WorldWideScience

Sample records for air samplers

  1. Relative performance of an indigenous personal air sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An indigenous personal air sampler (PAS) is developed for estimating inhaled air activity of personnel working in radiotoxic laboratories containing airborne concentrations of plutonium, uranium, thorium etc. Performance of this sampler was tested and compared with an imported equipment viz., Casella (London) personal air sampler. On several parameters such as the size, weight, cost and performance efficiency over large ranges etc. the indigenous PAS is comparable to the Casella air sampler. The paper summarises the results of thoron airborne activity evaluated by both the air samplers in specific areas at the Thorium Plant, Indian Rare Earths Ltd. (IRE), Bombay. (author). 2 tabs., 2 figs

  2. Locating air samplers inside a room using qualitative airflow studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravchik, T.; Levinson, S.; German, U. [Nuclear Research Center Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Haim, M. [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel)

    2000-05-01

    The concentration of airborne radioactive materials inside a room can vary widely from one location to another, sometimes by orders of magnitude even for locations that are reactively close. Inappropriately placed air samplers can give misleading results and, therefore, the location of air samplers is important. Proper placement of samplers is not always obvious and cannot be determined simply by observing the position of room air supply and exhaust vents. Airflow studies, such as the release of smoke aerosols, should be used. The significance of airflow pattern studies depends on the purpose of sampling-for estimating worker intakes, warning of abnormally high concentrations, defining airborne radioactive areas, testing for confinement of sealed radioactive materials, etc. Qualitative smoke tests were conducted inside rooms using a 'KUPO Inc.' smoke tube (D5050 fog machine). Smoke was released at elevation of 1-2 meters and its path was recorded on worksheet drawings of the room. The tests revealed three types of airflow patterns inside the rooms: a) flow path with a definite stable direction, b) flow path which changes direction arbitrarily as a result of airflow vortices, and c) static/stagnant air. In some cases the airflow path direction was different from the expected one. This emphasizes the significance of conducting airflow studies for location of air samplers and not only relying on intuition. An airflow patterns comparison study between the qualitative smoke tests and computer simulation using a commercial finite element CFD code, FIDAP 8.01, was also conducted. The measured and the computed paths of the airflow were mostly in good agreement. The computer simulation indicated additional details which could not be observed when performing the smoke tests because of physical and visibility limitations. (author)

  3. AirCore Reusable InSitu Sampler for CO2 and Trace Gas Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AirCore is a simple and novel atmospheric air column sampler to validate satellite observation data of greenhouse gases, using a lightweight, inexpensive coated...

  4. Field calibration of polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive air samplers for PCBs and OC pesticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaemfa, Chakra; Barber, Jonathan L. [Centre for Chemicals Management and Environmental Science Department, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Gocht, Tilman [Centre for Applied Geoscience, University of Tuebingen, Sigwartstrasse 10, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Harner, Tom [Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate, Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario M3H 5T4 (Canada); Holoubek, Ivan; Klanova, Jana [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Kamenice 126/3, 62500 Brno (Czech Republic); Jones, Kevin C. [Centre for Chemicals Management and Environmental Science Department, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.c.jones@lancaster.ac.uk

    2008-12-15

    Different passive air sampler (PAS) strategies have been developed for sampling in remote areas and for cost-effective simultaneous spatial mapping of POPs (persistent organic pollutants) over differing geographical scales. The polyurethane foam (PUF) disk-based PAS is probably the most widely used. In a PUF-based PAS, the PUF disk is generally mounted inside two stainless steel bowls to buffer the air flow to the disk and to shield it from precipitation and light. The field study described in this manuscript was conducted to: compare performance of 3 different designs of sampler; to further calibrate the sampler against the conventional active sampler; to derive more information on field-based uptake rates and equilibrium times of the samplers. Samplers were also deployed at different locations across the field site, and at different heights up a meteorological tower, to investigate the possible influence of sampler location. Samplers deployed <5 m above ground, and not directly sheltered from the wind gave similar uptake rates. Small differences in dimensions between the 3 designs of passive sampler chamber had no discernable effect on accumulation rates, allowing comparison with previously published data. - Field studies have validated the use of chambers containing polyurethane-disks for passively sampling persistent organic pollutants in air.

  5. Field calibration of polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive air samplers for PCBs and OC pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different passive air sampler (PAS) strategies have been developed for sampling in remote areas and for cost-effective simultaneous spatial mapping of POPs (persistent organic pollutants) over differing geographical scales. The polyurethane foam (PUF) disk-based PAS is probably the most widely used. In a PUF-based PAS, the PUF disk is generally mounted inside two stainless steel bowls to buffer the air flow to the disk and to shield it from precipitation and light. The field study described in this manuscript was conducted to: compare performance of 3 different designs of sampler; to further calibrate the sampler against the conventional active sampler; to derive more information on field-based uptake rates and equilibrium times of the samplers. Samplers were also deployed at different locations across the field site, and at different heights up a meteorological tower, to investigate the possible influence of sampler location. Samplers deployed <5 m above ground, and not directly sheltered from the wind gave similar uptake rates. Small differences in dimensions between the 3 designs of passive sampler chamber had no discernable effect on accumulation rates, allowing comparison with previously published data. - Field studies have validated the use of chambers containing polyurethane-disks for passively sampling persistent organic pollutants in air

  6. A Passive Sampler for Determination of Nitrogen Dioxide in Ambient Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dan; Lin, Lianzhi; Yuan, Hongyan; Choi, Martin M. F.; Chan, Winghong

    2005-08-01

    This article describes the use of a passive sampler for detecting and collecting nitrogen dioxide, NO 2 , in ambient air. This device is based on microporous PTFE membranes that allow air samples to diffuse through and subsequently react with an absorbing reagent solution. The absorbance value of this reagent is proportional to the NO 2 concentration in ambient air. It has been successfully applied to determine the NO 2 concentrations in various sampling sites. The sampler is simple, lightweight, and inexpensive. The experiments are suitable for college students in analytical chemistry and environmental studies.

  7. Arduino-based control system for measuring ammonia in air using conditionally-deployed diffusive samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, J. M.; Williams, C.; Shonkwiler, K. B.

    2012-12-01

    Arduino microcontrollers, wireless modules, and other low-cost hardware were used to develop a new type of air sampler for monitoring ammonia at strong areal sources like dairies, cattle feedlots, and waste treatment facilities. Ammonia was sampled at multiple locations on the periphery of an operation using Radiello diffusive passive samplers (Cod. RAD168- and RAD1201-Sigma-Aldrich). However, the samplers were not continuously exposed to the air. Instead, each sampling station included two diffusive samplers housed in specialized tubes that sealed the cartridges from the atmosphere. If a user-defined set of wind and weather conditions were met, the Radiellos were deployed into the air using a micro linear actuator. Each station was solar-powered and controlled by Arduinos that were linked to a central weather station using Xbee wireless modules (Digi International Inc.). The Arduinos also measured the total time of exposure using hall-effect sensors to verify the position of the cartridge (i.e., deployed or retracted). The decision to expose or retract the samplers was made every five minutes based on wind direction, wind speed, and time of day. Typically, the diffusive samplers were replaced with fresh cartridges every two weeks and the used samplers were analyzed in the laboratory using ion chromatography. Initial studies were conducted at a commercial dairy in northern Colorado. Ammonia emissions along the Front Range of Colorado can be transported into the mountains where atmospheric deposition of nitrogen can impact alpine ecosystems. Therefore, low-cost air quality monitoring equipment is needed that can be widely deployed in the region. Initial work at the dairy showed that ammonia concentrations ranged between 600 to 1200 ppb during the summer; the highest concentrations were downwind of a large anaerobic lagoon. Time-averaged ammonia concentrations were also used to approximate emissions using inverse dispersion models. This methodology provides a

  8. Passive samplers and community science in regional air quality measurement, education and communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlotte, in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, was ranked in the top ten cities with the worst air quality for ozone in the United States by the American Lung Association from 2009 to 2011. Nearby counties that may experience similar air quality do not have state or county monitors. This study utilized NOx and ozone Ogawa passive samplers and community scientists to monitor air quality in five counties surrounding Charlotte and increase public engagement in air quality issues. Community scientists deployed samplers weekly at a residential site within each county. Samples were analyzed using spectrophotometry and ion chromatography. Elevated NOx concentrations were observed in four of the five counties relative to those with existing monitors. Ozone concentrations showed little county to county variation, except Iredell and Cabarrus which had higher concentrations than Rowan. Community involvement in this work led to an increase in local dissemination of the results, thus increasing air quality awareness. - Highlights: • NOx concentrations in four adjacent counties were higher than the Mecklenburg site. • Ozone concentrations showed little county to county variation. • Passive samplers and community science can extend the air quality monitoring network. • Community science increases community awareness of air quality issues. - Regional community air quality monitoring is important in educating communities about air quality science issues that can impact personal health and behavior

  9. The Gillings Sampler – An Electrostatic Air Sampler as an Alternative Method for Aerosol In Vitro Exposure Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, Jose; Lichtveld, Kim; Ebersviller, Seth; Carson, Johnny L.; Walters, Glenn W.; Jaspers, Ilona; Jeffries, Harvey E.; Sexton, Kenneth G.; Vizuete, William

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in studying the toxicity and health risk of exposure to multi-pollutant mixtures found in ambient air, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is moving towards setting standards for these types of mixtures. Additionally, the Health Effects Institute's strategic plan aims to develop and apply next-generation multi-pollutant approaches to understanding the health effects of air pollutants. There's increasing concern that conventional in vitro exposure methods are not adequate to meet EPA's strategic plan to demonstrate a direct link between air pollution and health effects. To meet the demand for new in vitro technology that better represents direct air-to-cell inhalation exposures, a new system that exposes cells at the air-liquid interface was developed. This new system, named the Gillings Sampler, is a modified two-stage electrostatic precipitator that provides a viable environment for cultured cells. Polystyrene latex spheres were used to determine deposition efficiencies (38-45%), while microscopy and imaging techniques were used to confirm uniform particle deposition. Negative control A549 cell exposures indicated the sampler can be operated for up to 4 hours without inducing any significant toxic effects on cells, as measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and interleukin-8 (IL-8). A novel positive aerosol control exposure method, consisting of a p-tolualdehyde (TOLALD) impregnated mineral oil aerosol (MOA), was developed to test this system. Exposures to the toxic MOA at a 1 ng/cm2 dose of TOLALD yielded a reproducible 1.4 and 2 fold increase in LDH and IL-8 mRNA levels over controls. This new system is intended to be used as an alternative research tool for aerosol in vitro exposure studies. While further testing and optimization is still required to produce a “commercially ready” system, it serves as a stepping-stone in the development of cost-effective in vitro technology that can be made accessible to researchers

  10. Passive samplers and community science in regional air quality measurement, education and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest Hauser, Cindy; Buckley, Alexandra; Porter, Juliana

    2015-08-01

    Charlotte, in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, was ranked in the top ten cities with the worst air quality for ozone in the United States by the American Lung Association from 2009 to 2011. Nearby counties that may experience similar air quality do not have state or county monitors. This study utilized NOx and ozone Ogawa passive samplers and community scientists to monitor air quality in five counties surrounding Charlotte and increase public engagement in air quality issues. Community scientists deployed samplers weekly at a residential site within each county. Samples were analyzed using spectrophotometry and ion chromatography. Elevated NOx concentrations were observed in four of the five counties relative to those with existing monitors. Ozone concentrations showed little county to county variation, except Iredell and Cabarrus which had higher concentrations than Rowan. Community involvement in this work led to an increase in local dissemination of the results, thus increasing air quality awareness. PMID:25556581

  11. Comparative performance of two air samplers for monitoring airborne fungal propagules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.G.F. Távora

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have attempted to evaluate the importance of airborne fungi in the development of invasive fungal infection, especially for immunocompromised hosts. Several kinds of instruments are available to quantitate fungal propagule levels in air. We compared the performance of the most frequently used air sampler, the Andersen sampler with six stages, with a portable one, the Reuter centrifugal sampler (RCS. A total of 84 samples were analyzed, 42 with each sampler. Twenty-eight different fungal genera were identified in samples analyzed with the Andersen instrument. In samples obtained with the RCS only seven different fungal genera were identified. The three most frequently isolated genera in samples analyzed with both devices were Penicillium, Aspergillus and Cladophialophora. In areas supplied with a high efficiency particulate air filter, fungal spore levels were usually lower when compared to areas without these filters. There was a significant correlation between total fungal propagule measurements taken with both devices on each sampling occasion (Pearson coefficient = 0.50. However, the Andersen device recovered a broader spectrum of fungi. We conclude that the RCS can be used for quantitative estimates of airborne microbiological concentrations. For qualitative studies, however, this device cannot be recommended.

  12. Polyurethane foam (PUF) disks passive air samplers: Wind effect on sampling rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different passive sampler housings were evaluated for their wind dampening ability and how this might translate to variability in sampler uptake rates. Polyurethane foam (PUF) disk samplers were used as the sampling medium and were exposed to a PCB-contaminated atmosphere in a wind tunnel. The effect of outside wind speed on PUF disk sampling rates was evaluated by exposing polyurethane foam (PUF) disks to a PCB-contaminated air stream in a wind tunnel over air velocities in the range 0 to 1.75 m s-1. PUF disk sampling rates increased gradually over the range 0-0.9 m s-1 at ∼4.5-14.6 m3 d-1 and then increased sharply to ∼42 m3 d-1 at ∼1.75 m s-1 (sum of PCBs). The results indicate that for most field deployments the conventional 'flying saucer' housing adequately dampens the wind effect and will yield approximately time-weighted air concentrations. - Passive sampler housings dampen wind speed and reduce the variability in sampling rates

  13. PRODUCTION OF ACTIVATED CHARCOAL SAMPLER TUBES FOR SAMPLING AIR CONTAMINANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Nassiri

    1988-08-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the use of activated charcoal tubes for sampling gases and vapors is very well-known. For producing these tubes in the country, their production started in the laboratory of the department of occupation al health using activated charcoal, polyurethane foam and glass wool and consequently two types of foamed and foamless tubes were produced. To investigate the quality of the raw materials used, 186 tubes were exposed to various proportions of solutions of different volumes of known percentages of four compounds of benzene, toluene, O-xylene and P-xlene. The adsorption of various parts of sampler tubes was done by a chemical method using CS2 and the final analysis was done by gas chromatography. The results obtained show that the amount of the above named compounds adsorbed by glass wool and foam in comparison to the activated charcoal isn’t significant (respectively P<0.001 & P,0.05. Also the experiments don’s show any significant differences between the total amount of adsorbed chemicals by charcoal in the back-up layer and the sample layer of the foamed tube and the amount adsorbed in the foamless tube, when treated with various compounds (P,0.001. Considering the equal adsorption of both types of tubes and the advantage of foamed tubes in controlling the time duration and the flow rate of sampling, the foamed type was recommended for production and use.

  14. Aerosol sampler with remote air flow control and online radioactivity measurement above the filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Czech national Radiation Monitoring Network is equipped with JL-150 aerosol samplers 150 m3/h air flow rate. An upgraded design of this system is proposed. The features of the upgraded aerosol sampler include remote air flow rate control via pump power, maintaining the adjusted flow rate constant, sending status information either on demand or automatically on any change, online gamma spectra acquisition above the aerosol filter and their automatic evaluation, comparison of selected regions of a spectrum with the reference levels and automatic signalling when they are exceeded. The minimum detectable activities of 131I and 137Cs, which may be present in the air in case of NPP accident, are at tenths of Bq/m3 for 1 hour measuring time. (orig.)

  15. Characterization of polymer coated glass as a passive air sampler for persistent organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harner, Tom; Farrar, Nick J; Shoeib, Mahiba; Jones, Kevin C; Gobas, Frank A P C

    2003-06-01

    The use of thin-film polymer-coated glass surfaces or POGs as passive air samplers was investigated during an uptake experiment in an indoor environment with high levels of gas-phase polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). POGs consisted of a micron thick layer of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) coated onto glass cylinders. The uptake was initially linear with time and governed by the air-side mass transfer coefficient and surface area of the sampler. This was followed by a curvilinear region and finally a constant phase when equilibrium was established between air and EVA. The high surface area-to-volume ratio of the POGs allowed rapid equilibrium with gas-phase PCBs; equilibration times were on the order of hours for the low molecular weight congeners. The equilibrium concentration was dependent on the EVA-air partition coefficient, K(EVA-A), which was shown to be very well correlated to the octanol-air partition coefficient, K(OA). When POGs of varying thickness were equilibrated with air, the amount of PCB accumulated increased with increasing thickness of the EVA, indicating that uptake was by absorption into the entire polymer matrix. A wind field of 4 m s(-1) resulted in an increased uptake rate by a factor of approximately six compared to uptake in relatively still air. This wind speed effect was diminished, however, when POGs were housed in deployment chambers consisting of inverted stainless steel bowls. Relationships based on the air-side mass transfer coefficient and K(EVA-A) were developed for PCBs that describe the entire uptake profile and allow air concentrations to be determined from the amount of chemical accumulated in the POG. It is believed that these relationships are also valid when POGs are used to detect other classes of persistent organic pollutants.

  16. Application of Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME Sampler for Determination of Carbon Disulfide in Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AbdulRahman Bahrami

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon disulfide is used predominantly in the manufacture. It has affects the nervous system. In this study, the applicability of SPME as a passive sampler for determination of carbon disulphide in air was studied. Effect of sampler and environmental parameters on uptake of Carbon disulphide was studied as well. Four fibers were tested to select the best sampler for determine carbon disulfide in ambient air. A standard generation chamber was built in the laboratory and was used to test the SPME. Analysis SPME samples were carried out by a gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry and results were compared with data obtained with National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH method 1600. Polymethylsiloxane-carboxen (PDMS/CAR showed  the  most  effective stationary phase  material for sorbing BTEX among other materials (polyacrylate, PDMS, PDMS/divinylbenzene. Its linearity range in exposed mode was less than 10 minutes but with its retracted mode application, its linearity increased up to 8 hours. Temperature had not linear effect on uptake of pollutant in temperatures lower than 25, it has positive effect and above this range it has negative effect. Relative humidity had negative effect on mass loaded on fiber. Velocity in range of static to 0.5 m/s had no significant effect. The precision of the method was 4.18% relative standard deviation (RSD. The detection limit for carbon disulfide in the GC/MS system in SIM mode was 6.7 ng per sample. SPME is a good alternative for sampling of carbon disulfide in air. However, for the situations in high humidity values it should be used with care.

  17. Operating manual for Ford's Farm Range air samplers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Halverson, M.A.

    1980-10-01

    An air-sampling program was designed for a target enclosure at the Ford's Farm Range, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, where the Army test-fires tungsten and depleted-uranium armor penetrators. The primary potential particle inhalation hazard is depleted uranium. The sampling program includes workplace and filtered exhaust air sampling. Conventional isokinetic stack sampling was employed for the filtered exhaust air. Because of the need for rapid monitor response to concentration increases and decreases, conventional radioactive particle monitors were not used. Instead, real-time aerosol monitors employing a light-scattering technique were used for monitors requiring a fast response. For other monitoring functions, piezoelectric and beta-attenuation respirable-particle sampling techniques were used. The application of these technologies to the monitoring of airborne radioactive contaminants is addressed. Sampler installation and operation are detailed.

  18. First results from the high resolution air sampler (HIRES) installed in the CARIBIC observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenninkmeijer, C. A.; Koeppel, C.; Baker, A. K.; Schuck, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    In May 2010 the CARIBIC instrument container (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container; www.caribic-atmospheric.com) was upgraded to include a new high resolution air sampler, HIRES. This new sampler consists of 88 1L stainless steel sampling flasks, supplementing the existing 2 units with 14 2.5L glass flasks each, increasing the CARIBIC sampling capacity to 116 whole air samples collected using a single pumping unit having two metal bellow pumps in series. The CARIBIC project involves the monthly deployment of a fully automated instrument container equipped to make atmospheric measurements from aboard a commercial airliner, and has operated since 2005 onboard a Lufthansa Airbus 340-600. Measurements from the container include in-situ trace gas and aerosol analyses and the collection of aerosol and whole air samples for post-flight laboratory analysis. Measurements made from the sampling flasks include greenhouse gas (GHG) and nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) analysis. The first deployment of HIRES for a CARIBIC flight was in June 2010, and it has been in routine monthly operation since, making a total of 1188 HIRES air samples collected as of July 2011 (from a total of 1566 CARIBIC air samples). The ability of CARIBIC to observe the atmosphere at aircraft cruising altitudes (9-12 km) provides the opportunity to regularly measure the composition of the upper troposphere/lowermost stratosphere (UT/LS), and increased sampling resolution has provided invaluable long-term observations of GHG and NMHC gradients across the tropopause which are unique to CARIBIC. Here we provide a detailed description of the collection system itself, and give first results from the inaugural year of HIRES, which include detailed observations of pollution plumes over eastern Asia, tropical convection over continental Africa, and trace gas gradients in the tropopause at high northern latitudes.

  19. Testing flow-through air samplers for use in near-field vapour drift studies by measuring pyrimethanil in air after spraying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoghegan, Trudyanne S; Hageman, Kimberly J; Hewitt, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    Pesticide volatilisation and subsequent vapour drift reduce a pesticide's efficiency and contribute to environmental contamination. High-volume air samplers (HVSs) are often used to measure pesticide concentrations in air but these samplers are expensive to purchase and require network electricity, limiting the number and type of sites where they can be deployed. The flow-through sampler (FTS) presents an opportunity to overcome these limitations. The FTS is a wind-driven passive sampler that has been developed to quantify organic contaminants in remote ecosystems. FTSs differ from other passive samplers in that they turn into the wind and use the wind to draw air through the sampling media. The main objective of this work was to evaluate the FTS in a near-field pesticide vapour drift study by comparing the concentrations of pyrimethanil in air measured using one HVS and three FTSs placed in the same location. Pyrimethanil was sprayed onto a vineyard as part of normal pest management procedures. Air samples were collected every eight hours for 48 h. The volume of air sampled by the FTSs was calculated using the measured relationship between ambient wind speed and the wind speed inside the sampler as determined with a separate wind tunnel study. The FTSs sampled 1.7 to 40.6 m(3) of air during each 8 h sampling period, depending on wind speed, whereas the mean volume sampled by the HVS was 128.7 m(3). Mean pyrimethanil concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 3.2 μg m(-3) of air. Inter-sampler reproducibility, as represented by percent relative standard deviation, for the three FTSs was ∼20%. The largest difference in FTS-derived versus HVS-derived pyrimethanil concentrations occurred during the lowest wind-speed period. During this period, it is likely that the FTS predominately acted like a traditional diffusion-based passive sampler. As indicated by both types of sampler, pyrimethanil concentrations in air changed by a factor of ∼2 during the two days after spaying

  20. Testing flow-through air samplers for use in near-field vapour drift studies by measuring pyrimethanil in air after spraying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoghegan, Trudyanne S; Hageman, Kimberly J; Hewitt, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    Pesticide volatilisation and subsequent vapour drift reduce a pesticide's efficiency and contribute to environmental contamination. High-volume air samplers (HVSs) are often used to measure pesticide concentrations in air but these samplers are expensive to purchase and require network electricity, limiting the number and type of sites where they can be deployed. The flow-through sampler (FTS) presents an opportunity to overcome these limitations. The FTS is a wind-driven passive sampler that has been developed to quantify organic contaminants in remote ecosystems. FTSs differ from other passive samplers in that they turn into the wind and use the wind to draw air through the sampling media. The main objective of this work was to evaluate the FTS in a near-field pesticide vapour drift study by comparing the concentrations of pyrimethanil in air measured using one HVS and three FTSs placed in the same location. Pyrimethanil was sprayed onto a vineyard as part of normal pest management procedures. Air samples were collected every eight hours for 48 h. The volume of air sampled by the FTSs was calculated using the measured relationship between ambient wind speed and the wind speed inside the sampler as determined with a separate wind tunnel study. The FTSs sampled 1.7 to 40.6 m(3) of air during each 8 h sampling period, depending on wind speed, whereas the mean volume sampled by the HVS was 128.7 m(3). Mean pyrimethanil concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 3.2 μg m(-3) of air. Inter-sampler reproducibility, as represented by percent relative standard deviation, for the three FTSs was ∼20%. The largest difference in FTS-derived versus HVS-derived pyrimethanil concentrations occurred during the lowest wind-speed period. During this period, it is likely that the FTS predominately acted like a traditional diffusion-based passive sampler. As indicated by both types of sampler, pyrimethanil concentrations in air changed by a factor of ∼2 during the two days after spaying

  1. Utilization of rice husk silica as adsorbent for BTEX passive air sampler under high humidity condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areerob, Thanita; Grisdanurak, Nurak; Chiarakorn, Siriluk

    2016-03-01

    Selective adsorbent of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) was developed based on mesoporous silica materials, RH-MCM-41. It was synthesized from rice husk silica and modified by silane reagents. The silane reagents used in this study were trimethylchlorosilane (TMS), triisopropylchlorosilane (TIPS), and phenyldimethylchlorosilane (PDMS). Physiochemical properties of synthesized materials were characterized by small-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and surface area analysis. Materials packed in passive air sampler were tested for BTEX uptake capacity. The tests were carried out under an influence of relative humidity (25 to 99 %). Overall, RH-MCM-41 modified by TMS outperformed compared to those modified by other silane agents. The comparative BTEX adsorption on this material and commercial graphitized carbon black was reported. PMID:26573315

  2. Design and laboratory testing of a new flow-through directional passive air sampler for ambient particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun; Solera Garcia, Maria Angeles; Timmis, Roger; Jones, Kevin C

    2011-03-01

    A new type of directional passive air sampler (DPAS) is described for collecting particulate matter (PM) in ambient air. The prototype sampler has a non-rotating circular sampling tray that is divided into covered angular channels, whose ends are open to winds from sectors covering the surrounding 360°. Wind-blown PM from different directions enters relevant wind-facing channels, and is retained there in collecting pools containing various sampling media. Information on source direction and type can be obtained by examining the distribution of PM between channels. Wind tunnel tests show that external wind velocities are at least halved over an extended area of the collecting pools, encouraging PM to settle from the air stream. Internal and external wind velocities are well-correlated over an external velocity range of 2.0-10.0 m s⁻¹, which suggests it may be possible to relate collected amounts of PM simply to ambient concentrations and wind velocities. Measurements of internal wind velocities in different channels show that velocities decrease from the upwind channel round to the downwind channel, so that the sampler effectively resolves wind directions. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were performed on a computer-generated model of the sampler for a range of external wind velocities; the results of these analyses were consistent with those from the wind tunnel. Further wind tunnel tests were undertaken using different artificial particulates in order to assess the collection performance of the sampler in practice. These tests confirmed that the sampler can resolve the directions of sources, by collecting particulates preferentially in source-facing channels.

  3. An Improved, Automated Whole-Air Sampler and VOC Analysis System: Results from SONGNEX 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, B. M.; Gilman, J.; Tokarek, T. W.; Peischl, J.; Koss, A.; Yuan, B.; Warneke, C.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Sueper, D.; De Gouw, J. A.; Aikin, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the troposphere is critical for the understanding of emissions and physical and chemical processes that can impact both air quality and climate. Airborne VOC measurements have proven challenging due to the requirements of short sample collection times (=10 s) to maximize spatial resolution and sampling frequency and high sensitivity (pptv) to chemically diverse hydrocarbons, halocarbons, oxygen- and nitrogen-containing VOCs. NOAA ESRL CSD has built an improved whole air sampler (iWAS) which collects compressed ambient air samples in electropolished stainless steel canisters, based on the NCAR HAIS Advanced Whole Air Sampler [Atlas and Blake]. Post-flight chemical analysis is performed with a custom-built gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer system that pre-concentrates analyte cryostatically via a Stirling cooler, an electromechanical chiller which precludes the need for liquid nitrogen to reach trapping temperatures. For the 2015 Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus Study (SONGNEX), CSD conducted iWAS measurements on 19 flights aboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft between March 19th and April 27th. Nine oil and natural gas production regions were surveyed during SONGNEX and more than 1500 air samples were collected and analyzed. For the first time, we employed real-time mapping of sample collection combined with live data from fast time-response measurements (e.g. ethane) for more uniform surveying and improved target plume sampling. Automated sample handling allowed for more than 90% of iWAS canisters to be analyzed within 96 hours of collection - for the second half of the campaign improved efficiencies reduced the median sample age at analysis to 36 hours. A new chromatography peak-fitting software package was developed to minimize data reduction time by an order of magnitude without a loss of precision or accuracy. Here we report mixing ratios for aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons (C2-C8) along with select

  4. Assessing seasonal and spatial trends of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Indian agricultural regions using PUF disk passive air samplers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozo, Karla [Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate, Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ontario M3H 5T4 (Canada); Environmental Science Department, University of Siena, Via Mattioli 4, 53100 Siena (Italy); Harner, Tom, E-mail: tom.harner@ec.gc.c [Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate, Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ontario M3H 5T4 (Canada); Lee, Sum Chi [Atmospheric Science and Technology Directorate, Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ontario M3H 5T4 (Canada); Sinha, Ravindra K. [Centre for Environmental Science, School of Earth Biological and Environmental Sciences, Central University of Bihar, Patna (India); Sengupta, B. [Central Pollution Control Board, Parivesh Bhavan, East Arjun Nagar, Delhi (India); Loewen, Mark [Freshwater Institute, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Geethalakshmi, V. [Department of Agricultural Meteorology, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu (India); Kannan, Kurunthachalam [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and Department of Environmental Health Sciences, State University of New York at Albany, New York (United States); Volpi, Valerio [Environmental Science Department, University of Siena, Via Mattioli 4, 53100 Siena (Italy)

    2011-02-15

    The first survey of persistent organic pollutant (POP) concentrations in air across several Indian agricultural regions was conducted in 2006-2007. Passive samplers comprising polyurethane foam (PUF) disks were deployed on a quarterly basis at seven stations in agricultural regions, one urban site and one background site. The project was conducted as a sub-project of the Global Atmospheric Passive Sampling (GAPS) Network. In addition to revealing new information on air concentrations of several organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), the study has demonstrated the feasibility of conducting regional-scale monitoring for POPs in India using PUF disk samplers. The following analytes were detected with relatively high concentrations in air (mean for 2006 and 2007, pg/m{sup 3}): {alpha}- and {gamma}-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) (292 and 812, respectively); endosulfan I and II (2770 and 902, respectively); p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDT (247 and 931, respectively); and for the sum of 48 PCBs, 12,100 (including a site with extremely high air concentrations in 2007) and 972 (when excluding data for this site). - New data on air concentrations of POPs across Indian agricultural regions is generated using cost-effective passive air samplers.

  5. Wastewater treatment plants and landfills emit volatile methyl siloxanes (VMSs) to the atmosphere: Investigations using a new passive air sampler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Yu [Air Quality Research Division, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ontario M3H 5T4 (Canada); Shoeib, Mahiba, E-mail: Mahiba.Shoeib@ec.gc.ca [Air Quality Research Division, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ontario M3H 5T4 (Canada); Ahrens, Lutz [Air Quality Research Division, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ontario M3H 5T4 (Canada); Harner, Tom, E-mail: Tom.Harner@ec.gc.ca [Air Quality Research Division, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ontario M3H 5T4 (Canada); Ma, Jianmin [Air Quality Research Division, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ontario M3H 5T4 (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Volatile methyl siloxanes (VMSs) are a class of chemicals with an increasing range of applications and widespread distribution in the environment. Passive air samplers (PAS) comprising sorbent-impregnated polyurethane-foam (SIP) disks were first calibrated and then deployed around two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and at two landfill sites to investigate inputs of VMSs to air. SIP-derived air concentrations for {Sigma}VMSs (ng/m{sup 3}) at background sites on the perimeter of the WWTP were 479 {+-} 82.3 and comparable to results for the upwind samples at the landfills (333 {+-} 194). Order of magnitude higher concentrations of {Sigma}VMSs (ng/m{sup 3}) were found for on-site samples at the WWTPs (3980 {+-} 2620) and landfills (4670 {+-} 3360). Yearly emissions (kg/yr) to air were estimated and ranged from 60-2100 and 80-250, respectively, for the cyclic VMSs. These findings demonstrate and quantify for the first time, waste sector emissions of VMSs to the atmosphere. - Highlights: > A new passive air sampler is calibrated for volatile methyl siloxanes (VMSs). > The SIP disk sampler is used to map VMS levels around WWTPs and landfills. > The waste sector is shown to be a key emission source of VMSs to air. > This is the first study to quantify this emission pathway. - Wastewater treatment plants and landfills are shown to emit large quantities of chemicals used in personal care products (volatile methyl siloxanes) to the atmosphere.

  6. Use of dust fall filters as passive samplers for metal concentrations in air for communities near contaminated mine tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamer, P.I.; Sugeng, A. J.; Kelly, M.D.; Lothrop, N.; Klimecki, W.; Wilkinson, S.T.; Loh, M.

    2014-01-01

    Mine tailings are a source of metal exposures in many rural communities. Multiple air samples are necessary to assess the extent of exposures and factors contributing to these exposures. However, air sampling equipment is costly and requires trained personnel to obtain measurements, limiting the number of samples that can be collected. Simple, low-cost methods are needed to allow for increased sample collection. The objective of our study was to assess if dust fall filters can serve as passive air samplers and be used to characterize potential exposures in a community near contaminated mine tailings. We placed filters in cylinders, concurrently with active indoor air samplers, in 10 occupied homes. We calculated an estimated flow rate by dividing the mass on each dust fall filter by the bulk air concentration and the sampling duration. The mean estimated flow rate for dust fall filters was significantly different during sampling periods with precipitation. The estimated flow rate was used to estimate metal concentration in the air of these homes, as well as in 31 additional homes in another rural community impacted by contaminated mine tailings. The estimated air concentrations had a significant linear association with the measured air concentrations for beryllium, manganese and arsenic (p<0.05), whose primary source in indoor air is resuspended soil from outdoors. In the second rural community, our estimated metal concentrations in air were comparable to active air sampling measurements taken previously. This passive air sampler is a simple low-cost method to assess potential exposures near contaminated mining sites. PMID:24469149

  7. Performance of an air sampler and a gamma-ray detector in a small unmanned aerial vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of an air sampler and a small gamma-ray spectrometer was tested in an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) able to carry payload with mass up to 0.5 kg. Operation of the sampler was investigated with the aid of radon progeny normally present in outdoor air. Detection limits for several transuranium nuclides in air are of the order of 0.3 Bq m-3 assuming 0.5 h sampling time and 1 h counting time in direct alpha spectrometry. Unshielded 137Cs and 60Co point sources at the ground level were used to test the CsI spectrometer. Detection limits are approximately 1 GBq or larger depending on the flying altitude. (author)

  8. A Model Using Local Weather Data to Determine the Effective Sampling Volume for PCB Congeners Collected on Passive Air Samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkert, Nicholas J; Martinez, Andres; Hornbuckle, Keri C

    2016-07-01

    We have developed and evaluated a mathematical model to determine the effective sampling volumes (Veff) of PCBs and similar compounds captured using polyurethane foam passive air samplers (PUF-PAS). We account for the variability in wind speed, air temperature, and equilibrium partitioning over the course of the deployment of the samplers. The model, provided as an annotated Matlab script, predicts the Veff as a function of physical-chemical properties of each compound and meteorology from the closest Integrated Surface Database (ISD) data set obtained through NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). The model was developed to be user-friendly, only requiring basic Matlab knowledge. To illustrate the effectiveness of the model, we evaluated three independent data sets of airborne PCBs simultaneously collected using passive and active samplers: at sites in Chicago, Lancaster, UK, and Toronto, Canada. The model provides Veff values comparable to those using depuration compounds and calibration against active samplers, yielding an average congener specific concentration method ratio (active/passive) of 1.1 ± 1.2. We applied the model to PUF-PAS samples collected in Chicago and show that previous methods can underestimate concentrations of PCBs by up to 40%, especially for long deployments, deployments conducted under warming conditions, and compounds with log Koa values less than 8. PMID:26963482

  9. The effects of rice canopy on the air-soil exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorine pesticides using paired passive air samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Shaorui; Luo, Chunling; Li, Jun; Ming, Lili; Zhang, Gan; Li, Xiangdong

    2015-05-01

    The rice canopy in paddy fields can influence the air-soil exchange of organic chemicals. We used paired passive air samplers to assess the exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in a paddy field, South China. Levels of OCPs and light PAHs were generally higher under the canopy than above it. We found that the rice canopy can physically obstruct the evaporation of most OCPs and light PAHs, and can also act as a barrier to the gaseous deposition of p,p'-DDT and heavy PAHs. Paddy fields can behave as a secondary source of OCPs and light PAHs. The homolog patterns of these two types of chemical varied slightly between the air below and above the rice canopy, implying contributions of different sources. Paired passive air samplers can be used effectively to assess the in situ air-soil exchange of PAHs and OCPs in subtropical paddy fields. PMID:25686886

  10. Monitoring of air radioactivity at the Jungfraujoch research station: Test of a new high volume aerosol sampler

    OpenAIRE

    Flury, Thomas; Völkle, Hansruedi

    2008-01-01

    The Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (SFOPH) is responsible for the surveillance of environmental radioactivity in Switzerland and for the protection of the public from ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. In order to improve the Swiss radioactivity monitoring network, a new high volume air sampler (DIGITEL DHA-80) was tested in Fribourg and at the Jungfraujoch High Altitude Research Station at 3454 m. The filters are analyzed in the laboratory by a high purity coaxial germanium detector...

  11. Hydrogen sulfide measurements in air by passive/diffusive samplers and high-frequency analyzer: A critical comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Venturi, S.; Università di Firenze, Dip. Scienze della Terra, Italy; Cabassi, J.; Università di Firenze, Dip. Scienze della Terra, Italy; Tassi, F.; Università di Firenze; Capecchiacci, F.; Università di Firenze, Dip. Scienze della Terra, Italy; Vaselli, O.; Università di Firenze, dip. Scienze della Terra, Italy; Bellomo, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Palermo, Palermo, Italia; Calabrese, S.; Università di Palermo, Dipartimento DiSTeM; D'Alessandro, W.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Palermo, Palermo, Italia

    2016-01-01

    In this study, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) measurements in air carried out using (a) passive/diffusive samplers (Radiello® traps) and (b) a high-frequency (60 s) real-time analyzer (Thermo® 450i) were compared in order to evaluate advantages and limitations of the two techniques. Four different sites in urban environments (Florence, Italy) and two volcanic areas characterized by intense degassing of H2S-rich fluids (Campi Flegrei and Vulcano Island, Italy) were selected for such measurements. The ...

  12. Comparison of passive diffusion bag samplers and submersible pump sampling methods for monitoring volatile organic compounds in ground water at Area 6, Naval Air Station, Whidbey Island, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Raegan L.

    2002-01-01

    Ground-water samples were collected in April 1999 at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington, with passive diffusion samplers and a submersible pump to compare concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water samples collected using the two sampling methods. Single diffusion samplers were installed in wells with 10-foot screened intervals, and multiple diffusion samplers were installed in wells with 20- to 40-foot screened intervals. The diffusion samplers were recovered after 20 days and the wells were then sampled using a submersible pump. VOC concentrations in the 10-foot screened wells in water samples collected with diffusion samplers closely matched concentrations in samples collected with the submersible pump. Analysis of VOC concentrations in samples collected from the 20- to 40-foot screened wells with multiple diffusion samplers indicated vertical concentration variation within the screened interval, whereas the analysis of VOC concentrations in samples collected with the submersible pump indicated mixing during pumping. The results obtained using the two sampling methods indicate that the samples collected with the diffusion samplers were comparable with and can be considerably less expensive than samples collected using a submersible pump.

  13. Passive air sampler as a tool for long-term air pollution monitoring: Part 2. Air genotoxic potency screening assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capability of passive air sampling to be employed in the evaluation of direct genotoxicity of ambient air samples was assessed. Genotoxic effects of the total extracts from the polyurethane foam filters exposed for 28 days during a regional passive air sampling campaign were investigated. Twenty sampling sites were selected in Brno city on the area of approximately 20 x 20 km in October and November 2004. Brno is the second largest city of the Czech Republic, highly industrialized with approximately 370,000 of permanent inhabitants. The levels of PAHs, PCBs, and chlorinated pesticides were determined in all samples. Fraction of each extract was also assayed in the bacterial genotoxicity test using Escherichia coli sulA::lacZ. Complete dose-response relationships of the air extracts were determined. The statistical analysis showed significant correlation between observed biological effects and PAHs concentrations in samples. - Extracts from passive air samples can be used to assess genotoxic potency

  14. Passive air sampler as a tool for long-term air pollution monitoring: Part 1. Performance assessment for seasonal and spatial variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klánová, Jana; Kohoutek, Jirí; Hamplová, Lenka; Urbanová, Petra; Holoubek, Ivan

    2006-11-01

    The potential of passive air sampling devices (polyurethane foam disks) to assess the influence of local sources on the quality of the surrounding environment was investigated. DEZA Valasske Mezirici, a coal tar and mixed tar oils processing plant, and Spolana Neratovice, a chemical factory with the history of high production of organochlorinated pesticides (OCPs), were selected as the point sources of PAHs, and OCPs, respectively. Levels of PCBs, OCPs and PAHs were determined for all sampling sites and sampling periods. The study brought useful data about the air concentrations of POPs in the investigated regions. More important, it provided information on the transport and fate of POPs in the vicinity of local sources of contamination useful for the estimation of their influence. Very good capability of passive samplers to reflect temporal and spatial fluctuation in concentrations of persistent organic pollutants in the ambient air was confirmed which makes them applicable for monitoring on the local scale.

  15. Passive air sampler as a tool for long-term air pollution monitoring: Part 1. Performance assessment for seasonal and spatial variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klanova, J.; Kohoutek, J.; Hamplova, L.; Urbanova, P.; Holoubek, I. [Masaryk University, Brno (Czech Republic)

    2006-11-15

    The potential of passive air sampling devices (polyurethane foam disks) to assess the influence of local sources on the quality of the surrounding environment was investigated. DEZA Valasske Mezirici, a coal tar and mixed tar oils processing plant, and Spolana Neratovice, a chemical factory with the history of high production of organochlorinated pesticides (OCPs), were selected as the point sources of PAHs, and OCPs, respectively. Levels of PCBs, OCPs and PAHs were determined for all sampling sites and sampling periods. The study brought useful data about the air concentrations of POPs in the investigated regions. More important, it provided information on the transport and fate of POPs in the vicinity of local sources of contamination useful for the estimation of their influence. Very good capability of passive samplers to reflect temporal and spatial fluctuation in concentrations of persistent organic pollutants in the ambient air was confirmed which makes them applicable for monitoring on the local scale.

  16. Assessment of diffusion parameters of new passive samplers using optical chemical sensor for on-site measuring formaldehyde in indoor air: experimental and numerical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignau-Laulhere, Jane; Mocho, Pierre; Plaisance, Hervé; Raulin, Katarzyna; Desauziers, Valérie

    2016-03-01

    New passive samplers using a sensor consisting of a sol-gel matrix entrapping Fluoral-P as sampling media were developed for the determination of formaldehyde in indoor air. The reaction between Fluoral-P and formaldehyde produces a colored compound which is quantified on-site by means of a simple optical reading module. The advantages of this sensor are selectivity, low cost, ppb level limit of detection, and on-site direct measurement. In the development process, it is necessary to determine the sampling rate, a key parameter that cannot be directly assessed in the case of diffusive samplers using optical chemical sensor. In this study, a methodology combining experimental tests and numerical modeling is proposed and applied at five different radial diffusive samplers equipped with the same optical chemical sensor to assess the sampled material flows and sampling rates. These radial diffusive samplers differ in the internal volume of the sampler (18.97 and 6.14 cm(3)), the position of sensor inside the sampler (in front and offset of 1.2 cm above the membrane) and the width of the diffusion slot (1.4 and 5.9 mm). The influences of these three parameters (internal volume, position of sensor inside the sampler, and width of the diffusion slot) were assessed and discussed with regard to the formaldehyde sampling rate and water uptake by sensor (potential interference of measure). Numerical simulations based on Fick's laws are in agreement with the experimental results and provide to estimate the effective diffusion coefficient of formaldehyde through the membrane (3.50 × 10(-6) m(2) s(-1)). Conversion factors between the sensor response, sampled formaldehyde mass and sampling rate were also assessed. PMID:26847188

  17. Assessment of diffusion parameters of new passive samplers using optical chemical sensor for on-site measuring formaldehyde in indoor air: experimental and numerical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignau-Laulhere, Jane; Mocho, Pierre; Plaisance, Hervé; Raulin, Katarzyna; Desauziers, Valérie

    2016-03-01

    New passive samplers using a sensor consisting of a sol-gel matrix entrapping Fluoral-P as sampling media were developed for the determination of formaldehyde in indoor air. The reaction between Fluoral-P and formaldehyde produces a colored compound which is quantified on-site by means of a simple optical reading module. The advantages of this sensor are selectivity, low cost, ppb level limit of detection, and on-site direct measurement. In the development process, it is necessary to determine the sampling rate, a key parameter that cannot be directly assessed in the case of diffusive samplers using optical chemical sensor. In this study, a methodology combining experimental tests and numerical modeling is proposed and applied at five different radial diffusive samplers equipped with the same optical chemical sensor to assess the sampled material flows and sampling rates. These radial diffusive samplers differ in the internal volume of the sampler (18.97 and 6.14 cm(3)), the position of sensor inside the sampler (in front and offset of 1.2 cm above the membrane) and the width of the diffusion slot (1.4 and 5.9 mm). The influences of these three parameters (internal volume, position of sensor inside the sampler, and width of the diffusion slot) were assessed and discussed with regard to the formaldehyde sampling rate and water uptake by sensor (potential interference of measure). Numerical simulations based on Fick's laws are in agreement with the experimental results and provide to estimate the effective diffusion coefficient of formaldehyde through the membrane (3.50 × 10(-6) m(2) s(-1)). Conversion factors between the sensor response, sampled formaldehyde mass and sampling rate were also assessed.

  18. AirCore Reusable InSitu Sampler for CO2 and Trace Gas Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel design for an in situ air sampling sensor for CO2 and trace gases is proposed. The sensor, named AirCore, provides the advantages of existing in situ...

  19. Indoor and outdoor poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in Korea determined by passive air sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite concerns to their increasing contribution to ecological and human exposure, the atmospheric levels of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have been determined mainly in Europe and North America. This study presents the indoor and outdoor air concentrations of volatile PFASs [fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs), and perfluoroalkyl sulfonamides/sulfonamidoethanols/sulfonamide ethyl acetate (FOSAs/FOSEs/FOSEA)] for the first time in Korean cities. In contrast to the good agreement observed for indoor FTOHs levels in Korea and Europea/North America, FOSAs/FOSEs levels were 10–100-fold lower in Korean indoor air, representing a cultural difference of indoor source. Korean outdoor air contained higher PFAS levels than indoor air, and additionally showed different PFAS composition profile from indoor air. Thus, indoor air would not likely be a main contributor to atmospheric PFAS contamination in Korea, in contrast to western countries. Inhalation exposure of volatile PFASs was estimated to be a minor contributor to PFOA and PFOS exposure in Korea. - Highlights: ► Volatile PFASs were measured in indoor and outdoor airs of Korea, for the first time. ► Cultural difference in indoor source was observed for Korea v.s. western countries. ► Furthermore, PFASs concentrations were higher in indoor air than outdoor air. ► Indoor air was not a major contributor to atmospheric PFASs contamination in Korea. ► Release from industrial activities was considered a possible source. - Korean outdoor air showed not only different PFAS composition profile but higher PFAS levels than indoor airs, indicating indoor air would not be a main source to Korean atmospheric PFASs.

  20. Concentrations, Trends, and Air-Water Exchange of PAHs and PBDEs Derived from Passive Samplers in Lake Superior in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruge, Zoe; Muir, Derek; Helm, Paul; Lohmann, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) are both currently released into the environment from anthropogenic activity. Both are hence primarily associated with populated or industrial areas, although wildfires can be an important source of PAHs, as well. Polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were simultaneously deployed in surface water and near surface atmosphere to determine spatial trends and air-water gaseous exchange of 21 PAHs and 11 PBDEs at 19 sites across Lake Superior in 2011. Surface water and atmospheric PAH concentrations were greatest at urban sites (up to 65 ng L(-1) and 140 ng m(-3), respectively, averaged from June to October). Near populated regions, PAHs displayed net air-to-water deposition, but were near equilibrium off-shore. Retene, probably depositing following major wildfires in the region, dominated dissolved PAH concentrations at most Lake Superior sites. Atmospheric and dissolved PBDEs were greatest near urban and populated sites (up to 6.8 pg L(-1) and 15 pg m(-3), respectively, averaged from June to October), dominated by BDE-47. At most coastal sites, there was net gaseous deposition of BDE-47, with less brominated congeners contributing to Sault Ste. Marie and eastern open lake fluxes. Conversely, the central open lake and Eagle Harbor sites generally displayed volatilization of PBDEs into the atmosphere, mainly BDE-47. PMID:26436513

  1. DOSEmanPRO - active electronic online personal air sampler for detection of radon progeny long lived alpha nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Using the micro system - technology we developed a online personal air sampler not bigger than a mobile phone, to open a new dimension in personal dosimetry of inhaled radioactive aerosols. The DOSEman PRO containing an internal pump with a continuous air flow of 0.15 I/min sample the radon progeny or other nuclides on a millipore filter with excellent spectroscopic resolution. A 1.5 cm2 light protected ion-implanted silicon detector analyses the alpha radiation at the filter. This small detector head contains also the pre amplification and pulse processing. The alpha radiation of the radon progeny and the long lived alpha nuclides is analyzed by a 60 channel spectrometer. The energy resolution of the online analyzed filter spectra is in the order of 150 keV. Mechanical and electronic design enables one to distinguish the long lived alpha nuclides from the radon and thoron progeny very easily. Using a special algorithm we correct the influence of the tailing of the radon progeny to the long lived alpha nuclides and take into consideration possible interference in determining the long lived alpha nuclides. Because of the air sampling volume of nearly 10 I/h, the system has a high efficiency. The detection limit by 2 hours sampling time is 0.05 Bq/m3 alpha nuclide concentration. In a modified device for air sampling especially of long-lived alpha nuclides like uranium, radium or plutonium, the flow rate is increased to 0,3 1/min e.g. during a 10 h sampling period we can detect 0.005 Bq/m3 in a low radon atmosphere. Assuming increased radon progeny concentration, the statistical error for the long lived alpha nuclides will be higher, but in most of the cases for use in nuclear facilities low radon concentrations are ambient conditions. This concept of an electronic personal air sampler with an alpha spectroscopy offers some outstanding advantages compared to passive dosimeters or off-line alpha air filters: The dose value and the nuclide concentration is

  2. Passive air sampler as a tool for long-term air pollution monitoring: Part 1. Performance assessment for seasonal and spatial variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of passive air sampling devices (polyurethane foam disks) to assess the influence of local sources on the quality of the surrounding environment was investigated. DEZA Valasske Mezirici, a coal tar and mixed tar oils processing plant, and Spolana Neratovice, a chemical factory with the history of high production of organochlorinated pesticides (OCPs), were selected as the point sources of PAHs, and OCPs, respectively. Levels of PCBs, OCPs and PAHs were determined for all sampling sites and sampling periods. The study brought useful data about the air concentrations of POPs in the investigated regions. More important, it provided information on the transport and fate of POPs in the vicinity of local sources of contamination useful for the estimation of their influence. Very good capability of passive samplers to reflect temporal and spatial fluctuation in concentrations of persistent organic pollutants in the ambient air was confirmed which makes them applicable for monitoring on the local scale. - Passive air sampling techniques can indicate seasonal and spatial variations in the ambient concentrations of persistent organic compounds near point sources

  3. Relative solubiolity in simulated biological fluids of PuO2 on air sampler filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultrafiltration method was developed to estimate the solubility of PuO2 on an air filter in simulated lung fluid (SLF), simulated gastric juice (SGJ), and in 1% DTPA. After a very rapid early appearance in the filtrate, both 238Pu and 239Pu showed similar rates of low ultrafilterability. The amount of 239Pu appearing during the first day of ultrafiltration was 10 times less in SLF than in SGJ or DTPA, although the amount of 238Pu was similar for the three solvents. The method used to estimate solubility requires only about 1000 dpm of plutonium alpha radiation per sample

  4. A preliminary investigation into the use of Red Pine (Pinus Resinosa) tree cores as historic passive samplers of POPs in outdoor air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauert, Cassandra; Harner, Tom

    2016-09-01

    The suitability of Red Pine trees (Pinus Resinosa) to act as passive samplers for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in outdoor air and to provide historic information on air concentration trends was demonstrated in this preliminary investigation. Red Pine tree cores from Toronto, Canada, were tested for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs), alkylated-PAHs, nitro and oxy-PAHs, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and novel brominated flame retardants (novel BFRs). The PBDEs and novel BFRs demonstrated a similar relative contribution in cores representing 30 years of tree growth, to that reported in contemporary air samples. Analysis of tree ring segments of 5-15 years resulted in detectable concentrations of some PAHs and alk-PAHs and demonstrated a transition from petrogenic sources to pyrogenic sources over the period 1960-2015. A simple uptake model was developed that treats the tree rings as linear-phase passive air samplers. The bark infiltration factor, IFBARK, is a key parameter of the model that reflects the permeability of the bark to allow chemicals to be transferred from ambient air to the outer tree layer (cambium). An IFBARK of about 2% was derived for the Red Pine trees based on tree core and air monitoring data.

  5. Correlations between short-term mobile monitoring and long-term passive sampler measurements of traffic-related air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Erin A.; Schaal, LaNae; Sasakura, Miyoko; Crampton, Robert; Gould, Timothy R.; Hartin, Kris; Sheppard, Lianne; Larson, Timothy; Simpson, Christopher D.; Yost, Michael G.

    2016-05-01

    Mobile monitoring has provided a means for broad spatial measurements of air pollutants that are otherwise impractical to measure with multiple fixed site sampling strategies. However, the larger the mobile monitoring route the less temporally dense measurements become, which may limit the usefulness of short-term mobile monitoring for applications that require long-term averages. To investigate the stationarity of short-term mobile monitoring measurements, we calculated long term medians derived from a mobile monitoring campaign that also employed 2-week integrated passive sampler detectors (PSD) for NOx, Ozone, and nine volatile organic compounds at 43 intersections distributed across the entire city of Baltimore, MD. This is one of the largest mobile monitoring campaigns in terms of spatial extent undertaken at this time. The mobile platform made repeat measurements every third day at each intersection for 6-10 min at a resolution of 10 s. In two-week periods in both summer and winter seasons, each site was visited 3-4 times, and a temporal adjustment was applied to each dataset. We present the correlations between eight species measured using mobile monitoring and the 2-week PSD data and observe correlations between mobile NOx measurements and PSD NOx measurements in both summer and winter (Pearson's r = 0.84 and 0.48, respectively). The summer season exhibited the strongest correlations between multiple pollutants, whereas the winter had comparatively few statistically significant correlations. In the summer CO was correlated with PSD pentanes (r = 0.81), and PSD NOx was correlated with mobile measurements of black carbon (r = 0.83), two ultrafine particle count measures (r = 0.8), and intermodal (1-3 μm) particle counts (r = 0.73). Principal Component Analysis of the combined PSD and mobile monitoring data revealed multipollutant features consistent with light duty vehicle traffic, diesel exhaust and crankcase blow by. These features were more consistent

  6. Aerosol samplers innovation possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growing demand for an early detection of increased levels of the artificial radionuclides in the atmosphere resulted in the design and fabrication of an aerosol sampler with automated spectrometric unit providing online gamma spectrometry above the aerosol filter. Study was performed with two types of high volume samplers- SENYA JL-900 SnowWhite (900 m3/h) a SENYA JL-150 Hunter (150 m3/h). This work gives results of the design optimization with respect to the detector type, geometry of measurement, remote control and spectrometric evaluation 222Rn and 220Rn concentration fluctuations in the outdoor air are discussed with regard to the detection limit so the radionuclides expected after the NPP accident. (authors)

  7. Active Hydrazine Vapor Sampler (AHVS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rebecca C.; Mcbrearty, Charles F.; Curran, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    The Active Hydrazine Vapor Sampler (AHVS) was developed to detect vapors of hydrazine (HZ) and monomethylhydrazine (MMH) in air at parts-per-billion (ppb) concentration levels. The sampler consists of a commercial personal pump that draws ambient air through paper tape treated with vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde). The paper tape is sandwiched in a thin cardboard housing inserted in one of the two specially designed holders to facilitate sampling. Contaminated air reacts with vanillin to develop a yellow color. The density of the color is proportional to the concentration of HZ or MMH. The AHVS can detect 10 ppb in less than 5 minutes. The sampler is easy to use, low cost, and intrinsically safe and contains no toxic material. It is most beneficial for use in locations with no laboratory capabilities for instrumentation calibration. This paper reviews the development, laboratory test, and field test of the device.

  8. Assessing levels and seasonal variations of current-use pesticides (CUPs) in the Tuscan atmosphere, Italy, using polyurethane foam disks (PUF) passive air samplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyurethane foam disks (PUF) passive air samplers (PAS) were deployed over 4 sampling periods of 3–5-months (≥ 1 year) at ten urban and rural locations throughout the Tuscany Region. The purpose was to assess the occurrence and seasonal variations of ten current-use pesticides (CUPs). PUF disk extracts were analyzed using GC–MS. The organophosphates insecticides; chlorpyrifos (3–580 pg m−3) and chlorpyrifos-methyl (below detection limit – to 570 pg m−3) presented the highest levels in air, and showed seasonal fluctuation coinciding with the growing seasons. The relative proportion urban/(urban + rural) ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 showing no differences between urban and rural concentrations. Air back trajectories analysis showed air masses passing over agricultural fields and potentially enhancing the drift of pesticides into the urban sites. This study represents the first information regarding CUPs in the atmosphere of Tuscany region using PAS-PUF disk. - Highlights: • Current use pesticides (CUPs) were detected in the atmosphere of Tuscany, Italy. • Chlorpyrifos showed the highest concentrations in air with seasonal patterns. • CUPs levels might be influenced by agricultural activities. • No differences were detected between Urban and Rural sites. • Air mass analysis indicated the monitoring sites are influenced by local sources. - Seasonality of CUPs was measured in Tuscany, Italy. Chlorpyrifos showed the highest values. Urban and rural sites showed no differences. Agricultural activities influence CUPs levels in air

  9. Construção de amostrador passivo de baixo custo para determinação de dióxido de nitrogênio A low-cost passive sampler for monitoring nitrogen dioxide in air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanessa R. Melchert

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A new passive sampling system for monitoring NO2 in air has been developed to measure gas concentrations in indoor and outdoor air. The sampler is inexpensive, and easy to construct and operate. Nitrogen dioxide forms a derivative after reaction with a filter coated with triethanolamine and ethyleneglycol. The nitrogen dioxide derivative is extracted from the filter, and the concentration is determined by colorimetry. To test the sampler for measuring ambient level nitrogen dioxide, measurements were carried out inside homes and in a range of workplace environments.

  10. Improved correction method for using passive air samplers to assess the distribution of PCNs in the Dongjiang River basin of the Pearl River Delta, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Li, Qilu; Xu, Yue; Luo, Chunling; Liu, Xiang; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2012-07-01

    An improved correction method was established using passive air samplers to assess the distributions of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) in the eastern Pearl River Delta, South China. This method was based on a joint correction that used the active air sampling rate and the addition of depuration compounds. As a correction factor, the depuration compounds' properties do not need to be similar to the target compounds. The total PCN air concentrations ranged from 6.4 to 832, with an average of 148 ± 201 pg m-3 in the study area, while the TEQ of the PCNs ranged from 1.2 × 10-4 to 2.6 × 10-2 pg m-3. High concentrations of PCNs were mostly observed in the highly industrialized areas. The PCN air levels were remarkably increased in winter compared with summer. Tri-CNs was the most dominant homologue group, while CN 24 was the most dominant congener. The high proportion of combustion-related PCNs suggests that the contribution of combustion sources to the PCN air burden has been significant recently in comparison with historical emissions.

  11. Use of passive samplers to detect organochlorine pesticides in air and water at wetland mountain region sites (S-SE Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meire, Rodrigo Ornellas; Khairy, Mohammed; Targino, Admir Créso; Galvão, Petrus Magnus Amaral; Torres, Joåo Paulo Machado; Malm, Olaf; Lohmann, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    Low-density polyethylene (LDPE) passive samplers were deployed in upland surface waters and the overlying atmosphere during May and June 2012, to determine the transport and trends of freely dissolved and gaseous organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) along altitudinal gradients in mountain regions in south and southeast Brazil. Gaseous OCP concentrations were dominated by hexachlorobenzene (3.0-29 pg m(-3)) and endosulfans (Ʃ = α-endosulfan + β-endosulfan + endosulfan sulphate, 170-260 pg m(-3)), whereas freely dissolved endosulfans were significantly higher than all other OCPs (p pesticides at the highest elevation sites indicated their efficient high-altitude transport from regional sources. Air-water exchange gradients indicated net deposition of most volatile and recently banned OCPs (e.g., HCB, endosulfan) over Brazilian mountains. Moreover, the exposure of these sites to large-scale continental airflows with varying source contributions may partly explain the atmospheric deposition of selected OCPs over upland freshwaters at tropical and subtropical mountains sites in Brazil. These findings, coupled with LDPE passive air and water sampling measurements, point out the potential inputs from distant sources of semi-volatile chemicals to the two high-altitude sites.

  12. Spatial trends, sources, and air-water exchange of organochlorine pesticides in the Great Lakes basin using low density polyethylene passive samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairy, Mohammed; Muir, Derek; Teixeira, Camilla; Lohmann, Rainer

    2014-08-19

    Polyethylene passive samplers were deployed during summer and fall of 2011 in the lower Great Lakes to assess the spatial distribution and sources of gaseous and freely dissolved organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and their air-water exchange. Average gaseous OCP concentrations ranged from nondetect to 133 pg/m(3). Gaseous concentrations of hexachlorobenzene, dieldrin, and chlordanes were significantly greater (Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.05) at Lake Erie than Lake Ontario. A multiple linear regression implied that both cropland and urban areas within 50 and 10 km buffer zones, respectively, were critical parameters to explain the total variability in atmospheric concentrations. Freely dissolved OCP concentrations (nondetect to 114 pg/L) were lower than previously reported. Aqueous half-lives generally ranged from 1.7 to 6.7 years. Nonetheless, concentrations of p,p'-DDE and chlordanes were higher than New York State Ambient Water Quality Standards for the protection of human health from the consumption of fish. Spatial distributions of freely dissolved OCPs in both lakes were influenced by loadings from areas of concern and the water circulation patterns. Flux calculations indicated net deposition of γ-hexachlorocyclohexane, heptachlor-epoxide, and α- and β-endosulfan (-0.02 to -33 ng/m(2)/day) and net volatilization of heptachlor, aldrin, trans-chlordane, and trans-nonachlor (0.0 to 9.0 ng/m(2)/day) in most samples. PMID:25019318

  13. Use of passive samplers to detect organochlorine pesticides in air and water at wetland mountain region sites (S-SE Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meire, Rodrigo Ornellas; Khairy, Mohammed; Targino, Admir Créso; Galvão, Petrus Magnus Amaral; Torres, Joåo Paulo Machado; Malm, Olaf; Lohmann, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    Low-density polyethylene (LDPE) passive samplers were deployed in upland surface waters and the overlying atmosphere during May and June 2012, to determine the transport and trends of freely dissolved and gaseous organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) along altitudinal gradients in mountain regions in south and southeast Brazil. Gaseous OCP concentrations were dominated by hexachlorobenzene (3.0-29 pg m(-3)) and endosulfans (Ʃ = α-endosulfan + β-endosulfan + endosulfan sulphate, 170-260 pg m(-3)), whereas freely dissolved endosulfans were significantly higher than all other OCPs (p exchange gradients indicated net deposition of most volatile and recently banned OCPs (e.g., HCB, endosulfan) over Brazilian mountains. Moreover, the exposure of these sites to large-scale continental airflows with varying source contributions may partly explain the atmospheric deposition of selected OCPs over upland freshwaters at tropical and subtropical mountains sites in Brazil. These findings, coupled with LDPE passive air and water sampling measurements, point out the potential inputs from distant sources of semi-volatile chemicals to the two high-altitude sites. PMID:26595311

  14. Variable percentage sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jr., William H.

    1976-01-01

    A remotely operable sampler is provided for obtaining variable percentage samples of nuclear fuel particles and the like for analyses. The sampler has a rotating cup for a sample collection chamber designed so that the effective size of the sample inlet opening to the cup varies with rotational speed. Samples of a desired size are withdrawn from a flowing stream of particles without a deterrent to the flow of remaining particles.

  15. An inexpensive sampler for obtaining bulk sediment cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Charles M.; Schiebe, Frank R.; Ritchie, Jerry C.

    1991-09-01

    A large-volume core sampler for sediment—muck substrates is described. The sampler can acquire a discrete sediment core of 10 cm in diameter and up to 1.5 m long. Such samplers are needed to collect the volume necessary for analysis of sediments for contaminants, bulk density, or radioactive dating. The sampler consists of a 1- to 2-m length of PVC pipe mounted below a threaded metal pipe air exhaust—intake assembly. This assembly is quick-connected to standard threaded lengths (300 cm) of water pipe (2 cm diam) or electrical conduit so that bottom sediments in water depths of up to 10 m can be sampled. The core sampler is hand-operated and pushed into bottom sediments from a boat. It does not have to be triggered remotely because of the one-way modified check valve in the air exhaust—intake assembly. After the sampler is extracted from the sediment, the extension handle can be quickly removed for ease of sampler handling, and the core can be extruded from the PVC tube by air pressure.

  16. Environmental Awareness Sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halnen, Andrew; And Others

    This sampler for teachers provides information for initiating and dealing with environmental studies in the classroom. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach, behavioral objectives related to environmental awareness are listed for social studies, science, mathematics, language arts, health, physical education, recreation, music, and local…

  17. South Philadelphia Passive Sampler and Sensor Study - Interim Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starting in the June 2013, the U.S. EPA and the City of Philadelphia Air Measurements Services (AMS) began a collaborative research project to investigate how sensor-based, stand-alone air measurements (SAMs) and passive samplers (PSs) can help improve information on air pollutan...

  18. Initial field evaluation of the Harvard active ozone sampler for personal ozone monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyh, A S; Roberts, P T; Lurmann, F W; Schoell, B M; Avol, E L

    1999-01-01

    Assessing personal exposure to ozone has only been feasible recently with the introduction of passive ozone samplers. These devices are easy to use, but changes in air velocity across their collection surfaces can affect performance. The Harvard active ozone sampler (AS) was developed in response to problems with the passive methods. This active sampler has been tested extensively as a microenvironmental sampler. To test for personal sampling, 40 children attending summer day-camp in Riverside, California wore the active ozone sampler for approximately 2.6 h on July 19 and 21, 1994, when ozone concentrations were about 100 ppb and 140 ppb, respectively. The children spent 94-100% of the sampling period outside, staying within a well-defined area while participating in normal camp activities. Ambient ozone concentrations across this area were monitored by two UV photometric ozone monitors. The active sampler was worn in a small backpack that was also equipped with a passive ozone sampler. Device precision, reported as the percent difference between duplicate pairs of samplers, was +/- 3.7% and +/- 4.2% for the active and passive samplers, respectively. The active sampler measured, on average, 94.5 +/- 8.2% of the ambient ozone while the passive samplers measured, on average, 124.5 +/- 18.8%. The samplers were worn successfully for the entire sampling period by all participating children. PMID:10321353

  19. Variable depth core sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Peter M.; Reger, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  20. The Rasch Sampler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman D. Verhelst

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The Rasch sampler is an efficient algorithm to sample binary matrices with given marginal sums. It is a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC algorithm. The program can handle matrices of up to 1024 rows and 64 columns. A special option allows to sample square matrices with given marginals and fixed main diagonal, a problem prominent in social network analysis. In all cases the stationary distribution is uniform. The user has control on the serial dependency.

  1. A personal dust sampler simulating variable human lung function.

    OpenAIRE

    Kucharski, R.

    1980-01-01

    In a prototype of a new personal dust sampling system (PDS) the speed of air sampling in the breathing zone is related to the pulmonary ventilation rate of the wearer, using the correlation between pulmonary ventilation and pulse rate that is monitored by electrodes fastened on the sampler wearer's chest. The method of calibration and the results of dust chamber and field measurements are presented. The prototype of the new sampler was tested in a lead and zinc smelting plant against a routin...

  2. Side-wall sampler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, B.

    1969-11-01

    A side-wall sampler which is capable of taking samples from the walls of test holes to a depth of 1,000 ft or more is described. Samples have been extracted from till, clay, silt, and fine- to coarse-grained sands in drift and nonindurated bedrock from more than 1,000 test holes in S. Saskatchewan. Side-hole sampling is faster and cheaper than conventional sampling methods and is ideally suited for geological investigations. Mineralogical paleonto- locical and radiocarbon analyses have been determined on side-hole cores.

  3. South Philadelphia Passive Sampler and Sensor Study: Interim Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starting in June 2013, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) and the City of Philadelphia Air Measurements Services began collaborative research on the use of passive samplers (PSs) and stand-alone air measurement (SAM) systems to improve information on the...

  4. Wood Dust Sampling: Field Evaluation of Personal Samplers When Large Particles Are Present

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Taekhee; Harper, Martin; Slaven, James E.; Lee, Kiyoung; Rando, Roy J.; Maples, Elizabeth H.

    2010-01-01

    Recent recommendations for wood dust sampling include sampling according to the inhalable convention of International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 7708 (1995) Air quality—particle size fraction definitions for health-related sampling. However, a specific sampling device is not mandated, and while several samplers have laboratory performance approaching theoretical for an ‘inhalable’ sampler, the best choice of sampler for wood dust is not clear. A side-by-side field study was consid...

  5. Background culturable bacteria aerosol in two large public buildings using HVAC filters as long term, passive, high-volume air samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Nicholas J; Kuehn, Thomas H; Kim, Seung Won; Raynor, Peter C; Anantharaman, Senthilvelan; Ramakrishnan, M A; Goyal, Sagar M

    2008-04-01

    Background culturable bacteria aerosols were collected and identified in two large public buildings located in Minneapolis, Minnesota and Seattle, Washington over a period of 5 months and 3 months, respectively. The installed particulate air filters in the ventilation systems were used as the aerosol sampling devices at each location. Both pre and final filters were collected from four air handing units at each site to determine the influence of location within the building, time of year, geographical location and difference between indoor and outdoor air. Sections of each loaded filter were eluted with 10 ml of phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The resulting solutions were cultured on blood agar plates and incubated for 24 h at 36 degrees C. Various types of growth media were then used for subculturing, followed by categorization using a BioLog MicroStation (Biolog, Hayward, CA, USA) and manual observation. Environmental parameters were gathered near each filter by the embedded on-site environmental monitoring systems to determine the effect of temperature, humidity and air flow. Thirty nine different species of bacteria were identified, 17 found only in Minneapolis and 5 only in Seattle. The hardy spore-forming genus Bacillus was the most commonly identified and showed the highest concentrations. A significant decrease in the number of species and their concentration occurred in the Minneapolis air handling unit supplying 100% outdoor air in winter, however no significant correlations between bacteria concentration and environmental parameters were found.

  6. Parallel optical sampler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Skogen, Erik J; Vawter, Gregory A

    2014-05-20

    An optical sampler includes a first and second 1.times.n optical beam splitters splitting an input optical sampling signal and an optical analog input signal into n parallel channels, respectively, a plurality of optical delay elements providing n parallel delayed input optical sampling signals, n photodiodes converting the n parallel optical analog input signals into n respective electrical output signals, and n optical modulators modulating the input optical sampling signal or the optical analog input signal by the respective electrical output signals, and providing n successive optical samples of the optical analog input signal. A plurality of output photodiodes and eADCs convert the n successive optical samples to n successive digital samples. The optical modulator may be a photodiode interconnected Mach-Zehnder Modulator. A method of sampling the optical analog input signal is disclosed.

  7. Introduction to SamplerCompare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine B. Thompson

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available SamplerCompare is an R package for comparing the performance of Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC samplers. It samples from a collection of distributions with a collection of MCMC methods over a range of tuning parameters. Then, using log density evaluations per uncorrelated observation as a figure of merit, it generates a grid of plots showing the results of the simulation. It comes with a collection of predefined distributions and samplers and provides R and C interfaces for defining additional ones. It also provides the means to import simulation data generated by external systems. This document provides background on the package and demonstrates the basics of running simulations, visualizing results, and defining distributions and samplers in R.

  8. An automatic, refrigerated, sequential precipitation sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscio, M. R.; Pratt, G. C.; Krupa, S. V.

    The design and characteristics of an automated, refrigerated, sequential precipitation sampler are described. This sampler can collect rainfall on an event basis or as sequential segments within a rain event. Samples are sealed upon collection to prevent gas exchange and are refrigerated in situ at 4 ± 2° C. This sampler is commercially available.

  9. Soil separator and sampler and method of sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Barry H [Idaho Falls, ID; Ritter, Paul D [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-16

    A soil sampler includes a fluidized bed for receiving a soil sample. The fluidized bed may be in communication with a vacuum for drawing air through the fluidized bed and suspending particulate matter of the soil sample in the air. In a method of sampling, the air may be drawn across a filter, separating the particulate matter. Optionally, a baffle or a cyclone may be included within the fluidized bed for disentrainment, or dedusting, so only the finest particulate matter, including asbestos, will be trapped on the filter. The filter may be removable, and may be tested to determine the content of asbestos and other hazardous particulate matter in the soil sample.

  10. Fluidized Bed Asbestos Sampler Design and Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen E. Wright; Barry H. O' Brien

    2007-12-01

    A large number of samples are required to characterize a site contaminated with asbestos from previous mine or other industrial operations. Current methods, such as EPA Region 10’s glovebox method, or the Berman Elutriator method are time consuming and costly primarily because the equipment is difficult to decontaminate between samples. EPA desires a shorter and less costly method for characterizing soil samples for asbestos. The objective of this was to design and test a qualitative asbestos sampler that operates as a fluidized bed. The proposed sampler employs a conical spouted bed to vigorously mix the soil and separate fine particulate including asbestos fibers on filters. The filters are then analyzed using transmission electron microscopy for presence of asbestos. During initial testing of a glass prototype using ASTM 20/30 sand and clay fines as asbestos surrogates, fine particulate adhered to the sides of the glass vessel and the tubing to the collection filter – presumably due to static charge on the fine particulate. This limited the fines recovery to ~5% of the amount added to the sand surrogate. A second prototype was constructed of stainless steel, which improved fines recovery to about 10%. Fines recovery was increased to 15% by either humidifying the inlet air or introducing a voltage probe in the air space above the sample. Since this was not a substantial improvement, testing using the steel prototype proceeded without using these techniques. Final testing of the second prototype using asbestos suggests that the fluidized bed is considerably more sensitive than the Berman elutriator method. Using a sand/tremolite mixture with 0.005% tremolite, the Berman elutriator did not segregate any asbestos structures while the fluidized bed segregated an average of 11.7. The fluidized bed was also able to segregate structures in samples containing asbestos at a 0.0001% concentration, while the Berman elutriator method did not detect any fibers at this

  11. Mars Viking Surface Sampler Subsystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Surface Sampler Subsystem was developed for use on Viking Landers 1 and 2, which landed on the surface of the planet Mars in 1976. A major component of this subsystem is the Acquisition Assembly, which consists of a computer-controlled boom unit and collector head used for acquiring small samples of material from the Martian surface. The boom unit consists of an extendable/retractable furlable tube element capable of extending the tip of the collector head to a maximum of 3.45 m (136 in.), and an integral gimbal capable of 5 rad (288 deg) azimuth and 1.3-rad (74-deg) elevation movement. All Mars surface operations are performed automatically with periodic command uplinks and data downlinks through Deep Space Network antennae to the control center at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California

  12. Guidance on the use of passive-vapor-diffusion samplers to detect volatile organic compounds in ground-water-discharge areas, and example applications in New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Peter E.; Vroblesky, Don A.; Lyford, Forest P.

    2002-01-01

    Polyethylene-membrane passive-vapor-diffusion samplers, or PVD samplers, have been shown to be an effective and economical reconnaissance tool for detecting and identifying volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in bottom sediments of surface-water bodies in areas of ground-water discharge. The PVD samplers consist of an empty glass vial enclosed in two layers of polyethylene membrane tubing. When samplers are placed in contaminated sediments, the air in the vial equilibrates with VOCs in pore water. Analysis of the vapor indicates the presence or absence of VOCs and the likely magnitude of concentrations in pore water.

  13. Passive Sampler for Measurements of Atmospheric Nitric Acid Vapor (HNO3 Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Bytnerowicz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric acid (HNO3 vapor is an important nitrogenous air pollutant responsible for increasing saturation of forests with nitrogen and direct injury to plants. The USDA Forest Service and University of California researchers have developed a simple and inexpensive passive sampler for monitoring air concentrations of HNO3. Nitric acid is selectively absorbed on 47-mm Nylasorb nylon filters with no interference from particulate NO3-. Concentrations determined with the passive samplers closely corresponded with those measured with the co-located honeycomb annular denuder systems. The PVC protective caps of standardized dimensions protect nylon filters from rain and wind and allow for reliable measurements of ambient HNO3 concentrations. The described samplers have been successfully used in Sequoia National Park, the San Bernardino Mountains, and on Mammoth Mountain in California.

  14. INSTRUCTIONS FOR OPERATING LBL FORMALDEHYDE SAMPLER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanning, L.Z.; Allen, J.R.; Miksch, R.R.

    1981-09-01

    The LBL formaldehyde sampler consists of two parts: 1) a pump box and 2) a small refrigerator housing sampling bubblers. The pump box contains two pumps, a timer, a flow controller, an electrical cord, and a ten-foot piece of tubing to connect the refrigerator to the pump box. The small refrigerator contains four columns of bubbler sampling trains attached to a metal plate. Two sampling trains each are plumbed in parallel to two sampling ports on the back of the refrigerator. The two sampling lines supplied are to be attached to these ports to allow two locations to be sampled at once (usually one indoor and one outdoor). The refrigerator also contains a rack for holding bubbler tubes. In the sampling process, air is drawn through a sampling line attached to the fitting at the back of the refrigerator and into a prlmary bubbler containing a trapping solution. This trapping solution can be distilled water or an aqueous solution of some compound that reacts with formaldehyde. From this bubbler the air goes through a second bubbler containing the same trapping solution as the first bubbler. (To maintain sample integrity, all parts that the air sample contacts are made of Teflon, polypropylene, and stainless steel.) The air then goes into the third bubbler, which contains no liquid. This bubbler contains a hypodermic needle that serves as a flow-control orifice. The hypodermic needle, in conjunction with the flow controller in the pump box, ensures a constant a flow rate. The refrigerator contains four columns of these sets of three bubblers. After samples have been collected, the bubbler bottoms are detached and the contents of the first and second bubblers in each column are poured together, capped, and labeled. The use of a refrigerated primary and secondary bubbler whose contents are combined at the end of a sampling period ensures 95% collection efficiency. After the bubbler tubes are capped and labeled, they are stored either in the rack supplied in the

  15. Spatial analysis of volatile organic compounds in South Philadelphia using passive samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Select volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured in the vicinity of a petroleum refinery and related operations in South Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, using passive air sampling and laboratory analysis methods. Two-week, time-integrated samplers were deployed at 17 sites...

  16. Wind tunnel and field calibration of six aeolian dust samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Dirk; Offer, Zvi Y.

    The efficiency of six aeolian dust samplers was tested via wind tunnel experiments and field measurements. In the wind tunnel, four samplers designed to measure the horizontal dust flux and one sampler designed to measure the vertical dust flux (in the downward direction, i.e., deposition) were calibrated against an isokinetic reference sampler. The horizontal dust flux samplers were: the big spring number eight sampler (BSNE), the modified Wilson and Cooke sampler (MWAC), the suspended sediment trap (SUSTRA), and the wedge dust flux gauge (WDFG). Vertical deposition flux was measured using a marble dust collector (MDCO). A modified Sartorius SM 16711 dust sampler with adjustable flow rate (SARTORIUS) was used as isokinetic reference sampler. In the field experiments, the WDFG was replaced by a Sierra ultra high volume dust sampler (SIERRA). Wind tunnel calibrations were carried out at five wind velocities ranging from 1 to 5 m s -1. Field calibrations were conducted during seven periods of two weeks each. The most efficient samplers are the MWAC and the SIERRA, followed by the BSNE and the SUSTRA. The WDFG is more effective than the BSNE at velocities below 3 m s -1, but its efficiency drops quickly at higher wind speeds. The most recommendable sampler for field measurements is the BSNE, because its efficiency varies only very slightly with wind speed. In the absence of horizontal flux samplers, the MDCO collector can be used as an alternative to assess horizontal dust flux and airborne dust concentration provided the appropriate calibrations are made.

  17. A comparison of the performance of samplers for respirable dust in workplaces and laboratory analysis for respirable quartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpaele, Steven; Jouret, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The divergent sampling techniques for respirable dust and the analyses for crystalline silica are an important area of interest and discussion among industrial occupational hygienists in Europe. The variety of equipment for air sampling, methods and instrumentation can cause differences between results for the analysis of respirable crystalline silica (RCS). In this study, a Workplace Atmosphere Multi-sampler (WAM), developed by Adhesia, was used to compare respirable dust samplers in the workplace. This rotating device enables the comparison of 12 samplers in a workplace in each run. Seven laboratories participated in the comparison, using six different respirable dust samplers [British Cast Iron Research Association (BCIRA) to the Higgins Dewell (HD) design, Dorr Oliver, Casella SIMPEDS, SKC HD with a polycarbonate filter and polyvinylchloride filter, and the CIP10-R). Each laboratory analysed samples supplied by the samplers and reported the total respirable dust concentration and the RCS concentration. The techniques used were X-ray diffraction direct-on-filter, X-ray diffraction with deposition, infrared direct-on-filter, and infrared with potassium bromide (KBr) discs. The experiments were carried out in four different industries (enamel, sand extraction, foundry and brickworks). Generally, the SKC conductive black plastic sampler is oversampled (y = 1.52x + 0.008) and the CIP10 is undersampled (y = 0.74x + 0.068) when compared with the median air concentration. A pair-wise comparison of the different industries using t-tests indicated significant differences (P < 0.05) between the SKC conductive plastic samplers and the other samplers. The same series of statistical calculations were performed for the results obtained for RCS (quartz) and showed significant differences for the CIP10 techniques and the SKC conductive plastic cyclone analyses when using a polyvinylchloride filter. PMID:22826536

  18. Relative efficiencies of the Burkard 7-Day, Rotorod and Burkard Personal samplers for Poaceae and Urticaceae pollen under field conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peel, Robert George; Kennedy, Roy; Smith, Matt;

    2014-01-01

    Trap, the Sampling Technologies Rotorod Model 20 and the Burkard Personal Volumetric Air Sampler were evaluated for Urticaceae and Poaceae pollen under field conditions, and the influence of wind speed and relative humidity on these efficiency relationships was assessed. Data for the two pollen taxa were...... to only have a significant impact on inter-sampler relationships involving the vertically orientated Burkard Personal sampler, whilst no interaction between relative efficiency and relative humidity was observed. Conclusions: Data collected with the three models of sampler should only be compared once......Introduction: In aerobiological studies it is often necessary to compare concentration data recorded with different models of sampling instrument. Sampler efficiency typically varies from device to device, and depends on the target aerosol and local atmospheric conditions. To account...

  19. 21 CFR 884.1550 - Amniotic fluid sampler (amniocentesis tray).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amniotic fluid sampler (amniocentesis tray). 884... Diagnostic Devices § 884.1550 Amniotic fluid sampler (amniocentesis tray). (a) Identification. The amniotic fluid sampler (amniocentesis tray) is a collection of devices used to aspirate amniotic fluid from...

  20. Measurement of ambient ammonia with diffusion tube samplers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijsse, T.R.; Duyzer, J.H.; Verhagen, H.L.M.; Wyers, G.P.; Wayers, A.; Möls, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Results of a study to evaluate the suitability of passive samplers for the measurement of monthly averaged ammonia concentrations are presented. Five different samplers were tested. Four were diffusion tube samplers which differed in length and in the way they were modified to minimize disturbing ef

  1. High volume electrostatic field-sampler for collection of fine particle bulk samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Sharma, Anoop; Wallin, Håkan; Alstrup Jensen, Keld

    A high volume electrostatic field-sampler was developed for collection of fine particles, which easily can be recovered for subsequent sample characterisation and bioassays. The sampler was based on a commercial office air cleaner and consisted of a prefilter followed by electrostatic collection plates operating at 2.7 kV. The sampler performance was characterised for 26 nm to 5.4 μm-size particles in urban street air. The collection efficiency reached a maximum (60-70%) between 0.2 and 0.8 μm and dropped to ˜25% at 30 nm and 2.5 μm, respectively. After extraction in water, the particle loss wasozone generating capacity of the corona discharge during operation was on the order of 10 ppb. A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) degradation test using benzo[a]pyrene as a model showed that ˜85% was degraded after 24 h. However, similar results were observed when the corona discharge was switched off. Hence, the ozone and other corona discharge reactants do not appear to contribute considerably to PAH-degradation. The overall results show that the sampler type is a promising alternative to traditional sampling of fine particles for bulk analysis and bioassays. The main advantages are simple operation, high stability, high quantifiable particle recovery rates and low cost.

  2. Releasable Asbestos Field Sampler (RAFS) Operation Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Releasable Asbestos Field Sampler (RAFS) is a field instrument that provides an in-situ measurement of asbestos releasability from consistent and reproducible mechanical agitation of the source material such as soil. The RAFS was designed to measure concentration (asbestos st...

  3. Photodegradation of PAHs in passive water samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Ian J; Christensen, Guttorm; Bæk, Kine; Evenset, Anita

    2016-04-15

    Losses of deuterated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) used as performance reference compounds (PRCs) in semipermeable membrane devices deployed at fifteen coastal sampling sites near Harstad harbour in Northern Norway were used to investigate photodegradation of these photosensitive compounds. Unusual PRC dissipation profiles, especially for samplers exposed <5m below the water surface are indicative of photodegradation. A strong correlation between loss rates for d12-chrysene and d12-benzo[e]pyrene with consistently higher losses of the latter was found. The observed photodegradation rates may be sufficiently high to impact PAH masses absorbed by a factor of two. This study demonstrates that photodegradation during exposure of passive water samplers needs to be taken into account, particularly with deployments close to the water surface, when using SPMD canisters, or when sampling in the Arctic. PMID:26876557

  4. Thin layer chromatography residue applicator sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Peter J.; Kelly, Fredrick R.; Haas, Jeffrey S.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2007-07-24

    A thin layer chromatograph residue applicator sampler. The residue applicator sampler provides for rapid analysis of samples containing high explosives, chemical warfare, and other analyses of interest under field conditions. This satisfied the need for a field-deployable, small, hand-held, all-in-one device for efficient sampling, sample dissolution, and sample application to an analytical technique. The residue applicator sampler includes a sampling sponge that is resistant to most chemicals and is fastened via a plastic handle in a hermetically sealed tube containing a known amount of solvent. Upon use, the wetted sponge is removed from the sealed tube and used as a swiping device across an environmental sample. The sponge is then replaced in the hermetically sealed tube where the sample remains contained and dissolved in the solvent. A small pipette tip is removably contained in the hermetically sealed tube. The sponge is removed and placed into the pipette tip where a squeezing-out of the dissolved sample from the sponge into the pipette tip results in a droplet captured in a vial for later instrumental analysis, or applied directly to a thin layer chromatography plate for immediate analysis.

  5. Microbiological air quality of processing areas in a dairy plant as evaluated by the sedimentation technique and a one-stage air sampler Qualidade microbiológica do ar de ambientes de processamento em indústria de laticínios avaliada por amostrador de ar de um estágio e pela técnica da sedimentação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Costa Salustiano

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The microbiological air quality at processing areas in a dairy plant was evaluated by using a one-stage air sampler, based on Andersen principles (impaction technique and by culture settling plate technique, also known as sedimentation technique. Among these areas, milk reception, packaging, and pasteurization rooms were included. Rooms where cheese, yogurt, butter and "doce de leite"(Latin American typical treat made of concentrated milk and sugar are made were also evaluated. For all processing areas, the numbers of mesophilic aerobic bacteria and yeast and molds recovered by air sampler were higher than 90 CFU·m-3 - the maximum value recommended by American Public Health Association (APHA. In four of the six processing areas, the microbial numbers were higher than APHA's standard (30 CFU.cm-2.week-1 according to culture settling plate technique. The results showed a difference (pFoi avaliada a microbiota do ar dos ambientes de recepção, embalagem e pasteurização de leite, produção de queijos, de iogurte e de doce de leite e manteiga em uma indústria de laticínios pelas técnicas de sedimentação e de impressão em ágar utilizando um amostrador de ar de um estágio baseado no princípio de Andersen. As contagens de microrganismos mesófilos aeróbios e de fungos filamentosos e leveduras pela técnica impressão em ágar ultrapassaram 90UFC·m-3 de ar, valor máximo recomendado pela APHA. Pela técnica de sedimentação, as contagens microbianas do ar de quatro ambientes também ultrapassaram 30UFC·cm-2·semana-1, conforme recomendação da APHA. Os ambientes diferiram (p<0,05 apenas para os números de Staphylococcus aureus. (<1,0 a 4,3 UFC.m-3. As contagens microbianas por impressão em ágar foram de 2 a 10 vezes maiores que as obtidas por sedimentação, evidenciando a maior capacidade da impressão em ágar em determinar microrganismos do ar, inclusive patógenos. Quanto à distribuição da microbiota do ar, houve a predomin

  6. Functional design criteria for the retained gas sampler system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Retained Gas Sampler System (RGSS) is being developed to capture and analyze waste samples from Hanford Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks to determine both the quantity and composition of gases retained in the waste. The RGSS consists of three main components: the Sampler, Extractor, and Extruder. This report describes the functional criteria for the design of the RGSS components. The RGSS Sampler is based on the WHC Universal Sampler design with modifications to eliminate gas leakage. The primary function of the Sampler is to capture a representative waste sample from a tank and transport the sample with minimal loss of gas content from the tank to the laboratory. The function of the Extruder is to transfer the waste sample from the Sampler to the Extractor. The function of the Extractor is to separate the gases from the liquids and solids, measure the relative volume of gas to determine the void fraction, and remove and analyze the gas constituents

  7. A miniature flexible sampler for subsurface lunar exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yun; Lu, Wei; Xiong, Pengwen; Song, Aiguo

    2016-06-01

    Lunar subsurface sampling is one of the critical technologies in the advancement of space exploration, and a lunar sampler with low weight, small volume, and low power consumption would significantly reduce the cost of space exploration. Thus, this paper proposes a novel miniature lunar sampler which adopts a flexible tape spring as its sampling arm. Compared with existing rigid-arm samplers, the proposed sampler has the merits of very low weight, reduced volume, and little power consumption. The mechanical design is illustrated in detail, the corresponding flexible kinematics model is built by considering flexibility compensation, and the working space of the sampler is depicted. The performance, e.g. the maximum acceleration, the maximum load capacity, and the sampling depth of the flexible arm, is analyzed through experiments, and each limit is established. In addition, the sampling process is demonstrated with the lab-based experiments, and the feasibility of the sampler is verified.

  8. Retained gas sampler interim safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This safety assessment addresses the proposed action to install, operate, and remove a Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) in Tank 101-SY at Hanford. Purpose of the RGS is to help characterize the gas species retained in the tank waste; the information will be used to refine models that predict the gas-producing behavior of the waste tank. The RGS will take samples of the tank from top to bottom; these samples will be analyzed for gas constituents. The proposed action is required as part of an evaluation of mitigation concepts for eliminating episodic gas releases that result in high hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space

  9. The ''Gent'' stacked filter unit (SFU) sampler for the collection of atmospheric aerosols in two size fractions: Description and instructions for installation and use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a description and general instructions for the installation and use of the ''Gent'' Stacked Filter Unit (SFU) PM10 sampler. The sampler operates at a flow rate of 16 litres per min. It collects particulates which have an equivalent aerodynamic diameter (EAD) of less than 10 μm in separate ''coarse'' (2-10 μm EAD) and ''fine'' (10 μm EAD particles is accomplished by a PM10 pre-impaction stage upstream of the stacked filter cassette. The air is drawn through the sampler by means of a diaphragm vacuum pump, which is enclosed in a special housing together with a needle valve, vacuum gauge, flow meter, volume meter, time switch (for interrupted sampling) and hour meter. A list of manufacturers of the various components of the sampler is also given. (author). 4 figs, 1 tab

  10. Air Sampling Instruments for Evaluation of Atmospheric Contaminants. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, Cincinnati, OH.

    This text, a revision and extension of the first three editions, consists of papers discussing the basic considerations in sampling air for specific purposes, sampler calibration, systems components, sample collectors, and descriptions of air-sampling instruments. (BT)

  11. PRODUCTION OF ACTIVATED CHARCOAL SAMPLER TUBES FOR SAMPLING AIR CONTAMINANTS

    OpenAIRE

    P Nassiri; F Golbabaie; S. Nasseri; M. Mahmoodi; K. Mehrain

    1988-01-01

    The importance of the use of activated charcoal tubes for sampling gases and vapors is very well-known. For producing these tubes in the country, their production started in the laboratory of the department of occupation al health using activated charcoal, polyurethane foam and glass wool and consequently two types of foamed and foamless tubes were produced. To investigate the quality of the raw materials used, 186 tubes were exposed to various proportions of solutions of different volumes of...

  12. Siting Samplers to Minimize Expected Time to Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, Travis; Lorenzetti, David M.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2012-05-02

    We present a probabilistic approach to designing an indoor sampler network for detecting an accidental or intentional chemical or biological release, and demonstrate it for a real building. In an earlier paper, Sohn and Lorenzetti(1) developed a proof of concept algorithm that assumed samplers could return measurements only slowly (on the order of hours). This led to optimal detect to treat architectures, which maximize the probability of detecting a release. This paper develops a more general approach, and applies it to samplers that can return measurements relatively quickly (in minutes). This leads to optimal detect to warn architectures, which minimize the expected time to detection. Using a model of a real, large, commercial building, we demonstrate the approach by optimizing networks against uncertain release locations, source terms, and sampler characteristics. Finally, we speculate on rules of thumb for general sampler placement.

  13. Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... house) Industrial emissions (like smoke and chemicals from factories) Household cleaners (spray cleaners, air fresheners) Car emissions (like carbon monoxide) *All of these things make up “particle pollution.” They mostly come from cars, trucks, buses, and ...

  14. Performance of High Flow Rate Personal Respirable Samplers When Challenged with Mineral Aerosols of Different Particle Size Distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Peter; Thorpe, Andrew; Echt, Alan

    2016-05-01

    It is thought that the performance of respirable samplers may vary when exposed to dust aerosols with different particle sizes and wind speeds. This study investigated the performance of the GK 4.16 (RASCAL), GK 2.69, PPI 8, and FSP 10, high flow rate personal samplers when exposed to aerosols of mineral dust in a wind tunnel at two different wind speeds (1 and 2 m s(-1)) and orientations (towards and side-on to the source of emission). The mass median aerodynamic diameter of four aerosolized test dusts ranged from 8 to 25 µm with geometric standard deviations from 1.6 to 2 µm. The performance of each sampler type was compared with that of the SIMPEDS (Higgins-Dewell design) sampler. There was slight evidence to suggest that the performance of the FSP 10 is affected by the direction of the inlet relative to the air flow, although this was not significant when most respirable dust concentrations were compared, possibly due to the variability of paired dust concentration results. The GK 2.69, RASCAL, and PPI 8 samplers had similar performances, although the results when side-on to the emission source were generally slightly lower than the SIMPEDS. Despite slight differences between respirable dust concentrations the respirable crystalline silica values were not significantly different from the SIMPEDS. The GK family of cyclones obtained most precise results and more closely matched the SIMPEDS. A comparison with dust concentration results from previous calm air chamber studies (where wind speeds were work indicating consistent performance relative to the SIMPEDS in both calm and moving air. PMID:26865560

  15. Improving the Convergence of Reversible Samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Bellet, Luc; Spiliopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    In Monte-Carlo methods the Markov processes used to sample a given target distribution usually satisfy detailed balance, i.e. they are time-reversible. However, relatively recent results have demonstrated that appropriate reversible and irreversible perturbations can accelerate convergence to equilibrium. In this paper we present some general design principles which apply to general Markov processes. Working with the generator of Markov processes, we prove that for some of the most commonly used performance criteria, i.e., spectral gap, asymptotic variance and large deviation functionals, sampling is improved for appropriate reversible and irreversible perturbations of some initially given reversible sampler. Moreover we provide specific constructions for such reversible and irreversible perturbations for various commonly used Markov processes, such as Markov chains and diffusions. In the case of diffusions, we make the discussion more specific using the large deviations rate function as a measure of performance.

  16. Calibration of nylon organic chemical integrative samplers and sentinel samplers for quantitative measurement of pulsed aquatic exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Shane A; Belden, Jason B

    2016-06-01

    Environmental exposures often occur through short, pulsed events; therefore, the ability to accurately measure these toxicologically-relevant concentrations is important. Three different integrative passive sampler configurations were evaluated under different flow and pulsed exposure conditions for the measurement of current-use pesticides (n=19), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (n=10), and personal care products (n=5) spanning a broad range of hydrophobicities (log Kow 1.5-7.6). Two modified POCIS-style samplers were investigated using macroporous nylon mesh membranes (35μm pores) and two different sorbent materials (i.e. Oasis HLB and Dowex Optipore L-493). A recently developed design, the Sentinel Sampler (ABS Materials), utilizing Osorb media enclosed within stainless steel mesh (145μm pores), was also investigated. Relatively high sampling rates (Rs) were achieved for all sampler configurations during the short eight-day exposure (4300-27mL/d). Under flow conditions, median Rs were approximately 5-10 times higher for POCIS-style samplers and 27 times higher for Sentinel Samplers, as compared to static conditions. The ability of samplers to rapidly measure hydrophobic contaminants may be a trade off with increased flow dependence. Analyte accumulation was integrative under pulsed and continuous exposures for POCIS-style samplers with mean difference between treatments of 11% and 33%; however, accumulation into Sentinel Samplers was more variable. Collectively, results show that reducing membrane limitations allows for rapid, integrative accumulation of a broad range of analytes even under pulsed exposures. As such, these sampler designs may be suitable for monitoring environmental substances that have short aquatic half-lives. PMID:27139214

  17. Acoustically enriching, large-depth aquatic sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Jonas; Ogden, Sam; Johansson, Linda; Hjort, Klas; Thornell, Greger

    2012-05-01

    In marine biology, it is useful to collect water samples when exploring the distribution and diversity of microbial communities in underwater environments. In order to provide, e.g., a miniaturized submersible explorer with the capability of collecting microorganisms, a compact sample enrichment system has been developed. The sampler is 30 mm long, 15 mm wide, and just a few millimetres thick. Integrated in a multilayer steel, polyimide and glass construction is a microfluidic channel with piezoelectric transducers, where microorganism and particle samples are collected and enriched, using acoustic radiation forces for gentle and labelless trapping. High-pressure, latchable valves, using paraffin as the actuation material, at each end of the microfluidic channel keep the collected sample pristine. A funnel structure raised above the surface of the device directs water into the microfluidic channel as the vehicle propels itself or when there is a flow across its hull. The valves proved leak proof to a pressure of 2.1 MPa for 19 hours and momentary pressures of 12.5 MPa, corresponding to an ocean depth of more than 1200 metres. By reactivating the latching mechanism, small leakages through the valves could be remedied, which could thus increase the leak-less operational time. Fluorescent particles, 1.9 μm in diameter, were successfully trapped in the microfluidic channel at flow rates up to 15 μl min(-1), corresponding to an 18.5 cm s(-1) external flow rate of the sampler. In addition, liquid-suspended GFP-marked yeast cells were successfully trapped. PMID:22422039

  18. Personal sampler for monitoring of viable viruses; modelling of outdoor sampling conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodulin, A. I.; Desyatkov, B. M.; Lapteva, N. A.; Sergeev, A. N.; Agranovski, I. E.

    A new personal bioaerosol sampler has recently been developed and verified to be very efficient for monitoring of viable airborne bacteria, fungi and viruses. The device is capable of providing high recovery rates even for microorganisms which are rather sensitive to physical and biological stresses. However, some mathematical procedure is required for realistic calculation of an actual concentration of viable bioaerosols in the air taking into account a rate of inactivation of targeted microorganisms, sampling parameters, and results of microbial analysis of collecting liquid from the sampler. In this paper, we develop such procedure along with the model of aerosol propagation for outdoor conditions. Combining these procedures allows one to determine the optimal sampling locations for the best possible coverage of the area to be monitored. A hypothetical episode concerned with terrorists' attack during music concert in the central square of Novosibirsk, Russia was considered to evaluate possible coverage of the area by sampling equipment to detect bioaerosols at various locations within the square. It was found that, for chosen bioaerosol generation parameters and weather conditions, the new personal sampler would be capable to reliably detect pathogens at all locations occupied by crowd, even at distances of up to 600 m from the source.

  19. Sampling of BTX in Hat Yai city using cost effective laboratory-built PCB passive sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subba, Jas Raj; Thammakhet, Chongdee; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2016-08-23

    A laboratory-built printed circuit board (PCB) passive sampler used for the monitoring of xylene and styrene in copy print shops was re-validated for detecting benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) and applied for the sampling of ambient air from Hat Yai city, Songkhla, Thailand, in the month of November 2014. For monitoring, the PCB passive samplers were exposed to target analytes in 16 locations covering high to low exposure areas. After sampling, the samplers were thermally desorbed and the analytes were trapped by multi-walled carbon nanotubes packed into a micro-preconcentrator coupled to a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a flame ionization detector. At the optimum GC operating conditions, the linear dynamic ranges for BTX were 0.06-5.6 µg for benzene, 0.07-2.2 µg for toluene and 0.23-2.5 µg for xylene with R(2) > 0.99 with the limits of detection being 6.6, 6.8 and 19 ng for benzene, toluene and xylene, respectively. The concentrations of BTX in the 16 sampling sites were in the range of N.D.-1.3 ± 1.6, 4.50 ± 0.76-49.6 ± 3.7 and 1.00 ± 0.21-39.6 ± 3.1 µg m(-3), respectively. When compared to past studies, there had been an increase in the benzene concentration. PMID:27231039

  20. A personal sampler for aircraft engine cold start particles: laboratory development and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armendariz, Alfredo; Leith, David

    2003-01-01

    Industrial hygienists in the U.S. Air Force are concerned about exposure of their personnel to jet fuel. One potential source of exposure for flightline ground crews is the plume emitted during the start of aircraft engines in extremely cold weather. The purpose of this study was to investigate a personal sampler, a small tube-and-wire electrostatic precipitator (ESP), for assessing exposure to aircraft engine cold start particles. Tests were performed in the laboratory to characterize the sampler's collection efficiency and to determine the magnitude of adsorption and evaporation artifacts. A low-temperature chamber was developed for the artifact experiments so tests could be performed at temperatures similar to actual field conditions. The ESP collected particles from 0.5 to 20 micro m diameter with greater than 98% efficiency at particle concentrations up to 100 mg/m(3). Adsorption artifacts were less than 5 micro g/m(3) when sampling a high concentration vapor stream. Evaporation artifacts were significantly lower for the ESP than for PVC membrane filters across a range of sampling times and incoming vapor concentrations. These tests indicate that the ESP provides more accurate exposure assessment results than traditional filter-based particle samplers when sampling cold start particles produced by an aircraft engine.

  1. Laboratory evaluation of the CIP 10 personal dust sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gero, A; Tomb, T

    1988-06-01

    The "capteur individuel de poussiere" CIP 10 personal dust sampler--developed by the Centre d'Etudes et Recherches de Charbonnages de France (CERCHAR) research organization--is a small, quiet, lightweight unit which samples at a flow rate of 10 L/min. It is a three-stage sampler, using two stages to remove nonrespirable dust particles and one stage to collect the respirable fraction. Airflow through the sampler is induced by the third stage, which is a rotating collector cup that contains a fine grade sponge. Laboratory tests were conducted in a dust chamber using aerosols of Arizona road dust, coal dust and silica dust. Aerosol concentrations measured with the CIP 10 were compared to those measured with the coal mine dust personal sampler unit used in the United States. The results of this study showed that aerosol concentrations measured with the CIP 10 were linearly related to those obtained with the coal mine dust personal sampler. The relationship, however, was dependent on preselector configuration and aerosol characteristics. The collection medium allows some small particles (less than 3 microns) to pass through the sampler without being collected. As much as 13% (by weight) of the aerosol that penetrated through the preseparating stages was exhausted from the sampler. PMID:2840817

  2. Laboratory evaluation of the CIP 10 personal dust sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gero, A; Tomb, T

    1988-06-01

    The "capteur individuel de poussiere" CIP 10 personal dust sampler--developed by the Centre d'Etudes et Recherches de Charbonnages de France (CERCHAR) research organization--is a small, quiet, lightweight unit which samples at a flow rate of 10 L/min. It is a three-stage sampler, using two stages to remove nonrespirable dust particles and one stage to collect the respirable fraction. Airflow through the sampler is induced by the third stage, which is a rotating collector cup that contains a fine grade sponge. Laboratory tests were conducted in a dust chamber using aerosols of Arizona road dust, coal dust and silica dust. Aerosol concentrations measured with the CIP 10 were compared to those measured with the coal mine dust personal sampler unit used in the United States. The results of this study showed that aerosol concentrations measured with the CIP 10 were linearly related to those obtained with the coal mine dust personal sampler. The relationship, however, was dependent on preselector configuration and aerosol characteristics. The collection medium allows some small particles (less than 3 microns) to pass through the sampler without being collected. As much as 13% (by weight) of the aerosol that penetrated through the preseparating stages was exhausted from the sampler.

  3. Mobile passive samplers: Concept for a novel mode of exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrative passive sampling with devices such as semipermeable membrane devices generally relies on rigs for month-long static exposures in water. We evaluate here whether mobile exposures of passive samplers can provide reliable estimates of dissolved contaminant concentrations. Mobile exposures were obtained by towing samplers fastened to the end of a benthic trawl net. Significant and reproducible absorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during 5 h-long deployments was made possible by high sampling rates resulting from high water turbulences during towing at 1.2-1.5 knots. Sampling rates (72-215 L d-1) estimated from the dissipation of performance reference compounds were supported by in situ calibration with samplers exposed for a 30 days in the vicinity of the test site. Higher fluoranthene and pyrene absorption in samplers exposed to the trawling-induced sediment plume could be attributed to desorption from re-suspended sediments. This mode of exposure has the potential to be used in monitoring programmes. - Highlights: → We evaluated for the first time a novel mode of passive sampler exposure. → High sampling rates and the detection of dissolved PAHs after only 5 h of sampling were obtained. → We calibrated this novel mode of sampler exposure with conventionally-exposed passive samplers. → Dissolved PAHs were measured in and above a benthic trawler-induced sediment plume. - The first application of a novel mode of exposure for passive sampling devices in water is presented.

  4. Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years several regulations and standards for air quality and limits for air pollution were issued or are in preparation by the European Union, which have severe influence on the environmental monitoring and legislation in Austria. This chapter of the environmental control report of Austria gives an overview about the legal situation of air pollution control in the European Union and in specific the legal situation in Austria. It gives a comprehensive inventory of air pollution measurements for the whole area of Austria of total suspended particulates, ozone, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, heavy metals, benzene, dioxin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and eutrophication. For each of these pollutants the measured emission values throughout Austria are given in tables and geographical charts, the environmental impact is discussed, statistical data and time series of the emission sources are given and legal regulations and measures for an effective environmental pollution control are discussed. In particular the impact of fossil-fuel power plants on the air pollution is analyzed. (a.n.)

  5. A new sampler for stratified lagoon chemical and microbiological assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, M R; Brooks, J P; Adeli, A

    2014-07-01

    A sampler was needed for a spatial and temporal study of microbial and chemical stratification in a large swine manure lagoon that was known to contain zoonotic bacteria. Conventional samplers were limited to collections of surface water samples near the bank or required a manned boat. A new sampler was developed to allow simultaneous collection of multiple samples at different depths, up to 2.3 m, without a manned boat. The sampler was tethered for stability, used remote control (RC) for sample collection, and accommodated rapid replacement of sterile tubing modules and sample containers. The sampler comprised a PVC pontoon with acrylic deck and watertight enclosures, for a 12 VDC gearmotor, to operate the collection module, and vacuum system, to draw samples into reusable autoclavable tubing and 250-mL bottles. Although designed primarily for water samples, the sampler was easily modified to collect sludge. The sampler held a stable position during deployment, created minimal disturbance in the water column, and was readily cleaned and sanitized for transport. The sampler was field tested initially in a shallow fresh water lake and subsequently in a swine manure treatment lagoon. Analyses of water samples from the lagoon tests showed that chemical and bacterial levels, pH, and EC did not differ between 0.04, 0.47, and 1.0 m depths, but some chemical and bacterial levels differed between winter and spring collections. These results demonstrated the utility of the sampler and suggested that future manure lagoon studies employ fewer or different depths and more sampling dates. PMID:24549945

  6. Air Quality Monitoring Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, K.; Palmgren, F.

    The Danish Air Quality Monitoring Programme (LMP IV) has been revised in accordance with the Framework Directive and the first three daughter directives of SO2, NOx/NO2, PM10, lead, benzene, CO and ozone. PM10 samplers are under installation and the installation will be completed during 2002...

  7. [b][/b]Relative efficiencies of the Burkard 7-Day, Rotorod and Burkard Personal samplers for Poaceae and Urticaceae pollen under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Peel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction[/b]. In aerobiological studies it is often necessary to compare concentration data recorded with different models of sampling instrument. Sampler efficiency typically varies from device to device, and depends on the target aerosol and local atmospheric conditions. To account for these differences inter-sampler correction factors may be applied, however for many pollen samplers and pollen taxa such correction factors do not exist and cannot be derived from existing published work. [b]Materials and methods.[/b] In this study, the relative efficiencies of the Burkard 7-Day Recording Volumetric Spore Trap, the Sampling Technologies Rotorod Model 20, and the Burkard Personal Volumetric Air Sampler were evaluated for Urticaceae and Poaceae pollen under field conditions. The influence of wind speed and relative humidity on these efficiency relationships was also assessed. Data for the two pollen taxa were collected during 2010 and 2011–2012, respectively. [b]Results[/b]. The three devices were found to record significantly different concentrations for both pollen taxa, with the exception of the 7-Day and Rotorod samplers for Poaceae pollen. Under the range of conditions present during the study, wind speed was found to only have a significant impact on inter-sampler relationships involving the vertically-orientated Burkard Personal sampler, while no interaction between relative efficiency and relative humidity was observed. [b]Conclusions[/b]. Data collected with the three models of sampler should only be compared once the appropriate correction has been made, with wind speed taken into account where appropriate.

  8. Testing of high-volume sampler inlets for the sampling of atmospheric radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Hammad; Su, Wei-Chung; Cheng, Yung S; Medici, Fausto

    2006-09-01

    Sampling of air for radioactive particles is one of the most important techniques used to determine the nuclear debris from a nuclear weapon test in the Earth's atmosphere or those particles vented from underground or underwater tests. Massive-flow air samplers are used to sample air for any indication of radionuclides that are a signature of nuclear tests. The International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization includes seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound, and gaseous xenon isotopes sampling technologies, in addition to radionuclide sampling, to monitor for any violation of the treaty. Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute has developed a large wind tunnel to test the outdoor radionuclide samplers for the International Monitoring System. The inlets for these samplers are tested for their collection efficiencies for different particle sizes at various wind speeds. This paper describes the results from the testing of two radionuclide sampling units used in the International Monitoring System. The possible areas of depositional wall losses are identified and the losses in these areas are determined. Sampling inlet type 1 was tested at 2.2 m s wind speed for 5, 10, and 20-microm aerodynamic diameter particles. The global collection efficiency was about 87.6% for 10-microm particles for sampling inlet type 1. Sampling inlet type 2 was tested for three wind speeds at 0.56, 2.2, and 6.6 m s for 5, 10, and 20-microm aerodynamic diameter particles in two different configurations (sampling head lowered and raised). The global collection efficiencies for these configurations for 10-microm particles at 2.2 m s wind speed were 77.4% and 82.5%, respectively. The sampling flow rate was 600 m h for both sampling inlets.

  9. 7 CFR 800.185 - Duties of official personnel and warehouse samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Duties of official personnel and warehouse samplers... official personnel and warehouse samplers. (a) General. Official personnel and warehouse samplers shall... of § 800.161. (d) Scope of operations. Official personnel and warehouse samplers shall operate...

  10. A survey of an air monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to compare personal air sampling data to stationary air sampling data and to bioassay data that was taken during the decontamination and decommissioning of sixty-one plutonium glove boxes at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1995. An air monitoring program administered at Argonne National Laboratory was assessed by comparing personal air sampler (PAS) data, stationary air sampler (SAS) data, and bioassay data. The study revealed that the PAS and SAS techniques were equivalent when averaged over all employees and all workdays, but the standard deviation was large. Also, large deviations were observed in individual samples. The correlation between individual PAS results and bioassay results was low. Personal air samplers and bioassay monitoring played complementary roles in assessing the workplace and estimating intakes. The PAS technique is adequate for detection and evaluation of contaminated atmospheres, whereas bioassay monitoring is better for determining individual intakes

  11. A survey of an air monitoring program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.B.

    1997-08-01

    The objective of this report is to compare personal air sampling data to stationary air sampling data and to bioassay data that was taken during the decontamination and decommissioning of sixty-one plutonium glove boxes at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1995. An air monitoring program administered at Argonne National Laboratory was assessed by comparing personal air sampler (PAS) data, stationary air sampler (SAS) data, and bioassay data. The study revealed that the PAS and SAS techniques were equivalent when averaged over all employees and all workdays, but the standard deviation was large. Also, large deviations were observed in individual samples. The correlation between individual PAS results and bioassay results was low. Personal air samplers and bioassay monitoring played complementary roles in assessing the workplace and estimating intakes. The PAS technique is adequate for detection and evaluation of contaminated atmospheres, whereas bioassay monitoring is better for determining individual intakes.

  12. A Gibbs sampler for multivariate linear regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantz, Adam B.

    2016-04-01

    Kelly described an efficient algorithm, using Gibbs sampling, for performing linear regression in the fairly general case where non-zero measurement errors exist for both the covariates and response variables, where these measurements may be correlated (for the same data point), where the response variable is affected by intrinsic scatter in addition to measurement error, and where the prior distribution of covariates is modelled by a flexible mixture of Gaussians rather than assumed to be uniform. Here, I extend the Kelly algorithm in two ways. First, the procedure is generalized to the case of multiple response variables. Secondly, I describe how to model the prior distribution of covariates using a Dirichlet process, which can be thought of as a Gaussian mixture where the number of mixture components is learned from the data. I present an example of multivariate regression using the extended algorithm, namely fitting scaling relations of the gas mass, temperature, and luminosity of dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters as a function of their mass and redshift. An implementation of the Gibbs sampler in the R language, called LRGS, is provided.

  13. Deep-Sea Hydrothermal-Vent Sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Alberto E.; Venkateswaran, Kasthur; Matthews, Jaret B.

    2008-01-01

    An apparatus is being developed for sampling water for signs of microbial life in an ocean hydrothermal vent at a depth of as much as 6.5 km. Heretofore, evidence of microbial life in deep-sea hydrothermal vents has been elusive and difficult to validate. Because of the extreme conditions in these environments (high pressures and temperatures often in excess of 300 C), deep-sea hydrothermal- vent samplers must be robust. Because of the presumed low density of biomass of these environments, samplers must be capable of collecting water samples of significant volume. It is also essential to prevent contamination of samples by microbes entrained from surrounding waters. Prior to the development of the present apparatus, no sampling device was capable of satisfying these requirements. The apparatus (see figure) includes an intake equipped with a temperature probe, plus several other temperature probes located away from the intake. The readings from the temperature probes are utilized in conjunction with readings from flowmeters to determine the position of the intake relative to the hydrothermal plume and, thereby, to position the intake to sample directly from the plume. Because it is necessary to collect large samples of water in order to obtain sufficient microbial biomass but it is not practical to retain all the water from the samples, four filter arrays are used to concentrate the microbial biomass (which is assumed to consist of particles larger than 0.2 m) into smaller volumes. The apparatus can collect multiple samples per dive and is designed to process a total volume of 10 L of vent fluid, of which most passes through the filters, leaving a total possibly-microbe-containing sample volume of 200 mL remaining in filters. A rigid titanium nose at the intake is used for cooling the sample water before it enters a flexible inlet hose connected to a pump. As the water passes through the titanium nose, it must be cooled to a temperature that is above a mineral

  14. Task plan for test of PRBT prototypic liquid sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this task is to determine just how representative Precipitate Reactor Bottom Tank (PRBT) samples taken from the Hydragard trademark prototypic liquid sampler are of the in-tank contents and also to determine the homogeneity of the in-tank contents. This shall be accomplished by a statistical design study sampling plan for paired contrasts of the analysis results of samples taken from: (1) the Hydragard trademark prototypic liquid sampler paired with the more fundamental grab sampler at the lower elevation for the Hydragard trademark prototypic liquid sampler accuracy and (2) the grab sampler at the lower elevation paired with the grab sampler at the upper elevation for the in-tank homogeneity. These measurements are paired together to sharpen the contrast so that, as nearly as possible, only the conditions of the effect under study will differ between the two. This ''split-plot'' arrangement provides increased precision for the contrast under study by canceling out common extraneous effects, thereby enabling the detection of smaller effects. The secondary objective of the task is to determine the level of influence of the major contributors to the overall uncertainty in the sample preparation and measurement process. These major steps include: preparation method (H2SO4-HF Titanium dissolution); aliquoting and dilution within a dissolution; measurement and long-term behavior of the ICP and AA instruments, as monitored by the measurement of standards and blanks embedded within each block of samples for the measurement sequence. This sampling task, therefore, is mostly devoted to determining the sampler characteristics and is not intended to provide a comprehensive estimate of the overall uncertainty affecting DWPF sample analysis in routine operation

  15. Design of an exposure chamber to test samplers used in the evaluation of personal exposure to nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, R.; Izadi, H.; Quémerais, B.

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to design a laboratory size exposure chamber for the testing of samplers used to collect personal exposure samples for nanoparticles. A polyethylene cylindrical container with a diameter of 42 cm and height of 60 cm was used as the testing chamber. The chamber was divided into 2 parts by an aluminium honey comb. Particles generated using a 1 jet Collison nebulizer (BGI) operating at a flow rate of 4L/min were inserted into the chamber via a tube located near to the top of the chamber. A heater was inserted just after the nebulizer to avoid condensation of water in the tubing, and dilution air, running at 10L/min was inserted just after the heater. As particle charge can dramatically affect sampling a particle neutralizer was attached to the generation system so as to neutralize the particles before they enter the chamber. A diffusion dryer was used to remove any water from the air stream prior to enter the chamber. A fan was used to mix and distribute the generated particles. After generation and mixing, the particles passed through the aluminium honeycomb which is essential to eliminate any turbulent or unwanted air flow. Six sampling ports along with a pressure gauge were placed on the walls 15 cm from the bottom of the chamber. The pressure gauge was added to ensure the desired pressure is achieved during sampling. The sampling ports allowed for the connection of five samplers and sampling pumps as well as the connection of an ultrafine particle counter. The exposure chamber was developed to assess various samplers for carbon nanotubes and cellulose nanocrystals. Results showed that the chamber was working properly and that mixing was sufficiently uniform to test samplers.

  16. Calibration of the Ogawa passive ozone sampler for aircraft cabins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhangar, Seema; Singer, Brett C.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2013-02-01

    Elevated ozone levels in aircraft cabins would pose a health hazard to exposed passengers and crew. The Ogawa passive sampler is a potentially useful tool for measuring in-cabin ozone levels. Accurate interpretation of measured values requires knowing the effective collection rate of the sampler. To calibrate the passive sampler for the aircraft-cabin environment, ozone was measured simultaneously with an Ogawa sampler and an active ozone analyzer that served as a transfer standard, on 11 commercial passenger flights, during Feb-Apr 2007. An empirical pressure-independent effective collection rate that can be used to convert nitrate mass to ozone mixing ratio was determined to be 14.3 ± 0.9 atm cm3 min-1 (mean ± standard error). This value is similar to estimates from other applications where airflow rates are low, such as in personal monitoring and in chamber studies. This study represents the first field calibration of any passive sampler for the aircraft cabin environment.

  17. Assessment of SRS ambient air monitoring network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jannik, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-03

    Three methodologies have been used to assess the effectiveness of the existing ambient air monitoring system in place at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC. Effectiveness was measured using two metrics that have been utilized in previous quantification of air-monitoring network performance; frequency of detection (a measurement of how frequently a minimum number of samplers within the network detect an event), and network intensity (a measurement of how consistent each sampler within the network is at detecting events). In addition to determining the effectiveness of the current system, the objective of performing this assessment was to determine what, if any, changes could make the system more effective. Methodologies included 1) the Waite method of determining sampler distribution, 2) the CAP88- PC annual dose model, and 3) a puff/plume transport model used to predict air concentrations at sampler locations. Data collected from air samplers at SRS in 2015 compared with predicted data resulting from the methodologies determined that the frequency of detection for the current system is 79.2% with sampler efficiencies ranging from 5% to 45%, and a mean network intensity of 21.5%. One of the air monitoring stations had an efficiency of less than 10%, and detected releases during just one sampling period of the entire year, adding little to the overall network intensity. By moving or removing this sampler, the mean network intensity increased to about 23%. Further work in increasing the network intensity and simulating accident scenarios to further test the ambient air system at SRS is planned

  18. Efficiency of Airborne Sample Analysis Platform (ASAP Bioaerosol Sampler for Pathogen Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag eSharma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The threat of bioterrorism and pandemics has highlighted the urgency for rapid and reliable bioaerosol detection in different environments. Safeguarding against such threats requires continuous sampling of the ambient air for pathogen detection. In this study we investigated the efficacy of the Airborne Sample Analysis Platform (ASAP 2800 bioaerosol sampler to collect representative samples of air and identify specific viruses suspended as bioaerosols. To test this concept, we aerosolized an innocuous replication-defective bovine adenovirus serotype 3 (BAdV3 in a controlled laboratory environment. The ASAP efficiently trapped the surrogate virus at 5×10E3 plaque-forming units (p.f.u. [2×10E5 genome copy equivalent] concentrations or more resulting in the successful detection of the virus using quantitative PCR. These results support the further development of ASAP for bioaerosol pathogen detection.

  19. Properties of the Affine Invariant Ensemble Sampler in high dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Huijser, David; Brewer, Brendon J

    2015-01-01

    We present theoretical and practical properties of the affine-invariant ensemble sampler Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In high dimensions the affine-invariant ensemble sampler shows unusual and undesirable properties. We demonstrate this with an $n$-dimensional correlated Gaussian toy problem with a known mean and covariance structure, and analyse the burn-in period. The burn-in period seems to be short, however upon closer inspection we discover the mean and the variance of the target distribution do not match the expected, known values. This problem becomes greater as $n$ increases. We therefore conclude that the affine-invariant ensemble sampler should be used with caution in high dimensional problems. We also present some theoretical results explaining this behaviour.

  20. Convergence rate of Gibbs sampler and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Kaican; GENG; Zhi

    2005-01-01

    Based on the convergence rate defined by the Pearson-x2 distance, this paper discusses properties of different Gibbs sampling schemes. Under a set of regularity conditions, it is proved in this paper that the rate of convergence on systematic scan Gibbs samplers is the norm of a forward operator. We also discuss that the collapsed Gibbs sampler has a faster convergence rate than the systematic scan Gibbs sampler as proposed by Liu et al. Based on the definition of convergence rate of the Pearson-x2 distance,this paper proved this result quantitatively. According to Theorem 2, we also proved that the convergence rate defined with the spectral radius of matrix by Robert and Shau is equivalent to the corresponding radius of the forward operator.

  1. Venturi-type fluidic sampler for liquid-solid mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong Xu; Binbin Liu

    2012-01-01

    Static-type samplers are required for sampling corrosive,toxic,high-temperature,or radioactive liquid-solid fluids.We have designed a compact reverse flow diverter pumping system for transferring liquid-solid mixtures.In accordance with the Venturi principle,an acceptable volume of liquid-solid fluid is automatically collected into a sampling bottle.The effects of sampling needle sizes,sectional area of the T-section,solid concentration,and liquid viscosity on the performance of fluidic samplers were experimentally investigated.The sample volume increased upon the reduction of the sampling needle length and the increase of the sectional area of the T-section,but decreased with the increase of solid concentration and liquid viscosity.Unbiased samples of acceptable volume were produced by the proposed fluidic sampler,even at 10.21 mPa s liquid viscosity,35 wt% solid concentration,and 6.74 m sampling height.

  2. A mathematics sampler topics for the liberal arts

    CERN Document Server

    Berlinghoff, William P; Skrien, Dale

    2001-01-01

    Now in its fifth edition, A Mathematics Sampler presents mathematics as both science and art, focusing on the historical role of mathematics in our culture. It uses selected topics from modern mathematics-including computers, perfect numbers, and four-dimensional geometry-to exemplify the distinctive features of mathematics as an intellectual endeavor, a problem-solving tool, and a way of thinking about the rapidly changing world in which we live. A Mathematics Sampler also includes unique LINK sections throughout the book, each of which connects mathematical concepts with areas of interest th

  3. A population-based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a carbon monoxide passive sampler and occupational dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apte, M.G.

    1997-09-01

    Two devices, an occupational carbon monoxide (CO) dosimeter (LOCD), and an indoor air quality (IAQ) passive sampler were developed for use in population-based CO exposure assessment studies. CO exposure is a serious public health problem in the U.S., causing both morbidity and mortality (lifetime mortality risk approximately 10{sup -4}). Sparse data from population-based CO exposure assessments indicate that approximately 10% of the U.S. population is exposed to CO above the national ambient air quality standard. No CO exposure measurement technology is presently available for affordable population-based CO exposure assessment studies. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested in the laboratory and field. The palladium-molybdenum based CO sensor was designed into a compact diffusion tube sampler that can be worn. Time-weighted-average (TWA) CO exposure of the device is quantified by a simple spectrophotometric measurement. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested over an exposure range of 40 to 700 ppm-hours and 200 to 4200 ppm-hours, respectively. Both devices were capable of measuring precisely (relative standard deviation <20%), with low bias (<10%). The LOCD was screened for interferences by temperature, humidity, and organic and inorganic gases. Temperature effects were small in the range of 10{degrees}C to 30{degrees}C. Humidity effects were low between 20% and 90% RH. Ethylene (200 ppm) caused a positive interference and nitric oxide (50 ppm) caused a negative response without the presence of CO but not with CO.

  4. Assessment of SRS ambient air monitoring network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jannik, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-03

    Three methodologies have been used to assess the effectiveness of the existing ambient air monitoring system in place at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC. Effectiveness was measured using two metrics that have been utilized in previous quantification of air-monitoring network performance; frequency of detection (a measurement of how frequently a minimum number of samplers within the network detect an event), and network intensity (a measurement of how consistent each sampler within the network is at detecting events). In addition to determining the effectiveness of the current system, the objective of performing this assessment was to determine what, if any, changes could make the system more effective. Methodologies included 1) the Waite method of determining sampler distribution, 2) the CAP88- PC annual dose model, and 3) a puff/plume transport model used to predict air concentrations at sampler locations. Data collected from air samplers at SRS in 2015 compared with predicted data resulting from the methodologies determined that the frequency of detection for the current system is 79.2% with sampler efficiencies ranging from 5% to 45%, and a mean network intensity of 21.5%. One of the airmonitoring stations had an efficiency of less than 10%, and detected releases during just one sampling period of the entire year, adding little to the overall network intensity. By moving or removing this sampler, the mean network intensity increased to about 23%. Further work in increasing the network intensity and simulating accident scenarios to further test the ambient air system at SRS is planned

  5. Selection and testing of on-line samplers for head-end reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The General Atomic cold reprocessing head-end pilot plant contains a number of processing steps. Samplers are required to obtain on-line information on the performance of each step. A number of samplers have been selected and tested. The different types of samplers are described and potential sites in the pilot plant are discussed. Initial tests results with simulated process materials are presented. Ideas for other samplers are discussed

  6. EVALUATION OF ACTIVATED CHARCOAL SAMPLER TUBES

    OpenAIRE

    P Nassiri; F Golbabaie; K. Mehrain; A. Hematian

    1994-01-01

    This study has been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the local made charcoal tubes against adsorption of benzene, toluene and xylene vapors. Results indicate that desorption capacity and the recovery percentage decrease as the benzene, toluene and xylene concentrations and also relative humidity increase. It is concluded that the water vapor is the major interfere in the adsorption of mentioned vapors when the air is passed through the activated charcoal bed. The experiments show th...

  7. Stress analysis of portable safety platform (Core Sampler Truck)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides the stress analysis and evaluation of the portable platform of the rotary mode core sampler truck No. 2 (RMCST number-sign 2). The platform comprises railing, posts, deck, legs, and a portable ladder; it is restrained from lateral motion by means of two brackets added to the drill-head service platform

  8. EVALUATION OF ACTIVATED CHARCOAL SAMPLER TUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Nassiri

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available This study has been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the local made charcoal tubes against adsorption of benzene, toluene and xylene vapors. Results indicate that desorption capacity and the recovery percentage decrease as the benzene, toluene and xylene concentrations and also relative humidity increase. It is concluded that the water vapor is the major interfere in the adsorption of mentioned vapors when the air is passed through the activated charcoal bed. The experiments show that the local made charcoal tubes are suitable for sampling in the predicted ranges existing in the work place.

  9. Direct analysis of airborne mite allergen (Der f1) in the residential atmosphere by chemifluorescent immunoassay using bioaerosol sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Kumiko; Suzuki, Yurika; Miki, Daisuke; Arai, Moeka; Arakawa, Takahiro; Shimomura, Hiroji; Shiba, Kiyoko; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2014-06-01

    Dermatophagoides farinae allergen (Der f1) is one of the most important indoor allergens associated with allergic diseases in humans. Mite allergen Der f1 is usually associated with particles of high molecular weight; thus, Der f1 is generally present in settled dust. However, a small quantity of Der f1 can be aerosolized and become an airborne component. Until now, a reliable method of detecting airborne Der f1 has not been developed. The aim of this study was to develop a fiber-optic chemifluorescent immunoassay for the detection of airborne Der f1. In this method, the Der f1 concentration measured on the basis of the intensity of fluorescence amplified by an enzymatic reaction between the labeled enzyme by a detection antibody and a fluorescent substrate. The measured Der f1 concentration was in the range from 0.49 to 250 ng/ml and a similar range was found by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This method was proved to be highly sensitive to Der f1 compared with other airborne allergens. For the implementation of airborne allergen measurement in a residential environment, a bioaerosol sampler was constructed. The airborne allergen generated by a nebulizer was conveyed to a newly sampler we developed for collecting airborne Der f1. The sampler was composed of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cells for gas/liquid phases and some porous membranes which were sandwiched in between the two phases. Der f1 in air was collected by the sampler and measured using the fiber-optic immunoassay system. The concentration of Der f1 in aerosolized standards was in the range from 0.125 to 2.0 mg/m(3) and the collection rate of the device was approximately 0.2%.

  10. An assessment of the variability in performance of wet atmospheric deposition samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, R.C.; Robertson, J.K.; Obal, John

    1987-01-01

    The variability in performance of two brands of wet/dry atmospheric deposition samplers were compared for 1 year at a sincle site. A total of nine samplers were used. Samples were collected weekly and analyzed for pH, specific conductance, common chemical constituents, and sample volume. Additionally, data on the duration of each sampler opening were recorded using a microdatalogger. These data disprove the common perception that samplers remain open throughout a precipitation event. The sensitivity of sampler sensors within the range tested did not have a defineable impact on sample collection. The nonnormal distribution within the data set necessitated application of the nonparametric Friedman Test to assess comparability of sample chemical composition and volume between and within sampler brands. Statistically significant differences existed for most comparisons, however the test did not permit quantification of their magnitudes. Differences in analyte concentrations between samplers were small. (USGS)

  11. Automated Rain Sampler for Real time pH and Conductivity Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Weerasinghe, R; Jayananda, M K; Sonnadara, D U J

    2015-01-01

    To monitor the acidity of rain water in real time, a rain water sampling system was developed. The rain sampler detects the initial rain after a dry spell and collects a water sample. Before performing the measurements, the pH probe is calibrated using a standard buffer solution whereas the conductivity probe is calibrated using deionized water. After calibrating the probes the pH and the conductivity of the collected rain water sample are measured using the pH and the conductivity probe. Weather parameters such as air temperature, humidity and pressure are also recorded simultaneously. The pH and conductivity measurement data including weather parameters are transmitted to central station using a GSM modem for further analysis. The collected rain water sample is preserved at the remote monitoring station for post chemical analysis. A programmable logic controller controls the entire process.

  12. Projecting Ammonia Dry Deposition Using Passive Samplers and a Bi-Directional Exchange Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robarge, W. P.; Walker, J. T.; Austin, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Animal agriculture within the United States is known to be a source of ammonia (NH3) emissions. Dry deposition of NH3 to terrestrial ecosystems immediately surrounding large local sources of NH3 emissions (e.g. animal feeding operations) is difficult to measure, and is best estimated via models. Presented here are results for a semi-empirical modeling approach for estimating air-surface exchange fluxes of NH3 downwind of a large poultry facility (~ 3.5 million layers) using a bi-directional air-surface exchange model. The modeling domain is the western section of the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge in Tyrrell, Washington, and Hyde Counties of eastern North Carolina in the South Atlantic Coastal Plain physiographic region. Vegetation within the modeling domain is primarily pocosin wetlands, characterized by acid (pH 3.6) peat soils and a thick canopy of shrub vegetation (leatherwood (Cyrilla racemiflora), inkberry (Ilex glabra), wax myrtle (Morella cerifera)). Land surrounding the refuge is primarily used for crop production: ~ 28%, 24%, and 45% agricultural in Tyrell, Hyde, and Washington counties, respectively. Ammonia air-surface exchange (flux) was calculated using a two-layer canopy compensation point model developed by Nemitz et al. (2001. Quart. J. Roy. Met. Soc. 127, 815 - 833.) as implemented by Walker et al. (2008. Atmos. Environ., 42, 3407 - 3418.), in which the competing processes of emission and deposition within the foliage-soil system were taken into account by relating the net canopy-scale NH3 flux to the net emission potential of the canopy (i.e., foliage and soil). Ammonia air concentrations were measured using ALPHA passive samplers (Center for Ecology and Hydrology, Edinburgh) along transects to the north and northeast of the poultry facility at distances of 800, 2000 and 3200 m, respectively. Samplers were deployed in duplicate at each location at a height of 5.8 m from July 2008 to July 2010 weekly during warm months and bi-weekly curing

  13. A miniaturized active sampler for the assessment of personal exposure to nitrogen dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staimer, Norbert; Delfino, Ralph J. [University of California at Irvine, Epidemiology Division, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Bufalino, Charles [University of California at Riverside, Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, Riverside, CA (United States); Fine, Philip M.; Sioutas, Constantinos [University of Southern California, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kleinman, Michael T. [University of California at Irvine, Department of Community and Environmental Medicine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2005-11-01

    A personalized, miniaturized air sampling system was evaluated to estimate the daily exposure of pediatric asthmatics to nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}). The lightweight device (170 g) uses a sampling pump connected to a solid sorbent tube containing triethanolamine (TEA)-impregnated molecular sieve. The pump is powered by a 9 V battery and samples air over a 24 h period at a collection rate of 0.100 L/min. After exposure, the solid sorbent is removed from the tubes for spectrophotometric analysis (Griess Assay). The lower detection limit of the overall method for NO{sub 2} is 11 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. The linearity, precision and accuracy of the sampler was evaluated. Different NO{sub 2} concentrations generated in the laboratory (range: 50 to 340 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) were simultaneously measured by the TEA tube samplers and colocated continuous chemiluminescent NO{sub x} analyzers (reference method). The coefficient of determination for the laboratory test derived from ordinary linear regression (OLR) was r {sup 2}=0.99 (y{sub OLR}=0.94x-4.58) and the precision 3.6%. Further, ambient NO{sub 2} concentrations in the field (range: 10-120 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) were verified with continuous chemiluminescent monitors next to the active samplers. Reweighted least squares analysis (RLS) based on the least median squares procedure (LMS) resulted in a correlation of r {sup 2}=0.68 for a field comparison in Riverside, CA (y{sub RLS}=1.01x-0.94) and r {sup 2}=0.92 in Los Angeles, CA (y{sub RLS}=1.31x-7.12). The precision of the TEA tube devices was 7.4% (at 20-60 {mu}g/m{sup 3} NO{sub 2}) under outdoor conditions. Data show that the performance of this small active sampling system was satisfactory for measuring environmental concentrations of NO{sub 2} under laboratory and field conditions. It is useful for personal monitoring of NO{sub 2} in environmental epidemiology studies where daily measurements are desired. (orig.)

  14. A Gibbs sampler for motif detection in phylogenetically close sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddharthan, Rahul; van Nimwegen, Erik; Siggia, Eric

    2004-03-01

    Genes are regulated by transcription factors that bind to DNA upstream of genes and recognize short conserved ``motifs'' in a random intergenic ``background''. Motif-finders such as the Gibbs sampler compare the probability of these short sequences being represented by ``weight matrices'' to the probability of their arising from the background ``null model'', and explore this space (analogous to a free-energy landscape). But closely related species may show conservation not because of functional sites but simply because they have not had sufficient time to diverge, so conventional methods will fail. We introduce a new Gibbs sampler algorithm that accounts for common ancestry when searching for motifs, while requiring minimal ``prior'' assumptions on the number and types of motifs, assessing the significance of detected motifs by ``tracking'' clusters that stay together. We apply this scheme to motif detection in sporulation-cycle genes in the yeast S. cerevisiae, using recent sequences of other closely-related Saccharomyces species.

  15. Partitioning of organochlorine pesticides from water to polyethylene passive samplers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, Sarah E., E-mail: sarah.hale@ncl.ac.u [School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Martin, Timothy J., E-mail: t.j.martin@ncl.ac.u [School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Goss, Kai-Uwe, E-mail: kai-uwe.goss@ufz.d [UFZ, Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research-UFZ, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Arp, Hans Peter H., E-mail: Hans.Peter.Arp@ngi.n [Department of Environmental Engineering, Norwegian Geotechnical Institute (NGI), P.O. Box 3930, Ulleval Stadion, N-0806, Oslo (Norway); Werner, David, E-mail: david.werner@ncl.ac.u [School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    The mass transfer rates and equilibrium partitioning behaviour of 14 diverse organochlorine pesticides (OCP) between water and polyethylene (PE) passive samplers, cut from custom made PE sheets and commercial polyethylene plastic bags, were quantified. Overall mass transfer coefficients, k{sub O}, estimated PE membrane diffusion coefficients, D{sub PE}, and PE-water partitioning coefficients, K{sub PE-water,} are reported. In addition, the partitioning of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from water to PE is quantified and compared with literature values. K{sub PE-water} values agreed mostly within a factor of two for both passive samplers and also with literature values for the reference PAHs. As PE is expected to exhibit similar sorption behaviour to long-chain alkanes, PE-water partitioning coefficients were compared to hexadecane-water partitioning coefficients estimated with the SPARC online calculator, COSMOtherm and a polyparameter linear free energy relationship based on the Abraham approach. The best correlation for all compounds tested was with COSMOtherm estimated hexadecane-water partitioning coefficients. - The partitioning of organochlorine pesticides between single phase polyethylene passive samplers and water is quantified.

  16. Partitioning of organochlorine pesticides from water to polyethylene passive samplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mass transfer rates and equilibrium partitioning behaviour of 14 diverse organochlorine pesticides (OCP) between water and polyethylene (PE) passive samplers, cut from custom made PE sheets and commercial polyethylene plastic bags, were quantified. Overall mass transfer coefficients, kO, estimated PE membrane diffusion coefficients, DPE, and PE-water partitioning coefficients, KPE-water, are reported. In addition, the partitioning of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from water to PE is quantified and compared with literature values. KPE-water values agreed mostly within a factor of two for both passive samplers and also with literature values for the reference PAHs. As PE is expected to exhibit similar sorption behaviour to long-chain alkanes, PE-water partitioning coefficients were compared to hexadecane-water partitioning coefficients estimated with the SPARC online calculator, COSMOtherm and a polyparameter linear free energy relationship based on the Abraham approach. The best correlation for all compounds tested was with COSMOtherm estimated hexadecane-water partitioning coefficients. - The partitioning of organochlorine pesticides between single phase polyethylene passive samplers and water is quantified.

  17. A carbon monoxide passive sampler: Research and development needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traynor, G.W.; Apte, M.G.; Diamond, R.C.; Woods, A.L.

    1991-11-01

    In rare instances, carbon monoxide (CO) levels in houses can reach dangerously high concentrations, causing adverse health effects ranging from mild headaches to, under extreme conditions, death. Hundreds of fatal accidental carbon monoxide poisonings occur each year primarily due to the indoor operation of motor vehicles, the indoor use of charcoal for cooking, the operation of malfunctioning vented and unvented combustion appliances, and the misuse combustion appliances. Because there is a lack of simple, inexpensive, and accurate field sampling instrumentation, it is difficult for gas utilities and researchers to conduct field research studies designed to quantify the concentrations of CO in residences. Determining the concentration of CO in residences is the first step towards identifying the high risk appliances and high-CO environments which pose health risks. Thus, there exists an urgent need to develop and field-validate a CO-quantifying technique suitable for affordable field research. A CO passive sampler, if developed, could fulfill these requirements. Existing CO monitoring techniques are discussed as well as three potential CO-detection methods for use in a CO passive sampler. Laboratory and field research needed for the development and validation of an effective and cost-efficient CO passive sampler are also discussed.

  18. Summary report on the design of the retained gas sampler system (retained gas sampler, extruder and extractor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootan, D.W.; Bolden, R.C.; Bridges, A.E.; Cannon, N.S.; Chastain, S.A.; Hey, B.E.; Knight, R.C.; Linschooten, C.G.; Pitner, A.L.; Webb, B.J.

    1994-09-29

    This document summarizes work performs in Fiscal Year 1994 to develop the three main components of Retained Gas Sampler System (RGSS). These primary components are the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS), the Retained Gas Extruder (RGE), and the Retained Gas Extractor (RGEx). The RGS is based on the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Universal Sampler design, and includes modifications to reduce gas leakage. The primary data priorities for the RGSS are to measure the void fraction and the flammable gas concentration in the waste sample. Significant progress has been made in developing the RGSS. The RGSS is being developed by WHC to extract a representative waste sample from a Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks and to measure both the amount and composition of free and {open_quotes}bound{close_quotes} gases. Sudden releases of flammable gas mixtures are a safety concern for normal waste storage operations and eventual waste retrieval. Flow visualization testing was used to identify important fluid dynamic issues related to the sampling process. The primary data priorities for the RGSS are to measure the void fraction and the flammable gas concentration in the waste sample. The safety analysis for the RGSS is being performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and is more than sixty percent (60%) complete.

  19. Summary report on the design of the retained gas sampler system (retained gas sampler, extruder and extractor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarizes work performs in Fiscal Year 1994 to develop the three main components of Retained Gas Sampler System (RGSS). These primary components are the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS), the Retained Gas Extruder (RGE), and the Retained Gas Extractor (RGEx). The RGS is based on the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Universal Sampler design, and includes modifications to reduce gas leakage. The primary data priorities for the RGSS are to measure the void fraction and the flammable gas concentration in the waste sample. Significant progress has been made in developing the RGSS. The RGSS is being developed by WHC to extract a representative waste sample from a Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks and to measure both the amount and composition of free and open-quotes boundclose quotes gases. Sudden releases of flammable gas mixtures are a safety concern for normal waste storage operations and eventual waste retrieval. Flow visualization testing was used to identify important fluid dynamic issues related to the sampling process. The primary data priorities for the RGSS are to measure the void fraction and the flammable gas concentration in the waste sample. The safety analysis for the RGSS is being performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and is more than sixty percent (60%) complete

  20. Measuring Concentrations of Particulate 140La in the Air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Colin E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Keillor, Martin E.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Sorom, Rich D.; Van Etten, Don M.

    2016-05-01

    Air sampling systems were deployed to measure the concentration of radioactive material in the air during the Full-Scale Radiological Dispersal Device experiments. The air samplers were positioned 100-600 meters downwind of the release point. The filters were collected immediately and analyzed in the field. Quantities for total activity collected on the air filters are reported along with additional information to compute the average or integrated air concentrations.

  1. A sample-freezing drive shoe for a wire line piston core sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, F.; Herkelrath, W.N.

    1996-01-01

    Loss of fluids and samples during retrieval of cores of saturated, noncohesive sediments results in incorrect measures of fluid distributions and an inaccurate measure of the stratigraphic position of the sample. To reduce these errors, we developed a hollow drive shoe that freezes in place the lowest 3 inches (75 mm) of a 1.88-inch-diameter (48 mm), 5-foot-long (1.5 m) sediment sample taken using a commercial wire line piston core sampler. The end of the core is frozen by piping liquid carbon dioxide at ambient temperature through a steel tube from a bottle at the land surface to the drive shoe where it evaporates and expands, cooling the interior surface of the shoe to about -109??F (-78??C). Freezing a core end takes about 10 minutes. The device was used to collect samples for a study of oil-water-air distributions, and for studies of water chemistry and microbial activity in unconsolidated sediments at the site of an oil spill near Bemidji, Minnesota. Before freezing was employed, samples of sandy sediments from near the water table sometimes flowed out of the core barrel as the sampler was withdrawn. Freezing the bottom of the core allowed for the retention of all material that entered the core barrel and lessened the redistribution of fluids within the core. The device is useful in the unsaturated and shallow saturated zones, but does not freeze cores well at depths greater than about 20 feet (6 m) below water, possibly because the feed tube plugs with dry ice with increased exhaust back-pressure, or because sediment enters the annulus between the core barrel and the core barrel liner and blocks the exhaust.

  2. Sampling of high amounts of bioaerosols using a high-volume electrostatic field sampler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, A. M.; Sharma, Anoop Kumar

    2008-01-01

    sampler for collection of fine particles has been described. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this sampler can be used for collection of high amounts of authentic bioaerosols that can subsequently be used for biological analysis. The investigation was carried out at a biofuel plant...... the same season by a factor smaller than four. The quantities of some microbial components were higher in the dust collected with all samplers in March than in August. In conclusion, by using the electrostatic field sampler, it was possible to sample replicas of large authentic aerosol samples that can...

  3. Passive sampling of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in indoor air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorkamp, Katrin; Mayer, Philipp

    PCBs were widely used in construction materials in the 1906s and 1970s, a period of high building activity in Denmark. The objective of this study was therefore to use passive sampling techniques to develop a simple and cost-effective screening tool for PCBs in indoor air. The study proceeded...... in three phases combining a literature review, laboratory experiments and measurements in buildings potentially containing PCBs in indoor air. The laboratory experiments showed a strong influence of air velocity on the PCB partitioning between air and the passive sampler. Based on the results of the first...... two phases and comments from experts in the field of PCB containing construction materials, a kinetic sampler (petri dish with silicone) and a potential equilibrium sampler (silicone-coated paper) were tested in buildings. Calibration and validation were based on conventional active sampling, for both...

  4. Introduction to Maxxam All-Season Passive Sampling System and Principles of Proper Use of Passive Samplers in the Field Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmao Tang

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Maxxam all-season passive sampling system (PASS is introduced in this paper. The PASS can be used to quantitatively and accurately monitor SO2 , NO2, O 3, and H2 S in air in all weather conditions with flexible exposure times from several hours to several months. The air pollution detection limits of PASS are very low. They can be from sub ppb to ppt levels. The principles of proper use of passive samplers in the field study are discussed by using the PASS as an example.

  5. Microbial air-sampling equipment, part 1: meeting United States pharmacopeia chapter 797 standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastango, Eric S

    2008-01-01

    The most recent changes to Chapter 797 of the United States Pharmcopeia-National Formulary initiated an intense controversy about the frequency of cleanroom air sampling that is required to prevent the contamination of sterile preparations. For compounders who must purchase an air sampler to use in the cleanroom, choices abound. Included in this article are a review of United States Pharmacopeia-National Formulary requirements that pertain to air sampling, a discussion of how recent revision to Chapter 797 affect air sampling and patient safety, and, for easy reference, a table that features specifications for various models of microbial air samplers.

  6. Gradient-based MCMC samplers for dynamic causal modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Biswa; Friston, Karl J; Penny, Will D

    2016-01-15

    In this technical note, we derive two MCMC (Markov chain Monte Carlo) samplers for dynamic causal models (DCMs). Specifically, we use (a) Hamiltonian MCMC (HMC-E) where sampling is simulated using Hamilton's equation of motion and (b) Langevin Monte Carlo algorithm (LMC-R and LMC-E) that simulates the Langevin diffusion of samples using gradients either on a Euclidean (E) or on a Riemannian (R) manifold. While LMC-R requires minimal tuning, the implementation of HMC-E is heavily dependent on its tuning parameters. These parameters are therefore optimised by learning a Gaussian process model of the time-normalised sample correlation matrix. This allows one to formulate an objective function that balances tuning parameter exploration and exploitation, furnishing an intervention-free inference scheme. Using neural mass models (NMMs)-a class of biophysically motivated DCMs-we find that HMC-E is statistically more efficient than LMC-R (with a Riemannian metric); yet both gradient-based samplers are far superior to the random walk Metropolis algorithm, which proves inadequate to steer away from dynamical instability.

  7. Development of a sampler to characterize radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is very important to find a method of decontamination for nuclear contaminated objects without generating large amounts of radioactive waste. In order to develop an appropriate method it's necessary to know how much the object is contaminated and what the contaminant is. The project focus was to develop a sampler that may give this information with high precision, generating few waste and easy to operate. The sampler used a pulsed Nd:YAG (Neodymium-doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet) laser in its fundamental wavelength of 1064nm to ablate the materials surface, then the particulates generated by the ablation were sucked by a vacuum pump, collected by a filter and then analyzed in a gamma spectrometer to determine which contaminants were present in the sample. A set of two mirrors attached to two DC motors was controlled by a computer interface using the software LabView to make the laser beam scan and ablate a determined area of the materials surface. (author)

  8. Chemistry of the sea surface microlayer. 1. Fabrication and testing of the sampler

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singbal, S.Y.S.; Narvekar, P.V.

    A screen sampler fabricated to study the sea surface microlayer (SML) has been described. The screen sampler was tested in the Mandovi estuary and adjacent waters. Physico-chemical parameters of the subsurface waters from a depth of 25 cm was also...

  9. An on-the-go-soil sampler for an automated soil nitrate mapping system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sibley, K.J.; Adsett, J.F.; Struik, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    An automated on-the-go soil sampler was developed as part of a soil nitrate mapping system that collects data for precisely analyzing small-scale variation in soil NO3-N. An essential requirement of the sampler is the ability to reliably collect a soil sample of known "weight" (mass). It was hypothe

  10. 50 CFR 697.12 - At-sea sea sampler/observer coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) ATLANTIC COASTAL FISHERIES COOPERATIVE... must: (1) Notify the sea sampler/observer of any sea turtles, marine mammals, or other specimens taken by the vessel. (2) Provide the sea sampler/observer with sea turtles, marine mammals, or...

  11. A left-in-place group milk sampler can improve disease monitoring in dairy herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarke, T.; Deveraux, R.S.; Madison, N.; Hannah, M.C.; Ridge, S.E.; Ryan, L.; Wientjes, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    A novel milk sampler (MilkThief) is described. It can collect representative samples of milk to be used for disease monitoring from groups of cows during a milking session. The maximum dilution of each individual cow¿s milk did not exceed a 1 : 45 limit when we tested the sampler in a range of Austr

  12. 50 CFR 260.50 - Suspension or revocation of license of licensed sampler or licensed inspector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension or revocation of license of... Licensing of Samplers and Inspectors § 260.50 Suspension or revocation of license of licensed sampler or... or evidence that he may wish to offer as to why his license should not be suspended or revoked....

  13. Performance Evaluation of Automated Passive Capillary Sampler for Estimating Water Drainage in the Vadose Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passive capillary samplers (PCAPs) are widely used to monitor, measure and sample drainage water under saturated and unsaturated soil conditions in the vadose zone. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance and accuracy of automated passive capillary sampler for estimating drainage...

  14. Development and field validation of a new diffusive sampler for determination of atmospheric volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özden Üzmez, Özlem; Gaga, Eftade O.; Döğeroğlu, Tuncay

    2015-04-01

    A tailor-made diffusive sampler was developed for the determination of atmospheric Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and the validation of the sampler was carried out under field conditions. All parts of the diffusive sampler which are reusable after a proper cleaning process were made of plastic material (delrin). The reusability of the sampler brings an important advantage considering its lower cost. Activated carbon was used as adsorbent and VOCs adsorbed on the activated carbon were analyzed by GC-MS (gas chromatography equipped with mass selective detector). A comprehensive validation study including detection limit, precision, bias, recovery, self-consistency, shelf life, storage stability, reusability was carried out in accordance with the related European standards ((EN) 13528-1 (2000) and 13528-2 (2000)). Also, a comparison was performed with some commercial diffusive samplers such as 3 M OVM 3500 and Radiello to test the performance of the new diffusive sampler in different environments such as urban area and road tunnel. Uptake rates for the measured VOCs were determined and they were evaluated together with the meteorological parameters (temperature, humidity, wind speed). According to the validation results; all the parameters evaluated for the sampler comply with the related standards and this is an indication of the reliability of the sampler for the sampling of VOCs in the atmosphere.

  15. Effects of Hardness on Pintle Rod Performance in the Universal and Retained Gas Samplers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-11-18

    Interaction between hardness of the pintle rods and the retainer rings used in the core samplers is investigated. It is found that ordinary Rockwell C measurements are not sufficient and superficial hardness instruments are recommended to verify hardness since in-production hardness of pintle rods is found to vary widely and probably leads to some premature release of pistons in samplers.

  16. Determination of organochlorine pesticides in Indian coastal water using a moored in-situ sampler

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.; SenGupta, R.

    An attempt has been made to determine the concentration of different organochlorine pesticides in the seawater off the central West Coast of India using an in-situ-sampler. The Seastar in-situ sampler is an instrument, which is designed to pump...

  17. Silica Measurement with High Flow Rate Respirable Size Selective Samplers: A Field Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taekhee; Harper, Martin; Kashon, Michael; Lee, Larry A; Healy, Catherine B; Coggins, Marie A; Susi, Pam; O'Brien, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    High and low flow rate respirable size selective samplers including the CIP10-R (10 l min(-1)), FSP10 (11.2 l min(-1)), GK2.69 (4.4 l min(-1)), 10-mm nylon (1.7 l min(-1)), and Higgins-Dewell type (2.2 l min(-1)) were compared via side-by-side sampling in workplaces for respirable crystalline silica measurement. Sampling was conducted at eight different occupational sites in the USA and five different stonemasonry sites in Ireland. A total of 536 (268 pairs) personal samples and 55 area samples were collected. Gravimetric analysis was used to determine respirable dust mass and X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine quartz mass. Ratios of respirable dust mass concentration, quartz mass concentration, respirable dust mass, and quartz mass from high and low flow rate samplers were compared. In general, samplers did not show significant differences greater than 30% in respirable dust mass concentration and quartz mass concentration when outliers (ratio 3.0) were removed from the analysis. The frequency of samples above the limit of detection and limit of quantification of quartz was significantly higher for the CIP10-R and FSP10 samplers compared to low flow rate samplers, while the GK2.69 cyclone did not show significant difference from low flow rate samplers. High flow rate samplers collected significantly more respirable dust and quartz than low flow rate samplers as expected indicating that utilizing high flow rate samplers might improve precision in quartz measurement. Although the samplers did not show significant differences in respirable dust and quartz concentrations, other practical attributes might make them more or less suitable for personal sampling.

  18. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 18 AND TANK 19 WALL SAMPLER PERFORMANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, R.; Thaxton, D.; Minichan, R.; France, T.; Steeper, T.; Corbett, J.; Martin, B.; Vetsch, B.

    2009-12-19

    A sampling tool was required to evaluate residual activity ({mu}Curies per square foot) on the inner wall surfaces of underground nuclear waste storage tanks. The tool was required to collect a small sample from the 3/8 inch thick tank walls. This paper documents the design, testing, and deployment of the remotely operated sampling device. The sampler provides material from a known surface area to estimate the overall surface contamination in the tank prior to closure. The sampler consisted of a sampler and mast assembly mast assembly, control system, and the sampler, or end effector, which is defined as the operating component of a robotic arm. The mast assembly consisted of a vertical 30 feet long, 3 inch by 3 inch, vertical steel mast and a cantilevered arm hinged at the bottom of the mast and lowered by cable to align the attached sampler to the wall. The sampler and mast assembly were raised and lowered through an opening in the tank tops, called a riser. The sampler is constructed of a mounting plate, a drill, springs to provide a drive force to the drill, a removable sampler head to collect the sample, a vacuum pump to draw the sample from the drill to a filter, and controls to operate the system. Once the sampler was positioned near the wall, electromagnets attached it to the wall, and the control system was operated to turn on the drill and vacuum to remove and collect a sample from the wall. Samples were collected on filters in removable sampler heads, which were readily transported for further laboratory testing.

  19. Field tests of nylon-screen diffusion samplers and pushpoint samplers for detection of metals in sediment pore water, Ashland and Clinton, Massachusetts, 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Marc J.; Vroblesky, Don A.; Campo, Kimberly W.; Massey, Andrew J.; Scheible, Walter

    2005-01-01

    Efficient and economical screening methods are needed to detect and to determine the approximate concentrations of potentially toxic trace-element metals in shallow groundwater- discharge areas (pore water) where the metals may pose threats to aquatic organisms; such areas are likely to be near hazardous-waste sites. Pushpoint and nylon-screen diffusion samplers are two complementary options for use in such environments. The pushpoint sampler, a simple well point, is easy to insert manually and to use. Only 1 day is required to collect samples. The nylon-screen diffusion sampler is well suited for use in sediments that do not allow a pump to draw water into a pushpoint sampler. In this study, both types of devices were used in sediments suitable for the use of the pushpoint sampler. Sampling with the nylon-screen diffusion sampler requires at least two site visits: one to deploy the samplers in the sediment, and a second to retrieve the samplers and collect the samples after a predetermined equilibration period. Extensive laboratory quality-control studies, field testing, and laboratory analysis of samples collected at the Nyanza Chemical Waste Dump Superfund site along the Sudbury River in Ashland, Massachusetts, and at a Superfund site-assessment location on Rigby Brook in Clinton, Massachusetts, indicate that these two devices yield comparable results for most metals and should be effective tools for pore-water studies. The nylon-screen diffusion samplers equilibrated within 1-2 days in homogeneous, controlled conditions in the laboratory. Nylon-screen diffusion samplers that were not purged of dissolved oxygen prior to deployment yielded results similar to those that were purged. Further testing of the nylon-screen diffusion samplers in homogeneous media would help to resolve any ambiguities about the data variability from the field studies. Comparison of data from replicate samples taken in both study areas shows that even samples taken from sites within a

  20. Determining the spatial variability of personal sampler inlet locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, R.; Volkwein, J.; Mcwilliams, L. [NIOSH, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Research Laboratory

    2007-09-15

    This article examines the spatial variability of dust concentrations within a coal miner's breathing zone and the impact of sampling location at the cap lamp, nose, and lapel. Tests were conducted in the National Institute for Safety and Health Pittsburgh Research Laboratory full-scale, continuous miner gallery using three prototype personal dust monitors (PDM). The dust masses detected by the PDMs were used to calculate the percentage difference of dust mass between the cap lamp and the nose and between the lapel and the nose. The calculated percentage differences of the masses ranged from plus 12% to minus 25%. Breathing zone tests were also conducted in four underground coal mines using the torso of a mannequin to simulate a miner. Coal mine dust was sampled with multi-cyclone sampling cans mounted directly in front of the mannequin near the cap lamp, nose, and lapel. These four coal mine tests found that the spatial variability of dust levels and imprecision of the current personal sampler is a greater influence than the sampler location within the breathing zone. However, a one-sample t-test of this data did find that the overall mean value of the cap lamp/nose ratio was not significantly different than 1 (p-value = 0.21). However; when applied to the overall mean value of the lapel/nose ratio there was a significant difference from 1 (p-value < 0.0001). This finding is important because the lapel has always been the sampling location for coal mine dust samples. But these results suggest that the cap location is slightly more indicative of what is breathed through the nose area.

  1. An Affine-invariant Sampler for Exoplanet Fitting and Discovery in Radial Velocity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Fengji; Goodman, Jonathan; Hogg, David W.; Weare, Jonathan; Schwab, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) proves to be powerful for Bayesian inference and in particular for exoplanet radial velocity fitting because MCMC provides more statistical information and makes better use of data than common approaches like chi-square fitting. However, the nonlinear density functions encountered in these problems can make MCMC time-consuming. In this paper, we apply an ensemble sampler respecting affine invariance to orbital parameter extraction from radial velocity data. This new sampler has only one free parameter, and does not require much tuning for good performance, which is important for automatization. The autocorrelation time of this sampler is approximately the same for all parameters and far smaller than Metropolis-Hastings, which means it requires many fewer function calls to produce the same number of independent samples. The affine-invariant sampler speeds up MCMC by hundreds of times compared with Metropolis-Hastings in the same computing situation. This novel sampler would be ideal for projects involving large data sets such as statistical investigations of planet distribution. The biggest obstacle to ensemble samplers is the existence of multiple local optima; we present a clustering technique to deal with local optima by clustering based on the likelihood of the walkers in the ensemble. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the sampler on real radial velocity data.

  2. Neural Network Based State of Health Diagnostics for an Automated Radioxenon Sampler/Analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Paul E.; Kangas, Lars J.; Hayes, James C.; Schrom, Brian T.; Suarez, Reynold; Hubbard, Charles W.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; McIntyre, Justin I.

    2009-05-13

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are used to determine the state-of-health (SOH) of the Automated Radioxenon Analyzer/Sampler (ARSA). ARSA is a gas collection and analysis system used for non-proliferation monitoring in detecting radioxenon released during nuclear tests. SOH diagnostics are important for automated, unmanned sensing systems so that remote detection and identification of problems can be made without onsite staff. Both recurrent and feed-forward ANNs are presented. The recurrent ANN is trained to predict sensor values based on current valve states, which control air flow, so that with only valve states the normal SOH sensor values can be predicted. Deviation between modeled value and actual is an indication of a potential problem. The feed-forward ANN acts as a nonlinear version of principal components analysis (PCA) and is trained to replicate the normal SOH sensor values. Because of ARSA’s complexity, this nonlinear PCA is better able to capture the relationships among the sensors than standard linear PCA and is applicable to both sensor validation and recognizing off-normal operating conditions. Both models provide valuable information to detect impending malfunctions before they occur to avoid unscheduled shutdown. Finally, the ability of ANN methods to predict the system state is presented.

  3. Research Note Difference between low-volume and high-volume Andersen samplers in measuring atmospheric aerosols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengfu Fu; Nobuo Shinohaya; Mitsuo Ito; Xueqin Xu; Mincong Shen; Liangjun Xu

    2008-01-01

    The mass concentration and size distribution of aerosols in Tokaimura were investigated using a high-volume and a low-volume Andersen sampler. A difference was found using the two samplers: the concentration of total aerosols determined with the high-volume sampler is smaller than that of the low-volume sampler by 70-90% throughout the year. Compared to the high-volume sampler, low-volume sampler gave lower concentration for aerosols7μm, higher concentration for aerosols of 3.3-7.0μm and<1.1μm, though similar results for aerosols of 1.1-3.3μm. The low-volume sampler was found to have better separation efficiency and higher accuracy.

  4. An Affine-Invariant Sampler for Exoplanet Fitting and Discovery in Radial Velocity Data

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Fengji; Hogg, David W; Weare, Jonathan; Schwab, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) proves to be powerful for Bayesian inference and in particular for exoplanet radial velocity fitting because MCMC provides more statistical information and makes better use of data than common approaches like chi-square fitting. However, the non-linear density functions encountered in these problems can make MCMC time-consuming. In this paper, we apply an ensemble sampler respecting affine invariance to orbital parameter extraction from radial velocity data. The autocorrelation time of this sampler is approximately the same for all parameters and far smaller than Metropolis-Hastings, which means it requires many fewer function calls to produce the same number of independent samples. The affine-invariant sampler speeds up MCMC by hundreds of times compared with Metropolis-Hastings in the same computing situation. Besides being fast, the new sampler has only one free parameter, and it does not require tuning for good performance, which is important for automatization. This novel ...

  5. Novel Highly Efficient Compact Rotary-Hammering Planetary Sampler Actuated by a Single Piezoelectric Actuator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We had two objectives in this task: 1. Develop effective single low-mass, low-power piezoelectric drive that can actuate rotary-hammer samplers through walls. 2....

  6. Characterization and Application of Passive Samplers for Monitoring of Pesticides in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Lutz; Daneshvar, Atlasi; Lau, Anna E; Kreuger, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Five different water passive samplers were calibrated under laboratory conditions for measurement of 124 legacy and current used pesticides. This study provides a protocol for the passive sampler preparation, calibration, extraction method and instrumental analysis. Sampling rates (RS) and passive sampler-water partition coefficients (KPW) were calculated for silicone rubber, polar organic chemical integrative sampler POCIS-A, POCIS-B, SDB-RPS and C18 disk. The uptake of the selected compounds depended on their physicochemical properties, i.e., silicone rubber showed a better uptake for more hydrophobic compounds (log octanol-water partition coefficient (KOW) > 5.3), whereas POCIS-A, POCIS-B and SDB-RPS disk were more suitable for hydrophilic compounds (log KOW < 0.70). PMID:27584699

  7. Progress Toward an Enceladus Amino Acid Sampler Astrobiology Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, J. P.; Willis, P. A.; Blacksberg, J.

    2012-12-01

    The development of a new astrobiolgoy instrument for exploring the trace chemical composition of the Enceladus jets and plume, and the e-ring of Saturn is presented. The Enceladus amino acid sampler (EAAS) allows for detection of amino acids using optical Raman spectroscopy integrated with a sample pre-concentration system. The pre-concentration process facilitates the delivery of a sample to a mass spectrometer for detection of specific amino acids. The initial EAAS design utilizes lab-on-a-breadboard components where a sample inlet, sample outlet, reagents, controllers, pumps, valves and pre-concentration column for the EAAS prototype are all assembled on a 5" x 7" breadboard. The pre-concentration process is controlled using automation scripts and software. An optical window allows a Raman spectrometer to directly monitor the pre-concentration of amino acids in a filter/column loaded with of a strong cation exchange resin. Initial samples to demonstrate EAAS simulate the conditions of Don Juan Pond, one of the coldest and saltiest bodies of liquid water on Earth, located in the Wright Valley of Antarctica. This EAAS development is an important step toward a new type of astrobiology science instrument that is capable of operating on a spacecraft in flight or in orbit.

  8. Assessing Contaminant Migration and Risk through Passive Interstitial Water Samplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soils and sediments account for a large proportion of the contaminated materials being managed under cleanup programs across the country, including at sites addressed by the U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Costs for managing a single sediment site can approach $1 billion, and overall program costs could exceed the trillion-dollar mark. Thus, using realistic information for contaminant levels in the risk calculations used to guide cleanup decisions for these sites is crucial. The risk-based decisions for contaminated soils and sediments are typically based on bulk solid concentrations. The reason for using that metric in the equations applied to estimate exposure and risk to biota and humans is that it is relatively easy to measure. However, the bulk concentration does not address the actual bio-accessibility or bioavailability of the contaminants. This can result in a substantial overestimate of risk, leading to cleanup decisions that are much more conservative than warranted. Such decisions can translate to unnecessary excavation or dredging that causes significant environmental damage to those natural systems, thus having the opposite effect intended by health and environmental protection programs. More realistic values that represent the bioavailable fraction of contaminants in soil and sediment are clearly needed to guide more effective cleanup decisions. Passive interstitial water samplers have emerged as a practical way to address this need. (authors)

  9. Statistical ranging of asteroid orbits: efficient MCMC and importance samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Jenni; Fedorets, Grigori; Granvik, Mikael; Oszkiewicz, Dagmara Anna; Muinonen, Karri

    2015-08-01

    We address the asteroid initial orbit computation problem by comparing various versions of the statistical ranging method (Virtanen et al. 2001, Muinonen et al. 2001) developed for exiguous observational data. In particular, the performance of the Markov-chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) ranging (Oszkiewicz et al. 2009) and the importance-sampler ranging methods, including the most recently developed random-walk ranging (Muinonen et al. 2015) are compared. We demonstrate the capabilities of the methods for various classes of asteroids, including near-Earth and main-belt asteroids, as well as transneptunian objects. We also study the performance of our statistical inverse methods as a function of increasing observational time interval, i.e., during the so-called phase transition. We also envision the application of the methods for space-debris orbits.Muinonen, K., Virtanen, J., Bowell, E., 2001. Collision probability for Earth-crossing asteroids using orbital ranging. Celestial Mechanics and Dynamical Astronomy 81, 93-101.Muinonen K., et al. 2015. Asteroid orbits from Gaia astrometry with random-walk statistical ranging, Planetary and Space Science, in preparation.Oszkiewicz, D., Muinonen, K., Virtanen, J., Granvik, M., 2009. Asteroid orbital ranging using Markov-chain Monte Carlo. Meteoritics and Planetary Science 44, 12, 1897-1904.Virtanen, J., Muinonen, K., Bowell, E., 2001. Statistical ranging of asteroid orbits. Icarus 154, 412-431.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Integrative Sampler (CNIS) for passive sampling of nanosilver in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Fischer, Jillian; Martin, Jonathan; Hoque, Md Ehsanul; Telgmann, Lena; Hintelmann, Holger; Metcalfe, Chris D; Yargeau, Viviane

    2016-11-01

    Nanomaterials such as nanosilver (AgNP) can be released into the aquatic environment through production, usage, and disposal. Sensitive and cost-effective methods are needed to monitor AgNPs in the environment. This work is hampered by a lack of sensitive methods to detect nanomaterials in environmental matrixes. The present study focused on the development, calibration and application of a passive sampling technique for detecting AgNPs in aquatic matrixes. A Carbon Nanotube Integrative Sampler (CNIS) was developed using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the sorbent for accumulating AgNPs and other Ag species from water. Sampling rates were determined in the laboratory for different sampler configurations and in different aquatic matrixes. The sampler was field tested at the Experimental Lakes Area, Canada, in lake water dosed with AgNPs. For a configuration of the CNIS consisting of CNTs bound to carbon fiber (i.e. CNT veil) placed in Chemcatcher® housing, the time weighted average (TWA) concentrations of silver estimated from deployments of the sampler in lake mesocosms dosed with AgNPs were similar to the measured concentrations of "colloidal silver" (i.e. develop on the sampler and could affect the sampling rates. With further development, this novel sampler may provide a simple and sensitive method for screening for the presence of AgNPs in surface waters. PMID:27343941

  11. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of a newly designed passive particle sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, H; Tavakoli, B; Ahmadi, G; Dhaniyala, S; Harner, T; Holsen, T M

    2016-07-01

    In this work a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed to predict the deposition of particles on a newly designed passive dry deposition (Pas-DD) sampler. The sampler uses a parallel plate design and a conventional polyurethane foam (PUF) disk as the deposition surface. The deposition of particles with sizes between 0.5 and 10 μm was investigated for two different geometries of the Pas-DD sampler for different wind speeds and various angles of attack. To evaluate the mean flow field, the k-ɛ turbulence model was used and turbulent fluctuating velocities were generated using the discrete random walk (DRW) model. The CFD software ANSYS-FLUENT was used for performing the numerical simulations. It was found that the deposition velocity increased with particle size or wind speed. The modeled deposition velocities were in general agreement with the experimental measurements and they increased when flow entered the sampler with a non-zero angle of attack. The particle-size dependent deposition velocity was also dependent on the geometry of the leading edge of the sampler; deposition velocities were more dependent on particle size and wind speeds for the sampler without the bend in the leading edge of the deposition plate, compared to a flat plate design. Foam roughness was also found to have a small impact on particle deposition. PMID:27108045

  12. Study on the Thermal Insulation Performance of a New Seabed Sediment Fidelity Sampler Based on ANSYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Guoying; LIU Guijie; YUAN Weijie

    2009-01-01

    A new seabed sediment fidelity sampler was developed and its thermal insulation performance was studied and analyzed.The temperature distribution simulation indicated that the sample quality could be insured by using this new sampler. Based on ANSYS10, the temperature finite element model of the sample cylinder was established. According to the law of conservation of energy, the unsteady heat transmit equation of the sampler under solid-liquid coupling condition was derived, then the mathematical model calculation was carried out by using a mixed finite-element finite-difference method, and two thermal insulation methods were used. The simulation was carried out by using the thickness of the thermal insulation layer and heat conductivity as the variable parameters and the temperature distribution of the sampler and related influencing factors were obtained. Optimization analysis was conducted using the simulation data and related parameters and the magnitude ranges of the parameters were obtained that could meet the design temperature requirements. The experimental data and simulation results indicated that the results were in good agreement with the realities, and this sampler might be of value for seabed sediment sampler design and manufacture.

  13. NASA/JPL hydrothermal vent bio-sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, J.; Behar, A.; Bruckner, J.; Matthews, J.

    pagestyle empty begin document On the bottom of the oceans with volcanic activity present hydrothermal vents can be found which spew out mineral rich superheated water from the porous seafloor crust Some of these vents are situated several thousands of meters below the surface where the sunlight never reaches Yet life thrives here on the minerals and chemical compounds that the vent water brings up with it This chemosynthetic microbial community forms the basis of some of the most interesting ecosystems on our planet and could possibly also be found on other water rich planets and moons in the solar system Perhaps under the icy surface of the moon Europa there exist hydrothermal vents with such biota thriving independently of the solar energy The Hydrothermal Vent Bio-sampler HVB is a system which will be used to collect pristine samples of the water emanating from hydrothermal vents An array of temperature and flow sensors will monitor the sampling conditions This will allow for the samples to be collected from defined locations within the plume and the diversity and distribution of the chemosynthetic communities that might live there can be accurately described The samples will have to be taken without any contamination from the surrounding water thus the pristine requirement Monitoring the flow will assure that enough water has been sampled to account for the low biomass of these environments The system will be using a series of filters down to 0 2 mu m in pore size and the samples can be directly collected from the system for both culture-

  14. Ammonia concentration modeling based on retained gas sampler data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrones, G.; Palmer, B.J.; Cuta, J.M.

    1997-09-01

    The vertical ammonia concentration distributions determined by the retained gas sampler (RGS) apparatus were modeled for double-shell tanks (DSTs) AW-101, AN-103, AN-104, and AN-105 and single-shell tanks (SSTs) A-101, S-106, and U-103. One the vertical transport of ammonia in the tanks were used for the modeling. Transport in the non-convective settled solids and floating solids layers is assumed to occur primarily via some type of diffusion process, while transport in the convective liquid layers is incorporated into the model via mass transfer coefficients based on empirical correlations. Mass transfer between the top of the waste and the tank headspace and the effects of ventilation of the headspace are also included in the models. The resulting models contain a large number of parameters, but many of them can be determined from known properties of the waste configuration or can be estimated within reasonable bounds from data on the waste samples themselves. The models are used to extract effective diffusion coefficients for transport in the nonconvective layers based on the measured values of ammonia from the RGS apparatus. The modeling indicates that the higher concentrations of ammonia seen in bubbles trapped inside the waste relative to the ammonia concentrations in the tank headspace can be explained by a combination of slow transport of ammonia via diffusion in the nonconvective layers and ventilation of the tank headspace by either passive or active means. Slow transport by diffusion causes a higher concentration of ammonia to build up deep within the waste until the concentration gradients between the interior and top of the waste are sufficient to allow ammonia to escape at the same rate at which it is being generated in the waste.

  15. Development of a new passive sampler based on diffusive milligel beads for copper analysis in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, M.; Reynaud, S.; Lespes, G.; Potin-Gautier, M. [Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour/CNRS UMR IPREM 5254, Hélioparc, 2 av. du Président Angot, 64053 Pau (France); Mignard, E. [CNRS-Solvay-Université Bordeaux, UMR5258, Laboratoire du Futur, 178 Avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac Cedex (France); Chéry, P. [Bordeaux Science Agro, 1 cours du Général De Gaulle, Gradignan, 33175 (France); Schaumlöffel, D. [Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour/CNRS UMR IPREM 5254, Hélioparc, 2 av. du Président Angot, 64053 Pau (France); Grassl, B., E-mail: bruno.grassl@univ-pau.fr [Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour/CNRS UMR IPREM 5254, Hélioparc, 2 av. du Président Angot, 64053 Pau (France)

    2015-08-26

    A new passive sampler was designed and characterized for the determination of free copper ion (Cu{sup 2+}) concentration in aqueous solution. Each sampling device was composed of a set of about 30 diffusive milligel (DMG) beads. Milligel beads with incorporated cation exchange resin (Chelex) particles were synthetized using an adapted droplet-based millifluidic process. Beads were assumed to be prolate spheroids, with a diameter of 1.6 mm and an anisotropic factor of 1.4. The milligel was controlled in chemical composition of hydrogel (monomer, cross-linker, initiator and Chelex concentration) and characterized in pore size. Two types of sampling devices were developed containing 7.5% and 15% of Chelex, respectively, and 6 nm pore size. The kinetic curves obtained demonstrated the accumulation of copper in the DMG according to the process described in the literature as absorption (and/or adsorption) and release following the Fick's first law of diffusion. For their use in water monitoring, the typical physico-chemical characteristics of the samplers, i.e. the mass-transfer coefficient (k{sub 0}) and the sampler-water partition coefficient (K{sub sw}), were determined based on a static exposure design. In order to determine the copper concentration in the samplers after their exposure, a method using DMG bead digestion combined to Inductively Coupled Plasma – Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) analysis was developed and optimized. The DMG devices proved to be capable to absorb free copper ions from an aqueous solution, which could be accurately quantified with a mean recovery of 99% and a repeatability of 7% (mean relative uncertainty). - Highlights: • Controlled geometry of new passive sampler with ellipsoidal shape. • Original manufacturing process based on droplet-based millifluidic device. • Pore size characterization of the sampler. • Mass-transfer and sampler-water partitioning coefficients by static exposure experiments.

  16. Design and testing of a new sampler for simplified vacuum-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiantzi, Evangelia; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Psillakis, Elefteria

    2016-07-13

    The design and testing of a new and low-cost experimental setup used for vacuum-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction (Vac-HSSPME) is reported here. The device consists of a specially designed O-ring seal screw cap offering gas-tight seal to commercially available headspace vials. The new polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) cap was molded by a local manufacturer and had a hole that could tightly accommodate a septum. All operations were performed through the septum: air evacuation of the sampler, sample introduction and HSSPME sampling. The analytical performance of the new sampler was evaluated using 22 mL headspace vials with 9 mL water samples spiked with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Several experimental parameters were controlled and the optimized conditions were: 1000 rpm agitation speed; 30 min extraction time; 40 °C sampling temperature; polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (PDMS-DVB) fiber. The lack of accurate Henry's law constant (KH) values and information regarding how they change with temperature was a major limitation in predicting the phase location of evaporation resistance during Vac-HSSPME. Nevertheless, the combined effects of system conditions indicated the increasing importance of gas phase resistance with increasing degree of PCBs chlorination. Stirring enhancements were not recorded for the higher chlorinated PCBs suggesting that the hyperhydrophobic gas/water interface was the preferred location for these compounds. Analytically, the developed method was found to yield linear calibration curves with limits of detection in the sub ng L(-1) level and relative standard deviations ranging between 5.8 and 14%. To compensate for the low recoveries of the higher chlorinated PCB congeners in spiked river water the standard addition methodology was applied. Overall, the compact design of the new and reusable sample container allows efficient HSSPME sampling of organic analytes in water within short extraction times and at low sampling

  17. Measurement of volatile organic compounds during start-up of bioremediation of French limited superfund site in Crosby Texas using wind dependent whole-air sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole-air sampling was performed before and after the start-up of the bioremediation of an industrial (primarily petrochemical) waste lagoon in Crosby Texas, near Houston. Four 'Sector Samplers' were deployed at the four corners of the French Limited Superfund Site. These samplers collect air into one of two SUMMA polished canisters depending upon wind direction and speed. When the wind blows at the sampler from across the waste lagoon, air is routed to the 'IN' sector canister, otherwise sample is collected in the 'OUT' sector canister. As such, each sampler provides its own background sample, and, upon gas chromatographic analysis, individual compounds can be associated with the waste lagoon. Five sets of 24-hour sector samples were taken; the first set was collected prior to the start of the bioremediation effort and the remaining four sets were taken sequentially for four 24-hour periods after the start-up of the procedure

  18. optGpSampler: an improved tool for uniformly sampling the solution-space of genome-scale metabolic networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wout Megchelenbrink

    Full Text Available Constraint-based models of metabolic networks are typically underdetermined, because they contain more reactions than metabolites. Therefore the solutions to this system do not consist of unique flux rates for each reaction, but rather a space of possible flux rates. By uniformly sampling this space, an estimated probability distribution for each reaction's flux in the network can be obtained. However, sampling a high dimensional network is time-consuming. Furthermore, the constraints imposed on the network give rise to an irregularly shaped solution space. Therefore more tailored, efficient sampling methods are needed. We propose an efficient sampling algorithm (called optGpSampler, which implements the Artificial Centering Hit-and-Run algorithm in a different manner than the sampling algorithm implemented in the COBRA Toolbox for metabolic network analysis, here called gpSampler. Results of extensive experiments on different genome-scale metabolic networks show that optGpSampler is up to 40 times faster than gpSampler. Application of existing convergence diagnostics on small network reconstructions indicate that optGpSampler converges roughly ten times faster than gpSampler towards similar sampling distributions. For networks of higher dimension (i.e. containing more than 500 reactions, we observed significantly better convergence of optGpSampler and a large deviation between the samples generated by the two algorithms.optGpSampler for Matlab and Python is available for non-commercial use at: http://cs.ru.nl/~wmegchel/optGpSampler/.

  19. the nature of air flow near the inlets of blunt dust sampling probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, J. H.; Hutson, D.; Mark, D.

    This paper sets out to describe the nature of air flow near blunt dust samplers in a way which allows a relatively simple assessment of their performances for collecting dust particles. Of particular importance is the shape of the limiting stream surface which divides the sampled air from that which passes outside the sampler, and how this is affected by the free-stream air velocity, the sampling flow rate, and the shape of the sampler body. This was investigated for two-dimensional and axially-symmetric sampler systems by means of complementary experiments using electrolytic tank potential flow analogues and a wind tunnel respectively. For extreme conditions the flow of air entering the sampling orifice may be wholly divergent or wholly convergent. For a wide range of intermediate conditions, however, the flow first diverges then converges, exhibiting a so-called "spring onion effect". Whichever of these applies for a particular situation, the flow may be considered to consist of two parts, the outer one dominated by the flow about the sampler body and the inner one dominated by the flow into the sampling orifice. Particle transport in this two-part flow may be assessed using ideas borrowed from thin-walled probe theory.

  20. Polar organic chemical integrative samplers for pesticides monitoring: impacts of field exposure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissalde, Sophie; Mazzella, Nicolas; Mazellier, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    This study focuses on how Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS) work in real environmental conditions. A selection of 23 polar pesticides and 8 metabolites were investigated by exposure of triplicates of integrative samplers in two rivers in France for successive 14-day periods. The pesticides and metabolites were trapped not only in Oasis HLB sorbent but also in the polyethersulfone (PES) membrane of the POCIS. The distribution of pesticides depended on the molecular structure. The use of the Performance Reference Compound (PRC) is also discussed here. The impact of some environmental parameters and exposure setup on the transfer of pesticides in POCIS sorbent was studied: river flow rate, biofouling on membranes, sampler holding design and position in the stream. Results show a significant impact of river flow velocity on PRC desorption, especially for values higher than 4 cm·s(-1). Some fouling was observed on the PES membrane which could potentially have an impact on molecule accumulation in the POCIS. Finally, the positioning of the sampler in the river did not have significant effects on pesticide accumulation, when perpendicular exposures were used (sampler positioning in front of the water flow). The POCIS with PRC correction seems to be a suitable tool for estimating time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations, for all the molecules except for one of the nine pesticides analyzed in these two French rivers.

  1. Chemical and isotopic properties and origin of coarse airborne particles collected by passive samplers in industrial, urban, and rural environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéguen, Florence; Stille, Peter; Dietze, Volke; Gieré, Reto

    2012-12-01

    Passive air samplers have been installed in industrial, urban, rural and remote forested environments in order to collect coarse airborne particles for subsequent chemical characterization. To identify principal polluting sources, isotopic tracers, such as Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic ratios, have been used. The mass deposition rates (MDRs) of trace metals, determined for each of the studied environments, clearly indicate that industrial and traffic sites are especially affected by air pollution. Elements such as V, Pb, Fe, Cr, Co, Mo, Cd, Ni, As, Sb and Zn are notably enriched in samples from industrial zones, whereas V, Mn, Ba, Sr, Al, U, Th, rare earth elements (REE), Zr, Y, Cs, Rb, Sb, Sn and Cu are principal components of the airborne particles collected close to areas influenced by heavy traffic. The chemical/isotopic baseline composition derived from the airborne particles is the result of mixing of particles from different industrial sources, traffic and fertilizers. The monthly analysis of trace-metal MDRs of the collected airborne particle samples from different stations around the industrial zone allows for the detection of distinct atmospheric dust-deposition events during the year, characterized by high MDRs. "Natural" dusts from regional soil re-suspension, including from more distant regions like the Sahara desert, might overprint the regional atmospheric baseline composition, as suggested by trace metal trajectories in ternary diagrams and by Sr, Nd and Pb isotope data.

  2. Bayesian Analysis for Exponential Random Graph Models Using the Adaptive Exchange Sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ick Hoon; Yuan, Ying; Liang, Faming

    2013-10-01

    Exponential random graph models have been widely used in social network analysis. However, these models are extremely difficult to handle from a statistical viewpoint, because of the intractable normalizing constant and model degeneracy. In this paper, we consider a fully Bayesian analysis for exponential random graph models using the adaptive exchange sampler, which solves the intractable normalizing constant and model degeneracy issues encountered in Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations. The adaptive exchange sampler can be viewed as a MCMC extension of the exchange algorithm, and it generates auxiliary networks via an importance sampling procedure from an auxiliary Markov chain running in parallel. The convergence of this algorithm is established under mild conditions. The adaptive exchange sampler is illustrated using a few social networks, including the Florentine business network, molecule synthetic network, and dolphins network. The results indicate that the adaptive exchange algorithm can produce more accurate estimates than approximate exchange algorithms, while maintaining the same computational efficiency. PMID:24653788

  3. Bayesian analysis for exponential random graph models using the adaptive exchange sampler

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Ick Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Exponential random graph models have been widely used in social network analysis. However, these models are extremely difficult to handle from a statistical viewpoint, because of the existence of intractable normalizing constants. In this paper, we consider a fully Bayesian analysis for exponential random graph models using the adaptive exchange sampler, which solves the issue of intractable normalizing constants encountered in Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations. The adaptive exchange sampler can be viewed as a MCMC extension of the exchange algorithm, and it generates auxiliary networks via an importance sampling procedure from an auxiliary Markov chain running in parallel. The convergence of this algorithm is established under mild conditions. The adaptive exchange sampler is illustrated using a few social networks, including the Florentine business network, molecule synthetic network, and dolphins network. The results indicate that the adaptive exchange algorithm can produce more accurate estimates than approximate exchange algorithms, while maintaining the same computational efficiency.

  4. Bayesian Analysis for Exponential Random Graph Models Using the Adaptive Exchange Sampler*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ick Hoon; Yuan, Ying; Liang, Faming

    2014-01-01

    Exponential random graph models have been widely used in social network analysis. However, these models are extremely difficult to handle from a statistical viewpoint, because of the intractable normalizing constant and model degeneracy. In this paper, we consider a fully Bayesian analysis for exponential random graph models using the adaptive exchange sampler, which solves the intractable normalizing constant and model degeneracy issues encountered in Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations. The adaptive exchange sampler can be viewed as a MCMC extension of the exchange algorithm, and it generates auxiliary networks via an importance sampling procedure from an auxiliary Markov chain running in parallel. The convergence of this algorithm is established under mild conditions. The adaptive exchange sampler is illustrated using a few social networks, including the Florentine business network, molecule synthetic network, and dolphins network. The results indicate that the adaptive exchange algorithm can produce more accurate estimates than approximate exchange algorithms, while maintaining the same computational efficiency. PMID:24653788

  5. Gaseous Products of Incense Coil Combustion Extracted by Passive Solid Phase Microextraction Samplers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsi Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Burning incense indoors is a common behavior in Southeast Asia. In this investigation, needle trap samplers (NTS, a novel, green analytical technology is used for sampling gaseous combustion by-products from sandalwood incense coils. To extract indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs, two NTS are prepared, one using 60–80 mesh and the other using 100–120 mesh divinylbenzene (DVB particles packed in 22-gauge stainless steel needles. This work compares extraction efficiency of an NTS and that of a commercially available 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane solid phase microextration (PDMS-SPME fiber sampler. Experimental results indicated that the 100–120 mesh DVB-NTS performed best among all samplers during a 1 h sampling period. The main extracted compounds were toluene, ethylbenzene, propane, chloromethane, 1,3-butadiene, methanol and dichloromethane. The potential use of small badge-sized or pen-sized NTS for the indoor atmosphere and occupational hygiene applications is addressed.

  6. Chaotic motif sampler: detecting motifs from biological sequences by using chaotic neurodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Takafumi; Ikeguchi, Tohru

    Identification of a region in biological sequences, motif extraction problem (MEP) is solved in bioinformatics. However, the MEP is an NP-hard problem. Therefore, it is almost impossible to obtain an optimal solution within a reasonable time frame. To find near optimal solutions for NP-hard combinatorial optimization problems such as traveling salesman problems, quadratic assignment problems, and vehicle routing problems, chaotic search, which is one of the deterministic approaches, has been proposed and exhibits better performance than stochastic approaches. In this paper, we propose a new alignment method that employs chaotic dynamics to solve the MEPs. It is called the Chaotic Motif Sampler. We show that the performance of the Chaotic Motif Sampler is considerably better than that of the conventional methods such as the Gibbs Site Sampler and the Neighborhood Optimization for Multiple Alignment Discovery.

  7. Composite sampling of a Bacillus anthracis surrogate with cellulose sponge surface samplers from a nonporous surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenia A M Tufts

    Full Text Available A series of experiments was conducted to explore the utility of composite-based collection of surface samples for the detection of a Bacillus anthracis surrogate using cellulose sponge samplers on a nonporous stainless steel surface. Two composite-based collection approaches were evaluated over a surface area of 3716 cm2 (four separate 929 cm2 areas, larger than the 645 cm2 prescribed by the standard Centers for Disease Control (CDC and Prevention cellulose sponge sampling protocol for use on nonporous surfaces. The CDC method was also compared to a modified protocol where only one surface of the sponge sampler was used for each of the four areas composited. Differences in collection efficiency compared to positive controls and the potential for contaminant transfer for each protocol were assessed. The impact of the loss of wetting buffer from the sponge sampler onto additional surface areas sampled was evaluated. Statistical tests of the results using ANOVA indicate that the collection of composite samples using the modified sampling protocol is comparable to the collection of composite samples using the standard CDC protocol (p  =  0.261. Most of the surface-bound spores are collected on the first sampling pass, suggesting that multiple passes with the sponge sampler over the same surface may be unnecessary. The effect of moisture loss from the sponge sampler on collection efficiency was not significant (p  =  0.720 for both methods. Contaminant transfer occurs with both sampling protocols, but the magnitude of transfer is significantly greater when using the standard protocol than when the modified protocol is used (p<0.001. The results of this study suggest that composite surface sampling, by either method presented here, could successfully be used to increase the surface area sampled per sponge sampler, resulting in reduced sampling times in the field and decreased laboratory processing cost and turn-around times.

  8. Approximate reconstruction of bandlimited functions for the integrate and fire sampler

    CERN Document Server

    Feichtinger, Hans G; Romero, José Luis; Alvarado, Alexander Singh; Velasco, Gino Angelo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study the reconstruction of a bandlimited signal from samples generated by the integrate and fire model. This sampler allows us to trade complexity in the reconstruction algorithms for simple hardware implementations, and is specially convenient in situations where the sampling device is limited in terms of power, area and bandwidth. Although perfect reconstruction for this sampler is impossible, we give a general approximate reconstruction procedure and bound the corresponding error. We also show the performance of the proposed algorithm through numerical simulations.

  9. Comparison Between Light Scattering and Gravimetric samplers for PM10 mass concentration in Poultry and pig houses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambra-Lopez, M.; Winkel, A.; Mosquera Losada, J.; Ogink, N.W.M.; Aarnink, A.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare co-located real-time light scattering devices and equivalent gravimetric samplers in poultry and pig houses for PM10 mass concentration, and to develop animal-specific calibration factors for light scattering samplers. These results will contribute to evalu

  10. Los Alamos Air Monitoring Data Related to the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    In response to the disasters in Japan on March 11, 2011, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is collecting air data and analyzing the data for fission products. At present, we report preliminary data from three high-volume air samplers and one stack sampler. Iodine-131 (I-131) is not optimally measured by our standard polypropylene filters. In addition to the filter data, we have one measurement obtained from a charcoal cartridge. These data, together with measurements of other radionuclides are adequate for a preliminary assessment and assure us that radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi do not present a threat to human health at or near Los Alamos.

  11. Applicability of a modified MCE filter method with Button Inhalable Sampler for monitoring personal bioaerosol inhalation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenqiang; Xu, Hong; Yao, Maosheng

    2013-05-01

    In this study, a "modified" mixed cellulose ester (MCE) filter culturing method (directly placing filter on agar plate for culturing without extraction) was investigated in enumerating airborne culturable bacterial and fungal aerosol concentration and diversity both in different environments. A Button Inhalable Sampler loaded with a MCE filter was operated at a flow rate of 5 L/min to collect indoor and outdoor air samples using different sampling times: 10, 20, and 30 min in three different time periods of the day. As a comparison, a BioStage impactor, regarded as the gold standard, was operated in parallel at a flow rate of 28.3 L/min for all tests. The air samples collected by the Button Inhalable Sampler were directly placed on agar plates for culturing, and those collected by the BioStage impactor were incubated directly at 26 °C. The colony forming units (CFUs) were manually counted and the culturable concentrations were calculated both for bacterial and fungal aerosols. The bacterial CFUs developed were further washed off and subjected to polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) for diversity analysis. For fungal CFUs, microscopy method was applied to studying the culturable fungal diversity obtained using different methods. Experimental results showed that the performance of two investigated methods varied with sampling environments and microbial types (culturable bacterial and fungal aerosols). For bacterial aerosol sampling, both methods were shown to perform equally well, and in contrast the "modified" MCE filter method was demonstrated to enumerate more culturable fungal aerosols than the BioStage impactor. In general, the microbial species richness (number of gel bands) was observed to increase with increasing collection time. For both methods, the DGGE gel patterns were observed to vary with sampling time and environment despite of similar number of gel bands. In addition, an increase in sampling time from 20 to 30 min

  12. Technical considerations for the use of passive samplers to quantify the isotopic composition of NOx and NO2 using the denitrifier method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Bigyan; Hastings, Meredith G.

    2016-10-01

    background air that can represent multiple NOx sources. Thus, passive samplers cannot be used to diagnose isotopic signatures unless only exposed to a single emissions source. The oxygen isotopic composition of nitrite (the collection analyte) results determined via the denitrifier method must be corrected in comparison to nitrate isotopic reference materials, resulting in an increase of ∼25‰. Even with this correction, the oxygen isotopic results are lower than what would be expected for ozone-dominated atmospheric chemistry in an urban area, and the oxygen isotopic results for NOx were consistently lower than that found for NO2. We suggest that the oxygen isotopic composition of NO and NO2 were modified upon capture and conversion to nitrite on the passive sampler pads, and does not directly reflect abundances in the atmosphere.

  13. PERFORMANCE OF A NEW DIFFUSIVE SAMPLER FOR HG0 DETERMINATION IN THE TROPOSPHERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercury behaves uniquely in the atmosphere due to its volatility and long lifetime. The existing methods for measuring atmospheric mercury are either expensive or labour intensive. The present paper presents a new measurement technique, the diffusive sampler, that is portable, in...

  14. A novel method for the in situ calibration of flow effects on a phosphate passive sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara O'Brien, Dominique; Chiswell, Barry; Mueller, Jochen F

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring of nutrients including phosphate in the aquatic environment remains a challenge. In the last decade passive sampling techniques have been developed that facilitates the time integrated monitoring of phosphate (P) through the use of an iron hydroxide (ferrihydrite) to sequester dissolved phosphate from solution. These methods rely on established techniques to negate the effects of flow (and associated turbulence) and control the rate at which chemicals accumulate within passive samplers. In this study we present a phosphate sampler within which a suspension of ferrihydrite is contained behind a commercially available membrane. Accumulation of dissolved phosphates into the P-sampler is governed by the rate at which ions are diffusing through the membrane and the water boundary layer (WBL). As the WBL changes subject to flow we have adopted an in situ calibration technique based on the dissolution of gypsum to predict the change in the rate of uptake dependent on flow. Here we demonstrate that the loss of gypsum from the passive flow monitor (PFM) can be used to predict the sampling rate (the volume of water extracted per day) for phosphate as a function of water velocity. The outcome of this study presents a new in-field tool for more accurate prediction of the effect of flow/turbulence on the uptake kinetics into passive samplers that is controlled by the diffusion of the chemical of interest through the stagnant water boundary layer. PMID:19137160

  15. Framing the Problem of Identity in Composition and TESOL Studies: A Sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messekher, Hayat

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at how the intricate issue of identity has been addressed and framed in composition and TESOL studies (C&T). It reviews five articles and a book as a sampler to explore identity research in various contexts ranging from the problematic rise of identity in second-language acquisition (SLA) research in 1997, which represented a…

  16. Calibration of the Chemcatcher passive sampler for the monitoring of priority organic pollutants in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integrative passive sampler consisting of a C18 Empore[reg] disk receiving phase saturated with n-octanol and fitted with low-density polyethylene diffusion membrane was calibrated for the measurement of time-weighted average concentrations of hydrophobic micropollutants, including polyaromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorine pesticides, in water. The effect of temperature and water turbulence on kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterising the exchange of analytes between the sampler and water was studied in a flow-through system under controlled conditions. It was found that the absorption of test analytes from water to the sampler is related to their desorption to water. This allows for the in situ calibration of the uptake of pollutants using offload kinetics of performance reference compounds. The sampling kinetics are dependent on temperature, and for most of the tested analytes also on the flow velocity. Sampler-water partition coefficients did not significantly change with temperature. - A calibration method and data that are required for in situ measurement of the time-weighted average concentrations of hydrophobic priority organic pollutants in water using Chemcatcher passive sampling device are presented

  17. Variable-suction multicompartment samplers to measure spatiotemporal unsaturated water and solute fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, E.; Hogervorst, F.A.N.; Rooij, de G.; Stagnitti, F.

    2010-01-01

    To better understand the movement of water and solutes in soils, and the risk of groundwater contamination, we need water and solute flux observations distributed in space and time. We designed a new variable-suction multicompartment percolation sampler that can be buried below an undisturbed soil v

  18. 7 CFR 52.32 - Suspension or revocation of license of licensed sampler or licensed inspector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension or revocation of license of licensed... Inspection and Certification Licensing of Samplers and Inspectors § 52.32 Suspension or revocation of license..., with the Secretary supported by any argument or evidence that he may wish to offer as to why...

  19. Calibration of Silicone Rubber Passive Samplers: Experimental and Modeled Relations between Sampling Rate and Compound Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusina, T.P.; Smedes, F.; Koblizkova, M.; Klanova, J.

    2010-01-01

    Sampling rates (R-s) for silicone rubber (SR) passive samplers were measured under two different hydrodynamic conditions. Concentrations were maintained in the aqueous phase by continuous equilibration with SR sheets of a large total surface area which had been spiked with polycyclic aromatic hydroc

  20. Passive samplers of hydrophobic organic chemicals reach equilibrium faster in the laboratory than in the field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, K.; Tucca, F.

    2015-01-01

    The use of passive sampling methods for monitoring hydrophobic organic chemicals frequently requires the determination of equilibration times and partition coefficients in the laboratory. These experiments are often carried out by exposing passive samplers in a finite water volume, and errors are ea

  1. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable. The test requirements and performance... specified for a reference method sampler in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable, such as... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aerosol transport test for Class...

  2. Air Monitoring of Emissions from the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allen, Shannon P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Debra C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brock, Burgandy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Coronado, Melissa A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dewart, Jean M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eisele, William F. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fuehne, David P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gadd, Milan S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Green, Andrew A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lujan, Joan J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacDonell, Carolyn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whicker, Jeffrey J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-12

    In response to the disasters in Japan on March 11, 2011, and the subsequent emissions from Fukushima-Daiichi, we monitored the air near Los Alamos using four air-monitoring systems: the standard AIRNET samplers, the standard rad-NESHAP samplers, the NEWNET system, and high-volume air samplers. Each of these systems has advantages and disadvantages. In combination, they provide a comprehensive set of measurements of airborne radionuclides near Los Alamos during the weeks following March 11. We report air-monitoring measurements of the fission products released from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear-power-plant accident in 2011. Clear gamma-spectrometry peaks were observed from Cs-134, Cs-136, Cs-137, I-131, I132, Te-132, and Te-129m. These data, together with measurements of other radionuclides, are adequate for an assessment and assure us that radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi did not present a threat to human health at or near Los Alamos. The data demonstrate the capabilities of the Los Alamos air-monitoring systems.

  3. Equivalency of a personal dust monitor to the current United States coal mine respirable dust sampler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, S.J.; Volkwein, J.C.; Vinson, R.P.; Joy, G.J.; Mischler, S.E.; Tuchman, D.P.; McWilliams, L.J. [NIOSH, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Research Laboratory

    2008-01-15

    The United States National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has developed and tested a new instrument known as the Personal Dust Monitor (PDM). The new dust monitor is an integral part of the cap lamp that coal miners normally carry to work and provides continuous information about the concentration of respirable coal mine dust within the breathing zone of that individual. Previous laboratory testing demonstrated that there is a 95% confidence that greater than 95% of individual PDM measurements fall within +/- 25% of reference measurements. The work presented in this paper focuses on the relationship between the PDM and respirable dust concentrations currently measured by a coal mine dust personal sampler unit utilizing a 10 mm Dorr-Oliver nylon cyclone. The United Kingdom Mining Research Establishment instrument, used as the basis for coal mine respirable dust standards, had been designed specifically to match the United Kingdom British Medical Research Council (BMRC) criterion. The personal sampler is used with a 1.38 multiplier to convert readings to the BMRC criterion. A stratified random sampling design incorporating a proportionate allocation strategy was used to select a sample of mechanized mining units representative of all US underground coal mines. A sample of 180 mechanized mining units was chosen, representing approximately 20% of the mechanized mining units in production at the time the sample was selected. A total of 129 valid PDM/personal sampler dust sample sets were obtained. A weighted linear regression analysis of this data base shows that, in comparison with the personal sampler, the PDM requires a mass equivalency conversion multiplier of 1.05 (95% C.I. = (1.03, 1.08)) when the small intercept term is removed from the analysis. Removal of the intercept term results in a personal sampler-equivalent concentration increase of 2.9% at a PDM measurement of 2.0 mg m{sup -3}.

  4. Monitoring solute fluxes: Integrating electrical resistivity with multi-compartment sampler techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, Esther; Fernandez, Perrine; French, Helen K.

    2016-04-01

    The impact of agriculture, industry, airport activities on soil and water quality is strongly influenced by soil heterogeneity. To improve risk assessment, monitoring, and treatment strategies, we require a better understanding of the effect of soil heterogeneity on contaminant movement and better methods for monitoring heterogeneous contaminated transport. Sufficient characterization of spatial and temporal distribution of contaminant transport requires measurements of water and solute fluxes at multiple locations with a high temporal resolution. During this presentation, we will show a newly developed instrument, which combines multi-compartment sampling with electrical resistivity measurements, to observe spatial and temporal fluxes of contaminants. Solute monitoring is often limited to observations of resident concentrations, while flux concentrations govern the movement of solutes in soils. Bloem et al. (2010) developed a multi-compartment sampler (MCS) which is capable of measuring fluxes at a high spatial resolution under natural conditions. The sampler is divided into 100 separate compartments of 31 by 31 mm. Flux data can be recorded at a high time resolution (every 5 minutes). Tracer leaching can be monitored by frequently sampling the collected leachate while leaving the sampler buried in situ. To optimize the monitoring of tracer leaching and measure real solute fluxes the multi-compartment sampler has been extended with 121 electrodes. The electrodes are mounted at each corner of each compartment to measure the electrical conductivity above each compartment while water percolates through the compartments. By using different electrode couples, the setup can also be used to image above the multi-compartment sampler. The instrument can be used for detailed studies both in the laboratory and in the field. For laboratory experiments a transparent column is used which fits perfect on top of the MCS. We present a selection of the integrated electrical

  5. A new sampler for collecting separate dry and wet atmospheric depositions of trace organic chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Don T.; Cessna, Allan J.; Gurprasad, Narine P.; Banner, James

    Studies conducted in Saskatchewan and elsewhere have demonstrated the atmospheric transport of agricultural pesticides and other organic contaminants and their deposition into aquatic ecosystems. To date these studies have focused on ambient concentrations in the atmosphere and in wet precipitation. To measure the dry deposition of organic chemicals, a new sampler was designed which uses a moving sheet of water to passively trap dry particles and gasses. The moving sheet of water drains into a reservoir and, during recirculation through the sampler, is passed through an XAD-2 resin column which adsorbs the trapped organic contaminants. All surfaces which contact the process water are stainless steel or Teflon. Chemicals collected can be related to airborne materials depositing into aquatic ecosystems. The sampler has received a United States patent (number 5,413,003 - 9 May 1996) with the Canadian patent pending. XAD-2 resin adsorption efficiencies for 10 or 50 μg fortifications of ten pesticides ranged from 76% for atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino- S-triazine) to 110% for triallate [ S-(2,3,3-trichloro-2-phenyl)bis(1-methylethyl)carbamothioate], dicamba (2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid) and toxaphene (chlorinated camphene mixture). Field testing using duplicate samplers showed good reproducibility and amounts trapped were consistent with those from high volume and bulk pan samplers located on the same site. Average atmospheric dry deposition rates of three chemicals, collected for 5 weeks in May and June, were: dicamba, 69 ng m -2 da -1; 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid), 276 ng m -2 da -1: and, γ-HCH ( γ-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-hexachlorocyclohexane), 327 ng m -2 da -1.

  6. Air sampling in the workplace. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, E.E.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Strom, D.J.; Cicotte, G.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wiblin, C.M. [Advanced Systems Technology, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); McGuire, S.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications

    1993-09-01

    This report provides technical information on air sampling that will be useful for facilities following the recommendations in the NRC`s Regulatory Guide 8.25, Revision 1, ``Air sampling in the Workplace.`` That guide addresses air sampling to meet the requirements in NRC`s regulations on radiation protection, 10 CFR Part 20. This report describes how to determine the need for air sampling based on the amount of material in process modified by the type of material, release potential, and confinement of the material. The purposes of air sampling and how the purposes affect the types of air sampling provided are discussed. The report discusses how to locate air samplers to accurately determine the concentrations of airborne radioactive materials that workers will be exposed to. The need for and the methods of performing airflow pattern studies to improve the accuracy of air sampling results are included. The report presents and gives examples of several techniques that can be used to evaluate whether the airborne concentrations of material are representative of the air inhaled by workers. Methods to adjust derived air concentrations for particle size are described. Methods to calibrate for volume of air sampled and estimate the uncertainty in the volume of air sampled are described. Statistical tests for determining minimum detectable concentrations are presented. How to perform an annual evaluation of the adequacy of the air sampling is also discussed.

  7. Microbial air-sampling equipment, part 2: experiences of compounding pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixon, Bill; Cabaleiro, Joe; Latta, Kenneth S

    2008-01-01

    The most recent changes to Chapter 797 of the United States Pharmacopeia-National Formulary initiated an intense controversy about the frequency of cleanroom air sampling that is required to prevent the contamination of sterile preparations. For compounders who must purchase an air sampler to use in the cleanroom, choices abound. This article summarizes discussions from compounding pharmacists and their experiences with air sampling devices.

  8. BAQMAP Air Quality Monitoring and Surveillance Program for Botswana. Mission 2 Report 27 January - 18 February 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekkestad, T.

    1997-12-31

    This report is concerned with Mission 2 of a joint project between the authorities in Botswana and Norway on the development of an air pollution monitoring and surveillance program for Botswana. Mission 2 was undertaken as part of the annual meeting on 4 February 1997. Discussions and decision on the air quality program was performed after the annual meeting. Passive samplers for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} were installed in Selebi-Phikwe and Francistown. The samplers measured air pollution from the BCL smelter and traffic, respectively, during the first two weeks of February 1997. The samplers have been analysed and the results are given in this report, which also includes a status report. 13 tabs.

  9. Does urban vegetation mitigate air pollution in northern conditions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is generally accepted that urban vegetation improves air quality and thereby enhances the well-being of citizens. However, empirical evidence on the potential of urban trees to mitigate air pollution is meager, particularly in northern climates with a short growing season. We studied the ability of urban park/forest vegetation to remove air pollutants (NO2, anthropogenic VOCs and particle deposition) using passive samplers in two Finnish cities. Concentrations of each pollutant in August (summer; leaf-period) and March (winter, leaf-free period) were slightly but often insignificantly lower under tree canopies than in adjacent open areas, suggesting that the role of foliage in removing air pollutants is insignificant. Furthermore, vegetation-related environmental variables (canopy closure, number and size of trees, density of understorey vegetation) did not explain the variation in pollution concentrations. Our results suggest that the ability of urban vegetation to remove air pollutants is minor in northern climates. -- Highlights: ► The ability of northern urban vegetation to remove air pollutants is minor. ► Vegetation-related environmental variables had no effect on air pollution levels. ► The ability of vegetation to clean air did not differ between summer and winter. ► Dry deposition passive samplers proved applicable in urban air pollution study. -- The ability of urban vegetation to remove air pollutants seems to be minor in northern climates

  10. Sampling and analysis of aircraft engine cold start particles and demonstration of an electrostatic personal particle sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armendariz, Alfredo; Leith, David; Boundy, Maryanne; Goodman, Randall; Smith, Les; Carlton, Gary

    2003-01-01

    Aircraft engines emit an aerosol plume during startup in extremely cold weather that can drift into areas occupied by flightline ground crews. This study tested a personal sampler used to assess exposure to particles in the plume under challenging field conditions. Area and personal samples were taken at two U.S. Air Force (USAF) flightlines during the winter months. Small tube-and-wire electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) were mounted on a stationary stand positioned behind the engines to sample the exhaust. Other ESPs were worn by ground crews to sample breathing zone concentrations. In addition, an aerodynamic particle sizer 3320 (APS) was used to determine the size distribution of the particles. Samples collected with the ESP were solvent extracted and analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results indicated that the plume consisted of up to 75 mg/m(3) of unburned jet fuel particles. The APS showed that nearly the entire particle mass was respirable, because the plumes had mass median diameters less than 2 micro m. These tests demonstrated that the ESP could be used at cold USAF flightlines to perform exposure assessments to the cold start particles.

  11. Emissions of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons from Natural Gas Extraction into Air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulik, L Blair; Donald, Carey E; Smith, Brian W; Tidwell, Lane G; Hobbie, Kevin A; Kincl, Laurel; Haynes, Erin N; Anderson, Kim A

    2016-07-19

    Natural gas extraction, often referred to as "fracking", has increased rapidly in the United States in recent years. To address potential health impacts, passive air samplers were deployed in a rural community heavily affected by the natural gas boom. Samplers were analyzed for 62 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Results were grouped based on distance from each sampler to the nearest active well. Levels of benzo[a]pyrene, phenanthrene, and carcinogenic potency of PAH mixtures were highest when samplers were closest to active wells. PAH levels closest to natural gas activity were comparable to levels previously reported in rural areas in winter. Sourcing ratios indicated that PAHs were predominantly petrogenic, suggesting that PAH levels were influenced by direct releases from the earth. Quantitative human health risk assessment estimated the excess lifetime cancer risks associated with exposure to the measured PAHs. At sites closest to active wells, the risk estimated for maximum residential exposure was 0.04 in a million, which is below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's acceptable risk level. Overall, risk estimates decreased 30% when comparing results from samplers closest to active wells to those farthest from them. This work suggests that natural gas extraction is contributing PAHs to the air, at levels that would not be expected to increase cancer risk. PMID:27400263

  12. Emissions of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons from Natural Gas Extraction into Air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulik, L Blair; Donald, Carey E; Smith, Brian W; Tidwell, Lane G; Hobbie, Kevin A; Kincl, Laurel; Haynes, Erin N; Anderson, Kim A

    2016-07-19

    Natural gas extraction, often referred to as "fracking", has increased rapidly in the United States in recent years. To address potential health impacts, passive air samplers were deployed in a rural community heavily affected by the natural gas boom. Samplers were analyzed for 62 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Results were grouped based on distance from each sampler to the nearest active well. Levels of benzo[a]pyrene, phenanthrene, and carcinogenic potency of PAH mixtures were highest when samplers were closest to active wells. PAH levels closest to natural gas activity were comparable to levels previously reported in rural areas in winter. Sourcing ratios indicated that PAHs were predominantly petrogenic, suggesting that PAH levels were influenced by direct releases from the earth. Quantitative human health risk assessment estimated the excess lifetime cancer risks associated with exposure to the measured PAHs. At sites closest to active wells, the risk estimated for maximum residential exposure was 0.04 in a million, which is below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's acceptable risk level. Overall, risk estimates decreased 30% when comparing results from samplers closest to active wells to those farthest from them. This work suggests that natural gas extraction is contributing PAHs to the air, at levels that would not be expected to increase cancer risk.

  13. Radiochemistry of the 3M SBMF-40VF filter media used by the DOE CTBT Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty calls for the monitoring of aerosol radionuclides throughout the globe. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed the Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) for the Department of Energy to automatically collect and measure radioactive aerosols from the atmosphere. The RASA passes high volumes of air through a 3MTM Substrate Blown Microfiber Media (SBMF) specifically designated as SBMF-40VF. It then automatically moves the filter media in front of a high-purity germanium detector and collects a gamma spectrum. If further analysis on the filter is desired, the filter is sent to a laboratory and radiochemical analysis is performed. This paper discusses the method of dissolution of the SBMF-40VF filter media and the separation of the radioisotopes of interest. (author)

  14. Ambient Ammonia Monitoring in the Central United States Using Passive Diffusion Samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughey, M.; Gay, D.; Sweet, C.

    2008-12-01

    Environmental scientists and governmental authorities are increasingly aware of the need for more comprehensive measurements of ambient ammonia in urban, rural and remote locations. As the predominant alkaline gas, ammonia plays a critical role in atmospheric chemistry by reacting readily with acidic gases and particles. Ammonium salts often comprise a major portion of the aerosols that impair visibility, not only in urban areas, but also in national parks and other Class I areas. Ammonia is also important as a plant nutrient that directly or indirectly affects terrestrial and aquatic biomes. Successful computer simulations of important environmental processes require an extensive representative data set of ambient ammonia measurements in the range of 0.1 ppbv or greater. Generally instruments with that level of sensitivity are not only expensive, but also require electrical connections, an enclosed shelter and, in many instances, frequent attention from trained technicians. Such requirements significantly restrict the number and locations of ambient ammonia monitors that can be supported. As an alternative we have employed simple passive diffusion samplers to measure ambient ammonia at 9 monitoring sites in the central U.S. over the past 3 years. Passive samplers consist of a layer of an acidic trapping medium supported at a fixed distance behind a microporous barrier for which the diffusive properties are known. Ammonia uptake rates are determined by the manufacturer under controlled laboratory conditions. (When practical, field results are compared against those from collocated conventional samplers, e.g., pumped annular denuders.) After a known exposure time at the sampling site, the sampler is resealed in protective packaging and shipped to the analytical laboratory where the ammonia captured in the acidic medium is carefully extracted and quantified. Because passive samplers are comparatively inexpensive and do not require electricity or other facilities they

  15. THE ASSESSMENT OF MICROBIOLOGICAL INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN BAKERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Wołejko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess microbiological indoor air quality of selected bakeries located in the region of Podlasie. The microbiological studies were conducted in autumn in 2014 in three selected bakeries. Microbiological air counts were measured by impaction using an air sampler MAS-100 NT. The microbiological air studies, comprised the determination of the total number of psychrophilic and mesophilic bacteria, namely indicator bacteria such as: bacteria of the species Pseudomonas fluorescens, mannitol-positive and mannitol-negative Staphylococc, the total number of bacteria from the Enterobacteriaceae family and fungi found in atmospheric air. The results of the study of indoor air polluted with the analyzed groups of microorganisms differed depending on the type of test air and the location of the manufacturing plant. In the plants, the concentration of mesophilic bacteria and mannitol–positive and mannitol-negative Staphylococcus exceeded the limit values of unpolluted air, according to the Polish Standard recommendations.

  16. Benthic organisms collected using sediment sampler from the CAPT. BRADY J in the Gulf of Mexico from (NODC Accession 8300082)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organisms were collected using sediment sampler casts from the CAPT. BRADY J and CAJUN SPECIAL in the Gulf of Mexico from 03 May 1982 to 13 October 1982....

  17. Development of a wireless air pollution sensor package for aerial-sampling of emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new sensor system for mobile and aerial emission sampling was developed for open area pollutant sources, such as prescribed forest burns. The sensor system, termed “Kolibri”, consists of multiple low-cost air quality sensors measuring CO2, CO, samplers for particulate matter wi...

  18. Using nicotine measurements and parental reports to assess indoor air : The PIAMA birth cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunekreef, B; Leaderer, BP; van Strien, R; Oldenwening, M; Smit, HA; Koopman, L; Kerkhof, M

    2000-01-01

    We used two methods to collect data on indoor smoking exposure of 3-month-old infants. First, parents of approximately 100 children completed a questionnaire. We then measured nicotine in the air of the living rooms in smoking and non-smoking households with a passive sampler for a period of 2 weeks

  19. Test plan for phase II of the Retained Gas Sampler system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) system is being developed to permit characterization of the gas phase component of waste tank core samples. Several laboratory experiments have been conducted which have affirmed the proof-of-principle for separating the gas phase materials from waste tank material in a quantitative manner. However, experiments conducted thus far have dealt only with representative materials and simulated hardware mock-ups. This test plan deals with the operation and testing of actual devices in the hot cell environment. This test plan coves all aspects of the RGS system including: sampler load-in, extrusion, gas extraction, quantitative separation, sample collection, and quantitative analysis. Sample material used in this test plan will be waste tank simulants and will not be radioactive. The work environment, however, will be an operating hot cell facility and will have radioactive contaminated surfaces. Operation of the system will therefore require an official radiation work permit (RWP)

  20. Silicone passive equilibrium samplers as ‘chemometers’ in eels and sediments of a Swedish lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnke, Annika; Mayer, Philipp; McLachlan, Michael S.;

    2014-01-01

    Passive equilibrium samplers deployed in two or more media of a system and allowed to come to equilibrium can be viewed as ‘chemometers’ that reflect the difference in chemical activities of contaminants between the media. We applied silicone-based equilibrium samplers to measure relative chemical...... activities of seven ‘indicator’ polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and hexachlorobenzene in eels and sediments from a Swedish lake. Chemical concentrations in eels and sediments were also measured using exhaustive extraction methods. Lipid-normalized concentrations in eels were higher than organic carbon......-normalized concentrations in sediments, with biota–sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) of five PCBs ranging from 2.7 to 12.7. In contrast, chemical activities of the same pollutants inferred by passive sampling were 3.5 to 31.3 times lower in eels than in sediments. The apparent contradiction between BSAFs and activity...

  1. A new sampler for simulating aerosol deposition in the respiratory tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dehong; ZHUO Weihai; YI Yanling; CHEN Bo; LIU Haikuan

    2008-01-01

    Abstract For estimation of the deposition fractions of radon progeny in different regions of the respiratory tract, a new sampler consisting of three different configurations of sampling heads was developed. The deposition fractions of aerosols on the wire screens inside the sampling heads were calculated with the fan model of filtration theory. The deposition fractions of aerosols in different regions of the respiratory tract were calculated with the lung dose evaluation program (LUDEP (C)) developed by National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) as References. In general indoor and mine environments, the deviation between the deposition fractions of attached aerosol on the wire screens designed in this study and its reference values in the respiratory tract is less than 5%. It is possible to accurately estimate the deposition fractions of radon progeny in different regions of the respiratory tract through mimic measurements of radon progeny collected with the new sampler.

  2. Passive sampling of selected endocrine disrupting compounds using polar organic chemical integrative samplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (pharmaceutical POCIS and pesticide POCIS) were examined for their sampling efficiency of selected endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). Laboratory-based calibration of POCISs was conducted by exposing them at high and low concentrations of 14 EDCs (4-alkyl-phenols, their ethoxylate oligomers, bisphenol A, selected estrogens and synthetic steroids) for different time periods. The kinetic studies showed an integrative uptake up to 28 days. The sampling rates for the individual compounds were obtained. The use of POCISs could result in an integrative approach to the quality status of the aquatic systems especially in the case of high variation of water concentrations of EDCs. The sampling efficiency of POCISs under various field conditions was assessed after their deployment in different aquatic environments. - Calibration and field performance of polar organic integrative samplers for monitoring EDCs in aquatic environments

  3. Pharmaceuticals, alkylphenols and pesticides in Mediterranean coastal waters: Results from a pilot survey using passive samplers

    OpenAIRE

    Munaron, Dominique; Tapie, Nathalie; BUDZINSKI Helene; Andral, Bruno; Gonzalez, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    21 pharmaceuticals, 6 alkylphenols and 27 hydrophilic pesticides and biocides were investigated using polar organic contaminant integrative samplers (POCIS) during a large-scale study of contamination of French Mediterranean coastal waters. Marine and transitional water-bodies, defined under the EU Water Framework Directive were monitored. Our results show that the French Mediterranean coastal waters were contaminated with a large range of emerging contaminants, detected at low concentrations...

  4. SEM/EDS of Submicron and Coarse PM Using Modified Passive Aerosol Sampler Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J.; Wang, Z.; Willis, B.; Casuccio, G.

    2008-12-01

    Deployment of multiple UNC Passive Aerosol Samplers is an inexpensive and unobtrusive technique for assessing airborne particulate matter (PM) exposure and spatial variability. Computer-controlled SEM/EDS (Scanning Electron Microscopy / Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) is used to measure the deposited particle mass and chemistry. A deposition velocity model is used to obtain ambient PM and elemental size distributions. Previous results have correlated well with active sampler results in environments dominated by coarse mineral dusts. To accurately measure submicron and carbonaceous aerosols, an improved collection substrate is needed. Previous studies used a double-sided carbon adhesive tab, which was ideal for coarse PM but under-detected submicron PM. One promising alternative is polycarbonate (PC) filter substrates. Another is transmission electron microscope (TEM) grids with formvar films mounted over holes drilled in the samplers. Preliminary tests of PC filters and TEM grid substrates, including tests in areas with smoke aerosols, exhibited substantial submicron aerosol and differing elemental size distributions. Detailed qualitative and quantitative evidence shows that the PC filters retained coarse PM well and yielded improved submicron PM imaging. TEM grids yield the best imaging and chemistry of submicron carbonaceous PM, but potentially the poorest retention of coarse PM. PM and elemental size distributions are presented for collocated passive samplers using the three substrate types, in both indoor and outdoor environments. Several methods are proposed to further optimize passive sampling of both submicron and coarse PM. Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.

  5. Bayesian Analysis for Exponential Random Graph Models Using the Adaptive Exchange Sampler*

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Ick Hoon; Yuan, Ying; Liang, Faming

    2013-01-01

    Exponential random graph models have been widely used in social network analysis. However, these models are extremely difficult to handle from a statistical viewpoint, because of the intractable normalizing constant and model degeneracy. In this paper, we consider a fully Bayesian analysis for exponential random graph models using the adaptive exchange sampler, which solves the intractable normalizing constant and model degeneracy issues encountered in Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulati...

  6. Suction Cup Sampler Bias in Leaching Characterization of an Undisturbed Field Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandi-Dohrn, Florian M.; Dick, Richard P.; Hess, Mario; Selker, John S.

    1996-05-01

    An accurate assessment of leaching losses in the vadose zone requires measurement of both solute and water flux to compute flux concentrations (CF). Leachate collected at a depth of 1.2 m in 32 passive capillary samplers (PCAPS), which sample soil-pore water continuously at tensions of 0-50 cm H2O was compared to that collected in 32 suction cup samplers operated under a falling head vacuum of 530-cm H2O over a 2-year period. There was evidence that PCAPS collected CF and suction cup samplers collected resident concentrations (CR) as shown by the earlier breakthrough of a bromide tracer in the PCAPS as compared to the suction cup samplers. CR was up to 100% lower than CF during the rising branch of Br tracer breakthrough and up to 78% greater during the declining branch of breakthrough. Br content and water flux into PCAPS were correlated with correlation coefficients changing from positive to negative values with the advancement of the tracer breakthrough peak through the profile indicating the declining importance of preferential flow on Br transport. CR and CF differed significantly (P < 0.05) for 35% of the sampling events for NO3, but seasonal means were mostly insignificantly different for this regularly applied and therefore more uniformly distributed anion. The early breakthrough of Rhodamine WT and Brilliant Blue FCF, which was applied with the Br, was very low with 0.15% and 0.08% of the initial concentration C0, respectively, with CR differing from CF by up to -100%. For all tracers, mass leached using CR is therefore prone to bias for short-term (<0.6 pore volumes) monitoring.

  7. Empirical Statistical Power for Testing Multilocus Genotypic Effects under Unbalanced Designs Using a Gibbs Sampler

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chaeyoung

    2012-01-01

    Epistasis that may explain a large portion of the phenotypic variation for complex economic traits of animals has been ignored in many genetic association studies. A Baysian method was introduced to draw inferences about multilocus genotypic effects based on their marginal posterior distributions by a Gibbs sampler. A simulation study was conducted to provide statistical powers under various unbalanced designs by using this method. Data were simulated by combined designs of number of loci, wi...

  8. Second generation dichotomous sampler for large-scale monitoring of airborne particulate matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loo, B.W.; Adachi, R.S.; Cork, C.P.; Goulding, F.S.; Jaklevic, J.M.; Landis, D.A.; Searles, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The differences which exist between fine (< 2.5 ..mu..m) and coarse (> 2.5 ..mu..m) airborne particles with respect to their origin, chemical properties, and environmental impact, call for their separate collection and analysis. An automated dichotomous sampler (ADS), equipped with a high efficiency single-stage virtual impactor and a microprocessor-based controller to self-correct fault conditions including filter overload, has been developed as a model for commercial production.

  9. Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) for purification and extraction of silicone passive samplers used for the monitoring of organic pollutants

    OpenAIRE

    Brockmeyer, Berit; Kraus, Uta R.; Theobald, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Silicone passive samplers have gained an increasing attention as single-phased, practical and robust samplers for monitoring of organic contaminants in the aquatic environment in recent years. However, analytical challenges arise in routine application during the extraction of analytes as silicone oligomers are co-extracted and interfere severely during chemical analyses (e.g. gas chromatographic techniques). In this study, we present a fast, practical pre-cleaning method for silicone passive...

  10. Chemical calibration, performance, validation and applications of the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) in aquatic environments

    OpenAIRE

    Morin, N.; Miège, C.; Coquery, M.; Randon, J.

    2012-01-01

    POCIS (Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler) is a relatively recent integrative sampler developed to trap hydrophilic organic micropollutants in aquatic environments. Nevertheless, at present, there is no review dealing specifically with this tool. The aim of this paper was to compile information from numerous references based on POCIS in order to discuss on the evaluation of time-weighted average concentrations (calibration methods, sampling rates, performance and reference compounds&#...

  11. A comparison of freshwater mussels and passive samplers as indicators of heavy metal pollution in aquatic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Laila C.; Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning;

    2013-01-01

    The utility of passive sampling as a tool for determining the ecological state of wet retention ponds was investigated as an alternative to the analysis of living organisms. The accumulation of heavy metals over time in mussels and passive samplers exposed to artificial stormwater was examined...... there was no strong correlation between the heavy metal concentrations observed in the mussels and those in the passive samplers....

  12. Radionuclides in ground-level air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the air surveillance programme the concentrations of artificial radionuclides are monitored in the air close to the ground to obtain the necessary basic data for estimating the exposure of the Finnish population to fall-out radionuclides and also to detect atmospheric traces of radioactive materials caused by their use or production. Airborne dust is collected on filters with high-volume air samplers and the concentrations of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the air are evaluated. In the first quarter of 1986 only long-lived cesium, caused by earlier atmospheric nuclear explosions was detected. The concentrations of cesium were very low. In January and March a small amount of short-lived, fresh fission and activation products were also observed

  13. Design and experimental evaluation of a new nanoparticle thermophoretic personal sampler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A personal sampler that thermophoretically samples particles between a few nanometers and approximately 300 nm has been designed and first prototypes built. The thermal precipitator (TP) is designed to take samples in the breathing zone of a worker in order to determine the personal exposure to airborne nanomaterials. In the sampler, particles are deposited onto silicon substrates that can be used for consecutive electron microscopic (EM) analysis of the particle size distribution and chemical composition of the sampled particles. Due to very homogeneous size-independent particle deposition on a large portion of the substrate, representative samples can be taken for offline analysis. The experimental evaluation revealed a good general agreement with numerical simulations concerning homogeneity of the deposit and a very high correlation (R² = 0.98) of the deposition rate per unit area with number concentrations simultaneously measured with an SMPS for particle sizes between 14 and 305 nm. The samplers’ small size of only 45 x 32 × 97 mm3 and low weight of only 140 g make it perfectly suitable as a personal sampler. The power consumption for temperature control and pump is around 1.5 W and can be easily provided by batteries.

  14. Assessment of benthic macroinvertebrates at Nile tilapia production using artificial substrate samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura E Silva, M S G; Graciano, T S; Losekann, M E; Luiz, A J B

    2016-05-17

    Biomonitoring is a cheap and effective tool for evaluation of water quality, and infer on the balance of aquatic ecosystems. The benthic macroinvertebrates are bioindicators sensitive to environmental changes, and can assist in detecting and preventing impacts such as organic enrichment and imbalance in the food chain. We compared the structure of benthic communities on artificial substrate samplers located in places near and far from net cages for production of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Samplers were manufactured with nylon net, using substrates such as crushed stone, gravel, loofah and cattail leaves. Samples were collected after 30 days of colonization, rinsed and then the specimens were identified and quantified. The following metrics were calculated: richness of Operational Taxonomic Units, Margalef richness, abundance of individuals, Shannon index and evenness index. The macrobenthic community structure was strongly modified according to the proximity of the net cages. Metrics showed significant differences (p < 0.05) between near and distant sites, for both periods (dry and rainy seasons). The position of the samplers significantly affected the structure of macroinvertebrate community, as near sites showed higher values for the community metrics, such as richness and diversity. Near sites presented a larger number of individuals, observed both in the dry and rainy seasons, with a predominance of Chironomidae (Diptera) in the dry season and Tubificidae (Oligochaeta) in the rainy season. PMID:27191461

  15. Spatial Distribution of Tropospheric Ozone in National Parks of California: Interpretation of Passive-Sampler Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Ray

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The National Park Service (NPS has tested and used passive ozone samplers for several years to get baseline values for parks and to determine the spatial variability within parks. Experience has shown that the Ogawa passive samplers can provide ±10% accuracy when used with a quality assurance program consisting of blanks, duplicates, collocated instrumentation, and a standard operating procedure that carefully guides site operators. Although the passive device does not meet EPA criteria as a certified method (mainly, that hourly values be measured, it does provide seasonal summed values of ozone. The seasonal ozone concentrations from the passive devices can be compared to other monitoring to determine baseline values, trends, and spatial variations. This point is illustrated with some kriged interpolation maps of ozone statistics. Passive ozone samplers were used to get elevational gradients and spatial distributions of ozone within a park. This was done in varying degrees at Mount Rainier, Olympic, Sequoia–Kings Canyon, Yosemite, Joshua Tree, Rocky Mountain, and Great Smoky Mountains national parks. The ozone has been found to vary by factors of 2 and 3 within a park when average ozone is compared between locations. Specific examples of the spatial distributions of ozone in three parks within California are given using interpolation maps. Positive aspects and limitations of the passive sampling approach are presented.

  16. Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) for purification and extraction of silicone passive samplers used for the monitoring of organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeyer, Berit; Kraus, Uta R; Theobald, Norbert

    2015-12-01

    Silicone passive samplers have gained an increasing attention as single-phased, practical and robust samplers for monitoring of organic contaminants in the aquatic environment in recent years. However, analytical challenges arise in routine application during the extraction of analytes as silicone oligomers are co-extracted and interfere severely during chemical analyses (e.g. gas chromatographic techniques). In this study, we present a fast, practical pre-cleaning method for silicone passive samplers applying accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) for the removal of silicone oligomers prior to the water deployment (hexane/dichloromethane, 100 °C, 70 min). ASE was also shown to be a very fast (10 min) and efficient extraction method for non-polar contaminants (non-exposed PRC recoveries 66-101 %) sampled by the silicone membrane. For both applications, temperature, extraction time and the solvent used for ASE have been optimized. Purification of the ASE extract was carried out by silica gel and high-pressure liquid size exclusion chromatography (HPLC-SEC). The silicone oligomer content was checked by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (TXRF) in order to confirm the absence of the silicone oligomers prior to analysis of passive sampler extracts. The established method was applied on real silicone samplers from the North- and Baltic Sea and showed no matrix effects during analysis of organic pollutants. Internal laboratory standard recoveries were in the same range for laboratory, transport and exposed samplers (85-126 %). PMID:26289330

  17. A comparison of solid sampler methods for the determination of hexamethylene-based isocyanates in spray-painting operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzinski, W E; Yin, J; England, E; Carlton, G; Key-Schwartz, R; Lesage, J

    2001-01-01

    A polyurethane foam sponge impregnated with 1-(2-methoxyphenyl) piperazine in dimethylsulfoxide was mounted in both cassette and inhalable organic monitor samplers and these were then compared with a dual-filter cassette. The samplers were used for the collection of hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) monomer and oligomers during actual spray-painting operations. The dual filter cassettes were positioned on a mannequin. The polyurethane foam cassette (PUF CAS) and polyurethane foam inhalable organic monitor (PUF IOM) samplers were positioned on a cart in the same maximum overspray area. Data from this pilot study suggest that there is no significant difference (P < 0.05, n = 6) in the amount of HDI monomer obtained with the PUF IOM sampler when compared with the amount obtained from the dual filter cassette. The data also suggest that the PUF IOM sampler yields a higher amount of HDI oligomer than either the dual filter cassette or the PUF CAS sampler, neither of which exhibited a significant difference (P < 0.05, n = 6) from each other. PMID:11331997

  18. Optimization design of performance test of cyclone separator sand sampler based on numerical simulation and wind erosion tunnel experiment%基于数值模拟与风洞试验的旋风分离式集沙仪优化设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄炎; 赵满全

    2015-01-01

    为了解风蚀风沙运动规律,提高旋风分离式集沙仪集沙效率。该文在Fluent 平台中建立了旋风分离式集沙仪有限元模型,基于RNG k-ε模型和雷诺应力模型对旋风分离式集沙仪进行数值分析,并对3种不同结构参数旋风分离式集沙仪进行风洞试验。通过有限元分析,得到了其内部气相运动规律,观察到集沙仪升气管附近气流强度较大,其内部有“短路流”存在。同时,通过对3种不同结构参数旋风分离式集沙仪进行数值模拟,得到结构参数为:筒体直径50 mm;锥体段高度125 mm 的旋风分离式集沙仪集沙盒底部具有较小的湍动能和向上轴向速度,其大小分别为0.99 m2/s2和1.48 m/s。另外,分别对3种不同结构参数旋风分离式集沙仪进行风洞试验,得到了改变筒体直径与锥体段高度引起集沙盒底部湍流强度的改变,从而对集沙效率有一定影响,相比较筒体直径而言,锥体段高度对集沙效率影响更明显;集沙盒底部湍动能和向上轴向速度较小的集沙仪,集沙效率较高,具有良好的分离性能。结合数值模拟和风洞试验确定了集沙盒底部湍动能、向上轴向速度为目标函数,根据目标函数,优化设计了集沙盒直管的长度,确定了集沙盒直管长16 mm的旋风分离式集沙仪可以降低集沙盒底部湍动能和向上轴向速度,理论上可以提高旋风分离式集沙仪集沙效率。该文研究结果可为进一步提高旋风分离式集沙仪性能提供依据。%For the purpose of knowing the motion law of sand erosion and improving the efficiency of cyclone separation sand sampler, the finite element model of cyclone separation sand sampler is built by using the software of Fluent. There is a two-phase movement inside the cyclone separation sand sampler, including air and soil particles. The cyclone separation sand sampler mainly separates the soil

  19. Diffusive sampling and measurement of microbial volatile organic compounds in indoor air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, A; Eitaki, Y; Kawai, T; Kanazawa, A; Takeda, M; Kishi, R

    2009-10-01

    Microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOC), chemicals emitted from various microorganisms, in indoor air have been of concern in recent years. For large field studies, diffusive samplers are widely used to measure indoor environments. Since the sampling rate of a sampler is a fundamental parameter to calculate concentration, the sampling rates of eight MVOC with diffusive samplers were determined experimentally using a newly developed water-bubbling method: air was supplied to the MVOC-solutions and the vapor collected in an exposure bag, where diffusive and active samplers were placed in parallel for comparison. Correlations between the diffusive and active samplings gave good linear regressions. The sampling rates were 30-35 ml/min and the detection limits were 0.044-0.178 microg/m(3), as determined by GC/MS analysis. Application of the sampling rates in indoor air was validated by parallel sampling of the diffusive and active sampling method. 5% Propan-2-ol/CS(2) was the best solvent to desorb the compounds from absorbents. The procedure was applied to a field study in 41 dwellings. The most frequently detected compounds were hexan-2-one and heptan-2-one, with 97.5% detection rates and geometric mean values of 0.470 and 0.302 microg/m(3), respectively. This study shows that diffusive samplers are applicable to measure indoor MVOC levels. Practical Implications At present, there are still limited reports on indoor Microbial Volatile Organic Compounds (MVOC) levels in general dwellings and occupants' health. Compared with active sampling methods, air sampling using a diffusive sampler is particularly advantageous for use in large field studies due to its smallness, light-size, easy-handling, and cost-effectiveness. In this study, sampling rates of selected MVOC of the diffusive sampler were determined using the water-bubbling method: generating gases by water-bubbling and exposing the diffusive and active samplers at the same time. The obtained sampling rates

  20. Assessment of exposure to composite nanomaterials and development of a personal respiratory deposition sampler for nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cena, Lorenzo

    2011-12-01

    The overall goals of this doctoral dissertation are to provide knowledge of workers' exposure to nanomaterials and to assist in the development of standard methods to measure personal exposure to nanomaterials in workplace environments. To achieve the first goal, a field study investigated airborne particles generated from the weighing of bulk carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the manual sanding of epoxy test samples reinforced with CNTs. This study also evaluated the effectiveness of three local exhaust ventilation (LEV) conditions (no LEV, custom fume hood and biosafety cabinet) for control of exposure to particles generated during sanding of CNT-epoxy nanocomposites. Particle number and respirable mass concentrations were measured with direct-read instruments, and particle morphology was determined by electron microscopy. Sanding of CNT-epoxy nanocomposites released respirable size airborne particles with protruding CNTs very different in morphology from bulk CNTs that tended to remain in clusters (>1mum). Respirable mass concentrations in the operator's breathing zone were significantly greater when sanding took place in the custom hood (p theory for particles between 40 and 150 nm but deviated from theory for particles outside of this range. New coefficients for the single-fiber efficiency model were identified that minimized the sum of square error (SSE) between the experimental values and those estimated with the model. Compared to the original theory, the SSE calculated using the modified theory was at least threefold lower for all screens and flow rates. Since nylon fibers produce no significant spectral interference when ashed for spectrometric examination, the ability to accurately estimate collection efficiency of submicrometer particles makes nylon mesh screens an attractive collection substrate for nanoparticles. In the third study, laboratory experiments were conducted to develop a novel nanoparticle respiratory deposition (NRD) sampler that selectively

  1. Quantitative Assessment of Detection Frequency for the INL Ambient Air Monitoring Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Arthur S. Rood

    2014-11-01

    A quantitative assessment of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) air monitoring network was performed using frequency of detection as the performance metric. The INL air monitoring network consists of 37 low-volume air samplers in 31 different locations. Twenty of the samplers are located on INL (onsite) and 17 are located off INL (offsite). Detection frequencies were calculated using both BEA and ESER laboratory minimum detectable activity (MDA) levels. The CALPUFF Lagrangian puff dispersion model, coupled with 1 year of meteorological data, was used to calculate time-integrated concentrations at sampler locations for a 1-hour release of unit activity (1 Ci) for every hour of the year. The unit-activity time-integrated concentration (TICu) values were calculated at all samplers for releases from eight INL facilities. The TICu values were then scaled and integrated for a given release quantity and release duration. All facilities modeled a ground-level release emanating either from the center of the facility or at a point where significant emissions are possible. In addition to ground-level releases, three existing stacks at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, and Material and Fuels Complex were also modeled. Meteorological data from the 35 stations comprising the INL Mesonet network, data from the Idaho Falls Regional airport, upper air data from the Boise airport, and three-dimensional gridded data from the weather research forecasting model were used for modeling. Three representative radionuclides identified as key radionuclides in INL’s annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants evaluations were considered for the frequency of detection analysis: Cs-137 (beta-gamma emitter), Pu-239 (alpha emitter), and Sr-90 (beta emitter). Source-specific release quantities were calculated for each radionuclide, such that the maximum inhalation dose at any publicly accessible sampler or the National

  2. Water Flow and Solute Transport in Heterogeneous Soils: A new Multicompartment Sampler and a Theoretical Toolkit for Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, G. H.; Hogervorst, F. A.; Bloem, E.; Stagnitti, F.; Cirpka, O. A.

    2007-12-01

    Water flow and solute transport in soils are invariably affected by heterogeneity and often by preferential flow, both typically occurring within 1 square meter. Paradoxically, we need to understand flow and transport at this small scale to quantify them at the field and regional scales. This paradox arises from the geometry of soils: the scale in the direction of the flow is orders of magnitude smaller than the scales perpendicular to it. We present a coherent package of experimental and theoretical tools to observe and analyze small-scale variations (within 0.1- 1 square meter) of water and solute fluxes. Multicompartment samplers can measure small-scale water and solute movement in space and time, particularly in temperate climates. The latest generation of samplers allows repeated extraction of percolate samples in situ under controlled suction to minimize disturbance of the unsaturated flow field. After discussing the general principle of such samplers, a method will be presented to estimate the required total sampling area of a sampler from the degree of flow convergence in a soil. In recent years, we improved our ability to analyze the data produced by multicompartment samplers. The spatial solute distribution curve as the spatial equivalent of the travel time distribution was parameterized and physically interpreted. Both distributions were unified in the leaching surface, which has tremendous potential for detailed interpretation and model evaluation. Multicompartment samplers can also help identify the nature of the solute transport process. Recently, we expanded the theory of solute dilution to make it applicable to multicompartment sampler data. We will demonstrate how dilution theory can be used to determine the predominance of a convective-dispersive or a stochastic-convective transport regime during a tracer experiment.

  3. SRS environmental air surveillance program 1954-2015: General trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jannik, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-02

    The radiological monitoring program at SRS was established under the DuPont Company in June 1951 and was used as a measurement of the effectiveness of plant controls and as an authoritative record of environmental conditions surrounding the plant. It also served as a method of demonstrating compliance with applicable federal regulations and guidance. This document serves as a general summary of changes made specifically to the environmental air monitoring program since its inception, and a discussion of the general trends seen in the air monitoring program at SRS from 1954 to 2015. Initially, the environmental air surveillance program focused not only on releases from SRS but also on fallout from various weapons testing performed through the end of 1978. Flypaper was used to measure the amount of fallout in the atmosphere during this period, and was present at each of the 10 monitoring stations. By 1959, all site stacks were included in the air monitoring program to determine their contribution to the airborne radioactivity onsite, and the number of air surveillance samplers rose to 18. This trend of an increased number of sampling locations continued to a peak of 35 sampling locations before shifting to a downward trend in the mid-1990s. In 1962, 4 outer-range samplers were placed in Savannah and Macon, GA, and in Greenville and Columbia, SC. Until 1976, air samplers were simply placed around the perimeter of the various operation locations (after 1959, this included stacks to determine their contribution to the airborne radioactivity), with the intent of creating as representative a distribution as possible of the air surrounding operations.

  4. Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, dust, pollen and ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, ...

  5. Quantitative Evaluation of an Air-monitoring Network Using Atmospheric Transport Modeling and Frequency of Detection Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Arthur S; Sondrup, A Jeffrey; Ritter, Paul D

    2016-04-01

    A methodology has been developed to quantify the performance of an air-monitoring network in terms of frequency of detection. Frequency of detection is defined as the fraction of "events" that result in a detection at either a single sampler or network of samplers. An "event" is defined as a release to the atmosphere of a specified amount of activity over a finite duration that begins on a given day and hour of the year. The methodology uses an atmospheric transport model to predict air concentrations of radionuclides at the samplers for a given release time and duration. Another metric of interest determined by the methodology is called the network intensity, which is defined as the fraction of samplers in the network that have a positive detection for a given event. The frequency of detection methodology allows for evaluation of short-term releases that include effects of short-term variability in meteorological conditions. The methodology was tested using the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Laboratory Site ambient air-monitoring network consisting of 37 low-volume air samplers in 31 different locations covering a 17,630 km region. Releases from six major facilities distributed over an area of 1,435 km were modeled and included three stack sources and eight ground-level sources. A Lagrangian Puff air dispersion model (CALPUFF) was used to model atmospheric transport. The model was validated using historical Sb releases and measurements. Relevant 1-wk release quantities from each emission source were calculated based on a dose of 1.9×10 mSv at a public receptor (0.01 mSv assuming release persists over a year). Important radionuclides were Am, Cs, Pu, Pu, Sr, and tritium. Results show the detection frequency was over 97.5% for the entire network considering all sources and radionuclides. Network intensity results ranged from 3.75% to 62.7%. Evaluation of individual samplers indicated some samplers were poorly located and added little to the overall

  6. Quantitative Evaluation of an Air-monitoring Network Using Atmospheric Transport Modeling and Frequency of Detection Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Arthur S; Sondrup, A Jeffrey; Ritter, Paul D

    2016-04-01

    A methodology has been developed to quantify the performance of an air-monitoring network in terms of frequency of detection. Frequency of detection is defined as the fraction of "events" that result in a detection at either a single sampler or network of samplers. An "event" is defined as a release to the atmosphere of a specified amount of activity over a finite duration that begins on a given day and hour of the year. The methodology uses an atmospheric transport model to predict air concentrations of radionuclides at the samplers for a given release time and duration. Another metric of interest determined by the methodology is called the network intensity, which is defined as the fraction of samplers in the network that have a positive detection for a given event. The frequency of detection methodology allows for evaluation of short-term releases that include effects of short-term variability in meteorological conditions. The methodology was tested using the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Laboratory Site ambient air-monitoring network consisting of 37 low-volume air samplers in 31 different locations covering a 17,630 km region. Releases from six major facilities distributed over an area of 1,435 km were modeled and included three stack sources and eight ground-level sources. A Lagrangian Puff air dispersion model (CALPUFF) was used to model atmospheric transport. The model was validated using historical Sb releases and measurements. Relevant 1-wk release quantities from each emission source were calculated based on a dose of 1.9×10 mSv at a public receptor (0.01 mSv assuming release persists over a year). Important radionuclides were Am, Cs, Pu, Pu, Sr, and tritium. Results show the detection frequency was over 97.5% for the entire network considering all sources and radionuclides. Network intensity results ranged from 3.75% to 62.7%. Evaluation of individual samplers indicated some samplers were poorly located and added little to the overall

  7. Application of Chemcatcher passive sampler for monitoring levels of mercury in contaminated river water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Martínez, Rocío; Gómez-Gómez, M Milagros; Greenwood, Richard; Mills, Graham A; Vrana, Branislav; Palacios-Corvillo, María A

    2009-02-15

    A passive sampler (Chemcatcher) consisting of a 47 mm Emporetrade mark chelating disk (CHE) with iminodiacetic groups as the receiving phase overlaid with a diffusion membrane was developed and calibrated for the monitoring of Hg in water. Three different diffusion membranes including cellulose acetate (CA), polyethersulphone (PS) and cellulose dialysis membrane (D) were tested. The best performance was obtained with the CHE-PS tandem. The effective sampling rate of the device (R(s), L day(-1)) is defined as the equivalent volume of water extracted per unit time, and is analyte specific and can be determined experimentally in a flow-through tank. Effects of water temperature and turbulence on the uptake rate of Hg were assessed under controlled laboratory conditions. Sampling rates were in the range of 0.029-0.091 L day(-1). An increase in sampling rate with turbulence was demonstrated. The detection limit of the sampler obtained in flowing waters ranged between 2.2 and 2.9 ng L(-1)Hg. The performance of Chemcatcher was tested alongside spot water sampling in a 14-day field deployment at two locations on the Valdeazogues River, Almadén, Spain. In general, the Hg concentration estimated by the Chemcatcher was lower than that found in spot water samples collected over the same period. This may be explained by the behaviour of this sampler that measures only the labile fraction of Hg in water, and this will exclude some species. However, Chemcatcher preconcentrates Hg allowing its determination in some places where its concentration is below the detection limit of spot sampling. PMID:19084668

  8. Use of passive samplers in pollution monitoring: a numerical approach for marinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, A; Karacık, B; Henkelmann, B; Pfister, G; Schramm, K-W; Yakan, S D; Barlas, B; Okay, O S

    2014-12-01

    Triolein-containing semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and butyl rubber (BR) based sorbents were employed as passive samplers in 14 coastal stations of Turkey including shipyards and marinas to characterize time-integrated levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and their relationship to potential pollution sources. Passive samplers of SPMDs and BR sorbents were deployed for 30days in the spring of 2012. The maximum concentrations of total PAH and PCB compounds sequestered by SPMDs were 3338 ng g(-1) SPMD and 4247 pg g(-1) SPMD. (END)-I and DDT-related compounds were dominant OCP compounds for most of the sites in passive samplers. Total PAH concentrations in SPMDs were found 1.2 to 8 times higher than the concentrations in BRs. However, BR sorbents were able to sample some PAHs which could not be sampled by SPMDs. The concentrations of PCBs and OCPs in BRs were similar or higher than SPMDs. SPMD-data were used to estimate the average ambient water concentrations of the contaminants. Two existing theoretical approaches have been used to derive the concentrations of hydrophobic pollutants in the ambient waters. The results were found very similar and range from 7318 to 183864 pg L(-1) for PAHs, from 2 to 186 pg L(-1) for PCBs, and from 98 to 848 pg L(-1) for OCPs. Furthermore, a simple numerical model was designed to estimate the boat-related water concentrations in marinas by using the seawater data supplied by SPMDs. The model was mainly built on the water concentration and the capacities of a particular marina and then applied to two sites in the second marina. A good correlation was found between the model outputs and SPMD-water data. PMID:25108068

  9. Fast monitoring of indoor bioaerosol concentrations with ATP bioluminescence assay using an electrostatic rod-type sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Woon; Park, Chul Woo; Lee, Sung Hwa; Hwang, Jungho

    2015-01-01

    A culture-based colony counting method is the most widely used analytical technique for monitoring bioaerosols in both indoor and outdoor environments. However, this method requires several days for colony formation. In this study, our goal was fast monitoring (Sampling: 3 min, Detection: bioluminescence assay using a bioaerosol sampler. For this purpose, a novel hand-held electrostatic rod-type sampler (110 mm wide, 115 mm long, and 200 mm tall) was developed and used with a commercial luminometer, which employs the Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence method. The sampler consisted of a wire-rod type charger and a cylindrical collector, and was operated with an applied voltage of 4.5 kV and a sampling flow rate of 150.7 lpm. Its performance was tested using Staphylococcus epidermidis which was aerosolized with an atomizer. Bioaerosol concentrations were measured using ATP bioluminescence method with our sampler and compared with the culture-based method using Andersen cascade impactor under controlled laboratory conditions. Indoor bioaerosol concentrations were also measured using both methods in various indoor environments. A linear correlation was obtained between both methods in lab-tests and field-tests. Our proposed sampler with ATP bioluminescence method may be effective for fast monitoring of indoor bioaerosol concentrations.

  10. Fast monitoring of indoor bioaerosol concentrations with ATP bioluminescence assay using an electrostatic rod-type sampler.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Woon Park

    Full Text Available A culture-based colony counting method is the most widely used analytical technique for monitoring bioaerosols in both indoor and outdoor environments. However, this method requires several days for colony formation. In this study, our goal was fast monitoring (Sampling: 3 min, Detection: < 1 min of indoor bioaerosol concentrations with ATP bioluminescence assay using a bioaerosol sampler. For this purpose, a novel hand-held electrostatic rod-type sampler (110 mm wide, 115 mm long, and 200 mm tall was developed and used with a commercial luminometer, which employs the Adenosine triphosphate (ATP bioluminescence method. The sampler consisted of a wire-rod type charger and a cylindrical collector, and was operated with an applied voltage of 4.5 kV and a sampling flow rate of 150.7 lpm. Its performance was tested using Staphylococcus epidermidis which was aerosolized with an atomizer. Bioaerosol concentrations were measured using ATP bioluminescence method with our sampler and compared with the culture-based method using Andersen cascade impactor under controlled laboratory conditions. Indoor bioaerosol concentrations were also measured using both methods in various indoor environments. A linear correlation was obtained between both methods in lab-tests and field-tests. Our proposed sampler with ATP bioluminescence method may be effective for fast monitoring of indoor bioaerosol concentrations.

  11. Performance of Passive Samplers Analyzed by Computer-Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy to Measure PM10-2.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Thomas M; Sawvel, Eric J; Willis, Robert; West, Roger R; Casuccio, Gary S

    2016-07-19

    We report on the precision and accuracy of measuring PM10-2.5 and its components with particles collected by passive aerosol samplers and analyzed by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Passive samplers were deployed for week-long intervals in triplicate and colocated with a federal reference method sampler at three sites and for 5 weeks in summer 2009 and 5 weeks in winter 2010 in Cleveland, OH. The limit of detection of the passive method for PM10-2.5 determined from blank analysis was 2.8 μg m(-3). Overall precision expressed as root-mean-square coefficient of variation (CVRMS) improved with increasing concentrations (37% for all samples, n = 30; 19% for PM10-2.5 > 10 μg m(-3), n = 9; and 10% for PM10-2.5 > 15 μg m(-3), n = 4). The linear regression of PM10-2.5 measured passively on that measured with the reference sampler exhibited an intercept not statistically different than zero (p = 0.46) and a slope not statistically different from unity (p = 0.92). Triplicates with high CVs (CV > 40%, n = 5) were attributed to low particle counts (and mass concentrations), spurious counts attributed to salt particles, and Al-rich particles. This work provides important quantitative observations that can help guide future development and use of passive samplers for measuring atmospheric particulate matter. PMID:27300163

  12. Study of Nox Levels At The Castellon Area (spain) By Means of Passive Samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, J. M.; Esteve, V.

    Nitrogen oxides are emitted by mobile sources like traffic, heating engines and indus- tries. In the case of La Plana de Castellon area, the cities, the industrial area called El Serrallo (with its oil refinery and power plant), the tile factories and the main roads (A7-E15 and N-340), all they are the main pollutant focus of NOx. Those pollutants are precursors of tropospheric ozone formation. The aim of this work is the study of nitrogen oxides levels in La Plana de Castellon area, by means of passive samplers and stand relationships between NOx levels and ozone levels both measured with pas- sive samplers. The measurement campaign is made during summer, the higher pho- tochemical activity period (from May to September) in order to obtain the necessary data of NOx levels to make the relationship with measured ozone levels. Measuring campaing has been divided into sampling periods of one week. Twelve samples are collected each sampling period to cover an interest area of 1400 Km2, Two of these samples are laboratory blanks, four are situated at reference points (beside an auto- matic NOx sampler), one is situated at A7-E15 expressway, other at the main road N-340 and another one in a hard traffic road. The other three are placed in the main cities (Castellon and Benicassim). We employ Radielloo samplers developed by Dr. Cocheo at Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri. Samples located far from the main roads, at countryside show the lowest levels of NOx, lower than 10 ppb. Samples located at Castellon city show a difference between downtown and boundaries of about 33% higher at downtown, raising from 11 ppb to 14,5 ppb of NOx. The highest levels of NOx are measured at roads and their surroundings with medium levels of 14,3 ppb of NOx. Moreover, the sample located close to the expressway raises its level until 18 ppb of NOx, 53,4% higher than the media of all the samples measured. We would like to thank Dr. M. Wolfson(Harvard University), Dr. Carlos Felis (Conselleria de

  13. Field test of the PNNL Automated Radioxenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagomarsino, R.J.; Ku, E.; Latner, N.; Sanderson, C.G.

    1998-07-01

    As part of the requirements of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), the Automated Radioxenon/Sampler Analyzer (ARSA) was designed and engineered by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The instrument is to provide near real-time detection and measurement of the radioxenons released into the atmosphere after a nuclear test. Forty-six field tests, designed to determine the performance of the ARSA prototype under simulated field conditions, were conducted at EML from March to December 1997. This final report contains detailed results of the tests with recommendations for improvements in instrument performance.

  14. Partial Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU) for the Type 4 In Situ Vapor Sampler (ISVS) Carts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides the ''Partial'' Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU), for the Type 4 in-situ vapor sampler system (ISVS). This document is generated to support the completion of equipment modifications and engineering documentation for the ISVS system that is used for sampling gaseous vapors in the Hanford single shell radioactive waste storage tanks. The ABU is used to document the items required for transferring the ISVS system to operations for field use. This document is generated following Characterization Engineering Desk Instruction DI-CE-004-001

  15. Evaluation of atmospheric PCDD/F depositions via automated and traditional water surface samplers in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Kai Hsien; Kao, Shuh Ji; Liu, Kung Ting; Lee, Tzu Yi

    2012-03-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) are a group of compounds of major environmental concern. Once emitted into the atmosphere, PCDD/Fs undergo photochemical reactions and enter other environmental compartments via wet and dry deposition. In this study, atmospheric PCDD/F depositions were collected via an automated PCDD/F deposition sampler and traditional cylindrical vessels, respectively, in northern, central, and southern Taiwan from 2008 to 2010. The automated PCDD/F precipitation sampler used in this study can prevent both resuspension and photodegradation of the PCDD/Fs collected and also effectively separates the PCDD/F samples into dry and wet contributions. The results indicate that the average atmospheric PCDD/F concentrations collected by the high-volume sampling trains were 13.6 ± 10 (n = 10), 15.6 ± 5.2 (n = 7), and 10.9 ± 6.3 (n = 6) fg I-TEQ/m(3) in northern, central, and southern Taiwan, respectively. In addition, the results also indicate that the PCDD/F deposition flux collected with an automated PCDD/F sampler (1.84 ± 0.90-8.68 ± 5.1 pg I-TEQ/m(2)/day, n = 23) is significantly higher than that sampled with cylindrical vessels (1.11 ± 0.69-5.64 ± 5.2 pg I-TEQ/m(2)/day, n = 23). Based on the Mann-Whitney statistical analysis, the p value (0.037) of PCDD/F deposition flux between those two samplers measurement is lower than 0.05. The difference is attributed to the fact that part of the PCDD/F depositions collected by traditional cylindrical vessels is photodegraded and revolatilized. In addition, the wet deposition flux of PCDD/Fs (3.66 to 470 pg I-TEQ/m(2)/rainy day, n = 23) observed in Taiwan is significantly higher than the dry deposition flux (0.38 to 4.55 pg I-TEQ/m(2)/sunny day, n = 23). The results demonstrate that the wet deposition is the major PCDD/F removal mechanism in the atmosphere. Furthermore, the overall PCDD/Fs deposition velocity and scavenging (rainout) coefficient in Taiwan are calculated as 0

  16. Atmospheric deposition of PCDD/Fs measured via automated and traditional samplers in Northern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Kai Hsien; Liu, Kung Ting; Chang, Shu Hao; Chang, Moo Been

    2009-11-01

    Most polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in the atmosphere are bound to particles which are suspended in the atmosphere, and eventually settle on soil, vegetation, water bodies or other receptors in the environment. Monitoring atmospheric deposition fluxes (dry/wet) is important in tracing the environmental fate and behavior of PCDD/Fs. PCDD/F depositions were collected via an automated PCDD/F ambient sampler and traditional cylindrical vessels, respectively, from April 2007 to February 2008. The automated PCDD/F ambient sampler used in this study can prevent both re-suspension and photo degradation of the PCDD/Fs collected and effectively separates the PCDD/F samples into dry and wet contributions. The results indicated that the ambient PCDD/F concentrations collected using the PS-1 sampler ranged from 0.02 pg I-TEQ/m(3) to 0.16 pg I-TEQ/m(3) in Northern Taiwan. The results also indicated that the PCDD/F deposition flux collected using the automated PCDD/F sampler (17.5 pg I-TEQ/m(2) d to 25.8 pg I-TEQ/m(2) d) was significantly higher than that sampled with the cylindrical vessels (2.0 pg I-TEQ/m(2) d to 9.9 pg I-TEQ/m(2) d). The difference was attributed to the fact that part of the PCDD/F depositions collected using the traditional cylindrical vessels had undergone photo degradation and evaporation. In addition, the wet deposition flux of PCDD/Fs (39.4 pg I-TEQ/m(2) rainy day to 228 pg I-TEQ/m(2) rainy day) observed in this study was significantly higher than the dry deposition flux (12.3 pg I-TEQ/m(2) sunny day to 16.7 pg I-TEQ/m(2) sunny day). These results demonstrated that wet deposition is the major PCDD/F removal mechanism in the atmosphere. PMID:19819518

  17. Influence of travel speed on spray deposition uniformity from an air-assisted variable-rate sprayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A newly developed LiDAR-guided air-assisted variable-rate sprayer for nursery and orchard applications was tested at various travel speeds to compare its spray deposition and coverage uniformity with constant-rate applications. Spray samplers, including nylon screens and water-sensitive papers (WSP)...

  18. Development of a Thermal Desorption Tube Sampler and Cryo-GC-MS Method for the Measurement of VOCs in Biomass Burning Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, C.; Angelevska, A.; Jaffe, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are commonly used to distinguish regional biomass burning emissions from those that have undergone long-range transport. This study focuses on acetonitrile, which is a robust tracer for biomass burning due to its relatively long atmospheric lifetime (weeks to months). By quantifying this tracer in atmospheric samples, we can not only identify biomass burning emission sources over varying spatial scales but also determine the effect of biomass burning on pollution events, such as the production of ozone, in remote or urban areas. We use PoraPak N as a collection medium for both background and elevated levels of acetonitrile and other VOCs in discrete atmospheric samples. Thermal desorption tubes are inserted into a multi-tube active sampler, where each tube is capable of sampling between approximately 5 and 30 liters of ambient air over the course of 2-8 hours. After collection, we analyze these samples using thermal desorption into a cryofocusing trap with subsequent gas chromatography (GC) for separation and detection by a mass spectrometer (MS). To test the field deployment of this technique, we collected samples of both background ambient air and air that was impacted by biomass burning plumes at the Mount Bachelor Observatory (MBO) in central Oregon during summer and fall 2015. Based on previous studies by Wang et al. (2007) and others cited therein, we expect to see ambient concentrations at MBO between 0.1 and 10 ppb of acetonitrile. Long-term active sampling by multiple thermal desorption tubes along with analysis of these samples via Cryo-GC-MS provides a portable, low-maintenance method of measuring biomass burning tracers in remote or urban areas. With this technique, we can further investigate the relative impacts of regionally and long-range transported biomass burning emissions on air quality during high pollution events.

  19. Methodology for profiling anti-androgen mixtures in river water using multiple passive samplers and bioassay-directed analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscio, Camilla; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Al-Salhi, Raghad; Ramsey, Michael H; Hill, Elizabeth M

    2014-06-15

    The identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals in surface waters is challenging as they comprise a variety of structures which are often present at nanomolar concentrations and are temporally highly variable. Hence, a holistic passive sampling approach can be an efficient technique to overcome these limitations. In this study, a combination of 4 different passive samplers used for sampling polar (POCIS Apharm and POCIS Bpesticide) and apolar compounds (LDPE low density polyethylene membranes, and silicone strips) were used to profile anti-androgenic activity present in river water contaminated by a wastewater effluent. Extracts of passive samplers were analysed using HPLC fractionation in combination with an in vitro androgen receptor antagonist screen (YAS). Anti-androgenic activity was detected in extracts from silicone strips and POCIS A/B at (mean ± SD) 1.1 ± 0.1 and 0.55 ± 0.06 mg flutamide standard equivalents/sampler respectively, but was not detected in LDPE sampler extracts. POCIS samplers revealed higher selectivity for more polar anti-androgenic HPLC fractions compared with silicone strips. Over 31 contaminants were identified which showed inhibition of YAS activity and were potential anti-androgens, and these included fungicides, germicides, flame retardants and pharmaceuticals. This study reveals that passive sampling, using a combination of POCIS A and silicone samplers, is a promising tool for screening complex mixture of anti-androgenic contaminants present in surface waters, with the potential to identify new and emerging structures with endocrine disrupting activity.

  20. Development and application of a dichotomous vapor/aerosol sampler for HDI-derived total reactive isocyanate group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rando, R J; Poovey, H G

    1999-01-01

    A dichotomous vapor/aerosol sampler was developed for measurement of HDI (1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate)-derived total reactive isocyanate group (TRIG). The sampler consisted of an impactor or cyclone inlet, followed by an annular diffusional denuder, and a glass-fiber filter backup. The denuder walls and backup filter were each coated with 20 mg tributylphosphate and 1 mg MAMA reagent (9-N-methylamino-methylanthracene). After collection, MAMA-derivatized isocyanates were desorbed from the sampler and determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with dual-wavelength ultraviolet absorbance and fluorescence detection. Test atmospheres of HDI vapor and of HDI/HDI-biuret aerosols were generated in the laboratory and sampled with the optimized dichotomous sampler. Vapor phase HDI was completely collected by the diffusional denuder. When a mixture of HDI-biuret and HDI (approximately 30 ppb) was nebulized and collected with the dichotomous sampler, approximately 78% of the HDI was in the vapor phase, whereas about 22% was associated with the aerosol fraction. The dichotomous sampler was then used to measure vapor and condensed phase TRIG in a paint spray booth during application of a polyurethane paint. Measured levels of TRIG during the spraying operation averaged 391 +/- 154 micrograms/m3. Concentrations of HDI monomer averaged only 14 +/- 6.5 micrograms/m3. HDI-biuret was the largest component of TRIG found in these samples and was completely in the condensed aerosol phase. In contrast, the majority of the HDI was in the vapor phase, but significant (15-26%) amounts were measured in the aerosol fraction of the paint overspray. Thus, significant partitioning of HDI between vapor and condensed phases was demonstrated in both the laboratory and field, even when its concentration was well below the vapor saturation point. PMID:10635539

  1. Air pollution with particulates and heavy metals in some Syrian cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of air pollution in different sites of five Syrian cities (Damascus, Aleppo, Tartous, Homs, and Sweda) was carried out. The concentrations of total suspended particulate less than 10 microns (PM 10) and less than 3 micron (PM3) were measured using high volume air sampler (HVAS). Heavy element concentration, Pb, Cd, Zn and Cu were also determined using high volume air sampler (HVAS). Heavy element concentrations, Pb, Cd, Zn and Cu were also determined using anodic stripping voltammetry. The result showed that TSP, PM10 and PM3 were higher than WHO standards in several times. Mean lead concentrations ranged between 0.58 and 2.96 μg/m3 and 0.56 and 1.53 μg/m3 in Damascus and Aleppo respectively, while in the other cities these concentrations were less than WHO standards (0.5 - 1 μg/m3). (author)

  2. PeGS: Perturbed Gibbs Samplers that Generate Privacy-Compliant Synthetic Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Park

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a categorical data synthesizer algorithm that guarantees a quantifiable disclosure risk. Our algorithm, named Perturbed Gibbs Sampler (PeGS, can handle high-dimensional categorical data that are intractable if represented as contingency tables. PeGS involves three intuitive steps: 1 disintegration, 2 noise injection, and 3 synthesis. We first disintegrate the original data into building blocks that (approximately capture essential statistical characteristics of the original data. This process is efficiently implemented using feature hashing and non-parametric distribution approximation. In the next step, an optimal amount of noise is injected into the estimated statistical building blocks to guarantee differential privacy or l-diversity. Finally, synthetic samples are drawn using a Gibbs sampler approach. California Patient Discharge data are used to demonstrate statistical properties of the proposed synthetic methodology. Marginal and conditional distributions as well as regression coefficients obtained from the synthesized data are compared to those obtained from the original data. Intruder scenarios are simulated to evaluate disclosure risks of the synthesized data from multiple angles. Limitations and extensions of the proposed algorithm are also discussed.

  3. A portable membrane contactor sampler for analysis of noble gases in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Han, Liang-Feng; Jaklitsch, Manfred; Aggarwal, Pradeep K

    2013-01-01

    To enable a wider use of dissolved noble gas concentrations and isotope ratios in groundwater studies, we have developed an efficient and portable sampling device using a commercially available membrane contactor. The device separates dissolved gases from a stream of water and collects them in a small copper tube (6 mm in diameter and 100 mm in length with two pinch-off clamps) for noble gas analysis by mass spectrometry. We have examined the performance of the sampler using a tank of homogeneous water prepared in the laboratory and by field testing. We find that our sampling device can extract heavier noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) more efficiently than the lighter ones (He and Ne). An extraction time of about 60 min at a flow rate of 3 L/min is sufficient for all noble gases extracted in the sampler to attain equilibrium with the dissolved phase. The extracted gas sample did not indicate fractionation of helium ((3) He/(4) He) isotopes or other noble gas isotopes. Field performance of the sampling device was tested using a groundwater well in Vienna and results were in excellent agreement with those obtained from the conventional copper tube sampling method.

  4. Position Weight Matrix, Gibbs Sampler, and the Associated Significance Tests in Motif Characterization and Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuhua Xia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Position weight matrix (PWM is not only one of the most widely used bioinformatic methods, but also a key component in more advanced computational algorithms (e.g., Gibbs sampler for characterizing and discovering motifs in nucleotide or amino acid sequences. However, few generally applicable statistical tests are available for evaluating the significance of site patterns, PWM, and PWM scores (PWMS of putative motifs. Statistical significance tests of the PWM output, that is, site-specific frequencies, PWM itself, and PWMS, are in disparate sources and have never been collected in a single paper, with the consequence that many implementations of PWM do not include any significance test. Here I review PWM-based methods used in motif characterization and prediction (including a detailed illustration of the Gibbs sampler for de novo motif discovery, present statistical and probabilistic rationales behind statistical significance tests relevant to PWM, and illustrate their application with real data. The multiple comparison problem associated with the test of site-specific frequencies is best handled by false discovery rate methods. The test of PWM, due to the use of pseudocounts, is best done by resampling methods. The test of individual PWMS for each sequence segment should be based on the extreme value distribution.

  5. A study on emission of phthalate esters from plastic materials using a passive flux sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, M.; Shinohara, N.; Lim, A.; Otake, T.; Kumagai, K.; Yanagisawa, Y.

    Phthalate esters are used as plasticizer in many plastics, and several studies have shown their toxicity. Phthalate esters are gradually emitted over time, and so it is conceivable that they pose a significant health risk. This study aims to investigate the temperature dependence of the emissions of various phthalate esters and to estimate the health risks of these emissions at various temperatures. A passive-type sampler was developed to measure the flux of phthalate esters from the surface of plastic materials. With this sampler, we examined three widely used plastic materials: synthetic leather, wallpaper and vinyl flooring. The observed maximum emissions of diethyl phthalate, dibutyl phthalate, and diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) from these materials at 20°C were 0.89, 0.77, and 14 μg m -2 h -1, respectively. Emissions at 80°C were 2.8, 4.5×10 2, and 1.5×10 3 μg m -2 h -1, respectively. The results showed this temperature dependence is determined primarily by the type of phthalate ester and less so by the type of material. The estimation from the results of temperature dependence indicated the concentration of DEHP in a vehicle left out in the sunshine during the day can exceed the recommended levels of Japan Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare.

  6. Auto-Gopher: a wireline deep sampler driven by piezoelectric percussive actuator and EM rotary motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badescu, Mircea; Ressa, Aaron; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Zacny, Kris; Paulsen, Gale L.; Beegle, Luther; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2013-04-01

    The ability to penetrate subsurfaces and perform sample acquisition at depth of meters may be critical for future NASA in-situ exploration missions to bodies in the solar system, including Mars and Europa. A corer/sampler was developed with the goal of enabling acquisition of samples from depths of several meters where if used on Mars would be beyond the oxidized and sterilized zone. For this purpose, we developed a rotary-hammering coring drill, called Auto-Gopher, which employs a piezoelectric actuated percussive mechanism for breaking formations and an electric motor that rotates the bit to remove the powdered cuttings. This sampler is a wireline mechanism that can be fed into and retrieved from the drilled hole using a winch and a cable. It includes an inchworm anchoring mechanism allowing the drill advancement and weight on bit control without twisting the reeling and power cables. The penetration rate is being optimized by simultaneously activating the percussive and rotary motions of the Auto-Gopher. The percussive mechanism is based on the Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) mechanism that is driven by piezoelectric stack and that was demonstrated to require low axial preload. The design and fabrication of this device were presented in previous publications. This paper presents the results of laboratory and field tests and lessons learned from this development.

  7. Prototype particulate stack sampler with single-cut nozzle and microcomputer calculating/display system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype particulate stack sampler (PPSS) has been developed to improve on the existing EPA Method 5 sampling apparatus. Its primary features are (1) higher sampling rate (56 1/min); (2) display (on demand) of all required variables and calculated values by a microcomputer-based calculating and display system; (3) continuous stack gas moisture determination; (4) a virtual impactor nozzle with 3 μm mass median diameter cutpoint which collects fine and coarse particle fractions on separate glass fiber filters; (5) a variable-area inlet to maintain isokinetic sampling conditions; and (6) conversion to stainless steel components from the glass specified by EPA Method 5. The basic sampling techniques of EPA Method 5 have been retained; however, versatility in the form of optional in-stack filters and general modernization of the stack sampler have been provided in the prototype design. Laboratory testing with monodisperse dye aerosols has shown the present variable inlet, virtual impactor nozzle to have a collection efficiency which is less than 77% and significant wall losses. This is primarily due to lack of symmetry in this rectangular jet impactor and short transition lengths dictated by physical design constraints (required passage of the nozzle through a 7.6 cm (3 in) diameter stack port). Electronic components have shown acceptable service in laboratory testing although no field testing of the prototype under a broad range of temperature, humidity, and SO2 concentration has been undertaken

  8. Estimated variability of National Atmospheric Deposition Program/Mercury Deposition Network measurements using collocated samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherbee, G.A.; Gay, D.A.; Brunette, R.C.; Sweet, C.W.

    2007-01-01

    The National Atmospheric Deposition Program/Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) provides long-term, quality-assured records of mercury in wet deposition in the USA and Canada. Interpretation of spatial and temporal trends in the MDN data requires quantification of the variability of the MDN measurements. Variability is quantified for MDN data from collocated samplers at MDN sites in two states, one in Illinois and one in Washington. Median absolute differences in the collocated sampler data for total mercury concentration are approximately 11% of the median mercury concentration for all valid 1999-2004 MDN data. Median absolute differences are between 3.0% and 14% of the median MDN value for collector catch (sample volume) and between 6.0% and 15% of the median MDN value for mercury wet deposition. The overall measurement errors are sufficiently low to resolve between NADP/MDN measurements by ??2 ng??l-1 and ??2 ????m-2?? year-1, which are the contour intervals used to display the data on NADP isopleths maps for concentration and deposition, respectively. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007.

  9. A Portable Membrane-based Gas Sampler for Gases Dissolved in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, P.; Loose, B.; Stute, M.

    2007-12-01

    The complications that arise while collecting, transporting and storing groundwater for trace gas analysis have prompted a new approach, which uses membrane technology to obtain a gas sample from the water stream, in the field. This portable groundwater sampler uses a microporous hydrophobic membrane to collect a finite volume of gas, which is in solubility equilibrium with a time-invariant stream of water. Samples of the gas volume can be analyzed to determine original water concentrations for virtually any dissolved gas. The sampler does not require the use of compressed inert gas and its power consumption is minimal. During the development stages, N2, Ar, O2, CO2 and SF6 were sampled and measured using gas chromatography to evaluate the equilibrium condition and confirm the equilibration time, which was initially gauged using a pressure transducer. Equilibration studies were conducted in the laboratory and at Black Rock Forest, a field site near the Lamont Campus of Columbia University. The time required to achieve solubility equilibrium depends on the dissolved gas content and the water flow rate; 100 cc of gas can be collected, from water in equilibrium with the atmosphere, at low flow (ca. 2 L min-1) in less than 1 hour. The initial results demonstrate that gauge pressure is a good proxy for solubility equilibrium, and that diffusion can fractionate the gas ratios during rapid mass transfer as indicated by rapid pressure changes.

  10. Size-time composition profile of aerosols using the drum sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Thomas A.; Feeney, Patrick J.; Eldred, Robert A.

    1987-03-01

    Mie scattering theory imposes strict requirements for both size and compositional information on aerosols associated with visibility degradation. But, at the very clean National Park Service sites where we do such studies, episodes of degraded visibility may be infrequent and of short duration. To meet these needs, an 8 stage impactor of the Battelle/SFU design was mated to rotating drum impaction surfaces of the Lundgren design in a compact and rugged DRUM sampler of Davis design. This unit, three years in development, has been extensively tested using laboratory aerosols and field intercomparisons. The standard unit runs essentially unattended for 14 or 28 days. The samples are analyzed in 2 to 8 hour time segments. Analyses are done by carefully collimated (1 mm, 2 mm) proton beams in a tightly coupled PIXE system, yielding sensitivities of a few {solng}/{m 3}. Dramatic shifts in the size distribution of sulfur versus time have been observed, with direct influence on optical extinction. Further, primary smelter effluents have been clearly identified at Grand Canyon NP, but only in the DRUM sampler makes excellent use of PIXE capabilities, but can also be analyzed by lasers (Csoot) and β-gauging (mass).

  11. A New Simple Suspended-Load Sampler: Continuous Particulate Matter Collection from Rivers with Low and High Suspended Matter Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralik, Martin; Miesbauer, Hermann; Humer, Franko; Oberndorfer, Hermann

    2010-05-01

    Please fill in your abstract text. Suspended particulate matter (SPM) or suspended load in waters is the part of the stream load that is carried for a considerable period of time in suspension. Long term suspended sediment monitoring is hampered by the limited sample size or enormous investments in equipment and/or working hours. In addition many samplers are limited to easily accessible sampling points equipped with electric power supply or to certain types of streams and cannot operate unattended in case of floods. The sorption characteristics of the suspended particulate matter (wash load) have been recognized as important transporters of natural and anthropogenic trace constituents. To allow repeated analyses sometimes several grams of dried SPM are needed. All parts of the sediment sampler are available as spare parts in hardware stores and made of polyvinylchloride (PVC). The inlet device is connected with the sampler by a tubing of several meter length. Without a pump the sampler can be positioned at a safe place lower than the inlet device to allow a continuous flow. Only a small portion (0.001-0.002 l/s) of the river water flows down through the central pipe by gravitational force to the bottom of the container. Due to the considerable larger diameter of the container the water rises very slowly (1-3 hours) and leaves the container at a small overflow-pipe allowing a nearly complete settling and/or flocculation (80-90%) of the suspended load in the container. The sampler was tested in an alpine torrent and two rivers in flat areas. The newly developed sampler offers following advantages. The sampler (1) is inexpensive and robust, (2) operates in case of small cascade or cataracts (>0.5 m) without power supply, (3) can be used singly or in lateral or vertical nests, (4) allows continuous settling and flocculation without perturbation by vibrating movements of the sampler (5) is resistant to plugging and clogging by coarser particles and plant debris, (6

  12. Analysis techniques and performance of the Domino Ring Sampler version 4 based readout for the MAGIC telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Sitarek, Julian; Mazin, Daniel; Paoletti, Riccardo; Tescaro, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Recently the readout of the MAGIC telescopes has been upgraded to a new system based on the Domino Ring Sampler version 4 chip. We present the analysis techniques and the signal extraction performance studies of this system. We study the behaviour of the baseline, the noise, the cross-talk, the linearity and the time resolution. We investigate also the optimal signal extraction. In addition we show some of the analysis techniques specific to the readout based on the Domino Ring Sampler version 2 chip, previously used in the MAGIC II telescope.

  13. Performance of High Flow Rate Personal Respirable Samplers When Challenged with Mineral Aerosols of Different Particle Size Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Stacey, Peter; Thorpe, Andrew; Echt, Alan

    2016-01-01

    It is thought that the performance of respirable samplers may vary when exposed to dust aerosols with different particle sizes and wind speeds. This study investigated the performance of the GK 4.16 (RASCAL), GK 2.69, PPI 8, and FSP 10, high flow rate personal samplers when exposed to aerosols of mineral dust in a wind tunnel at two different wind speeds (1 and 2 m s−1) and orientations (towards and side-on to the source of emission). The mass median aerodynamic diameter of four aerosolized t...

  14. Elimination of microorganisms from dental operatory compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ciccio, A; Chan, E C

    1998-01-01

    Compressed air is used to power high-speed handpieces, as well as to dry and clean surfaces in the oral cavity during patient treatment, in all dental operatories. The compressed air used in the dental operatories located in large institutions such as universities or hospitals is generally obtained from a central source, and is produced by continually running compressors. In operatories located in private practice settings, compressed air is obtained from small on-site air compressors, which may be run less frequently. A survey was made of operatories in the Montreal area to determine the microbial load of the compressed air produced by air compressors. An air sampler was used to collect compressed air and impinge it on a rotating agar medium surface. Compared to the air produced from compressors in constant use, the air collected from compressors that ran intermittently had a very high microbial load. The efficacy of an apparatus designed to sterilize the contaminated air produced by small, on-site compressors was tested. Called a Purilair, this device heats every particle of inflowing compressed air to 250 degrees C and then forces it through a fine-pore ceramic filter. In three private practice operatories, an in-line Purilair effectively sterilized the air being delivered by small compressors. The same result was obtained in the laboratory when lyophilized spores and cells of Bacillus stearothermophilus and conidia of Penicillium notatum and Aspergillus niger were sprayed into the intake line of the apparatus. PMID:9473876

  15. Elimination of microorganisms from dental operatory compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ciccio, A; Chan, E C

    1998-01-01

    Compressed air is used to power high-speed handpieces, as well as to dry and clean surfaces in the oral cavity during patient treatment, in all dental operatories. The compressed air used in the dental operatories located in large institutions such as universities or hospitals is generally obtained from a central source, and is produced by continually running compressors. In operatories located in private practice settings, compressed air is obtained from small on-site air compressors, which may be run less frequently. A survey was made of operatories in the Montreal area to determine the microbial load of the compressed air produced by air compressors. An air sampler was used to collect compressed air and impinge it on a rotating agar medium surface. Compared to the air produced from compressors in constant use, the air collected from compressors that ran intermittently had a very high microbial load. The efficacy of an apparatus designed to sterilize the contaminated air produced by small, on-site compressors was tested. Called a Purilair, this device heats every particle of inflowing compressed air to 250 degrees C and then forces it through a fine-pore ceramic filter. In three private practice operatories, an in-line Purilair effectively sterilized the air being delivered by small compressors. The same result was obtained in the laboratory when lyophilized spores and cells of Bacillus stearothermophilus and conidia of Penicillium notatum and Aspergillus niger were sprayed into the intake line of the apparatus.

  16. Techniques of low technology sampling of air pollution by metals: a comparison of concentrations and map patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, O L; Gailey, F A

    1987-07-01

    During a 17 month survey of air pollution in the town of Armadale, central Scotland, the concentrations of some metals (iron, manganese, zinc, lead, copper, chrome, nickel, cadmium, and cobalt) were measured in seven types of low technology sampler--four indigenous and three transplanted--at 47 sites. The geographical patterns of the concentrations in the samplers were compared on two types of map. For most metals, sites with high concentrations were present close to the foundry and also in the north of the town. The differences between the patterns of pollution shown by the various types of sampler probably reflected differing mechanisms for collection and different affinities for various sizes and types of metal particle.

  17. Air pollution in Thailand using nuclear-related analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods of neutron activation, both instrumental and radiochemical, and atomic absorption spectrophotometry are used in a study of the concentrations of Al, As, Br, Cd, Cl, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, V, Zn and Pb in airborne particulate matter collected from 7 permanent and 9 temporary air quality monitoring stations. The location of the stations are urban residential, suburban residential, mixed (commercial and residential), commercial and industrial areas and near major roads in Bangkok Metropolitan areas. Air sampling is performed once a month for 24 hours continuously using the high volume air sampler (GMW 2000 H) and for 5, 10, and 15 days continuously using an Anderson Air Sampler (SIBATA AN-200). The elements As, Cd and Cu are determined destructively using ion exchange chromatography while Hg and Se are determined by the dry combustion technique. The determination of Pb was done by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The results of Pb concentrations in airborne particulate matters, collected during 1987 to 1991, were reported by the Office of the National Environment Board. Levels of Pb content were found to be lower than the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. (author). 3 refs, 4 tabs

  18. Air Abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Is Air Abrasion? Article Chapters What Is Air Abrasion? What Happens? The Pros and Cons Will I Feel Anything? Is Air Abrasion for Everyone? print full article print this ...

  19. THE POTENTIAL INFLUENCES OF FACE VELOCITY ON PM ARTIFACT LOSSES FOR EXPOSURE SAMPLERS USING TEFLON FILTER COLLECTION SUBSTRATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influences of artifact formations and losses on Particulate Matter (PM) sampler collection surfaces are well documented, especially for nitrates (Hering and Cass, 1999), and SVOC's (McDow, 1999), and more recently for speciated carbon (Turpin and Lim, 2001). These artifact...

  20. Performance evaluation and accuracy of passive capillary samplers (PCAPs) for estimating real-time drainage water fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Successful monitoring of pollutant transport through the soil profile requires accurate, reliable, and appropriate instrumentation to measure amount of drainage water or flux within the vadose layer. We evaluated the performance and accuracy of automated passive capillary wick samplers (PCAPs) for ...

  1. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Performance Specifications for PM2.5 Class II Equivalent Samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Performance Specifications for PM2.5..., Subpt. F, Table F-1 Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 53—Performance Specifications for PM2.5 Class II Equivalent Samplers Performance test Specifications Acceptance criteria § 53.62 Full Wind Tunnel...

  2. Modelling and field application of the Chemcatcher passive sampler calibration data for the monitoring of hydrophonic organic pollutants in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrana, B.; Mill, G.A.; Kotterman, M.J.J.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Booij, K.; Greenwood, R.

    2007-01-01

    Passive sampling of dissolved pollutants in water has been gaining acceptance for environmental monitoring. Previously, an integrative passive sampler consisting of a C18 Empore® disk receiving phase saturated with n-octanol and fitted with low density polyethylene membrane, was developed and calibr

  3. Beehold : the colony of the honeybee (Apis mellifera L) as a bio-sampler for pollutants and plant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, van der J.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Bio-sampling is a function of bio-indication. Bio-indication with honeybee colonies (Apis mellifera L) is where the research fields of environmental technology and apiculture overlap. The honeybees are samplers of the environment by collecting unintentionally and simultaneously, along with nectar, p

  4. Efficacy of a Passive Diffusion Sampler to Assess Microbial Spatial Dynamics in a Contaminated Aquifer-wetland System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshtein, J. D.; Kneeshaw, T. A.; Voytek, M. A.; Cozzarelli, I. M.; McGuire, J. T.; Baez Cazull, S.

    2006-05-01

    Microbiological processes affect biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and contaminants in subsurface systems. Microbial response to changes in terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs), and in turn the microbes' effect on TEAP distribution are critical to understanding the fate and transport of contaminants. A challenge to studying microbial processes is obtaining samples that yield enough biomass to assess microbial communities and are spatially and temporally representative of changes in water chemistry. Our study focuses on the interface between ground water affected by landfill leachate at the closed Norman, Oklahoma landfill and porewater in a slough adjacent to the landfill (a contaminated aquifer-wetland system). We used a combination of more traditional and newer molecular microbiological approaches to provide an extension of the biochemical and culture approaches commonly employed in studies of microbial processes in subsurface environments. In order to enable contemporaneous and spatially concordant sampling of water chemistry and microbiology, passive diffusion samplers containing sponge material at discrete intervals were installed in the slough sediment. Unlike peeper diffusion samplers, the sampler installed is porous enough to allow native organisms to flow through the device and colonize the substrate. In addition to obtaining critical biomass, this setup allows us to extract nucleic acids easily while minimizing the affect of inhibitors to molecular analyses that are found commonly in organic rich sediments and contaminated systems. Discrete interval microbe samplers (DIMPS, Geosyntec) were deployed at 2 sites in the Norman Landfill slough and allowed to equilibrate for 14 days before retrieval and removal of sponge substrate at 14 depth intervals. Cores were taken near the passive diffusion samplers, sectioned for Most Probable Number (MPN) analysis and assessed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) for microbial abundance of metabolically important

  5. Evaluation of the Chemcatcher and DGT passive samplers for monitoring metals with highly fluctuating water concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Ian J; Knutsson, Jesper; Guigues, Nathalie; Mills, Graham A; Fouillac, Anne-Marie; Greenwood, Richard

    2007-07-01

    Passive sampling devices accumulate chemicals continuously from water and can provide time weighted average (TWA) concentrations of pollutants over the exposure period. Hence, they offer a number of advantages over other conventional monitoring techniques such as spot or grab sampling. The diffusive gradient in thin film (DGT) and the Chemcatcher passive samplers can be used to provide TWA concentrations of labile metals, but the approaches to their calibration differ. DGT uses diffusion coefficients of metals in the hydrogel layer, whereas Chemcatcher uses metal specific uptake rates, with both sets of values obtained under controlled laboratory conditions with constant aqueous metal concentrations. However, little is known of how such samplers respond to fluctuating concentrations. We evaluated the responsiveness of these two passive sampling devices to rapidly changing concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in natural freshwater, over a relatively short deployment time. Maximum metal concentrations in water were varied between 70 and 140 microg L(-1). Experiments were carried out in a tank with a rotating carousel system and filled with Meuse river water, allowing a degree of control over experimental conditions while using natural river water. Fluctuating concentrations were obtained by stepwise addition of standard solutions of the metals. The reliability and accuracy of the TWA concentrations measured by the samplers were assessed by comparison with concentrations of the metals in spot samples of water taken regularly over the deployment period. The spot samples of water were either unfiltered (total), filtered (0.45 microm) or ultrafiltered (5 kDa). Predictive speciation modelling using the visual MINTEQ programme was also undertaken. There was reasonable agreement between the TWA concentrations of Cd and Ni obtained with Chemcatcher and DGT and the total Cd and Ni concentrations measured in repeated unfiltered spot samples. For elements (i.e. Cu, Pb, Zn

  6. Engineering upgrades to the Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer for the CTBT International Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) is an automated collection and analysis system designed for aerosol radionuclide monitoring for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The advantages of an automated system include minimal need for human intervention and consistent analytical data. However, maintainability and down time issues threaten this utility, even for systems with over 90 % data availability. Engineering upgrades to the RASA are currently being pursued to address these issues, as well as measures relevant to technical lessons learned from the Fukushima nuclear power plant event. Current work includes a new automation control unit and other potential improvements such as alternative detector cooling and sampling options. This paper presents the current state of upgrades and improvements under investigation. (author)

  7. The Joker: A custom Monte Carlo sampler for binary-star and exoplanet radial velocity data

    CERN Document Server

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-01-01

    Given sparse or low-quality radial-velocity measurements of a star, there are often many qualitatively different stellar or exoplanet companion orbit models that are consistent with the data. The consequent multimodality of the likelihood function leads to extremely challenging search, optimization, and MCMC posterior sampling over the orbital parameters. Here we create a custom-built Monte Carlo sampler that can produce a posterior sampling for orbital parameters given sparse or noisy radial-velocity measurements, even when the likelihood function is poorly behaved. The six standard orbital parameters for a binary system can be split into four non-linear parameters (period, eccentricity, argument of pericenter, phase) and two linear parameters (velocity amplitude, barycenter velocity). We capitalize on this by building a sampling method in which we densely sample the prior pdf in the non-linear parameters, and perform rejection sampling using a likelihood function marginalized over the linear parameters. Wit...

  8. Calibration and use of the Chemcatcher passive sampler for monitoring organotin compounds in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Martínez, R; Palacios-Corvillo, M A; Greenwood, R; Mills, G A; Vrana, B; Gómez-Gómez, M M

    2008-06-23

    An integrative passive sampler (Chemcatcher) consisting of a 47 mm C18 Empore disk as the receiving phase overlaid with a thin cellulose acetate diffusion membrane was developed and calibrated for the measurement of time-weighted average water concentrations of organotin compounds [monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), tributlytin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPhT)] in water. The effect of water temperature and turbulence on the uptake rate of these analytes was evaluated in the laboratory using a flow-through tank. Uptake was linear over a 14-day period being in the range: MBT (3-23 mL day(-1)), DBT (40-200 mL day(-1)), TBT (30-200 mL day(-1)) and TPhT (30-190 mL day(-1)) for all the different conditions tested. These sampling rates were high enough to permit the use of the Chemcatcher to monitor levels of organotin compounds typically found in polluted aquatic environments. Using gas chromatography (GC) with either ICP-MS or flame photometric detection, limits of detection for the device (14-day deployment) for the different organotin compounds in water were in the range of 0.2-7.5 ng L(-1), and once accumulated in the receiving phase the compounds were stable over prolonged periods. Due to anisotropic exchange kinetics, performance reference compounds could not be used with this passive sampling system to compensate for changes in sampling rate due to variations in water temperature, turbulence and biofouling of the surface of the diffusion membrane during field deployments. The performance of the Chemcatcher was evaluated alongside spot water sampling in Alicante Habour, Spain which is known to contain elevated levels of organotin compounds. The samplers provided time-weighted average concentrations of the bioavailable fractions of the tin compounds where environmental concentrations fluctuated markedly in time. PMID:18513537

  9. Development of an automatic smear sampler and a polymer film for surface radioactive contamination assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the surface contamination by an indirect method is subject to the various kinds of error according to the sampling person and needs much time and effort in the sampling and assay. In this research, an automatic smear sampler is developed. It improved efficiency for assay work of surface contamination level achieved periodically in a radiation controlled area. Using an automatic smear sampler developed, it is confirmed that radioactive contaminated materials are uniformly transferred to smear paper more than any sampling method by an operator. Also, Solid scintillation proximity membranes were prepared for measuring the amount of radioactive contamination in laboratories contaminated by the low energy beta-ray emitter, such as 3H and 14C. Polysulfone scintillation proximity membranes were prepared by impregnating Cerium Activated Yttrium Silicate (CAYS), an inorganic fluor, in a membrane structure. The inorganic fluor-impregnated membranes were applied to detect the radioactive surface contamination. The preparation of membranes was divided into two processes. A supporting polymer film was made of casting solutions consisting of polysulfone and solvent, their cast film being solidified by vacuum evaporation. CAYS-dispersed polymer solutions were cast over the first, solidified polymer films and coagulated either by evaporating solvent in the solution with non-solvent in a coagulation bath. The prepared membranes had two distinguished, but tightly attached, double layers : one is the supporting layer of dense polymer film and the other results revealed that the prepared membranes were efficient to monitor radioactive contamination with reliable counting ability. For enhancement of pick-up and measurement efficiency, the membrane was prepared with the condition of different membrane solidification. The scintillation produced by interaction with radiation and CAYS was measured with photomultiplier tube. The test results showed that the prepared membranes

  10. Determination of Critical Experiment Correlations Using the Sampler Sequence Within SCALE 6.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The validation of neutron transport methods used in nuclear criticality safety analyses is required by consensus American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society (ANSI/ANS) standards. In the last decade, there has been an increased interest in correlations among critical experiments used in validation that have shared physical attributes and which impact the independence of each measurement. The statistical methods included in many of the frequently cited guidance documents on performing validation calculations incorporate the assumption that all individual measurements are independent, so little guidance is available to practitioners on the topic. Typical guidance includes recommendations to select experiments from multiple facilities and experiment series in an attempt to minimize the impact of correlations or common-cause errors in experiments. Recent efforts have been made both to determine the magnitude of such correlations between experiments and to develop and apply methods for adjusting the bias and bias uncertainty to account for the correlations. This paper describes recent work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the Sampler sequence from the SCALE code system to develop experimental correlations using a Monte Carlo sampling technique. Sampler will be available for the first time with the release of SCALE 6.2, and a brief introduction to the methods used to calculate experiment correlations within this new sequence is presented in this paper. Techniques to utilize these correlations in the establishment of upper subcritical limits are the subject of a companion paper and will not be discussed here. Example experimental uncertainties and correlation coefficients are presented for a variety of low-enriched uranium water-moderated lattice experiments selected for use in a benchmark exercise by the Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety Subgroup on Uncertainty Analysis in Criticality Safety Analyses. The results include

  11. Application of Surface-Water Microlayer Sampler in the Hydrologic Assessment of Frog Malformations in Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P. M.; Menheer, M. A.; Taylor, H.; Aiken, G.; Peart, D.; Thurman, E. M.; Scribner, E. A.; Weishaar, J.; Rostad, C.; Rosenberry, D.

    2001-12-01

    Since the summer of 1993, frog malformations have been reported throughout North America, including over 150 sites in 54 counties of Minnesota. Water-quality analyses of bulk water (grab) samples collected at more than 20 frog malformation sites have yet to indicate any direct relationships between water quality and frog malformation rates. However, many potential contaminants to frog egg masses, metamorphs, and adults are hydrophobic or have a strong association with floating particles that may accumulate in microlayers found on the surface of water bodies. To assess surface microlayer chemistry, a radio-controlled catamaran sampler was developed to collect hydrophobic microlayer samples using a rotating Teflon-coated drum. The drum was positioned to sit approximately 0.5 inch in the surface-water body. Samples were collected on the rotating drum, extracted off the rotating drum using a series of wiper-blades, and funneled into Teflon collection pans. A series of water samples were collected using three different techniques to determine if any relationships exist between the water quality of the surface microlayer and/or lower waters and frog malformation rates. Grab, upper-surface, and microlayer samples were collected during June, August and October 2001 at four surface-water bodies. Grab samples were collected through Teflon tubing held throughout the vertical water column, while upper-surface water samples were collected through Teflon tubing held at the water surface. Microlayer samples were collected using the designed sampler. Collected water samples were analyzed for major ions, trace elements, nutrients, total mercury, dissolved organic carbon, pesticides, hormones, isoflavones, and a series of waste-water constituents. In 2000, frog malformation rates were above 5% at two of the sites, and rates were less than 1% at the other two sites. Available results from water-quality analyses will be presented.

  12. Is there a future for biomonitoring of elemental air pollution? A review focused on a larger-scaled health-related (epidemiological) context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterbeek, B.; Sarmento, S.; Verburg, T.

    2010-01-01

    The present paper focuses on biomonitoring of elemental atmospheric pollution, which is reviewed in terms of larger-scaled biomonitoring surveys in an epidemiological context. Based on the literature information, today’s availability of solar-powered small air filter samplers and fibrous ion exchang

  13. Quality Control Technique for High-Volume Atmospheric Particulate Sampler%大流量大气颗粒物采样器质量控制技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常印忠; 王世联; 刘蜀疆; 樊元庆; 赵允刚; 陈占营; 李奇

    2013-01-01

    Quality control technique was developed for high-volume atmospheric particulate sampler. The flow meter of PMS-800 sampler was calibrated by an ISA1932 nozzle flow meter, and the global collection efficiency of PMS-800 sampler was tested by a type 2031 mobile sampler. The results show that the flowrate relative deviation between ISA1932 nozzle flow meter and PMS-800 sampler flow meter is less than 5%, and the global collection efficiency relative deviation between type 2031 sampler and PMS-800 sampler is less than 10%. The performance of PMS-800 sampler meets the specifications with the request of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. This method can be applied to quality control for high-volume atmospheric particulate sampler.%利用ISA1932喷嘴流量计和2031型采样器,测试了PMS-800大流量大气颗粒物采样器的流量和总采样效率,研究建立了大流量大气颗粒物采样器质量控制方法.结果表明,PMS-800采样器流量计与ISA1932喷嘴流量计的相对偏差小于5%,总采样效率与2031型采样器的相对偏差小于10%,满足全面禁止核试验条约(CTBT)相关技术文件要求.该方法可用于大流量大气颗粒物采样器的质量控制.

  14. Organochlorine pesticides and PCBs in air of southern Mexico (2002-2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegria, Henry A.; Wong, Fiona; Jantunen, Liisa M.; Bidleman, Terry F.; Figueroa, Miguel Salvador; Bouchot, Gerardo Gold; Moreno, Victor Ceja; Waliszewski, Stefan M.; Infanzon, Raul

    Air samples were collected in southern Mexico in 2002-2004 to determine the extent of contamination with organochlorine (OC) pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The ΣDDTs ranged from 239 to 2360 pg m -3. Other prominent OC pesticides were endosulfans, toxaphene and lindane. Pesticides detected in lower concentrations include chlordanes, dieldrin, and heptachlor. Proportions of DDT compounds suggested fresh use of DDT in some locations and a mix of fresh and aged residues at others. Ratios of trans-chlordane/ cis-chlordane were consistent with fresh chlordane usage or emission of residues from former termiticide applications. The ΣPCBs was relatively low at all sites. Concentrations of OC pesticides measured with passive samplers agreed well with those measured using high-volume samplers. Air back trajectory analysis suggests a complex pattern of regional atmospheric transport.

  15. Seasonal variation of 7Be and 3H in Korean ambient air and rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seasonal variation of the 7Be activities in air was monitored by a continuous sampling with a high volume air dust sampler. And also, 7Be and 3H activities in precipitation were determined. The activity level of 7Be in air was ranged from 1.94 to 47.2 Bq/m3. And 7Be in the precipitation was separated using cation exchange resin and the monthly average activity level was ranged from 0.29 to 4.77 Bq/L. 3H was analyzed using electrolytic enrichment method and activity ranged from 0.27 to 2.22 Bq/L. (author)

  16. Development of Air Sampling Technology by the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years the Health Physics and Medical Division of the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, has pursued a vigorous programme of investigation and development in the field of air-sampling technology. The programme has made important contributions to the development of sampling media, the design of sampling equipment, the characterization of environmental airborne contamination and the interpretation of air-sampling data in terms of personal exposure. These developments form the basis for the present operational and research programmes in this field in the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (U.K.A.E.A). . This paper, which summarizes the advances made in the Harwell laboratories in the above fields, is divided into three sections: 1. Sampling techniques. The development and characterization of glass-fibre filter papers (Stevens and Hounam) with improved surface collection properties has simplified counting procedures and has made ' possible detailed autoradiographic examination of the dust collected. The problem of energy degradation of alpha radiation by absorption in particles and paper has been studied (Stevens and Toureau). Development of charcoal-impregnated papers (Stevens and Hounam) has facilitated the detection and measurement of airborne contamination by iodine vapour. The combination of these papers with granular characoal in the May Pack (May) has given a sampling device which is now in common use for the determination and characterization of atmospheric iodine contamination. The concept and development of the personal air sampler (Sherwood and Greenhalgh) led to a better appreciation of the uncertainties of conventional air sampling and to the first quantitative demonstration of the problems of interpreting air samples in terms of personal inhalation exposure. Work on the design of a size selective head for the personal air sampler has not yet resolved the difficulties. The drawbacks of the cascade impactor as a continuous size

  17. Elemental characterization of air particulate matter in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenos Aires, the capital city of Argentina, is surrounded by 24 neighboring districts forming the so-called Buenos Aires metropolitan area (AMBA) that holds a population of 14 million people. In this work, the atmospheric aerosol of this metropolitan area was characterized through the determination of mass concentration, black carbon and elemental concentrations, on PM10 and PM2.5 samples taken using a 'Gent' sampler. The sampling site was located at an urban area characterized by fast and heavy traffic and samples were collected each third day, along 24 hours, between October 2005 and February 2006. A number of elements (As, Ba, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Th, Yb and Zn) were determined by Neutron Activation Analysis and their results, as well as those of gravimetric mass concentrations, were compared with historical data. Enrichment factors were calculated for both fractions, using Sc as reference element and Mason's crustal concentration values, showing enrichment for As, Br, Sb, Se and Zn. Although the number of analyzed filters is still small, a preliminary factor analysis was run on both fraction results and different source profiles were found. The attribution of the sources to soil, high temperature processes including refuse incineration, fuel combustion and others, metal processes, traffic and other anthropogenic ones is discussed. (author)

  18. Elemental characterization of air particulate matter in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasan, Raquel C.; Pla, Rita R.; Invernizzi, Rodrigo [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Centro Atomico Ezeiza. Grupo Tecnicas Analiticas Nucleares], E-mail: jasan@cae.cnea.gov.ar, E-mail: rpla@cae.cnea.gov.ar; Santos, Marina dos [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Centro Atomico Constituyentes. Lab. de Contaminacion del Aire], E-mail: mdossant@cnea.gov.ar

    2007-07-01

    Buenos Aires, the capital city of Argentina, is surrounded by 24 neighboring districts forming the so-called Buenos Aires metropolitan area (AMBA) that holds a population of 14 million people. In this work, the atmospheric aerosol of this metropolitan area was characterized through the determination of mass concentration, black carbon and elemental concentrations, on PM10 and PM2.5 samples taken using a 'Gent' sampler. The sampling site was located at an urban area characterized by fast and heavy traffic and samples were collected each third day, along 24 hours, between October 2005 and February 2006. A number of elements (As, Ba, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Th, Yb and Zn) were determined by Neutron Activation Analysis and their results, as well as those of gravimetric mass concentrations, were compared with historical data. Enrichment factors were calculated for both fractions, using Sc as reference element and Mason's crustal concentration values, showing enrichment for As, Br, Sb, Se and Zn. Although the number of analyzed filters is still small, a preliminary factor analysis was run on both fraction results and different source profiles were found. The attribution of the sources to soil, high temperature processes including refuse incineration, fuel combustion and others, metal processes, traffic and other anthropogenic ones is discussed. (author)

  19. Aerosol properties over Interior Alaska from lidar, DRUM Impactor sampler, and OPC-sonde measurements and their meteorological context during ARCTAS-A, April 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Atkinson

    2013-02-01

    lidar and OPC-sonde unambiguously discern aerosols height stratification patterns indicative of long range transport. Identification of a dust component is suggested by DRUM sampler results, which indicate crustal species, and supported by synoptic and trajectory analysis, which indicates both a source-region lifting event and appropriate air-mass pathways.

  20. Dynamic Radioactive Source for Evaluating and Demonstrating Time-dependent Performance of Continuous Air Monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Thomas D; Moore, Murray E; Justus, Alan L; Hudston, Jonathan A; Barbé, Benoît

    2016-11-01

    Evaluation of continuous air monitors in the presence of a plutonium aerosol is time intensive, expensive, and requires a specialized facility. The Radiation Protection Services Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory has designed a Dynamic Radioactive Source, intended to replace plutonium aerosol challenge testing. The Dynamic Radioactive Source is small enough to be inserted into the sampler filter chamber of a typical continuous air monitor. Time-dependent radioactivity is introduced from electroplated sources for real-time testing of a continuous air monitor where a mechanical wristwatch motor rotates a mask above an alpha-emitting electroplated disk source. The mask is attached to the watch's minute hand, and as it rotates, more of the underlying source is revealed. The measured alpha activity increases with time, simulating the arrival of airborne radioactive particulates at the air sampler inlet. The Dynamic Radioactive Source allows the temporal behavior of puff and chronic release conditions to be mimicked without the need for radioactive aerosols. The new system is configurable to different continuous air monitor designs and provides an in-house testing capability (benchtop compatible). It is a repeatable and reusable system and does not contaminate the tested air monitor. Test benefits include direct user control, realistic (plutonium) aerosol spectra, and iterative development of continuous air monitor alarm algorithms. Data obtained using the Dynamic Radioactive Source has been used to elucidate alarm algorithms and to compare the response time of two commercial continuous air monitors. PMID:27682903

  1. Termiticide use and indoor air quality in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, E P

    1989-01-01

    Organochlorine insecticides have been used extensively for the past 35 yr to reduce termite damage. The USEPA estimates that chlordane and heptachlor have been used in 24 million homes in the US. The pollution of air inside dwellings is a growing concern in the US because the population at risk includes the young and aged. Those exposed to pollutants in the home may be exposed for 24 hr instead of the usual 8 hr a day in the work place. Many of the halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons have been used as pesticides and have been reported as air contaminants inside buildings. Most of these chemicals are lipophilic, ubiquitous in the environment, and persistent. A number of chemicals found in indoor air have been reported to cause human health effects and some are carcinogenic. Many studies have been conducted using a variety of air samplers inside dwellings to determine levels of termiticides in indoor air. These include the Greenburg-Smith impinger, nylon chiffon screens, polyurethane foam plug samplers, and a Millipore miniature vacuum pump with a sampling tube containing Chromosorb 102 as the collecting medium. Chlordane and heptachlor have been widely used as termiticides and both have been implicated as serious problems. The US Air Force experienced several instances of contamination of houses with airborne chlordane following termite treatment, and numerous other studies have shown the magnitude of the problem. Because of increased instances of indoor air contamination, several new alternatives have been developed for termite control to reduce the potential for chemical exposure in indoor air of houses treated with termiticides. These new techniques include use of growth regulators and newer less hazardous chemicals. PMID:2692087

  2. Pattern recognition methods and air pollution source identification. [based on wind direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibecki, H. F.; King, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    Directional air samplers, used for resolving suspended particulate matter on the basis of time and wind direction were used to assess the feasibility of characterizing and identifying emission source types in urban multisource environments. Filters were evaluated for 16 elements and X-ray fluorescence methods yielded elemental concentrations for direction, day, and the interaction of direction and day. Large numbers of samples are necessary to compensate for large day-to-day variations caused by wind perturbations and/or source changes.

  3. A Cohort Study of Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Mortality in Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Jerrett, Michael; Murray M Finkelstein; Brook, Jeffrey R.; Arain, M Altaf; Kanaroglou, Palvos; Stieb, Dave M.; Gilbert, Nicolas L.; Verma, Dave; Finkelstein, Norm; Kenneth R Chapman; Sears, Malcolm R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic exposure to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) may contribute to premature mortality, but few studies to date have addressed this topic. Objectives In this study we assessed the association between TRAP and mortality in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Methods We collected nitrogen dioxide samples over two seasons using duplicate two-sided Ogawa passive diffusion samplers at 143 locations across Toronto. We calibrated land use regressions to predict NO2 exposure on a fine scale ...

  4. An evaluation of total and inhalable samplers for the collection of wood dust in three wood products industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Martin; Muller, Brian S

    2002-10-01

    In 1998 the American Conference for Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) proposed size selective sampling for wood dust based on the inhalable fraction. Thus the proposed threshold limit values (TLVs) require the use of a sampler whose performance matches the inhalable convention. The Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) sampler has shown good agreement with the inhalable convention under controlled conditions, and the Button sampler, developed by the University of Cincinnati, has shown reasonable agreement in at least one laboratory study. The Button sampler has not been previously evaluated under wood working conditions, and the IOM has been shown to sample more mass than expected when compared to the standard closed-face cassette, which may be due to the collection of very large particles in wood working environments. Some projectile particles may be > 100 microm aerodynamic diameter and thus outside the range of the convention. Such particles, if present, can bias the estimates of concentration considerably. This study is part of an on-going research focus into selecting the most appropriate inhalable sampler for use in these industries, and to examine the impact of TLV changes. This study compared gravimetric analyses (National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health Method 0500) of side-by-side personal samples using the Button, IOM, and 37 mm closed-face cassette (CFC) under field-use conditions. A total of 51 good sample pairs were collected from three wood products industries involved in the manufacturing of cabinets, furniture, and shutters. Paired t-tests were run on each sample pair using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 10. The IOM and the CFC measured statistically different concentrations (p woodworking environments, and, taken together, the data imply a conversion factor greater than the 2.5 normally applied to CFC results to approximate inhalable values, as measured by the IOM. Raising the limit values by

  5. A gel probe equilibrium sampler for measuring arsenic porewater profiles and sorption gradients in sediments: II. Field application to Haiwee reservoir sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, K.M.; Root, R.; O'Day, P. A.; Hering, J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic (As) geochemistry and sorption behavior were measured in As- and iron (Fe)-rich sediments of Haiwee Reservoir by deploying undoped (clear) polyacrylamide gels and hydrous ferric oxide (HFO)-doped gels in a gel probe equilibrium sampler, which is a novel technique for directly measuring the effects of porewater composition on As adsorption to Fe oxides phases in situ. Arsenic is deposited at the sediment surface as As(V) and is reduced to As(III) in the upper layers of the sediment (0-8 cm), but the reduction of As(V) does not cause mobilization into the porewater. Dissolved As and Fe concentrations increased at depth in the sediment column driven by the reductive dissolution of amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxides and conversion to a mixed Fe(II, III) green rust-type phase. Adsorption of As and phosphorous (P) onto HFO-doped gels was inhibited at intermediate depths (10-20 cm), possibly due to dissolved organic or inorganic carbon, indicating that dissolved As concentrations were at least partially controlled by porewater composition rather than surface site availability. In sediments that had been recently exposed to air, the region of sorption inhibition was not observed, suggesting that prior exposure to air affected the extent of reductive dissolution, porewater chemistry, and As adsorption behavior. Arsenic adsorption onto the HFO-doped gels increased at depths >20 cm, and the extent of adsorption was most likely controlled by the competitive effects of dissolved phosphate. Sediment As adsorption capacity appeared to be controlled by changes in porewater composition and competitive effects at shallower depths, and by reductive dissolution and availability of sorption sites at greater burial depths. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  6. Bacterial communities in urban aerosols collected with wetted-wall cyclonic samplers and seasonal fluctuations of live and culturable airborne bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravva, Subbarao V; Hernlem, Bradley J; Sarreal, Chester Z; Mandrell, Robert E

    2012-02-01

    Airborne transmission of bacterial pathogens from point sources (e.g., ranches, dairy waste treatment facilities) to areas of food production (farms) has been suspected. Determining the incidence, transport and viability of extremely low levels of pathogens require collection of high volumes of air and characterization of live bacteria from aerosols. We monitored the numbers of culturable bacteria in urban aerosols on 21 separate days during a 9 month period using high volume cyclonic samplers at an elevation of 6 m above ground level. Culturable bacteria in aerosols fluctuated from 3 CFU to 6 million CFU/L of air per hour and correlated significantly with changes in seasonal temperatures, but not with humidity or wind speed. Concentrations of viable bacteria determined by fluorescence staining and flow cytometry correlated significantly with culturable bacteria. Members of the phylum Proteobacteria constituted 98% of the bacterial community, which was characterized using 16S rRNA gene sequencing using DNA from aerosols. Aquabacterium sp., previously characterized from aquatic environments, represented 63% of all clones and the second most common were Burkholderia sp; these are ubiquitous in nature and some are potential human pathogens. Whole genome amplification prior to sequencing resulted in a substantial decrease in species diversity compared to characterizing culturable bacteria sorted by flow cytometry based on scatter signals. Although 27 isolated colonies were characterized, we were able to culture 38% of bacteria characterized by sequencing. The whole genome amplification method amplified DNA preferentially from Phyllobacterium myrsinacearum, a minor member of the bacterial communities, whereas Variovorax paradoxus dominated the cultured organisms. PMID:22193549

  7. In Situ Electrostatic Separation of Ambient PM2.5 into Source-Specific Fractions During Collection in a FRM Sampler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naresh Shah; Frank E. Huggins; Gerald P. Huffman

    2006-07-31

    Coal combustion is generally viewed as a major source of PM2.5 emissions into the atmosphere. For some time, toxicologists have been asking for an exposure environment enriched with the coal combustion source specific PM{sub 2.5} to conduct meaningful exposure studies to better understand the mechanisms of the adverse health effects of coal combustion specific PM2.5 in the ambient environment. There are several unique characteristics of primary PM generated from coal combustion. In this research project, an attempt has been made to exploit some of the unique properties of PM generated from coal fired power plants to preferentially separate them out from the rest of the primary and secondary PM in the ambient environment. An existing FRM sampler used for monitoring amount of PM{sub 2.5} in the ambient air is modified to incorporate an electrostatic field. A DC corona charging device is also installed at the ambient air inlet to impart positive or negative charge to the PM. Visual Basic software has been written to simulate the lateral movement of PM as it passes through the electrostatic separator under varying operating conditions. The PM samples collected on polycarbonate filters under varying operating conditions were extensively observed for clustering and/or separation of PM in the direction parallel to the electric field. No systematic PM separation was observed under any of the operating conditions. A solution to overcome this kind of turbulence caused remixing has been offered. However, due to major programmatic changes in the DOE UCR program, there are no venues available to further pursue this research.

  8. Technical procedures for implementation of meteorology/air quality site studies, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-01

    This report describes The Technical Procedures that will be used to monitor air quality and meteorology. Topics include: high-volume filter handling; operation, maintenance, and calibration of the 10-M meteorological and air quality system; processing data from the 10-M meteorological tower; processing data from the 60-M meteorological tower; processing total suspended particulate filters and data from the high-volume air samplers; operation maintenance, and calibration of the 60-M meteorological and air quality system; and auditing the air quality system. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Technical procedures for implementation of meteorology/air quality site studies, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes The Technical Procedures that will be used to monitor air quality and meteorology. Topics include: high-volume filter handling; operation, maintenance, and calibration of the 10-M meteorological and air quality system; processing data from the 10-M meteorological tower; processing data from the 60-M meteorological tower; processing total suspended particulate filters and data from the high-volume air samplers; operation maintenance, and calibration of the 60-M meteorological and air quality system; and auditing the air quality system. 4 refs., 6 figs

  10. Overview of the Chemcatcher® for the passive sampling of various pollutants in aquatic environments Part A: Principles, calibration, preparation and analysis of the sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charriau, Adeline; Lissalde, Sophie; Poulier, Gaëlle; Mazzella, Nicolas; Buzier, Rémy; Guibaud, Gilles

    2016-02-01

    The passive sampler Chemcatcher(®), which was developed in 2000, can be adapted for various types of water contaminants (e.g., trace metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides and pharmaceutical residues) depending on the materials chosen for the receiving phase and the membrane. The Chemcatcher(®) has been used in numerous research articles in both laboratory experiments and field exposures, and here we review the state-of-the-art in applying this passive sampler. Part A of this review covers (1) the theory upon which the sampler is based (i.e., brief theory, calculation of water concentration, Performance and Reference Compounds), (2) the preparation of the device (i.e., sampler design, choice of the membrane and disk, mounting of the tool), and (3) calibration procedures (i.e., design of the calibration tank, tested parameters, sampling rates). PMID:26653485

  11. Benthic organisms collected using sediment sampler from the EXCELLENCE in the Gulf of Mexico from 26 April 1979 to 19 November 1979 (NODC Accession 8000502)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organisms were collected using sediment sampler casts from the EXCELLENCE in the Gulf of Mexico from 26 April 1979 to 19 November 1979. Data were submitted...

  12. Benthic organisms collected using sediment sampler from the SW RESEARCHER in the Gulf of Mexico from 22 September 1977 to 16 December 1977 (NODC Accession 8100224)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organisms were collected using sediment sampler casts from the SW RESEARCHER in the Gulf of Mexico from 22 September 1977 to 16 December 1977. Data were...

  13. Zooplankton, chemical, and other data collected from net, sediment sampler, and other instruments from 01 July 1970 to 01 March 1972 in the Great Lakes (NODC Accession 7200691)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton, chemical, and other data were collected using net, sediment sampler, and other instruments in the Great Lakes. Data were collected from 01 July 1970 to...

  14. Analysis techniques and performance of the Domino Ring Sampler version 4 based readout for the MAGIC telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitarek, Julian, E-mail: dzuleq@gmail.com [IFAE, Edifici Cn., Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Gaug, Markus, E-mail: Markus.Gaug@uab.cat [Física de les Radiacions, Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); CERES, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona-IEEC, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Mazin, Daniel, E-mail: mazin@mpp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, D-80805 München (Germany); Paoletti, Riccardo, E-mail: paoletti@pi.infn.it [Università di Siena, and INFN Pisa, I-53100 Siena (Italy); Tescaro, Diego, E-mail: diegot@ifae.es [Inst. de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2013-09-21

    Recently the readout of the MAGIC telescopes has been upgraded to a new system based on the Domino Ring Sampler version 4 chip. We present the analysis techniques and the signal extraction performance studies of this system. We study the behavior of the baseline, the noise, the cross-talk, the linearity and the time resolution. We investigate also the optimal signal extraction. In addition we show some of the analysis techniques specific to the readout based on the Domino Ring Sampler version 2 chip, previously used in the MAGIC II telescope. -- Highlights: • We perform studies of the DRS4 based readout of the MAGIC telescopes • Advanced pedestal subtraction procedure results in a stable baseline. • The noise of the system is below one photoelectron. • The calibration of the DRS4 time response gives time resolution of 0.2 ns. • Linearity is very good up to saturation at 750 phe.

  15. POCIS passive samplers as a monitoring tool for pharmaceutical residues and their transformation products in marine environment

    OpenAIRE

    Bueno, M. J. M.; Herrera, S.; Munaron, D.; Boillot, C.; Fenet, H.; Chiron, Serge; Gomez, E

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, several scientific studies have shown that carbamazepine (CBZ) is one of the most frequently detected pharmaceutical in aquatic environment. However, little data is available on its detection and its transformation products (TPs) in marine water. The use of polar organic chemical integrative sampling (POCIS) passive samplers as a semi-quantitative and qualitative tool for screening of pharmaceuticals and TPs in seawater has been studied. Furthermore, the uptake rates of the...

  16. Monitoring and flux determination of trace metals in rivers of the Seversky Donets basin (Ukraine) using DGT passive samplers

    OpenAIRE

    Vystavna, Yuliya; Huneau, Frédéric; Motelica-Heino, Mikael; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Vergeles, Yuri; Stolberg, Felix

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the in situ application of diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) passive samplers for trace metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) monitoring in transboundary Udy and Lopan rivers of the Seversky Donets watershed in the Kharkiv region (Ukraine), which has a long history of industrial development. The research discusses potential sources of DGT-measured labile metals in water and seasonal variations. Our results demonstrate the application of DGT for identif...

  17. Polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS): application for monitoring organic micropollutants in wastewater effluent and surface water

    OpenAIRE

    Miège, C.; Budzinski, H.; Jacquet, R.; Soulier, C.; Pelte, T.; Coquery, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of POCIS (Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler) for the evaluation of river water quality downstream of wastewater treatment plants. POCIS proved well adapted to sampling alkylphenols and several pharmaceuticals. Concentration factors and the decrease in limits of quantification, compared to grab water sample analyses, were significant except for hormones, β-blockers and bronchodilators. Promising preliminary results obtained i...

  18. An in situ intercomparison exercise on passive samplers for monitoring metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and pesticides in surface waters

    OpenAIRE

    Miège, C.; Mazzella, N.; Schiavone, S.; Dabrin, A.; Berho, C.; Ghestem, J.P.; Gonzalez, C.; Gonzalez, J L; Lalere, B.; Lardy Fontan, S.; Lepot, B.; Munaron, D.; Tixier, C.; Togola, A.; Coquery, M.

    2012-01-01

    An intercomparison exercise on passive samplers (PSs) was organized in summer 2010 for the measurement of selected metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pesticides in surface waters. Various PSs were used and compared at 2 rivers sites and one marine lagoon. A total of 24 laboratories participated. We present selected significant outputs from this exercise, including discussion on quality assurance and quality control for PSs, the interlaboratory variability of field blanks, tim...

  19. Using DGT passive samplers and MC-ICPMS to determine Pb and Zn isotopic signature of groundwaters.

    OpenAIRE

    Desaulty, Anne-Marie; Millot, Romain; Guerrot, Catherine; Berho, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    International audience Several studies have shown the interest of Zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) isotopic compositions to track anthropogenic pollutions in surface water and groundwater [1-2]. However, given the low content in Pb and Zn in natural waters, several litres are needed to perform a single isotopic analysis by MC-ICPMS. One solution is to use passive DGT (diffusive gradients in thin films) samplers for in-situ pre-concentration of these metals. In these devices, metals are immobilized ...

  20. Determination of Vocs in groundwater at an industrial contamination site using a homemade low-density polyethylene passive diffusion sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xu; Tan, Zhiqiang; Pang, Long; Liu, Jingfu

    2013-11-01

    A home-made inexpensive passive diffusion bag (PDB) sampler, prepared by filling deionized water in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) tubes, was evaluated for volatile organic compounds (VOC) sampling in groundwater at industrial contamination sites. Impacts of environmentally relevant conditions on the sampling equilibration time and partitioning of VOCs between the sampler and the water sample were investigated. Sample salinity, agitation and temperature can influence the equilibration time, but generally sampling equilibration was obtained in 14 days under real field sampling of VOCs in groundwater. Both laboratory study and field testing in a contaminated site showed that the VOC concentrations in the developed sampler were equal to those in the water samples at equilibrium. Coupled with a purge and trap concentrator-gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (P&T-GC-MS), the developed PDB sampler provided a low-cost sampling device for routine monitoring of VOCs in groundwater in wells, with LODs in the range of 2.9-10 microg/L. The proposed PDB was applied to determine VOCs in groundwater at an industrial contamination site, and the present results agreed well with those determined using conventional pump-and-sample monitoring. All the studied 13 VOCs were tested in the four wells in the industrial contamination sites, with their concentrations in the range of 12-73660 microg/L. In addition, while benzene and toluene were heavily contaminated up to a maximum concentration of 74000 tg/L and 6000 microg/L, respectively, 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene and bromobenzene had relatively low contamination levels (below 25 microg/L). PMID:24552064

  1. Comparison of speciation sampler and PC-BOSS fine particulate matter organic material results obtained in Lindon, Utah, during winter 2001-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Cory; Eatough, Norman L; Eatough, Delbert J; Olson, Neal; Long, Russell W

    2008-01-01

    The Particle Concentrator-Brigham Young University Organic Sampling System (PC-BOSS) has been previously verified as being capable of measuring total fine particulate matter (PM2.5), including semi-volatile species. The present study was conducted to determine if the simple modification of a commercial speciation sampler with a charcoal denuder followed by a filter pack containing a quartz filter and a charcoal-impregnated glass (CIG) fiber filter would allow for the measurement of total PM2.5, including semi-volatile organic material. Data were collected using an R&P (Rupprecht and Pastasnik Co., Inc.) Partisol Model 2300 speciation sampler; an R&P Partisol speciation sampler modified with a BOSS denuder, followed by a filter pack with a quartz and a CIG filter; a Met One spiral aerosol speciation sampler (SASS); and the PC-BOSS from November 2001 to March 2002 at a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Science to Achieve Results (STAR) sampling site in Lindon, UT. Total PM2.5 mass, ammonium nitrate (both nonvolatile and semi-volatile), ammonium sulfate, organic carbon (both non-volatile and semi-volatile), and elemental carbon were determined on a 24-hr basis. Results obtained with the individual samplers were compared to determine the capability of the modified R&P speciation sampler for measuring total PM2.5, including semi-volatile components. Data obtained with the modified speciation sampler agreed with the PC-BOSS results. Data obtained with the two unmodified speciation samplers were low by an average of 26% because of the loss of semi-volatile organic material from the quartz filter during sample collection.

  2. Characterisation of air particulate matter in Klang Valley by neutron activation analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air particulate matter is known to affect human health, impairs visibility and can cause climate change. Study on air particulate matter in term of particle size and chemical contents is very important to indicate the quality of air in a sampling area. Information on concentration of important constituents in air particles can be used to identify some of emission sources which contribute to the pollution problem. The data collected may also be, used as a basis to design a strategy in order to overcome the air pollution problem in the area. The study involved sampling of air dust at two stations, one in Bangi and the other in Kuala Lumpur using Gent Stack Sampler units. Each sampler capable of collecting air particle sizes smaller than 2.5 micron (PM 2.5) and between 2.5 - O micron on two different filters simultaneously. The filters were measured for their mass, elemental carbon and elemental concentrations using analytical equipment or techniques including reflectometer and Neutron Activation Analysis. The results of analysis on samples collected in 1997-1998 are discussed. (author)

  3. Air-soil exchange of organochlorine pesticides in a sealed chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Han, Baolu; Xue, Nandong; Zhou, Lingli; Li, Fasheng

    2015-01-01

    So far little is known about air-soil exchange under any sealed circumstances (e.g., in plastic and glass sheds), which however has huge implications for the soil-air-plant pathways of persistent organic pollutants including organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). A newly designed passive air sampler was tested in a sealed chamber for measuring the vertical concentration profiles of gaseous phase OCPs (hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs)). Air was sampled at 5, 15, and 30 cm above ground level every 10th day during a 60-day period by deploying polyurethane foam cylinders housed in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene-covered cartridges. Concentrations and compositions of OCPs along the vertical sections indicated a clear relationship with proximity to the mixture of HCHs and DDTs which escapes from the soils. In addition, significant positive correlations were found between air temperatures and concentrations of HCHs and DDTs. These results indicated revolatilization and re-deposition being at or close to dynamic pseudo-equilibrium with the overlying air. The sampler used for addressing air-soil exchange of persistent organic pollutants in any sealed conditions is discussed. PMID:25597683

  4. Air-soil exchange of organochlorine pesticides in a sealed chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Yang; Baolu Han; Nandong Xue; Lingli Zhou; Fasheng Li

    2015-01-01

    So far little is known about air-soil exchange under any sealed circumstances (e.g.,in plastic and glass sheds),which however has huge implications for the soil-air-plant pathways of persistent organic pollutants including organochlorine pesticides (OCPs).A newly designed passive air sampler was tested in a sealed chamber for measuring the vertical concentration profiles of gaseous phase OCPs (hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs)).Air was sampled at 5,15,and 30 cm above ground level every 10th day during a 60-day period by deploying polyurethane foam cyhnders housed in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene-covered cartridges.Concentrations and compositions of OCPs along the vertical sections indicated a clear relationship with proximity to the mixture of HCHs and DDTs which escapes from the soils.In addition,significant positive correlations were found between air temperatures and concentrations of HCHs and DDTs.These results indicated revolatilization and re-deposition being at or close to dynamic pseudo-equilibrium with the overlying air.The sampler used for addressing air-soil exchange of persistent organic pollutants in any sealed conditions is discussed.

  5. The TOMPs ambient air monitoring network - Continuous data on UK air quality for over 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Carola; Katsoyiannis, Athanasios; Jones, Kevin C; Sweetman, Andrew J

    2016-10-01

    Long-term air monitoring datasets are needed for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to assess the effectiveness of source abatement measures and the factors controlling ambient levels. The Toxic Organic Micro Pollutants (TOMPs) Network, which has operated since 1991, collects ambient air samples at six sites across England and Scotland, using high-volume active air samplers. The network provides long-term ambient air trend data for a range of POPs at both urban and rural locations. Data from the network provides the UK Government, regulators and researchers with valuable information on emission/source controls and on the effectiveness of international chemicals regulation such as the Stockholm Convention and UN/ECE Protocol on POPs. The target chemicals of TOMPs have been polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and, since 2010, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The continuous monitoring of these compounds demonstrates the constant decline in UK air concentrations over the last two decades, with average clearance rates for PCDD/Fs in urban locations of 5.1 years and for PCBs across all sites 6.6 years. No significant declines in rural locations for PCDD/Fs have been observed. There is a strong observable link between the declining ambient air concentrations and the emission reductions estimated in the annually produced National Atmospheric Emission Inventory (NAEI) dataset. These findings clearly demonstrate the unique strengths of long-term consistent datasets for the evaluation of the success of chemical regulation and control.

  6. Pesticide impact on aquatic invertebrates identified with Chemcatcher® passive samplers and the SPEAR(pesticides) index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münze, Ronald; Orlinskiy, Polina; Gunold, Roman; Paschke, Albrecht; Kaske, Oliver; Beketov, Mikhail A; Hundt, Matthias; Bauer, Coretta; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Möder, Monika; Liess, Matthias

    2015-12-15

    Pesticides negatively affect biodiversity and ecosystem function in aquatic environments. In the present study, we investigated the effects of pesticides on stream macroinvertebrates at 19 sites in a rural area dominated by forest cover and arable land in Central Germany. Pesticide exposure was quantified with Chemcatcher® passive samplers equipped with a diffusion-limiting membrane. Ecological effects on macroinvertebrate communities and on the ecosystem function detritus breakdown were identified using the indicator system SPEARpesticides and the leaf litter degradation rates, respectively. A decrease in the abundance of pesticide-vulnerable taxa and a reduction in leaf litter decomposition rates were observed at sites contaminated with the banned insecticide Carbofuran (Toxic Units≥-2.8), confirming the effect thresholds from previous studies. The results show that Chemcatcher® passive samplers with a diffusion-limiting membrane reliably detect ecologically relevant pesticide pollution, and we suggest Chemcatcher® passive samplers and SPEARpesticides as a promising combination to assess pesticide exposure and effects in rivers and streams.

  7. Improved evaluation of measurement uncertainty from sampling by inclusion of between-sampler bias using sampling proficiency testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Michael H; Geelhoed, Bastiaan; Wood, Roger; Damant, Andrew P

    2011-04-01

    A realistic estimate of the uncertainty of a measurement result is essential for its reliable interpretation. Recent methods for such estimation include the contribution to uncertainty from the sampling process, but they only include the random and not the systematic effects. Sampling Proficiency Tests (SPTs) have been used previously to assess the performance of samplers, but the results can also be used to evaluate measurement uncertainty, including the systematic effects. A new SPT conducted on the determination of moisture in fresh butter is used to exemplify how SPT results can be used not only to score samplers but also to estimate uncertainty. The comparison between uncertainty evaluated within- and between-samplers is used to demonstrate that sampling bias is causing the estimates of expanded relative uncertainty to rise by over a factor of two (from 0.39% to 0.87%) in this case. General criteria are given for the experimental design and the sampling target that are required to apply this approach to measurements on any material.

  8. Pesticide impact on aquatic invertebrates identified with Chemcatcher® passive samplers and the SPEAR(pesticides) index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münze, Ronald; Orlinskiy, Polina; Gunold, Roman; Paschke, Albrecht; Kaske, Oliver; Beketov, Mikhail A; Hundt, Matthias; Bauer, Coretta; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Möder, Monika; Liess, Matthias

    2015-12-15

    Pesticides negatively affect biodiversity and ecosystem function in aquatic environments. In the present study, we investigated the effects of pesticides on stream macroinvertebrates at 19 sites in a rural area dominated by forest cover and arable land in Central Germany. Pesticide exposure was quantified with Chemcatcher® passive samplers equipped with a diffusion-limiting membrane. Ecological effects on macroinvertebrate communities and on the ecosystem function detritus breakdown were identified using the indicator system SPEARpesticides and the leaf litter degradation rates, respectively. A decrease in the abundance of pesticide-vulnerable taxa and a reduction in leaf litter decomposition rates were observed at sites contaminated with the banned insecticide Carbofuran (Toxic Units≥-2.8), confirming the effect thresholds from previous studies. The results show that Chemcatcher® passive samplers with a diffusion-limiting membrane reliably detect ecologically relevant pesticide pollution, and we suggest Chemcatcher® passive samplers and SPEARpesticides as a promising combination to assess pesticide exposure and effects in rivers and streams. PMID:26282741

  9. Calibration of a passive sampler based on stir bar sorptive extraction for the monitoring of hydrophobic organic pollutants in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrana, Branislav; Komancová, Lucie; Sobotka, Jaromír

    2016-05-15

    A passive sampler based on stir bars coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was calibrated for the measurement of time-weighted average concentrations of hydrophobic micropollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides, in water. Stir bar/water partition coefficients were measured by equilibrating bars with sheets made of silicone rubber material for which partition coefficients had been reported previously. Kinetic parameters characterising the exchange of analytes between stir bars and water were determined under controlled exposure conditions using a passive dosing system. The dosing system consisted of silicone rubber sheets with a large surface area, spiked with analytes. During stir bar sampler exposure, analytes partitioned from dosing sheets to water in the exposure tank and maintained constant exposure concentrations. Reversible and isotropic exchange kinetics of analytes between sampler and water was confirmed by measuring the release of a range of performance reference compounds (PRCs) from stir bars. Application of a two-resistance model confirmed that, except for hexachlorocyclohexane isomers, uptake of the test compounds under the experimental conditions was controlled by diffusion in the water boundary layer. This permits the application of PRCs for in situ calibration of uptake kinetics of test compounds to stir bars. PMID:26992498

  10. A minimally invasive micro sampler for quantitative sampling with an ultrahigh-aspect-ratio microneedle and a PDMS actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Long; Wang, Yan; Yao, Jinyuan; Yang, Cuijun; Ding, Guifu

    2016-08-01

    This study describes a novel micro sampler consisting of an ultrahigh-aspect-ratio microneedle and a PDMS actuator. The microneedle was fabricated by a new method which introduced reshaped photoresist technology to form a flow channel inside. The microneedle includes two parts: shaft and pedestal. In this study, the shaft length is 1500 μm with a 45° taper angle on the tip and pedestal is 1000 μm. Besides, the shaft and pedestal are connected by an arc connection structure with a length of 600 μm. The microneedles have sufficient mechanical strength to insert into skin with a wide safety margin which was proved by mechanics tests. Moreover, a PDMS actuator with a chamber inside was designed and fabricated in this study. The chamber, acting as a reservoir in sampling process as well as providing power, was optimized by finite element analysis (FEA) to decrease dead volume and improve sampling precision. The micro sampler just needs finger press to activate the sampling process as well as used for quantitative micro injection to some extent. And a volume of 31.5 ± 0.8 μl blood was successfully sampled from the ear artery of a rabbit. This micro sampler is suitable for micro sampling for diagnose or therapy in biomedical field. PMID:27372944

  11. The Use of a New Passive Sampler for Ozone and Nitrogen Oxides Monitoring in Ecological Effects Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco De Santis

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, cost-effective diffusive sampler is described that is suitable for measuring parts per billion (ppb levels of ozone and nitrogen oxides. The diffusive sampler makes use of nitrite for ozone determination whereas for nitrogen oxides and nitrogen dioxide an active carbon tissue impregnated with sodium carbonate is used. Nitrate and nitrite, the formation of which is proportional to the pollutant concentration and sampling duration, are the two species analysed, respectively. Diffusion tubes have the advantage of being a low- cost, convenient way of mapping spatial distributions and investigating long-term trends of ozone and nitrogen oxides. The method is extremely useful for assessing long-term concentrations such as the annual mean for nitrogen oxides, as required by the Daughter Directive 1999/30/EC. Field tests to validate the method have been carried out at an urban background location with co-located passive samplers and continuous measurements of O3 and NOx . An application in ecological effects monitoring for ozone is also presented.

  12. Study of the superficial ozone concentrations in the atmosphere of Comunidad de Madrid using passive samplers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Galán Madruga

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The ozone is a secondary atmospheric pollutant which is generated for photochemical reactions of volatil organic compounds (VOC’s and nitrogen oxides (NOx. In Spain the ozone is a big problem as a consequence of the solar radiation to reach high levels. Exposure over a period of time to elevated ozone concentrations can cause damage in the public health and alterations in the vegetation.The aim of this study is to carry out the development and validation of a measurement method to let asses the superficial ozone levels in the Comunidad de Madrid, by identifing the zones more significants, where to measure with UV photometric monitors (automatics methods this pollutant and where the health and the vegetation can be affected. To such effect, passive samplers are used, which have glass fiber filters coated with a solution of sodium nitrite, potassium carbonate, glycerol and water. The nitrite ion in the presence of ozone is oxidized to nitrato ion, which it is extrated with ultrapure water and analyzed for ion chromatography, by seen proportional to the concentration existing in the sampling point.The results of validation from field tests indicate a excellent correlation between the passive and the automatic method.The higher superficial ozone concentrations are placed in rural zones, distanced of emission focus of primary pollutants (nitrogen oxides and volatil organic compounds... principally in direction soutwest and northwest of the Comunidad of Madrid.

  13. Pharmaceuticals, alkylphenols and pesticides in Mediterranean coastal waters: Results from a pilot survey using passive samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munaron, Dominique; Tapie, Nathalie; Budzinski, Hélène; Andral, Bruno; Gonzalez, Jean-Louis

    2012-12-01

    21 pharmaceuticals, 6 alkylphenols and 27 hydrophilic pesticides and biocides were investigated using polar organic contaminant integrative samplers (POCIS) during a large-scale study of contamination of French Mediterranean coastal waters. Marine and transitional water-bodies, defined under the EU Water Framework Directive were monitored. Our results show that the French Mediterranean coastal waters were contaminated with a large range of emerging contaminants, detected at low concentrations during the summer season. Caffeine, carbamazepine, theophilline and terbutaline were detected with a detection frequency higher than 83% in the coastal waters sampled, 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), 4-tert-octylphenol (4-OP) and 4-nonylphenol diethoxylate (NP2EO) were detected in all coastal waters sampled, and diuron, terbuthylazine, atrazine, irgarol and simazine were detected in more than 77% of samples. For pharmaceuticals, highest time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations were measured for caffeine and carbamazepine (32 and 12 ng L-1, respectively). For alkylphenols, highest TWA concentrations were measured for 4-nonylphenol mono-ethoxylate and 4-nonylphenol (41 and 33 ng L-1, respectively), and for herbicides and biocides, they were measured for diuron and irgarol (33 and 2.5 ng L-1, respectively). Except for Diana lagoon, lagoons and semi-enclosed bays were the most contaminated areas for herbicides and pharmaceuticals, whilst, for alkylphenols, levels of contamination were similar in lagoons and coastal waters. This study demonstrates the relevance and utility of POCIS as quantitative tool for measuring low concentrations of emerging contaminants in marine waters.

  14. astroABC: An Approximate Bayesian Computation Sequential Monte Carlo sampler for cosmological parameter estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Jennings, Elise

    2016-01-01

    Given the complexity of modern cosmological parameter inference where we are faced with non-Gaussian data and noise, correlated systematics and multi-probe correlated data sets, the Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) method is a promising alternative to traditional Markov Chain Monte Carlo approaches in the case where the Likelihood is intractable or unknown. The ABC method is called "Likelihood free" as it avoids explicit evaluation of the Likelihood by using a forward model simulation of the data which can include systematics. We introduce astroABC, an open source ABC Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) sampler for parameter estimation. A key challenge in astrophysics is the efficient use of large multi-probe datasets to constrain high dimensional, possibly correlated parameter spaces. With this in mind astroABC allows for massive parallelization using MPI, a framework that handles spawning of jobs across multiple nodes. A key new feature of astroABC is the ability to create MPI groups with different communica...

  15. Vadose Zone Monitoring of Dairy Green Water Lagoons using Soil Solution Samplers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brainard, James R.; Coplen, Amy K

    2005-11-01

    Over the last decade, dairy farms in New Mexico have become an important component to the economy of many rural ranching and farming communities. Dairy operations are water intensive and use groundwater that otherwise would be used for irrigation purposes. Most dairies reuse their process/green water three times and utilize lined lagoons for temporary storage of green water. Leakage of water from lagoons can pose a risk to groundwater quality. Groundwater resource protection infrastructures at dairies are regulated by the New Mexico Environment Department which currently relies on monitoring wells installed in the saturated zone for detecting leakage of waste water lagoon liners. Here we present a proposal to monitor the unsaturated zone beneath the lagoons with soil water solution samplers to provide early detection of leaking liners. Early detection of leaking liners along with rapid repair can minimize contamination of aquifers and reduce dairy liability for aquifer remediation. Additionally, acceptance of vadose zone monitoring as a NMED requirement over saturated zone monitoring would very likely significantly reduce dairy startup and expansion costs. Acknowledgment Funding for this project was provided by the Sandia National Laboratories Small Business Assistance Program

  16. Temporal and spatial variation of perchlorate in streambed sediments: results from in-situ dialysis samplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fate of perchlorate (ClO4-) in streambed sediments is becoming a concern due to the increasing number of groundwater and surface water contamination sites in the United States. Dialysis samplers were deployed at three sites over a period of 1 year to determine the vertical distribution of ClO4-in sediment pore water. Results indicated that the spatial and temporal ClO4-penetration into sediments could be affected by numerous factors, such as temperature, microbial degradation, ClO4-surface water concentration, and sediment physico-geological properties. In general, maximum ClO4-penetration into sediments at the studied sites was 30 cm below the sediment-water surface. The vertical sequential depletion of electron acceptors in sediments suggested that microbial reduction was responsible for ClO4-depletion in stream sediments. Biodegradation of ClO4-occurred over a seasonally variable active depth zone of 1-10 cm. Results implied that there was a rapid natural attenuation potential of perchlorate in saturated near-surface sediments. -Perchlorate may be rapidly attenuated in saturated near-surface sediments

  17. Use of Surrogated Snow Surface Sampler to Determine Dry Deposition of PAHs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have recently begun to attract attentions due to their cancerogenic and mutagenic effects on genes and human health. Some of related studies in literature focused on atmospheric concentrations while others investigated atmospheric dry and wet deposition fluxes. In literature, dry deposition studies used the results of coated and uncoated surrogated surfaces and reported an appropriate extraction and analysis steps. In such dry deposition studies, losses (infiltration, etc.) of snow samples are a fact and therefore, findings and results should contain uncertainties. In this study, a surrogated snow surface sampler was used to determine dry deposition of PAHs in the city centre of Erzurum. Snow samples were collected in 8 distinct locations in Erzurum city centre taken on trays and on surface without using trays. Analysis results of the snow samples taken on surface as well as on trays were compared. The proportion of total filtrate PAH compounds from surface versus from tray were found to be 53 percentage, whereas this proportion was 68 percentage for solid phase samples. Though the infiltration or loss varied depending on different samples, average loss was 2 times more for liquid phase whereas it was 2.4 times more for solid phase samplings. (author)

  18. Evaluation of sampling methods for toxicological testing of indoor air particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirkkonen, Jenni; Täubel, Martin; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Leppänen, Hanna; Lindsley, William G; Chen, Bean T; Hyvärinen, Anne; Huttunen, Kati

    2016-09-01

    There is a need for toxicity tests capable of recognizing indoor environments with compromised air quality, especially in the context of moisture damage. One of the key issues is sampling, which should both provide meaningful material for analyses and fulfill requirements imposed by practitioners using toxicity tests for health risk assessment. We aimed to evaluate different existing methods of sampling indoor particulate matter (PM) to develop a suitable sampling strategy for a toxicological assay. During three sampling campaigns in moisture-damaged and non-damaged school buildings, we evaluated one passive and three active sampling methods: the Settled Dust Box (SDB), the Button Aerosol Sampler, the Harvard Impactor and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Bioaerosol Cyclone Sampler. Mouse RAW264.7 macrophages were exposed to particle suspensions and cell metabolic activity (CMA), production of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) were determined after 24 h of exposure. The repeatability of the toxicological analyses was very good for all tested sampler types. Variability within the schools was found to be high especially between different classrooms in the moisture-damaged school. Passively collected settled dust and PM collected actively with the NIOSH Sampler (Stage 1) caused a clear response in exposed cells. The results suggested the higher relative immunotoxicological activity of dust from the moisture-damaged school. The NIOSH Sampler is a promising candidate for the collection of size-fractionated PM to be used in toxicity testing. The applicability of such sampling strategy in grading moisture damage severity in buildings needs to be developed further in a larger cohort of buildings.

  19. Evaluation of sampling methods for toxicological testing of indoor air particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirkkonen, Jenni; Täubel, Martin; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Leppänen, Hanna; Lindsley, William G; Chen, Bean T; Hyvärinen, Anne; Huttunen, Kati

    2016-09-01

    There is a need for toxicity tests capable of recognizing indoor environments with compromised air quality, especially in the context of moisture damage. One of the key issues is sampling, which should both provide meaningful material for analyses and fulfill requirements imposed by practitioners using toxicity tests for health risk assessment. We aimed to evaluate different existing methods of sampling indoor particulate matter (PM) to develop a suitable sampling strategy for a toxicological assay. During three sampling campaigns in moisture-damaged and non-damaged school buildings, we evaluated one passive and three active sampling methods: the Settled Dust Box (SDB), the Button Aerosol Sampler, the Harvard Impactor and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Bioaerosol Cyclone Sampler. Mouse RAW264.7 macrophages were exposed to particle suspensions and cell metabolic activity (CMA), production of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) were determined after 24 h of exposure. The repeatability of the toxicological analyses was very good for all tested sampler types. Variability within the schools was found to be high especially between different classrooms in the moisture-damaged school. Passively collected settled dust and PM collected actively with the NIOSH Sampler (Stage 1) caused a clear response in exposed cells. The results suggested the higher relative immunotoxicological activity of dust from the moisture-damaged school. The NIOSH Sampler is a promising candidate for the collection of size-fractionated PM to be used in toxicity testing. The applicability of such sampling strategy in grading moisture damage severity in buildings needs to be developed further in a larger cohort of buildings. PMID:27569522

  20. Comparison between light scattering and gravimetric samplers for PM10 mass concentration in poultry and pig houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra-López, María; Winkel, Albert; Mosquera, Julio; Ogink, Nico W. M.; Aarnink, André J. A.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare co-located real-time light scattering devices and equivalent gravimetric samplers in poultry and pig houses for PM10 mass concentration, and to develop animal-specific calibration factors for light scattering samplers. These results will contribute to evaluate the comparability of different sampling instruments for PM10 concentrations. Paired DustTrak light scattering device (DustTrak aerosol monitor, TSI, U.S.) and PM10 gravimetric cyclone sampler were used for measuring PM10 mass concentrations during 24 h periods (from noon to noon) inside animal houses. Sampling was conducted in 32 animal houses in the Netherlands, including broilers, broiler breeders, layers in floor and in aviary system, turkeys, piglets, growing-finishing pigs in traditional and low emission housing with dry and liquid feed, and sows in individual and group housing. A total of 119 pairs of 24 h measurements (55 for poultry and 64 for pigs) were recorded and analyzed using linear regression analysis. Deviations between samplers were calculated and discussed. In poultry, cyclone sampler and DustTrak data fitted well to a linear regression, with a regression coefficient equal to 0.41, an intercept of 0.16 mg m-3 and a correlation coefficient of 0.91 (excluding turkeys). Results in turkeys showed a regression coefficient equal to 1.1 (P = 0.49), an intercept of 0.06 mg m-3 (P < 0.0001) and a correlation coefficient of 0.98. In pigs, we found a regression coefficient equal to 0.61, an intercept of 0.05 mg m-3 and a correlation coefficient of 0.84. Measured PM10 concentrations using DustTraks were clearly underestimated (approx. by a factor 2) in both poultry and pig housing systems compared with cyclone pre-separators. Absolute, relative, and random deviations increased with concentration. DustTrak light scattering devices should be self-calibrated to investigate PM10 mass concentrations accurately in animal houses. We recommend linear regression

  1. Development and field application of a 6-bottle serial gas-tight fluid sampler for collecting seafloor cold seep and hydrothermal vent fluids with autonomous operation capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S.; Ding, K.; Yang, C.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.; Tan, C.; Schaen, A. T.; Luhmann, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    A 6-bottle serial gas-tight sampler (so-called "six-shooter") was developed for application with deep-sea vent fluids. The new device is composed of a custom-made 6-channel valve manifold and six sampling bottles which are circularly distributed around the valve manifold. Each valve channel consists of a high-pressure titanium cartridge valve and a motor-driven actuator. A sampling snorkel is connected to the inlet of the manifold that delivers the incoming fluid to different bottles. Each sampling bottle has a 160 ml-volume chamber and an accumulator chamber inside where compressed nitrogen is used to maintain the sample at near in-situ pressure. An electronics chamber that is located at the center of the sampler is used to carry out all sampling operations, autonomously, if desired. The sampler is of a compact circular configuration with a diameter of 26 cm and a length of 54 cm. During the SVC cruise AT 26-12, the sampler was deployed by DSV2 Alvin at a cold seep site MC036 with a depth of 1090 m in the Gulf of Mexico. The sampler collected fluid samples automatically following the tidal cycle to monitor the potential impact of the tide cycle on the fluid chemistry of cold seep in a period of two day. During the cruise AT 26-17, the sampler was used with newly upgraded DSV2 Alvin three times at the hydrothermal vent sites along Axial Seamount and Main Endeavor Field on Juan de Fuca Ridge. During a 4-day deployment at Anemone diffuse site (Axial Caldera), the sampler was set to work in an autonomous mode to collect fluid samples according to the preset interval. During other dives, the sampler was manually controlled via ICL (Inductively Coupled Link) communication through the hull. Gas-tight fluid samples were collected from different hydrothermal vents with temperatures between 267 ℃ and 335 ℃ at the depth up to 2200 m. The field results indicate unique advantages of the design. It can be deployed in extended time period with remote operation or working

  2. Design of a small personal air monitor and its application in aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, Chris

    2009-01-15

    A small air sampling system using standard air filter sampling technology has been used to monitor the air in aircraft. The device is a small ABS constructed cylinder 5 cm in diameter and 9 cm tall and can be operated by non technical individuals at an instant notice. It is completely self contained with a 4 AAA cell power supply, DC motor, a centrifugal fan, and accommodates standard 37 mm filters and backup pads. The monitor is totally enclosed and pre assembled in the laboratory. A 45 degrees twist of the cap switches on the motor and simultaneously opens up the intake ports and exhaust ports allowing air to pass through the filter. A reverse 45 degrees twist of the cap switches off the motor and closes all intake and exhaust ports, completely enclosing the filter. The whole monitor is returned to the laboratory by standard mail for analysis and reassembly for future use. The sampler has been tested for electromagnetic interference and has been approved for use in aircraft during all phases of flight. A set of samples taken by a BAe-146-300 crew member during two flights in the same aircraft and analyzed by GC-MS, indicated exposure to tricresyl phosphate (TCP) levels ranging from 31 to 83 nanograms/m(3) (detection limit aircraft. It was concluded that the air sampler was capable of monitoring air concentrations of TCP isomers in aircraft above 4.5 nanogram/m(3). PMID:18801557

  3. Study of air pollution in Buenos Aires city. Appendix 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work performed since 1993 on the study of the elemental profile of Buenos Aires atmosphere is presented. Both aerosol direct sampling and biomonitors have been used and the samples have been analyzed mainly by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). Due to problems with XRF, Anodic Stripping Voltammetry has been chosen for lead determination and Ion Chromatography for soluble anions. For aerosol direct sampling, analytical and sampling methods are described, as well as the sampling campaigns. Experiments have been performed for studying differences between day/night elemental concentrations along the week and a possible seasonal dependence. Some results of mass concentrations and others from INAA are presented. Sampling with the 'Gent sampler' began during August 1994 at an urban residential area of the city. The results of mass concentrations for the first 28 pairs of samples are shown together with some INAA results, as this is the only technique used for the analysis. Lichens and tree bark were the chosen biomonitors. Sampling and analytical methods by INAA are exposed, presenting some of the results that have been obtained. The participation in the aerosol analysis for the Ushuaia Global Atmospheric Watch Station is also commented. (author)

  4. Honey Bees (Apis mellifera, L. as Active Samplers of Airborne Particulate Matter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Negri

    Full Text Available Honey bees (Apis mellifera L. are bioindicators of environmental pollution levels. During their wide-ranging foraging activity, these hymenopterans are exposed to pollutants, thus becoming a useful tool to trace the environmental contaminants as heavy metals, pesticides, radionuclides and volatile organic compounds. In the present work we demonstrate that bees can also be used as active samplers of airborne particulate matter. Worker bees were collected from hives located in a polluted postmining area in South West Sardinia (Italy that is also exposed to dust emissions from industrial plants. The area is included in an official list of sites of national interest for environmental remediation, and has been characterized for the effects of pollutants on the health of the resident population. The head, wings, hind legs and alimentary canal of the bees were investigated with Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX. The analyses pointed to specific morphological and chemical features of the particulate, and resulted into the identification of three categories of particles: industry-, postmining-, and soil-derived. With the exception of the gut, all the analyzed body districts displayed inorganic particles, mostly concentrated in specific areas of the body (i.e. along the costal margin of the fore wings, the medial plane of the head, and the inner surface of the hind legs. The role of both past mining activities and the industrial activity close to the study area as sources of the particulate matter is also discussed. We conclude that honey bees are able to collect samples of the main airborne particles emitted from different sources, therefore could be an ideal tool for monitoring such a kind of pollutants.

  5. Size selective isocyanate aerosols personal air sampling using porous plastic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanh Huynh, Cong; Duc, Trinh Vu

    2009-02-01

    As part of a European project (SMT4-CT96-2137), various European institutions specialized in occupational hygiene (BGIA, HSL, IOM, INRS, IST, Ambiente e Lavoro) have established a program of scientific collaboration to develop one or more prototypes of European personal samplers for the collection of simultaneous three dust fractions: inhalable, thoracic and respirable. These samplers based on existing sampling heads (IOM, GSP and cassettes) use Polyurethane Plastic Foam (PUF) according to their porosity to support sampling and separator size of the particles. In this study, the authors present an original application of size selective personal air sampling using chemical impregnated PUF to perform isocyanate aerosols capturing and derivatizing in industrial spray-painting shops.

  6. Distributions of air pollutants associated with oil and gas development measured in the Upper Green River Basin of Wyoming.

    OpenAIRE

    R. A. Field; J.J. Soltis; P. Pérez-Ballesta; E. Grandesso; D. C. Montague

    2015-01-01

    Diffusive sampler monitoring techniques were employed to assess the spatial variability of air pollutants associated with the Pinedale Anticline and Jonah Field oil and natural gas (O&NG) developments in the Upper Green River Basin, Wyoming. Diffusive sampling identified both the extent of wintertime ozone episodes and the distributions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOC) including BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene isomers), and volatile ...

  7. Use of sulfur hexafluoride airflow studies to determine the appropriate number and placement of air monitors in an alpha inhalation exposure laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of the appropriate number and placement of air monitors in the workplace is quite subjective and is generally one of the more difficult tasks in radiation protection. General guidance for determining the number and placement of air sampling and monitoring instruments has been provided by technical reports such as Mishima, J. These two documents and other published guidelines suggest that some insight into sampler placement can be obtained by conducting airflow studies involving the dilution and clearance of the relatively inert tracer gas sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) in sampler placement studies and describes the results of a study done within the ITRI alpha inhalation exposure laboratories. The objectives of the study were to document an appropriate method for conducting SF6 dispersion studies, and to confirm the appropriate number and placement of air monitors and air samplers within a typical ITRI inhalation exposure laboratory. The results of this study have become part of the technical bases for air sampling and monitoring in the test room

  8. Use of sulfur hexafluoride airflow studies to determine the appropriate number and placement of air monitors in an alpha inhalation exposure laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, G.J.; Hoover, M.D.

    1995-12-01

    Determination of the appropriate number and placement of air monitors in the workplace is quite subjective and is generally one of the more difficult tasks in radiation protection. General guidance for determining the number and placement of air sampling and monitoring instruments has been provided by technical reports such as Mishima, J. These two documents and other published guidelines suggest that some insight into sampler placement can be obtained by conducting airflow studies involving the dilution and clearance of the relatively inert tracer gas sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) in sampler placement studies and describes the results of a study done within the ITRI alpha inhalation exposure laboratories. The objectives of the study were to document an appropriate method for conducting SF{sub 6} dispersion studies, and to confirm the appropriate number and placement of air monitors and air samplers within a typical ITRI inhalation exposure laboratory. The results of this study have become part of the technical bases for air sampling and monitoring in the test room.

  9. Passive air sampling of gaseous elemental mercury: a critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLagan, David S.; Mazur, Maxwell E. E.; Mitchell, Carl P. J.; Wania, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Because gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) is distributed globally through the atmosphere, reliable means of measuring its concentrations in air are important. Passive air samplers (PASs), designed to be cheap, simple to operate, and to work without electricity, could provide an alternative to established active sampling techniques in applications such as (1) long-term monitoring of atmospheric GEM levels in remote regions and in developing countries, (2) atmospheric mercury source identification and characterization through finely resolved spatial mapping, and (3) the recording of personal exposure to GEM. An effective GEM PAS requires a tightly constrained sampling rate, a large and stable uptake capacity, and a sensitive analytical technique. None of the GEM PASs developed to date achieve levels of accuracy and precision sufficient for the reliable determination of background concentrations over extended deployments. This is due to (1) sampling rates that vary due to meteorological factors and manufacturing inconsistencies, and/or (2) an often low, irreproducible and/or unstable uptake capacity of the employed sorbents. While we identify shortcomings of existing GEM PAS, we also reveal potential routes to overcome those difficulties. Activated carbon and nanostructured metal surfaces hold promise as effective sorbents. Sampler designs incorporating diffusive barriers should be able to notably reduce the influence of wind on sampling rates.

  10. MiniSipper: a new in situ water sampler for high-resolution, long-duration acid mine drainage monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Thomas P; Todd, Andrew S

    2012-11-15

    Abandoned hard-rock mines can be a significant source of acid mine drainage (AMD) and toxic metal pollution to watersheds. In Colorado, USA, abandoned mines are often located in remote, high elevation areas that are snowbound for 7-8 months of the year. The difficulty in accessing these remote sites, especially during winter, creates challenging water sampling problems and major hydrologic and toxic metal loading events are often under sampled. Currently available automated water samplers are not well suited for sampling remote snowbound areas so the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed a new water sampler, the MiniSipper, to provide long-duration, high-resolution water sampling in remote areas. The MiniSipper is a small, portable sampler that uses gas bubbles to separate up to 250 five milliliter acidified samples in a long tubing coil. The MiniSipper operates for over 8 months unattended in water under snow/ice, reduces field work costs, and greatly increases sampling resolution, especially during inaccessible times. MiniSippers were deployed in support of an U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) project evaluating acid mine drainage inputs from the Pennsylvania Mine to the Snake River watershed in Summit County, CO, USA. MiniSipper metal results agree within 10% of EPA-USGS hand collected grab sample results. Our high-resolution results reveal very strong correlations (R(2)>0.9) between potentially toxic metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn) and specific conductivity at the Pennsylvania Mine site. The large number of samples collected by the MiniSipper over the entire water year provides a detailed look at the effects of major hydrologic events such as snowmelt runoff and rainstorms on metal loading from the Pennsylvania Mine. MiniSipper results will help guide EPA sampling strategy and remediation efforts in the Snake River watershed. PMID:23103760

  11. A mini drivepoint sampler for measuring pore water solute concentrations in the hyporheic zone of sand-bottom streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, J.H.; Murphy, F.; Fuller, C.C.; Triska, F.J.

    1998-01-01

    A new method for collecting pore-water samples in sand and gravel streambeds is presented. We developed a mini drivepoint solution sampling (MINIPOINT) technique to collect pore-water samples at 2.5-cm vertical resolution. The sampler consisted of six small-diameter stainless steel drivepoints arranged in a 10-cm-diameter circular array. In a simple procedure, the sampler was installed in the streambed to preset drivepoint depths of 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0, 12.5, and 15.0 cm. Sampler performance was evaluated in the Shingobee River, Minnesota, and Pinal Creek, Arizona, by measuring the vertical gradient of chloride concentration in pore water beneath the streambed that was established by the uninterrupted injection to the stream for 3 d. Pore-water samples were withdrawn from all drivepoints simultaneously. In the first evaluation, the vertical chloride gradient was unchanged at withdrawal rates between 0.3 and 4.0 ml min-1 but was disturbed at higher rates. In the second evaluation, up to 70 ml of pore water was withdrawn from each drivepoint at a withdrawal rate of 2.5 ml min-1 without disturbing the vertical chloride gradient. Background concentrations of other solutes were also determined with MINIPOINT sampling. Steep vertical gradients were present for biologically reactive solutes such as DO, NH4/+, NO3/-, and dissolved organic C in the top 20 cm of the streambed. These detailed solute profiles in the hyporheic zone could not have been determined without a method for close interval vertical sampling that does not disturb natural hydrologic mixing between stream water and groundwater.

  12. Estimation of Uncertainty in Tracer Gas Measurement of Air Change Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Iizuka

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Simple and economical measurement of air change rates can be achieved with a passive-type tracer gas doser and sampler. However, this is made more complex by the fact many buildings are not a single fully mixed zone. This means many measurements are required to obtain information on ventilation conditions. In this study, we evaluated the uncertainty of tracer gas measurement of air change rate in n completely mixed zones. A single measurement with one tracer gas could be used to simply estimate the air change rate when n = 2. Accurate air change rates could not be obtained for n ≥ 2 due to a lack of information. However, the proposed method can be used to estimate an air change rate with an accuracy of

  13. Evaluation of the use of performance reference compounds in an oasis-HLB adsorbent based passive sampler for improving water concentration estimates of polar herbicides in freshwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzella, N.; Lissalde, S.; Moreira, S.; Delmas, F.; Mazellier, P.; Huckins, J.N.

    2010-01-01

    Passive samplers such as the Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS) are useful tools for monitoring trace levels of polar organic chemicals in aquatic environments. The use of performance reference compounds (PRC) spiked into the POCIS adsorbent for in situ calibration may improve the semiquantitative nature of water concentration estimates based on this type of sampler. In this work, deuterium labeled atrazine-desisopropyl (DIA-d5) was chosen as PRC because of its relatively high fugacity from Oasis HLB (the POCIS adsorbent used) and our earlier evidence of its isotropic exchange. In situ calibration of POCIS spiked with DIA-d5was performed, and the resulting time-weighted average concentration estimates were compared with similar values from an automatic sampler equipped with Oasis HLB cartridges. Before PRC correction, water concentration estimates based on POCIS data sampling ratesfrom a laboratory calibration exposure were systematically lower than the reference concentrations obtained with the automatic sampler. Use of the DIA-d5 PRC data to correct POCIS sampling rates narrowed differences between corresponding values derived from the two methods. Application of PRCs for in situ calibration seems promising for improving POCIS-derived concentration estimates of polar pesticides. However, careful attention must be paid to the minimization of matrix effects when the quantification is performed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  14. Method for the in Situ Calibration of a Passive Phosphate Sampler in Estuarine and Marine Waters

    OpenAIRE

    O'Brien, D. S.; Booij, K.; Hawker, D.W.; Mueller, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Passive samplers for phosphate were calibrated in the laboratory over a range of flow velocities (0-27 cm s(-1)) and ionic strengths (0-0.62 mol kg(-1)). The observed sampling rates were between 0.006 and 0.20 L d(-1). An empirical model allowed the estimation of these sampling rates with a precision of 8.5%. Passive flow monitors (PFMs), based on gypsum dissolution rates, were calibrated for the same range of flow velocities and ionic strength. Mass loss rates of the PFMs increased with incr...

  15. Polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS): application for monitoring organic micropollutants in wastewater effluent and surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miège, Cécile; Budzinski, Hélène; Jacquet, Romain; Soulier, Coralie; Pelte, Thomas; Coquery, Marina

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of POCIS (Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler) for the evaluation of river water quality downstream of wastewater treatment plants. POCIS proved well adapted to sampling alkylphenols and several pharmaceuticals. Concentration factors and the decrease in limits of quantification, compared to grab water sample analyses, were significant except for hormones, β-blockers and bronchodilators. Promising preliminary results obtained in situ on deuterated atenolol used as a performance reference compound need to be confirmed in-lab. This work confirms that POCIS is a valuable tool for monitoring hydrophilic organic molecules in river and wastewaters. PMID:22193508

  16. Motor Vehicles Air Pollution in Nairobi, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Odhiambo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Air quality monitoring in most developing countries is not routinely conducted, and in some urban areas such information does not even exist, though signs of deteriorating air quality and health problems related to air pollution are visible. By measuring air pollutants (i.e., Nitrogen Oxides, ozone, suspended particulates matter (PM10, and trace elements e.g. lead, this study investigated air quality in Nairobi, one of the largest cities in eastern Africa and the capital of Kenya. Sampling was done once a week from February to April 2003. Hourly average concentrations of NOx and O3 were measured using a technique that is based on "chemilumiscent" reaction at a site connecting two main highways in Nairobi (University and Uhuru from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. PM10 was collected using “Gent” Stacked Filter Unit (SFU air sampler fitted with nucleopore filters (0.4 and 8.0 mm pore size for fine and coarse filters, respectively that were analyzed for trace elements by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescent (EDXRF technique. An automatic vehicle counter was used for determining the vehicle density at the sampling site. Results show that most pollutants, for example, lead (0.05 1 to 1.106 µg/m3, bromine (LLD to 0.43 µg/m3, NO2 (0.011-0.976 ppm, NO (0.001-0.2628 ppm and O3 (LLD-0.1258 ppm are within the WHO guidelines. PM10 levels (66.66 - 444.45 µg/m3 were above the WHO guidelines for most of the days, with coarse particulate accounting for more than 70%. Strong correlation (r = 0.966 between fine (0.4 µm particulates, NOx, and motor vehicle density, indicate the importance of traffic as a common source for both fine particulates and NOx.

  17. Thin air

    OpenAIRE

    Jasanoff, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    Clearing the air How do we grasp the air? Without Michel Callon’s guidance, I might never have asked that question. Years ago, when I first entered environmental law practice, I took it for granted that problems such as air pollution exist “out there” in the real world for science to discover and law to fix. It is a measure of Callon’s influence that I understand the law today as a metaphysical instrument, no less powerful in its capacity to order nature than the tools of the ancient oracular...

  18. Air Pollution and Watershed Research in the Central Sierra Nevada of California: Nitrogen and Ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Hunsaker

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining healthy forests is the major objective for the Forest Service scientists and managers working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Air pollution, specifically ozone (O3 and nitrogenous (N air pollutants, may severely affect the health of forest ecosystems in the western U.S. Thus, the monitoring of air pollution concentration and deposition levels, as well as studies focused on understanding effects mechanisms, are essential for evaluation of risks associated with their presence. Such information is essential for development of proper management strategies for maintaining clean air, clean water, and healthy ecosystems on land managed by the Forest Service. We report on two years of research in the central Sierra Nevada of California, a semi-arid forest at elevations of 1100–2700 m. Information on O3 and N air pollutants is obtained from a network of 18 passive samplers. We relate the atmospheric N concentration to N concentrations in streams, shallow soil water, and bulk deposition collectors within the Kings River Experimental Watershed. This watershed also contains an intensive site that is part of a recent Forest Service effort to calculate critical loads for N, sulfur, and acidity to forest ecosystems. The passive sampler design allows for extensive spatial measurements while the watershed experiment provides intensive spatial data for future analysis of ecosystem processes.

  19. Determining indoor air quality and identifying the origin of odour episodes in indoor environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eva Gallego; Xavier Roca; Jose Francisco Perales; Xavier Guardino

    2009-01-01

    A methodology for identifying volatile organic compounds (VOC) and determining air quality of indoor air has been developed. The air samples are collected using pump samplers by the inhabitants when they perceive odorous and/or discomfort episodes. Glass multi-sorbent tubes are connected to the pump samplers for the retention of VOC. The analysis is performed by automatic thermal desorption (ATD) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). This methodology can be applied in cases of sick building syndrome (SBS) evaluation, in which building occupants experience a series of varied symptoms that appear to be linked to time spent in the building. Chemical pollutants concentrations (e.g., VOC) have been described to contribute to SBS. To exemplify the methodology, a qualitative determination and an evaluation of VOC present were performed in a dwelling where the occupants experienced the SBS symptoms. Higher total VOC (TVOC) value was detected in episodes in indoor air (1.33 ( 1.53 mg/m3) compared to outdoor air (0.71 ( 0.46 mg/m3). The concentrations of individual VOCs, such as ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, 1-butanol, acetic acid, acetonitrile and 1-metoxy-2-propanol, were also higher than the expected for a standard dwelling. The external source of VOC was found to be a not declared activity of storage and manipulation of solvents located at the bottom of a contiguous building.

  20. Measurements of air contaminants during the Cerro Grande fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhart, Craig

    2010-08-01

    Ambient air sampling for radioactive air contaminants was continued throughout the Cerro Grande fire that burned part of Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the fire, samples were collected more frequently than normal because buildup of smoke particles on the filters was decreasing the air flow. Overall, actual sampling time was 96% of the total possible sampling time for the May 2000 samples. To evaluate potential human exposure to air contaminants, the samples were analyzed as soon as possible and for additional specific radionuclides. Analyses showed that the smoke from the fire included resuspended radon decay products that had been accumulating for many years on the vegetation and the forest floor that burned. Concentrations of plutonium, americium, and depleted uranium were also measurable, but at locations and concentrations comparable to non-fire periods. A continuous particulate matter sampler measured concentrations that exceeded the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for PM-10 (particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter). These high concentrations were caused by smoke from the fire when it was close to the sampler.

  1. Air pollution and watershed research in the central Sierra Nevada of California: nitrogen and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsaker, Carolyn; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Auman, Jessica; Cisneros, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Maintaining healthy forests is the major objective for the Forest Service scientists and managers working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Air pollution, specifically ozone (O3) and nitrogenous (N) air pollutants, may severely affect the health of forest ecosystems in the western U.S. Thus, the monitoring of air pollution concentration and deposition levels, as well as studies focused on understanding effects mechanisms, are essential for evaluation of risks associated with their presence. Such information is essential for development of proper management strategies for maintaining clean air, clean water, and healthy ecosystems on land managed by the Forest Service. We report on two years of research in the central Sierra Nevada of California, a semi-arid forest at elevations of 1100-2700 m. Information on O3 and N air pollutants is obtained from a network of 18 passive samplers. We relate the atmospheric N concentration to N concentrations in streams, shallow soil water, and bulk deposition collectors within the Kings River Experimental Watershed. This watershed also contains an intensive site that is part of a recent Forest Service effort to calculate critical loads for N, sulfur, and acidity to forest ecosystems. The passive sampler design allows for extensive spatial measurements while the watershed experiment provides intensive spatial data for future analysis of ecosystem processes.

  2. Measuring nonpolar organic contaminant partitioning in three Norwegian sediments using polyethylene passive samplers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, Ian J., E-mail: ian.allan@niva.no; Ruus, Anders; Schaanning, Morten T.; Macrae, Kenneth J.; Naes, Kristoffer

    2012-04-15

    Freely dissolved pore water concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), penta- and hexachlorobenzene (PeCB and HCB), octachlorostyrene (OCS), p,p Prime -DDE and p,p Prime -DDD were measured in bottom sediments from three sites in Norway. Sediments were from Aker Brygge, site of a former shipyard in the inner part of Oslofjord, Frierfjord in the Grenlandsfjord area, impacted during the 50 year-long activity of a magnesium smelter plant, and from Kristiansand harbour, site with high industrial activity. Low density polyethylene (LDPE) membrane samplers were exposed to these sediments in laboratory incubation under constant and low-level agitation for periods of 1, 2, 6, 13, 23 and 50 days. Freely dissolved pore water concentrations were estimated from contaminant masses accumulated and sampling rates obtained from the measurement of kinetics of dissipation of performance reference compounds (PRCs). Marked differences in freely dissolved PAH concentrations and resulting organic carbon-normalised sediment-pore water partition coefficients, logK{sub TOC}, between these three sediments could be observed despite the generally similar total sediment concentrations. In contrast with the PAH data, partitioning of PCBs and other organochlorine compounds (OCs) was relatively similar in all three sediments. For sediments from Frierfjord and Kristiansand, logK{sub TOC} values were lower for PCBs/OCs than for PAHs, indicating higher availability. Similar partitioning of PAHs and PCBs/OCs was found for sediments from Aker Brygge. No simple logK{sub oc}-logK{sub ow} relationships could model these data successfully. These results support the notion that the assessment of the risk posed by these compounds present in sediments in most cases requires actual measurement of contaminant availability. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of a robust passive sampling measurement for batch sediment testing. Black

  3. Development of a flexible dialysis pore water sampler placement system: easy handling and related error sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Hilgert

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Investigations in the context of greenhouse gas production measurements in sub-tropical reservoirs brought up the necessity to survey the in situ pore water gas and ion concentrations at many positions within a relatively short time. As several sediment cores were taken, the interest in analyzing the pore water at the same time and at the same positions forced us to develop a cost- and time saving method for the placement of dialysis pore water samplers (DPS. General prerequisites were the ability to place several DPS per day, within a flexible depth range of up to 40 m and with a low cost budget. To meet these requirements, a DPS placing system (DPSPS was developed, which would allow the precise placement of DPS in water with a depth of up to 40 m and assessing the biases of on-board measurements and possible methodological improvements. The DPSPS was transported to Brazil and tested in a measurement campaign for 10 days. The measurements were carried out during two campaigns in December 2012 and March 2013 in the Capivari Reservoir north-east of Curitiba in the State of Paraná. The system worked properly and several DPS could be placed from a 5 m class aluminum boat. The placement was performed with high accuracy regarding the positioning as well as the penetration depth of the DPS. After the recovery of the DPS, the possible biases during sampling were analyzed. Possible back-diffusion was investigated, taking oxygen concentration as one representative parameter for estimation of the sample behavior. Laboratory as well as field results showed that special care has to be taken to minimize the influence of diffusion processes during post-recovery sampling. The results also suggested that the used membranes are affected by clogging which is likely to influence the diffusion times of various ions and gases. It can be stated that the DPSPS was developed successfully as the demands in terms of handling as well as monitoring efficiency and sample

  4. Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a close in June 2013 when the company, Conscious Clothing, was awarded the My Air grand ... Page Options: Request Translation Services Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Reddit Email Evernote More Increase Font Size Decrease ...

  5. Measurement of 2-nonenal and diacetyl emanating from human skin surface employing passive flux sampler-GCMS system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Keita; Sekine, Yoshika; Furukawa, Shota; Takahashi, Minami; Oikawa, Daisuke

    2016-08-15

    It is commonly said elderly persons have a characteristic body odor, and, at present, two chemical compounds have been found to vary with age in male Japanese: 2-nonenal and diacetyl. To investigate dermal emission flux of the ageing odor related compounds, we have developed a non-invasive sampling device based on a concept of passive flux sampler (PFS). The sampler was placed on the skin surface to create a headspace, and the gases emanating from skin moved toward a disk-type adsorbent. The trapped gases were then extracted with dichloromethane and determined by GCMS. The PFS was practically applied to healthy volunteers covering a wide range of age. Since emission fluxes of both compounds remarkably varied with sampling position, the nape of the neck was fixed as regular sampling position where there are dense networks of both sebaceous and eccrine glands which are potential sources of both compounds. The emission flux of 2-nonenal increased with age for both male and female volunteers, whilst the flux of diacetyl showed highest in 30s and decreased over 40s. Although diacetyl has been known as a middle-aged male odor, this study showed the odor caused by diacetyl was not specific to male. PMID:27362995

  6. Estimation of the Human Extrathoracic Deposition Fraction of Inhaled Particles Using a Polyurethane Foam Collection Substrate in an IOM Sampler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrah K. Sleeth

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Extrathoracic deposition of inhaled particles (i.e., in the head and throat is an important exposure route for many hazardous materials. Current best practices for exposure assessment of aerosols in the workplace involve particle size selective sampling methods based on particle penetration into the human respiratory tract (i.e., inhalable or respirable sampling. However, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO has recently adopted particle deposition sampling conventions (ISO 13138, including conventions for extrathoracic (ET deposition into the anterior nasal passage (ET1 and the posterior nasal and oral passages (ET2. For this study, polyurethane foam was used as a collection substrate inside an inhalable aerosol sampler to provide an estimate of extrathoracic particle deposition. Aerosols of fused aluminum oxide (five sizes, 4.9 µm–44.3 µm were used as a test dust in a low speed (0.2 m/s wind tunnel. Samplers were placed on a rotating mannequin inside the wind tunnel to simulate orientation-averaged personal sampling. Collection efficiency data for the foam insert matched well to the extrathoracic deposition convention for the particle sizes tested. The concept of using a foam insert to match a particle deposition sampling convention was explored in this study and shows promise for future use as a sampling device.

  7. Toward the next generation of air quality monitoring: Persistent organic pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hayley; MacLeod, Matthew; Guardans, Ramon; Scheringer, Martin; Barra, Ricardo; Harner, Tom; Zhang, Gan

    2013-12-01

    Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) are global pollutants that can migrate over long distances and bioaccumulate through food webs, posing health risks to wildlife and humans. Multilateral environmental agreements, such as the Stockholm Convention on POPs, were enacted to identify POPs and establish the conditions to control their release, production and use. A Global Monitoring Plan was initiated under the Stockholm Convention calling for POP monitoring in air as a core medium; however long temporal trends (>10 years) of atmospheric POPs are only available at a few selected sites. Spatial coverage of air monitoring for POPs has recently significantly improved with the introduction and advancement of passive air samplers. Here, we review the status of air monitoring and modeling activities and note major uncertainties in data comparability, deficiencies of air monitoring and modeling in urban and alpine areas, and lack of emission inventories for most POPs. A vision for an internationally-integrated strategic monitoring plan is proposed which could provide consistent and comparable monitoring data for POPs supported and supplemented by global and regional transport models. Key recommendations include developing expertise in all aspects of air monitoring to ensure data comparability and consistency; partnering with existing air quality and meteorological networks to leverage synergies; facilitating data sharing with international data archives; and expanding spatial coverage with passive air samplers. Enhancing research on the stability of particle-bound chemicals is needed to assess exposure and deposition in urban areas, and to elucidate long-range transport. Conducting targeted measurement campaigns in specific source areas would enhance regional models which can be extrapolated to similar regions to estimate emissions. Ultimately, reverse-modeling combined with air measurements can be used to derive “emission” as an indicator to assess environmental

  8. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 86 - Constant Volume Sampler Flow Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Barometric pressure (corrected) PB “Hg ±.01 “Hg. Ambient temperature TA °F ±.5 °F. Air Temperature into LFE... a small cylinder that has been charged with pure propane or carbon monoxide gas (caution—carbon... release a quantity of pure propane or carbon monoxide into the system during the sampling period. 4....

  9. 40 CFR 1065.341 - CVS and batch sampler verification (propane check).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... overflow HC concentration does not exceed 2 µmol/mol, record this value as x THCinit and use it to correct... background concentrations of HC, measure and record background HC in the dilution air. (4) Zero any... CO2 or CO. A failed propane check might indicate one or more problems that may require...

  10. Simultaneous determination of trace pesticides in urban air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Kimiko; Kitamura, Eri; Yamashita, Toshiro; Kido, Azuma

    Thirty-nine kinds of pesticides in the air were monitored in Kitakyushu City. Air samples were collected by a high-volume air sampler equipped with a quartz fiber filter and XAD-2 resin trap. After sampling about 700 m' of air, pesticides were extracted with dichloromethane from the quartz fiber filter and XAD-2 resin separately by ultrasonic method. The extracts were concentrated and fractionated by silica gel column chromatography. After adding internal standards, the sample solutions were analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with a selected ion monitor (GC/MS-SIM) using a fused silica capillary column for the quantification of 39 kinds of pesticides. In order to evaluate the accuracy of this method, a recovery test was performed. Standard compounds were spiked into the XAD-2 resin trap at a concentration level of l μg by sucking 700 m 3 of sample air. The recovery efficiencies of almost all tested pesticides yielded more than 70% and their relative standard deviations were less than 20%. This method was applied to monitor pesticides in air collected in summer and spring seasons in Kitakyushu City. Of the 39 pesticides examined, 23 were detected in summer and 21 detected in spring. The concentration of Isofenphos, 10 ng m ·, was the highest in the summer sample and the concentration of propoxur, 11 ng m -3, in the spring sample.

  11. Investigation of a Particle into Liquid Sampler to Study the Formation & Ageing of Secondary Organic Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, K. L.; Hamilton, J. F.; Rickard, A. R.; Bloss, W. J.; Alam, M. S.; Camredon, M.; Munoz, A.; Vazquez, M.; Rodenas, M.; Vera, T.; Borrás, E.

    2012-12-01

    The atmospheric oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in the presence of NOx results in the formation of tropospheric ozone and Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) [Hallquist et al., 2009]. Whilst SOA is known to affect both climate and human health, the VOC oxidation pathways leading to SOA formation are poorly understood [Solomon et al., 2007]. This is in part due to the vast number and the low concentration of SOA species present in the ambient atmosphere. It has been estimated as many as 10,000 to 100,000 VOCs have been detected in the atmosphere, all of which can undergo photo-chemical oxidation and contribute to SOA formation [Goldstein and Galbally, 2007]. Atmospheric simulation chambers such as the EUropean PHOtoREactor (EUPHORE) in Valencia, Spain, are often used to study SOA formation from a single VOC precursor under controlled conditions. SOA composition and formation can be studied using online techniques such as Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS), which provide high time resolution but limited structural information [Zhang et al., 2007]. Offline techniques, such as collection onto filters, extraction and subsequent analysis, provide detailed SOA composition but only usually one or two samples per experiment. In this work we report time resolved SOA composition analysis using a Particle into Liquid Sampler (PILS) followed by Liquid Chromatography Ion-Trap Mass Spectrometry (LC-IT-MS/MS) and Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FTICR-MS/MS). Experiments were performed at EUPHORE investigating the formation and composition of Methyl Chavicol SOA. Methyl Chavicol (also known as Estragole) was identified as the highest floral emission from an oil palm plantation in Malaysian Borneo and has also been observed in US pine forests [Bouvier-Brown et al., 2009; Misztal et al., 2010]. Previous studies indicate a high SOA yield from Methyl Chavicol at around 40 % [Lee et al., 2006], however currently there have been very few literature

  12. Air surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, G.W.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the air surveillance and monitoring programs currently in operation at that Hanford Site. Atmospheric releases of pollutants from Hanford to the surrounding region are a potential source of human exposure. For that reason, both radioactive and nonradioactive materials in air are monitored at a number of locations. The influence of Hanford emissions on local radionuclide concentrations was evaluated by comparing concentrations measured at distant locations within the region to concentrations measured at the Site perimeter. This section discusses sample collection, analytical methods, and the results of the Hanford air surveillance program. A complete listing of all analytical results summarized in this section is reported separately by Bisping (1995).

  13. A Monitoring of Air Pollutants (CO, SO2 and NO in Ambient Air Near an Industrial Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radin Mohamed Radin Maya Saphira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A monitoring assessment was carried out to measure the concentration of air pollutants in ambient air in the university campus, which is located adjacent to the industrial area. The air pollutants were monitored for CO (Carbon monoxide, SO2 (Sulfur dioxide and NO (Nitrous oxide at the three sampling points, with distance reference based from the industrial area. Air pollutant gases were sampled from the I-Brid Toxic Gases Analyzer with the sampling hour referred to the Recommended Malaysian Air Quality Guidelines (RMAQG during October 2013 to Jun 2014. Meteorological data was collected from the E-Sampler device for 24 hours. It was found that the CO concentrations were fall within the RMAQG at all stations monitored. The SO2 concentration was high at Station 3 (Material lab, with 0.66 ppm which was exceeded the RMAQG of 0.13 ppm. All three stations recorded high concentration of NO, which the peak concentration occurred at the afternoon sampling. The nearest Station 3 (Material lab has recorded the highest level of NO, SO2 and CO compared to the other stations. The monitoring data has contributed some highlights to the authority and awareness about possible long risk effect of the air pollutants at the case study.

  14. MICROBIOLOGICAL SURVEILLANCE OF AIR QUALITY IN OPE RATION THEATRES - COMPARISON OF THE CONVENTIONAL SETTLE PL ATE TECHNIQUES VS USE OF AN AIR SAMPLING DEVICE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathab

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Air as a means of nosocomial transmission has alw ays remained as a cause of concern for health care providers and especially personnel involved in infection control activities. Although there are no uniform c onsensus on either the standards for surveillance, methodology for monitoring or the lev els of acceptable contamination, it still remains a fact that we need to have some criteria t o monitor air quality in atleast the critical care areas like the operation theatres. METHODOLOGY: Air quality surveillance in the operation theatres was performed simultaneously usin g the settle plate technique and an air sampling device. A total of 9 operation theatres were subjected to 4 surveillance cycles with a minimum of 2 recordings in each theatre following standard protocols and accepted method used to calculate bioburden. RESULTS: A comparison was made between the two methods using the data available with 72 recordings . In th e settle plate technique, the mean cfu /mm3 was found to be 17.11 and 22cfu/mm3 at less than 30 cm and at a point more than 30cms of the operating table where as the corresponding means usi ng the air sampler was137.83 and 164.11cfu/mm3 respectively which showed considerable statistical significance . CONCLUSION : The use of an air sampler would be more appropriate in monitoring the air quality in critical care areas ensuring a more stringent method of qual ity check without compromising on the the standard accepted norms and addressing the issue of patient safety with reference to infection prevention

  15. Healthy Air Outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung.org > Our Initiatives > Healthy Air > Outdoor Healthy Air Outdoors The quality of the air we breathe ... families and can even shorten their lives. Outdoor Air Pollution and Health Outdoor air pollution continues to ...

  16. Main features and possibilities of the new scale module for calculation of sensitivity and uncertainty by sampling: SAMPLER; Principlaes caracteristicas y posibilidades del nuevo modulo de SCALE 6.2 para calculo de sensibilidad e incertidumbre por muestreo: SAMPLER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesado, C.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G.

    2014-07-01

    Due to the importance of calculating sensitivity and uncertainty in the calculation of field engineering, and especially in the nuclear world, it has been decided to present the main features of the new module present in the new version of SCALE 6.2 (currently beta 3 version) called SAMPLER. This module allows the calculation of uncertainty in a wide range of effective sections, neutron parameters, composition and physical parameters. However, the calculation of sensitivity is not present in the beta 3 release. Even so, this module can be helpful for participants of the proposed Benchmark by Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (UAM-LWR), as well as to analysts in general. (Author)

  17. Calibration of the MDCO dust collector and of four versions of the inverted frisbee dust deposition sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sow, Mamadou; Goossens, Dirk; Rajot, Jean Louis

    2006-12-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were conducted to determine the efficiency of sediment samplers designed to measure the deposition of aeolian dust. Efficiency was ascertained relative to a water surface, which was considered the best alternative for simulating a perfectly absorbent surface. Two types of samplers were studied: the Marble Dust Collector (MDCO) and the inverted frisbee sampler. Four versions of the latter catcher were tested: an empty frisbee, an empty frisbee surrounded by an aerodynamic flow deflector ring, a frisbee filled with glass marbles, and a frisbee filled with glass marbles and surrounded by a flow deflector ring. Efficiency was ascertained for five wind velocities (range: 1-5 m s - 1 ) and eight grain size classes (range: 10-89 μm). The efficiency of dust deposition catchers diminishes rapidly as the wind speed increases. It also diminishes as the particles caught become coarser. Adding a flow deflector ring to a catcher substantially improves the catcher's efficiency, by up to 100% in some cases. The addition of glass marbles to a catcher, on the other hand, does not seem to increase the efficiency, at least not at wind velocities inferior to the deflation threshold. For higher velocities the marbles protect the settled particles from resuspension, keeping them in the catcher. The following five parameters determine the accumulation of aeolian dust in a catcher: the horizontal dust flux, the weight of the particles, atmospheric turbulence, resuspension, and the dust shadow effect created by the catcher. The final accumulation flux depends on the combination of these parameters. The catchers tested in this study belong to the best catchers currently in use in earth science and have been the subject of various aerodynamic studies to improve their efficiency. Nevertheless the catching efficiency remains low, in the order of 20-40% for wind speeds above 2 m s - 1 . Other catchers suffer from the same low efficiencies. There is, thus, evidence to

  18. Use of a Robotic Sampler (PIPER) for Evaluation of Particulate Matter Exposure and Eczema in Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Lokesh; Mainelis, Gediminas; Ramagopal, Maya; Black, Kathleen; Shalat, Stuart L

    2016-02-01

    While the association of eczema with asthma is well recognized, little research has focused on the potential role of inhalable exposures and eczema. While indoor air quality is important in the development of respiratory disease as children in the U.S. spend the majority of their time indoors, relatively little research has focused on correlated non-respiratory conditions. This study examined the relationship between particulate matter (PM) exposures in preschool age children and major correlates of asthma, such as wheeze and eczema. Air sampling was carried out using a robotic (PIPER) child-sampling surrogate. This study enrolled 128 participants, 57 male and 71 female children. Ages ranged from 3 to 58 months with the mean age of 29.3 months. A comparison of subjects with and without eczema showed a difference in the natural log (ln) of PM collected from the PIPER air sampling (p = 0.049). PIPER's sampling observed an association between the ln PM concentrations and eczema, but not an association with wheezing history in pre-school children. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis of the role of the microenvironment in mediating atopic dermatitis, which is one of the predictors of persistent asthma. Our findings also support the use of PIPER in its ability to model and sample the microenvironment of young children. PMID:26907317

  19. Use of a Robotic Sampler (PIPER for Evaluation of Particulate Matter Exposure and Eczema in Preschoolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokesh Shah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available While the association of eczema with asthma is well recognized, little research has focused on the potential role of inhalable exposures and eczema. While indoor air quality is important in the development of respiratory disease as children in the U.S. spend the majority of their time indoors, relatively little research has focused on correlated non-respiratory conditions. This study examined the relationship between particulate matter (PM exposures in preschool age children and major correlates of asthma, such as wheeze and eczema. Air sampling was carried out using a robotic (PIPER child-sampling surrogate. This study enrolled 128 participants, 57 male and 71 female children. Ages ranged from 3 to 58 months with the mean age of 29.3 months. A comparison of subjects with and without eczema showed a difference in the natural log (ln of PM collected from the PIPER air sampling (p = 0.049. PIPER’s sampling observed an association between the ln PM concentrations and eczema, but not an association with wheezing history in pre-school children. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis of the role of the microenvironment in mediating atopic dermatitis, which is one of the predictors of persistent asthma. Our findings also support the use of PIPER in its ability to model and sample the microenvironment of young children.

  20. 一种锚式表层沉积物采集装置%One Anchor-Device Sampler for the Surface Sediment Collection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛彬; 郭远明; 李铁军; 崔雪亮; 张玉荣; 朱剑

    2013-01-01

    One anchor-device sampler for the surface sediment collection was invented since conventional surface sediment sampler was too heavy for cancellation water current,depth,sediment condition and the sampling success rate. The new sampler like boat anchor whose quality was 1/3 of grab sampler′s. What′s more,the new sampler was very easy to operate and its success rate was nearly 100%,so it should be applied and popularized. In the paper,the structure and working process were introduced.%鉴于传统的柱状采泥器、抓斗式采泥器比重较大,受海流、水深、底质情况制约,采样成功率低的问题,借鉴了船锚的工作原理,研制了锚式表层沉积物采集装置。其重量为抓斗式采泥器的1/3,操作简便,成功率近100%,可以推广使用。该文介绍其结构和工作过程。

  1. Measurement of overall uptake coefficients for HO2 radicals by aerosol particles sampled from ambient air at Mts. Tai and Mang (China)

    OpenAIRE

    Taketani, F.; Y. Kanaya; P. Pochanart; Liu, Y; Li, J.; K. Okuzawa; K. Kawamura; Z. Wang; H. Akimoto

    2012-01-01

    HO2 uptake coefficients for ambient aerosol particles, collected on quartz fiber filter using a high-volume air sampler in China, were measured using an aerosol flow tube coupled with a chemical conversion/laser-induced fluorescence technique at 760 Torr and 298 K, with a relative humidity of 75%. Aerosol particles were regenerated with an atomizer using the water extracts from the aerosol particles. Over 10 samples, the measured HO2 uptake coefficients for the aerosol parti...

  2. Measurement of overall uptake coefficients for HO2 radicals by aerosol particles sampled from ambient air at Mts. Tai and Mang, China

    OpenAIRE

    H. Akimoto; Z. Wang; K. Okuzawa; K. Kawamura; Li, J.; Liu, Y; P. Pochanart; Taketani, F.; Y. Kanaya

    2012-01-01

    HO2 uptake coefficients for ambient aerosol particles, collected on quartz filter using a high-volume air sampler in China, were measured using an aerosol flow tube coupled with a chemical conversion/laser-induced fluorescence technique at 760 Torr and 298 K, with a relative humidity of 75%. Aerosol particles were regenerated with an atomizer using the water extracts from the aerosol particles. Over 10 samples, the measured HO2 uptake coefficients for the aerosol particles at the Mt. ...

  3. A field experiment with variable-suction multi-compartment samplers to measure the spatio-temporal distribution of solute leaching in an agricultural soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, E.; Hogervorst, F. A. N.; de Rooij, G. H.

    2009-04-01

    Solutes spread out in time and space as they move downwards from the soil surface with infiltrating water. Solute monitoring in the field is often limited to observations of resident concentrations, while flux concentrations govern the movement of solutes in soils. A recently developed multi-compartment sampler is capable of measuring fluxes at a high spatial resolution with minimal disturbance of the local pressure head field. The objective of this paper is to use this sampler to quantify the spatial and temporal variation of solute leaching below the root zone in an agricultural field under natural rainfall in winter and spring. We placed two samplers at 31 and 25 cm depth in an agricultural field, leaving the soil above undisturbed. Each sampler contained 100 separate cells of 31 × 31 mm. Water fluxes were measured every 5 min for each cell. We monitored leaching of a chloride pulse under natural rainfall by frequently extracting the collected leachate while leaving the samplers buried in situ. This experiment was followed by a dye tracer experiment. This setting yielded information that widely surpassed the information that can be provided by separate anionic and dye tracer trials, and solute transport monitoring by coring or suction cups. The detailed information provided by the samplers showed that percolation at the sampling depth started much faster (approximately 3 h after the start of rainfall) in initially wet soil (pressure head above - 65 cm) than in drier soil (more than 14 h at pressure heads below - 80 cm). At any time, 25% of the drainage passed through 5-6% of the sampled area, reflecting the effect of heterogeneity on the flow paths. The amount of solute carried by individual cells varied over four orders of magnitude. The lateral concentration differences were limited though. This suggests a convective-dispersive regime despite the short vertical travel distance. On the other hand, the dilution index indicates a slight tendency towards

  4. Aerosol analysis for the regional air pollution study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and operation of an aerosol sampling and analysis program implemented during the 1975 to 1977 St. Louis Regional Air Pollution Study is described. A network of ten samplers were operated at selected sites in the St. Louis area and the total mass and elemental composition of the collected particulates were determined. Sampling periods of 2 to 24 hours were employed. The samplers were capable of collecting aerosol particles in two distinct size ranges corresponding to fine ( 2.4 μm diameter) particles. This unique feature allowed the separation of the particulate samples into two distinct fractions with differing chemical origins and health effects. The analysis methods were also newly developed for use in the St. Louis RAPS study. Total particulate mass was measured by a beta-particle attenuation method in which a precision of +- 5 μm/cm2 could be obtained in a one minute measurement time. Elemental compositions of the samples were determined using an energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence method in which detectable limits of 5 ng/cm2 or less were routinely achieved for elements ranging in atomic number from Al to Pb. The advantages of these analytical methods over more conventional techniques arise from the ability to automate the measurements. During the course of the two year study, a total of more than 35,000 individual samples were processed and a total of 28 concentrations measured for each sample

  5. Direct gravimetric measurements of the mass of the antarctic aerosol collected by high volume sampler: PM10 summer seasonal variation at Terra Nova Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truzzi, Cristina; Lambertucci, Luca; Illuminati, Silvia; Annibaldi, Anna; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    An on-site procedure was set up for direct gravimetric measurement of the mass of aerosol collected using high volume impactors (aerodynamic size cut point of 10 microm, PM10); this knowledge has hitherto been unavailable. Using a computerized microbalance in a clean chemistry laboratory, under controlled temperature (+/-0.5 degrees C) and relative humidity (+/-1%), continuous, long time filter mass measurements (hours) were carried out before and after exposure, after a 48 h minimun equilibration at the laboratory conditions. The effect of the electrostatic charge was exhausted in 30-60 min, after which stable measurements were obtained. Measurements of filters exposed for 7-11 days (1.13 m3 min(-1)) in a coastal site near Terra Nova Bay (December 2000 - February 2001), gave results for aerosol mass in the order of 10-20 mg (SD approximately 2 mg), corresponding to atmospheric concentrations of 0.52-1.27 microg m(-3). Data show a seasonal behaviour in the PM10 content with an increase during December - early January, followed by a net decrease. The above results compare well with estimates obtained from proxy data for the Antarctic Peninsula (0.30 microg m(-3)), the Ronne Ice Shelf (1.49 microg m(-3)), and the South Pole (0.18 microg m(-3), summer 1974-1975, and 0.37 microg m(-3), average summer seasons 1975-1976 and 1977-1978), and from direct gravimetric measurements recently obtained from medium volume samplers at McMurdo station (downwind 3.39 microg m(-3), upwind 4.15 microg m(-3)) and at King George Island (2.5 microg m(-3), summer, particle diameter <20 microm). This finding opens the way to the direct measurement of the chemical composition of the Antarctic aerosol and, in turn, to a better knowledge of the snow/air relationships as required for the reconstruction of the chemical composition of past atmospheres from deep ice core data. PMID:16398350

  6. Main features and possibilities of the new scale module for calculation of sensitivity and uncertainty by sampling: SAMPLER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the importance of calculating sensitivity and uncertainty in the calculation of field engineering, and especially in the nuclear world, it has been decided to present the main features of the new module present in the new version of SCALE 6.2 (currently beta 3 version) called SAMPLER. This module allows the calculation of uncertainty in a wide range of effective sections, neutron parameters, composition and physical parameters. However, the calculation of sensitivity is not present in the beta 3 release. Even so, this module can be helpful for participants of the proposed Benchmark by Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (UAM-LWR), as well as to analysts in general. (Author)

  7. Real-time detection of focal position of workpiece surface during laser processing using diffractive beam samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Binh Xuan; Hoang, PhuongLe; Ahn, Sanghoon; Kim, Jeng-o.; Sohn, Hyonkee; Noh, Jiwhan

    2016-11-01

    The real-time fabrication of microgrooves on a curved surface using a laser beam, without preprogramming their shapes into the machining instructions, is a major challenge in laser processing owing to limitations associated with the real-time detection of the focal position. A new approach using a sampled fraction of the beam from a diffractive beam sampler (DBS) is therefore presented in order to overcome this limitation. By considering the sampled fraction of the beam an analysis of the results allows for precise positioning of the specimen for focal-point identification. This allows for the determination of the focus for a broad variety of laser types and laser powers, thereby providing stringent focusing conditions with high numerical apertures. This approach is easy to implement, inexpensive, independent of the roughness or granularity of the workpieces, and more importantly does not require auxiliary lasers and displacement sensors for real-time measurement during the fabrication process.

  8. Application of the triolein-embedded cellulose acetate membrane passive sampler for monitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianfeng; He, Guiying; Li, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Triolein-embedded cellulose acetate membrane (TECAM) can be used as a passive sampler to measure hydrophobic organic contaminants in water. Uptake constant rates (k u ) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by TECAM sampling were measured under different hydrodynamic conditions. The measured k u values were modeled to enable the quantification of time weighed average (TWA) concentrations of PAHs in the field. An empirical relationship that enables the calculation of in situ k u values of chemicals using performance reference compounds (PRCs) was derived and its application was demonstrated in a field study. The results showed that freely dissolved concentrations of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) can be accurately measured in the field using TECAM method based on empirical uptake models calibrated with PRCs.

  9. Changes in airborne fungi from the outdoors to indoor air; large HVAC systems in nonproblem buildings in two different climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, P C; Neumeister-Kemp, H G; Esposito, B; Lysek, G; Murray, F

    2003-01-01

    Little is known about the changes in occurrence and distribution of airborne fungi as they are transported in the airstream from the outdoor air through the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system to the indoor air. To better understand this, airborne fungi were analyzed in the HVAC systems of two large office buildings in different climate zones. Fungal samples were taken in each of the walk-in chambers of the HVAC systems using a six-stage Andersen Sampler with malt extract agar. Results showed that fungal species changed with different locations in the HVAC systems. The outdoor air intake produced the greatest filtration effect for both the counts and species of outdoor air fungi. The colony forming unit (CFU) counts and species diversity was further reduced in the air directly after the filters. The cooling coils also had a substantial filtration effect. However, in room air the CFU counts were double and the mixture of fungal species was different from the air leaving the HVAC system at the supply air outlet in most locations. Diffusion of outdoor air fungi to the indoors did not explain the changes in the mixture of airborne fungi from the outdoor air to the indoor air, and some of the fungi present in the indoor air did not appear to be transported indoors by the HVAC systems.

  10. Royal Danish Air Force. Air Operations Doctrine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Søren

    This brief examines the development of the first Danish Air Force Air Operations Doctrine, which was officially commissioned in October 1997 and remained in effect until 2010. The development of a Danish air power doctrine was heavily influenced by the work of Colonel John Warden (USAF), both...... through his book ”The Air Campaign” and his subsequent planning of the air campaign against Iraq in 1990-1991. Warden’s ideas came to Denmark and the Danish Air Force by way of Danish Air Force students attending the United States Air Force Air University in Alabama, USA. Back in Denmark, graduates from...... the Air University inspired a small number of passionate airmen, who then wrote the Danish Air Operations Doctrine. The process was supported by the Air Force Tactical Command, which found that the work dovetailed perfectly with the transformation process that the Danish Air Force was in the midst...

  11. Calibrated Passive Sampling--Multi-plot Field Measurements of NH3 Emissions with a Combination of Dynamic Tube Method and Passive Samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacholski, Andreas

    2016-03-21

    Agricultural ammonia (NH3) emissions (90% of total EU emissions) are responsible for about 45% airborne eutrophication, 31% soil acidification and 12% fine dust formation within the EU15. But NH3 emissions also mean a considerable loss of nutrients. Many studies on NH3 emission from organic and mineral fertilizer application have been performed in recent decades. Nevertheless, research related to NH3 emissions after application fertilizers is still limited in particular with respect to relationships to emissions, fertilizer type, site conditions and crop growth. Due to the variable response of crops to treatments, effects can only be validated in experimental designs including field replication for statistical testing. The dominating ammonia loss methods yielding quantitative emissions require large field areas, expensive equipment or current supply, which restricts their application in replicated field trials. This protocol describes a new methodology for the measurement of NH3 emissions on many plots linking a simple semi-quantitative measuring method used in all plots, with a quantitative method by simultaneous measurements using both methods on selected plots. As a semi-quantitative measurement method passive samplers are used. The second method is a dynamic chamber method (Dynamic Tube Method) to obtain a transfer quotient, which converts the semi-quantitative losses of the passive sampler to quantitative losses (kg nitrogen ha(-1)). The principle underlying this approach is that passive samplers placed in a homogeneous experimental field have the same NH3 absorption behavior under identical environmental conditions. Therefore, a transfer co-efficient obtained from single passive samplers can be used to scale the values of all passive samplers used in the same field trial. The method proved valid under a wide range of experimental conditions and is recommended to be used under conditions with bare soil or small canopies (<0.3 m). Results obtained from

  12. Particulate Matter Levels in Ambient Air Adjacent to Industrial Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, R. M. S. R.; Nizam, N. M. S.; Al-Gheethi, A. A.; Lajis, A.; Kassim, A. H. M.

    2016-07-01

    Air quality in the residential areas adjacent to the industrial regions is of great concern due to the association with human health risks. In this work, the concentrations of particulate matter (PM10) in the ambient air of UTHM campus was investigated tostudy the air qualityand their compliance to the Malaysian Ambient Air Quality Guidelines (AAQG). The PM10 samples were taken over 24 hours from the most significant area at UTHM including Stadium, KolejKediamanTunDr. Ismail (KKTDI) and MakmalBahan. The meteorological parameters; temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction as well as particulate matterwere estimated by using E-Sampler Particulate Matter (PM10) Collector. The highest concentrations of PM10 (55.56 µg/m3) was recorded at MakmalBahan during the working and weekend days. However, these concentrations are less than 150 pg/m3. It can be concluded that although UTHM is surrounded by the industrial area, the air quality in the campus still within the standards limits.

  13. Diffusive sampling of 25 volatile organic compounds in indoor air: Uptake rate determination and application in Flemish homes for the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walgraeve, C.; Demeestere, K.; Dewulf, J.; Van Huffel, K.; Van Langenhove, H.

    2011-10-01

    Passive sampling of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air has received increasing attention in recent years. However, in order to use passive sampling as a reliable sampling technique a compound and sampler specific uptake rate is needed. Therefore, the scope of our study was threefold. First, uptake rates for 25 VOCs were determined under real indoor and outdoor conditions using axial-sampling tube-type samplers filled with Tenax TA, and active (pumped) sampling as a reference technique. Secondly, the mechanisms of passive sampling were investigated by comparing the experimentally determined uptake rates (0.13-0.46 ml min-1) to the ideal uptake rates, calculated based on Fick's first law of diffusion and sampler geometry. Sampling efficiency SE, defined as the ratio between the experimental and ideal uptake rate, was introduced as a correction factor and showed that ideal uptake rates may underestimate VOC concentrations by a factor up to 4. This compound dependent SE is explained in terms of the partitioning coefficient K, i.e. the compound's Tenax TA to air concentration equilibrium ratio. Compounds with a low K-value showed the most pronounced non-ideal sorptive behavior. Third, the experimentally determined uptake rates were used to determine VOC concentrations (between 12 and 311 μg m-3) in 6 homes for the elderly in Antwerp (Belgium). This study provides unique data for indoor air quality at care centers in Flanders.

  14. Regional and global atmospheric aerosol studies using the ''Gent'' stacked filter unit sampler and other aerosol collectors, with multi-elemental analysis of the samples by nuclear-related analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ''Gent'' staked filter unit sampler and other collection devices are used in regional and global scale studies on the tropospheric atmospheric aerosols, its composition, sources and fate. The aerosol samples are analyzed by particle-induced X-ray emission analysis, instrumental neutron activation analysis, ion chromatography, a light reflectance technique (for determining black carbon), and gravimetry (for measuring the particular mass). In evaluating the data, use is made of receptor modelling techniques, transport models and wind sector analysis, and also of air mass trajectories and other meteorological information. Preliminary results from a long-term study in southern Norway are presented. It is suggested that the anthropogenic and soil dust aerosol components are mainly adverted to southern Norway by long-range transport and that the major fraction of the submicrometer particle mass is from anthropogenic origin. Preliminary results are also presented for an intensive study in southern Africa. On the basis of the data for two sites (about 40 km apart) in the Kruger National Park it was concluded that regionally representative aerosol samples were collected and that the biomass burning products account for more than 50% of the fine particle mass. Finally, our plans for future work are given. (author). 70 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  15. Methods for measuring the emission of dust in the air from the industrial objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods are used for measuring the emission of dust in the air from the industrial objects. The first is gravimetrical method, measuring of particular matter in flowing gases, using GRAVIMAT SHC 502 sampler, and the second is optoelectronic method working with the transmission light principle with extinction output, using OMD 41 in-situ dust monitor. Both methods are explained theoretically and the probe measurement is fulfilled for one of our industrial objects. The two methods are connected, because of the necessity of the implementation of the results from the first measurements in the second ones which are continual for long time. (Author)

  16. Recent developments in the air particulate research capability at the New Zealand ion beam analysis facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The New Zealand capability in Ion Beam Analysis of air particulate samples has been upgraded in recent years. The main equipment change has been the introduction of the ability to analyse samples taken using the Streaker (PIXE International Corporation) sampling system. This is an automated sampler which allows for great flexibility in monitoring programmes by collecting particulates for up to about 70 sampling periods which can range in collection times from seconds to many hours. The IBA analysis for hydrogen on standard filters and for PIXE multi-elemental analysis of the Streaker filters has also been studied with a view to optimising analytical methods. (author)

  17. Air filtration and indoor air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    Demands for better indoor air quality are increasing, since we spend most of our time indoors and we are more and more aware of indoor air pollution. Field studies in different parts of the world have documented that high percentage of occupants in many offices and buildings find the indoor air...... decent ventilation and air cleaning/air filtration, high indoor air quality cannot be accomplished. The need for effective air filtration has increased with increasing evidence on the hazardous effects of fine particles. Moreover, the air contains gaseous pollutants, removal of which requires various air...... cleaning techniques. Supply air filter is one of the key components in the ventilation system. Studies have shown that used ventilation filters themselves can be a significant source of indoor air pollution with consequent impact on perceived air quality, sick building syndrome symptoms and performance...

  18. AirData

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The AirData site provides access to yearly summaries of United States air pollution data, taken from EPA's air pollution databases. AirData has information about...

  19. R9 Air Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Region 9 Air Districts layer is a compilation of polygons representing the California Air Pollution Control and Air Quality Management Districts, Arizona Air...

  20. Hazardous Air Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Hazardous Air Pollutants Hazardous air pollutants are those known to cause ... protect against adverse environmental effects. About Hazardous Air Pollutants What are hazardous air pollutants? Health and Environmental ...

  1. California Air Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Air ResourcesCalifornia Air Resources BoardThe following datasets are from the California Air Resources Board: * arb_california_airbasins - California Air BasinsThe...

  2. Development of an integrated sampler based on direct {sup 222}Rn/{sup 220}Rn progeny sensors in flow-mode for estimating unattached/attached progeny concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Rosaline, E-mail: rosaline@barc.gov.i [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Health, Safety and Environment Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sapra, B.K.; Mayya, Y.S. [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Health, Safety and Environment Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2009-11-15

    A flow-mode integrated sampler consisting of a wire-mesh and filter-paper array along with passive solid state nuclear track detectors has been developed for estimating unattached and attached fraction of {sup 222}Rn/{sup 220}Rn progeny concentration. The essential element of this sampler is the direct {sup 222}Rn/{sup 220}Rn progeny sensor (DRPS/DTPS), which is an absorber-mounted-LR115 type nuclear track detector that selectively registers the alpha particles emitted from the progeny deposited on its surface. During sampling at a specified flow-rate, the unattached progeny is captured on the wire-mesh; while the attached progeny gets transmitted and is captured on the filter-paper. The alpha particles emitted by the deposited progeny atoms are registered on the sensors placed at a specified distance facing the wire-mesh and the filter-paper, respectively. The various steps involved in the development of this flow-mode direct progeny sampler such as the optimization of the sampling rate and the distance between the sensor and the deposition substrate are discussed. The sensitivity factor of the DTPS-loaded sampler for {sup 220}Rn progeny deposited on the wire-mesh and filter-paper is found to be 23.77 +- 0.64 (track cm{sup -2} h{sup -1}) (Bq m{sup -3}){sup -1} and 22.30 +- 0.18 (track cm{sup -2} h{sup -1}) (Bq m{sup -3}){sup -1}, respectively; while that of DRPS-loaded sampler for {sup 222}Rn progeny deposition, is 3.03 +- 0.14 (track cm{sup -2} h{sup -1}) (Bq m{sup -3}){sup -1} and 2.08 +- 0.07 (track cm{sup -2} h{sup -1}) (Bq m{sup -3}){sup -1}, respectively. The highlight of this flow-mode sampler is its high sensitivity and that it utilizes the passive technique for estimating the unattached and attached progeny concentration, thus doing away with the alpha counting procedures.

  3. Air pollution in Thailand using nuclear-related analytical techniques. Appendix 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1993, the samples of air particulate matter have been collected from many permanent air quality monitoring stations in Bangkok city including one in another major city, Cholburi, and also from various temporary sites near major roads of Bangkok. The sampling devices used are High volume (HV) and PM-10 samplers while a Gent stacked filter unit collector is used at a regional site represented residential area where the meteorological information is kept for reference. The instrumental neutron activation analysis for the determination of trace elements in air particulate samples has been performed. The result data of those analyzed samples are reported in the paper with the calculated enrichment factors by use of Wedepohl's table of crustal abundances and Sc as the reference element. (author)

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives in indoor and outdoor air in an eight-home study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Jane C.; Mack, Gregory A.; Kuhlman, Michael R.; Wilson, Nancy K.

    A pilot field study was performed in Columbus, OH, during the winter of 1986/1987. The objectives were to determine the feasibility of the use of a newly developed quiet sampler in indoor air sampling for particles and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOC) and to measure the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), PAH derivatives, and nicotine in air in selected residences. Eight homes were chosen for sampling on the basis of these characteristics: electric/gas heating system, electric/gas cooking appliances, and the absence/presence of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). The indoor sampler was equipped with a quartz-fiber filter to collect particles followed by XAD-4 resin to trap SVOC. A PS-1 sampler with a similar sampling module was used outdoors. The indoor air was sampled in the kitchen and living room areas over two consecutive 8-h periods. The outdoor air was sampled concurrently with the indoor samples over a 16-h period. Fifteen PAH, five nitro-PAH, five oxygenated PAH, and three nitrogen heterocyclic compounds were determined in these samples. The most abundant PAH found indoors was naphthalene. The indoor concentrations of PAH derivatives were lower than those of their parent compounds. Average concentrations of all but three target compounds (naphthalene dicarboxylic acid anhydride, pyrene dicarboxylic acid anhydride, and 2-nitrofluoranthene) were higher indoors than outdoors. Environmental tobacco smoke was the most significant influence on indoor pollutant levels. Homes with gas heating systems had higher indoor pollutant levels than homes with electric heating systems. However, the true effects of heating and cooking systems were not characterized as accurately as the effects of ETS because of the small sample sizes and the lack of statistical significance for most pollutant differences in the absence of ETS. The concentrations of PAH marker compounds (phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene) correlated well with the concentrations

  5. Lead and cadmium in indoor air and the urban environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was conducted to find potential terrestrial biomonitors for heavy metals in indoor air in an urban environment. TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 were collected in three retirement facilities in the urban area of Vienna. In addition, particulate matter and soil, vegetation, and isopods (Porcellio scaber L.) were collected in the adjacent garden areas. Aerosols were sampled with a low-volume air sampler. The sampled materials were wet ashed and total lead and cadmium contents were determined. Water-soluble heavy metal concentrations were measured in aqueous extracts from air exposed filters, soil, and vegetation. Lead and cadmium were analyzed by graphite furnace AAS. Lead contents in the vegetation were inferred from water-soluble lead in soils. Lead in isopods generally reflected the contents in vegetation. Cadmium in plants probably derived from soil solutions as well as from atmospheric input. Isopods reflected the total cadmium contents in soils. Particulate matter was dominated by PM2.5, both with respect to mass concentrations and to heavy metal contents. The indoor aerosol was found to be influenced by human activity, indoor sources, and outdoor particles. Relationships between indoor airborne heavy metals and the contents in vegetation (lead and cadmium: positive) and isopods (lead: negative) were identified to have the potential for biomonitoring indoor air quality. - Urban vegetation and isopods are potential indicators for indoor aerial heavy metals

  6. Lead and cadmium in indoor air and the urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarnicki, Günter J K

    2005-07-01

    The present study was conducted to find potential terrestrial biomonitors for heavy metals in indoor air in an urban environment. TSP, PM(10), and PM(2.5) were collected in three retirement facilities in the urban area of Vienna. In addition, particulate matter and soil, vegetation, and isopods (Porcellio scaber L.) were collected in the adjacent garden areas. Aerosols were sampled with a low-volume air sampler. The sampled materials were wet ashed and total lead and cadmium contents were determined. Water-soluble heavy metal concentrations were measured in aqueous extracts from air exposed filters, soil, and vegetation. Lead and cadmium were analyzed by graphite furnace AAS. Lead contents in the vegetation were inferred from water-soluble lead in soils. Lead in isopods generally reflected the contents in vegetation. Cadmium in plants probably derived from soil solutions as well as from atmospheric input. Isopods reflected the total cadmium contents in soils. Particulate matter was dominated by PM(2.5), both with respect to mass concentrations and to heavy metal contents. The indoor aerosol was found to be influenced by human activity, indoor sources, and outdoor particles. Relationships between indoor airborne heavy metals and the contents in vegetation (lead and cadmium: positive) and isopods (lead: negative) were identified to have the potential for biomonitoring indoor air quality.

  7. Assessment of Envi-Carb™ as a passive sampler binding phase for acid herbicides without pH adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seen, Andrew; Bizeau, Oceane; Sadler, Lachlan; Jordan, Timothy; Nichols, David

    2014-05-01

    The graphitised carbon solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbent Envi-Carb has been used to fabricate glass fibre filter- Envi-Carb "sandwich" disks for use as a passive sampler for acid herbicides. Passive sampler uptake of a suite of herbicides, including the phenoxyacetic acid herbicides 4-chloro-o-tolyloxyacetic acid (MCPA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid (Dicamba), was achieved without pH adjustment, demonstrating for the first time a suitable binding phase for passive sampling of acid herbicides at neutral pH. Passive sampling experiments with Duck River (Tasmania, Australia) water spiked at 0.5 μg L(-1) herbicide concentration over a 7 d deployment period showed that sampling rates in Duck River water decreased for seven out of eight herbicides, and in the cases of 3,6-dichloro-2-pyridinecarboxylic acid (Clopyralid) and Dicamba no accumulation of the herbicides occurred in the Envi-Carb over the deployment period. Sampling rates for 4-amino-3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinecarboxylic acid (Picloram), 2,4-D and MCPA decreased to approximately 30% of the sampling rates in ultrapure water, whilst sampling rates for 2-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-ylcarbamoylsulfamoyl) benzoic acid, methyl ester (Sulfometuron-methyl) and 3,5,6-Trichloro-2-pyridinyloxyacetic acid (Triclopyr) were approximately 60% of the ultrapure water sampling rate. For methyl N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-N-(methoxyacetyl)-D-alaninate (Metalaxyl-M) there was little variation in sampling rate between passive sampling experiments in ultrapure water and Duck River water. SPE experiments undertaken with Envi-Carb disks using ultrapure water and filtered and unfiltered Duck River water showed that not only is adsorption onto particulate matter in Duck River water responsible for a reduction in herbicide sampling rate, but interactions of herbicides with dissolved or colloidal matter (matter able to pass through a 0.2 μm membrane filter) also reduces the herbicide sampling

  8. Benthic organisms and phytoplankton collected using net and sediment sampler casts from the CAPT. BRADY J and other platforms in Gulf of Mexico from 10 October 1982 to 30 November 1983 (NODC Accession 8400200)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organisms and phytoplankton were collected using sediment sampler and net casts in the Gulf of Mexico. Data were submitted by Texas A bottom depth and...

  9. Bacteria, taxonomic code, and other data collected from G.W. PIERCE in North Atlantic Ocean from sediment sampler; 20 February 1976 to 23 March 1976 (NODC Accession 7601642)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bacteria, taxonomic code, and other data were collected using sediment sampler and other instruments in the North Atlantic Ocean from G.W. PIERCE. Data were...

  10. Benthic organisms data collected using sediment sampler casts from NOAA Ship OCEANOGRAPHER in the Chukchi Sea from 1986-09-06 to 1987-10-05 (NCEI Accession 8900299)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organisms data were collected using sediment sampler casts from NOAA Ship OCEANOGRAPHER in the Chukchi Sea from 06 September 1986 to 05 October 1987. Data...

  11. Benthic organism and marine toxic substances and pollutants collected using net and sediment sampler casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in Gulf of Mexico from 1979-07-23 to 1980-12-13 (NCEI Accession 8200103)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and marine toxic substances and pollutants were collected using net, sediment sampler, and other instruments from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other...

  12. Benthic organisms and marine toxic substances and pollutants collected using net and sediment samplers from the MT MITCHELL and other platforms from 22 May 1974 to 27 May 1974 (NODC Accession 7800886)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organisms and marine toxic substances and pollutants were collected using sediment sampler and net casts in the coastal waters of the East coast of US. Data...

  13. Benthic organisms and marine toxic substances and pollutants collected using sediment sampler and net casts from the GUS III and EXCELLENCE in the Gulf of Mexico from 24 May 1978 to 26 February 1979 (NODC Accession 7900304)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organisms and marine toxic substances and pollutants were collected using sediment sampler and net casts in the Gulf of Mexico. Data were submitted by Texas...

  14. Benthic organisms collected using sediment sampler and net casts from the GUS III and EXCELLENCE in the Gulf of Mexico from 22 May 1978 to 20 April 1979 (NODC Accession 7900332)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organisms were collected using sediment sampler and net casts in the Gulf of Mexico. Data were submitted by Texas A they may have been collected by point...

  15. Combining passive samplers and biomonitors to evaluate endocrine disrupting compounds in a wastewater treatment plant by LC/MS/MS and bioassay analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscio, C; Magi, E; Di Carro, M; Suter, M J-F; Vermeirssen, E L M

    2009-10-01

    Two types of integrative sampling approaches (passive samplers and biomonitors) were tested for their sampling characteristics of selected endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). Chemical analyses (LC/MS/MS) were used to determine the amounts of five EDCs (nonylphenol, bisphenol A, estrone, 17beta-estradiol and 17alpha-ethinylestradiol) in polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and freshwater mussels (Unio pictorum); both had been deployed in the influent and effluent of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Genoa, Italy. Estrogenicity of the POCIS samples was assessed using the yeast estrogen screen (YES). Estradiol equivalent values derived from the bioassay showed a positive correlation with estradiol equivalents calculated from chemical analyses data. As expected, the amount of estrogens and EEQ values in the effluent were lower than those in the influent. Passive sampling proved to be the preferred method for assessing the presence of these compounds since employing mussels had several disadvantages both in sampling efficiency and sample analyses.

  16. Comparison between the polar organic chemical integrative sampler and the solid-phase extraction for estimating herbicide time-weighted average concentrations during a microcosm experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzella, N.; Debenest, T.; Delmas, F.

    2008-01-01

    Polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) were exposed for 9 days in two different microcosms that contained river waters spiked with deethylterbuthylazine, terbuthylazine and isoproturon. The experiment was performed with natural light and strong turbulence (flow velocities of about 1550 cm/s) for reproducing natural conditions. The concentrations were kept relatively constant in the first microcosm (2.63.6 µg/L) and were variable in the second microcosm (peak concentrations ranged...

  17. Comparison of the stable-isotopic composition of soil water collected from suction lysimeters, wick samplers, and cores in a sandy unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, M. K.; Delin, G. N.; Komor, S. C.; Regan, C. P.

    1999-10-01

    Soil water collected from suction lysimeters and wick samplers buried in the unsaturated zone of a sand and gravel aquifer and extracted from soil cores were analyzed for stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope values. Soil water isotopic values differed among the three sampling methods in most cases. However, because each sampling method collected different fractions of the total soil-water reservoir, the isotopic differences indicated that the soil water at a given depth and time was isotopically heterogeneous. This heterogeneity reflects the presence of relatively more and less mobile components of soil water. Isotopic results from three field tests indicated that 95-100% of the water collected from wick samplers was mobile soil water while samples from suction lysimeters and cores were mixtures of more and less mobile soil water. Suction lysimeter samples contained a higher proportion of more mobile water (15-95%) than samples from cores (5-80%) at the same depth. The results of this study indicate that, during infiltration events, soil water collected with wick samplers is more representative of the mobile soil water that is likely to recharge ground water during or soon after the event than soil water from suction lysimeters or cores.

  18. Characterization of performance reference compound kinetics and analyte sampling rate corrections under three flow regimes using nylon organic chemical integrative samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Shane A; Belden, Jason B

    2016-09-30

    Performance reference compounds (PRCs) can be spiked into passive samplers prior to deployment. If the dissipation kinetics of PRCs from the sampler corresponds to analyte accumulation kinetics, then PRCs can be used to estimate in-situ sampling rates, which may vary depending on environmental conditions. Under controlled laboratory conditions, the effectiveness of PRC corrections on prediction accuracy of water concentrations were evaluated using nylon organic chemical integrative samplers (NOCIS). Results from PRC calibrations suggest that PRC elimination occurs faster under higher flow conditions; however, minimal differences were observed for PRC elimination between fast flow (9.3cm/s) and slow flow (5.0cm/s) conditions. Moreover, minimal differences were observed for PRC elimination from Dowex Optipore L-493; therefore, PRC corrections did not improve results for NOCIS configurations containing Dowex Optipore L-493. Regardless, results suggest that PRC corrections were beneficial for NOCIS configurations containing Oasis HLB; however, due to differences in flow dependencies of analyte sampling rates and PRC elimination rates across the investigated flow regimes, the use of multiple PRC corrections was necessary. As such, a "Best-Fit PRC" approach was utilized for Oasis HLB corrections using caffeine-(13)C3, DIA-d5, or no correction based on the relative flow dependencies of analytes and these PRCs. Although PRC corrections reduced the variability when in-situ conditions differed from laboratory calibrations (e.g. static versus moderate flow), applying PRC corrections under similar flow conditions increases variability in estimated values. PMID:27578408

  19. Calibration of the Chemcatcher passive sampler for monitoring selected polar and semi-polar pesticides in surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunold, Roman; Schäfer, Ralf Bernhard; Paschke, Albrecht; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Liess, Matthias

    2008-09-01

    Passive sampling is a powerful method for continuous pollution monitoring, but calibration experiments are still needed to generate sampling rates in order to estimate water concentrations for polar compounds. We calibrated the Chemcatcher device with an uncovered SDB-XC Empore disk as receiving phase for 12 polar and semi-polar pesticides in aquatic environments in flow-through tank experiments at two water flow velocities (0.135 m/s and 0.4 m/s). In the 14-day period of exposure the uptake of test substances in the sampler remained linear, and all derived sampling rates R(s) were in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 L/day. By additionally monitoring the release of two preloaded polar pesticides from the SDB-XC disks over time, very high variation in release kinetics was found, which calls into question the applicability of performance reference compounds. Our study expands the applicability of the Chemcatcher for monitoring trace concentrations of pesticides with frequent occurrence in water. PMID:18068881

  20. A suspended-particle rosette multi-sampler for discrete biogeochemical sampling in low-particle-density waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breier, J. A.; Rauch, C. G.; McCartney, K.; Toner, B. M.; Fakra, S. C.; White, S. N.; German, C. R.

    2010-06-22

    To enable detailed investigations of early stage hydrothermal plume formation and abiotic and biotic plume processes we developed a new oceanographic tool. The Suspended Particulate Rosette sampling system has been designed to collect geochemical and microbial samples from the rising portion of deep-sea hydrothermal plumes. It can be deployed on a remotely operated vehicle for sampling rising plumes, on a wire-deployed water rosette for spatially discrete sampling of non-buoyant hydrothermal plumes, or on a fixed mooring in a hydrothermal vent field for time series sampling. It has performed successfully during both its first mooring deployment at the East Pacific Rise and its first remotely-operated vehicle deployments along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It is currently capable of rapidly filtering 24 discrete large-water-volume samples (30-100 L per sample) for suspended particles during a single deployment (e.g. >90 L per sample at 4-7 L per minute through 1 {mu}m pore diameter polycarbonate filters). The Suspended Particulate Rosette sampler has been designed with a long-term goal of seafloor observatory deployments, where it can be used to collect samples in response to tectonic or other events. It is compatible with in situ optical sensors, such as laser Raman or visible reflectance spectroscopy systems, enabling in situ particle analysis immediately after sample collection and before the particles alter or degrade.

  1. The Analog Ring Sampler: a 1 GHz signal sampling for the DVCS experiment in Hall A at Jefferson Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Camacho, Carlos

    2003-10-01

    The Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) experiment in Hall A at Jefferson Lab uses a 132-block PbF2 electromagnetic calorimeter to detect a high energy photon ( ˜1.5-3.5 GeV). In order to cope with pile-up events coming from a high rate background, a new acquisition system based on the Analog Ring Sampler (ARS) chip has been developed. It continuously samples a signal at 1 GHz in a ring of 128 capacitors. When validated by an external trigger, every sample is digitalized by 12-bit flash-ADCs. In order to reduce the amount of data to record, 128×12 bits per sampled signal (waveform), as well as the acquisition dead time, a dedicated calorimeter trigger module has been developed. The electronics logic of both ARS and trigger modules will be detailed and their performances discussed. A waveform reconstruction algorithm to recognize several pulses in the 128 ns time window will also be presented.

  2. Evaluation of performance reference compounds (PRCs) to monitor emerging polar contaminants by polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) in rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinteiro, Inmaculada; Schopfer, Adrien; Estoppey, Nicolas; Fong, Camille; Grandjean, Dominique; de Alencastro, Luiz F

    2016-02-01

    In this work, a method combining polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was assessed for the determination of two corrosion inhibitors (benzotriazole and methylbenzotriazole), seven pesticides (atrazine, diuron, isoproturon, linuron, metolachlor, penconazole, terbuthylazine), and four pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine, diclofenac, metformin, sulfamethoxazole) in river water. As a first step, two POCIS sorbents, hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) and Strata X-CW, were compared. The comparison of the uptake profiles of the studied compounds showed that the HLB sorbent provides better uptake (higher sampled amount and better linearity) than Strata X-CW except for the basic compound metformin. Since the sampling rate (R s) of POCIS depends on environmental factors, seven compounds were evaluated as potential performance reference compounds (PRCs) through kinetic experiments. Deisopropylatrazine-d5 (DIA-d5) and, as far as we know, for the first time 4-methylbenzotriazole-d3 showed suitable desorption. The efficiency of both compounds to correct for the effect of water velocity was shown using a channel system in which POCIS were exposed to 2 and 50 cm s(-1). Finally, POCIS were deployed upstream and downstream of agricultural wine-growing and tree-growing areas in the Lienne River and the Uvrier Canal (Switzerland). The impact of the studied areas on both streams could be demonstrated. PMID:26637214

  3. The First Attempt at Non-Linear in Silico Prediction of Sampling Rates for Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas H; Baz-Lomba, Jose A; Harman, Christopher; Reid, Malcolm J; Owen, Stewart F; Bury, Nicolas R; Thomas, Kevin V; Barron, Leon P

    2016-08-01

    Modeling and prediction of polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) sampling rates (Rs) for 73 compounds using artificial neural networks (ANNs) is presented for the first time. Two models were constructed: the first was developed ab initio using a genetic algorithm (GSD-model) to shortlist 24 descriptors covering constitutional, topological, geometrical and physicochemical properties and the second model was adapted for Rs prediction from a previous chromatographic retention model (RTD-model). Mechanistic evaluation of descriptors showed that models did not require comprehensive a priori information to predict Rs. Average predicted errors for the verification and blind test sets were 0.03 ± 0.02 L d(-1) (RTD-model) and 0.03 ± 0.03 L d(-1) (GSD-model) relative to experimentally determined Rs. Prediction variability in replicated models was the same or less than for measured Rs. Networks were externally validated using a measured Rs data set of six benzodiazepines. The RTD-model performed best in comparison to the GSD-model for these compounds (average absolute errors of 0.0145 ± 0.008 L d(-1) and 0.0437 ± 0.02 L d(-1), respectively). Improvements to generalizability of modeling approaches will be reliant on the need for standardized guidelines for Rs measurement. The use of in silico tools for Rs determination represents a more economical approach than laboratory calibrations. PMID:27363449

  4. The First Attempt at Non-Linear in Silico Prediction of Sampling Rates for Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Modeling and prediction of polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) sampling rates (Rs) for 73 compounds using artificial neural networks (ANNs) is presented for the first time. Two models were constructed: the first was developed ab initio using a genetic algorithm (GSD-model) to shortlist 24 descriptors covering constitutional, topological, geometrical and physicochemical properties and the second model was adapted for Rs prediction from a previous chromatographic retention model (RTD-model). Mechanistic evaluation of descriptors showed that models did not require comprehensive a priori information to predict Rs. Average predicted errors for the verification and blind test sets were 0.03 ± 0.02 L d–1 (RTD-model) and 0.03 ± 0.03 L d–1 (GSD-model) relative to experimentally determined Rs. Prediction variability in replicated models was the same or less than for measured Rs. Networks were externally validated using a measured Rs data set of six benzodiazepines. The RTD-model performed best in comparison to the GSD-model for these compounds (average absolute errors of 0.0145 ± 0.008 L d–1 and 0.0437 ± 0.02 L d–1, respectively). Improvements to generalizability of modeling approaches will be reliant on the need for standardized guidelines for Rs measurement. The use of in silico tools for Rs determination represents a more economical approach than laboratory calibrations. PMID:27363449

  5. Calibration and field evaluation of polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) for monitoring pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS) is a new tool for the sampling of organic pollutants in water. We tested this device for the monitoring of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater. After calibration, a field application was carried out in a French hospital for six pharmaceutical compounds (Atenolol, Prednisolone, Methylprednisolone, Sulfamethoxazole, Ofloxacin, Ketoprofen). POCIS were calibrated in tap water and wastewater in laboratory conditions close to relevant environmental conditions (temperature, flow velocity). Sampling rates (Rs) were determined and we observed a significant increase with flow velocity and temperature. Whatever the compound, the Rs value was lower in wastewater and the linear phase of uptake was shorter. POCIS were deployed in a hospital sewage pipe during four days and the estimated water concentrations were close to those obtained with twenty-four hour composite samples. -- Highlights: ► Calibration of POCIS for the monitoring of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater. ► Uptake profile presents a shorter linear phase in wastewater than in tap water. ► Influence of Rs values by temperature, flow velocity and bio-fouling. ► Correlation between concentrations estimated from POCIS or measured in TWA samples. ► Deployment period should be no longer than five days. -- After calibration in tap water and hospital wastewater, POCIS were used to monitor pharmaceuticals in hospital sewage and were compared to TWA sampling

  6. Two-dimensional small-scale variability of pore water phosphate in freshwater lakes: results from a novel dialysis sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Jorg; Rüter, Kristina; Hupfer, Michael

    2002-05-01

    Vertical concentration profiles of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) in the upper sedimentary zone of freshwater lakes are an important means for studying internal phosphorus (P) loading and to gain insight into early diagenetic processes. The interpretation of such pore water profiles generally neglects the occurrence of horizontal variability at a specific sampling site. To further examine this variability, we have designed a novel two-dimensional sampler (2D peeper) consisting of 2280 chambers at a spatial resolution of 9 mm providing a sampling area of 43 x 44 cm. This new device was deployed in three eutrophic lakes in north-eastern Germany. The resulting 2D images of the SRP concentrations, diffusive fluxes, and turnover rates revealed systematic vertical and horizontal structures with local niches of increased phosphorus release. Thus, the extrapolation of P flux calculations based on one-dimensional pore water profiles may lead to a considerable error. The observed small-scale horizontal heterogeneity, probably mainly caused by organisms, was larger in the biologically more active Lake Müllrose and Süsser See than in the deeper Arendsee where meio- and macrozoobenthos were missing. In all cases, the variability was highest at the sediment-water interface and diminished with sediment depth. PMID:12026990

  7. Timing in Analytical Pyrolysis: Py(HMDS)-GC/MS of Glucose and Cellulose Using Online Micro Reaction Sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattonai, Marco; Tamburini, Diego; Colombini, Maria P; Ribechini, Erika

    2016-09-20

    A novel analytical approach based on pyrolysis-gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry of carbohydrates with in situ silylation using hexamethyldisilazane is presented in this work for the first time. A micro reaction sampler was used to simultaneously achieve the pyrolyis reaction and facilitate the derivatization of pyrolysis products, by enabling the materials to react with the derivatizing agent in a sealed capsule at high temperature and pressure for long periods of time. This drastically increased the complete silylation of the pyrolysis products and the chromatographic resolution, resulting in less complex pyrograms and increased sensitivity toward the most stable compounds. Different results were obtained for glucose and cellulose in terms of predominant pyrolytic pathways. The formation of anhydrosugars was the preferential pyrolytic reaction for glucose, while the formation of cyclopentenones and small molecules was predominant for the pyrolysis of cellulose. Steric hindrance effects of polysaccharide chains on the efficiency of the derivatizing agent were hypothesized in order to explain the different results. A good reproducibility was found, with relative standard deviations not greater than 10%. Semiquantitative calculations showed that the partial silylation of anhydrosugars was almost completely overcome after 10 min of reactive pyrolysis. This work discloses a powerful and potentially widely applicable analytical method for the investigations of organic materials under controlled pyrolytic conditions, with the advantage of increasing the effectiveness of in situ derivatization. PMID:27525449

  8. Exposure of bakery and pastry apprentices to airborne flour dust using PM2.5 and PM10 personal samplers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paris Christophe

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study describes exposure levels of bakery and pastry apprentices to flour dust, a known risk factor of occupational asthma. Methods Questionnaires on work activity were completed by 286 students. Among them, 34 performed a series of two personal exposure measurements using a PM2.5 and PM10 personal sampler during a complete work shift, one during a cold ("winter" period, and the other during a hot ("summer" period. Results Bakery apprentices experience greater average PM2.5 and PM10 exposures than pastry apprentices (p 10 values among bakers = 1.10 mg.m-3 [standard deviation: 0.83] than in summer (0.63 mg.m-3 [0.36]. While complying with current European occupational limit values, these exposures exceed the ACGIH recommendations set to prevent sensitization to flour dust (0.5 mg.m-3. Over half the facilities had no ventilation system. Conclusion Young bakery apprentices incur substantial exposure to known airways allergens, a situation that might elicit early induction of airways inflammation.

  9. Air movement and perceived air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Kaczmarczyk, J.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of air movement on perceived air quality (PAQ) and sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms was studied. In total, 124 human subjects participated in four series of experiments performed in climate chambers at different combinations of room air temperature (20, 23, 26 and 28 °C), relative...... humidity (30, 40 and 70%) and pollution level (low and high). Most of the experiments were performed with and without facially applied airflow at elevated velocity. The importance of the use of recirculated room air and clean, cool and dry outdoor air was studied. The exposures ranged from 60. min to 235....... min. Acceptability of PAQ and freshness of the air improved when air movement was applied. The elevated air movement diminished the negative impact of increased air temperature, relative humidity and pollution level on PAQ. The degree of improvement depended on the pollution level, the temperature...

  10. KANDUNGAN LOGAM BERAT PADA AIR DAN SEDIMEN DI PERAIRAN SOCAH DAN KWANYAR KABUPATEN BANGKALAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Andy Nugraha

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Logam berat sangat berbahaya bagi biota laut maupun trofik level diatasnya. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui kandungan logam berat di perairan Socah dan Kwanyar kabupaten Bangkalan. Penelitian ini dilaksanakan selama 3 bulan. Pengambilan sampel air menggunakan botol sampel, sedangkan pengambilan sampel sedimen menggunakan grab sampler. Sampel kemudian dianalisa dengan spektrofotometer serapan atom (SSA. Hasil menunjukkan bahwa kandungan logam berat Cd, Cu, Pb, dan Hg pada air di perairan Socah dan Kwanyar masih dibawah ambang batas baku mutu air laut, sedangkan kandungan logam berat di sedimen melebihi ambang batas baku mutu air laut untuk biota laut. Secara umum, kandungan logam berat di sedimen lebih tinggi dari pada kandungan logam berat di air. Kata Kunci : Logam berat, Pencemaran, Spektrophotometer  HEAVY METALS CONTENTS IN WATER AND SEDIMENT IN KWANYAR AND SOCAH WATER, BANGKALANHeavy metals are very dangerous for marine life as well as the trophic level above. This study aims to determine the content of heavy metals in the waters Socah and Kwanyar Bangkalan. This study was conducted over 3 months. Water sampled using a sample bottle, while sediment samples was taken using a grab sampler. The sample was then analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS. Results showed that the content of heavy metals Cd, Cu, Pb and Hg in the water in the Socah and Kwanyar waters still below the seawater quality standard limits, whereas the heavy metal content in sediments exceeded the water quality standard for marine sea. In general, the content of heavy metals in sediment is higher than on the water.Keywords: Heavy metals, Pollution, AAS

  11. Spatial variability of POPs in European background air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Halse

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Passive air samplers (PAS were deployed at 86 European background sites during summer 2006 in order (i to gain further insight into spatial patterns of persistent organic pollutants (POPs in European background air and, (ii to evaluate PAS as an alternative sampling technique under EMEP (Co-operative programme for monitoring and evaluation of the long-range transmissions of air pollutants in Europe. The samples were analyzed for selected PCBs, HCHs, DDTs, HCB, PAHs and chlordanes, and air concentrations were calculated on the basis of losses of performance reference compounds. Air concentrations of PCBs were generally lowest in more remote areas of northern Europe with elevated levels in more densely populated areas. γ-HCH was found at elevated levels in more central parts of Europe, whereas α-HCH, β-HCH and DDTs showed higher concentrations in the south-eastern part. There was no clear spatial pattern in the concentrations for PAHs, indicative of influence by local sources, rather than long range atmospheric transport (LRAT. HCB was evenly distributed across Europe, while the concentrations of chlordanes were typically low or non-detectable. A comparison of results obtained on the basis of PAS and active air sampling (AAS illustrated that coordinated PAS campaigns have the potential serve as useful inter-comparison exercises within and across existing monitoring networks. The results also highlighted limitations of the current EMEP measurement network with respect to spatial coverage. We finally adopted an existing Lagrangian transport model (FLEXPART as recently modified to incorporate key processes relevant for POPs to evaluate potential source regions affecting observed concentrations at selected sites. Using PCB-28 as an example, the model predicted concentrations which agreed within a factor of 3 with PAS measurements for all except 1 out of the 17 sites selected for this analysis.

  12. Investigating the Impact of a Metals Foundry on Neighborhood Air Quality through PM2.5 PMF Analysis and Mobile Environmental Odor Diaries App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, D.; Clayton, I.; George, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Chapman Elementary School in Portland, OR was identified by USA Today as being in the 2nd percentile of schools in the nation for poor air quality. This ranking was based on the EPA Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators (RSEI) model using the EPA's Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) program. The metals foundry identified in the report as the leading contributor to the poor air quality at Chapman currently meets its Title V permit and reports these permitted emissions to the TRI program. However, the poor air quality ranking is based on models that rely on emissions from permits and are not necessarily reflective of actual emissions. Several observational approaches were employed to assess the potential source contributors to air quality at Chapman. Two MiniVol Tactical Air Samplers (TAS) were co-located 1km from the facility at Chapman Elementary to sample according to the EPA six-day monitoring schedule for one year, filters were analyzed for mass and metals via XRF. Ogawa NO2 samplers were placed at various points around the Chapman neighborhood to develop an NO2 high-density measurement campaign to assess pollutant transport. In addition, a novel mobile environmental odor diaries app was developed and deployed to collect and geo-locate resident observation of odors. All observations were analyzed through mapping, dispersion modeling (AERMOD) and positive-matrix-factorization (PMF) analysis. This multi-dimensional analysis is designed to provide a framework for future studies to address increasing citizen concern about neighborhood level pollution.

  13. Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... protect yourself and your family. Learn more Air Quality at Work Workers should breathe easy while on the job, but worksites with poor air quality put employees at risk. Healthy air is essential ...

  14. Air protection. Ochrana ovzdusia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siska, F.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses problems of air pollution control, air pollution abatement and effects of air pollution. Air pollution caused by black and brown coal combustion, by fossil-fuel power plants and by coking plants is evaluated. Air pollution by dusts, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, ammonia as well arsenic, barium, beryllium, boron, chromium, gallium, cobalt, manganese, copper, nickel, lead, plutonium, titanium and vanadium, which sometimes accompany ashes in coal, is analyzed. Methods of air pollution abatement such as fluidized bed combustion, coal preparation, desulfurization or dry coke quenching are described. Systems for air pollution control are presented: air filtration, cyclones, electrostatic precipitators. Systems of air pollution measurement and recording are evaluated. Propagation of air pollutants in the atmosphere as well as the factors which influence pollutant propagation are characterized. Problems associated with site selection for fossil-fuel power plants are also discussed. An analysis of economic aspects of air pollution abatement and air pollution control is made. (55 refs.)

  15. HEPA air filter (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pet dander and other irritating allergens from the air. Along with other methods to reduce allergens, such ... controlling the amount of allergens circulating in the air. HEPA filters can be found in most air ...

  16. Bad Air Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Bad Air Day Air Quality and Your Health In many parts of the country, summer has the worst air quality of any season. When the forecast says ...

  17. Application of Frequency of Detection Methods in Design and Optimization of the INL Site Ambient Air Monitoring Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, Arthur S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sondrup, A. Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This report presents an evaluation of a hypothetical INL Site monitoring network and the existing INL air monitoring network using frequency of detection methods. The hypothetical network was designed to address the requirement in 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H (2006) that “emissions of radionuclides to ambient air from U.S. DOE facilities shall not exceed those amounts that would cause any member of the public to receive in any year an effective dose equivalent exceeding 10 mrem/year.” To meet the requirement for monitoring only, “radionuclide releases that would result in an effective dose of 10% of the standard shall be readily detectable and distinguishable from background.” Thus, the hypothetical network consists of air samplers placed at residence locations that surround INL and at other locations where onsite livestock grazing takes place. Two exposure scenarios were used in this evaluation: a resident scenario and a shepherd/rancher scenario. The resident was assumed to be continuously present at their residence while the shepherd/rancher was assumed to be present 24-hours at a fixed location on the grazing allotment. Important radionuclides were identified from annual INL radionuclide National Emission Standards for Hazardous Pollutants reports. Important radionuclides were defined as those that potentially contribute 1% or greater to the annual total dose at the radionuclide National Emission Standards for Hazardous Pollutants maximally exposed individual location and include H-3, Am-241, Pu-238, Pu 239, Cs-137, Sr-90, and I-131. For this evaluation, the network performance objective was set at achieving a frequency of detection greater than or equal to 95%. Results indicated that the hypothetical network for the resident scenario met all performance objectives for H-3 and I-131 and most performance objectives for Cs-137 and Sr-90. However, all actinides failed to meet the performance objectives for most sources. The shepherd/rancher scenario showed

  18. The cauliflower-like black crusts on sandstones: A natural passive sampler to evaluate the surrounding environmental pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillas, Héctor; Maguregui, Maite; García-Florentino, Cristina; Carrero, Jose Antonio; Salcedo, Isabel; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Black crust in buildings can be formed as a result of different kind of chemical and physical reactions between the stone surface and environmental factors (e.g. acid aerosols emitted to the atmosphere, airborne particulate matter, etc.). Moreover, biological colonizations can also be present on them. This kind of pathology is widely present in limestones, but fewer are the case study dealing with the characterization of black crusts on sandstones. In this work we present an innovative methodology based on the use of cauliflower-like black crusts formed on sandstone material as natural passive sampler to evaluate the environmental pollution related with the emission of natural (crustal particles and marine aerosol particles) and metallic elements in the airborne particulate matter from the surrounding atmosphere. To illustrate its usefulness, different cauliflower-like black crusts growing in areas protected from the rain growing in an historical construction, La Galea Fortress, made up of sandstone and placed in the Abra Bay (Getxo, Basque Country, Spain) were characterized. This area suffers the anthropogenic emissions coming from the surrounding industry, traffic, sea port, and the natural ones coming from the surrounding marine atmosphere. The applied analytical methodology began with a previous elemental in situ screening in order to evaluate and compare the presence of the metals trapped in black crusts from different orientations using a hand-held energy dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometer. After this preliminary study, samples of black crusts were taken in order to characterize them in the laboratory using molecular techniques (Raman spectroscopy and XRD) and elemental techniques (ICP-MS, SEM-EDS and micro energy dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence). With the last two elemental techniques, imaging analyses were performed at different lateral resolutions in order to observe the distribution of the metals and other kind of particles trapped in the black

  19. Novel lineage patterns from an automated water sampler to probe marine microbial biodiversity with ships of opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Rowena F.; Picard, Kathryn T.; Hamilton, Kristina M.; Walne, Antony; Tarran, Glen A.; Mills, David; McQuatters-Gollop, Abigail; Edwards, Martin

    2015-09-01

    There is a paucity of data on long-term, spatially resolved changes in microbial diversity and biogeography in marine systems, and yet these organisms underpin fundamental ecological processes in the oceans affecting socio-economic values of the marine environment. We report results from a new autonomous Water and Microplankton Sampler (WaMS) that is carried within the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR). Whilst the CPR with its larger mesh size (270 μm), is designed to capture larger plankton, the WaMS was designed as an additional device to capture plankton below 50 μm and delicate larger species, often destroyed by net sampling methods. A 454 pyrosequencing and flow cytometric investigation of eukaryotic microbes using the partial 18S rDNA from thirteen WaMS samples collected over three months in the English Channel revealed a wide diversity of organisms. Alveolates, Fungi, and picoplanktonic Chlorophytes were the most common lineages captured despite the small sample volumes (200-250 ml). The survey also identified Cercozoa and MAST heterotrophic Stramenopiles, normally missed in microscopic-based plankton surveys. The most common was the likely parasitic LKM11 Rozellomycota lineage which comprised 43.2% of all reads and are rarely observed in marine pelagic surveys. An additional 9.5% of reads belonged to other parasitic lineages including marine Syndiniales and Ichthyosporea. Sample variation was considerable, indicating that microbial diversity is spatially or temporally patchy. Our study has shown that the WaMS sampling system is autonomous, versatile and robust, and due to its deployment on the established CPR network, is a cost-effective monitoring tool for microbial diversity for the detection of smaller and delicate taxa.

  20. Evaluation of intake efficiencies and associated sediment-concentration errors in US D-77 bag-type and US D-96-type depth-integrating suspended-sediment samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabol, Thomas A.; Topping, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate measurements of suspended-sediment concentration require suspended-sediment samplers to operate isokinetically, within an intake-efficiency range of 1.0 ± 0.10, where intake efficiency is defined as the ratio of the velocity of the water through the sampler intake to the local ambient stream velocity. Local ambient stream velocity is defined as the velocity of the water in the river at the location of the nozzle, unaffected by the presence of the sampler. Results from Federal Interagency Sedimentation Project (FISP) laboratory experiments published in the early 1940s show that when the intake efficiency is less than 1.0, suspended-sediment samplers tend to oversample sediment relative to water, leading to potentially large positive biases in suspended-sediment concentration that are positively correlated with grain size. Conversely, these experiments show that, when the intake efficiency is greater than 1.0, suspended‑sediment samplers tend to undersample sediment relative to water, leading to smaller negative biases in suspended-sediment concentration that become slightly more negative as grain size increases. The majority of FISP sampler development and testing since the early 1990s has been conducted under highly uniform flow conditions via flume and slack-water tow tests, with relatively little work conducted under the greater levels of turbulence that exist in actual rivers. Additionally, all of this recent work has been focused on the hydraulic characteristics and intake efficiencies of these samplers, with no field investigations conducted on the accuracy of the suspended-sediment data collected with these samplers. When depth-integrating suspended-sediment samplers are deployed under the more nonuniform and turbulent conditions that exist in rivers, multiple factors may contribute to departures from isokinetic sampling, thus introducing errors into the suspended-sediment data collected by these samplers that may not be predictable on the basis

  1. Microbiological assessment of indoor air quality at different hospital sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabo Verde, Sandra; Almeida, Susana Marta; Matos, João; Guerreiro, Duarte; Meneses, Marcia; Faria, Tiago; Botelho, Daniel; Santos, Mateus; Viegas, Carla

    2015-09-01

    Poor hospital indoor air quality (IAQ) may lead to hospital-acquired infections, sick hospital syndrome and various occupational hazards. Air-control measures are crucial for reducing dissemination of airborne biological particles in hospitals. The objective of this study was to perform a survey of bioaerosol quality in different sites in a Portuguese Hospital, namely the operating theater (OT), the emergency service (ES) and the surgical ward (SW). Aerobic mesophilic bacterial counts (BCs) and fungal load (FL) were assessed by impaction directly onto tryptic soy agar and malt extract agar supplemented with antibiotic chloramphenicol (0.05%) plates, respectively using a MAS-100 air sampler. The ES revealed the highest airborne microbial concentrations (BC range 240-736 CFU/m(3) CFU/m(3); FL range 27-933 CFU/m(3)), exceeding, at several sampling sites, conformity criteria defined in national legislation [6]. Bacterial concentrations in the SW (BC range 99-495 CFU/m(3)) and the OT (BC range 12-170 CFU/m(3)) were under recommended criteria. While fungal levels were below 1 CFU/m(3) in the OT, in the SW (range 1-32 CFU/m(3)), there existed a site with fungal indoor concentrations higher than those detected outdoors. Airborne Gram-positive cocci were the most frequent phenotype (88%) detected from the measured bacterial population in all indoor environments. Staphylococcus (51%) and Micrococcus (37%) were dominant among the bacterial genera identified in the present study. Concerning indoor fungal characterization, the prevalent genera were Penicillium (41%) and Aspergillus (24%). Regular monitoring is essential for assessing air control efficiency and for detecting irregular introduction of airborne particles via clothing of visitors and medical staff or carriage by personal and medical materials. Furthermore, microbiological survey data should be used to clearly define specific air quality guidelines for controlled environments in hospital settings.

  2. Microbiological assessment of indoor air quality at different hospital sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabo Verde, Sandra; Almeida, Susana Marta; Matos, João; Guerreiro, Duarte; Meneses, Marcia; Faria, Tiago; Botelho, Daniel; Santos, Mateus; Viegas, Carla

    2015-09-01

    Poor hospital indoor air quality (IAQ) may lead to hospital-acquired infections, sick hospital syndrome and various occupational hazards. Air-control measures are crucial for reducing dissemination of airborne biological particles in hospitals. The objective of this study was to perform a survey of bioaerosol quality in different sites in a Portuguese Hospital, namely the operating theater (OT), the emergency service (ES) and the surgical ward (SW). Aerobic mesophilic bacterial counts (BCs) and fungal load (FL) were assessed by impaction directly onto tryptic soy agar and malt extract agar supplemented with antibiotic chloramphenicol (0.05%) plates, respectively using a MAS-100 air sampler. The ES revealed the highest airborne microbial concentrations (BC range 240-736 CFU/m(3) CFU/m(3); FL range 27-933 CFU/m(3)), exceeding, at several sampling sites, conformity criteria defined in national legislation [6]. Bacterial concentrations in the SW (BC range 99-495 CFU/m(3)) and the OT (BC range 12-170 CFU/m(3)) were under recommended criteria. While fungal levels were below 1 CFU/m(3) in the OT, in the SW (range 1-32 CFU/m(3)), there existed a site with fungal indoor concentrations higher than those detected outdoors. Airborne Gram-positive cocci were the most frequent phenotype (88%) detected from the measured bacterial population in all indoor environments. Staphylococcus (51%) and Micrococcus (37%) were dominant among the bacterial genera identified in the present study. Concerning indoor fungal characterization, the prevalent genera were Penicillium (41%) and Aspergillus (24%). Regular monitoring is essential for assessing air control efficiency and for detecting irregular introduction of airborne particles via clothing of visitors and medical staff or carriage by personal and medical materials. Furthermore, microbiological survey data should be used to clearly define specific air quality guidelines for controlled environments in hospital settings. PMID

  3. REACH. Air Conditioning Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Joe; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of air conditioning. The instructional units focus on air conditioning fundamentals, window air conditioning, system and installation, troubleshooting and…

  4. Application of cellular neural network (CNN) to the prediction of missing air pollutant data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Ülkü Alver; Bayat, Cuma; Uçan, Osman N.

    2011-07-01

    For air-quality assessments in most major urban centers, air pollutants are monitored using continuous samplers. Sometimes data are not collected due to equipment failure or during equipment calibration. In this paper, we predict daily air pollutant concentrations (PM 10 and SO 2) from the Yenibosna and Umraniye air pollution measurement stations in Istanbul for times at which pollution data was not recorded. We predicted these pollutant concentrations using the CNN model with meteorological parameters, estimating missing daily pollutant concentrations for two data sets from 2002 to 2003. These data sets had 50 and 20% of data missing. The results of the CNN model predictions are compared with the results of a multivariate linear regression (LR). Results show that the correlation between predicted and observed data was higher for all pollutants using the CNN model (0.54-0.87). The CNN model predicted SO 2 concentrations better than PM 10 concentrations. Another interesting result is that winter concentrations of all pollutants were predicted better than summer concentrations. Experiments showed that accurate predictions of missing air pollutant concentrations are possible using the new approach contained in the CNN model. We therefore proposed a new approach to model air-pollution monitoring problem using CNN.

  5. Can pine needles indicate trends in the air pollution levels at remote sites?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data from ten years of integrated monitoring were used here to evaluate whether pine needles are a feasible tool for an assessment of long-term trends of the atmospheric contamination. Pine needles collected once a year were compared to high volume air samples collected for 24 h, every 7 days, and passive air samples integrated over 28-day periods. Results showed the same concentration patterns of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) captured in needles and high volume samples. Passive air samplers were less efficient in sampling the particle-bound compounds. Theoretical air volume equivalent to each needle sample (VEQ) was calculated as a ratio of the needle concentration over the mean air concentration. Results indicated different equivalent volumes for PAHs and organochlorines, possibly due to the faster degradation rates of PAHs in needles. The most important finding is that in the long term a needle monitoring gives very similar information on temporal trends of the atmospheric pollution as does a high volume air monitoring. - Pine needle monitoring is a feasible tool for an assessment of temporal trends in the atmospheric contamination.

  6. Can pine needles indicate trends in the air pollution levels at remote sites?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klanova, Jana, E-mail: klanova@recetox.muni.c [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology RECETOX, Masaryk University, Kamenice 126/3, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Cupr, Pavel; Barakova, Daniela; Seda, Zdenek; Andel, Petr; Holoubek, Ivan [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology RECETOX, Masaryk University, Kamenice 126/3, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2009-12-15

    Data from ten years of integrated monitoring were used here to evaluate whether pine needles are a feasible tool for an assessment of long-term trends of the atmospheric contamination. Pine needles collected once a year were compared to high volume air samples collected for 24 h, every 7 days, and passive air samples integrated over 28-day periods. Results showed the same concentration patterns of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) captured in needles and high volume samples. Passive air samplers were less efficient in sampling the particle-bound compounds. Theoretical air volume equivalent to each needle sample (V{sub EQ}) was calculated as a ratio of the needle concentration over the mean air concentration. Results indicated different equivalent volumes for PAHs and organochlorines, possibly due to the faster degradation rates of PAHs in needles. The most important finding is that in the long term a needle monitoring gives very similar information on temporal trends of the atmospheric pollution as does a high volume air monitoring. - Pine needle monitoring is a feasible tool for an assessment of temporal trends in the atmospheric contamination.

  7. A sampler of useful computational tools for applied geometry, computer graphics, and image processing foundations for computer graphics, vision, and image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen-Or, Daniel; Ju, Tao; Mitra, Niloy J; Shamir, Ariel; Sorkine-Hornung, Olga; Zhang, Hao (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    A Sampler of Useful Computational Tools for Applied Geometry, Computer Graphics, and Image Processing shows how to use a collection of mathematical techniques to solve important problems in applied mathematics and computer science areas. The book discusses fundamental tools in analytical geometry and linear algebra. It covers a wide range of topics, from matrix decomposition to curvature analysis and principal component analysis to dimensionality reduction.Written by a team of highly respected professors, the book can be used in a one-semester, intermediate-level course in computer science. It

  8. Field evaluation of the error arising from inadequate time averaging in the standard use of depth-integrating suspended-sediment samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David J.; Rubin, David M.; Wright, Scott A.; Melis, Theodore S.

    2011-01-01

    Several common methods for measuring suspended-sediment concentration in rivers in the United States use depth-integrating samplers to collect a velocity-weighted suspended-sediment sample in a subsample of a river cross section. Because depth-integrating samplers are always moving through the water column as they collect a sample, and can collect only a limited volume of water and suspended sediment, they collect only minimally time-averaged data. Four sources of error exist in the field use of these samplers: (1) bed contamination, (2) pressure-driven inrush, (3) inadequate sampling of the cross-stream spatial structure in suspended-sediment concentration, and (4) inadequate time averaging. The first two of these errors arise from misuse of suspended-sediment samplers, and the third has been the subject of previous study using data collected in the sand-bedded Middle Loup River in Nebraska. Of these four sources of error, the least understood source of error arises from the fact that depth-integrating samplers collect only minimally time-averaged data. To evaluate this fourth source of error, we collected suspended-sediment data between 1995 and 2007 at four sites on the Colorado River in Utah and Arizona, using a P-61 suspended-sediment sampler deployed in both point- and one-way depth-integrating modes, and D-96-A1 and D-77 bag-type depth-integrating suspended-sediment samplers. These data indicate that the minimal duration of time averaging during standard field operation of depth-integrating samplers leads to an error that is comparable in magnitude to that arising from inadequate sampling of the cross-stream spatial structure in suspended-sediment concentration. This random error arising from inadequate time averaging is positively correlated with grain size and does not largely depend on flow conditions or, for a given size class of suspended sediment, on elevation above the bed. Averaging over time scales >1 minute is the likely minimum duration required

  9. Evaluation of the Sequential Spot Sampler (S3) for time-resolved measurement of PM2.5 sulfate and nitrate through lab and field measurements

    OpenAIRE

    A. Hecobian; A. Evanoski-Cole; A. Eiguren-Fernandez; Sullivan, A. P.; G. S. Lewis; Hering, S.V.; Collett Jr., J. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Sequential Spot Sampler (S3), a newly developed instrument to collect aerosols for time-resolved chemical composition measurements, was evaluated in the laboratory and field for the measurement of particulate sulfate and nitrate. The S3 uses a multi-temperature condensation growth tube to grow individual aerosols to droplets which are then deposited as a ∼ 1 mm diameter dry spot at the end of the growth tube in a 100 µL well of a multi-well plate. The well plate advances ...

  10. Indoor Air Pollution (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Students to Environmental Health Information Menu Home Air Pollution Air Pollution Home Indoor Air Pollution Outdoor Air Pollution ... Pollution Indoor Air Pollution Print this Page Air Pollution Air Pollution Home Indoor Air Pollution Outdoor Air Pollution ...

  11. Air pollution in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work will look into PM-10 particulate matter collected from Nairobi City, Kenya (metropolitan city) and the remote forest on Mount Kenya (Timau Hills 3,875 m) for background monitoring. Previous work was done along the roadside, where total suspended particulate matter was collected and zinc, lead, and bromine were identified as highly enriched elements. The nine elements analyzed by EDXRF were found to account for 20% of the total mass. In this work we hope to account for more mass by including AAS and ion chromatography in the analytical methods. Indoor (industrial) samples will also be collected using Personal Samplers with a PM-10 Cyclone Head. Receptor modelling will be done taking into account the indoor data. Variations of the data with seasons and changes in weather will be analyzed. The background data will be used to assess long-range transfer of particulate. (author). 12 refs, 1 fig

  12. Source Term Estimates of Radioxenon Released from the BaTek Medical Isotope Production Facility Using External Measured Air Concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Cameron, Ian M.; Dumais, Johannes R.; Imardjoko, Yudi; Marsoem, Pujadi; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Stoehlker, Ulrich; Widodo, Susilo; Woods, Vincent T.

    2015-10-01

    Abstract Batan Teknologi (BaTek) operates an isotope production facility in Serpong, Indonesia that supplies 99mTc for use in medical procedures. Atmospheric releases of Xe-133 in the production process at BaTek are known to influence the measurements taken at the closest stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS). The purpose of the IMS is to detect evidence of nuclear explosions, including atmospheric releases of radionuclides. The xenon isotopes released from BaTek are the same as those produced in a nuclear explosion, but the isotopic ratios are different. Knowledge of the magnitude of releases from the isotope production facility helps inform analysts trying to decide whether a specific measurement result came from a nuclear explosion. A stack monitor deployed at BaTek in 2013 measured releases to the atmosphere for several isotopes. The facility operates on a weekly cycle, and the stack data for June 15-21, 2013 show a release of 1.84E13 Bq of Xe-133. Concentrations of Xe-133 in the air are available at the same time from a xenon sampler located 14 km from BaTek. An optimization process using atmospheric transport modeling and the sampler air concentrations produced a release estimate of 1.88E13 Bq. The same optimization process yielded a release estimate of 1.70E13 Bq for a different week in 2012. The stack release value and the two optimized estimates are all within 10 percent of each other. Weekly release estimates of 1.8E13 Bq and a 40 percent facility operation rate yields a rough annual release estimate of 3.7E13 Bq of Xe-133. This value is consistent with previously published estimates of annual releases for this facility, which are based on measurements at three IMS stations. These multiple lines of evidence cross-validate the stack release estimates and the release estimates from atmospheric samplers.

  13. A gel probe equilibrium sampler for measuring arsenic porewater profiles and sorption gradients in sediments: I. Laboratory development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, K.M.; Root, R.; O'Day, P. A.; Hering, J.G.

    2008-01-01

    A gel probe equilibrium sampler has been developed to study arsenic (As) geochemistry and sorption behavior in sediment porewater. The gels consist of a hydrated polyacrylamide polymer, which has a 92% water content. Two types of gels were used in this study. Undoped (clear) gels were used to measure concentrations of As and other elements in sediment porewater. The polyacrylamide gel was also doped with hydrous ferric oxide (HFO), an amorphous iron (Fe) oxyhydroxide. When deployed in the field, HFO-doped gels introduce a fresh sorbent into the subsurface thus allowing assessment of in situ sorption. In this study, clear and HFO-doped gels were tested under laboratory conditions to constrain the gel behavior prior to field deployment. Both types of gels were allowed to equilibrate with solutions of varying composition and re-equilibrated in acid for analysis. Clear gels accurately measured solution concentrations (??1%), and As was completely recovered from HFO-doped gels (??4%). Arsenic speciation was determined in clear gels through chromatographic separation of the re-equilibrated solution. For comparison to speciation in solution, mixtures of As(III) and As(V) adsorbed on HFO embedded in gel were measured in situ using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Sorption densities for As(III) and As(V) on HFO embedded in gel were obtained from sorption isotherms at pH 7.1. When As and phosphate were simultaneously equilibrated (in up to 50-fold excess of As) with HFO-doped gels, phosphate inhibited As sorption by up to 85% and had a stronger inhibitory effect on As(V) than As(III). Natural organic matter (>200 ppm) decreased As adsorption by up to 50%, and had similar effects on As(V) and As(III). The laboratory results provide a basis for interpreting results obtained by deploying the gel probe in the field and elucidating the mechanisms controlling As partitioning between solid and dissolved phases in the environment. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  14. Measurement of 85Kr concentration in the environmental air during the hot-test operation of Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    85Kr concentration in air in the vicinity of the reprocessing plant was measured when it was released from the plant stack during the hot-test operation using PWR spent fuels. Charcoal absorption method was devised for this experiment as a rapid, simple and inexpensive technique for the measurement of 85Kr concentration at about 10-9 μCi/cm3. Special air samplers were located at few kilometers distant from the stack and the air was collected for an hour at a flow-rate of 1.5 liters per minute. About thirty air samples were taken and analyzed for 85Kr concentration successfully. The performance of sampling and analytical methods employed was good, although some improvements were found to be necessary. An example is that an air-collection bag should be made of ''saran'' so that the leakage be minimized. Usually in the atmospheric diffusion study sulfur hexafluoride gas is used as an air-tracer, and analytical procedure for the gas concentration down to 10-3 ppb is well established. In this experiment SF6 gas was injected into the stack during the discharge of 85Kr and the concentration in sampled air was also determined. The results show a good correlation between 85Kr and SF6 concentration in sampled air. (author)

  15. Navsonde Atmospheric Sampler Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a low-cost, retrievable and reusable, autonomously guided dropsonde capable of deploying from a host aircraft and performing in-situ...

  16. Jovian Moon Sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, B. C.; Gamber, R. T.; Sutter, B. M.; Faulconer, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, a lot of interest has been focused on Europa and Ganymede due the evidence of subsurface water oceans. Unique methods of exploring the Jovian moons have been developed that allow sampling of the lunar surfaces. These methods include low cost concepts to collect a surface sampled return it to Earth using concepts similar to the Stardust Discovery mission. The spacecraft can be placed on a ballistic trajectory that will carry it close to the surface of the moons of Jupiter. High resolution imaging of the surface can be collected during the approach phase. Small projectiles can be released and used to kick up a plume of surface material. Unique collectors can capture material from this plume as the spacecraft flies over the surface and through the plume of small particles. The spacecraft is protected from damage by shields. This material can then be retracted into a small Sample Return Capsule, SRC, similar to the Stardust capsule. Aerogel and other absorbant materials are used as the collecting medium. A ballistic return to Earth allows for tracking and capture of the capsule at Earth and return to the Utah Test and Training range. Small hard-landing capsules can be dropped to the surface of the moons during the low flyby by using a retrorocket to slow the capsules. These small landers can also collect critical data on the surface composition and relay it to the flyby spacecraft.

  17. Pyramid Comet Sampler Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Based on the sampling requirements, we propose an Inverted Pyramid sampling system. Each face of the pyramid includes a cutting blade which is independently...

  18. Employee Office Sampler

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Capture/store/manage end-user work activities at designated times as needed for DOWS sampling. The end-user, e.g., CR, receives a desktop alert when a DOWS sample...

  19. Identification of chemical composition and measurement of V, As, Cr and Fe in Yogyakarta ambient air particulate by neutron activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activation neutron analysis can be used to identify chemical composition and measure V, As, Cr and Fe contents in Yogyakarta ambient particulate. The air sampling has been done around Yogyakarta city such as: Gg. Narada Gandok around North Ring road (A1 post), Mentri Supeno cross road (A2 post), Purbanegaran GK II (A3 post), Wirobrajan cross road (A4 post), Adisutjipto (A5 post), and in front of Sentul market on JI. Sultan Agung with low volume sampler equipped with AP millipore fiber glass filter. Other places used for air sampling were around PPNY, JI. Babarsari (B1) and Jl. Gejayan (B2) by using high volume sampler equipped with TF A 21133 series filter. The filter was irradiated at Kartini reactor at the average of 1.04 x 1011 n.cm-2.s-1 on January 10, 1995. The V, As, Cr and Fe content in air around Yogyakarta respectively was: 81.5 - 264.9 ng/m3 air; 56.7 - 596.4 ng/m3 air; 30.5 - 153.8 ng/m3 air and 22.4 - 108μg/m3 air. The accuracy of the analysis method was checked by comparing the analysis result to the certificate label of the reference material SRM 1633a. The accuracy was: 21.1%; 13.9%; 7.7% and 13.3% for V, As, Cr and Fe. The V, As, Cr and Fe content in air particulate around Yogyakarta is still the below permissible level of the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1987

  20. Effect of backyard burning on dioxin deposition and air concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wevers, M; De Fré, R; Desmedt, M

    2004-03-01

    The influence from open burning of garden and household waste on locally measured dioxin deposition and air concentrations was evaluated in three sets of experiments: the combustion of garden waste in barrels and in open fires, and the incineration of household waste in an empty oil drum. Each set was composed of eight individual experiments over 4 h. Deposition gauges were located 20 m NE, SE, SW and NW with respect to the source and on a background location at 400 m SW. Air samples were taken in the plume with a medium volume sampler equipped with a quartz filter and a polyurethane plug. The results illustrate deposition increments in the wind direction at a distance of 20 m from the source of 0.8 pg TEQ/m2 day for garden waste and 2.5 pg TEQ/m2 day for household waste. Concentrations in the plume were increased by 160-580 fg TEQ/m3 over a period of 12 and 31 h respectively. Expressed at a reference CO2 concentration of 9% this corresponds with a range from 0.8 to 3.6 ng TEQ/m3, which is comparable with a poorly controlled MSWI. Emission factors in the order of magnitude of 4.5 ng TEQ/kg combusted garden waste and 35 ng TEQ/kg burned municipal waste were determined.

  1. Sorbent-based sampling methods for volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds in air Part 1: Sorbent-based air monitoring options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfenden, Elizabeth

    2010-04-16

    Sorbent tubes/traps are widely used in combination with gas chromatographic (GC) analytical methods to monitor the vapour-phase fraction of organic compounds in air. Target compounds range in volatility from acetylene and freons to phthalates and PCBs and include apolar, polar and reactive species. Airborne vapour concentrations will vary depending on the nature of the location, nearby pollution sources, weather conditions, etc. Levels can range from low percent concentrations in stack and vent emissions to low part per trillion (ppt) levels in ultra-clean outdoor locations. Hundreds, even thousands of different compounds may be present in any given atmosphere. GC is commonly used in combination with mass spectrometry (MS) detection especially for environmental monitoring or for screening uncharacterised workplace atmospheres. Given the complexity and variability of organic vapours in air, no one sampling approach suits every monitoring scenario. A variety of different sampling strategies and sorbent media have been developed to address specific applications. Key sorbent-based examples include: active (pumped) sampling onto tubes packed with one or more sorbents held at ambient temperature; diffusive (passive) sampling onto sorbent tubes/cartridges; on-line sampling of air/gas streams into cooled sorbent traps; and transfer of air samples from containers (canisters, Tedlar) bags, etc.) into cooled sorbent focusing traps. Whichever sampling approach is selected, subsequent analysis almost always involves either solvent extraction or thermal desorption (TD) prior to GC(/MS) analysis. The overall performance of the air monitoring method will depend heavily on appropriate selection of key sampling and analytical parameters. This comprehensive review of air monitoring using sorbent tubes/traps is divided into 2 parts. (1) Sorbent-based air sampling option. (2) Sorbent selection and other aspects of optimizing sorbent-based air monitoring methods. The paper presents

  2. Combining passive samplers and biomonitors to evaluate endocrine disrupting compounds in a wastewater treatment plant by LC/MS/MS and bioassay analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liscio, C. [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Universita di Genova, via Dodecaneso, 31, 16146 Genova (Italy); Magi, E., E-mail: magie@chimica.unige.i [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Universita di Genova, via Dodecaneso, 31, 16146 Genova (Italy); Di Carro, M. [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Universita di Genova, via Dodecaneso, 31, 16146 Genova (Italy); Suter, M.J.-F.; Vermeirssen, E.L.M. [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Uberlandstrasse 133, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2009-10-15

    Two types of integrative sampling approaches (passive samplers and biomonitors) were tested for their sampling characteristics of selected endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). Chemical analyses (LC/MS/MS) were used to determine the amounts of five EDCs (nonylphenol, bisphenol A, estrone, 17beta-estradiol and 17alpha-ethinylestradiol) in polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and freshwater mussels (Unio pictorum); both had been deployed in the influent and effluent of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Genoa, Italy. Estrogenicity of the POCIS samples was assessed using the yeast estrogen screen (YES). Estradiol equivalent values derived from the bioassay showed a positive correlation with estradiol equivalents calculated from chemical analyses data. As expected, the amount of estrogens and EEQ values in the effluent were lower than those in the influent. Passive sampling proved to be the preferred method for assessing the presence of these compounds since employing mussels had several disadvantages both in sampling efficiency and sample analyses. - Passive sampling and biomonitoring were used to determine the amounts of endocrine disrupting compounds in wastewaters.

  3. Semi-continuous sampling of health relevant atmospheric particle subfractions for chemical speciation using a rotating drum impactor in series with sequential filter sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengxia; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Karg, Erwin; Cyrys, Josef; Gu, Jianwei; Orasche, Jürgen; Abbaszade, Gülcin; Peters, Annette; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    To achieve unattended continuous long-term (eg., 1 week) sampling of size-segregated 24-h ambient particulate matter (PM), a sampling strategy of a modified 3-stage rotating drum impactor (RDI) in series with a sequential filter sampler was introduced and verified in a field campaign. Before the field sampling, lab experiment was conducted to test the collection efficiency of the third stage of the RDI using the quartz-fiber filter (QFF) as the substrate. The measured value is 0.36 μm, which is larger than the nominal value 0.1 μm. A fast direct analysis of organic species in all size fractions (levoglucosan were quantified. The comparability of two such sampler sets was verified with respect to the PM collection profile of the two RDIs as well as measured concentration of chemical compounds in each sampled size fraction, so that a future epidemiological study on the relationship between the finest PM/its chemical composition and health outcome could be carried out through parallel sampling at two sites. The internal correlations between the size-segregated organic compounds are discussed. Besides, the correlations between the size-segregated organic species and size-segregated particulate number concentration (PNC) as well as meteorological parameter are discussed as well. PMID:26676546

  4. A multipoint (49 points) study of dry deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Erzurum, Turkey by using surrogated snow surface samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, Hanefi; Paloluoğlu, Cihan; Turalioğlu, Fatma S; Gaga, Eftade O

    2016-06-01

    Dry deposition of atmospheric 18 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) components was investigated in the scope of the study by using surrogate snow samplers at 49 different sampling points in and around the city center of Erzurum, Turkey. Snow was sampled twice, the first of which was taken immediately after the first fresh snow cover and placed into aluminum trays to obtain dry deposition surface while the second sample was taken from the snow cover (accumulated snow) exposed to an 8-day dry deposition period and then analyzed and extracted. All the samples taken from the samplers were extracted using solid and liquid phase extraction and analyzed through GC-MS. It was observed that at the end of an 8-day dry period, snow samples enriched 5.5 times more in PAH components than the baseline. PAH deposition was determined to be influenced mainly by coal, mixed source, traffic, diesel fuel, and petrol fuel at 43, 27, 20, 8, and 2 % of sampling points, respectively. Local polluting sources were found to be effective on the spatial distribution of dry deposition of PAH components in urban area. PMID:26983812

  5. Connectable solar air collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestergaard Jensen, S.; Bosanac, M.

    2002-02-01

    The project has proved that it is possible to manufacture solar air collector panels, which in an easy way can be connected into large collector arrays with integrated ducting without loss of efficiency. The developed connectable solar air collectors are based on the use of matrix absorbers in the form of perforated metal sheets. Three interconnected solar air collectors of the above type - each with an transparent area of approx. 3 m{sup 2} - was tested and compared with parallel tests on two single solar air collectors also with a transparent area of approx. 3 m{sup 2} One of the single solar air collectors has an identical absorber as the connectable solar air collectors while the absorber of the other single solar air collector was a fibre cloth. The efficiency of the three solar air collectors proved to be almost identical in the investigated range of mass flow rates and temperature differences. The solar air collectors further proved to be very efficient - as efficient as the second most efficient solar air collectors tested in the IEA task 19 project Solar Air Systems. Some problems remain although to be solved: the pressure drop across especially the connectable solar air collectors is too high - mainly across the inlets of the solar air collectors. It should, however, be possible to considerably reduce the pressure losses with a more aerodynamic design of the inlet and outlet of the solar air collectors; The connectable solar air collectors are easy connectable but the air tightness of the connections in the present form is not good enough. As leakage leads to lower efficiencies focus should be put on making the connections more air tight without loosing the easiness in connecting the solar air collectors. As a spin off of the project a simple and easy way to determine the efficiency of solar, air collectors for pre-heating of fresh air has been validated. The simple method of determining the efficiency has with success been compared with an advance method

  6. Determination of very small activities of radioiodine and plutonium in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mobile high volume sampler with the following characteristics was developed: air flow rate 5000 m3.h-1, total cross section of the seven activated charcoal filter units 0.6 m2, diameter of each filter unit 33 cm, thickness of charcoal layer 4 - 7 cm. The sorbed radioiodine is eluted from the charcoal in a circulation unit by a circulating solution (sodium hydroxide/hydrazine) and is transfered into a sorbent containing silver (ion exchange resin with colloidal silver), thereby bringing about a reduction in volume by a factor of approximately 1000. The radioiodine activity is then determined by gamma spectrometric measurement of the silver containing sorbent. The overall radioiodine yield measured with 123I spike (sorption on charcoal and transfer to the silver containing sorbent) is 75 (+- 7)%. A detection limit of 0.02 mBq.m-3 is achieved for 131I. If the sampler is operated with the standard throughput of 5000 m3.h-1, this limit applies to one hour average concentration values. Results of environmental monitorings for the period 1979 - 1982 at the Research Center Seibersdorf for 131I (up to 2,6 mBq/m3) and for plutonium (up to 4 μBq/m3) are given. (Author)

  7. Passive air sampling of PCBs, PBDEs, and organochlorine pesticides across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaward, Foday M; Farrar, Nick J; Harner, Tom; Sweetman, Andrew J; Jones, Kevin C

    2004-01-01

    This study presents concurrently sampled ambient air data for a range of persistent organic pollutants at the continental scale. This was achieved using a passive air sampling system, deploying polyurethane foam disks, which was prepared in one laboratory, sealed to prevent contamination, sent out by courier to volunteers participating in different countries, exposed for 6 weeks, collected, resealed, and returned to the laboratory for analysis. Europe was the study area--a region with a history of extensive POPs usage and emission and with marked national differences in population density, the degree of urbanization and industrial/agricultural development. Samplers were deployed at remote/rural/urban locations in 22 countries and analyzed for PCBs, a range of organochlorine pesticides (HCB, alpha-HCH, gamma-HCH, ppDDT, ppDDE), and PBDEs. Calculated air concentrations were in line with those obtained by conventional active air sampling techniques. The geographical pattern of all compounds reflected suspected regional emission patterns and highlighted localized hotspots. PCB and PBDE levels varied by over 2 orders of magnitude; the highest values were detected in areas of high usage and were linked to urbanized areas. HCB was relatively uniformly distributed, reflecting its persistence and high degree of mixing in air. Higher gamma-HCH, ppDDT, and ppDDE levels generally occurred in South and East Europe. PMID:14740714

  8. Air Quality Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Facilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other...

  9. Airing It Out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzemeyer, Ted

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how proper maintenance can help schools eliminate sources contributing to poor air quality. Maintaining heating and air conditioning units, investigating bacterial breeding grounds, fixing leaking boilers, and adhering to ventilation codes and standards are discussed. (GR)

  10. AirCompare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — AirCompare contains air quality information that allows a user to compare conditions in different localities over time and compare conditions in the same location...

  11. Allegheny County Air Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Air quality data from Allegheny County Health Department monitors throughout the county. Air quality monitored data must be verified by qualified individuals...

  12. Air Quality System (AQS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Air Quality System (AQS) database contains measurements of air pollutant concentrations from throughout the United States and its territories. The measurements...

  13. Indoor air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine Susanne; Recevska, Ieva

     The objective of the 35th specific agreement is to provide support to the EEA activities in Environment and Health (E&H) on the topic of indoor air quality. The specific objectives have been to provide an overview of indoor air related projects in EU and indoor air related policies as well...... as idenfiying "good practices" to reduce health impact of indoor air exposure and suggest areas for future improvements....

  14. Assessing Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) using passive air sampling in the atmosphere of one of the most wood-smoke-polluted cities in Chile: The case study of Temuco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, Karla; Estellano, Victor H; Harner, Tom; Diaz-Robles, Luis; Cereceda-Balic, Francisco; Etcharren, Pablo; Pozo, Katerine; Vidal, Victor; Guerrero, Fabián; Vergara-Fernández, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    This study addresses human health concerns in the city of Temuco that are attributed to wood smoke and related pollutants associated with wood burning activities that are prevalent in Temuco. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in air across urban and rural sites over three seasons in Temuco using polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive air samplers (PUF-PAS). Concentrations of ΣPAHs (15 congeners) in air ranged from BDL to ∼70 ng m(-3) and were highest during the winter season, which is attributed to emissions from residential heating by wood combustion. The results for all three seasons showed that the PAH plume was widespread across all sites including rural sites on the outskirts of Temuco. Some interesting variations were observed between seasons in the composition of PAHs, which were attributed to differences in seasonal point sources. A comparison of the PAH composition in the passive samples with active samples (gas+particle phase) from the same site revealed similar congener profiles. Overall, the study demonstrated that the PUF disk passive air sampler provides a simple approach for measuring PAHs in air and for tracking effectiveness of pollution control measures in urban areas in order to improve public health.

  15. Air Pollution Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Rockville, MD.

    This catalog lists the universities, both supported and not supported by the Division of Air Pollution, which offer graduate programs in the field of air pollution. The catalog briefly describes the programs and their entrance requirements, the requirements, qualifications and terms of special fellowships offered by the Division of Air Pollution.…

  16. Indoor Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    We usually think of air pollution as being outdoors, but the air in your house or office could also be polluted. Sources of indoor pollution ... is known as sick building syndrome. Usually indoor air quality problems only cause discomfort. Most people feel ...

  17. Indoor Air Quality Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin Union Free School District, NY.

    This manual identifies ways to improve a school's indoor air quality (IAQ) and discusses practical actions that can be carried out by school staff in managing air quality. The manual includes discussions of the many sources contributing to school indoor air pollution and the preventive planning for each including renovation and repair work,…

  18. We Pollute the Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    1.Clean air is important to good health.If the aircontains impurities,they may be absorbed by ourbodies and make us ill.We need clean air,butunfortunately,air pollution is generally present,especially in cities. 2.Our cities have many factories,which we need tomake food products,clothing and many other things.

  19. Air Travel Health Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENU Return to Web version Air Travel Health Tips Air Travel Health Tips How can I improve plane travel? Most people don't have any problems when ... and dosages of all of your medicines. The air in airplanes is dry, so drink nonalcoholic, decaffeinated ...

  20. Airborne Asbestos Exposures from Warm Air Heating Systems in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdett, Garry J; Dewberry, Kirsty; Staff, James

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the concentrations of airborne asbestos that can be released into classrooms of schools that have amosite-containing asbestos insulation board (AIB) in the ceiling plenum or other spaces, particularly where there is forced recirculation of air as part of a warm air heating system. Air samples were collected in three or more classrooms at each of three schools, two of which were of CLASP (Consortium of Local Authorities Special Programme) system-built design, during periods when the schools were unoccupied. Two conditions were sampled: (i) the start-up and running of the heating systems with no disturbance (the background) and (ii) running of the heating systems during simulated disturbance. The simulated disturbance was designed to exceed the level of disturbance to the AIB that would routinely take place in an occupied classroom. A total of 60 or more direct impacts that vibrated and/or flexed the encapsulated or enclosed AIB materials were applied over the sampling period. The impacts were carried out at the start of the sampling and repeated at hourly intervals but did not break or damage the AIB. The target air volume for background samples was ~3000 l of air using a static sampler sited either below or ~1 m from the heater outlet. This would allow an analytical sensitivity (AS) of 0.0001 fibres per millilitre (f ml(-1)) to be achieved, which is 1000 times lower than the EU and UK workplace control limit of 0.1 f ml(-1). Samples with lower volumes of air were also collected in case of overloading and for the shorter disturbance sampling times used at one site. The sampler filters were analysed by phase contrast microscopy (PCM) to give a rapid determination of the overall concentration of visible fibres (all types) released and/or by analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the concentration of asbestos fibres. Due to the low number of fibres, results were reported in terms of both the calculated

  1. Airborne Asbestos Exposures from Warm Air Heating Systems in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdett, Garry J; Dewberry, Kirsty; Staff, James

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the concentrations of airborne asbestos that can be released into classrooms of schools that have amosite-containing asbestos insulation board (AIB) in the ceiling plenum or other spaces, particularly where there is forced recirculation of air as part of a warm air heating system. Air samples were collected in three or more classrooms at each of three schools, two of which were of CLASP (Consortium of Local Authorities Special Programme) system-built design, during periods when the schools were unoccupied. Two conditions were sampled: (i) the start-up and running of the heating systems with no disturbance (the background) and (ii) running of the heating systems during simulated disturbance. The simulated disturbance was designed to exceed the level of disturbance to the AIB that would routinely take place in an occupied classroom. A total of 60 or more direct impacts that vibrated and/or flexed the encapsulated or enclosed AIB materials were applied over the sampling period. The impacts were carried out at the start of the sampling and repeated at hourly intervals but did not break or damage the AIB. The target air volume for background samples was ~3000 l of air using a static sampler sited either below or ~1 m from the heater outlet. This would allow an analytical sensitivity (AS) of 0.0001 fibres per millilitre (f ml(-1)) to be achieved, which is 1000 times lower than the EU and UK workplace control limit of 0.1 f ml(-1). Samples with lower volumes of air were also collected in case of overloading and for the shorter disturbance sampling times used at one site. The sampler filters were analysed by phase contrast microscopy (PCM) to give a rapid determination of the overall concentration of visible fibres (all types) released and/or by analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the concentration of asbestos fibres. Due to the low number of fibres, results were reported in terms of both the calculated

  2. Contamination of the air and other environmental samples of the Ulm region by radioactive fission products after the accident of the Chernobyl reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since April 30, 1986, the radioactivity of the fission products released by the accident of the Chernobyl reactor has been measured in the air of the city of Ulm. The airborne dust samples were collected with flow calibrated samplers on cellulose acetate membrane filters and counted with a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer. Later on, the radioactivity measurements were expanded to other relevant environmental samples contaminated by radioactive atmospheric precipitates including grass, spruce needles, mosses, lichens, various kinds of food, drinking water, asphalt and concrete surface layers, municipal sewage sludge and sewage sludge ash. This paper reports the obtained results. (orig.)

  3. Air Conditioning Does Reduce Air Pollution Indoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Bud

    1970-01-01

    Report of the winter meeting of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. Subjects covered are--(1) title subject, (2) predictions for the human habitat in 1994, (3) fans, and (4) fire safety in buildings. (JW)

  4. Advanced air distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2011-01-01

    The aim of total volume air distribution (TVAD) involves achieving uniform temperature and velocity in the occupied zone and environment designed for an average occupant. The supply of large amounts of clean and cool air are needed to maintain temperature and pollution concentration at acceptable....... Ventilation in hospitals is essential to decrease the risk of airborne cross-infection. At present, mixing air distribution at a minimum of 12 ach is used in infection wards. Advanced air distribution has the potential to aid in achieving healthy, comfortable and productive indoor environments at levels...... higher than what can be achieved today with the commonly used total volume air distribution principles....

  5. Evaluation of a Sequential Spot Sampler (S3 for time-resolved measurement of PM2.5 sulfate and nitrate through lab and field measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hecobian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Sequential Spot Sampler (S3, a newly developed instrument to collect aerosols for time resolved chemical composition measurements, was evaluated in the laboratory and field for the measurement of particulate sulfate and nitrate. The S3 uses a multi-temperature condensation growth tube to grow individual aerosols to droplets which are then deposited as a ~ 1 mm diameter dry spot at the end of the growth tube on a 100 μL well of a multi-well plate. The well plate advances automatically to provide a sequence of time-resolved samples. The collected aerosols are subsequently analyzed in the laboratory. The sample is concentrated during the collection process and the laboratory extraction and analysis steps can be automated. The well plate, as received from the field, is placed onto a needle-based autosampler that adds liquid for sample extraction and injects sample extract from each well onto an ion chromatograph for analysis. Laboratory evaluation for sulfate and nitrate ions showed that PEEK used as well plate material does not contribute any artifacts; a 60 min extraction procedure leads to the recovery of sulfate and nitrate from the dry spots at above 95 % extraction efficiency; and samples stored frozen and analyzed up to 23 months later show less than a 10 % change in sulfate and nitrate concentrations. In a month long field study conducted in Southern California, two S3s were deployed alongside a URG denuder/filter-pack and a Particle-Into-Liquid Sampler combined with an Ion Chromatograph (PILS-IC. Collocated S3 sampler concentrations compared by linear regression show good agreement with r2 = 0.99 and slope = 0.99 (±0.004 μg m−3 for sulfate and r2 = 0.99 and slope =1.0 (±0.006 μg m−3 for nitrate. When compared to the URG denuder/filter-pack and the PILS-IC, the S3 sulfate and nitrate concentrations yielded correlations above 0.84 for the square of the correlation coefficient and regression slopes close to one.

  6. Evaluation of a Sequential Spot Sampler (S3) for time-resolved measurement of PM2.5 sulfate and nitrate through lab and field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecobian, A.; Evanoski-Cole, A.; Eiguren-Fernandez, A.; Sullivan, A. P.; Lewis, G. S.; Hering, S. V.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2015-10-01

    The Sequential Spot Sampler (S3), a newly developed instrument to collect aerosols for time resolved chemical composition measurements, was evaluated in the laboratory and field for the measurement of particulate sulfate and nitrate. The S3 uses a multi-temperature condensation growth tube to grow individual aerosols to droplets which are then deposited as a ~ 1 mm diameter dry spot at the end of the growth tube on a 100 μL well of a multi-well plate. The well plate advances automatically to provide a sequence of time-resolved samples. The collected aerosols are subsequently analyzed in the laboratory. The sample is concentrated during the collection process and the laboratory extraction and analysis steps can be automated. The well plate, as received from the field, is placed onto a needle-based autosampler that adds liquid for sample extraction and injects sample extract from each well onto an ion chromatograph for analysis. Laboratory evaluation for sulfate and nitrate ions showed that PEEK used as well plate material does not contribute any artifacts; a 60 min extraction procedure leads to the recovery of sulfate and nitrate from the dry spots at above 95 % extraction efficiency; and samples stored frozen and analyzed up to 23 months later show less than a 10 % change in sulfate and nitrate concentrations. In a month long field study conducted in Southern California, two S3s were deployed alongside a URG denuder/filter-pack and a Particle-Into-Liquid Sampler combined with an Ion Chromatograph (PILS-IC). Collocated S3 sampler concentrations compared by linear regression show good agreement with r2 = 0.99 and slope = 0.99 (±0.004) μg m-3 for sulfate and r2 = 0.99 and slope =1.0 (±0.006) μg m-3 for nitrate. When compared to the URG denuder/filter-pack and the PILS-IC, the S3 sulfate and nitrate concentrations yielded correlations above 0.84 for the square of the correlation coefficient and regression slopes close to one.

  7. Evaluation of the Sequential Spot Sampler (S3) for time-resolved measurement of PM2.5 sulfate and nitrate through lab and field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecobian, A.; Evanoski-Cole, A.; Eiguren-Fernandez, A.; Sullivan, A. P.; Lewis, G. S.; Hering, S. V.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2016-02-01

    The Sequential Spot Sampler (S3), a newly developed instrument to collect aerosols for time-resolved chemical composition measurements, was evaluated in the laboratory and field for the measurement of particulate sulfate and nitrate. The S3 uses a multi-temperature condensation growth tube to grow individual aerosols to droplets which are then deposited as a ˜ 1 mm diameter dry spot at the end of the growth tube in a 100 µL well of a multi-well plate. The well plate advances automatically to provide a sequence of time-resolved samples. The collected aerosols are subsequently analyzed in the laboratory. The sample is concentrated during the collection process, and the laboratory extraction and analysis steps can be automated. The well plate, as received from the field, is placed onto a needle-based autosampler that adds liquid for sample extraction and injects sample extract from each well onto an ion chromatograph for analysis. Laboratory evaluation for sulfate and nitrate ions showed that poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) used as well plate material does not contribute any artifacts; a 60 min extraction procedure leads to the recovery of sulfate and nitrate from the dry spots at above 95 % extraction efficiency; and samples stored frozen and analyzed up to 23 months later show less than a 10 % change in sulfate and nitrate concentrations. The limit of detection was 0.5 µg m-3 for sulfate and 0.2 µg m-3 for nitrate for a 1 h sampling period. In a month-long field study conducted in southern California, two S3s were deployed alongside a URG denuder-filter-pack and a Particle-Into-Liquid Sampler combined with an Ion Chromatograph (PILS-IC). Collocated S3 sampler concentrations compared by linear regression show good agreement, with r2 = 0.99 and slope = 0.99 (±0.004) µg m-3 for sulfate and r2 = 0.99 and slope = 1.0 (±0.006) µg m-3 for nitrate. When compared to the URG denuder-filter-pack and the PILS-IC, the S3 sulfate and nitrate concentrations yielded

  8. Released air during vapor and air cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonská, Jana; Kozubková, Milada

    2016-06-01

    Cavitation today is a very important problem that is solved by means of experimental and mathematical methods. The article deals with the generation of cavitation in convergent divergent nozzle of rectangular cross section. Measurement of pressure, flow rate, temperature, amount of dissolved air in the liquid and visualization of cavitation area using high-speed camera was performed for different flow rates. The measurement results were generalized by dimensionless analysis, which allows easy detection of cavitation in the nozzle. For numerical simulation the multiphase mathematical model of cavitation consisting of water and vapor was created. During verification the disagreement with the measurements for higher flow rates was proved, therefore the model was extended to multiphase mathematical model (water, vapor and air), due to release of dissolved air. For the mathematical modeling the multiphase turbulence RNG k-ɛ model for low Reynolds number flow with vapor and air cavitation was used. Subsequently the sizes of the cavitation area were verified. In article the inlet pressure and loss coefficient depending on the amount of air added to the mathematical model are evaluated. On the basis of the approach it may be create a methodology to estimate the amount of released air added at the inlet to the modeled area.

  9. Air Conditioner/Dehumidifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    An ordinary air conditioner in a very humid environment must overcool the room air, then reheat it. Mr. Dinh, a former STAC associate, devised a heat pipe based humidifier under a NASA Contract. The system used heat pipes to precool the air; the air conditioner's cooling coil removes heat and humidity, then the heat pipes restore the overcooled air to a comfortable temperature. The heat pipes use no energy, and typical savings are from 15-20%. The Dinh Company also manufactures a "Z" coil, a retrofit cooling coil which may be installed on an existing heater/air conditioner. It will also provide free hot water. The company has also developed a photovoltaic air conditioner and solar powered water pump.

  10. Manual for THOR-AirPAS - air pollution assessment system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steen Solvang; Ketzel, Matthias; Brandt, Jørgen;

    The report provides an outline of the THOR-AirPAS - air pollution assessment system and a brief manual for getting started with the air quality models and input data included in THOR-AirPAS.......The report provides an outline of the THOR-AirPAS - air pollution assessment system and a brief manual for getting started with the air quality models and input data included in THOR-AirPAS....

  11. Spatial variability of POPs in European background air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Halse

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Persistent organic pollutants (POPs are recognized for their potential to create harmful effects in remote areas and several monitoring programs have been established which measure POPs in air. Active air sampling (AAS has so far been the recommended method used under the EMEP (co-operative programme for monitoring and evaluation of the long-range transmissions of air pollutants in Europe measurement program. The number of EMEP AAS stations is still limited and mainly located in the north western part of Europe. Passive air sampling (PAS methods, which have become increasingly popular in recent years, offer an opportunity as a complementary sampling strategy which could improve sampling coverage under EMEP. To gain further insight into spatial patterns of POPs in European background air and to evaluate PAS as an alternative sampling technique under EMEP, PAS were deployed at 86 European background sites during summer 2006. Duplicate PAS samplers were also deployed at EMEP AAS sites to allow for a comparison of results obtained using both methods. The PAS were analyzed for selected PCBs, HCHs, DDTs, PAHs, chlordanes and HCB, and air concentrations were calculated on the basis of losses of performance reference compounds. Air concentrations of PCBs were generally lowest in more remote areas of Northern Europe with elevated levels in more densely populated areas. γ-HCH was found at elevated levels in more central parts of Europe, whereas α-HCH, β-HCH and DDTs showed higher concentrations in the southeastern part. There was no clear spatial pattern in the concentrations for PAHs, indicative of influence by local sources, rather than long range atmospheric transport (LRAT. HCB was evenly distributed across Europe, while the concentrations of chlordanes were typically low or non-detectable. Co-deployed PAS samples showed a fair agreement between the duplicates, typically within 30%. Larger differences were seen when comparing results obtained on

  12. Determination of trichloroanisole and trichlorophenol in wineries' ambient air by passive sampling and thermal desorption-gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camino-Sánchez, F J; Bermúdez-Peinado, R; Zafra-Gómez, A; Ruíz-García, J; Vílchez-Quero, J L

    2015-02-01

    The present paper describes the calibration of selected passive samplers used in the quantitation of trichlorophenol and trichloroanisole in wineries' ambient air, by calculating the corresponding sampling rates. The method is based on passive sampling with sorbent tubes and involves thermal desorption-gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis. Three commercially available sorbents were tested using sampling cartridges with a radial design instead of axial ones. The best results were found for Tenax TA™. Sampling rates (R-values) for the selected sorbents were determined. Passive sampling was also used for accurately determining the amount of compounds present in the air. Adequate correlation coefficients between the mass of the target analytes and exposure time were obtained. The proposed validated method is a useful tool for the early detection of trichloroanisole and its precursor trichlorophenol in wineries' ambient air while avoiding contamination of wine or winery facilities. PMID:25576042

  13. Relationships Between Indoor Air Pollution and Psychrometric and Effective Factors in the Polyurethane Factories with Emphasis on Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Etemadi Nejad

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study is determination of the relationship between airborne methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI and selective psychrometric variables. The production of MDI factories were polyurethane adhesives, paints and varnishes and the workers were exposed to MDI in the indoor air. The air samples were collected by midget impinger and multiple regressions model was used to determine the relationship between variables. All of the samplers (midget impinger were connected to mini personal sampler pump fixed toworkstations near the source of pollution based on NIOSH method 5522. The first step in the analysis of a solution is derivatization of isocyanates for the separation through HPLC, for their qualitative as well as quantitative analysis. Air sampling and analysis was performed according to (NIOSH method 5522 for diisocyanate in air. The results revealed that a correlation between MDI concentration and relative humidity, dry bulb temperature, altitude and dimension of polyurethane factories. Dimension of factories yields reasonable negative relationship, the MDI concentration was ranged from 93.8 to 99(μg/m3 and statistically significant at 0.0001 level and the relative humidity was ranged from 42.6 to 45% and dry bulb temperatureranged from 28 to 29°C were statistically significant at 0.035 and 0.0001 level, respectively. A statistical predictive model was obtained from multiple regression modeling for MDI and psychrometric parameters. The result of the current study may be useful for the prediction of diisocyanate pollution for polyurethane factoriesin the same psychrometric condition. This indicates that the MDI concentration is attributed to psychrometric parameters.

  14. Exposures to 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate during polyurethane spray painting in the U.S. Air Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, G N; England, E C

    2000-09-01

    1,6-Hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) exposures were measured during polyurethane enamel spray painting at four Air Force bases. Breathing zone samples were collected for HDI monomer and polyisocyanates (oligomers) using three sampling methods: NIOSH Method 5521, the Iso-Chek sampler, and the total aerosol mass method (TAMM). Exposures to HDI monomer are low when compared to current occupational exposure limits; the highest 8-hr time-weighted average (TWA) exposure found was 3.5 micrograms/m3, below the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value (TLV) of 34 micrograms/m3. HDI oligomer levels were higher; mean task exposures indicated by either the Iso-Chek sampler or TAMM are above the Oregon ceiling limit of 1 mg/m3. Eight-hour TWA exposures, however, were much lower, with only one exceeding the Oregon standard of 0.5 mg/m3. Poor worker practices commonly observed during this study included: standing in downwind positions so paint overspray passed through breathing zones; spraying toward other painters; and using excessive paint spray gun air cap pressures. Workers should stand in upwind orientation relative to the aircraft being painted, causing overspray to move away from the painter's breathing zone; adjust their position to prevent spraying other painters or limit paint application to one worker at a time; and use air cap pressure gauges prior to spraying to limit spray gun air cap pressures and reduce paint overspray generation rates. These improved techniques will result in reduced worker exposures to isocyanates. PMID:10983405

  15. Estimating pesticide sampling rates by the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) in the presence of natural organic matter and varying hydrodynamic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlestra, Lucner; Amirbahman, Aria; Courtemanch, David L.; Alvarez, David A.; Patterson, Howard

    2012-01-01

    The polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) was calibrated to monitor pesticides in water under controlled laboratory conditions. The effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on the sampling rates (Rs) was evaluated in microcosms containing -1 of total organic carbon (TOC). The effect of hydrodynamics was studied by comparing Rs values measured in stirred (SBE) and quiescent (QBE) batch experiments and a flow-through system (FTS). The level of NOM in the water used in these experiments had no effect on the magnitude of the pesticide sampling rates (p > 0.05). However, flow velocity and turbulence significantly increased the sampling rates of the pesticides in the FTS and SBE compared to the QBE (p pesticide concentrations in water from POCIS deployed in stagnant and turbulent environmental systems without correction for NOM.

  16. Principal component analysis of air particulate data from the industrial area of islamabad, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Gent air sampler was used to collect 72 pairs of size fractionated coarse and fine (PM/sub 10/ and PM/sub 2.5/) particulate mass samples from the industrial zone (sector I-9) of Islamabad. These samples were analyzed for their elemental composition using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). Principal component analysis (PCA), which can be used for source apportionment of quantified elemental data, was used to interpret the data. Graphical representations of loadings were used to explain the data through grouping of the elements from same source. The present work shows well defined elemental fingerprints of suspended soil and road dust, industry, motor vehicle exhaust and tyres, and coal and refuses combustions for the studied locality of Islamabad. (author)

  17. Sources and distribution of organic compounds using passive samplers in Lake Mead national recreation area, Nevada and Arizona, and their implications for potential effects on aquatic biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael R; Alvarez, David A; Goodbred, Steven L; Leiker, Thomas J; Patiño, Reynaldo

    2010-01-01

    The delineation of lateral and vertical gradients of organic contaminants in lakes is hampered by low concentrationsand nondetection of many organic compounds in water. Passive samplers (semipermeable membrane devices [SPMDs] and polar organic chemical integrative samplers [POCIS]) are well suited for assessing gradients because they can detect synthetic organic compounds (SOCs) at pg L(-1) concentrations. Semi-permeable membrane devices and POCIS were deployed in Lake Mead, at two sites in Las Vegas Wash, at four sites across Lake Mead, and in the Colorado River downstream from Hoover Dam. Concentrations of hydrophobic SOCs were highest in Las Vegas Wash downstream from waste water and urban inputs and at 8 m depth in Las Vegas Bay (LVB) where Las Vegas Wash enters Lake Mead. The distribution of hydrophobic SOCs showed a lateral distribution across 10 km of Lake Mead from LVB to Boulder Basin. To assess possible vertical gradient SOCs, SPMDs were deployed at 4-m intervals in 18 m of water in LVB. Fragrances and legacy SOCs were found at the greatest concentrations at the deepest depth. The vertical gradient of SOCs indicated that contaminants were generally confined to within 6 m of the lake bottom during the deployment interval. The high SOC concentrations, warmer water temperatures, and higher total dissolved solids concentrations at depth are indicative of a plume of Las Vegas Wash water moving along the lake bottom. The lateral and vertical distribution of SOCs is discussed in the context of other studies that have shown impaired health of fish exposed to SOCs. PMID:20830903

  18. Preliminary Results from Downhole Osmotic Samplers in a Gas Tracer Injection Experiment in the Upper Oceanic Crust on the Eastern Flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, M. T.; Clark, J. F.; Neira, N. M.; Fisher, A. T.; Wheat, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from a gas tracer injection experiment in the ocean crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, in an area of hydrothermal circulation. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer was injected in Hole 1362B in 2010, during IODP Expedition 327. Fluid samples were subsequently collected from a borehole observatory (CORK) installed in this hole and similar CORKs in three additional holes (1026B, 1362A, and 1301A), located 300 to 500 m away. This array of holes is located on 3.5 My old seafloor, as an array oriented subparallel to the Endeavor Segment of Juan de Fuca Ridge. Borehole fluid samples were collected in copper coils using osmotic pumps. In addition to pumps at seafloor wellheads, downhole sampling pumps were installed in the perforated casing in the upper ocean crust. These downhole samplers were intended to produce a high-resolution continuous record of tracer concentrations, including records from the first year after tracer injection in Holes 1362A and 1362B. In contrast, wellhead samplers were not installed on these CORKs holes until 2011, and wellhead records from all CORKs have a record gap of up to one year, because of a delayed expedition in 2012. The downhole samples were recovered with the submersible Alvin in August 2014. SF6 concentrations in downhole samples recovered in 2014 are generally consistent with data obtained from wellhead samples. Of particular interest are the results from Hole 1362B, where a seafloor valve was opened and closed during various recovery expeditions. High resolution tracer curves produced from the 1362B downhole samples confirm that these operations produced an SF6 breakthrough curve corresponding to a classic push-pull test used to evaluate contaminant field locations in terrestrial setting. Complete analyses of downhole samples from these CORKs are expected to produce high-resolution breakthrough curves that will allow more precise analysis and modeling of hydrothermal flow in the study area.

  19. Comparison of continuous air monitor utilization: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, J.C.; Whicker, J.J.; Voss, J.T.

    1997-08-01

    The Chemical Metallurgy Research (CMR) building has been upgrading to different continuous air monitors (CAMs) over the past several years. During the transition, both the newer and older CAMs were positioned in the rooms for field testing and comparison. On December 19, 1996, an accidental release of plutonium aerosol occurred into a laboratory in the CMR building. The event occurred while the room was unoccupied, and no personnel were exposed from this incident. There were two fixed air samplers (FASs) and three CAMs operating in the room at the time the release occurred, including two of the recently installed Canberra Alpha Sentry CAMs and one older Eberline CAM. The apparent cause of the release was a procedure carried out in the basement involving the replacement of the HEPA filter in the ventilation exhaust of a slot-box in the laboratory. For a short period, the ventilation was disconnected from the slot-box in this room, but not from the chemical hood exhaust on the opposite side of the laboratory. Therefore, a condition was created where backflow could occur out of the slot-box and into the room. Eventually all three CAMs in the room alarmed, and the situation was successfully monitored and brought under control by health physics personnel. Data on CAM performance were logged, and Pu activity collected on CAM and FAS filters were measured. A comparison of the new and old continuous air monitoring programs was performed and many interesting lessons on CAM performance and CAM utilization were learned. Overall, this comparison showed the advantages of remote monitoring, timely spectral information, and concentration measurements resolved in time and space.

  20. Air filtration in HVAC systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ginestet, Alain; Tronville, Paolo; Hyttinen, Marko

    2010-01-01

    Air filtration Guidebook will help the designer and user to understand the background and criteria for air filtration, how to select air filters and avoid problems associated with hygienic and other conditions at operation of air filters. The selection of air filters is based on external conditions such as levels of existing pollutants, indoor air quality and energy efficiency requirements.