA-Ames 7 x 10 ft wind tunnel to investigate the lift distribution on a semispan wing with a discontinuous change in spanwise twist. The semispan wing had a tip with an adjustable pitch angle independent on the inboard section pitch angle simulating the free tip rotor blade when its free tip is at a deflected position. The spanwise lift distribution over the wing and the tip were measured and three component velocity surveys behind the wing were obtained with a 3-D laser Doppler velocimeter (LV) with the wing at one angle of attack and the tip deflected at different pitch angles. A six-component internal strain gage balance was also used to measure total forces and moments on the tip. The 3-D lift was computed from the 2-D lift distributions obtained from the LV and from the strain gage balance. The results from both experimental methods are shown to be in agreement with predictions made by a steady, 3-D panel code, VSAERO.

  18. Provide a suitable range to include the thermal creeping effect on slip velocity and temperature jump of an air flow in a nanochannel by lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimipour, Arash

    2017-01-01

    The thermal creeping effect on slip velocity of air forced convection through a nanochannel is studied for the first time by using a lattice Boltzmann method. The nanochannel side walls are kept hot while the cold inlet air streams along them. The computations are presented for the wide range of Reynolds number, Knudsen number and Eckert number while slip velocity and temperature jump effects are involved. Moreover appropriate validations are performed versus previous works concerned the micro-nanoflows. The achieved results are shown as the velocity and temperature profiles at different cross sections, streamlines and isotherms and also the values of slip velocity and temperature jump along the nanochannel walls. The ability of the lattice Boltzmann method to simulate the thermal creeping effects on hydrodynamic and thermal domains of flow is shown at this study; so that its effects should be involved at lower values of Eckert number and higher values of Reynolds number especially at entrance region where the most temperature gradient exists.

  19. High-transmission 20-channel polychromator for observing non-Maxwellian electron velocity distributions in plasmas by Thomson scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, C J

    1988-07-15

    A high-transmission (~45%) twenty-channel polychromator equipped with near-infrared sensitive photomultipliers has been constructed to record Thomson scattering spectra at the TORTUR tokamak. The high transmission was achieved by the use of mirrors instead of fiber optics to guide the spectrally resolved light to a set of photomultipliers. Spectral analysis is performed with a holographically ruled concave grating. Acceptable dimensions of the wavelength selection mirrors were obtained by magnifying the spectral image by a factor of 5 with a Mangin mirror. Electron temperatures up to 1000 eV at a density of 5 x 10(19) m(-3) can be measured with an accuracy of approximately l%. Both high sensitivity and high resolution enable the detection of irregularities in the velocity distribution. For example, satellites corresponding to partial densities of (5 +/- 1) x 10(17) m(-3) were found at 23 nm from the laser wavelength.

  20. Reconstruction of the sound velocity and absorption spatial distributions in soft biological tissue phantoms from experimental ultrasound tomography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, V. A.; Zotov, D. I.; Rumyantseva, O. D.

    2015-03-01

    The paper is devoted to implementing in a specific tomographic device a two-step algorithm designed to reconstruct the spatial distributions of the sound velocity and absorption coefficient, primarily in soft biological tissues. To generate the input data of the first and second steps, a correlation algorithm is used based on determination of the time shift in the signal propagation time in the presence of an object. The results of reconstruction are presented, which are based on data measured for objects-phantoms using a developed experimental ultrasound tomograph model. We discuss problems that arise during reconstruction with a low resolution at the first step of the algorithm, and we demonstrate the high spatial resolving power achieved at the second step.

  1. Influence of external white noise on the formation of Tsallis' velocity distribution function: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri Kadijani, M.; Abbasi, H.

    2016-09-01

    Dynamics of a dust layer suspending in a plasma and interacting through a Yukawa-type potential is considered. In the small affinity limit, the influence of an external white noise on the formation of Tsallis' velocity distribution function is studied through molecular dynamics simulation. The characteristic length of the noise is much smaller than the system size that causes a number of subsystems (islands) to be formed with the size similar to the noise one. The external noise leads to the temperature fluctuation in each island. Therefore, a stochastic formalism based on a Langevin equation for the fluctuating temperature is presented. The approach provides a dynamical reason how a fluctuating temperature takes a system to a unique class of quasi-equilibrium states. In particular, the dependence of the model systems on the noise parameters is explained. The non-extensive parameter is obtained through which the small affinity limit can be defined.

  2. An experimental study of wave propagation and velocity distributions in a vertically driven time-dependent granular gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, John Anthony

    Averaged over appropriate space and time scales the dynamics of highly fluidized granular systems are often reminiscent of molecular fluid flows. As a result, theoretical efforts to describe these systems have borrowed heavily from continuum mechanics, particularly hydrodynamics. This has led to various proposed granular hydrodynamic theories which have been used to simulate granular materials in various states of confinement and excitation. These studies suggest that a continuum model for granular gasses can accurately reproduce the mean density, velocity and temperature profiles for an experimental granular gas. This thesis contributes to this body of work by presenting an experimental study of the hydrodynamic fields and velocity distributions within a vertically driven quasi-2D granular gas. We have taken pictures as fast as possible of a time-dependent granular gas using a high-speed CCD camera. We have extracted the positions and velocities of 57-564 particles per frame over 400 GB of raw images collected at 3700 fps. We used this data to compute the density, velocity and temperature fields as functions of time and space to a very high resolution. This approach led to the discovery of novel substructures within the hydrodynamic fields which would have been overlooked had we chosen to average over a drive cycle as earlier studies have done. In particular, the high spatial resolution available from our measurements reveals a serrated substructure in the shock waves which has not been reported before. This substructure is the result of collisional momentum transport . One of the current issues in formulating a granular continuum model is how to incorporate local and non-local dependencies between stress and strain correctly. In this thesis we demonstrate that the collisional transfer of momentum produces a non-local effect in the stress tensor which plays a major role in determining the mean flow. Current models have incorporated only the collisional or

  3. The Effects of Sub-Regional Climate Velocity on the Distribution and Spatial Extent of Marine Species Assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Kleisner

    Full Text Available Many studies illustrate variable patterns in individual species distribution shifts in response to changing temperature. However, an assemblage, a group of species that shares a common environmental niche, will likely exhibit similar responses to climate changes, and these community-level responses may have significant implications for ecosystem function. Therefore, we examine the relationship between observed shifts of species in assemblages and regional climate velocity (i.e., the rate and direction of change of temperature isotherms. The assemblages are defined in two sub-regions of the U.S. Northeast Shelf that have heterogeneous oceanography and bathymetry using four decades of bottom trawl survey data and we explore temporal changes in distribution, spatial range extent, thermal habitat area, and biomass, within assemblages. These sub-regional analyses allow the dissection of the relative roles of regional climate velocity and local physiography in shaping observed distribution shifts. We find that assemblages of species associated with shallower, warmer waters tend to shift west-southwest and to shallower waters over time, possibly towards cooler temperatures in the semi-enclosed Gulf of Maine, while species assemblages associated with relatively cooler and deeper waters shift deeper, but with little latitudinal change. Conversely, species assemblages associated with warmer and shallower water on the broad, shallow continental shelf from the Mid-Atlantic Bight to Georges Bank shift strongly northeast along latitudinal gradients with little change in depth. Shifts in depth among the southern species associated with deeper and cooler waters are more variable, although predominantly shifts are toward deeper waters. In addition, spatial expansion and contraction of species assemblages in each region corresponds to the area of suitable thermal habitat, but is inversely related to assemblage biomass. This suggests that assemblage distribution

  4. 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves in a biotite gneiss, measured in oil as the pressure medium: Comparison with velocity measurements in a multi-anvil pressure apparatus and with texture-based calculated data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokajíček, T.; Kern, H.; Svitek, T.; Ivankina, T.

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasonic measurements of the 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves were performed on a spherical sample of a biotite gneiss from the Outokumpu scientific drill hole. Measurements were done at room temperature and pressures up to 400 and 70 MPa, respectively, in a pressure vessel with oil as a pressure medium. A modified transducer/sample assembly and the installation of a new mechanical system allowed simultaneous measurements of P- and S-wave velocities in 132 independent directions of the sphere on a net in steps of 15°. Proper signals for P- and S-waves could be recorded by coating the sample surface with a high-viscosity shear wave gel and by temporal point contacting of the transmitter and receiver transducers with the sample surface during the measurements. The 3D seismic measurements revealed a strong foliation-related directional dependence (anisotropy) of P- and S-wave velocities, which is confirmed by measurements in a multi-anvil apparatus on a cube-shaped specimen of the same rock. Both experimental approaches show a marked pressure sensitivity of P- and S-wave velocities and velocity anisotropies. With increasing pressure, P- and S-wave velocities increase non-linearly due to progressive closure of micro-cracks. The reverse is true for velocity anisotropy. 3D velocity calculations based on neutron diffraction measurements of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of major minerals show that the intrinsic bulk anisotropy is basically caused by the CPO of biotite constituting about 23 vol.% of the rock. Including the shape of biotite grains and oriented low-aspect ratio microcracks into the modelling increases bulk anisotropy. An important finding from this study is that the measurements on the sample sphere and on the sample cube displayed distinct differences, particularly in shear wave velocities. It is assumed that the differences are due to the different geometries of the samples and the configuration of the transducer-sample assembly

  5. Water velocity at water-air interface is not zero: Comment on "Three-dimensional quantification of soil hydraulic properties using X-ray computed tomography and image-based modeling" by Saoirse R. Tracy et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. X.; Fan, X. Y.; Li, Z. Y.

    2016-07-01

    Tracy et al. (2015, doi: 10.1002/2014WR016020) assumed in their recent paper that water velocity at the water-air interface is zero in their pore-scale simulations of water flow in 3-D soil images acquired using X-ray computed tomography. We comment that such a treatment is physically wrong, and explain that it is the water-velocity gradient in the direction normal to the water-air interface, rather than the water velocity, that should be assumed to be zero at the water-air interface if one needs to decouple the water flow and the air flow. We analyze the potential errors caused by incorrectly taking water velocity at the water-air interface zero based on two simple examples, and conclude that it is not physically sound to make such a presumption because its associated errors are unpredictable.

  6. On the feasibility of measuring urban air pollution by wireless distributed sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltchanov, Sharon; Levy, Ilan; Etzion, Yael; Lerner, Uri; Broday, David M; Fishbain, Barak

    2015-01-01

    Accurate evaluation of air pollution on human-wellbeing requires high-resolution measurements. Standard air quality monitoring stations provide accurate pollution levels but due to their sparse distribution they cannot capture the highly resolved spatial variations within cities. Similarly, dedicated field campaigns can use tens of measurement devices and obtain highly dense spatial coverage but normally deployment has been limited to short periods of no more than few weeks. Nowadays, advances in communication and sensory technologies enable the deployment of dense grids of wireless distributed air monitoring nodes, yet their sensor ability to capture the spatiotemporal pollutant variability at the sub-neighborhood scale has never been thoroughly tested. This study reports ambient measurements of gaseous air pollutants by a network of six wireless multi-sensor miniature nodes that have been deployed in three urban sites, about 150 m apart. We demonstrate the network's capability to capture spatiotemporal concentration variations at an exceptional fine resolution but highlight the need for a frequent in-situ calibration to maintain the consistency of some sensors. Accordingly, a procedure for a field calibration is proposed and shown to improve the system's performance. Overall, our results support the compatibility of wireless distributed sensor networks for measuring urban air pollution at a sub-neighborhood spatial resolution, which suits the requirement for highly spatiotemporal resolved measurements at the breathing-height when assessing exposure to urban air pollution.

  7. The influence of the gas-distributing grid diameter on the transition velocity and hydrodynamics of the bottom layer in circulating fluidized bed installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuponogov, V. G.; Baskakov, A. P.

    2013-11-01

    The dependences of dimensionless fluidization velocities separating bubble, transition, and fast fluidization regimes on the properties of dispersed material for particles belonging to groups B and D (according to D. Geldart's classification) are presented. Correspondence between the considered dependences and experimental data obtained by different researchers and their correlation with critical fluidization velocities and particle terminal velocities are shown. The hydrodynamic mechanisms governing the saturation of fluidized bed with bubbles on reaching the transition fluidization velocity in installations having different sizes are considered. Factors due to which a bottom bubble layer disappears in narrow installations and is retained on large-diameter grids in an intense channel forming mode are explained. Experimental data are presented from which it is seen that the bubble layer hydrodynamics depends on the gas-distributing grid diameter and that this diameter has an insignificant influence on the fluidization velocity during the transition from a bubble to fast fluidization regime.

  8. Distributed modeling of monthly air temperatures over the rugged terrain of the Yellow River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yan; QIU XinFa; HE YongJian; SHI GuoPing; LIU ChangMing

    2009-01-01

    Our analyses of the monthly mean air temperature of meteorological stations show that altitude, global solar radiation and surface effective radiation have a significant impact on air temperature. We set up a physically-based empirical model for monthly air temperature simulation. Combined the proposed model with the distributed modeling results of global solar radiation and routine meteorological ob-servation data, we also developed a method for the distributed simulation of monthly sir temperatures over rugged terrain. Spatial distribution maps are generated at a resolution of 1 km×1 km for the monthly mean, the monthly mean maximum and the monthly mean minimum air temperatures for the Yellow River Basin. Analysis shows that the simulation results reflect to a considerable extent the macro and local distribution characteristics of air temperature. Cross-validation shows that the pro-posed model displays good stability with mean absolute bias errors of 0.19℃-0.35℃. Tests carried out on local meteorological station data and case year data show that the model has good spatial and temporal simulation capacity. The proposed model solely uses routine meteorological data and can be applied easily to other regions.

  9. Structure of the velocity distribution of sheath-accelerated secondary electrons in an asymmetric RF-dc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrabrov, Alexander V.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Ventzek, Peter L. G.; Ranjan, Alok; Chen, Lee

    2015-10-01

    Low-pressure capacitively-coupled discharges with additional dc bias applied to a separate electrode are utilized in plasma-assisted etching for semiconductor device manufacturing. Measurements of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) of the flux impinging on the wafer, as well as in the plasma bulk, show a thermal population and additional peaks within a broad range of energies. That range extends from the thermal level up to the value for the ‘ballistic’ peak, corresponding to the bias potential. The non-thermal electron flux has been correlated to alleviating the electron shading effect and providing etch-resistance properties to masking photoresist layers. ‘Middle-energy peak electrons’ at energies of several hundred eV may provide an additional sustaining mechanism for the discharge. These features in the electron velocity (or energy) distribution functions are possibly caused by secondary electrons emitted from the electrodes and interacting with two high-voltage sheaths: a stationary sheath at the dc electrode and an oscillating self-biased sheath at the powered electrode. Since at those energies the mean free path for large-angle scattering (momentum relaxation length) is comparable to, or exceeds the size of the discharge gap, these ‘ballistic’ electrons will not be fully scattered by the background gas as they traverse the inter-electrode space. We have performed test-particle simulations in which the features in the EVDF of electrons impacting the RF electrode are fully resolved at all energies. An analytical model has been developed to predict existence of peaked and step-like structures in the EVDF. Those features can be explained by analyzing the kinematics of electron trajectories in the discharge gap. Step-like structures in the EVDF near the powered electrode appear due to accumulation of electrons emitted from the dc electrode within a portion of the RF cycle, and their subsequent release. Trapping occurs when the RF

  10. Influence of velocity effects on the shape of N2 (and air) broadened H2O lines revisited with classical molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, N. H.; Tran, H.; Gamache, R. R.; Bermejo, D.; Domenech, J.-L.

    2012-08-01

    The modeling of the shape of H2O lines perturbed by N2 (and air) using the Keilson-Storer (KS) kernel for collision-induced velocity changes is revisited with classical molecular dynamics simulations (CMDS). The latter have been performed for a large number of molecules starting from intermolecular-potential surfaces. Contrary to the assumption made in a previous study [H. Tran, D. Bermejo, J.-L. Domenech, P. Joubert, R. R. Gamache, and J.-M. Hartmann, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 108, 126 (2007)], 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2007.03.009, the results of these CMDS show that the velocity-orientation and -modulus changes statistically occur at the same time scale. This validates the use of a single memory parameter in the Keilson-Storer kernel to describe both the velocity-orientation and -modulus changes. The CMDS results also show that velocity- and rotational state-changing collisions are statistically partially correlated. A partially correlated speed-dependent Keilson-Storer model has thus been used to describe the line-shape. For this, the velocity changes KS kernel parameters have been directly determined from CMDS, while the speed-dependent broadening and shifting coefficients have been calculated with a semi-classical approach. Comparisons between calculated spectra and measurements of several lines of H2O broadened by N2 (and air) in the ν3 and 2ν1 + ν2 + ν3 bands for a wide range of pressure show very satisfactory agreement. The evolution of non-Voigt effects from Doppler to collisional regimes is also presented and discussed.

  11. Electron-photon shower distribution function tables for lead, copper and air absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Messel, H

    2013-01-01

    Electron-Photon Shower Distribution Function: Tables for Lead, Copper and Air Absorbers presents numerical results of the electron-photon shower distribution function for lead, copper, and air absorbers. Electron or photon interactions, including Compton scattering, elastic Coulomb scattering, and the photo-electric effect, are taken into account in the calculations. This book consists of four chapters and begins with a review of both theoretical and experimental work aimed at deducing the characteristics of the cascade produced from the propagation of high energy electrons and photons through

  12. Advanced Methods for Air Distribution in Occupied Spaces for Reduced Risk from Air-Borne Diseases and Improved Air Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov

    rates to reduce the concentration of pollutants/pathogens to levels that would not deteriorate the air quality or be harmful for the occupants. It is also connected to certain energy limitation issues. Filtration and UVGI are efficient in protecting occupants provided the sources are located outdoors......, airplanes, etc. The second part of the thesis focuses on a novel ventilation strategy for reduction the risk of cross-infection for medical staff, visitors, and patients in hospital wards. The novel ventilation strategy is implemented by a specially developed device, named Hospital Bed Integrated...

  13. Hyporheic flow and dissolved oxygen distribution in fish nests: The effects of open channel velocity, permeability patterns, and groundwater upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, M. Bayani; Ford, Aimee E.; Kaufman, Matthew H.; Kessler, Adam J.; Cook, Perran L. M.

    2016-12-01

    Many fish lay their eggs in nests, or redds, which they construct in sediment. The viability of eggs depends on many factors, particularly their oxygenation. Because dissolved oxygen is typically saturated within the stream channel, the dissolved oxygen distribution within the redd depends on whether or not hyporheic flow and transport occur within the sediment. We conducted a series of flume and numerical flow and age transport modeling experiments with the aim of understanding the effects of salmonid redds on the hyporheic transport of young oxygenated water. Hyporheic flow was visualized directly through dye injections. Dissolved oxygen throughout the fish nest was measured using a planar optode. Experiments were conducted at various open channel flow velocities in order to understand their effect on dissolved oxygen, and computational simulations considered various sediment textures and ambient groundwater upwelling rates to add process-level insight. We found that, as also shown by previous studies, the redd topography induces multiscale hyporheic flow that effectively flushes the egg pocket location with younger presumably oxygenated water; older water upwells and forms anoxic zones. This pattern persists even at the lowest channel flow rates and at small upwelling velocities of older ambient groundwater which splits the multiscale hyporheic flow cells into isolated pockets. Large groundwater upwelling rates can shut down all the hyporheic flushing. The relatively coarse texture of the redd further promotes hyporheic flushing of the redd sediment with oxygenated water. Thus, redd morphology and sediment texture optimally combine to induce hyporheic exchange flow that delivers young oxygenated water to the egg pocket.

  14. Secondary craters from large impacts on Europa and Ganymede: Ejecta size-velocity distributions on icy worlds, and the scaling of ejected blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Kelsi N.; McKinnon, William B.; Nowicki, L. T.

    2013-09-01

    We have mapped fields of secondary craters around three large primary craters on Europa and Ganymede and estimated the size and velocity of the fragments that formed the secondaries using updated scaling equations for ice impacts. We characterize the upper envelope of the fragment size-velocity distribution to obtain a function for the largest fragments at a given ejection velocity. Power-law velocity exponents found in our study of icy satellite secondary fields are compared to the exponents found for similar studies of mercurian, lunar, and martian craters; for all but basin-scale impacts, fragment size decreases more slowly with increasing ejection velocity than on rocky bodies. Spallation theory provides estimates of the size of ejected spall plates at a given velocity, but this theory predicts fragments considerably smaller than are necessary to form most of our observed secondaries. In general, ejecta fragment sizes scale with primary crater diameter and decrease with increasing ejection velocity, υej, by 1/υej or greater, and point-source scaling implies a relation between the two. The largest crater represented in any of these studies, Gilgamesh on Ganymede, exhibits a relatively steep velocity dependence. Extrapolating the results to the escape speed for each icy moon yields the size of the largest fragment that could later re-impact to form a so-called sesquinary crater, either on the parent moon or a neighboring satellite. We find that craters above 2 km in diameter on Europa and Ganymede are unlikely to be sesquinaries.

  15. Improvement of air distribution in refrigerated vertical open front remote supermarket display cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, I.; Luscombe, P.; McLean, L.; Sarathy, C.S.P.; Sheahen, P.; Srinivasan, K. [Frigrite Refrigeration Pty. Ltd, 27 Grange Road, Cheltenham, Vic. 3192 (Australia)

    2008-08-15

    This paper presents some of the results derived from extensive experimentation on display cases for supermarkets and derives some possible improvements to augment temperature uniformity and energy performance. The effect of the perforation pattern of the rear duct on the distribution of airflow between these and the front curtain is brought out. The critical component is air infiltration across the curtain, which is governed by internal air distribution and curtain characteristics. It is observed that a 70-30 distribution of flow between the curtain and the rear duct perforations yields a performance that satisfies the standards. Further, a judicious distribution of perforations on the rear duct at various levels and across is necessary. Correlations available in the literature are useful in making a qualitative assessment of the results. (author)

  16. The seasonal vertical distribution of the Saharan Air Layer and its modulation by the wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsamalis, C.; Chédin, A.; Pelon, J.; Capelle, V.

    2013-11-01

    The Saharan Air Layer (SAL) influences large-scale environment from western Africa to eastern tropical Americas, by carrying large amounts of dust aerosols. However, the vertical distribution of the SAL is not well established due to a lack of systematic measurements away from the continents. This can be overcome by using the observations of the spaceborne lidar CALIOP onboard the satellite CALIPSO. By taking advantage of CALIOP's capability to distinguish dust aerosols from other types of aerosols through depolarization, the seasonal vertical distribution of the SAL is analyzed at 1° horizontal resolution over a period of 5 yr (June 2006-May 2011). This study shows that SAL can be identified all year round displaying a clear seasonal cycle. It occurs higher in altitude and more northern in latitude during summer than during winter, but with similar latitudinal extent near Africa for the four seasons. The south border of the SAL is determined by the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), which either prohibits dust layers from penetrating it or reduces significantly the number of dust layers seen within or south of it, as over the eastern tropical Atlantic. Spatially, near Africa, it is found between 5° S and 15° N in winter and 5-30° N in summer. Towards the Americas (50° W), SAL is observed between 5° S and 10° N in winter and 10-25° N in summer. During spring and fall, SAL is found between the position of winter and summer not only spatially but also vertically. In winter, SAL occurs in the altitude range 0-3 km off western Africa, decreasing to 0-2 km close to South America. During summer, SAL is found to be thicker and higher near Africa at 1-5 km, reducing to 0-2 km in the Gulf of Mexico, farther west than during the other seasons. SAL is confined to one layer, of which the mean altitude decreases with westward transport by 13 m deg-1 during winter and 28 m deg-1, after 30° W, during summer. Its mean geometrical thickness decreases by 25 m deg-1 in

  17. Air method measurements of apple vessel length distributions with improved apparatus and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabtal Cohen; John Bennink; Mel Tyree

    2003-01-01

    Studies showing that rootstock dwarfing potential is related to plant hydraulic conductance led to the hypothesis that xylem properties are also related. Vessel length distribution and other properties of apple wood from a series of varieties were measured using the 'air method' in order to test this hypothesis. Apparatus was built to measure and monitor...

  18. Dynamic models of heating and cooling coils with one-dimensional air distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zijie; Krauss, G.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents the simulation models of the plate-fin, air-to-water (or water vapour) heat exchangers used as air-heating or air-cooling and dehumidifying coils in the HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning) systems. The thermal models are used to calculate the heat exchange between distributing air and coil pipes and outlet temperatures of air and heat or chilled fluid. The aerodynamic models are used to account for the pressure drop of the air crossing the coil tubes. They can also be used to optimize the structures of such coils. The models are based on principal laws of heat and mass conservation and fluid mechanics. They are transparent and easy to use. In our work, a coil is considered as an assembly of numbers of basic elements in which all the state variables are unique. Therefore we can conveniently simulate the coils with different structures and different geometric parameters. Two modular programs TRNSYS (Transient System Simulation) and ESACAP are utilized as supporting softwares which make the programming and simulation greatly simplified. The coil elements and a real coil were simulated. The results were compared with the data offered by the manufacturer (company SOFICA) and also with those obtained using critical methods such as NTU method, etc. and good agreement is attained.

  19. Dynamic Models of Heating and Cooling Coils with One—Dimensional Air Distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangZijie; G.Krauss

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the simulation models of the plate-fin,air-to-water(or water vapour) heat exchangers used as air-heating or air-cooling and dehumidifying colis in the HVAC(Heating,Ventilation and AIr-Conditioning)systems.The thermal models are used to calculate the heat exchange between distributing air and coil pipes and outlet temperatures of air and heat or chilled fluid.The aerodynamic models are used to account for the pressure drop of the air crossing the coil tubes,They can also be used to optimize the structres of such coils.The models are based on principal laws of teat and mass conservation and fluid mechanics.They are transparent and easy to use.In our work,a coil is considered as an assembly of numbers of basic elements in which all the state variables are unique.Therefore we can conveniently simulate the coils with different structures and different geometric parameters.Two modular programs TRNSYS(Transient System Simulation)and ESACAP are utilized as supporting softwares which make the programming and simulation greatly simplified.The coil elements and a real coil were simulated.The results were compared with the data offered by the manufacturer(company SOFICA) and also with those obtained using critical methods such as NTU method ,etc.and good agreement is attained.

  20. A single laser all fibre based optical sensor and switching system and method for measuring velocity in atmospheric air flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A system for measuring a velocity of tracer particle motion in a fluid comprising at least one laser emitter configured to emit a continuous wave laser beam and a plur ality of optical devices being configured to alternately receive a laser beam, focusing the laser beam onto a same probe volume c...

  1. The Origin of Non-Maxwellian Solar Wind Electron Velocity Distribution Function: Connection to Nanoflares in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Che, H

    2014-01-01

    The formation of the observed core-halo feature in the solar wind electron velocity distribution function is a long-time puzzle. In this letter based on the current knowledge of nanoflares we show that the nanoflare-accelerated electron beams are likely to trigger a strong electron two-stream instability that generates kinetic Alfv\\'en wave and whistler wave turbulence, as we demonstrated in a previous paper. We further show that the core-halo feature produced during the origin of kinetic turbulence is likely to originate in the inner corona and can be preserved as the solar wind escapes to space along open field lines. We formulate a set of equations to describe the heating processes observed in the simulation and show that the core-halo temperature ratio of the solar wind is insensitive to the initial conditions in the corona and is related to the core-halo density ratio of the solar wind and to the quasi-saturation property of the two-stream instability at the time when the exponential decay ends. This rel...

  2. Critical study of the distribution of rotational velocities of Be stars. I. Deconvolution methods, effects due to gravity darkening, macroturbulence, and binarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorec, J.; Frémat, Y.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Royer, F.; Cidale, L.; Hubert, A.-M.; Semaan, T.; Martayan, C.; Cochetti, Y. R.; Arias, M. L.; Aidelman, Y.; Stee, P.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Among intermediate-mass and massive stars, Be stars are the fastest rotators in the main sequence (MS) and, as such, these stars are a cornerstone to validate models of structure and evolution of rotating stars. Several phenomena, however, induce under- or overestimations either of their apparent Vsini, or true velocity V. Aims: In the present contribution we aim at obtaining distributions of true rotational velocities corrected for systematic effects induced by the rapid rotation itself, macroturbulent velocities, and binarity. Methods: We study a set of 233 Be stars by assuming they have inclination angles distributed at random. We critically discuss the methods of Cranmer and Lucy-Richardson, which enable us to transform a distribution of projected velocities into another distribution of true rotational velocities, where the gravitational darkening effect on the Vsini parameter is considered in different ways. We conclude that iterative algorithm by Lucy-Richardson responds at best to the purposes of the present work, but it requires a thorough determination of the stellar fundamental parameters. Results: We conclude that once the mode of ratios of the true velocities of Be stars attains the value V/Vc ≃ 0.77 in the main-sequence (MS) evolutionary phase, it remains unchanged up to the end of the MS lifespan. The statistical corrections found on the distribution of ratios V/Vc for overestimations of Vsini, due to macroturbulent motions and binarity, produce a shift of this distribution toward lower values of V/Vc when Be stars in all MS evolutionary stages are considered together. The mode of the final distribution obtained is at V/Vc ≃ 0.65. This distribution has a nearly symmetric distribution and shows that the Be phenomenon is characterized by a wide range of true velocity ratios 0.3 ≲ V/Vc ≲ 0.95. It thus suggests that the probability that Be stars are critical rotators is extremely low. Conclusions: The corrections attempted in the present

  3. [Spatiotemporal distribution of negative air ion concentration in urban area and related affecting factors: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiang-Hua; Wang, Jian; Zeng, Hong-Da; Chen, Guang-Shui; Zhong, Xian-Fang

    2013-06-01

    Negative air ion (NAI) concentration is an important indicator comprehensively reflecting air quality, and has significance to human beings living environment. This paper summarized the spatiotemporal distribution features of urban NAI concentration, and discussed the causes of these features based on the characteristics of the environmental factors in urban area and their effects on the physical and chemical processes of NAI. The temporal distribution of NAI concentration is mainly controlled by the periodic variation of solar radiation, while the spatial distribution of NAI concentration along the urban-rural gradient is mainly affected by the urban aerosol distribution, underlying surface characters, and urban heat island effect. The high NAI concentration in urban green area is related to the vegetation life activities and soil radiation, while the higher NAI concentration near the water environment is attributed to the water molecules that participate in the generation of NAI through a variety of ways. The other environmental factors can also affect the generation, life span, component, translocation, and distribution of NAI to some extent. To increase the urban green space and atmospheric humidity and to maintain the soil natural attributes of underlying surface could be the effective ways to increase the urban NAI concentration and improve the urban air quality.

  4. Estimation of air to grass -dry and wet deposition rates, velocities, and mass interception factors for iodine for a postulated accidental scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karunakara, N.; Ujwal, P.; Yashodhara, I.; Sudeep Kumara, K. [University Science Instrumentation Centre, Mangalore University (India); Geetha, P.V. [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited (India); Dileep, B.N.; Joshi, P.J. [Environmental Survey Laboratory, Kaiga Generating Station (India); Ravi, P.M. [Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India)

    2014-07-01

    Air to grass radionuclide transfer parameters such as dry and wet deposition rates, velocities, and mass interception factors are important basic input parameters for the estimation of radiation dose to the public around a nuclear power plant. We have carried out a study on air to grass transfer of iodine for a postulated emergency situation. A walk-in environmental chamber was designed and fabricated with facilities for exposing the plants grown in pots to controlled levels of radionuclides/stable elements. The temperature, humidity, and airflow inside the environmental chamber can be controlled to required values. The chamber has the facility for generating artificial rainfall. Grass grown in pots was kept inside the environmental chamber. Stable iodine (elemental form) was sublimed and injected into the environmental chamber suddenly to generate known concentration of iodine in the air inside the chamber. This simulated an accidental release of iodine to the environment. The concentration of iodine in the air inside the chamber was monitored continuously by drawing air from the environmental chamber through a bubbling setup (bubbling air through 1% sodium carbonate solution) and the iodine was then separated chemically and the concentration was measured by UV-VIS spectrometry. The concentration of iodine inside the chamber was monitored for every 30 min. The grass was exposed to iodine for 3 h after which the leaves were sampled and analysed for iodine concentration. From the concentration values of iodine in air and grass - the dry deposition rate, deposition velocity, and mass interception rates were estimated. The dry deposition velocity of iodine varied in the range of 0.5x10{sup -5}-3.3x10{sup -5} m s{sup -1} with a mean value of 1.7x10{sup -5} m s{sup -1}. The mass interception factor varied in the range of 0.25-13 m{sup 2} kg{sup -1} with a mean value of 4.2 m{sup 2} kg{sup -1} with respect to fresh weight. The wet deposition velocity varied in the range

  5. Experimental Evaluation of Indoor Air Distribution in High-Performance Residential Buildings: Part I. General Descriptions and Qualification Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalalzadeh, A. A.; Hancock, E.; Powell, D.

    2007-12-01

    The main objective of this project is to experimentally characterize an air distribution system in heating mode during a period of recovery from setback. The specific air distribution system under evaluation incorporates a high sidewall supply-air register/diffuser and a near-floor wall return air grille directly below. With this arrangement, the highest temperature difference between the supply air and the room can occur during the recovery period and create a favorable condition for stratification. The experimental approach will provide realistic input data and results for verification of computational fluid dynamics modeling.

  6. Study on the Effect of the Side Secondary Air Velocity on the Aerodynamic Field in a Tangentially Fired Furnace with HBC—SSA Burner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuTong; SunShaozeng; 等

    1999-01-01

    The present paper has compared a group of furnace aerodynamic fields at different velocities of side secondary air(SSA) in a test model of 420t/h utility boiler,applying Horizontal Bias Conbustion Pulverized Coal Burner with Side Secondary AIr(HBC-SSA Burner).Experimental results show that,when the ram pressure ratio of side secondary air(SSA) to primary air(PA) ρ2sv232/ρ1v12)is between 1.0-2.4,the furnace aerodynamic field only varies slightly.The relative rotational diameters(φ/L)in the burner domain are moderate and the furnace is in good fullness.Whenρ2s v232/ρ1v12 is beyond4,φ/L is so large that the stream sweeps water-cooled wall and rotateds strongly in the furnace.Therefore,slagging and high temperature corrosion of tube metal will be formed on the water-cooled wall in actual operation.This investigation provides the basis for the application of this new type burner.In addition,numerical simulations are conducted,and some defects in the numerical simulation are also pointed out and analyzed in this paper.

  7. Effect of air conditioning installation position on indoor air distribution in duplex apartment%空调安装位置对复式住宅室内流场的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晶; 史柏语; 戚译天; 吴国忠; 赵文凯; 李栋

    2012-01-01

    建立复式住宅的三维数理模型,利用CFD软件对复式住宅室内气流组织进行数值模拟,探讨室内温度场和速度场的变化关系,分析2种客厅内不同空调安装位置对复式住宅室内气流组织和热舒适性的影响.结果表明:客厅内空调送风只能同时保证客厅内主要活动区域,以及与其直接连接的相邻且无遮挡空间的空气温度满足要求;在送风时,位于客厅内上层卧室外墙上方空调比位于客厅内西墙墙壁上方的空调对室内气流的扰动作用更大,对室内风速及温度的影响也更大.这对于复式住宅内空调优化设计和节能具有指导意义.%Three-dimensional physical and mathematical models of duplex apartment were established in this paper. Indoor air distribution of the duplex apartment was simulated by using computational fluid dynamics software CFD, and the impact of the different installation position of air conditioning on indoor air distribution in summer were analyzed. By comparing the change relations of the indoor temperature field and velocity field in different circumstances, and the influence of two installation positions of air conditioning that meet the requirements of air distribution and thermal comfort in the duplex apartment were analyzed. Results show that air supply of air conditioning inside the drawing room only meet air temperature requirements of the main activity areas of drawing room and its' directly connected neighboring space without occlusion at the same time; and the disturbance effect of indoor air flow fluctuates more fiercely when air conditioning located in the indoor central position than the border, as well as the influence of indoor wind speed and temperature.

  8. Measurement of a 2D fast-ion velocity distribution function by tomographic inversion of fast-ion D-alpha spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, Asger Schou

    2014-01-01

    We present the first measurement of a local fast-ion 2D velocity distribution function f(v‖, v⊥). To this end, we heated a plasma in ASDEX Upgrade by neutral beam injection and measured spectra of fast-ion Dα (FIDA) light from the plasma centre in three views simultaneously. The measured spectra ...

  9. Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain

    2001-09-01

    This study was performed in order to find suitable efficiency and leakage specifications for Energy Star duct systems and provide recommendations on duct insulation specifications. This analysis looks at a typical house, with a selection of duct locations, climates, duct insulation (R-value), and duct leakage. A set of calculations were performed with reduced capacity and airflow to look at the effect of variable capacity systems. This was done to address concerns regarding the increased efficiency of multi-capacity equipment due to good part load performance and how these efficiency gains may be offset by increased duct losses. The duct system efficiencies were calculated using the procedures in proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P ''Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems'' (ASHRAE 1999). This proposed ASHRAE Standard can be used to calculate duct efficiency for both design and seasonal weather conditions. In this report, the seasonal efficiencies are used for most of the analysis because they are the most appropriate for estimating energy consumption in buildings. The effects at peak conditions are examined for changing duct insulation in order to provide preliminary estimates of the potential responses to time of use pricing. The study was performed in two parts. The first part focused on duct leakage and the second part on duct insulation. The HVAC systems in the two parts share many attributes, however, they differ in detail and so are treated separately here. All the calculation results are summarized in tables in the Appendix, and specific results are given in the text.

  10. Global Ammonia Distributions and Recent Trends from AIRS 13-years Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, J. X.; Wei, Z.; Strow, L. L.; Nowak, J. B.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia is an integral part of the nitrogen cycle and is projected to be the largest single contributor to each of acidification, eutrophication and secondary particulate matter in Europe by 2020 (Sutton et al., 2008). The impacts of NH3 also include: aerosol production affecting global radiative forcing, increases in emissions of the greenhouse gases nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4), and modification of the transport and deposition patterns of SO2 and NOx. Therefore, monitoring NH3 global distribution of sources is vitally important to human health with respect to both air and water quality and climate change. We have developed new daily and global ammonia (NH3) products from AIRS hyperspectral measurements. These products add value to AIRS's existing products that have made significant contributions to weather forecasts, climate studies, and air quality monitoring. With longer than 13 years of data records, these measurements have been used not only for daily monitoring purposes but also for inter-annual variability and short-term trend studies. We will discuss the global NH3 emission sources from biogenic and anthropogenic activities over many emission regions captured by AIRS. We will focus their variability in the last 13 years. Validation examples using in situ measurements for AIRS NH3 will also be presented.

  11. Partitioning of particle velocities in gas-solid turbulent flows into a continuous field and a spatially uncorrelated random distribution: theoretical formalism and numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Février, Pierre; Simonin, Olivier; Squires, Kyle D.

    2005-06-01

    The velocity distribution of dilute suspensions of heavy particles in gas-solid turbulent flows is investigated. A statistical approach - the mesoscopic Eulerian formalism (MEF) - is developed in which an average conditioned on a realization of the turbulent carrier flow is introduced and enables a decomposition of the instantaneous particle velocity into two contributions. The first is a contribution from an underlying continuous turbulent velocity field shared by all the particles - the mesoscopic Eulerian particle velocity field (MEPVF) - that accounts for all particle-particle and fluid-particle two-point correlations. The second contribution corresponds to a distribution - the quasi-Brownian velocity distribution (QBVD) - that represents a random velocity component satisfying the molecular chaos assumption that is not spatially correlated and identified with each particle of the system. The MEF is used to investigate properties of statistically stationary particle-laden isotropic turbulence. The carrier flow is computed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) or large-eddy simulation (LES) with discrete particle tracking employed for the dispersed phase. Particle material densities are much larger than that of the fluid and the force of the fluid on the particle is assumed to reduce to the drag contribution. Computations are performed in the dilute regime for which the influences of inter-particle collisions and fluid-turbulence modulation are neglected. The simulations show that increases in particle inertia increase the contribution of the quasi-Brownian component to the particle velocity. The particle velocity field is correlated at larger length scales than the fluid, with the integral length scales of the MEPVF also increasing with particle inertia. Consistent with the previous work of Abrahamson (1975), the MEF shows that in the limiting case of large inertia, particle motion becomes stochastically equivalent to a Brownian motion with a random spatial

  12. Effects of air velocity on laying hen production from 24 to 27 weeks under simulated evaporatively cooled conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermal conditions play a major role in production efficiency in commercial poultry production. Mitigation of thermal stress can improve productivity, but must be achieved economically. Weather and system design can limit effectiveness of evaporative cooling and increased air movement has been sho...

  13. Richards Bay Mesometeorological Data – Vertical profiles of air temperature and wind velocity and surface wind statistics.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholtz, MT

    1978-03-01

    Full Text Available This report details the experimental methods and data obtained in the course of a study of the movement of stable air over a complex region. The field work was carried out in the Richards Bay area on the Natal Coast during the period May to August...

  14. THE ORIGIN OF NON-MAXWELLIAN SOLAR WIND ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION: CONNECTION TO NANOFLARES IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    The formation of the observed core-halo feature in the solar wind electron velocity distribution function is a long-time puzzle. In this Letter, based on the current knowledge of nanoflares, we show that the nanoflare-accelerated electron beams are likely to trigger a strong electron two-stream instability that generates kinetic Alfvén wave and whistler wave turbulence, as we demonstrated in a previous paper. We further show that the core-halo feature produced during the origin of kinetic turbulence is likely to originate in the inner corona and can be preserved as the solar wind escapes to space along open field lines. We formulate a set of equations to describe the heating processes observed in the simulation and show that the core-halo temperature ratio of the solar wind is insensitive to the initial conditions in the corona and is related to the core-halo density ratio of the solar wind and to the quasi-saturation property of the two-stream instability at the time when the exponential decay ends. This relation can be extended to the more general core-halo-strahl feature in the solar wind. The temperature ratio between the core and hot components is nearly independent of the heliospheric distance to the Sun. We show that the core-halo relative drift previously reported is a relic of the fully saturated two-stream instability. Our theoretical results are consistent with the observations while new tests for this model are provided.

  15. Error estimations of dry deposition velocities of air pollutants using bulk sea surface temperature under common assumptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yung-Yao; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Keenlyside, Noel; Wang, Shu-Lun; Arthur Chen, Chen-Tung; Wang, Bin-Jye; Liu, Tsun-Hsien

    2010-07-01

    It is well known that skin sea surface temperature (SSST) is different from bulk sea surface temperature (BSST) by a few tenths of a degree Celsius. However, the extent of the error associated with dry deposition (or uptake) estimation by using BSST is not well known. This study tries to conduct such an evaluation using the on-board observation data over the South China Sea in the summers of 2004 and 2006. It was found that when a warm layer occurred, the deposition velocities using BSST were underestimated within the range of 0.8-4.3%, and the absorbed sea surface heat flux was overestimated by 21 W m -2. In contrast, under cool skin only conditions, the deposition velocities using BSST were overestimated within the range of 0.5-2.0%, varying with pollutants and the absorbed sea surface heat flux was underestimated also by 21 W m -2. Scale analysis shows that for a slightly soluble gas (e.g., NO 2, NO and CO), the error in the solubility estimation using BSST is the major source of the error in dry deposition estimation. For a highly soluble gas (e.g., SO 2), the error in the estimation of turbulent heat fluxes and, consequently, aerodynamic resistance and gas-phase film resistance using BSST is the major source of the total error. In contrast, for a medium soluble gas (e.g., O 3 and CO 2) both the errors from the estimations of the solubility and aerodynamic resistance are important. In addition, deposition estimations using various assumptions are discussed. The largest uncertainty is from the parameterizations for chemical enhancement factors. Other important areas of uncertainty include: (1) various parameterizations for gas-transfer velocity; (2) neutral-atmosphere assumption; (3) using BSST as SST, and (4) constant pH value assumption.

  16. Determination of phase-distributed PAH in Rome ambient air by denuder/GC-MS method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possanzini, Massimiliano; Di Palo, Vincenzo; Gigliucci, Pierfrancesco; Scianò, Maria Concetta Tomasi; Cecinato, Angelo

    An annular denuder—filter sampler has been tested for determination of both gaseous and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in air. Collection efficiency and capacity over 6-h sampling at an air flow rate of 6 l min -1 were assessed. Concentrations were measured and phase distributions of the most important 2-6 ring PAH in air samples collected in downtown Rome during November 2002 to April 2003 were determined. The 2- and 3-ring PAH were found for more than 90% in the gas phase, whilst congeners with more than 4 rings were present almost entirely in the particle phase. Comparison with a high-volume filter—PUF sampler showed that similar results for total PAH contents (gas + particle) were observed only for congeners with molecular mass higher than 178 (phenanthrene and anthracene).

  17. Characteristics of velocity distribution functions and entry mechanisms of protons in the near-lunar wake from SWIM/SARA on Chandrayaan-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanya, M. B.; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Holmström, Mats; Bhardwaj, Anil; Wurz, Peter; Alok, Abhinaw; Futaana, Yoshifumi

    2016-07-01

    Moon is an airless body with no global magnetic field, although regions of crustal magnetic fields known as magnetic anomalies exist on Moon. Solar wind, the magnetized plasma flow from the Sun, continuously impinges on Moon. Due to the high absorption of solar wind plasma on the lunar dayside, a large scale wake structure is formed downstream of the Moon. However, recent in-situ observations have revealed the presence of protons in the near-lunar wake (100 km to 200 km from the surface). The source of these protons have been found to be the solar wind that enter the wake either directly or after interaction with the lunar surface or with the magnetic anomalies. Using the entire data from the SWIM sensor, which was an ion-mass analyzer, of the SARA experiment onboard Chandrayaan-1, the characteristics of velocity distribution of these protons were investigated to understand the entry mechanisms to near lunar wake. The velocity distribution functions were computed in the two dimensional velocity space, namely in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the IMF (v_allel and v_perp) in the solar wind rest frame. Several proton populations were identified from the velocity distribution and their possible entry mechanism were inferred based on the characteristics of the velocity distribution. These entry mechanisms include (i) diffusion of solar wind protons into the wake along IMF, (ii) the solar wind protons with finite gyro-radii that are aided by the wake boundary electric field, (iii) solar wind protons with gyro-radii larger than lunar radii from the tail of the solar wind velocity distribution, and (iv) scattering of solar wind protons from the dayside lunar surface or from magnetic anomalies. In order to gain more insight into the entry mechanisms associated with different populations, the trajectories of the protons were computed backward in time (backtracing) for each of these populations. For most of the populations, the source mechanism obtained from

  18. Global distribution of mean age of stratospheric air from MIPAS SF6 measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fischer

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Global distributions of profiles of sulphur hexafluoride (SF6 have been retrieved from limb emission spectra recorded by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS on Envisat covering the period September 2002 to March 2004. Individual SF6 profiles have a precision of 0.5 pptv below 25 km altitude and a vertical resolution of 4–6 km up to 35 km altitude. These data have been validated versus in situ observations obtained during balloon flights of a cryogenic whole-air sampler. For the tropical troposphere a trend of 0.230±0.008 pptv/yr has been derived from the MIPAS data, which is in excellent agreement with the trend from ground-based flask and in situ measurements from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division. For the data set currently available, based on at least three days of data per month, monthly 5° latitude mean values have a 1σ standard error of 1%. From the global SF6 distributions, global daily and monthly distributions of the apparent mean age of air are inferred by application of the tropical tropospheric trend derived from MIPAS data. The inferred mean ages are provided for the full globe up to 90° N/S, and have a 1σ standard error of 0.25 yr. They range between 0 (near the tropical tropopause and 7 years (except for situations of mesospheric intrusions and agree well with earlier observations. The seasonal variation of the mean age of stratospheric air indicates episodes of severe intrusion of mesospheric air during each Northern and Southern polar winter observed, long-lasting remnants of old, subsided polar winter air over the spring and summer poles, and a rather short period of mixing with midlatitude air and/or upward transport during fall in October/November (NH and April/May (SH, respectively, with small latitudinal gradients, immediately before the new polar vortex starts to form. The mean age distributions further

  19. Measurement of oil volume fraction and velocity distributions in vertical oil-in-water flows using ERT and a local probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hua; WANG Mi; WU Ying-xiang; MA Yi-xin; WILLIAMS Richard

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the use of a high performance dual-plane electrical resistance tomography (ERT) system and a local dual-sensor conductance probe to measure the vertical upward oil-in-water pipe flows in which the mean oil volume fraction is up to 23.1%.A sensitivity coefficient back-projection (SBP) algorithm was adopted to reconstruct the flow distributions and a cross correlation method was applied to obtain the oil velocity distributions. The oil volume fraction and velocity distributions obtained from both measurement techniques were compared and good agreement was found, which indicates that the ERT technique can be used to measure the low fraction oil-water flows. Finally, the factors affecting measurement precision were discussed.

  20. Global solar irradiance in Cordoba: Clearness index distributions conditioned to the optical air mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varo, M.; Pedros, G.; Martinez-Jimenez, P. [Applied Physics Department, EPS, University of Cordoba, C/Maria Virgen y Madre s/n., Cordoba 14004 (Spain); Aguilera, M.J. [Applied Physics Department, ETSIAM, University of Cordoba, C/Menendez Pidal, s/n., Cordoba, 14004 (Spain)

    2006-07-15

    The biological and photochemical effects of solar radiation and solar energy applications make it really important to characterize the variability of this component. In view of the fact that the clearness index indicates not only the level of availability of solar radiation but also the changes in atmospheric conditions in a given location, since the classic Liu and Jordan study, many papers have dealt with its statistical distribution. Specifically, Tovar et al. [Tovar J, Olmo FJ, Alados-Arboledas L. Solar Energy 1998;62(6):387-393] proposed a model to represent the probability density distributions of the instantaneous clearness index conditioned to the optical air mass from measurements recorded in Granada (Spain). In this work, we have proved the applicability of this model in a different location, Cordoba (Spain), finding that the parameters for fitting the model depend on both the optical air mass and the geographic and climatic conditions. (author)

  1. Pressure Distribution and Air Data System for the Aeroassist Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Lorelei S.; Siemers, Paul M., III; Kern, Frederick A.

    1989-01-01

    The Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) is designed to provide critical flight data necessary for the design of future Aeroassist Space Transfer Vehicles (ASTV). This flight experiment will provide aerodynamic, aerothermodynamic, and environmental data for verification of experimental and computational flow field techniques. The Pressure Distribution and Air Data System (PD/ADS), one of the measurement systems incorporated into the AFE spacecraft, is designed to provide accurate pressure measurements on the windward surface of the vehicle. These measurements will be used to determine the pressure distribution and air data parameters (angle of attack, angle of sideslip, and free-stream dynamic pressure) encountered by the blunt-bodied vehicle over an altitude range of 76.2 km to 94.5 km. Design and development data are presented and include: measurement requirements, measurement heritage, theoretical studies to define the vehicle environment, flush-mounted orifice configuration, pressure transducer selection and performance evaluation data, and pressure tubing response analysis.

  2. Dynamics of electricity efficiency in commercial air-distribution systems in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansson, Lena

    1996-04-01

    This paper illustrates the long-term potential for reducing future electricity demand for air-distribution in commercial buildings in Sweden. The objective has been to develop a general quantitative scenario-based framework to describe some possible paths for electricity demand for air distribution and to analyze how governmental and utility-sponsored policy measures can affect electricity demand. The focus is on improved electricity efficiency, i.e. a reduction of electricity demand for the same level of services. The results suggest that higher electricity prices will not be very effective in reducing electricity demand, whereas significant electricity savings can be reached by implementing various policy programs, particularly standards. 56 refs, 4 figs, 5 tabs

  3. Imaging Fractures Through Relative Velocity Change Using Ambient Seismic Noise And Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS): A SUBTER Pilot Study At Blue Canyon Dome, Socorro NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S. R.; Knox, H. A.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Johnson, T. C.; Morris, J.; Grubelich, M. C.; King, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of fracture systems, including locations, morphology, and evolution, is critical for groundwater management, contaminant transport, and energy applications such as reservoir development (i.e. tight shale and geothermal) and reservoir management (i.e. carbon sequestration and wastewater injection). It has long been understood that the presence of fractures reduces bulk seismic velocity, with waves traveling perpendicular to fracture planes experiencing the strongest velocity reduction. We present results from seismic interferometry using ambient seismic noise to detect velocity changes following fracture emplacement from two energetic stimulations. Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) using fiber optic cables was used to record seismic arrivals at high spatial resolution ( 3 ft). Cables were grouted in the annulus of four cased monitoring boreholes surrounding the stimulation borehole at a radius of 4 feet. Ambient noise was recorded before and after each stimulation for 12-hour time periods. We used the Python package MSNoise to compute cross-correlations of all near-horizontal (less than 60°) channel pairs between boreholes and calculated the velocity change of each time period relative to initial conditions prior to stimulation. Results show an average velocity decrease of approximately 6% following the first fracturing event. Variations between channel pairs suggest some are more strongly affected than others, which is supported by evaluation of other geophysical data. These results show promise for locating fractures based on spatial variation in velocity changes. Unsurprisingly, results following the second stimulation are generally more scattered. Some velocities are further reduced compared to those after the first stimulation while others show a relative velocity increase. These results are roughly consistent with time-lapse seismic measurements conducted using active sources and classical sensors (e.g. hydrophones). Sandia National Laboratories is

  4. NASA Langley and NLR Research of Distributed Air/Ground Traffic Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballin, Mark G.; Hoekstra, Jacco M.; Wing, David J.; Lohr, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    Distributed Air/Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM) is a concept of future air traffic operations that proposes to distribute information, decision-making authority, and responsibility among flight crews, the air traffic service provider, and aeronautical operational control organizations. This paper provides an overview and status of DAG-TM research at NASA Langley Research Center and the National Aerospace Laboratory of The Netherlands. Specific objectives of the research are to evaluate the technical and operational feasibility of the autonomous airborne component of DAG-TM, which is founded on the operational paradigm of free flight. The paper includes an overview of research approaches, the airborne technologies under development, and a summary of experimental investigations and findings to date. Although research is not yet complete, these findings indicate that free flight is feasible and will significantly enhance system capacity and safety. While free flight cannot alone resolve the complex issues faced by those modernizing the global airspace, it should be considered an essential part of a comprehensive air traffic management modernization activity.

  5. A Computational and Experimental Study of Coflow Laminar Methane/Air Diffusion Flames: Effects of Fuel Dilution, Inlet Velocity, and Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, S.; Ma, B.; Bennett, B. A. V.; Giassi, D.; Stocker, D. P.; Takahashi, F.; Long, M. B.; Smooke, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    The influences of fuel dilution, inlet velocity, and gravity on the shape and structure of laminar coflow CH4-air diffusion flames were investigated computationally and experimentally. A series of nitrogen-diluted flames measured in the Structure and Liftoff in Combustion Experiment (SLICE) on board the International Space Station was assessed numerically under microgravity (mu g) and normal gravity (1g) conditions with CH4 mole fraction ranging from 0.4 to 1.0 and average inlet velocity ranging from 23 to 90 cm/s. Computationally, the MC-Smooth vorticity-velocity formulation was employed to describe the reactive gaseous mixture, and soot evolution was modeled by sectional aerosol equations. The governing equations and boundary conditions were discretized on a two-dimensional computational domain by finite differences, and the resulting set of fully coupled, strongly nonlinear equations was solved simultaneously at all points using a damped, modified Newton's method. Experimentally, flame shape and soot temperature were determined by flame emission images recorded by a digital color camera. Very good agreement between computation and measurement was obtained, and the conclusions were as follows. (1) Buoyant and nonbuoyant luminous flame lengths are proportional to the mass flow rate of the fuel mixture; computed and measured nonbuoyant flames are noticeably longer than their 1g counterparts; the effect of fuel dilution on flame shape (i.e., flame length and flame radius) is negligible when the flame shape is normalized by the methane flow rate. (2) Buoyancy-induced reduction of the flame radius through radially inward convection near the flame front is demonstrated. (3) Buoyant and nonbuoyant flame structure is mainly controlled by the fuel mass flow rate, and the effects from fuel dilution and inlet velocity are secondary.

  6. Test Protocol for Room-to-Room Distribution of Outside Air by Residential Ventilation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barley, C. D.; Anderson, R.; Hendron, B.; Hancock, E.

    2007-12-01

    This test and analysis protocol has been developed as a practical approach for measuring outside air distribution in homes. It has been used successfully in field tests and has led to significant insights on ventilation design issues. Performance advantages of more sophisticated ventilation systems over simpler, less-costly designs have been verified, and specific problems, such as airflow short-circuiting, have been identified.

  7. Contribution of static and dynamic load balancing in a real-time distributed air defence simulation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available and Dynamic Load Balancing In A Real-Time Distributed Air Defence Simulation Mr Bernardt Duvenhage; Mr Jan J. Nel Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) bduvenhage@csir.co.za, cnel@csir.co.za Abstract. Simulations with a large number... system. The measure to which dynamic load balancing could further enhance the performance is then explored. Such knowledge forms the basis for further load balance research. 1. INTRODUCTION The South African Council for Scientific and Industrial...

  8. High-velocity clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, BP; vanWoerden, H

    1997-01-01

    High-velocity clouds (HVCs) consist of neutral hydrogen (HI) at velocities incompatible with a simple model of differential galactic rotation; in practice one uses \\v(LSR)\\ greater than or equal to 90 km/s to define HVCs. This review describes the main features of the sky and velocity distributions,

  9. [Airborne Fungal Aerosol Concentration and Distribution Characteristics in Air- Conditioned Wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua-ling; Feng, He-hua; Fang, Zi-liang; Wang, Ben-dong; Li, Dan

    2015-04-01

    The effects of airborne fungus on human health in the hospital environment are related to not only their genera and concentrations, but also their particle sizes and distribution characteristics. Moreover, the mechanisms of aerosols with different particle sizes on human health are different. Fungal samples were obtained in medicine wards of Chongqing using a six-stage sampler. The airborne fungal concentrations, genera and size distributions of all the sampling wards were investigated and identified in detail. Results showed that airborne fungal concentrations were not correlated to the diseases or personnel density, but were related to seasons, temperature, and relative humidity. The size distribution rule had roughly the same for testing wards in winter and summer. The size distributions were not related with diseases and seasons, the percentage of airborne fungal concentrations increased gradually from stage I to stage III, and then decreased dramatically from stage V to stage VI, in general, the size of airborne fungi was a normal distribution. There was no markedly difference for median diameter of airborne fungi which was less 3.19 μm in these wards. There were similar dominant genera in all wards. They were Aspergillus spp, Penicillium spp and Alternaria spp. Therefore, attention should be paid to improve the filtration efficiency of particle size of 1.1-4.7 μm for air conditioning system of wards. It also should be targeted to choose appropriate antibacterial methods and equipment for daily hygiene and air conditioning system operation management.

  10. Radial distributions of air plants: a comparison between epiphytes and mistletoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Amanda; Burns, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    Vertical gradients of light and humidity within forest canopies are major predictors of air plant distributions. Although this pattern was first recognized over 120 years ago, few studies have considered an additional axis of resource availability, which exists radially around the trunks of trees. Here, we explored the radial distributions of mistletoes and epiphytes in relation to gradients of light and humidity around the trunks of their south-temperate host trees. Additionally, we correlated microclimate occupancy with plant physiological responses to shifting resource availability. The radial distributions of mistletoes and epiphytes were highly directional, and related to the availability of light and humidity, respectively. Mistletoes oriented northwest, parallel to gradients of higher light intensity, temperature, and lower humidity. Comparatively, epiphytes oriented away from the sun to the southeast. The rate of CO2 assimilation in mistletoes and photochemical efficiency of epiphytes was highest in plants growing in higher light and humidity environments, respectively. However, the photosynthetic parameters of mistletoes suggest that they are also efficient at assimilating CO2 in lower light conditions. Our results bridge a key gap in our understanding of within-tree distributions of mistletoes and epiphytes, and raise further questions on the drivers of air plant distributions.

  11. The effect of body postures on the distribution of air gap thickness and contact area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M.

    2017-02-01

    The heat and mass transfer in clothing is predominantly dependent on the thickness of air layer and the magnitude of contact area between the body and the garment. The air gap thickness and magnitude of the contact area can be affected by the posture of the human body. Therefore, in this study, the distribution of the air gap and the contact area were investigated for different body postures of a flexible manikin. In addition, the effect of the garment fit (regular and loose) and style (t-shirts, sweatpants, jacket and trousers) were analysed for the interaction between the body postures and the garment properties. A flexible manikin was scanned using a three-dimensional (3D) body scanning technique, and the scans were post-processed in dedicated software. The body posture had a strong effect on the air gap thickness and the contact area for regions where the garment had a certain distance from the body. Furthermore, a mathematical model was proposed to estimate the possible heat transfer coefficient for the observed air layers and their change with posture. The outcome of this study can be used to improve the design of the protective and functional garments and predict their effect on the human body.

  12. Field measurements of efficiency and duct retrofit effectiveness in residential forced air distributions systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jump, D.A.; Walker, I.S.; Modera, M.P.

    1996-08-01

    Forced air distribution systems can have a significant impact on the energy consumed in residences. It is common practice in U.S. residential buildings to place such duct systems outside the conditioned space. This results in the loss of energy by leakage and conduction to the surroundings. In order to estimate the magnitudes of these losses, 24 houses in the Sacramento, California, area were tested before and after duct retrofitting. The systems in these houses included conventional air conditioning, gas furnaces, electric furnaces and heat pumps. The retrofits consisted of sealing and insulating the duct systems. The field testing consisted of the following measurements: leakage of the house envelopes and their ductwork, flow through individual registers, duct air temperatures, ambient temperatures, surface areas of ducts, and HVAC equipment energy consumption. These data were used to calculate distribution system delivery efficiency as well as the overall efficiency of the distribution system including all interactions with building load and HVAC equipment. Analysis of the test results indicate an average increase in delivery efficiency from 64% to 76% and a corresponding average decrease in HVAC energy use of 18%. This paper summarizes the pre- and post-retrofit efficiency measurements to evaluate the retrofit effectiveness, and includes cost estimates for the duct retrofits. The impacts of leak sealing and insulating will be examined separately. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. Space density distribution of galaxies in the absolute magnitude - rotation velocity plane: a volume-complete Tully-Fisher relation from CALIFA stellar kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekeraité, S.; Walcher, C. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Garcia Lorenzo, B.; Lyubenova, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Spekkens, K.; van de Ven, G.; Wisotzki, L.; Ziegler, B.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; García-Benito, R.

    2016-10-01

    We measured the distribution in absolute magnitude - circular velocity space for a well-defined sample of 199 rotating galaxies of the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area Survey (CALIFA) using their stellar kinematics. Our aim in this analysis is to avoid subjective selection criteria and to take volume and large-scale structure factors into account. Using stellar velocity fields instead of gas emission line kinematics allows including rapidly rotating early-type galaxies. Our initial sample contains 277 galaxies with available stellar velocity fields and growth curve r-band photometry. After rejecting 51 velocity fields that could not be modelled because of the low number of bins, foreground contamination, or significant interaction, we performed Markov chain Monte Carlo modelling of the velocity fields, from which we obtained the rotation curve and kinematic parameters and their realistic uncertainties. We performed an extinction correction and calculated the circular velocity vcirc accounting for the pressure support of a given galaxy. The resulting galaxy distribution on the Mr-vcirc plane was then modelled as a mixture of two distinct populations, allowing robust and reproducible rejection of outliers, a significant fraction of which are slow rotators. The selection effects are understood well enough that we were able to correct for the incompleteness of the sample. The 199 galaxies were weighted by volume and large-scale structure factors, which enabled us to fit a volume-corrected Tully-Fisher relation (TFR). More importantly, we also provide the volume-corrected distribution of galaxies in the Mr-vcirc plane, which can be compared with cosmological simulations. The joint distribution of the luminosity and circular velocity space densities, representative over the range of -20 > Mr > -22 mag, can place more stringent constraints on the galaxy formation and evolution scenarios than linear TFR fit parameters or the luminosity function alone. Galaxies main

  14. Firn air-content of Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula, from seismic velocities, borehole surveys and firn modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulessa, Bernd; Brisbourne, Alex; Booth, Adam; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Bevan, Suzanne; Luckman, Adrian; Hubbard, Bryn; Gourmelen, Noel; Palmer, Steve; Holland, Paul; Ashmore, David; Shepherd, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The rising surface temperature of Antarctic Peninsula ice shelves is strongly implicated in ice shelf disintegration, by exacerbating the compaction of firn layers. Firn compaction is expected to warm the ice column and, given sufficiently wet and compacted layers, to allow meltwater to penetrate into surface crevasses and thus enhance hydrofracture potential. Integrating seismic refraction surveys with borehole neutron and firn core density logging, we reveal vertical and horizontal changes in firn properties across Larsen C Ice Shelf. Patterns of firn air-content derived from seismic surveys are broadly similar to those estimated previously from airborne radar and satellite data. Specifically, these estimates show greater firn compaction in the north and landward inlets compared to the south, although spatial gradients in seismic-derived air-contents are less pronounced than those previously inferred. Firn thickness is less than 10 m in the extreme northwest of Larsen C, in Cabinet Inlet, yet exceeds 40 m in the southeast, suggesting that the inlet is a focus of firn compaction; indeed, buried layers of massive refrozen ice were observed in 200 MHz GPR data in Cabinet and Whirlwind Inlets during a field campaign in the 2014-15 austral summer. Depth profiles of firn density provide a reasonable fit with those derived from closely-located firn cores and neutron probe data. Our model of firn structure is driven by RACMO and includes a 'bucket'-type hydrological implementation, and simulates the depth-density profiles in the inlets well. Discrepancies between measured and modelled depth-density profiles become progressively greater towards the ice-shelf front. RACMO incorrectly simulates the particular leeward (sea-ice-influenced) microclimate of the shallow boundary layer, leading to excess melt and/or lack of snowfall. The spatial sampling density of our seismic observations will be augmented following a further field campaign in the 2016-17 austral summer

  15. On the Pressure Drop and the Velocity Distribution in the Cylindrical Vortex Chamber with Two Inlet Pipes for the Control of Vortex Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira OGAWA; Tutomu OONO; Hayato OKABE; Noriaki AKIBA; Taketo OOYAGI

    2005-01-01

    @@ Vortex flow is applied to a cyclone dust collector, a vortex combustion chamber, and a vortex diode for vortex control. In order to apply the vortex flow to the industries, it is necessary to keep the stable flow condition and to estimate the response time of the transient flow process and also the intensity of the vortex flow. For control vortex flow, two types of vortex chamber with two inlet pipes were designed. One of them is to promote the vortex flow named as Co-Rotating Flow System and another one is to hinder the vortex flow named as Counter-Rotating Flow System. The pressure drops and the velocity distributions were measured for these vortex chambers. The estimation of the tangential velocity by the application of the angular momentum flux is compared with the measured velocity by a cylindrical Pitot-tube. The characteristics of the total pressure drop could be explained by introducing the circulation.

  16. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Waves in a Plasma Described by Kappa Velocity Distribution as Observed in the Saturńs Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, M. V.; Barbosa, M. V. G.; Simoes, F. J. L., Jr.

    2016-12-01

    Observations have shown that several regions in space plasmas exhibit non-Maxwellian distributions with high energy superthermal tails. Kappa velocity distribution functions can describe many of these regions and have been used since the 60's. They suit well to represent superthermal tails in solar wind as well as to obtain plasma parameters of plasma within planetary magnetospheres. A set of initial velocities following kappa distribution functions is used in KEMPO1 particle simulation code to analyze the normal modes of wave propagation. Initial conditions are determined using observed characteristics for Saturńs magnetosphere. Two electron species with different temperatures and densities and ions as a third species are used. Each electron population is described by a different kappa index. Particular attention is given to perpendicular propagation, Bernstein modes, and parallel propagation, Langmuir and electron-acoustic modes. The dispersion relation for the Bernstein modes is strongly influenced by the shape of the velocity distribution and consequently by the value of kappa index. Simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the dispersion relation obtained in the literature and they are in good agreement.

  17. Measuring centimeter-resolution air temperature profiles above land and water using fiber-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, Armin; Pfister, Lena; Olesch, Johannes; Thomas, Christoph K.

    2016-04-01

    The precise determination of near-surface air temperature profiles is of special importance for the characterization of airflows (e.g. cold air) and the quantification of sensible heat fluxes according to the flux-gradient similarity approach. In contrast to conventional multi-sensor techniques, measuring temperature profiles using fiber-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) provides thousands of measurements referenced to a single calibration standard at much reduced costs. The aim of this work was to enhance the vertical resolution of Raman scatter DTS measurements up to the centimeter-scale using a novel approach for atmospheric applications: the optical fiber was helically coiled around a meshed fabric. In addition to testing the new fiber geometry, we quantified the measurement uncertainty and demonstrated the benefits of the enhanced-resolution profiles. The fiber-optic cable was coiled around a hollow column consisting of white reinforcing fabric supported by plexiglass rings every meter. Data from two columns of this type were collected for 47 days to measure air temperature vertically over 3.0 and 5.1 m over a gently inclined meadow and over and in a small lake, respectively. Both profiles had a vertical resolution of 1 cm in the lower section near the surface and 5 cm in the upper section with an along-fiber instrument-specific averaging of 1.0 m and a temporal resolution of 30 s. Measurement uncertainties, especially from conduction between reinforcing fabric and fiber-optic cable, were estimated by modeling the fiber temperature via a detailed energy balance approach. Air temperature, wind velocity and radiation components were needed as input data and measured separately. The temperature profiles revealed valuable details, especially in the lowest 1 m above surface. This was best demonstrated for nighttime observations when artefacts due to solar heating did not occur. For example, the dynamics of a cold air layer was detected in a clear night

  18. Comparative Cooling Season Performance of Air Distribution Systems in Multistory Townhomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poerschke, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Beach, R. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Beggs, T. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-08-26

    IBACOS investigated the performance of a small-diameter high velocity heat pump system compared to a conventional system in a new construction triplex townhouse. A ductless heat pump system also was installed for comparison, but the homebuyer backed out because of aesthetic concerns about that system. In total, two buildings, having identical solar orientation and comprised of six townhomes, were monitored for comfort and energy performance. Results show that the small-diameter system provides more uniform temperatures from floor to floor in the three-story townhome. No clear energy consumption benefit was observed from either system. The builder is continuing to explore the small-diameter system as its new standard system to provide better comfort and indoor air quality. The homebuilder also explored the possibility of shifting its townhome product to meet the U.S. Department of Energy Challenge Home National Program Requirements.

  19. Lateral Distribution of the Radio Signal in Extensive Air Showers Measured with LOPES

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Asch, T; Badea, A F; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Brueggemann, M; Buchholz, P; Buitink, S; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; De Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Finger, M; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K H; Kang, D; Kickelbick, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Nigl, A; Oehlschläger, J; Over, S; Palmieri, N; Petcu, M; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schroeder, F; Sima, O; Singh, K; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Wommer, M; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

    2009-01-01

    The antenna array LOPES is set up at the location of the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany and aims to measure and investigate radio pulses from Extensive Air Showers. The coincident measurements allow us to reconstruct the electric field strength at observation level in dependence of general EAS parameters. In the present work, the lateral distribution of the radio signal in air showers is studied in detail. It is found that the lateral distributions of the electric field strengths in individual EAS can be described by an exponential function. For about 20% of the events a flattening towards the shower axis is observed, preferentially for showers with large inclination angle. The estimated scale parameters R0 describing the slope of the lateral profiles range between 100 and 200 m. No evidence for a direct correlation of R0 with shower parameters like azimuth angle, geomagnetic angle, or primary energy can be found. This indicates that the lateral profile is an intrinsic pr...

  20. Airborne lidar mapping of vertical ozone distributions in support of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthe, Edward E.; Nielsen, Norman B.; Livingston, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandated attainment of the ozone standard established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Improved photochemical models validated by experimental data are needed to develop strategies for reducing near surface ozone concentrations downwind of urban and industrial centers. For more than 10 years, lidar has been used on large aircraft to provide unique information on ozone distributions in the atmosphere. However, compact airborne lidar systems are needed for operation on small aircraft of the type typically used on regional air quality investigations to collect data with which to develop and validate air quality models. Data presented in this paper will consist of a comparison between airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) and airborne in-situ ozone measurements. Also discussed are future plans to improve the airborne ultraviolet-DIAL for ozone and other gas observations and addition of a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) emission spectrometer to investigate the effects of other gas species on vertical ozone distribution.