WorldWideScience

Sample records for air pressure effect

  1. Air Entrainment in Dynamic Wetting: Knudsen Effects and the Influence of Ambient Air Pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Sprittles, James E

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments on coating flows and liquid drop impact both demonstrate that wetting failures caused by air entrainment can be suppressed by reducing the ambient gas pressure. Here, it is shown that non-equilibrium effects in the gas can account for this behaviour, with ambient pressure reductions increasing the gas' mean free path and hence the Knudsen number $Kn$. These effects first manifest themselves through Maxwell slip at the gas' boundaries so that for sufficiently small $Kn$ they can be incorporated into a continuum model for dynamic wetting flows. The resulting mathematical model contains flow structures on the nano-, micro- and milli-metre scales and is implemented into a computational platform developed specifically for such multiscale phenomena. The coating flow geometry is used to show that for a fixed gas-liquid-solid system (a) the increased Maxwell slip at reduced pressures can substantially delay air entrainment, i.e. increase the `maximum speed of wetting', (b) unbounded maximum speeds ...

  2. Effect of Mixture Pressure and Equivalence Ratio on Detonation Cell Size for Hydrogen-Air Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    EFFECT OF MIXTURE PRESSURE AND EQUIVALENCE RATIO ON DETONATION CELL SIZE FOR HYDROGEN -AIR MIXTURES...protection in the United States. AFIT-ENY-MS-15-J-045 EFFECT OF MIXTURE PRESSURE AND EQUIVALENCE RATIO ON DETONATION CELL SIZE FOR HYDROGEN -AIR...DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENY-MS-15-J-045 EFFECT OF MIXTURE PRESSURE AND EQUIVALENCE RATIO ON DETONATION CELL SIZE FOR HYDROGEN -AIR MIXTURES

  3. Influence of air pressure on mechanical effect of laser plasma shock wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yu-Zhu; Wang Guang-An; Zhu Jin-Rong; Shen Zhong-Hua; Ni Xiao-Wu; Lu Jian

    2007-01-01

    The influence of air pressure on mechanical effect of laser plasma shock wave in a vacuum chamber produced by a Nd:YAG laser has been studied. The laser pulses with pulse width of 10ns and pulse energy of about 320mJ at 1.06μm wavelength is focused on the aluminium target mounted on a ballistic pendulum, and the air pressure in the chamber changes from 2.8 × 103 to 1.01×105pa. The experimental results show that the impulse coupling coefficient changes as the air pressure and the distance of the target from focus change. The mechanical effects of the plasma shock wave on the target are analysed at different distances from focus and the air pressure.

  4. Effects of hydraulic pressure on the performance of single chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaoan; Liu, Weifeng; Guo, Jian; Sun, Dan; Pan, Bin; Ye, Yaoli; Ding, Weijun; Huang, Haobin; Li, Fujian

    2014-06-15

    Scaling up of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) without losing power density requires a thorough understanding of the effect of hydraulic pressure on MFC performance. In this work, the performance of an activated carbon air-cathode MFC was evaluated under different hydraulic pressures. The MFC under 100 mmH2O hydraulic pressure produced a maximum power density of 1260 ± 24 mW m(-2), while the power density decreased by 24.4% and 44.7% as the hydraulic pressure increased to 500 mmH2O and 2000 mmH2O, respectively. Notably, the performance of both the anode and the cathode had decreased under high hydraulic pressures. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests of the cathode indicated that both charge transfer resistance and diffusion transfer resistance increased with the increase in hydraulic pressure. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA genes demonstrated that the similarity among anodic biofilm communities under different hydraulic pressures was ≥ 90%, and the communities of all MFCs were dominated by Geobacter sp. These results suggested that the reduction in power output of the single chamber air-cathode MFC under high hydraulic pressures can be attributed to water flooding of the cathode and suppression the metabolism of anodic exoelectrogenic bacteria.

  5. Hydrostatic pressure effect on micro air bubbles deposited on surfaces with a retreating tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, So Hung; Wang, Jingming; Yu, Yang; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2014-06-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on 6 μL air bubbles formed on micropillar structured PDMS and silicone surfaces using a 2 mm diameter stainless steel tip retreated at 1 mm/s was investigated. Dimensional analysis of the tip retraction process showed the experiments to be conducted in the condition where fluid inertial forces are comparable in magnitude with surface tension forces, while viscous forces were lower. Larger bubbles could be left behind on the structured PDMS surface. For hydrostatic pressures in excess of 20 mm H2O (196 Pa), the volume of bubble deposited was found to decrease progressively with pressure increase. The differences in width of the deposited bubbles (in contact with the substrate) were significant at any particular pressure but marginal in height. The attainable height before rupture reduced with pressure increase, thereby accounting for the reducing dispensed volume characteristic. On structured PDMS, the gaseous bridge width (in contact with the substrate) was invariant with tip retraction, while on silicone it was initially reducing before becoming invariant in the lead up to rupture. With silicone, hence, reductions in the contact width and height were both responsible for reduced volumes with pressure increase. Increased hydrostatic pressure was also found to restrict the growth in contact width on silicone during the stage when air was injected in through the tip. The ability to effect bubble size in such a simple manner may already be harnessed in nature and suggests possibilities in technological applications.

  6. Effect of microwave frequency on plasma formation in air breakdown at atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵朋程; 郭立新; 李慧敏

    2015-01-01

    Microwave breakdown at atmospheric pressure causes the formation of a discrete plasma structure. The one-dimensional fluid model coupling Maxwell equations with plasma fluid equations is used to study the effect of the mi-crowave frequency on the formation of air plasma. Simulation results show that, the filamentary plasma array propagating toward the microwave source is formed at different microwave frequencies. As the microwave frequency decreases, the ratio of the distance between two adjacent plasma filaments to the corresponding wavelength remains almost unchanged (on the order of 1/4), while the plasma front propagates more slowly due to the increase in the formation time of the new plasma filament.

  7. Air humidity and water pressure effects on the performance of air-cathode microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Yongtae

    2014-02-01

    To better understand how air cathode performance is affected by air humidification, microbial fuel cells were operated under different humidity conditions or water pressure conditions. Maximum power density decreased from 1130 ± 30 mW m-2 with dry air to 980 ± 80 mW m -2 with water-saturated air. When the cathode was exposed to higher water pressures by placing the cathode in a horizontal position, with the cathode oriented so it was on the reactor bottom, power was reduced for both with dry (1030 ± 130 mW m-2) and water-saturated (390 ± 190 mW m-2) air. Decreased performance was partly due to water flooding of the catalyst, which would hinder oxygen diffusion to the catalyst. However, drying used cathodes did not improve performance in electrochemical tests. Soaking the cathode in a weak acid solution, but not deionized water, mostly restored performance (960 ± 60 mW m-2), suggesting that there was salt precipitation in the cathode that was enhanced by higher relative humidity or water pressure. These results showed that cathode performance could be adversely affected by both flooding and the subsequent salt precipitation, and therefore control of air humidity and water pressure may need to be considered for long-term MFC operation. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Air humidity and water pressure effects on the performance of air-cathode microbial fuel cell cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yongtae; Zhang, Fang; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-02-01

    To better understand how air cathode performance is affected by air humidification, microbial fuel cells were operated under different humidity conditions or water pressure conditions. Maximum power density decreased from 1130 ± 30 mW m-2 with dry air to 980 ± 80 mW m-2 with water-saturated air. When the cathode was exposed to higher water pressures by placing the cathode in a horizontal position, with the cathode oriented so it was on the reactor bottom, power was reduced for both with dry (1030 ± 130 mW m-2) and water-saturated (390 ± 190 mW m-2) air. Decreased performance was partly due to water flooding of the catalyst, which would hinder oxygen diffusion to the catalyst. However, drying used cathodes did not improve performance in electrochemical tests. Soaking the cathode in a weak acid solution, but not deionized water, mostly restored performance (960 ± 60 mW m-2), suggesting that there was salt precipitation in the cathode that was enhanced by higher relative humidity or water pressure. These results showed that cathode performance could be adversely affected by both flooding and the subsequent salt precipitation, and therefore control of air humidity and water pressure may need to be considered for long-term MFC operation.

  9. The effect of form pressure on the air void structure of SCC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mikkel Vibæk; Hasholt, Marianne Tange; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2005-01-01

    on the air void structure of hardened, air entrained SCC. The subject was examined through laboratory investigations of SCC with two different amounts of air entrainment. The condition in the form was simulated by using containers making it possible to cure concrete under various pressures corresponding...... structure may be estimated by using Boyle-Mariottes law. However, other conditions such as the form filling method might influence....

  10. The Effects of Air Pressure on Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emissions of Lizards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Pim; Manley, Geoffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Small changes of air pressure outside the eardrum of five lizard species led to changes in frequency, level, and peak width of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAE). In contrast to humans, these changes generally occurred at very small pressures (<20 mbar). As in humans, SOAE amplitudes were gene

  11. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  12. High pressure air spray assistant power supply control strategies and their effects on diesel engine under transient operations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yongqiang; LIU Zhongchang; WANG Zhongshu; ZHU Ruoqun

    2007-01-01

    In order to reduce smoke from direct-injection (DI) turbo-charged and after-cooled (TCA) diesel engines under transient operations,the real-time controlling and measuring system of a high pressure air spray assistant power supply (HPAS) was developed.Effects of HPAS on a DI TCA diesel engine under constant engine speed and increased torque (CSIT) transient operations were studied by using different control strategies.Pre-spray (PS) strategy,which means supplying highly pressurized air into the exhaust manifold two seconds before the accelerating-graph begins to rise and stopping spraying air when the acceleratinggraph stops rising.Two other strategies-full-time-spray(FTS) and middle-time-spray (MTS)-were used to fully exploit HPAS potential.With the FTS and MTS strategies,the HPAS system can remarkably decrease smoke from DI TCA diesel engines under transient operations.

  13. Air pressure effects on sea level changes during the twentieth century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piecuch, Christopher G.; Thompson, Philip R.; Donohue, Kathleen A.

    2016-10-01

    Interpretation of tide gauge data in terms sea level (η) and ocean dynamics requires estimates of air pressure (pa) to determine the ocean's isostatic response—the inverted barometer effect (ηib). Three gridded pa products (HadSLP2, NOAA-20CRv2, and ERA-20C) are used alongside meteorological station pa and tide gauge η records to evaluate the contribution of ηib to η changes over the twentieth century. Agreement between gridded products is better during more recent periods and over regions with good historical data coverage, whereas it is worse for earlier time periods or in ocean areas with poor observational data coverage. Comparison against station data reveals the presence of systematic errors in the gridded products, for example, such that uncertainties estimated through differencing the gridded products underestimate the true errors by roughly 40% on interannual and decadal time scales. Notwithstanding such correlated errors, gridded products are still useful for interpretation of tide gauge data. Removing gridded estimates of ηib from η records reduces spatial variance in centennial trends across tide gauges by 10-30%, formal errors in centennial trends from individual gauges by ˜5%, and the temporal variance in detrended records by 10-15% on average (depending on choice of gridded product). Results here advocate for making the ηib correction to tide gauge records in studies of ocean circulation and global η over long, multidecadal, and centennial time scales using an ensemble mean taken across several gridded ηib products.

  14. Effect of non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment on gingival wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-02-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have been applied in the biomedical field for the improvement of various cellular activities. In dentistry, the healing of gingival soft tissue plays an important role in health and aesthetic outcomes. While the biomedical application of plasma has been thoroughly studied in dentistry, a detailed investigation of plasma-mediated human gingival fibroblast (HGF) migration for wound healing and its underlying biological mechanism is still pending. Therefore, the aim of this study is to apply a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAAPPJ) to HGF to measure the migration and to reveal the underlying biological mechanisms involved in the migration. After the characterization of NTAAPPJ by optical emission spectroscopy, the adherent HGF was treated with NTAAPPJ or air with a different flow rate. Cell viability, lipid peroxidation, migration, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the expression of migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK3) were investigated. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. NTAAPPJ and air treatment with a flow rate of 250-1000 standard cubic centimetres per minute (sccm) for up to 30 s did not induce significant decreases in cell viability or membrane damage. A significant increase in the migration of mitomycin C-treated HGF was observed after 30 s of NTAAPPJ treatment compared to 30 s air-only treatment, which was induced by high levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). An increase in migration-related gene expression and EGFR activation was observed following NTAAPPJ treatment in an air flow rate-dependent manner. This is the first report that NTAAPPJ treatment induces an increase in HGF migration without changing cell viability or causing membrane damage. HGF migration was related to an increase in intracellular ROS, changes in the expression of three of the migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK1), and EGFR activation. Therefore

  15. Effects of surface pressure on the properties of Langmuir monolayers and interfacial water at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei; Clark, Anthony J; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-02-24

    The effects of surface pressure on the physical properties of Langmuir monolayers of palmitic acid (PA) and dipalmitoylphosphatidic acid (DPPA) at the air/water interface are investigated through molecular dynamics simulations with atomistic force fields. The structure and dynamics of both monolayers and interfacial water are compared across the range of surface pressures at which stable monolayers can form. For PA monolayers at T = 300 K, the untilted condensed phase with a hexagonal lattice structure is found at high surface pressure, while the uniformly tilted condensed phase with a centered rectangular lattice structure is observed at low surface pressure, in agreement with the available experimental data. A state with uniform chain tilt but no periodic spatial ordering is observed for DPPA monolayers on a Na(+)/water subphase at both high and low surface pressures. The hydrophobic acyl chains of both monolayers pack efficiently at all surface pressures, resulting in a very small number of gauche defects. The analysis of the hydrogen-bonding structure/dynamics at the monolayer/water interface indicates that water molecules hydrogen-bonded to the DPPA head groups reorient more slowly than those hydrogen-bonded to the PA head groups, with the orientational dynamics becoming significantly slower at high surface pressure. Possible implications for physicochemical processes taking place on marine aerosols in the atmosphere are discussed.

  16. Inhibitory effect of silver nanoparticles mediated by atmospheric pressure air cold plasma jet against dermatophyte fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouf, Salama A; El-Adly, Amira A; Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam H

    2015-10-01

    In an in vitro study with five clinical isolates of dermatophytes, the MIC(50) and MIC(100) values of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) ranged from 5 to 16 and from 15 to 32 μg ml(- 1), respectively. The combined treatment of AgNPs with atmospheric pressure-air cold plasma (APACP) induced a drop in the MIC(50) and MIC100 values of AgNPs reaching 3-11 and 12-23 μg ml(- 1), respectively, according to the examined species. Epidermophyton floccosum was the most sensitive fungus to AgNPs, while Trichophyton rubrum was the most tolerant. AgNPs induced significant reduction in keratinase activity and an increase in the mycelium permeability that was greater when applied combined with plasma treatment. Scanning electron microscopy showed electroporation of the cell walls and the accumulation of AgNPs on the cell wall and inside the cells, particularly when AgNPs were combined with APACP treatment. An in vivo experiment with dermatophyte-inoculated guinea pigs indicated that the application of AgNPs combined with APACP was more efficacious in healing and suppressing disease symptoms of skin as compared with the application of AgNPs alone. The recovery from the infection reached 91.7 % in the case of Microsporum canis-inoculated guinea pigs treated with 13 μg ml(- 1) AgNPs combined with APACP treatment delivered for 2  min. The emission spectra indicated that the efficacy of APACP was mainly due to generation of NO radicals and excited nitrogen molecules. These reactive species interact and block the activity of the fungal spores in vitro and in the skin lesions of the guinea pigs. The results achieved are promising compared with fluconazole as reference antifungal drug.

  17. Effect of inlet-air humidity, temperature, pressure, and reference Mach number on the formation of oxides of nitrogen in a gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionna, N. R.; Diehl, L. A.; Trout, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the effect of inlet air humidity on the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from a gas turbine combustor. Combustor inlet air temperature ranged from 506 K (450 F) to 838 K (1050 F). The tests were primarily run at a constant pressure of 6 atmospheres and reference Mach number of 0.065. The NOx emission index was found to decrease with increasing inlet air humidity at a constant exponential rate: NOx = NOx0e-19H (where H is the humidity and the subscript 0 denotes the value at zero humidity). the emission index increased exponentially with increasing normalized inlet air temperature to the 1.14 power. Additional tests made to determine the effect of pressure and reference Mach number on NOx showed that the NOx emission index varies directly with pressure to the 0.5 power and inversely with reference Mach number.

  18. Pilot Study of the Effects of Simulated Turbine Passage Pressure on Juvenile Chinook Salmon Acclimated with Access to Air at Absolute Pressures Greater than Atmospheric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Abernethy, Cary S.

    2005-04-28

    The impacts of pressure on juvenile salmon who pass through the turbines of hydroelectric dams while migrating downstream on the Columbia and Snake rivers has not been well understood, especially as these impacts relate to injury to the fish's swim bladder. The laboratory studies described here were conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District at PNNL's fisheries research laboratories in 2004 to investigate the impacts of simulated turbine passage pressure on fish permitted to achieve neutral buoyancy at pressures corresponding to depths at which they are typically observed during downstream migration. Two sizes of juvenile Chinook salmon were tested, 80-100mm and 125-145mm total length. Test fish were acclimated for 22 to 24 hours in hyperbaric chambers at pressures simulating depths of 15, 30, or 60 ft, with access to a large air bubble. High rates of deflated swim bladders and mortality were observed. Our results while in conclusive show that juvenile salmon are capable of drawing additional air into their swimbladder to compensate for the excess mass of implanted telemetry devices. However they may pay a price in terms of increased susceptibility to injury, predation, and death for this additional air.

  19. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles. [for combustion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  20. Numerical Analysis on the Influence of Thermal Effects on Oil Flow Characteristic in High-Pressure Air Injection (HPAI Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous laboratory study, we have shown the thermal behavior of Keke Ya light crude oil (Tarim oilfield, branch of CNPC for high-pressure air injection (HPAI application potential study. To clarify the influences of thermal effects on oil production, in this paper, we derived a mathematical model for calculating oil flow rate, which is based on the heat conduction property in porous media from the combustion tube experiment. Based on remarkably limited knowledge consisting of very global balance arguments and disregarding all the details of the mechanisms in the reaction zone, the local governing equations are formulated in a dimensionless form. We use finite difference method to solve this model and address the study by way of qualitative analysis. The time-space dimensionless oil flow rate (qD profiles are established for comprehensive studies on the oil flow rate characteristic affected by thermal effects. It also discusses how these findings will impact HPAI project performances, and several guidelines are suggested.

  1. Simulation of subnanosecond streamers in atmospheric-pressure air: Effects of polarity of applied voltage pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeva, N. Yu.; Naidis, G. V.

    2016-08-01

    Results of simulation of subnanosecond streamer propagation in corona gap configuration, obtained in the framework of 2D fluid model, are presented. Effects related with the polarity of a voltage pulse applied to the stressed electrode are discussed. It is argued that these effects (dependence of the discharge current and propagation velocity on the polarity of applied voltage) observed in experiments can be attributed to the difference in initial (preceding the streamer formation) distributions of charged species inside the gap. This difference can be caused by preionization (at negative polarity) of the gas inside the discharge gap by runaway electrons. Calculated streamers have large widths (up to 1 cm) and move with velocities in the range of 109-1010 cm s-1, similar to experimental data.

  2. Modelling of heat and mass transfer in a granular medium during high-temperature air drying. Effect of the internal gas pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othmani, Hammouda; Hassini, Lamine; Lamloumi, Raja; El Cafsi, Mohamed Afif

    2016-02-01

    A comprehensive internal heat and water transfer model including the gas pressure effect has been proposed in order to improve the industrial high-temperature air drying of inserts made of agglomerated sand. In this model, the internal gas phase pressure effect was made perfectly explicit, by considering the liquid and vapour transfer by filtration and the liquid expulsion at the surface. Wet sand enclosed in a tight cylindrical glass bottle dried convectively at a high temperature was chosen as an application case. The model was validated on the basis of the experimental average water content and core temperature curves for drying trials at different operating conditions. The simulations of the spatio-temporal distribution of internal gas pressure were performed and interpreted in terms of product potential damage. Based on a compromise between the drying time and the pressure increase, a simple drying cycle was implemented in order to optimize the drying process.

  3. Experimental investigation of air pressure affecting filtration performance of fibrous filter sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Yu, Xiao; Wu, Ya; Lin, Zhongping

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the effect of air pressure on their filtration performance is important for assessing the effectiveness of fibrous filters under different practical circumstances. The effectiveness of three classes of air filter sheets were investigated in laboratory-based measurements at a wide range of air pressures (60-130 KPa). The filtration efficiency was found most sensitive to the air pressure change at smaller particle sizes. As the air pressure increased from 60 to 130 KPa, significant decrease in filtration efficiency (up to 15%) and increase in pressure drop (up to 90 Pa) were observed. The filtration efficiency of the filter sheet with largest fiber diameter and smallest solid volume fraction was affected most, while the pressure drop of the filter sheet with smallest fiber diameter and largest solid volume fraction was affected most. The effect of air pressure on the filtration efficiency was slightly larger at greater filter face air velocity. However, the effect of air pressure on the pressure drop was negligible. The filtration efficiency and pressure drop were explicitly expressed as functions of the air pressure. Two coefficients were empirically derived and successfully accounted for the effects of air pressure on filtration efficiency and pressure drop.

  4. Effect of Initial Moisture Content on the in-Vessel Composting Under Air Pressure of Organic Fraction of MunicipalSolid Waste in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhadi Makan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of initial moisture content on the in-vessel composting under air pressure of organic fraction of municipal solid waste in Morocco in terms of internal temperature, produced gases quantity, organic matter conversion rate, and the quality of the final composts.For this purpose, in-vessel bioreactor was designed and used to evaluate both appropriate initial air pressure and appropriate initial moisture content for the composting process. Moreover, 5 experiments were carried out within initial moisture content of 55%, 65%, 70%, 75% and 85%. The initial air pressure and the initial moisture content of the mixture showed a significant effect on the aerobic composting. The experimental results demonstrated that for composting organic waste, relatively high moisture contents are better at achieving higher temperatures and retaining them for longer times.This study suggested that an initial moisture content of around 75%, under 0.6 bar, can be considered as being suitable for efficient composting of organic fraction of municipal solid waste. These last conditions, allowed maximum value of temperature and final composting product with good physicochemical properties as well as higher organic matter degradation and higher gas production. Moreover, final compost obtained showed good maturity levels and can be used for agricultural applications.

  5. Effects of Atmospheric-Pressure N2, He, Air, and O2 Microplasmas on Mung Bean Seed Germination and Seedling Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhang, Xianhui; Zhuang, Jinxing; Yang, Size; Bazaka, Kateryna; (Ken) Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure N2, He, air, and O2 microplasma arrays have been used to investigate the effects of plasma treatment on seed germination and seedling growth of mung bean in aqueous solution. Seed germination and growth of mung bean were found to strongly depend on the feed gases used to generate plasma and plasma treatment time. Compared to the treatment with atmospheric-pressure O2, N2 and He microplasma arrays, treatment with air microplasma arrays was shown to be more efficient in improving both the seed germination rate and seedling growth, the effect attributed to solution acidification and interactions with plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Acidic environment caused by air discharge in water may promote leathering of seed chaps, thus enhancing the germination rate of mung bean, and stimulating the growth of hypocotyl and radicle. The interactions between plasma-generated reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitrogen compounds, and seeds led to a significant acceleration of seed germination and an increase in seedling length of mung bean. Electrolyte leakage rate of mung bean seeds soaked in solution activated using air microplasma was the lowest, while the catalase activity of thus-treated mung bean seeds was the highest compared to other types of microplasma. PMID:27584560

  6. Effects of Atmospheric-Pressure N2, He, Air, and O2 Microplasmas on Mung Bean Seed Germination and Seedling Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhang, Xianhui; Zhuang, Jinxing; Yang, Size; Bazaka, Kateryna; (Ken) Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric-pressure N2, He, air, and O2 microplasma arrays have been used to investigate the effects of plasma treatment on seed germination and seedling growth of mung bean in aqueous solution. Seed germination and growth of mung bean were found to strongly depend on the feed gases used to generate plasma and plasma treatment time. Compared to the treatment with atmospheric-pressure O2, N2 and He microplasma arrays, treatment with air microplasma arrays was shown to be more efficient in improving both the seed germination rate and seedling growth, the effect attributed to solution acidification and interactions with plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Acidic environment caused by air discharge in water may promote leathering of seed chaps, thus enhancing the germination rate of mung bean, and stimulating the growth of hypocotyl and radicle. The interactions between plasma-generated reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitrogen compounds, and seeds led to a significant acceleration of seed germination and an increase in seedling length of mung bean. Electrolyte leakage rate of mung bean seeds soaked in solution activated using air microplasma was the lowest, while the catalase activity of thus-treated mung bean seeds was the highest compared to other types of microplasma.

  7. IceBridge Paroscientific L0 Pressure Altimeter Raw Air Pressure

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge Paroscientific L0 Pressure Altimeter Raw Air Pressure (IAPRS0) data set contains air pressure readings taken over Antarctica using the...

  8. Effects of Atmospheric Pressure Air Plasma Pretreatment on the Seed Germination and Early Growth of Andrographis paniculata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jiayun; He, Rui; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhan, Ruoting; Chen, Weiwen; Yang, Size

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate whether air plasma can change the seed germination characteristics, seedling emergence, as well as biochemical reactivity, in Andrographis paniculata (A. paniculata) seedlings by modifying the seed coat and finding a beneficial treatment dose. Eight treatment doses and one control were used to conduct electrical conductivity determination, a germination test, a seedling emergence test and a biochemical assay. The results showed that after being treated with air plasma excited at 5950 V for 10 s, the permeability of the seeds was improved significantly, resulting in the acceleration of seed germination and seedling emergence. In the meantime, the catalase activity and catalase isoenzyme expression were also improved, while the malondialdehyde content in the seedlings was decreased (which means greater counteraction with environmental stress). After being treated with 4250 V for 10 s and 5950 V for 20 s, the seed germination was enhanced, but without an obvious change in seedling emergence. However, after treatment with 3400 V for 20 s and 5100 V for 10 s, the permeability of the seeds was decreased, resulting in a delay in seedling emergence. These results indicate that air plasma can change the physiological and biochemical characteristics of Andrographis paniculata seeds by modifying the seed coat, combined with the effects of the active plasma species, and that different treating doses have different effects.

  9. Predicted thermal superluminescence in low-pressure air

    CERN Document Server

    Aramyan, A R; Galechyan, G A; Mangasaryan, N R; Nersisyan, H B

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that due to the dissociation of the molecular oxygen it is possible to obtain inverted population in low pressure air by heating. As a result of the quenching of the corresponding levels of the atomic oxygen the thermal superluminescent radiation is generated. It has been found that the threshold of the overpopulation is exceeded at the air temperature 2300-3000 K. Using this effect a possible mechanism for the generation of the flashes of the radiation in air observed on the airframe of the space shuttle during its descent and reentry in the atmosphere is suggested.

  10. Intraoral air pressure and oral air flow under different bleed and bite-block conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, A H; Shelton, R L; Kastner, C U

    1986-03-01

    Intraoral pressures and oral flows were measured as normal talkers produced /p lambda/ and /si/ under experimental conditions that perturbed the usual aeromechanical production characteristics of the consonants. A translabial pressure-release device was used to bleed off intraoral pressure during /p/. Bite-blocks were used to open the anterior bite artificially during /s/. For /p/, intraoral pressure decreased and translabial air leakage increased as bleed orifice area increased. For /s/, flow increased as the area of sibilant constriction increased, but differential pressure across the /s/ oral constriction did not vary systematically with changes in its area. Flow on postconsonantal vowels /lambda/ and /i/ did not vary systematically across experimental conditions. The data imply that maintenance of perturbed intraoral pressure was more effective when compensatory options included opportunity for increased respiratory drive and structural adjustments at the place of consonant articulation rather than increased respiratory drive alone.

  11. Noncontact Monitoring of Respiration by Dynamic Air-Pressure Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, Tohru; Asada, Tetsunosuke; Sumi, Yoshihisa; Higuchi, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that a dynamic air-pressure sensor system allows respiratory status to be visually monitored for patients in minimally clothed condition. The dynamic air-pressure sensor measures vital information using changes in air pressure. To utilize this device in the field, we must clarify the influence of clothing conditions on measurement. The present study evaluated use of the dynamic air-pressure sensor system as a respiratory monitor that can reliably detect change in breathing patterns irrespective of clothing. Twelve healthy volunteers reclined on a dental chair positioned horizontally with the sensor pad for measuring air-pressure signals corresponding to respiration placed on the seat back of the dental chair in the central lumbar region. Respiratory measurements were taken under 2 conditions: (a) thinly clothed (subject lying directly on the sensor pad); and (b) thickly clothed (subject lying on the sensor pad covered with a pressure-reducing sheet). Air-pressure signals were recorded and time integration values for air pressure during each expiration were calculated. This information was compared with expiratory tidal volume measured simultaneously by a respirometer connected to the subject via face mask. The dynamic air-pressure sensor was able to receive the signal corresponding to respiration regardless of clothing conditions. A strong correlation was identified between expiratory tidal volume and time integration values for air pressure during each expiration for all subjects under both clothing conditions (0.840-0.988 for the thinly clothed condition and 0.867-0.992 for the thickly clothed condition). These results show that the dynamic air-pressure sensor is useful for monitoring respiratory physiology irrespective of clothing.

  12. Prenatal air pollution exposure and newborn blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossem, Lenie; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.; Melly, Steven J.; Kloog, Itai; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike; Zanobetti, Antonella; Coull, Brent A.; Schwartz, Joel D.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Oken, Emily; Gillman, Matthew W.; Koutrakis, Petros; Gold, Diane R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Air pollution exposure has been associated with increased blood pressure in adults. oBjective: We examined associations of antenatal exposure to ambient air pollution with newborn systolic blood pressure (SBP). Methods: We studied 1,131 mother–infant pairs in a Boston, Massachusetts, are

  13. Growth and β-galactosidase activity in cultures of Kluyveromyces marxianus under increased air pressure

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the effect of total air pressure raise on cell growth and intracellular β-galactosidase activity in batch cultures of Kluyveromyces marxianus CBS 7894. Methods and Results: A pressurized bioreactor was used for K. marxianus batch cultivation under increased air pressure from 1.2 to 6 bar. Under these conditions no inhibition of cell growth was observed. Moreover, the improvement of the oxygen transfer rate (OTR) from the gas to the culture medium by pressuriza...

  14. Behavior of a horizontal air curtain subjected to a vertical pressure gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, James; Phelps, LeEllen

    2012-09-01

    We present the details on an experiment to investigate the behavior of an air curtain that is subjected to a transverse pressure gradient. The setup simulates the conditions that will be present in the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST), a 4-meter solar observatory that will be built on Haleakala, Hawaii. A test rig was built to replicate the region at which the optical path crosses a temperature and pressure boundary between the telescope mount region, which is at the ambient temperature and pressure, and a warmer, pressurized lab space directly below. Use of an air curtain in place of an optically-transmitting window at the interface would allow science observations at a wider range of scientific wavelengths. With the air curtain exhibiting transitional flow behavior across the boundary, and applied pressure gradients of up to 6.5 Pa, we found that the air curtain was able to hold a pressure gradient of 0.25 Pa. As the applied pressure was increased, transient turbulent regions formed at the interface, and predictable flow behavior only occurred in the region closest to the air curtain blower. Computer modeling is used to validate the test data, identify laminar regions of the air curtain where minimal image distortion would occur, and explore the relationship between the applied pressure, effective pressure difference, and air curtain profile.

  15. The back-diffusion effect of air on the discharge characteristics of atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency glow discharges using bare metal electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen-Ting; Liang, Tian-Ran; Wang, Hua-Bo; Li, He-Ping; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2007-05-01

    Radio-frequency (RF), atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas using bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, deposition, surface treatment, disinfection, sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics, including the breakdown voltage and the discharge voltage for sustaining a stable and uniform α mode discharge of the RF APGD plasmas are presented. The experiments are conducted by placing the home-made planar-type plasma generator in ambient and in a vacuum chamber, respectively, with helium as the primary plasma-forming gas. When the discharge processes occur in ambient, particularly for the lower plasma-working gas flow rates, the experimental measurements show that it is the back-diffusion effect of air in atmosphere, instead of the flow rate of the gas, that results in the obvious decrease in the breakdown voltage with increasing plasma-working gas flow rate. Further studies on the discharge characteristics, e.g. the luminous structures, the concentrations and distributions of chemically active species in plasmas, with different plasma-working gases or gas mixtures need to be conducted in future work.

  16. The back-diffusion effect of air on the discharge characteristics of atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency glow discharges using bare metal electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Wenting; Liang Tianran; Wang Huabo; Li Heping; Bao Chengyu [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2007-05-15

    Radio-frequency (RF), atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas using bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, deposition, surface treatment, disinfection, sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics, including the breakdown voltage and the discharge voltage for sustaining a stable and uniform {alpha} mode discharge of the RF APGD plasmas are presented. The experiments are conducted by placing the home-made planar-type plasma generator in ambient and in a vacuum chamber, respectively, with helium as the primary plasma-forming gas. When the discharge processes occur in ambient, particularly for the lower plasma-working gas flow rates, the experimental measurements show that it is the back-diffusion effect of air in atmosphere, instead of the flow rate of the gas, that results in the obvious decrease in the breakdown voltage with increasing plasma-working gas flow rate. Further studies on the discharge characteristics, e.g. the luminous structures, the concentrations and distributions of chemically active species in plasmas, with different plasma-working gases or gas mixtures need to be conducted in future work.

  17. Working of spontaneously combustible coal seams with automatic air pressure regulation in the excavation field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golik, A.S.; Churikov, Yu.V.; Troyan, N.P.

    1980-01-01

    A demonstration is made of the effectiveness of using an automatic air pressure control system during the working of spontaneously combustible coal seams in order to control endogenic fires and gas. 2 figures.

  18. Measuring air pressure with a polymeric gas sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana R. Cordeiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this communication we describe the application of a conductive polymer gas sensor as an air pressure sensor. The device consists of a thin doped poly(4'-hexyloxy-2,5-biphenylene ethylene (PHBPE film deposited on an interdigitated metallic electrode. The sensor is cheap, easy to fabricate, lasts for several months, and is suitable for measuring air pressures in the range between 100 and 700 mmHg.

  19. Pressure Effect on Entrance Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Horslund; Couch, Mark

    1997-01-01

    The paper reports on experimentally determined pressure drops associated with orifice and capillary dies, where the exit pressure is elevated. The effect of hydrostatic pressure up to 70 MPa is reported for PS, LDPE and PP melts.......The paper reports on experimentally determined pressure drops associated with orifice and capillary dies, where the exit pressure is elevated. The effect of hydrostatic pressure up to 70 MPa is reported for PS, LDPE and PP melts....

  20. ICU intensive care unit application effect analysis of air-cushion pressure ulcers prevention%ICU重症监护病房应用防压疮气垫的效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵雪梅

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨ICU重症监护病房应用防压疮气垫的护理效果。方法:将我院重症监护室发生压疮的高危患者40例随机分为观察组和对照组各20例,观察组给予防压疮气垫护理,对照组未采用防压疮气垫防护措施,比较两组的压疮发生率。结果:对照组患者的压疮发生率显著高于观察组,两组比较,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:防压疮气垫能显著降低患者的压疮发生率,是ICU防治高危压疮的有效措施之一。%Objective:To discuss the ICU intensive care unit using the nursing effect of preventing pressure ulcers mattress. Methods:to the intensive care unit 40 patients with higher risk of pressure ulcers were randomly divided into observation group and control group 20 cases, observation group was given care in the air-cushion pressure ulcers, adopt protective measures preventing pressure ulcers air cushion, the control group to compare two groups the incidence of pressure ulcers. Results:the observation group is significantly higher than the control group, the incidence of pressure ulcers in patients with two groups of comparison, the difference statistically significant(P<0.05). Conclusion:for patients with pressure ulcers prevention air cushion bed can significantly reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers, ICU is one of the effective measures of prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in high-risk patients.

  1. Experimental Study on Coal-Breaking Pressure for Compressed Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on lab model experiments and through the limit analysis, the theoretical formula of calculauoncoal-breaking pressure with compressed air was derived. The experimental result shows that blasting pressure mustexceed 84.0 MPa to break coal with compressive strength of 13.2 MPa. The research provides an important theoretical basis for the design of airshooting mining and industrial tests.

  2. Heart-rate monitoring by air pressure and causal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Naoki; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Hata, Yutaka

    2011-06-01

    Among lots of vital signals, heart-rate (HR) is an important index for diagnose human's health condition. For instance, HR provides an early stage of cardiac disease, autonomic nerve behavior, and so forth. However, currently, HR is measured only in medical checkups and clinical diagnosis during the rested state by using electrocardiograph (ECG). Thus, some serious cardiac events in daily life could be lost. Therefore, a continuous HR monitoring during 24 hours is desired. Considering the use in daily life, the monitoring should be noninvasive and low intrusive. Thus, in this paper, an HR monitoring in sleep by using air pressure sensors is proposed. The HR monitoring is realized by employing the causal analysis among air pressure and HR. The causality is described by employing fuzzy logic. According to the experiment on 7 males at age 22-25 (23 on average), the correlation coefficient against ECG is 0.73-0.97 (0.85 on average). In addition, the cause-effect structure for HR monitoring is arranged by employing causal decomposition, and the arranged causality is applied to HR monitoring in a setting posture. According to the additional experiment on 6 males, the correlation coefficient is 0.66-0.86 (0.76 on average). Therefore, the proposed method is suggested to have enough accuracy and robustness for some daily use cases.

  3. Dirty Air, High Blood Pressure Linked

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    应树道

    2001-01-01

    贵刊去年第6期曾刊登一短文,题目是:盐,迫升血压之元凶。读了该文,我开始严格控制每日的食盐摄入量,再附以药物治疗,血压果然趋于平稳。近日上网,遇一奇文,意思是人的血压与空气污染状况有涉!根据对2600个成年人的调查,得出了这样的结论:Pollution may cause changes in the part of the nervous system that controls blood pressure.文章又同时说明:Exactly how pollution might cause blood pressure to climb remains unclear.人体之奥妙由此可见一斑。

  4. Inverse association between air pressure and rheumatoid arthritis synovitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikashi Terao

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a bone destructive autoimmune disease. Many patients with RA recognize fluctuations of their joint synovitis according to changes of air pressure, but the correlations between them have never been addressed in large-scale association studies. To address this point we recruited large-scale assessments of RA activity in a Japanese population, and performed an association analysis. Here, a total of 23,064 assessments of RA activity from 2,131 patients were obtained from the KURAMA (Kyoto University Rheumatoid Arthritis Management Alliance database. Detailed correlations between air pressure and joint swelling or tenderness were analyzed separately for each of the 326 patients with more than 20 assessments to regulate intra-patient correlations. Association studies were also performed for seven consecutive days to identify the strongest correlations. Standardized multiple linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate independent influences from other meteorological factors. As a result, components of composite measures for RA disease activity revealed suggestive negative associations with air pressure. The 326 patients displayed significant negative mean correlations between air pressure and swellings or the sum of swellings and tenderness (p = 0.00068 and 0.00011, respectively. Among the seven consecutive days, the most significant mean negative correlations were observed for air pressure three days before evaluations of RA synovitis (p = 1.7 × 10(-7, 0.00027, and 8.3 × 10(-8, for swellings, tenderness and the sum of them, respectively. Standardized multiple linear regression analysis revealed these associations were independent from humidity and temperature. Our findings suggest that air pressure is inversely associated with synovitis in patients with RA.

  5. Tongue-Palate Contact Pressure, Oral Air Pressure, and Acoustics of Clear Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searl, Jeff; Evitts, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared articulatory contact pressure (ACP), oral air pressure (Po), and speech acoustics for conversational versus clear speech. They also assessed the relationship of these measures to listener perception. Method: Twelve adults with normal speech produced monosyllables in a phrase using conversational and clear speech.…

  6. Horizontal high-pressure air injection well construction and operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hume, J. [Continental Resources Inc., ND (United States)

    2005-07-01

    This paper discussed the design and operational challenges of a horizontal high-pressure air injection well currently in use at the Cedar Hill Red River B field in North Dakota. The field was developed in 1994, using horizontal wells oriented from the northeast to the southwest corners of each section on 640 acre spacing. In March of 2001, the field was unitized resulting in a horizontal waterflood project and a 320 acre horizontal high pressure air injection project. Extreme temperatures and pressures occurring in the reservoir from the combustion processes associated with high pressure air injection have resulted in several challenges. Reservoir and fluid properties of the field were presented, as well as a type log. Details of the Buffalo and Cedar Hills field were also provided, with a comparison of horizontal and vertical patterns. A light oil displacement process was reviewed, with details of tubing leak corrosion, packer seal and detonation failures. Burn front exposure to casing was discussed, and a wellbore diagram was provided. Various horizontal conversions were discussed. A description of the Cedar Hills Compressor Station and compression trains was provided. It was concluded that knowledge gained from 25 years of vertical high pressure air injection experience has been successfully incorporated to create a safe and durable design. 1 tab., 16 figs.

  7. RHELP (Regenerative High Efficiency Low Pressure) Air Purification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-18

    4 (3), 269. 10. Allen, M. D. and Raabe, O. G., "Re-evaluation of millikan’s oil drop data for the motion of small particles in air," Journal of...rigorous physical filtration testing for collection efficiency, pressure drop , most penetrating particle size, and microwave sensitivity, among other...increased quality factor. More importantly, the synthesized filters were found to exceed military standards for HEPA filter with lower pressure drop . This

  8. Maximum Pressure Evaluation during Expulsion of Entrapped Air from Pressurized Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Maria Bucur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressurized pipeline systems may have a wide operating regime. This paper presents the experimental analysis of the transient flow in a horizontal pipe containing an air pocket, which allows the ventilation of the air after the pressurization of the hydraulic system, through an orifice placed at the downstream end. The measurements are made on a laboratory set-up, for different supply pressures and various geometries of water column length, air pocket and expulsion orifice diameter. Dimensional analysis is carried out in order to determine a relation between the parameters influencing the maximum pressure value. A two equations model is obtained and a criterion is established for their use. The equations are validated with experimental data from the present laboratory set-up and with other data available in the literature. The results presented as non-dimensional quantities variations show a good agreement with the previous experimental and analytical researches.

  9. Cold atmospheric-pressure air plasma treatment of C6 glioma cells: effects of reactive oxygen species in the medium produced by the plasma on cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuyang, Wang; Cheng, Cheng; Peng, Gao; Shaopeng, Li; Jie, Shen; Yan, Lan; Yongqiang, Yu; Paul, K. Chu

    2017-02-01

    An atmospheric-pressure air plasma is employed to treat C6 glioma cells in vitro. To elucidate on the mechanism causing cell death and role of reactive species (RS) in the medium produced by the plasma, the concentration of the long-lived RS such as hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and ozone in the plasma-treated liquid (phosphate-buffered saline solution) is measured. When vitamin C is added to the medium as a ROS quencher, the viability of C6 glioma cells after the plasma treatment is different from that without vitamin C. The results demonstrate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2, and O3 constitute the main factors for inactivation of C6 glioma cells and the reactive nitrogen species (RNS) may only play an auxiliary role in cell death.

  10. Pressure Effect on Extensional Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Horslund; Kjær, Erik Michael

    1999-01-01

    The primary object of these experiments was to investigate the influence of hydrostatic pressure on entrance flow. The effect of pressure on shear and extensional viscosity was evaluated using an axis symmetric capillary and a slit die where the hydrostatic pressure was raised with valves...

  11. The Jar Magic--Instructional Activities for Teaching Air Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Bing-Hong; Chen, Chyong-Sun

    2013-01-01

    There are a variety of impressive activities designed for teaching the concept of air pressure to junior high school students. Water, glasses, balloons, plastic bottles, and suction cups are some of the items commonly used in these experiments. For example, if we take a glass of water, cover it with a piece of cardboard, and invert the glass,…

  12. Pneumomediastinum following high pressure air injection to the hand.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, J

    2012-02-01

    We present the case of a patient who developed pneumomediastinum after high pressure air injection to the hand. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of pneumomediastinum where the gas injection site was the thenar eminence. Fortunately the patient recovered with conservative management.

  13. Pneumomediastinum following high pressure air injection to the hand.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, J

    2010-04-01

    We present the case of a patient who developed pneumomediastinum after high pressure air injection to the hand. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of pneumomediastinum where the gas injection site was the thenar eminence. Fortunately the patient recovered with conservative management.

  14. Traffic-related air pollution and noise and children's blood pressure : Results from the PIAMA birth cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilenko, Natalya; Van Rossem, Lenie; Brunekreef, Bert; Beelen, Rob; Eeftens, Marloes; Hoek, Gerard; Houthuijs, Danny; De Jongste, Johan C.; Van Kempen, Elise; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Meliefste, Kees; Oldenwening, Marieke; Smit, Henriette A.; Wijga, Alet H.; Gehring, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Elevation of a child's blood pressure may cause possible health risks in later life. There is evidence for adverse effects of exposure to air pollution and noise on blood pressure in adults. Little is known about these associations in children. We investigated the associations of air pollution

  15. Traffic-related air pollution and noise and children's blood pressure : Results from the PIAMA birth cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilenko, Natalya; van Rossem, Lenie; Brunekreef, Bert; Beelen, Rob; Eeftens, Marloes; Hoek, Gerard; Houthuijs, Danny; de Jongste, Johan C.; van Kempen, Elise; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Meliefste, Kees; Oldenwening, Marieke; Smit, Henriette A.; Wijga, Alet H.; Gehring, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Aims Elevation of a child's blood pressure may cause possible health risks in later life. There is evidence for adverse effects of exposure to air pollution and noise on blood pressure in adults. Little is known about these associations in children. We investigated the associations of air pollution

  16. The discharge of fine silica sand in a silo under different ambient air pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiau, Shu-San; Liao, Chun-Chung; Lee, Jie-Hsien

    2012-04-01

    Silos are widely used for the industrial scale handling and transportation of powdered and granular materials. The process of discharging powder in a silo involves the flow of both solid particles and an interstitial fluid, usually air. In this study, we experimentally investigate the effects of particle size and ambient pressure on the discharge process in open- and closed-top silos. The discharge rate, pressure drop, and pressure recovery rate are measured and discussed. The results show that the particle size, the diameter of the orifice, and the ambient pressure significantly influence the process of discharge. The effect of air flow is stronger on fine-powdered flow in a closed-top silo. The results indicate that the effects of air flow could be reduced by lowering the ambient pressure. In addition, a normalized critical pressure can be defined beyond which the discharge rate increases dramatically. With reduced ambient pressure, this normalized critical pressure decreases with increasing particle size. Finally, the experimental results are compared with results calculated using the Beverloo equation and Darcy's law.

  17. An experimental study of geyser-like flows induced by a pressurized air pocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elayeb, I. S.; Leon, A.; Choi, Y.; Alnahit, A. O.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies argues that the entrapment of pressurized air pockets within combined sewer systems can produce geyser flows, which is an oscillating jetting of a mixture of gas-liquid flows. To verify that pressurized air pockets can effectively produce geysers, laboratory experiments were conducted. However, past experiments were conducted in relatively small-scale apparatus (i.e. maximum φ2" vertical shaft). This study conducted a set of experiments in a larger apparatus. The experimental setup consists of an upstream head tank, a downstream head tank, a horizontal pipe (46.5ft long, φ6") and a vertical pipe (10ft long, φ6"). The initial condition for the experiments is constant flow discharge through the horizontal pipe. The experiments are initiated by injecting an air pocket with pre-determined volume and pressure at the upstream end of the horizontal pipe. The air pocket propagates through the horizontal pipe until it arrives to the vertical shaft, where it is released producing a geyser-like flow. Three flow rates in the horizontal pipe and three injected air pressures were tested. The variables measured were pressure at two locations in the horizontal pipe and two locations in the vertical pipe. High resolution videos at two regions in the vertical shaft were also recorded. To gain further insights in the physics of air-water interaction, the laboratory experiments were complemented with numerical simulations conducted using a commercial 3D CFD model, previously validated with experiments.

  18. EFFECTS OF ENTRAINED AIR MANNER ON CAVITATION DAMAGE*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jian-hua; LUO Chao

    2011-01-01

    Early in 1953 the experiments by Peterka proved that air entrainment has effects on decreasing cavitation damage. This technology has been widely used in the release works of high dams since the inception of air entrainment in the Grand Goulee Dam in 1960. Behavior, mechanism and application of air entrainment for cavitation damage control have been investigated for over half century. However, severe cavitation damage happened due to complex mechanism of air entrainment. The effects of air entrainment are related to many factors, including geometric parameters, hydraulic parameters and entrained air manners. In the present work an experimental set-up for air entrainment was specially designed, the behavior of reducing cavitation damage was experimentally investigated in the three aspects of entrained air pressure, air tube aera and air tube number. The results show that magnitude of reduction of cavitation damage is closely related to the entrained air tube number as well as entrained air pressure, air tube aera, and that the effect through three air tubes is larger than that through single air tube although the entrained air tubes have the same sum of tube aera, that is, 1 + 1 + 1 > 3. Therefore, it is important to design an effective manner of air entrainment.

  19. One-Component Pressure-Temperature Phase Diagrams in the Presence of Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Gamboa, Julio; Martire, Daniel O.; Donati, Edgardo R.

    2010-01-01

    One-component phase diagrams are good approximations to predict pressure-temperature ("P-T") behavior of a substance in the presence of air, provided air pressure is not much higher than the vapor pressure. However, at any air pressure, and from the conceptual point of view, the use of a traditional "P-T" phase diagram is not strictly correct. In…

  20. Analysis of mine's air leakage based on pressure gradient matrix between nodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-rang; WANG Hong-gang; WU Feng-liang; CHANG Xin-tan

    2008-01-01

    Air leakage may significantly affect the effectiveness of mine ventilation by in-creasing the cost of ventilation and arousing problems for ventilation management. Fur-thermore, air leakage may accelerate the process of coal spontaneous combustion andcause gas explosion, thus greatly threatens the safety of coat production. The estimationof air leakage, therefore, have great practical significance. For any ventilation system ofcoal mines, there is a defined pattern of pressure gradient which drived the mine air toflow in the network, drives possible air leakage to go shortcut as well. Air leakage mayoccur through ventilation structures such as ventilation doors and fractures of the surroun-dig coal and rock of airways. A concept and the relevent calculation method of the pres-sure gradient matrix was put forward to assist the analysis of potential air leakage routes.A simplified example was used to introduce the application principle of'pressure gradientmatrix in identifying all the potential air leaking routes, which offers a deeper understand-ing over the ventilation system and the prevention of coal spontaneous combustion.

  1. The effects of air leaks on solar air heating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkin, R.; Cash, M.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation to determine the effects of leakages in collector and duct work on the system performance of a typical single-family residence solar air heating system. Positive (leakage out) and negative (leakage in) pressure systems were examined. Collector and duct leakage rates were varied from 10 to 30 percent of the system flow rate. Within the range of leakage rates investigated, solar contribution to heated space and domestic hot water loads was found to be reduced up to 30 percent from the no-leak system contribution with duct leakage equally divided between supply and return duct; with supply duct leakage greater than return leakage a reduction of up to 35 percent was noted. The negative pressure system exhibited a reduction in solar contribution somewhat larger than the positive pressure system for the same leakage rates.

  2. Generation of subnanosecond electron beams in air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.

    2009-11-01

    Optimum conditions for the generation of runaway electron beams with maximum current amplitudes and densities in nanosecond pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure are determined. A supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with a current amplitude of ˜30 A, a current density of ˜20 A/cm2, and a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps has been observed behind the output foil of an air-filled diode. It is shown that the position of the SAEB current maximum relative to the voltage pulse front exhibits a time shift that varies when the small-size collector is moved over the foil surface.

  3. Adding a custom made pressure release valve during air enema for intussusception: A new technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosni Morsi Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-surgical reduction remains the first line treatment of choice for intussusception. The major complication of air enema reduction is bowel perforation. The authors developed a custom made pressure release valve to be added to portable insufflation devices, delivering air at pressures accepted as safe for effective reduction of intussusception in children under fluoroscopic guidance. The aim of this study was to develop a custom made pressure release valve that is suitable for the insufflation devices used for air enema reduction of intussusception and to put this valve into regular clinical practice. Materials and Methods: An adjustable, custom made pressure release valve was assembled by the authors using readily available components. The valve was coupled to a simple air enema insufflation device. The device was used for the trial of reduction of intussusception in a prospective study that included 132 patients. Results: The success rate for air enema reduction with the new device was 88.2%. The mean pressure required to achieve complete reduction was 100 mmHg. The insufflation pressure never exceeded the preset value (120 mmHg. Of the successful cases, 58.3% were reduced from the first attempt while 36.1% required a second insufflation. Only 5.55% required a third insufflation to complete the reduction. In cases with unsuccessful pneumatic reduction attempt (18.1%, surgical treatment was required. Surgery ranged from simple reduction to resection with a primary end to end anastomosis. No complications from air enema were recorded. Conclusions: The authors recommend adding pressure release valves to ensure safety by avoiding pressure overshoot during the procedure.

  4. Impacts of Changes of Indoor Air Pressure and Air Exchange Rate in Vapor Intrusion Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Rui; Suuberg, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    There has, in recent years, been increasing interest in understanding the transport processes of relevance in vapor intrusion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings on contaminated sites. These studies have included fate and transport modeling. Most such models have simplified the prediction of indoor air contaminant vapor concentrations by employing a steady state assumption, which often results in difficulties in reconciling these results with field measurements. This paper focuses on two major factors that may be subject to significant transients in vapor intrusion situations, including the indoor air pressure and the air exchange rate in the subject building. A three-dimensional finite element model was employed with consideration of daily and seasonal variations in these factors. From the results, the variations of indoor air pressure and air exchange rate are seen to contribute to significant variations in indoor air contaminant vapor concentrations. Depending upon the assumptions regarding the variations in these parameters, the results are only sometimes consistent with the reports of several orders of magnitude in indoor air concentration variations from field studies. The results point to the need to examine more carefully the interplay of these factors in order to quantitatively understand the variations in potential indoor air exposures.

  5. Microcontrolled air-mattress for ulcer by pressure prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasluosta, Cristian F.; Fontana, Juan M.; Beltramone, Diego A.; Taborda, Ricardo A. M.

    2007-11-01

    An ulcer by pressure is produced when a constant pressure is exerted over the skin. This generates the collapse of the blood vessels and, therefore, a lack in the contribution of the necessary nutrients for the affected zone. As a consequence, the skin deteriorates, eventually causing an ulcer. In order to prevent it, a protocol must be applied to the patient, which is reflected on time and cost of treatment. There are some air mattresses available for this purpose, but whose performance does not fulfill all requirements. The prototype designed in our laboratory is based on the principle of the air mattress. Its objective is to improve on existing technologies and, due to an increased automation, reduce time dedication for personnel in charge of the patient. A clinical experience was made in the local Emergencies Hospital and also in an institution dedicated to aged patients care. In both cases, the results obtained and the comments from the personnel involved were favorable.

  6. Microcontrolled air-mattress for ulcer by pressure prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasluosta, Cristian F; Fontana, Juan M; Beltramone, Diego A; Taborda, Ricardo A M [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba. Cordoba (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    An ulcer by pressure is produced when a constant pressure is exerted over the skin. This generates the collapse of the blood vessels and, therefore, a lack in the contribution of the necessary nutrients for the affected zone. As a consequence, the skin deteriorates, eventually causing an ulcer. In order to prevent it, a protocol must be applied to the patient, which is reflected on time and cost of treatment. There are some air mattresses available for this purpose, but whose performance does not fulfill all requirements. The prototype designed in our laboratory is based on the principle of the air mattress. Its objective is to improve on existing technologies and, due to an increased automation, reduce time dedication for personnel in charge of the patient. A clinical experience was made in the local Emergencies Hospital and also in an institution dedicated to aged patients care. In both cases, the results obtained and the comments from the personnel involved were favorable.

  7. Torricelli and the ocean of air: the first measurement of barometric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John B

    2013-03-01

    The recognition of barometric pressure was a critical step in the development of environmental physiology. In 1644, Evangelista Torricelli described the first mercury barometer in a remarkable letter that contained the phrase, "We live submerged at the bottom of an ocean of the element air, which by unquestioned experiments is known to have weight." This extraordinary insight seems to have come right out of the blue. Less than 10 years before, the great Galileo had given an erroneous explanation for the related problem of pumping water from a deep well. Previously, Gasparo Berti had filled a very long lead vertical tube with water and showed that a vacuum formed at the top. However, Torricelli was the first to make a mercury barometer and understand that the mercury was supported by the pressure of the air. Aristotle stated that the air has weight, although this was controversial for some time. Galileo described a method of measuring the weight of the air in detail, but for reasons that are not clear his result was in error by a factor of about two. Torricelli surmised that the pressure of the air might be less on mountains, but the first demonstration of this was by Blaise Pascal. The first air pump was built by Otto von Guericke, and this influenced Robert Boyle to carry out his classical experiments of the physiological effects of reduced barometric pressure. These were turning points in the early history of high-altitude physiology.

  8. AIR SEPARATION BY PRESSURE SWING ADSORPTION USING SUPERIOR ADSORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralph T. Yang

    2001-08-31

    Li-X zeolite (Si/Al = 1.0) is currently the best sorbent for use in the separation of air by adsorption processes. In particular, pressure swing adsorption (PSA) using zeolite sorbents is being increasingly used for air separation. Silver is also known to strongly affect the adsorptive properties of zeolites; and it is known that thermal vacuum dehydration of silver zeolites leads to the formation of silver clusters within the zeolite. In this work we have synthesized type X zeolites containing Ag and also varying mixtures of Li and Ag. In this project, we developed the Ag-containing zeolite as the best sorbent for air separation. We have also studied Co-ligand compounds as oxygen-selective sorbents. Syntheses, structural characterization and adsorption properties have been performed on all sorbents. The results are described in detail in 5 chapters.

  9. Investigation of Ozone Yield of Air Fed Ozonizer by High Pressure Homogeneous Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge ( DBD ) in dry air by using a simple DBD device. So far, we have tried to apply the homogeneous DBD to an...specific input energy region. In this work, we investigated the effect of gas pressure (from 0.1 MPa to 0.2 MPa) on the ozone yield by homogeneous DBD . The...homogeneous DBD decreased with increasing the gas pressure. 1. Introduction The dielectric barrier discharge ( DBD ) is composed of many filamentary micro

  10. Atmospheric-pressure air microplasma jets in aqueous media for the inactivation of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Si-ze [Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Liu, Dongping [Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Song, Ying [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, Yue [School of Physics, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2013-05-15

    The hollow fiber-based cold air microplasma jet array running at atmospheric pressure has been designed to inactivate Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens) cells in vitro in aqueous media. The influences of electrode configurations, air flow rate, and applied voltage on the discharge characteristics of the single microplasma jet operating in aqueous media are presented, and the bactericidal efficiency of the hollow fibers-based and large-volume microplasma jet array is reported. Optical emission spectroscopy is utilized to identify excited species during the antibacterial testing of plasma in solutions. These well-aligned and rather stable air microplasma jets containing a variety of short-lived species, such as OH and O radicals and charged particles, are in direct contact with aqueous media and are very effective in killing P. fluorescens cells in aqueous media. This design shows its potential application for atmospheric pressure air plasma inactivation of bacteria cells in aqueous media.

  11. Testing of heat exchangers in membrane oxygenators using air pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Carole; Stein, Jutta; Seidler, Rainer; Kind, Robert; Beck, Karin; Tosok, Jürgen; Upterfofel, Jörg

    2006-03-01

    All heat exchangers (HE) in membrane oxygenators are tested by the manufacturer for water leaks during the production phase. However, for safety reasons, it is highly recommended that HEs be tested again before clinical use. The most common method is to attach the heater-cooler to the HE and allow the water to recirculate for at least 10 min, during which time a water leak should be evident. To improve the detection of water leaks, a test was devised using a pressure manometer with an integrated bulb used to pressurize the HE with air. The cardiopulmonary bypass system is set up as per protocol. A pressure manometer adapted to a 1/2" tubing is connected to the water inlet side of the oxygenator. The water outlet side is blocked with a short piece of 1/2" deadend tubing. The HE is pressurized with 250 mmHg for at least 30 sec and observed for any drop. Over the last 2 years, only one oxygenator has been detected with a water leak in which the air-method leaktest was performed. This unit was sent back to the manufacturer who confirmed the failure. Even though the incidence of water leaks is very low, it does occur and it is, therefore, important that all HEs are tested before they are used clinically. This method of using a pressure manometer offers many advantages, as the HE can be tested outside of the operating room (OR), allowing earlier testing of the oxygenator, no water contact is necessary, and it is simple, easy and quick to perform.

  12. Advancing a smart air cushion system for preventing pressure ulcers using projection Moiré for large deformation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sheng-Lin; Tsai, Tsung-Heng; Lee, Carina Jean-Tien; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2016-03-01

    A pressure ulcer is one of the most important concerns for wheelchair bound patients with spinal cord injuries. A pressure ulcer is a localized injury near the buttocks that bear ischial tuberosity oppression over a long period of time. Due to elevated compression to blood vessels, the surrounding tissues suffer from a lack of oxygen and nutrition. The ulcers eventually lead to skin damage followed by tissue necrosis. The current medical strategy is to minimize the occurrence of pressure ulcers by regularly helping patients change their posture. However, these methods do not always work effectively or well. As a solution to fundamentally prevent pressure ulcers, a smart air cushion system was developed to detect and control pressure actively. The air cushion works by automatically adjusting a patient's sitting posture to effectively relieve the buttock pressure. To analyze the correlation between the dynamic pressure profiles of an air cell with a patient's weight, a projection Moiré system was adopted to measure the deformation of an air cell and its associated stress distribution. Combining a full-field deformation imaging with air pressure measured within an air cell, the patient's weight and the stress distribution can be simultaneously obtained. By integrating a full-field optical metrology with a time varying pressure sensor output coupled with different active air control algorithms for various designs, we can tailor the ratio of the air cells. Our preliminary data suggests that this newly developed smart air cushion has the potential to selectively reduce localized compression on the tissues at the buttocks. Furthermore, it can take a patient's weight which is an additional benefit so that medical personnel can reference it to prescribe the correct drug dosages.

  13. Analysis of an Aircraft Honeycomb Sandwich Panel with Circular Face Sheet/Core Disbond Subjected to Ground-Air Pressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinker, Martin; Krueger, Ronald; Ratcliffe, James

    2013-01-01

    The ground-air pressurization of lightweight honeycomb sandwich structures caused by alternating pressure differences between the enclosed air within the honeycomb core and the ambient environment is a well-known and controllable loading condition of aerospace structures. However, initial face sheet/core disbonds intensify the face sheet peeling effect of the internal pressure load significantly and can decrease the reliability of the sandwich structure drastically. Within this paper, a numerical parameter study was carried out to investigate the criticality of initial disbonds in honeycomb sandwich structures under ground-air pressurization. A fracture mechanics approach was used to evaluate the loading at the disbond front. In this case, the strain energy release rate was computed via the Virtual Crack Closure Technique. Special attention was paid to the pressure-deformation coupling which can decrease the pressure load within the disbonded sandwich section significantly when the structure is highly deformed.

  14. Thermal separation of soil particles from thermal conductivity measurement under various air pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sen; Ren, Tusheng; Lu, Yili; Meng, Ping; Zhang, Jinsong

    2017-01-05

    The thermal conductivity of dry soils is related closely to air pressure and the contact areas between solid particles. In this study, the thermal conductivity of two-phase soil systems was determined under reduced and increased air pressures. The thermal separation of soil particles, i.e., the characteristic dimension of the pore space (d), was then estimated based on the relationship between soil thermal conductivity and air pressure. Results showed that under both reduced and increased air pressures, d estimations were significantly larger than the geometrical mean separation of solid particles (D), which suggested that conductive heat transfer through solid particles dominated heat transfer in dry soils. The increased air pressure approach gave d values lower than that of the reduced air pressure method. With increasing air pressure, more collisions between gas molecules and solid surface occurred in micro-pores and intra-aggregate pores due to the reduction of mean free path of air molecules. Compared to the reduced air pressure approach, the increased air pressure approach expressed more micro-pore structure attributes in heat transfer. We concluded that measuring thermal conductivity under increased air pressure procedures gave better-quality d values, and improved soil micro-pore structure estimation.

  15. Thermal separation of soil particles from thermal conductivity measurement under various air pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sen; Ren, Tusheng; Lu, Yili; Meng, Ping; Zhang, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of dry soils is related closely to air pressure and the contact areas between solid particles. In this study, the thermal conductivity of two-phase soil systems was determined under reduced and increased air pressures. The thermal separation of soil particles, i.e., the characteristic dimension of the pore space (d), was then estimated based on the relationship between soil thermal conductivity and air pressure. Results showed that under both reduced and increased air pressures, d estimations were significantly larger than the geometrical mean separation of solid particles (D), which suggested that conductive heat transfer through solid particles dominated heat transfer in dry soils. The increased air pressure approach gave d values lower than that of the reduced air pressure method. With increasing air pressure, more collisions between gas molecules and solid surface occurred in micro-pores and intra-aggregate pores due to the reduction of mean free path of air molecules. Compared to the reduced air pressure approach, the increased air pressure approach expressed more micro-pore structure attributes in heat transfer. We concluded that measuring thermal conductivity under increased air pressure procedures gave better-quality d values, and improved soil micro-pore structure estimation.

  16. Pressurized air cathodes for enhanced stability and power generation by microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weihua; Yang, Wulin; Tian, Yushi; Zhu, Xiuping; Liu, Jia; Feng, Yujie; Logan, Bruce E.

    2016-11-01

    Large differences between the water and air pressure in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) can deform and damage cathodes. To avoid deformation, the cathode air pressure was controlled to balance pressure differences between the air and water. Raising the air pressures from 0 to 10 kPa at a set cathode potential of -0.3 V (versus Ag/AgCl) enhanced cathode performance by 17%, but pressures ≥25 kPa decreased current and resulted in air leakage into the solution. Matching the air pressure with the water pressure avoided cathode deformation and improved performance. The maximum power density increased by 15%, from 1070 ± 20 to 1230 ± 70 mW m-2, with balanced air and water pressures of 10-25 kPa. Oxygen partial pressures ≥12.5 kPa in the cathode compartment maintained the oxygen reduction rate to be within 92 ± 1% of that in ambient air. The use of pressurized air flow through the cathode compartments can enable closer spacing of the cathodes compared to passive gas transfer systems, which could make the reactor design more compact. The energy cost of pressurizing the cathodes was estimated to be smaller than the increase in power that resulted from the use of pressurized cathodes.

  17. Effect of aeration on fast gas pressure tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yu-jia; JIANG Cheng-lin; LI Xiao-wei; TANG Jun; WANG Chen; YANG Fei-long; WANG Fa-kai; ZHANG Chao-jie; DENG Shu-hua

    2009-01-01

    Given the problem of the long time required for testing gas pressure, we propose a fast-test method in which we used a technique of fast borehole sealing and air replenishing. Based on the characteristics of gas emission from boreholes to be tested, we built a theoretical model for calculating parameters during the process of increasing natural pressure and aeration. Using this model, we investigated the effect of different aeration conditions on velocity of pressure tests. The result shows that: 1) aerating air into boreholes can speed up gas pressure tests and 2) the more similar the pressure of the aerated air to the original gas pressure, the smaller the gas volume absorbed by coal and the shorter the time needed in pressure test. A case study in the Lu'an mining area shows that the time needed for gas pressure test is only 4 h using our method of aeration and 29 h under conditions of increasing natural pressure, saving time by 86.2%. This case study also indicates that, by using the aeration method, only one hour is needed for gas pressure to reach a stable state, which breaks the record of the shortest time needed for gas pressure tests in China.

  18. Acute changes in pulse pressure in relation to constituents of particulate air pollution in elderly persons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Lotte [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Unit of Lung Toxicology, K.U.Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Buczynska, Anna [Departement of Chemistry, UA, Wilrijk (Belgium); Walgraeve, Christophe [Research group EnVOC, Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, UGent, Gent (Belgium); Delcloo, Andy [Royal Meteorological Institute, Brussels (Belgium); Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja [Departement of Chemistry, UA, Wilrijk (Belgium); Molecular Science Institute, School of Chemistry, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa); Division of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester (United Kingdom); Van Grieken, Rene [Departement of Chemistry, UA, Wilrijk (Belgium); Demeestere, Kristof; Dewulf, Jo; Van Langenhove, Herman [Research group EnVOC, Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, UGent, Gent (Belgium); De Backer, Hugo [Royal Meteorological Institute, Brussels (Belgium); Nemery, Benoit, E-mail: ben.nemery@med.kuleuven.be [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Unit of Lung Toxicology, K.U.Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Nawrot, Tim S. [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Unit of Lung Toxicology, K.U.Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2012-08-15

    An increased pulse pressure (difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressure) suggests aortic stiffening. The objective of this study was to examine the acute effects of both particulate matter (PM) mass and composition on blood pressure, among elderly persons. We carried out a panel study in persons living in elderly homes in Antwerp, Belgium. We recruited 88 non-smoking persons, 70% women with a mean age of 83 years (standard deviation: 5.2). Blood pressure was measured and a blood sample was collected on two time points, which were chosen so that there was an exposure contrast in ambient PM exposure. The elemental content of the collected indoor and outdoor PM{sub 2.5} (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <2.5 {mu}m) mass concentration was measured. Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs) on outdoor PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <10 {mu}m) were measured. Each interquartile range increase of 20.8 {mu}g/m Superscript-Three in 24-h mean outdoor PM{sub 2.5} was associated with an increase in pulse pressure of 4.0 mmHg (95% confidence interval: 1.8-6.2), in persons taking antihypertensive medication (n=57), but not in persons not using antihypertensive medication (n=31) (p for interaction: 0.02). Vanadium, iron and nickel contents of PM{sub 2.5} were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, among persons on antihypertensive medication. Similar results were found for indoor concentrations. Of the oxy-PAHs, chrysene-5,6-dione and benzo[a]pyrene-3,6-dione were significantly associated with increases in systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure. In elderly, pulse pressure was positively associated with acute increases in outdoor and indoor air pollution, among persons taking antihypertensive medication. These results might form a mechanistic pathway linking air pollution as a trigger of cardiovascular events.

  19. The impact of mass flow and masking on the pressure drop of air filter in heavy-duty diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorji-Bandpy Mofid

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD calculation approach to predict and evaluate the impact of the mass-flow inlet on the pressure drop of turbocharger`s air filtfer in heavy-duty diesel engine. The numerical computations were carried out using a commercial CFD program whereas the inlet area of the air filter consisted of several holes connected to a channel. After entering through the channel, the air passes among the holes and enters the air filter. The effect of masking holes and hydraulic diameter is studied and investigated on pressure drop. The results indicate that pressure drop increase with decreasing of hydraulic diameter and masking of the holes has considerable affect on the pressure drop.

  20. The impact of mass flow and masking on the pressure drop of air filter in heavy-duty diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseeinzadeh, Sepideh; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation approach to predict and evaluate the impact of the mass-flow inlet on the pressure drop of turbocharger`s air filtfer in heavy-duty diesel engine. The numerical computations were carried out using a commercial CFD program whereas the inlet area of the air filter consisted of several holes connected to a channel. After entering through the channel, the air passes among the holes and enters the air filter. The effect of masking holes and hydraulic diameter is studied and investigated on pressure drop. The results indicate that pressure drop increase with decreasing of hydraulic diameter and masking of the holes has considerable affect on the pressure drop.

  1. Effect of Pulse Nanosecond Volume Discharge in Air at Atmospheric Pressure on Electrical Properties of Mis Structures Based on p-HgCdTe Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Nesmelov, S. N.; Dzyadukh, S. M.; Grigor'ev, D. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of the pulse nanosecond volume discharge in air at atmospheric pressure on the admittance of MIS structures based on MBE graded-gap p-Hg0.78Cd0.22Te is studied in a wide range of frequencies and temperatures. It is shown that the impact of the discharge leads to significant changes in electrical characteristics of MIS structures (the density of positive fixed charge increases), to the changes in the nature of the hysteresis of capacitance-voltage characteristics, and to an increase in the density of surface states. A possible reason for the changes in the characteristics of MIS structures after exposure to the discharge is substantial restructuring of the defect-impurity system of the semiconductor near the interface.

  2. Seed disinfection effect of atmospheric pressure plasma and low pressure plasma on Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Terumi; Takai, Yuichiro; Kawaradani, Mitsuo; Okada, Kiyotsugu; Tanimoto, Hideo; Misawa, Tatsuya; Kusakari, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Gas plasma generated and applied under two different systems, atmospheric pressure plasma and low pressure plasma, was used to investigate the inactivation efficacy on the seedborne pathogenic fungus, Rhizoctonia solani, which had been artificially introduced to brassicaceous seeds. Treatment with atmospheric plasma for 10 min markedly reduced the R. solani survival rate from 100% to 3% but delayed seed germination. The low pressure plasma treatment reduced the fungal survival rate from 83% to 1.7% after 10 min and the inactivation effect was dependent on the treatment time. The seed germination rate after treatment with the low pressure plasma was not significantly different from that of untreated seeds. The air temperature around the seeds in the low pressure system was lower than that of the atmospheric system. These results suggested that gas plasma treatment under low pressure could be effective in disinfecting the seeds without damaging them.

  3. The effect of atmospheric pressure on ventricular assist device output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Masaharu; Yamazaki, Akio; Fukuda, Wakako; Watanabe, Ken-Ichi; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukui, Kozo; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2012-03-01

    The effect of cabin pressure change on the respiratory system during flight is well documented in the literature, but how the change in atmospheric pressure affects ventricular assist device (VAD) output flow has not been studied yet. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the change in VAD output using a mock circulatory system in a low-pressure chamber mimicking high altitude. Changes in output and driving pressure were measured during decompression from 1.0 to 0.7 atm and pressurization from 0.7 to 1.0 atm. Two driving systems were evaluated: the VCT system and the Mobart system. In the VCT system, output and driving pressure remained the same during decompression and pressurization. In the Mobart system, the output decreased as the atmospheric pressure dropped and recovered during pressurization. The lowest output was observed at 0.7 atm, which was 80% of the baseline driven by the Mobart system. Under a practical cabin pressure of 0.8 atm, the output driven by the Mobart system was 90% of the baseline. In the Mobart system, the output decreased as the atmospheric pressure dropped, and recovered during pressurization. However, the decrease in output was slight. In an environment where the atmospheric pressure changes, it is necessary to monitor the diaphragmatic motion of the blood pump and the driving air pressure, and to adjust the systolic:diastolic ratio as well as the positive and negative pressures in a VAD system.

  4. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... other unfired pressure vessels. 56.13015 Section 56.13015 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels... applicable chapters of the National Board Inspection Code, a Manual for Boiler and Pressure Vessel...

  5. 30 CFR 57.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... other unfired pressure vessels. 57.13015 Section 57.13015 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure... the applicable chapters of the National Board Inspection Code, a Manual for Boiler and Pressure...

  6. Field test to study the pressure equilization on air permeable facade elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, C.A. van; Kalkman, I.M.; Geurts, C.P.W.

    2014-01-01

    The net wind load on the outer layer of a façade consisting of multiple layers is determined by the external pressure and the cavity pressure. For an air-permeable outer layer, the cavity pressure is dependent on the extent to which the external pressure equalizes over the openings. Minimizing the p

  7. The effects of channel diameter on flow pattern, void fraction and pressure drop of two-phase air-water flow in circular micro-channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saisorn, Sira [Energy Division, The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment (JGSEE), King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Wongwises, Somchai [Fluid Mechanics, Thermal Engineering and Multiphase Flow Research Lab. (FUTURE), Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2010-05-15

    Two-phase air-water flow characteristics are experimentally investigated in horizontal circular micro-channels. Test sections are made of fused silica. The experiments are conducted based on three different inner diameters of 0.53, 0.22 and 0.15 mm with the corresponding lengths of 320, 120 and 104 mm, respectively. The test runs are done at superficial velocities of gas and liquid ranging between 0.37-42.36 and 0.005-3.04 m/s, respectively. The flow visualisation is facilitated by systems mainly including stereozoom microscope and high-speed camera. The flow regime maps developed from the observed flow patterns are presented. The void fractions are determined based on image analysis. New correlation for two-phase frictional multiplier is also proposed for practical applications. (author)

  8. In-air and pressurized water reactor environment fatigue experiments of 316 stainless steel to study the effect of environment on cyclic hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurindranath; Natesan, Krishnamurti

    2016-05-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), under the sponsorship of Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program, is trying to develop a mechanistic approach for more accurate life estimation of LWR components. In this context, ANL has conducted many fatigue experiments under different test and environment conditions on type 316 stainless steel (316 SS) material which is widely used in the US reactors. Contrary to the conventional S ∼ N curve based empirical fatigue life estimation approach, the aim of the present DOE sponsored work is to develop an understanding of the material ageing issues more mechanistically (e.g. time dependent hardening and softening) under different test and environmental conditions. Better mechanistic understanding will help develop computer-based advanced modeling tools to better extrapolate stress-strain evolution of reactor components under multi-axial stress states and hence help predict their fatigue life more accurately. Mechanics-based modeling of fatigue such as by using finite element (FE) tools requires the time/cycle dependent material hardening properties. Presently such time-dependent material hardening properties are hardly available in fatigue modeling literature even under in-air conditions. Getting those material properties under PWR environment, are even harder. Through this work we made preliminary attempt to generate time/cycle dependent stress-strain data both under in-air and PWR water conditions for further study such as for possible development of material models and constitutive relations for FE model implementation. Although, there are open-ended possibility to further improve the discussed test methods and related material estimation techniques we anticipate that the data presented in this paper will help the metal fatigue research community particularly, the researchers who are dealing with mechanistic modeling of metal fatigue such as using FE tools. In this paper the fatigue experiments

  9. Health Effects of Air Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Education Report and Newsletter, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Summarizes health hazards associated with air pollution, highlighting the difficulty in establishing acceptable thresholds of exposure. Respiratory disease, asthma, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other problems are addressed. Indicates that a wide range of effects from any one chemical exists and that there are differences in sensitivity to…

  10. Study of short atmospheric pressure dc glow microdischarge in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Bogdanov, Eugene; Chirtsov, Alexander; Emelin, Sergey

    2011-10-01

    The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen and oxygen atoms; ozone molecule; and different nitrogen and oxygen ions with different plasmochemical reactions between them. Simulations predicted the main regions of the dc glow discharges including cathode and anode sheath and plasma of negative glow, Faraday dark space and transition region. Gas heating plays an important role in shaping the discharge profiles. The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen

  11. The effect of a photocatalytic air purifier on indoor air quality quantified using different measuring methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Barbara; Wargocki, Pawel; Skorek-Osikowska, A.;

    2010-01-01

    The effect on indoor air quality of an air purifier based on photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) was determined by different measuring techniques: sensory assessments of air quality made by human subjects, Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and chromatographic methods (Gas...... Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography with UV detection). The experiment was conducted in a simulated office, ventilated with 0.6 h(-1), 2.5 h(-1) and 6 h(-1), in the presence of additional pollution sources (carpet, chipboard and linoleum). At the lowest air change rate......, additional measurements were made with no pollution sources present in the office. All conditions were tested with the photocatalytic air purifier turned on and off. The results show that operation of the air purifier in the presence of pollutants emitted by building materials and furniture improves indoor...

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of water on a hydrophilic silica surface at high air pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, H.A.; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, R.L.

    2014-01-01

    of air in water at different pressures. Using the calibrated force field, we conduct MD simulations to study the interface between a hydrophilic silica substrate and water surrounded by air at different pressures. We find that the static water contact angle is independent of the air pressure imposed......Wepresent a force field forMolecular Dynamics (MD) simulations ofwater and air in contactwith an amorphous silica surface. We calibrate the interactions of each species present in the systemusing dedicated criteria such as the contact angle of a water droplet on a silica surface, and the solubility...

  13. Design of a MEMS piezoresistive differential pressure sensor with small thermal hysteresis for air data modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jin Woo; Lee, Jang-Sub; An, Jun-Eon; Park, Chan Gook

    2015-06-01

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation results of a MEMS piezoresistive differential pressure sensor fabricated by the dry etching process are described in this paper. The proposed sensor is designed to have optimal performances in mid-pressure range from 0 psi to 20 psi suitable for a precision air data module. The piezoresistors with a Wheatstone bridge structure are implanted where the thermal effects are minimized subject to sustainment of the sensitivity. The rectangular-shaped silicon diaphragm is adopted and its dimension is analyzed for improving pressure sensitivity and linearity. The bridge resistors are driven by constant current to compensate temperature effects on sensitivity. The designed differential pressure sensor is fabricated by using MEMS dry etching techniques, and the fabricated sensing element is attached and packaged in a Kovar package in consideration of leakage and temperature hysteresis. The implemented sensors are tested and evaluated as well. The evaluation results show the static RSS (root sum square) accuracy including nonlinearity, non-repeatability, and pressure hysteresis before temperature compensation is about 0.09%, and the total error band which includes the RSS accuracy, the thermal hysteresis, and other thermal effects is about 0.11%, which confirm the validity of the proposed design process.

  14. Effect of pressure on nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Uma D. [Department of Physics, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar-263145 (India); Kumar, M., E-mail: munish_dixit@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar-263145 (India)

    2010-07-01

    A simple theory is proposed to predict the effect of pressure on nanomaterials, which gets support from the Mie-Gruneisen theory of thermal expansivity as formulated by Born and Huang. We considered LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} to study the effect of pressure in the light of other formulations, viz. Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet and Kumar. The results obtained are found to present a good agreement with the experimental data as well as other formulations. To confirm the validity of the formulation, we applied the method to study the compression behaviour of a number of nanomaterials, viz. CdSe, Rb{sub 3}C{sub 60}, Ni(20 nm), carbon nanotube, {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {epsilon}-Fe (Hexagonal iron), MgO, CuO, {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (67 nm), {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {alpha}-Fe (filled nanotube), TiO{sub 2} (anatase), 3C-SiC (30 nm), TiO{sub 2} (rutile phase), Zr{sub 0.1}Ti{sub 0.9}O{sub 2}, AlN (hexagonal), {gamma}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, Ni-filled MWCNT and Fe-filled MWCNT. The results obtained are compared with the experimental data. A good agreement between theory and experiment demonstrates the validity of the present approach.

  15. Measurement of the pressure dependence of air fluorescence emission induced by electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Ave, M; Buonomo, B; Busca, N; Cazon, L; Chemerisov, S D; Conde, M E; Crowell, R A; Di Carlo, P; Di Giulio, C; Doubrava, M; Esposito, A; Facal, P; Franchini, F J; Horandel, J; Hrabovsky, M; Iarlori, M; Kasprzyk, T E; Keilhauer, B; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kuhlmann, S; Mazzitelli, G; Nozka, L; Obermeier, A; Palatka, M; Petrera, S; Privitera, P; Rídky, J; Rizi, V; Rodríguez, G; Salamida, F; Schovanek, P; Spinka, H; Strazzeri, E; Ulrich, A; Yusof, Z M; Vacek, V; Valente, P; Verzi, V; Waldenmaier, T

    2007-01-01

    The fluorescence detection of ultra high energy (> 10^18 eV) cosmic rays requires a detailed knowledge of the fluorescence light emission from nitrogen molecules, which are excited by the cosmic ray shower particles along their path in the atmosphere. We have made a precise measurement of the fluorescence light spectrum excited by MeV electrons in dry air. We measured the relative intensities of 34 fluorescence bands in the wavelength range from 284 to 429 nm with a high resolution spectrograph. The pressure dependence of the fluorescence spectrum was also measured from a few hPa up to atmospheric pressure. Relative intensities and collisional quenching reference pressures for bands due to transitions from a common upper level were found in agreement with theoretical expectations. The presence of argon in air was found to have a negligible effect on the fluorescence yield. We estimated that the systematic uncertainty on the cosmic ray shower energy due to the pressure dependence of the fluorescence spectrum i...

  16. A falling-pressure method for measuring air permeability of asphalt in laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailong; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Luk, Mario

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a simple analytical solution for estimating air permeability using the test data obtained by a falling-pressure method in laboratory. The perimeter of the column-shaped sample is fixed in a steel cylinder with the upper sample surface open to the atmosphere. The lower surface of the sample and the cylinder form an air chamber. A water manometer is connected to the air chamber to measure the air pressure inside after the chamber is pressurized. The data of pressure versus time in the air chamber are recorded and analyzed. An approximate analytical solution is derived to describe the pressure-time relationship in the air chamber. The air permeability can be easily estimated using the approximate analytical solution based on the linear least-squares fitting to the recorded pressure-time test data. This method is used to estimate the falling-pressure test data of 15 asphalt samples. The agreement between the test data and the analytical prediction is satisfactory for all the samples. To investigate the error caused by the approximate analytical solution, the air permeabilities are also estimated based on fully numerical solutions. The permeability values obtained from analytical and numerical solutions are very close. The maximum relative error is less than 6% for samples with more than five pressure-time records. A quantitative condition is given under which the analytical solution applies with negligible estimation error. Compared with the common, steady-state method for measuring air permeability, the falling-pressure method has its advantages such as simplicity and economy. The steady-state method has to measure the air flux through the sample, while the falling-pressure method does not.

  17. Direct measurement of the capillary pressure characteristics of water-air-gas diffusion layer systems for PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gostick, Jeff T.; Ioannidis, Marios A.; Fowler, Michael W.; Pritzker, Mark D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    A method and apparatus for measuring the relationship between air-water capillary pressure and water saturation in PEMFC gas diffusion layers (GDL) is described. Capillary pressure data for water injection and withdrawal from typical GDL materials are obtained, which demonstrate permanent hysteresis between water intrusion and water withdrawal. Capillary pressure, defined as the difference between the water and gas pressures at equilibrium, is positive during water injection and negative during water withdrawal. The results contribute to the understanding of liquid water behavior in GDL materials which is necessary for the development of effective PEMFC water management strategies. (author)

  18. "Deflategate": Time, Temperature, and Moisture Effects on Football Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Jack; Beljak, Lauren; Macatangay, Dahlia-Marie; Helmuth-Malone, Lilly; McWilliams, Catharina; Raptis, Sofia

    2016-09-01

    In a recent paper in TPT, DiLisi and Rarick used the National Football League "Deflategate" controversy to introduce to physics students the physics of a bouncing ball. In this paper, we measure and analyze the environmental effects of time, ambient temperature, and moisture on the internal pressure of an NFL football. We focus on the rate of pressure recovery that occurs when a cold football (either wet or dry) is returned to the warm locker room environment where the pressure was initially measured. Both studies stem from the so-called NFL "Deflategate" controversy in which footballs that initially met a minimum internal pressure requirement were rechecked at halftime of the AFC Championship game, and in some cases were reported to have fallen below the minimum pressure requirement. The question is whether the pressure changes were due to environmental exposure or rather to some air being released from the balls, or both.

  19. Effects of different pressure equalization methods on PSA and VSA processes for O2 production from air%不同均压方式对PSA和VSA空分制氧过程的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨彦钢; 丁艳宾; 马正飞; 赵春风

    2012-01-01

    对存在于变压吸附(PSA)和真空变压吸附(VSA)空分制氧过程中的均压步骤进行研究,应用ASPEN-ADSIM软件,模拟并比较4种不同均压方式(塔顶向塔顶均压(T-T),塔底向塔底均压(B-B),塔顶和塔底双向均压(TB),塔顶向塔底均压(T-B))对过程的影响,分析均压步骤的物流浓度、流量以及均压结束时床层轴向浓度分布.结果表明:采用T-B均压方式的PSA和VSA过程得到的产品O2纯度和收率最高.在均压步骤,均降床层塔顶出气有利于死空间中O2的回收,且减少床层吸附相中N2的脱附带出,从而得到较高的产品O2收率;均升床层塔底进气可使床层N2的质量摩尔浓度前沿陡峭,塔顶洁净,因此得到较高的产品O2纯度.%The pressure equalization step in O2 production from air of pressure swing adsorption(PSA) and vacuum swing adsorption( VSA) processes was studied. Influences of four different pressure equalization modes (the two beds connected by top to top (T-T) ,bottom to bottom(B-B) ,top and bottom both sides(TB) ,top to bottom (T-B)) on O2 production from air were simulated by ASPEN-ADSIM. Accordingly , the O2 concentration and flowrate of the stream in the pressure equalization step and the bed concentration profiles at the end of pressure equalization step were investigated. Results showed that PSA and VSA processes adopting, the pressure equalization mode of T-B had the highest O2 purity and O2 recovery. During pressure equalization step, opening the outlet end of bed 1 ( experiencing the step of de-pressurizing pressure equalization) to discharge gas benefit the increasing of O2 recovery of product, but opening the inlet end of bed 2 (experiencing the step of pressurizing pressure equalization) to let gas in from bed 1 had the benefit to increasing O2 purity of product.

  20. Effects of Shock Pressure on Transition Pressure in Zr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying-Hua; ZHANG Lin; CAI Ling-Cang

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of free surface velocity profiles of high-purity Zr samples under shock-wave loading are performed to study the dynamic strength and phase transition parameters. The peak pressure of the compression waves is within the range from 9 to 14 GPa, and the Hugoniot elastic limit is 0.5 GPa. An anomalous structure of shock waves is observed due to the α - ω phase transition in Zr. Shock pressure has effects on transition pressure which increases with increasing compression strength, and the stronger shocks have a lower transit time.

  1. Ozone production in parallel multichannel dielectric barrier discharge from oxygen and air: the influence of gas pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dingkun; Wang, Zhihua; Ding, Can; He, Yong; Whiddon, Ronald; Cen, Kefa

    2016-11-01

    This research aims to investigate the influence of gas pressure (0.1 Mpa-0.2 Mpa) on ozone generation in a parallel multichannel dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with a narrow gap (0.2 mm). In addition to determining ozone concentration and ozone yield characteristics with gas pressure variation, this paper examines the possible reasons leading to the inconsistency with previous reported results. All the experimental results are plotted on the basis of specific input energy (SIE) in order to conduct the comparison within identical power density. By reviewing the experimental results, the possible cause leading to the inconsistency concerning gas pressure dependences of ozone generation was found using different comparison bases. Results show that ozone generation is slightly suppressed with an increase of gas pressure with an initial increase in SIE. The results of the ozone yield show that an increase of gas pressure would have a favorable effect on ozone production efficiency with an SIE larger than 400 J l-1 in oxygen while ozone yield reaches the maximum at 0.14 Mpa with an SIE larger than 150 J l-1 in air. Increasing gas pressure would lead to a higher critical SIE value at which ozone yield firstly decreases with an increase of SIE both in oxygen and air. The results of nitrogen oxide byproducts show that both NO x byproducts emission and the discharge poisoning effect are suppressed by increasing gas pressure in air plasmas.

  2. Impacts of air pressure on the evolution of nanosecond pulse discharge products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jin-Lu; He Li-Ming; Ding Wei; Wang Yu-Qian; Du Chun

    2013-01-01

    Based on the nonequilibrium plasma dynamics of air discharge,a dynamic model of zero-dimensional plasma is established by combining the component density equation,the Boltzmann equation,and the energy transfer equation.The evolution properties of nanosecond pulse discharge (NPD) plasma under different air pressures are calculated.The results show that the air pressure has significant impacts on the NPD products and the peak values of particle number density for particles such as O atoms,O3 molecules,N2(A3) molecules in excited states,and NO molecules.It increases at first and then decreases with the increase of air pressure.On the other hand,the peak values of particle number density for N2(B3)and N2(C3) molecules in excited states are only slightly affected by the air pressure.

  3. Effects of boundary layer and liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chang-Fang; Wang, De-Yu; Cai, Zhong-Hua

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, numerical investigations for tank sloshing, based on commercial CFD package FLUENT, are performed to study effects of boundary layer grid, liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing pressure, wave height and rising time of impact pressure. Also, sloshing experiments for liquids of different viscosity are carried out to validate the numerical results. Through comparison of numerical and experimental results, a computational model including boundary layer grid can predict the sloshing pressure more accurately. Energy dissipation due to viscous friction leads to reduction of sloshing pressure and wave elevation. Sloshing pressure is also reduced because of cushion effect of compressible air. Due to high viscosity damping effect and compressible air effect, the rising time of impact pressure becomes longer. It is also found that liquid viscosity and compressible air influence distribution of dynamic pressure along the vertical tank wall.

  4. Effect of pressure on combustion of char in fluidised beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbull, E.; Blackshaw, H.W.; Davidson, J.F.; Goodyer, P.T.Y.; Hopes, R.B.; Kossakowski, E.R.

    1984-07-01

    Measurements of burn-out time are reported, for 0.25-1.7 mm carbon particles in an air-fluidised 100 mm dia bed of sand at pressures up to 17 bar absolute and bed temperatures of 1023-1173 K. A variety of carbons was used including (i) coke (ii) chars formed from coals of different ranks: thus the carbons had various porosities and surface areas. The effect of increased pressure is to increase the combustion rate, because of the higher oxygen concentration which accelerates the chemical reactions of combustion. On the other hand, pressure has virtually no influence on diffusion of oxygen towards a burning particle, because the higher oxygen concentration is offset by a proportionately lower diffusion coefficient. The overall effect is that as pressure increases, the chemical rate controlling steps become less important, so at very high pressure, combustion is diffusion controlled.

  5. Energy distribution of runaway electrons generated by a nanosecond discharge in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Kostyrya, I. D.; Lomaev, M. I.; Petin, V. K.; Rybka, D. V.; Shlyakhtun, S. V.

    2008-12-01

    The spectra of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam generated by a nanosecond discharge in atmospheric-pressure air were investigated. The temporal characteristics of the beam current pulses, gap voltage, and discharge current in a gas diode were measured with a time resolution of ˜0.1 ns. A simple technique was developed for recovering electron spectra from the curves of beam attenuation by aluminum foils. The effect of the cathode design, electrode gap length, and generator parameters on the electron spectra were studied using seven setups. It is shown that generation of electrons with anomalously high energies requires the use of cathodes with increased curvature radius.

  6. A study of the glow discharge characteristics of contact electrodes at atmospheric pressure in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wenzheng, E-mail: wzhliu@bjtu.edu.cn; Sun, Guangliang, E-mail: 11121659@bjtu.edu.cn; Li, Chuanhui; Zhang, Rongrong [School of Electrical Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2014-04-15

    Electric field distributions and discharge properties of rod-rod contact electrodes were studied under the condition of DBD for the steady generation of atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma (APGD) in air. We found that under the effect of the initial electrons generated in a nanometer-scale gap, the rod-rod cross-contact electrodes yielded APGD plasma in air. Regarding the rod-rod cross-contact electrodes, increasing the working voltage expanded the strong electric field area of the gas gap so that both discharge area and discharge power increased, and the increase in the number of contact points kept the initial discharge voltage unchanged and caused an increase in the plasma discharge area and discharge power. A mesh-like structure of cross-contact electrodes was designed and used to generate more APGD plasma, suggesting high applicability.

  7. Ultrasound enhanced plasma treatment of glass-fibre-reinforced polyester in atmospheric pressure air for adhesion improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Norrman, Kion

    2011-01-01

    A glass-fibre-reinforced polyester (GFRP) plate was treated with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure in air for adhesion improvement. The effects of ultrasonic irradiation using a high-power gas-jet generator during the treatment were investigated. The optical emission...

  8. An Explosive Range Model Based on the Gas Composition, Temperature, and Pressure during Air Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu Fan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Air drilling is low cost and effectively improves the penetration rate and causes minimal damage to liquid-sensitive pay zones. However, there is a potential downhole explosion when combustible gas mixed with drilling fluid reaches the combustible condition. In this paper, based on the underground combustion mechanism, an explosive range calculation model is established. This model couples the state equation and the empirical formula method, which considers the inert gas content, pressure, mixed gas component, and temperature. The result shows that increase of the inert gas content narrows the explosive range, while increase of the gas temperature and pressure improves the explosive range. A case in Chongqing, China, is used to validate the explosive range calculation model.

  9. Impact of air pressure on volatile organic compound emissions from a carpet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高鹏; 邓琴琴; LIN; Chao-hsin; 杨旭东

    2009-01-01

    The measurement of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from materials is normally conducted under standard environmental conditions, i.e., (23±1) ℃ temperature, (50±5)% relative humidity, and 0.1 MPa pressure. In order to define VOC emissions in non-standard environmental conditions, it is necessary to study the impact of key environmental parameters on emissions. This paper evaluates the impact of air pressure on VOC emissions from an aircraft carpet. The correlation between air pressure and VOC diffusion coefficient is derived, and the emission model is applied to studying the VOC emissions under pressure conditions of less than 0.1 MPa.

  10. Influence of air pressure on the performance of plasma synthetic jet actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Jia, Min; Wu, Yun; Li, Ying-hong; Zong, Hao-hua; Song, Hui-min; Liang, Hua

    2016-09-01

    Plasma synthetic jet actuator (PSJA) has a wide application prospect in the high-speed flow control field for its high jet velocity. In this paper, the influence of the air pressure on the performance of a two-electrode PSJA is investigated by the schlieren method in a large range from 7 kPa to 100 kPa. The energy consumed by the PSJA is roughly the same for all the pressure levels. Traces of the precursor shock wave velocity and the jet front velocity vary a lot for different pressures. The precursor shock wave velocity first decreases gradually and then remains at 345 m/s as the air pressure increases. The peak jet front velocity always appears at the first appearance of a jet, and it decreases gradually with the increase of the air pressure. A maximum precursor shock wave velocity of 520 m/s and a maximum jet front velocity of 440 m/s are observed at the pressure of 7 kPa. The averaged jet velocity in one period ranges from 44 m/s to 54 m/s for all air pressures, and it drops with the rising of the air pressure. High velocities of the precursor shock wave and the jet front indicate that this type of PSJA can still be used to influence the high-speed flow field at 7 kPa. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51407197, 51522606, 51336011, 91541120, and 11472306).

  11. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Monthly, Barometric (Air) Pressure

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has monthly Barometric (Air) Pressure data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  12. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Quarterly, Barometric (Air) Pressure

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has quarterly Barometric (Air) Pressure data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  13. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, 5-Day, Barometric (Air) Pressure

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has 5-day Barometric (Air) Pressure data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  14. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Daily, Barometric (Air) Pressure

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has daily Barometric (Air) Pressure data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  15. The effectiveness of a heated air curtain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Daria

    2014-11-01

    Air curtains are high-velocity plane turbulent jets which are installed in the doorway in order to reduce the heat and the mass exchange between two environments. The air curtain effectiveness E is defined as the fraction of the exchange flow prevented by the air curtain compared to the open-door situation. In the present study, we investigate the effects of an opposing buoyancy force on the air curtain effectiveness. Such an opposing buoyancy force arises for example if a downwards blowing air curtain is heated. We conducted small-scale experiments using water as the working fluid with density differences created by salt and sugar. The effectiveness of a downwards blowing air curtain was measured for situations in which the initial density of the air curtain was less than both the indoor and the outdoor fluid density, which corresponds to the case of a heated air curtain. We compare the effectiveness of the heated air curtain to the case of the neutrally buoyant air curtain. It is found that the effectiveness starts to decrease if the air curtain is heated beyond a critical temperature. Furthermore, we propose a theoretical model to describe the dynamics of the buoyant air curtain. Numerical results obtained from solving this model corroborate our experimental findings.

  16. NUMERICAL SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF PRESSURE PULSATION IN FRANCIS HYDRAULIC TURBINE WITH AIR ADMISSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the three-dimensional unsteady multiphase flow is simulated in the whole passage of Francis hydraulic turbine. The pressure pulsation is predicted and compared with experimental data at positions in the draft tube, in front of runner, guide vanes and at the inlet of the spiral case. The relationship between pressure pulsation in the whole passage and air admission is analyzed. The computational results show: air admission from spindle hole decreases the pressure difference in the horizontal section of draft tube, which in turn decreases the amplitude of low-frequency pressure pulsation in the draft tube; the rotor-stator interaction between the air inlet and the runner increases the blade-frequency pressure pulsation in front of the runner.

  17. Electrical explosion of Al and Ag wires in air at different pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Caplinger, J.; Parada, F.; Sotnikov, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    Experiments with electrically exploding fine Al and Ag wires in air demonstrate a strong dependence of the expanding metal core condition and velocity on ambient pressure. Expansion velocity of the wire core varies by 23 times between ˜0.2 km/s and ˜4.6 km/s. The shock-wave velocity at atmospheric pressure is ˜5 km/s and increases to ˜6 km/s when the pressure is decreased to 50 Torr. The condition of the metal core is strongly dependent on material and whether it is expanding into vacuum or against ambient air pressure. Expansion velocity of the fine Al and Ag wires for different surrounding pressures in general agree with Paschen's Law for air gap.

  18. Effects of pressure-shift freezing and pressure-assisted thawing on sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tironi, V; LeBail, A; de Lamballerie, M

    2007-09-01

    Effects of pressure-shift freezing and/or pressure-assisted thawing on the quality of sea bass muscle were evaluated and compared with conventional (air-blast) frozen and thawed samples. Microstructural analysis showed a marked decrease of muscle cell damage for pressure-assisted frozen samples. According to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), protein extractability, and SDS-PAGE results, high-pressure treatment (200 MPa) produced a partial denaturation with aggregation and insolubilization of the myosin, as well as alterations of the sarcoplasmic proteins. Only small differences between high-pressure processes (freezing or/and thawing) were registered. High-pressure-treated systems led to a decrease of water holding capacity but differences between high-pressure and conventional methods disappeared after cooking. Muscle color showed important alterations due to high-pressure treatments (increasing L* and b*).

  19. Space Charge Transient Kinetic Characteristics in DC Air Corona Discharge at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinghua; Xian, Richang; Sun, Xuefeng; Wang, Tao; Lv, Xuebin; Chen, Suhong; Yang, Fan

    2014-08-01

    Investigating the corona mechanism plays a key role in enhancing the performance of electrical insulation systems. Numerical simulation offers a better understanding of the physical characteristics of air corona discharges. Using a two-dimensional axisymmetrical kinetics model, into which the photoionization effect is incorporated, the DC air corona discharge at atmosphere pressure is studied. The plasma model is based on a self-consistent, multi-component, and continuum description of the air discharge, which is comprised of 12 species and 22 reactions. The discharge voltage-current characteristic predicted by the model is found to be in quite good agreement with experimental measurements. The behavior of the electronic avalanche progress is also described. O2+ and N2+ are the dominant positive ions, and the values of O- and O2- densities are much smaller than that of the electron. The electron and positive ion have a low-density thin layer near the anode, which is a result of the surface reaction and absorption effect of the electrode. As time progresses, the electric field increases and extends along the cathode surface, whereas the cathode fall shrinks after the corona discharge hits the cathode; thus, in the cathode sheath, the electron temperature increases and the position of its peak approaches to the cathode. The present computational model contributes to the understanding of this physical mechanism, and suggests ways to improve the electrical insulation system.

  20. The effect of a photocatalytic air purifier on indoor air quality quantified using different measuring methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolarik, Barbara [Technical University of Denmark, International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark); Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Danish Building Research Institute (SBi), Department of Construction and Health, Dr Neergaards Vej 15, 2970 Hoersholm (Denmark); Wargocki, Pawel [Technical University of Denmark, International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark); Skorek-Osikowska, Anna [Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Wisthaler, Armin [Institute of Ion Physics and Applied Physics, University of Innsbruck, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-06-15

    The effect on indoor air quality of an air purifier based on photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) was determined by different measuring techniques: sensory assessments of air quality made by human subjects, Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and chromatographic methods (Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography with UV detection). The experiment was conducted in a simulated office, ventilated with 0.6 h{sup -1}, 2.5 h{sup -1} and 6 h{sup -1}, in the presence of additional pollution sources (carpet, chipboard and linoleum). At the lowest air change rate, additional measurements were made with no pollution sources present in the office. All conditions were tested with the photocatalytic air purifier turned on and off. The results show that operation of the air purifier in the presence of pollutants emitted by building materials and furniture improves indoor air quality, as documented by sensory assessments made by human subjects. It also reduces concentrations of many chemical compounds present in the air as documented by the PTR-MS technique. For the lowest ventilation, results from measurements using the chromatographic methods have similar tendency, however many of the 50 compounds that were targeted for analysis were not detected at all, independent of whether the purifier was on or off. For the two conditions with higher ventilation the results were inconclusive. (author)

  1. Air pollution, blood pressure, and the risk of hypertensive complications during pregnancy: The generation r study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooven, E.H. van den; Kluizenaar, Y. de; Pierik, F.H.; Hofman, A.; Ratingen, S.W. van; Zandveld, P.Y.J.; MacKenbach, J.P.; Steegers, E.A.P.; Miedema, H.M.E.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution is associated with elevated blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. We assessed the associations of exposure to particulate matter (PM10) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) levels with blood pressure measured in each trimester of pregnancy and the risks of pregnancy-induced hype

  2. Finding the optimal setting of inflated air pressure for a multi-cell air cushion for wheelchair patients with spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamanami K

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure distribution patterns of the seating interface on the multi-cell air cushion (ROHO High Profile of 36 adults with spinal cord injury (SCI (Neurological level Th3 -L1 were measured at different air pressure levels by a pressure mat measurement system. Stress distribution relative to the inflated air pressure in the air cushion on the patients' wheelchairs was analyzed to determine the appropriate inflated air pressure of the cushion for patients. The maximum pressure points in all subjects were at the areas of the ischial tuberosities (82 to 347 mmHg. The optimal reduction in interface pressure at the ischial tuberosities was obtained just before bottoming out. The cushion air pressure at that point was between 17 and 42 mmHg, and correlated well to body weight (r = 0.495, P = 0.0021. In contrast, the maximum pressure levels did not correlate to body weight or the Body Mass Index (BMI. Pressure at the ischial area could be reduced, but not eliminated, by adjusting the air pressure. The maximum pressure levels seemed to be related to the shape of the buttocks, especially the amount of soft tissue, and exceeded the defined threshold for pressure ulcers (> 80 g/cm2.

  3. Pressure moderation and effective pressure in Navier-Stokes flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Chuong V.; Yu, Xinwei

    2016-10-01

    We study the Cauchy problem of the Navier-Stokes equations by both semi-analytic and classical energy methods. The former approach provides a physical picture of how viscous effects may or may not be able to suppress singularity development. In the latter approach, we examine the pressure term that drives the dynamics of the velocity norms \\parallel u{{\\parallel}{{Lq}}} , for q≥slant 3 . A key idea behind this investigation is due to the fact that the pressure p in this term is determined up to a function of both space and |u| , say P(x,|u|) , which may assume relatively broad forms. This allows us to use P as a pressure moderator in the evolution equation for \\parallel u{{\\parallel}{{Lq}}} , whereby optimal regularity criteria can be sought by varying P within its admissible classes. New regularity criteria are derived with and without making use of the moderator. The results obtained in the absence of the moderator feature some improvement over existing criteria in the literature. Several criteria are derived in terms of the moderated (effective) pressure p+P . A simple moderation scheme and the plausibility of the present approach to the problem of Navier-Stokes regularity are discussed.

  4. Air-leakage effects on stone cladding panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colantonio, Antonio

    1995-03-01

    This paper looks at the effects of air leakage on insulated stone clad precast panels used in present day construction of large commercial buildings. The building investigated was a newly built twenty story office building in a high density urban setting. Air leakage was suspected as a possible cause for thermal comfort complaints at isolated locations within the perimeter zones of the building. During the warrantee period the building owner asked for a quality control inspection of the air barrier assembly of the building envelope. Infrared thermography was used to locate areas of suspected air leakage within the building envelope. In order to differentiate thermal patterns produced by air leakage, conduction and convection as well as radiation from external sources, the building was inspected from the exterior; (1) after being pressurized for three hours, (2) one hour after the building was depressurized and (3) two and a half hours after total building depressurization was maintained by the building mechanical systems. Thermal images from similar locations were correlated for each time and pressure setting to verify air leakage locations within the building envelope. Areas exhibiting air leakage were identified and contractors were requested to carry out the necessary repairs. The pressure differential across the building envelope needs to be known in order to properly carry out an inspection to identify all locations of air leakage within a building envelope. As well the direction of the air movement and the density of the cladding material need to be accounted for in the proper inspection of these types of wall assemblies.

  5. Numerical simulation of high pressure release and dispersion of hydrogen into air with real gas model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaksarfard, R.; Kameshki, M. R.; Paraschivoiu, M.

    2010-06-01

    Hydrogen is a renewable and clean source of energy, and it is a good replacement for the current fossil fuels. Nevertheless, hydrogen should be stored in high-pressure reservoirs to have sufficient energy. An in-house code is developed to numerically simulate the release of hydrogen from a high-pressure tank into ambient air with more accuracy. Real gas models are used to simulate the flow since high-pressure hydrogen deviates from ideal gas law. Beattie-Bridgeman and Abel Noble equations are applied as real gas equation of state. A transport equation is added to the code to calculate the concentration of the hydrogen-air mixture after release. The uniqueness of the code is to simulate hydrogen in air release with the real gas model. Initial tank pressures of up to 70 MPa are simulated.

  6. Impact of two-way air flow due to temperature difference on preventing the entry of outdoor particles using indoor positive pressure control method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun; Zhao, Bin; Yang, Xudong

    2011-02-28

    Maintaining positive pressure indoors using mechanical ventilation system is a popular control method for preventing the entry of outdoor airborne particles. The idea is, as long as the supply air flow rate is larger than return air flow rate, the pressure inside the ventilated room should be positive since the superfluous air flow must exfiltrate from air leakages or other openings of the room to the outdoors. Based on experimental and theoretical analyses this paper aims to show the impact of two-way air flow due to indoor/outdoor temperature difference on preventing the entry of outdoor particles using positive pressure control method. The indoor positive pressure control method is effective only when the size of the opening area is restricted to a certain level, opening degree less than 30° in this study, due to the two-way air flow effect induced by differential temperature. The theoretical model was validated using the experimental data. The impacts of two-way air flow due to temperature difference and the supply air flow rate were also analyzed using the theoretical model as well as experimental data. For real houses, it seems that the idea about the positive pressure control method for preventing the entry of outdoor particles has a blind side.

  7. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of a direct current air corona discharge under atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xing-Hua; He Wei; Yang Fan; Wang Hong-Yu; Liao Rui-Jin; Xiao Han-Guang

    2012-01-01

    Air corona discharge is one of the critical problems associated with high-voltage equipment.Investigating the corona mechanism plays a key role in enhancing the electrical insulation performance.An improved self-consistent multi-component two-dimensional plasma hybrid model is presented for the simulation of a direct current atmospheric pressure corona discharge in air.The model is based on plasma hydrodynamic and chemical models,and includes 12 species and 26 reactions.In addition,the photoionization effect is introduced into the model.The simulation on a bar-plate electrode configuration with an inter-electrode gap of 5.0 mm is carried out.The discharge voltage-current characteristics and the current density distribution predicted by the hybrid model agree with the experimental measurements.In addition,the dynamics of volume charged species generation,discharge current waveform,current density distribution at an electrode,charge density,electron temperature,and electric field variations are investigated in detail based on the model.The results indicate that the model can contribute valuable insights into the physics of an air plasma discharge.

  8. Pressure effect on dissimilatory sulfate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, A. J.; Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Biosouring is the production of H2S by sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) in-situ or in the produced fluids of oil reservoirs. Sulfide is explosive, toxic and corrosive which can trigger equipment and transportation failure, leading to environmental catastrophe. As oil exploration and reservoir development continue, subsequent enhanced recovery is occurring in progressively deeper formations and typical oil reservoir pressures range from 10-50 MPa. Therefore, an understanding of souring control effects will require an accurate understanding of the influence of pressure on SRM metabolism and the efficacy of souring control treatments at high pressure. Considerable work to date has focussed on souring control at ambient pressure; however, the influence of pressure on biogeochemical processes and souring treatments in oil reservoirs is poorly understood. To explore the impact of pressure on SRM, wild type Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 (isolated from a producing oil well in Ventura County, California) was grown under a range of pressures (0.1-14 MPa) at 30 °C. Complete sulfate reduction occurred in all pressures tested within 3 days, but microbial growth was inhibited with increasing pressure. Bar-seq identified several genes associated with flagella biosynthesis (including FlhB) and assembly as important for survival at elevated pressure and fitness was confirmed using individual transposon mutants. Flagellar genes have previously been implicated with biofilm formation and confocal microscopy on glass slides incubated with wild type D. alaskensis G20 showed more biomass associated with surfaces under pressure, highlighting the link between pressure, flagellar and biofilm formation. To determine the effect of pressure on the efficacy of SRM inhibitors, IC50 experiments were conducted and D. alaskensis G20 showed a greater resistance to nitrate and the antibiotic chloramphenicol, but a lower resistance to perchlorate. These results will be discussed in the context of

  9. Cell immobilization on polymer by air atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Om, Ji-yeon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2014-08-01

    The study of cell immobilization on delicate polymer by an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (AAPPJ) is required for its medical application. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether AAPPJ treatment induce cell immobilization effect on delicate polymers without significant change of surface roughness by AAPPJ treatment. After surface roughness, dynamic contact angle, and chemical characteristics were investigated, the immobilization effect was evaluated with the mouse fibroblast L929 cell line. Surface roughness change was not observed (P > 0.05) in either delicate dental wax or polystyrene plate (PSP) as advancing and receding contact angles significantly decreased (P < 0.05), thanks to decreased hydrocarbon and formation of oxygen-related functional groups in treated PSP. Adherent L929 cells with elongated morphology were found in treated PSP along with the formation of immobilization markers vinculin and actin cytoskeleton. Increased PTK2 gene expression upregulated these markers on treated PSP.

  10. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Metz, Joannah M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from 1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems.

  11. Effects of air vessel on water hammer in high-head pumping station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Wang, F. J.; Zou, Z. C.; Li, X. N.; Zhang, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Effects of air vessel on water hammer process in a pumping station with high-head were analyzed by using the characteristics method. The results show that the air vessel volume is the key parameter that determines the protective effect on water hammer pressure. The maximum pressure in the system declines with increasing air vessel volume. For a fixed volume of air vessel, the shape of air vessel and mounting style, such as horizontal or vertical mounting, have little effect on the water hammer. In order to obtain good protection effects, the position of air vessel should be close to the outlet of the pump. Generally, once the volume of air vessel is guaranteed, the water hammer of a entire pipeline is effectively controlled.

  12. Conversion of Dynamic High Pressures from Air to Water for a Spherical TNT Charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Sharma

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical method has been applied to convert the dynamic high pressures from air-to-water for a spherical TNT charge. Standard equation of scaling law in air for TNT has been utilised to make the necessary conversions. The investigations have been made by taking into consideration the ambient pressure values for the two media. The calculations have been performed under the scaled distances to get better results. Experimental measurements using indigenous blast pressure gauge have been undertaken by detonating spherical charges of TNT under the same scaled distances in water to check the correctness of results and direct application of this method. A fairly close agreement between the theoretically computed and the experimental values of the dynamic high pressures shows the practical utility of this approach in that it enables an estimate of the experimental shock wave pressures, without conducting underwater experiments.

  13. 42 CFR 84.149 - Type C supplied-air respirator, demand and pressure demand class; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Type C supplied-air respirator, demand and pressure... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.149 Type C supplied-air respirator, demand and pressure demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Respirators tested under this section...

  14. Development of open air silicon deposition technology by silane-free atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical transport under local ambient gas control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Teruki; Konno, Nobuaki; Yoshida, Yukihisa

    2016-07-01

    Open air silicon deposition was performed by combining silane-free atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical transport and a newly developed local ambient gas control technology. The effect of air contamination on silicon deposition was investigated using a vacuum chamber, and the allowable air contamination level was confirmed to be 3 ppm. The capability of the local ambient gas control head was investigated numerically and experimentally. A safe and clean process environment with air contamination less than 1 ppm was achieved. Combining these technologies, a microcrystalline silicon film was deposited in open air, the properties of which were comparable to those of silicon films deposited in a vacuum chamber.

  15. Influence of ambient air pressure on impact pressure caused by breaking waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moutzouris, C.

    1979-01-01

    Engineers are interested in the dynamics of the interface waterstructure. In case of breaking of water waves on a structure high positive and sometimes negative pressures of very short duration occur. Not only the maxima and minima of the pressures on the structure are important to a designing engin

  16. Constant-Pressure Combustion Charts Including Effects of Diluent Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, L Richard; Bogart, Donald

    1949-01-01

    Charts are presented for the calculation of (a) the final temperatures and the temperature changes involved in constant-pressure combustion processes of air and in products of combustion of air and hydrocarbon fuels, and (b) the quantity of hydrocarbon fuels required in order to attain a specified combustion temperature when water, alcohol, water-alcohol mixtures, liquid ammonia, liquid carbon dioxide, liquid nitrogen, liquid oxygen, or their mixtures are added to air as diluents or refrigerants. The ideal combustion process and combustion with incomplete heat release from the primary fuel and from combustible diluents are considered. The effect of preheating the mixture of air and diluents and the effect of an initial water-vapor content in the combustion air on the required fuel quantity are also included. The charts are applicable only to processes in which the final mixture is leaner than stoichiometric and at temperatures where dissociation is unimportant. A chart is also included to permit the calculation of the stoichiometric ratio of hydrocarbon fuel to air with diluent addition. The use of the charts is illustrated by numerical examples.

  17. Air Pollution Exposure and Blood Pressure: An Updated Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgini, Paolo; Di Giosia, Paolo; Grassi, Davide; Rubenfire, Melvyn; Brook, Robert D; Ferri, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Both high arterial blood pressure (BP) and elevated levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution have been associated with an increased risk for several cardiovascular (CV) diseases, including stroke, heart failure, and myocardial infarction. Given that PM2.5 and high BP are each independently leading risk factors for premature mortality worldwide, a potential relationship between these factors would have tremendous public health repercussions. Therefore, the aim of this review is to summarize recent evidence linking air pollution and BP. Epidemiological findings demonstrate that particulate pollutants cause significant increases in BP parameters in relation to both short and long-term exposures, with robust evidence for exposures to PM2.5. Moreover, recent epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between residence within regions with higher levels of ambient PM and an increased incidence and prevalence of overt hypertension. Studies provide consistent results that elevated concentrations of pollutants increase hospital admissions and/or emergency visits for hypertensive disorders and also support that PM levels increases BP in vulnerable subsets of individuals (pregnant women, high CV risk individuals). In this context, PM-mediated BP elevations may be an important pathway which acts as a potential triggering factor for acute CV events. Mechanistic evidence illustrates plausible pathways by which acute and chronic exposures to air pollutants might disrupt hemodynamic balance favoring vasoconstriction, including autonomic imbalance and augmented release of various pro-oxidative, inflammatory and/or hemodynamically-active mediators. Together these responses may underlie PM-induced BP elevations; however, full details regarding the responsible mechanisms require further studies. As a consequence of the ubiquity of air pollution, even a small effect on raising BP and/or the prevalence of hypertension, i.e. the major risk factor for mortality

  18. Association between long-term air pollution and increased blood pressure and hypertension in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guang-Hui; Qian, Zhengmin Min; Xaverius, Pamela K; Trevathan, Edwin; Maalouf, Salwa; Parker, Jamaal; Yang, Laiji; Liu, Miao-Miao; Wang, Da; Ren, Wan-Hui; Ma, Wenjun; Wang, Jing; Zelicoff, Alan; Fu, Qiang; Simckes, Maayan

    2013-03-01

    Several studies have investigated the short-term effects of ambient air pollutants in the development of high blood pressure and hypertension. However, little information exists regarding the health effects of long-term exposure. To investigate the association between residential long-term exposure to air pollution and blood pressure and hypertension, we studied 24 845 Chinese adults in 11 districts of 3 northeastern cities from 2009 to 2010. Three-year average concentration of particles with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 µm (PM(10)), sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), nitrogen dioxides (NO(2)), and ozone (O(3)) were calculated from monitoring stations in the 11 districts. We used generalized additive models and 2-level logistic regressions models to examine the health effects. The results showed that the odds ratio for hypertension increased by 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.16) per 19 μg/m(3) increase in PM(10), 1.11 (95% CI, 1.04-1.18) per 20 μg/m(3) increase in SO(2), and 1.13 (95% CI, 1.06-1.20) per 22 μg/m(3) increase in O(3). The estimated increases in mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure were 0.87 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.48-1.27) and 0.32 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.08-0.56) per 19 μg/m(3) interquartile increase in PM(10), 0.80 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.46-1.14) and 0.31 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.10-0.51) per 20 μg/m(3) interquartile increase in SO(2), and 0.73 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.35-1.11) and 0.37 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.14-0.61) per 22 μg/m(3) interquartile increase in O(3). These associations were only statistically significant in men. In conclusion, long-term exposure to PM(10), SO(2), and O(3) was associated with increased arterial blood pressure and hypertension in the study population.

  19. Research on the water hammer protection of the long distance water supply project with the combined action of the air vessel and over-pressure relief valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D. D.; Jiang, J.; Zhao, Z.; Yi, W. S.; Lan, G.

    2013-12-01

    We take a concrete pumping station as an example in this paper. Through the calculation of water hammer protection with a specific pumping station water supply project, and the analysis of the principle, mathematical models and boundary conditions of air vessel and over-pressure relief valve we show that the air vessel can protect the water conveyance system and reduce the transient pressure damage due to various causes. Over-pressure relief valve can effectively reduce the water hammer because the water column re-bridge suddenly stops the pump and prevents pipeline burst. The paper indicates that the combination set of air vessel and over-pressure relief valve can greatly reduce the quantity of the air valve and can eliminate the water hammer phenomenon in the pipeline system due to the vaporization and water column separation and re-bridge. The conclusion could provide a reference for the water hammer protection of long-distance water supply system.

  20. A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun for nanomaterial synthesis in liquid phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zuo, Shasha; Liu, Jiahui; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-10-01

    A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun based on a dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes was proposed. The portable plasma gun with an embedded mini air pump was driven by a 12 V direct voltage battery. The air plasma jet generated from the gun could be touched without a common shock hazard. Besides working in air, the plasma gun can also work in water. The diagnostic result of optical emission spectroscopy showed the difference in reactive species of air plasma jet between in air and in water. The plasma gun was excited in 20 ml chloroauric acid aqueous solution with a concentration of 1.214 mM. A significant amount of gold nanoparticles were synthesized after 2 min continuous discharge. The plasma gun with these unique features is applicable in plasma medicine, etching, and s-nthesis of nanomaterials.

  1. A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun for nanomaterial synthesis in liquid phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zuo, Shasha; Liu, Jiahui [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Jue, E-mail: zhangjue@pku.edu.cn; Fang, Jing [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-10-15

    A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun based on a dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes was proposed. The portable plasma gun with an embedded mini air pump was driven by a 12 V direct voltage battery. The air plasma jet generated from the gun could be touched without a common shock hazard. Besides working in air, the plasma gun can also work in water. The diagnostic result of optical emission spectroscopy showed the difference in reactive species of air plasma jet between in air and in water. The plasma gun was excited in 20 ml chloroauric acid aqueous solution with a concentration of 1.214 mM. A significant amount of gold nanoparticles were synthesized after 2 min continuous discharge. The plasma gun with these unique features is applicable in plasma medicine, etching, and s-nthesis of nanomaterials.

  2. Numerical simulation of air flow field in high-pressure fan with splitter blades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianfeng LI; Junfu LU; Hai ZHANG; Qing LIU; Guangxi YUE

    2008-01-01

    For a deeper understanding of the flow char-acteristics in the high-pressure centrifugal blower of a fan of Model 9-26 with splitter blades, a three dimensional (3-D) numerical simulation of air flows in the fan was con-ducted with FLUENT software. The standard k-ε tur-bulent model and unstructured grids were used. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results showed that the performance of a fan could be improved by adding the splitter blades in the channel among the leaf blades. Under operational conditions, with the presence of splitter blades, the air flow rate of the fan increased about 5% and the total pressure at the outlet of the fan increased about 10% on average. It was also found that the length of the splitter blades affected the air flow and pressure drop. There is an optimal value for the length. The simulation results provide helpful information for improving the fan performance.

  3. Extreme Air Pollution Conditions Adversely Affect Blood Pressure and Insulin Resistance: The Air Pollution and Cardiometabolic Disease Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Robert D; Sun, Zhichao; Brook, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Rao, Xiaoquan; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Sun, Qinghua; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports that fine particulate matter adversely affects cardiometabolic diseases particularly in susceptible individuals; however, health effects induced by the extreme concentrations within megacities in Asia are not well described. We enrolled 65 nonsmoking adults with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in the Beijing metropolitan area into a panel study of 4 repeated visits across 4 seasons since 2012. Daily ambient fine particulate matter and personal black carbon levels ranged from 9.0 to 552.5 µg/m(3) and 0.2 to 24.5 µg/m(3), respectively, with extreme levels observed during January 2013. Cumulative fine particulate matter exposure windows across the prior 1 to 7 days were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure elevations ranging from 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.7) to 2.7 (0.6-4.8) mm Hg per SD increase (67.2 µg/m(3)), whereas cumulative black carbon exposure during the previous 2 to 5 days were significantly associated with ranges in elevations in diastolic blood pressure from 1.3 (0.0-2.5) to 1.7 (0.3-3.2) mm Hg per SD increase (3.6 µg/m(3)). Both black carbon and fine particulate matter were significantly associated with worsening insulin resistance (0.18 [0.01-0.36] and 0.22 [0.04-0.39] unit increase per SD increase of personal-level black carbon and 0.18 [0.02-0.34] and 0.22 [0.08-0.36] unit increase per SD increase of ambient fine particulate matter on lag days 4 and 5). These results provide important global public health warnings that air pollution may pose a risk to cardiometabolic health even at the extremely high concentrations faced by billions of people in the developing world today.

  4. Hydraulic Resistance and Liberation of Air in Aviation Kerosene Flow Through Diaphragms at Low Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanin, É. L.; Kitanina, E. É.; Zherebtsov, V. A.; Peganova, M. M.; Stepanov, S. G.; Bondarenko, D. A.; Morisson, D.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental investigations of the liberation of air in gravity flow of aviation fuel through a pipeline with diaphragms. Experiments were carried out in the pressure range 0.2-1.0 bar and temperature range -20 to +20°C. The TC-1 kerosene was preliminarily saturated with air at atmospheric pressure. The liberation of air after the diaphragms with three ratios of the flow area to the cross-sectional area of the pipeline has been investigated. The results of investigations of the two-phase flow in several experimental pipelines containing one or two diaphragms and other local hydraulic resistances have been generalized. The obtained approximation equations permit calculating the hydraulic resistance of the diaphragm in the two-phase flow and the mass gas content of air after the diaphragm in pipelines of complex geometry.

  5. Personal black carbon exposure influences ambulatory blood pressure: air pollution and cardiometabolic disease (AIRCMD-China) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyi; Sun, Zhichao; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Yang, Fumo; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Brook, Jeffrey R; Sun, Qinghua; Brook, Robert D; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Fan, Zhongjie

    2014-04-01

    Few prospective studies have assessed the blood pressure effect of extremely high air pollution encountered in Asia's megacities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between combustion-related air pollution with ambulatory blood pressure and autonomic function. During February to July 2012, personal black carbon was determined for 5 consecutive days using microaethalometers in patients with metabolic syndrome in Beijing, China. Simultaneous ambient fine particulate matter concentration was obtained from the Beijing Municipal Environmental Monitoring Center and the US Embassy. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate variability were measured from day 4. Arterial stiffness and endothelial function were obtained at the end of day 5. For statistical analysis, we used generalized additive mixed models for repeated outcomes and generalized linear models for single/summary outcomes. Mean (SD) of personal black carbon and fine particulate matter during 24 hours was 4.66 (2.89) and 64.2 (36.9) μg/m(3). Exposure to high levels of black carbon in the preceding hours was associated significantly with adverse cardiovascular responses. A unit increase in personal black carbon during the previous 10 hours was associated with an increase in systolic blood pressure of 0.53 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure of 0.37 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.89 and 0.10-0.65 mm Hg, respectively), a percentage change in low frequency to high frequency ratio of 5.11 and mean interbeat interval of -0.06 (95% confidence interval, 0.62-9.60 and -0.11 to -0.01, respectively). These findings highlight the public health effect of air pollution and the importance of reducing air pollution.

  6. Do sudden air temperature and pressure changes affect cardiovascular morbidity and mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavcová, E.; Davídkovová, H.; Kyselý, J.

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that sudden changes in weather (usually represented by air temperature and/or pressure) are associated with increases in daily mortality. Little is understood about physiological mechanisms responsible for the impacts of weather changes on mortality, and whether similar patterns appear for morbidity as well. Relatively little is known also about differences in the magnitude of the mortality response in provincial regions and in cities, where the impacts may be exacerbated by air pollution effects and/or heat island. The present study examines the effects of sudden air temperature and pressure changes on morbidity (represented by hospital admissions) and mortality due to cardiovascular diseases in the population of the Czech Republic (approx. 10 million inhabitants) and separately in the city of Prague (1.2 million inhabitants). The events are selected from data covering 1994-2009 using the methodology introduced by Plavcová and Kyselý (2010), and they are compared with the datasets on hospital admissions and daily mortality (both standardized to account for long-term changes and the seasonal and weekly cycles). Relative deviations of morbidity/mortality from the baseline were averaged over the selected events for days D-2 (2 days before a change) up to D+7 (7 days after), and their statistical significance was tested by means of the Monte Carlo method. The study aims at (i) identifying those weather changes associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity/mortality, separately in summer and winter, (ii) comparing the effects of weather changes on morbidity and mortality, (iii) identifying whether urban population of Prague is more/less vulnerable in comparison to the population of the whole Czech Republic, (iv) comparing the effects for different cardiovascular diseases (ischaemic heart diseases, ICD-10 codes I20-I25; cerebrovascular diseases, I60-I69; hypertension, I10; atherosclerosis, I70) and individual population groups (by age

  7. Optimal heat rejection pressure in transcritical carbon dioxide air conditioning and heat pump systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Shengming; Jakobsen, Arne

    1998-01-01

    Due to the urgent need for environmentally benign refrigerants, the use of the natural substance carbon dioxide in refrigeration systems has gained more and more attention. In systems such as automobile air-conditioners and heat pumps, owing to the relatively high heat rejection temperatures...... dioxide air conditioning or heat pump systems and for intelligent controlling such systems......., the cycles using carbon dioxide as refrigerant will have to operate in the transcritical area. In a transcritical carbon dioxide system, there is an optimal heat rejection pressure that gives a maximum COP. In this paper, it is shown that the value of this optimal heat rejection pressure mainly depends...

  8. Method of measuring the quantity of air liberated in aviation fuel flow at low pipeline pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanin, É. L.; Kitanina, E. É.; Zherebtsov, V. A.; Merkulov, O. A.; Peganova, M. M.; Bondarenko, D. A.; Morrison, D.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental studies of the quantity of air liberated in the flow of aviation fuel in the pipe at a low pressure. Experiments were carried out in the pressure range from 0.2 to 1.0 bar, and the temperature was varied from -20 to +20°C. We propose a method for determining the mass concentration of air dissolved in the fuel measured with the help of a chromatograph. An attempt to use an optical method for measuring the gas content of the flow has shown that it is useful in combination with a chromatographic method needed to calibrate the optical scheme.

  9. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

    2014-02-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  10. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, Armin [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Bergey, Daniel [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    In this project, Building America research team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. This was because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four system factor categories: balance, distribution, outside air source, and recirculation filtration. Recommended system factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  11. Effects of cryogenic cold air jet cutting on chip break in metal machining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ying; TONG Mingwei; WU Zhijuan

    2004-01-01

    The half-dry cutting employs cryogenic compressed air cooled down to (-10 to -40) ℃ and a micro-dosage of lubricating oil, called cryogenic cold air jet cutting was studied. On the basis of a comparative experiment on dry and cryogenic cold air jet cuttings carried out for grade 45 steel, the effects of cryogenic cold air jet on the breaking of chips were discussed.The experimental results reveal that in the valid ranges of pressure and temperature, the cryogenic cold air jet widens the chip breaking areas effectively. When the cutting depth is not greater than 1 mm, the influence of chip breaking is much more significant. But different injecting angle of cold air has different influence on the chip-break. From the experiment, the optimized jet injecting angle, temperature effecting range and pressure working range of cold air are obtained. These results can offer a foundation for industrial manufacturing.

  12. Effects of Ambient Pressure on Bubble Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢新培; 刘明海; 江中和; 潘垣

    2002-01-01

    The effects of the ambient pressure Pambient on the bubble characteristics of pulsed discharge in water are investigated. The simulation results show that, when Pambient increases from 1 atm to 100 atm, the bubble radius R decreases from 4cma to 7mm, and its pulsation period decreases frown 8ms to 0.2ms. The results also show that the peak pressure of the first shock wave is independent of Pambient, but the peak pressure of the second shock wave caused by the bubble re-expansion decreases when Pambient increases. On the other hand, the larger the ambient pressure, the larger the peak pressure of the plasma in the bubble, while the plasma temperature is independent of Pambient.

  13. Theoretical Computation for Non-Equilibrium Air Plasma Electrical Conductivity at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Dong; GUO Wen-Kang; XU Ping; LIANG Rong-Qing

    2007-01-01

    @@ Based on the Chapman-Enskog theory, we calculate the electrical conductivity of non-equilibrium air plasma in the two-temperature model. We consider different degrees of non-equilibrium, which is defined by the ratio of electronic temperature to heavy particles temperature. The method of computing the composition of air plasma is demonstrated. After calculating the electrical conductivity from electron temperature 1000 K to 15000K, the present result is compared with Murphy's study [Plasma Chem. Plasma Process 15 (1994) 279] for equilibrium case. All the calculation is completed at atmospheric pressure. The present results may have potential applications in numerical calculation of non-equilibrium air plasma.

  14. Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering profiles of air at different temperatures and pressures

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Ziyu; van de Water, Willem; Ubachs, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Rayleigh Brillouin (RB) scattering profiles for air have been recorded for the temperature range from 255 to 340 K and the pressure range from 640 to 3300 mbar, covering the conditions relevant for the Earth's atmosphere and for planned atmospheric light detection and ranging (LIDAR) missions. The measurements performed at a wavelength of 366.8 nm detect spontaneous RB scattering at a 90 degree scattering angle from a sensitive intracavity setup, delivering scattering profiles at a 1 percent rms noise level or better. The elusive transport coefficient, the bulk viscosity, is effectively derived by a comparing the measurements to the model, yielding an increased trend. The calculated (Tenti S6) line shapes are consistent with experimental data at the level of 2 percent, meeting the requirements for the future RB scattering LIDAR missions in the Earth's atmosphere. However, the systematic 2 percent deviation may imply that the model has a limit to describe the finest details of RB scattering in air. Finally, it...

  15. Biological effects of air pollution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosting, P.E.; Houten, J.G. ten

    1971-01-01

    Exposure of living organisms to sulphur dioxide, sulphuric acid, fly ash, other particulates, and oxides of nitrogen is discussed from the points of view of air pollution phenomenology, specific and nonspecific responses of plants, animals and man, and environmental and constitutional factors that i

  16. Studies of air pollution effects on vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The report consists of three parts which summarize pollutant-vegetation effects research studies. These include: oxidant effects of primary productivity in ponderosa pine in the San Bernardino National Forest; air pollution effects on vegetation related to geothermal power development; and regional assessment of air pollution impact on vegetation by mathematical modeling. A list of publications that report results of the studies is included in an appendix.

  17. Etching of polymers, proteins and bacterial spores by atmospheric pressure DBD plasma in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzminova, A.; Kretková, T.; Kylián, O.; Hanuš, J.; Khalakhan, I.; Prukner, V.; Doležalová, E.; Šimek, M.; Biederman, H.

    2017-04-01

    Many studies proved that non-equilibrium discharges generated at atmospheric pressure are highly effective for the bio-decontamination of surfaces of various materials. One of the key processes that leads to a desired result is plasma etching and thus the evaluation of etching rates of organic materials is of high importance. However, the comparison of reported results is rather difficult if impossible as different authors use diverse sources of atmospheric plasma that are operated at significantly different operational parameters. Therefore, we report here on the systematic study of the etching of nine different common polymers that mimic the different structures of more complicated biological systems, bovine serum albumin (BSA) selected as the model protein and spores of Bacillus subtilis taken as a representative of highly resistant micro-organisms. The treatment of these materials was performed by means of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) sustained in open air at constant conditions. All tested polymers, BSA and spores, were readily etched by DBD plasma. However, the measured etching rates were found to be dependent on the chemical structure of treated materials, namely on the presence of oxygen in the structure of polymers.

  18. Surface Treatment of Polyethylene Terephthalate Film Using Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge in Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方志; 邱毓昌; 王辉

    2004-01-01

    Non-thermal plasmas under atmospheric pressure are of great interest in polymer surface processing because of their convenience, effectiveness and low cost. In this paper, the treatment of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film surface for improving hydrophilicity using the non-thermal plasma generated by atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD) in air is conducted.The discharge characteristics of APGD are shown by measurement of their electrical discharge parameters and observation of light-emission phenomena, and the surface properties of PET before and after the APGD treatment are studied using contact angle measurement, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It is found that the APGD is homogeneous and stable in the whole gas gap, which differs from the commonly filamentary dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). A short time (several seconds) APGD treatment can modify the surface characteristics of PET film markedly and uniformly. After 10 s APGD treatment, the surface oxygen content of PET surface increases to 39%, and the water contact angle decreases to 19°, respectively.

  19. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renwu Zhou

    Full Text Available Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS. Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma.

  20. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhuang, Jinxing; Zong, Zichao; Zhang, Xianhui; Liu, Dongping; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-01-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma. PMID:27183129

  1. Diffuse plasma treatment of polyamide 66 fabric in atmospheric pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lee; Peng, Ming-yang; Teng, Yun; Gao, Guozhen

    2016-01-01

    The polyamide 66 (PA66) fabrics are hard to be colored or glued in industrial production due to the poor hydrophily. Diffuse plasma is a kind of non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure in air. This paper proposes that large-scale diffuse plasma generated between wire electrodes can be employed for improving the hydrophily of PA66 fabrics. A repetitive nanosecond-pulse diffuse-discharge reactor using a cylindrical wire electrode configuration is presented, which can generate large-scale non-thermal plasmas steadily at atmospheric pressure without any barrier dielectric. Then the reactor is used to treat PA66 fabrics in different discharge conditions. The hydrophilicity property of modified PA66 is measured by wicking test method. The modified PA66 is also analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to prove the surface changes in physical microstructure and chemical functional groups, respectively. What's more, the effects of treatment time and treatment frequency on surface modification are investigated and discussed.

  2. LOCA air-injection loads in BWR Mark II pressure suppression containment systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukita, Y.; Shiba, M. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki); Namatame, K. (Institute of Nuclear Safety, Tokyo (Japan))

    1984-02-01

    Large-scale blowdown tests were conducted to investigate the thermal-hydrodynamic response of a boiling-water reactor (BWR) Mark II pressure suppression containment system to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident. This paper presents the test results on the early blowdown transients, where air in the drywell is injected into the pressure suppression pool and induces various hydrodynamic loads onto the containment pressure boundary and internal structures. The test data are compared to predictions by analytical models used for the licensing evaluation of the hydrodynamic loads to assess these models.

  3. Physical effects of negative air ions in a wet sauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, I.; Noro, Hiroshi; Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Mano, Yukio; Agishi, Yuko

    The physical effects of negative air ions on humans were determined in an experimental sauna room equipped with an ionizer. Thirteen healthy persons took a wet sauna bath (dry bulb temperature 42° C, relative humidity 100%, 10 min exposure) with or without negative air ions. The subjects were not told when they were being exposed to negative air ions. There were no differences in the moods of these persons or changes in their blood pressures between the two saunas. The surface temperatures of the foreheads, hands, and legs in the sauna with negative ions were significantly higher than those in the sauna without ions. The pulse rates and sweat produced in the sauna with ions were singificantly higher than those in the sauna without ions. The results suggest that negative ions may amplify the effects on humans of the sauna.

  4. A coupled surface/subsurface flow model accounting for air entrapment and air pressure counterflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delfs, Jens Olaf; Wang, Wenqing; Kalbacher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    wave) shallow flow and two-phase flow in a porous medium. The simultaneous mass transfer between the soil, overland, and atmosphere compartments is achieved by upgrading a fully established leakance concept for overland-soil liquid exchange to an air exchange flux between soil and atmosphere. In a new...

  5. Health effects of air conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, C.; Caillaud, D.

    The air conditioning used in residential or commercial buildings (offices, hotels, sterile areas of hospitals, computer and electronics industries) is responsible for a certain number of well identified ailments which can be classified in three groups: infections (legionnaires'disease, ornithosis), allergies (mainly respiratory) eg. rhinitis, asthma, alveolitis but also Monday morning illness or humidifier fever, various functional disorders grouped under the name Sick Building Syndrome. To avoid these problems, a certain number of recommendations may be made. They concern: installation of air conditioning, humidification which is the cause of bacterial and fungal contamination, filtration, monitoring of the installation by qualitative and quantitative measurements, maintenance. The legal problems relating to these illnesses, the responsibility for which is ultimately laid at the door of the installers, should also be mentioned. Allergies are recognized to be of professional origin in Table 66 of allergic illnesses issued by the Social Security.

  6. Spontaneous ignition of methane-air mixtures in a wide range of pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhukov, VP; Sechenov, VA; Starikovskii, AY

    2003-01-01

    The ignition delay in methane-air mixtures (phi = 0.5) within the range of temperatures of 1200-1700 K and pressures of 3-450 atm behind reflected shock waves in a shock tube is measured on the basis of emission of the electron-excited OH radical (transition A(2)Sigma(+) - X(2)Pi) at the wavelength

  7. Spatiotemporally resolved characteristics of a gliding arc discharge in a turbulent air flow at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    A gliding arc discharge was generated in a turbulent air flow at atmospheric pressure driven by a 35 kHz alternating current (AC) electric power. The spatiotemporally resolved characteristics of the gliding arc discharge, including glow-type discharges, spark-type discharges, short-cutting events...

  8. Sustained diffusive alternating current gliding arc discharge in atmospheric pressure air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Li, Zhongshan

    2014-01-01

    Rapid transition from glow discharge to thermal arc has been a common problem in generating stable high-power non-thermal plasmas especially at ambient conditions. A sustained diffusive gliding arc discharge was generated in a large volume in atmospheric pressure air, driven by an alternating...

  9. The Determination of the Percent of Oxygen in Air Using a Gas Pressure Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, James; Chancey, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    The experiment of determination of the percent of oxygen in air is performed in a general chemistry laboratory in which students compare the results calculated from the pressure measurements obtained with the calculator-based systems to those obtained in a water-measurement method. This experiment allows students to explore a fundamental reaction…

  10. Electrode Evaporation Effects on Air Arc Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xingwen; CHEN Degui; LI Rui; WU Yi; NIU Chunping

    2008-01-01

    A numerical study of the effects of copper and silver vapours on the air arc behavior is performed. The commercial software FLUENT is adapted and modified to develop a two-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) models of arc with the thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients, net emission coefficient for the radiation model of 99% ai-1% Cu, 99% air-1% Ag, and pure air, respectively. The simulation result demonstrates that vaporization of the electrode material may cool the arc center region and reduce the arc velocity. The effects of Ag vapour are stronger compared to those of Cu vapour.

  11. Correcting Air-Pressure Data Collected by MEMS Sensors in Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na-Young Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel correction method for air-pressure data collected by microelectromechanical pressure sensors embedded in Android-based smartphones, in order to render them usable as meteorological data. The first step of the proposed correction method involves removing the mechanically derived outliers existing beyond the physical limits and those existing outside 3σ, as well as a reduction to the mean sea level pressure using the altitude data from digital elevation models. The second correction step involves classifying data by location and linear-regression analysis utilizing the temperature and humidity sensed by the smartphone to reduce correction errors by performing the analysis according to personalized settings. Air-pressure data obtained from smartphones is subject to several influential factors, depending on the users’ external environment. However, once corrected for spatial location, temperature, and humidity and for individual users after a comprehensive quality control, the corrected air-pressure data was highly reliable as an auxiliary resource for automatic weather stations.

  12. Systematic errors in global air-sea CO2 flux caused by temporal averaging of sea-level pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kettle

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term temporal averaging of meteorological data, such as wind speed and air pressure, can cause large errors in air-sea carbon flux estimates. Other researchers have already shown that time averaging of wind speed data creates large errors in flux due to the non-linear dependence of the gas transfer velocity on wind speed (Bates and Merlivat, 2001. However, in general, wind speed is negatively correlated with air pressure, and a given fractional change in the pressure of dry air produces an equivalent fractional change in the atmospheric partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2air. Thus low pressure systems cause a drop in pCO2air, which together with the associated high winds, promotes outgassing/reduces uptake of CO2 from the ocean. Here we quantify the errors in global carbon flux estimates caused by using monthly or climatological pressure data to calculate pCO2air (and thus ignoring the covariance of wind and pressure over the period 1990-1999, using two common parameterisations for gas transfer velocity. Results show that on average, compared with estimates made using 6 hourly pressure data, the global oceanic sink is systematically overestimated by 7% (W92 and 10% (WM99 when monthly mean pressure is used, and 9% (W92 and 12% (WM99 when climatological pressure is used.

  13. Systematic errors in global air-sea CO2 flux caused by temporal averaging of sea-level pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Merchant

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term temporal averaging of meteorological data, such as wind speed and air pressure, can cause large errors in air-sea carbon flux estimates. Other researchers have already shown that time averaging of wind speed data creates large errors in flux due to the non-linear dependence of the gas transfer velocity on wind speed (Bates and Merlivat, 2001. However, in general, wind speed is negatively correlated with air pressure, and a given fractional change in the pressure of dry air produces an equivalent fractional change in the atmospheric partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2air. Thus low pressure systems cause a drop in pCO2air, which together with the associated high winds, promotes outgassing/reduces uptake of CO2 from the ocean. Here we quantify the errors in global carbon flux estimates caused by using monthly or climatological pressure data to calculate pCO2air (and thus ignoring the covariance of wind and pressure over the period 1990–1999, using two common parameterisations for gas transfer velocity (Wanninkhof, 1992 (W92 and Wanninkhof and McGillis, 1999 (WM99. Results show that on average, compared with estimates made using 6 hourly pressure data, the global oceanic sink is systematically overestimated by 7% (W92 and 10% (WM99 when monthly mean pressure is used, and 9% (W92 and 12% (WM99 when climatological pressure is used.

  14. Long-term ambient air pollution exposure and risk of high blood pressure among citizens in Nis, Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanković, Aleksandra; Nikolić, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that long-term exposure to air pollution increases the risk for high blood pressure (BP). The aim of our study is to evaluate any effects in BP in citizens exposed to long-term ambient air pollution. The subjects are 1136 citizens, aged 18-70 years, living for more than 5 years in the same home in the areas with a different level of air pollution. The air concentrations of black smoke and sulfur dioxide were determined in the period from 2001 to 2011. We measured systolic and diastolic BP and heart rate. Multivariate methods were used in the analysis. Alcohol consumption had the greatest influence on the incidence of hypertension as a risk factor (RR: 3.461; 95% CI: 1.72-6.93) and age had the least (RR: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.183-1.92). Exposure to air pollution increases risk for developing hypertension 2.5 times (95% CI: 1.46-4.49). Physical activity has proved to be statistically significant protective factor for the development of hypertension. Long-term exposure to low levels of main air pollutants is significantly associated with elevated risk of hypertension.

  15. Study of nanosecond discharges in different H2 air mixtures at atmospheric pressure for plasma-assisted applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon, Anne; Kobayashi, Sumire; Bonaventura, Zdenek; Tholin, Fabien; Popov, Nikolay

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents 2D simulations of nanosecond pulsed discharges between two point electrodes in different H2/air mixtures and in air at atmospheric pressure. A fluid model is coupled with detailed kinetic schemes for air and different H2/air mixtures to simulate the discharge dynamics. First, as the positive and negative ionization waves propagate in the interelectrode gap, it has been observed that in H2/air mixtures with equivalence ratios between 0.3 and 2, major positive ions produced by the nanosecond discharge are N2+,O2+and HN2+.The discharge dynamics is shown to vary only slightly for equivalence ratios of the H2/air mixture between 0.3 and 2. Then, as the discharge transits to a nanosecond spark discharge, we have studied the different chemical reactions that lead to fast gas heating and to the production of radicals, as O,H and OH. Both thermal and chemical effects of the nanosecond spark discharge are of interest for plasma assisted combustion applications. This work has been supported by the project DRACO (Grant No. ANR-13-IS09-0004) and the french russian LIA Kappa.

  16. High pressure effects in anaesthesia and narcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; McMillan, Paul F; Greenfield, Susan A

    2006-10-01

    There is growing interest in determining the effects of high pressure on biological functions. Studies of brain processes under hyperbaric conditions can give a unique insight into phenomena such as nitrogen narcosis, inert gas anaesthesia, and pressure reversal of the effects of anaesthetic and narcotic agents. Such research may shed light on the action of anaesthetics, which remains poorly understood, and on the nature of consciousness itself. Various studies have established the behavioural response of organisms to hyperbaric conditions, in the presence or absence of anaesthetic agents. At the molecular level, X-ray crystallography has been used to investigate the incorporation of species like Xe in hydrophobic pockets within model ion channels that may account for pressure effects on neuronal transmission. New magnetic resonance imaging techniques are providing tomographic three-dimensional images that detail brain structure and function, and that can be correlated with behavioural studies and psychological test results. Such whole organ techniques are linked to the molecular scale via voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging studies on brain slices that provide time-resolved images of the dynamic formation and interconnection of inter-neuronal complexes. The VSD experiments are readily adapted to in situ studies under high pressure conditions. In this tutorial review we review the current state of knowledge of hyperbaric effects on brain processes: anaesthesia and narcosis, recent studies at the molecular level via protein crystallography at high pressure in a Xe atmosphere, and we also present some preliminary results of VSD imaging of brain slices under hyperbaric conditions.

  17. Pulsed positive discharges in air at moderate pressures near a dielectric rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinova, A.; Trienekens, D.; Ebert, U.; Nijdam, S.; Christen, T.

    2016-10-01

    We study pulsed positive discharges in air in a cylindrically symmetric setup with an electrode needle close (about 1 mm) above the top of a dielectric cylindrical rod of 4 mm in diameter mounted at its bottom on a grounded plate electrode. We present ICCD (intensified charge-coupled device) pictures and evaluations of experiments as well as simulations with a fluid discharge model; the simulations use cylindrical symmetry. In the experiments, there is an initial inception cloud phase, where the cylindrical symmetry is maintained, and later a streamer phase, where it is broken spontaneously. At 75-150 mbar, discharges with cylindrical symmetry are not attracted to the dielectric rod, but move away from it. The dielectric rod plays the sole role of an obstacle that shades (in the context of photoionization) a cone-shaped part of the inception cloud; the cone size is determined by the geometry of the setup. The material properties of the dielectric rod, such as its dielectric permittivity and the efficiency of the photon induced secondary electron emission do not have a noticeable effect. This is due to the abundance of photoionization in air, which supplies a positive discharge with free electrons and allows it to propagate along the electric field lines. Using some simple field calculations, we show that field enhancement due to dielectric polarization does not play a significant role in our geometry as long as the discharge maintains its cylindrical symmetry. The field component towards the rod is insufficiently enhanced to cause the discharge to move towards the rod. Any additional electrons produced by the dielectric surface do not influence this discharge morphology. This interpretation is supported by both experiments and simulations. At higher pressures (400-600 mbar) or for larger gaps between the needle and the dielectric rod, the inception cloud reaches its maximal radius within the gap between needle and rod and destabilizes there. In those cases

  18. A Comparative Study of Sound Speed in Air at Room Temperature between a Pressure Sensor and a Sound Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrani, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the comparison of sound speed measurements in air using two types of sensor that are widely employed in physics and engineering education, namely a pressure sensor and a sound sensor. A computer-based laboratory with pressure and sound sensors was used to carry out measurements of air through a 60 ml syringe. The fast Fourier…

  19. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. 84.157 Section 84.157 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.157 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. (a) The...

  20. Modeling of Pressure Effects in HVDC Cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Peter; Hassager, Ole; Strøbech, Esben

    1999-01-01

    A model is developed for the prediction of pressure effects in HVDC mass impregnatedcables as a result of temperature changes.To test the model assumptions, experiments were performed in cable like geometries.It is concluded that the model may predict the formation of gas cavities.......A model is developed for the prediction of pressure effects in HVDC mass impregnatedcables as a result of temperature changes.To test the model assumptions, experiments were performed in cable like geometries.It is concluded that the model may predict the formation of gas cavities....

  1. Calibrating airborne measurements of airspeed, pressure and temperature using a Doppler laser air-motion sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Cooper

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A new laser air-motion sensor measures the true airspeed with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.1 m s−1 and so reduces uncertainty in the measured component of the relative wind along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft to about the same level. The calculated pressure expected from that airspeed at the inlet of a pitot tube then provides a basis for calibrating the measurements of dynamic and static pressure, reducing standard uncertainty in those measurements to less than 0.3 hPa and the precision applicable to steady flight conditions to about 0.1 hPa. These improved measurements of pressure, combined with high-resolution measurements of geometric altitude from the global positioning system, then indicate (via integrations of the hydrostatic equation during climbs and descents that the offset and uncertainty in temperature measurement for one research aircraft are +0.3 ± 0.3 °C. For airspeed, pressure and temperature, these are significant reductions in uncertainty vs. those obtained from calibrations using standard techniques. Finally, it is shown that although the initial calibration of the measured static and dynamic pressures requires a measured temperature, once calibrated these measured pressures and the measurement of airspeed from the new laser air-motion sensor provide a measurement of temperature that does not depend on any other temperature sensor.

  2. Earth's air pressure 2.7 billion years ago constrained to less than half of modern levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Sanjoy M.; Buick, Roger; Hagadorn, James W.; Blake, Tim S.; Perreault, John M.; Harnmeijer, Jelte P.; Catling, David C.

    2016-06-01

    How the Earth stayed warm several billion years ago when the Sun was considerably fainter is the long-standing problem of the `faint young Sun paradox'. Because of negligible O2 and only moderate CO2 levels in the Archaean atmosphere, methane has been invoked as an auxiliary greenhouse gas. Alternatively, pressure broadening in a thicker atmosphere with a N2 partial pressure around 1.6-2.4 bar could have enhanced the greenhouse effect. But fossilized raindrop imprints indicate that air pressure 2.7 billion years ago (Gyr) was below twice modern levels and probably below 1.1 bar, precluding such pressure enhancement. This result is supported by nitrogen and argon isotope studies of fluid inclusions in 3.0-3.5 Gyr rocks. Here, we calculate absolute Archaean barometric pressure using the size distribution of gas bubbles in basaltic lava flows that solidified at sea level ~2.7 Gyr in the Pilbara Craton, Australia. Our data indicate a surprisingly low surface atmospheric pressure of Patm = 0.23 +/- 0.23 (2σ) bar, and combined with previous studies suggests ~0.5 bar as an upper limit to late Archaean Patm. The result implies that the thin atmosphere was rich in auxiliary greenhouse gases and that Patm fluctuated over geologic time to a previously unrecognized extent.

  3. Unraveling the "pressure effect" in nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedekind, Jan; Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Brus, David; Reguera, David

    2008-09-19

    The influence of the pressure of a chemically inert carrier gas on the nucleation rate is one of the biggest puzzles in the research of gas-liquid nucleation. Experiments can show a positive effect, a negative effect, or no effect at all. The same experiment may show both trends for the same substance depending on temperature, or for different substances at the same temperature. We show how this ambiguous effect naturally arises from the competition of two contributions: nonisothermal effects and pressure-volume work. Our model clarifies seemingly contradictory experimental results and quantifies the variation of the nucleation ability of a substance in the presence of an ambient gas. Our findings are corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations and might have important implications since nucleation in experiments, technical applications, and nature practically always occurs in the presence of an ambient gas.

  4. Effects of atmospheric pressure fluctuations on hill-side coal fires and surface anomalies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Zeyang; Zhu Hongqing; Xu Jiyuan; Qin Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents numerical studies on the effects of atmospheric pressure fluctuations on hill-side coal fires and their surface anomalies. Based on the single-particle reaction–diffusion model, a formula to estimate oxygen consumption rate at high temperature controlled by oxygen transport is proposed. Daily fluctuant atmospheric pressure was imposed on boundaries, including the abandoned gallery and cracks. Simulated results show that the effects of atmospheric pressure fluctuations on coal fires and surface anomalies depend on two factors: the fluctuant amplitude and the pressure difference between inlet(s) and outlet(s) of the air ventilation system. If the pressure difference is close to the fluctuant amplitude, atmospheric pressure fluctuations greatly enhance gas flow motion and tempera-tures of the combustion zone and outtake(s). If the pressure difference is much larger than the fluctuant amplitude, atmospheric pressure fluctuations exert no impact on underground coal fires and surface anomalies.

  5. Air pollution holiday effect in metropolitan Kaohsiung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, P.; Chen, P. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Different from Taipei, the metropolitan Kaohsiung which is a coastal and industrial city has the major pollution sources from stationary sources such as coal-fired power plants, petrochemical facilities and steel plants, rather than mobile sources. This study was an attempt to conduct a comprehensive and systematical examination of the holiday effect, defined as the difference in air pollutant concentrations between holiday and non-holiday periods, over the Kaohsiung metropolitan area. We documented evidence of a "holiday effect", where concentrations of NOx, CO, NMHC, SO2 and PM10 were significantly different between holidays and non-holidays, in the Kaohsiung metropolitan area from daily surface measurements of seven air quality monitoring stations of the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration during the Chinese New Year (CNY) and non-Chinese New Year (NCNY) periods of 1994-2010. Concentrations of the five pollutants were lower in the CNY than in the NCNY period, however, that of O3 was higher in the CNY than in the NCNY period and had no holiday effect. The exclusion of the bad air quality day (PSI > 100) and the Lantern Festival Day showed no significant effects on the holiday effects of air pollutants. Ship transportation data of Kaohsiung Harbor Bureau showed a statistically significant difference in the CNY and NCNY period. This difference was consistent with those found in air pollutant concentrations of some industrial and general stations in coastal areas, implying the possible impact of traffic activity on the air quality of coastal areas. Holiday effects of air pollutants over the Taipei metropolitan area by Tan et al. (2009) are also compared.

  6. Soot Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Faeth, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Soot oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round jets burning in coflowing air considering acetylene, ethylene, proplyene and propane as fuels. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation mainly occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of stable major gas species (N2, H2O, H2, 02, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, and C3H8) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by the deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption technique and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. It was found that soot surface oxidation rates are not particularly affected by fuel type for laminar diffusion flames and are described reasonably well by the OH surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.10, (standard deviation of 0.07) with no significant effect of fuel type in this behavior; these findings are in good agreement with the classical laminar premixed flame measurements of Neoh et al. Finally, direct rates of surface oxidation by O2 were small compared to OH oxidation for present conditions, based on estimated O2 oxidation rates due to Nagle and Strickland-Constable, because soot oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 1.2% by volume.

  7. Soot Oxidation in Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Soot oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round jets burning in coflowing air considering acetylene, ethylene, propylene and propane as fuels. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation mainly occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of stable major gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2,C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, and C3H8) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by the deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption technique and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. It was found that soot surface oxidation rates are not particularly affected by fuel type for laminar diffusion flames and are described reasonably well by the OH surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.10, (standard deviation of 0.07) with no significant effect of fuel type in this behavior; these findings are in good agreement with the classical laminar premixed flame measurements of Neoh et al. Finally, direct rates of surface oxidation by O2 were small compared to OH oxidation for present conditions, based on estimated O2 oxidation rates due to Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962), because soot oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 1.2% by volume.

  8. Air-driven Brazil nut effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, M.; Swift, Michael; King, P.

    2003-07-01

    A large heavy object may rise to the top of a bed of smaller particles under the influence of vertical vibration, the “Brazil nut effect.” Recently it has been noted that interstitial air can influence the Brazil nut rise time. Here we report that the air movement induced by vertical vibration produces a very strong Brazil nut effect for fine granular beds. We use a porous-bottomed box to investigate the mechanism responsible for this effect and to demonstrate that it is related to the piling of fine beds, first reported by Chladni and studied by Faraday. Both effects are due to the strong interaction of the fine particles with the air, as it is forced through the bed by the vibration.

  9. Experimental Study on a Standing Wave Thermoacoustic Prime Mover with Air Working Gas at Various Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Ikhsan; Achmadin, Wahyu N.; Murti, Prastowo; Nohtomi, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Thermoacoustic prime mover is an energy conversion device which converts thermal energy into acoustic work (sound wave). The advantages of this machine are that it can work with air as the working gas and does not produce any exhaust gases, so that it is environmentally friendly. This paper describes an experimental study on a standing wave thermoacoustic prime mover with air as the working gas at various pressures from 0.05 MPa to 0.6 MPa. We found that 0.2 MPa is the optimum pressure which gives the lowest onset temperature difference of 355 °C. This pressure value would be more preferable in harnessing low grade heat sources to power the thermoacoustic prime mover. In addition, we find that the lowest onset temperature difference is obtained when rh /δ k ratio is 2.85, where r h is the hydraulic radius of the stack and δ k is the thermal penetration depth of the gas. Moreover, the pressure amplitude of the sound wave is significantly getting larger from 2.0 kPa to 9.0 kPa as the charged pressure increases from 0.05 MPa up to 0.6 MPa.

  10. Influence of ambient air on the flowing afterglow of an atmospheric pressure Ar/O2 radiofrequency plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Duluard, C Y; Hubert, J; Reniers, F

    2016-01-01

    The influence of ambient air on the flowing afterglow of an atmospheric pressure Ar/O2 radiofrequency plasma has been investigated experimentally. Spatially resolved mass spectrometry and laser induced fluorescence on OH radicals were used to estimate the intrusion of air in between the plasma torch and the substrate as a function of the torch-to-substrate separation distance. No air is detected, within the limits of measurement uncertainties, for separation distances smaller than 5 mm. For larger distances, the effect of ambient air can no longer be neglected, and radial gradients in the concentrations of species appear. The Ar 4p population, determined through absolute optical emission spectroscopy, is seen to decrease with separation distance, whereas a rise in emission from the N2(C--B) system is measured. The observed decay in Ar 4p and N2(C) populations for separation distances greater than 9mm is partly assigned to the increasing collisional quenching rate by N2 and O2 molecules from the entrained air....

  11. Translational, rotational and vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc discharge at atmospheric pressure air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Gliding arc discharges have generally been used to generate non-equilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure. Temperature distributions of a gliding arc are of great interest both for fundamental plasma research and for practical applications. In the presented studies, translational, rotational...... and vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc generated at atmospheric pressure air are investigated. Translational temperatures (about 1100 K) were measured by laser-induced Rayleigh scattering, and two-dimensional temperature imaging was performed. Rotational and vibrational temperatures (about 3600 K and 6700...

  12. Numerical simulation of premixed Hydrogen/air combustion pressure in a spherical vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Han-yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the development process of hydrogen combustion in a closed vessel, an on-line chemical equilibrium calculator and a numerical simulation method would be used to analysis the combustion pressure and flame front of mixed gas, which based on 20L H2/air explosion experiments in spherical vessel (Crowl and Jo,2009. The results showed that, the turbulent model could reflect the process of combustion, and the error of combustion pressure by simulation is smaller than the Chemical Equilibrium Calculation. The heat loss and incomplete combustion are the main reason to cause the error.

  13. Spatiotemporal relationships between sea level pressure and air temperature in the tropics

    CERN Document Server

    Makarieva, Anastassia M; Nefiodov, Andrei V; Sheil, Douglas; Nobre, Antonio Donato; Li, Bai-Lian Larry

    2014-01-01

    While surface temperature gradients have been highlighted as drivers of low-level atmospheric circulation, the underlying physical mechanisms remain unclear. Lindzen and Nigam (1987) noted that sea level pressure (SLP) gradients are proportional to surface temperature gradients if isobaric height (the height where pressure does not vary in the horizontal plane) is constant; their own model of low-level circulation assumed that isobaric height in the tropics is around 3 km. Recently Bayr and Dommenget (2013) proposed a simple model of temperature-driven air redistribution from which they derived that the isobaric height in the tropics again varies little but occurs higher (at the height of the troposphere). Here investigations show that neither the empirical assumption of Lindzen and Nigam (1987) nor the theoretical derivations of Bayr and Dommenget (2013) are plausible. Observations show that isobaric height is too variable to determine a universal spatial or temporal relationship between local values of air ...

  14. Parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam generated in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.

    2011-05-01

    Conditions under which the number of runaway electrons in atmospheric-pressure air reaches ˜5 × 1010 are determined. Recommendations for creating runaway electron accelerators are given. Methods for measuring the parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam and X-ray pulses from gas-filled diodes, as well as the discharge current and gap voltage, are described. A technique for determining the instant of runaway electron generation with respect to the voltage pulse is proposed. It is shown that the reduction in the gap voltage and the decrease in the beam current coincide in time. The mechanism of intense electron beam generation in gas-filled diodes is analyzed. It is confirmed experimentally that, in optimal regimes, the number of electrons generated in atmospheric-pressure air with energies T > eU m , where U m is the maximum gap voltage, is relatively small.

  15. Air-pressure tunable depletion width, rectification behavior, and charge conduction in oxide nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivov, Yahya; Funke, Hans H; Singh, Vivek; Nagpal, Prashant

    2015-02-01

    Metal-oxide nanotubes provide large surface areas and functionalizable surfaces for a variety of optical and electronic applications. Here we report air-tunable rectifying behavior, depletion width modulation, and two-dimensional (2D) charge conduction in hollow titanium-dioxide nanotubes. The metal contact forms a Schottky-diode in the nanotubes, and the rectification factor (on/off ratio) can be varied by more than 3 orders of magnitude (1-2 × 10(3)) as the air pressure is increased from 2 mTorr to atmospheric pressure. This behavior is explained using a change in depletion width of these thin nanotubes by adsorption of water vapor on both surfaces of a hollow nanotube, and the resulting formation of a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) junction, which controls the 2D charge conduction properties in thin oxide nanotubes.

  16. Evaluation of analytical methodology for hydrocarbons in high pressure air and nitrogen systems. [evaluation of methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Samples of liquid oxygen, high pressure nitrogen, low pressure nitrogen, and missile grade air were studied to determine the hydrocarbon concentrations. Concentration of the samples was achieved by adsorption on a molecular sieve and activated charcoal. The trapped hydrocarbons were then desorbed and transferred to an analytical column in a gas chromatograph. The sensitivity of the method depends on the volume of gas passed through the adsorbent tubes. The value of the method was verified through recoverability and reproducibility studies. The use of this method enables LOX, GN2, and missile grade air systems to be routinely monitored to determine low level increases in specific hydrocarbon concentration that could lead to potentially hazardous conditions.

  17. The effect of air quality on sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Wargocki, Pawel; Wyon, David Peter

    2014-01-01

    The effect of air quality on sleep was examined for occupants of 14 identical single-occupancy dormitory rooms. The subjects, half women, were exposed to two conditions (open/closed window), each for one week, resulting in night-time average CO2 levels of 660 and 2585 ppm, and air temperatures...... of 24.7 and 23.9°C, respectively. Sleep was assessed from movement data recorded on wristwatch-type actigraphs and from online morning questionnaires, including the Groningen Sleep Quality scale, questions about the sleep environment, next-day well-being, SBS symptoms, and two tests of mental...... performance. Although no significant effects on the sleep quality scale or on next-day performance could be shown, there were significant and positive effects of a higher ventilation rate (open window) on the actigraph measured sleep latency and on the subjects’ assessment of the freshness of the air...

  18. Characterization of an atmospheric pressure air plasma source for polymer surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shujun; Tang, Jiansheng

    2013-10-01

    An atmospheric pressure air plasma source was generated through dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). It was used to modify polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) surfaces with very high throughput. An equivalent circuit model was used to calculate the peak average electron density. The emission spectrum from the plasma was taken and the main peaks in the spectrum were identified. The ozone density in the down plasma region was estimated by Absorption Spectroscopy. NSF and ARC-ODU

  19. Salt Survey Comparison of Pressurized vs Ambient Deck Air Intakes on JEFF (B) Hovercraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-02

    10 Vegetation Collected on Lift Fan Screen 21 Figure 11 Paint Stripping in Lift Fan Shows Dirty vs Clean Air 22 APPENDIX FIGURES Figure A-l Nuclepore...terms of the readings on deck and that ingested in No. 6 engine. Although one single reading is insufficient to draw any fir * conclusions, these data, on...salt above 0.14 PPM, correlates with AVCO experimental data (TF-35 engine). 11. The pressurized engine data demonstrated that the effectof leakage

  20. Ionic wind generation by a wire-cylinder-plate corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Colas, Dorian,; Ferret, Antoine; Pai, David,; Lacoste, Deanna,; Laux, C.

    2010-01-01

    International audience; A wire-cylinder-plate electrode configuration is presented to generate ionic wind with a dc corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure. The objective of the work is to maximize the power supplied to the flow in order to increase acceleration while avoiding breakdown. Thus, the proposed experimental setup addresses the problem of decoupling the mechanism of ion generation from that of ion acceleration. Using a wire-plate configuration as a reference, we have focuse...

  1. Self-Organized Filaments in Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Air at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-Fang; LI Xue-Chen; YINZeng-Qian; QIAN Sheng-Fa; OUYANG Ji-Ting; WANG Long

    2001-01-01

    The self-organized filament pattern created by dielectric barrier discharges in air at atmospheric pressure is investigated experimentally. The density and dimension of filament are analysed quantitatively. The experimental results show that the distance between neighbouring filaments decreases with the increased applied voltage or with the decreased width of the gas gap. Also, the diameter of the filament decreases with the increased applied voltages or with the decreased width of the gas gap.

  2. Effects of high-frequency chest wall oscillation on pleural pressure and oscillated flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Tal; Skjodt, Neil M; Jones, Richard L

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HF-CWO) is directly related to the level of oscillated flow (osc) in the airways. We used the Vest system to investigate the effects of HFCWO on chest wall and pleural pressures and we correlated these pressures to the resultant osc. We also compared the latest HFCWO device with it predecessor. Different combinations of vest inflation pressure (background pressure) and oscillation frequency were randomly applied to 10 healthy volunteers. Chest wall pressure was determined using an air-filled bag under the vest and pleural pressure was estimated using an esophageal balloon. Reverse plethysmography was used to measure osc at the mouth and a spirometer was used to measure changes in end-expired lung volume. We found a significant correlation between chest wall and pleural pressure with approximately one-third of the chest wall pressure transmitted into the pleural space. Mean esophageal pressure remained negative at all background pressure/frequency combinations. There was a significant correlation (pHFCWO and since osc is dependent on esophageal pulse pressure, which in turn is dependent on chest wall pulse pressure, it follows that the effectiveness of HFCWO is influenced by the ability to generate an effective chest wall pulse pressure.

  3. Numerical Modelling of Soot Formation in Laminar Axisymmetric Ethylene-Air Coflow Flames at Atmospheric and Elevated Pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelgadir, Ahmed

    2015-03-30

    A set of coflow diffusion flames are simulated to study the formation, growth, and oxidation of soot in flames of diluted hydrocarbon fuels, with focus on the effects of pressure. Firstly, we assess the ability of a high performance CFD solver, coupled with detailed transport and kinetic models, to reproduce experimental measurements of a series of ethylene-air coflow flames. Detailed finite rate chemistry describing the formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydro-carbons is used. Soot is modeled with a moment method and the resulting moment transport equations are solved with a Lagrangian numerical scheme. Numerical and experimental results are compared for various pressures. Finally, a sensitivity study is performed assessing the effect of the boundary conditions and kinetic mechanisms on the flame structure and stabilization properties.

  4. An effective silencer design for artificially air conditioned environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Kyoji; Pang, Li Feng

    2004-11-01

    An effective silencer for an air conditioning duct is studied. A duct with an acoustically soft boundary is employed as an effective silencer. On the acoustically soft boundary the sound pressure is zero and it is impossible to realize such boundary in the air-borne sound field, because of the non-existence of a much lighter medium than the air. In this study, the arrangement of one-quarter wave-length acoustic tubes is employed as a soft boundary. This acoustic tube has frequency dependence, but the sound pressure becomes nearly zero at the tube mouth around the odd resonance frequency. The relation between the noise reduction efficiency and this acoustically soft boundary is examined experimentally and more than 40 dB noise reduction is obtained in a one-half octave band around the first resonance frequency. It is also made clear that more than one wave length of soft boundary is required to get enough reduction compared with the reduction obtained in the case of quite a long soft boundary.

  5. Evaluation of the Operator Protection Factors Offered by Positive Pressure Air Suits against Airborne Microbiological Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie A. Steward

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Laboratories throughout the world that perform work with Risk Group 4 Pathogens generally adopt one of two approaches within BSL-4 environments: either the use of positive pressure air-fed suits or using Class III microbiological safety cabinets and isolators for animal work. Within the UK at present, all laboratories working with Risk Group 4 agents adopt the use of Class III microbiological safety cabinet lines and isolators. Operator protection factors for the use of microbiological safety cabinets and isolators are available however; there is limited published data on the operator protection factors afforded by the use of positive pressure suits. This study evaluated the operator protection factors provided by positive pressure air suits against a realistic airborne microbiological challenge. The suits were tested, both intact and with their integrity compromised, on an animated mannequin within a stainless steel exposure chamber. The suits gave operator protection in all tests with an intact suit and with a cut in the leg. When compromised by a cut in the glove, a very small ingress of the challenge was seen as far as the wrist. This is likely to be due to the low airflow in the gloves of the suit. In all cases no microbiological penetration of the respiratory tract was observed. These data provide evidence on which to base safety protocols for use of positive pressure suits within high containment laboratories.

  6. Evaluation of the operator protection factors offered by positive pressure air suits against airborne microbiological challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Jackie A; Lever, Mark S

    2012-08-01

    Laboratories throughout the world that perform work with Risk Group 4 Pathogens generally adopt one of two approaches within BSL-4 environments: either the use of positive pressure air-fed suits or using Class III microbiological safety cabinets and isolators for animal work. Within the UK at present, all laboratories working with Risk Group 4 agents adopt the use of Class III microbiological safety cabinet lines and isolators. Operator protection factors for the use of microbiological safety cabinets and isolators are available however; there is limited published data on the operator protection factors afforded by the use of positive pressure suits. This study evaluated the operator protection factors provided by positive pressure air suits against a realistic airborne microbiological challenge. The suits were tested, both intact and with their integrity compromised, on an animated mannequin within a stainless steel exposure chamber. The suits gave operator protection in all tests with an intact suit and with a cut in the leg. When compromised by a cut in the glove, a very small ingress of the challenge was seen as far as the wrist. This is likely to be due to the low airflow in the gloves of the suit. In all cases no microbiological penetration of the respiratory tract was observed. These data provide evidence on which to base safety protocols for use of positive pressure suits within high containment laboratories.

  7. [Airport related air pollution and health effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Ancona, Carla; Forastiere, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Airport is an extremely complex emission source of airborne pollutants that can have a significant impact on the environment. Indeed, several airborne chemicals emitted during airport activities may significantly get worse air quality and increase exposure level of both airport workers and general population living nearby the airports. In recent years airport traffic has increased and consequently several studies investigated the association between airport-related air pollution and occurrence of adverse health effects, particularly on respiratory system, in exposed workers and general population resident nearby. In this context, we carried out a critical evaluation of the studies that investigated this correlation in order to obtain a deeper knowledge of this issue and to identify the future research needs. Results show that the evidence of association between airport-related air pollution and health effects on workers and residents is still limited.

  8. Surface Pressure Study of Lipid Aggregates at the Air Water Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shew, Woody; Ploplis Andrews, Anna

    1996-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the growth of fatty acid aggregates on a water/air interface were made by analyzing surface pressure measurements taken with a Langmuir Balance. High concentrations of palmitic acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, and also phosphatidylethanolamine in solution with chloroform were applied with a syringe to the surface of the Langmuir Balance and surface pressure was monitored as aggregates assembled spontaneously. The aggregation process for palmitic acid was determined to consist of three distinct parts. Exponential curves were fit to the individual regions of the data and growth and decay constants were determined. Surface pressure varied in very complex ways for lauric acid, myristic acid, and phosphatidylethanolamine yet kinetic measurements yield qualitative information about assembly of those aggregates. This research was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-93-22301.

  9. Emissions measurements for a lean premixed propane/air system at pressures up to 30 atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffe, G.

    1979-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted in which the emissions of a lean premixed system of propane and air were measured at pressures of 5, 10, 20 and 30 atm in a flametube apparatus. Measurements were made for inlet temperatures between 600K and 1000K and combustor residence times from 1.0 to 3.0 msec. A schematic of the test rig is presented along with graphs showing emissions measurements for nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and UHC as functions of bustor residence time for various equivalence ratios, entrance temperatures and pressures; typical behavior of emissions as a function of equivalence ratio for a fixed residence time. Correlations of nitric oxide emission index with adiabatic flame temperature for a fixed residence time of 2 msec and pressures from 5 to 30 atm; and adiabatic flame temperature corresponding to CO breakpoint conditions for 2 msec residence time as a function of inlet temperature.

  10. Effect of pressure gradients on Gortler instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, S. A.; Nayfeh, A. H.

    1980-01-01

    Gortler instability for boundary-layer flows over generally curved walls is considered. The full linearized disturbance equations are obtained in an orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. A perturbation procedure to account for second-order effects is used to determine the effects of the displacement thickness and the variation of the streamline curvature on the neutral stability of the Blasius flow. The pressure gradient in the mean flow is accounted for by solving the nonsimilar boundary-layer equations. Growth rates are obtained for the actual mean flow and the Falkner-Skan flows. The results demonstrate the strong influence of the pressure gradient and the nonsimilarity of the basic flow on the stability characteristics.

  11. Recent neurochemical basis of inert gas narcosis and pressure effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostain, J C; Balon, N

    2006-01-01

    Compressed air or a nitrogen-oxygen mixture produces from 0.3 MPa nitrogen narcosis. The traditional view was that anaesthesia or narcosis occurs when the volume of a hydrophobic site is caused to expand beyond a critical amount by the absorption of molecules of a narcotic gas. The observation of the pressure reversal effect on general anaesthesia has for a long time supported the lipid theory. However, recently, protein theories are in increasing consideration since results have been interpreted as evidence for a direct anaesthetic-protein interaction. The question is to know whether inert gases act by binding processes on proteins of neurotransmitter receptors. Compression with breathing mixtures where nitrogen is replaced by helium which has a low narcotic potency induces from 1 MPa, the high pressure nervous syndrome which is related to neurochemical disturbances including changes of the amino-acid and monoamine neurotransmissions. The use of narcotic gas (nitrogen or hydrogen) added to a helium-oxygen mixture, reduced some symptoms of the HPNS but also had some effects due to an additional effect of the narcotic potency of the gas. The researches performed at the level of basal ganglia of the rat brain and particularly the nigro-striatal pathway involved in the control of the motor, locomotor and cognitive functions, disrupted by narcosis or pressure, have indicated that GABAergic neurotransmission is implicated via GABAa receptors.

  12. Air distribution and ventilation effectiveness in an occupied room heated by warm air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krajcik, Michal; Simone, Angela; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2012-01-01

    and at different simulated outside conditions, internal heat gains and air change rates. Floor heating was also simulated and compared with the warm air heating system. Vertical air temperature profiles, air velocity profiles and equivalent temperatures were derived in order to describe the thermal environment......Air distribution, ventilation effectiveness and thermal environment were experimentally studied in a simulated room in a low-energy building heated and ventilated by warm air supplied by a mixing ventilation system. Measurements were performed for various positions of the air terminal devices....... Contaminant removal effectiveness and air change efficiency were used to evaluate ventilation effectiveness. No significant risk of thermal discomfort due to vertical air temperature differences or draught was found. When the room was heated by warm air, buoyancy forces were important for ventilation...

  13. 全膝关节置换术后应用持续冷疗联合空气波气压治疗的护理效果观察%Nursing effect observation of continuous cryotherapy combined with air wave pressure treatment after total knee replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘霞

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨持续冷疗联合空气波气压治疗对全膝关节置换术后减轻关节肿痛的效果。方法120例行全膝关节置换术后患者,按入院先后顺序随机分为对照组和观察组,各60例。对照组采用cryu-cuff加压冷疗自动循环系统持续冷疗,观察组采用cryu-cuff加压冷疗自动循环系统联合空气波气压治疗,观察两组患者关节疼痛、肿胀程度。结果观察组关节疼痛程度、患侧关节肿胀值均低于对照组,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论持续冷疗联合空气波气压治疗对全膝关节置换术后患者减轻关节肿痛有较好疗效,利于患者早期康复训练,有效促进关节功能恢复,值得临床推广。%Objective To explore the effect of continuous cryotherapy combined with air wave pressure treatment for relieving swelling and pain in joint after total knee replacement. Methods A total of 120 patients undergoing total knee replacement were randomly divided into control group and observation group by their admission order, and each group contained 60 cases. The control group received continuous cryotherapy by cryu-cuff pressurized cryotherapy automatic cycle system, and the observation group received additional air wave pressure treatment for combination treatment. Swelling and pain degree in joint of the two groups were observed. Results The observation group had lower indexes of joint pain degree and swelling in injured joint than the control group, and the difference had statistical significance (P<0.05). Conclusion The combination of continuous cryotherapy and air wave pressure treatment has good curative effect in relieving swelling and pain after total knee replacement. It can provide benefits for early rehabilitation exercise and knee joint recovery, and is worthy of clinical promotion.

  14. High pressure effects on fruits and vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, R.A.H.; Matser, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter provides an overview on different high pressure based treatments (high pressure pasteurization, blanching, pressure-assisted thermal processing, pressure-shift freezing and thawing) available for the preservation of fruits and vegetable products and extending their shelf life. Pressure t

  15. A comparison between the dimensions of positive transtibial residual limb molds prepared by air pressure casting and weight-bearing casting methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiaghaei, Behnam; Ebrahimi, Ismail; Kamyab, Mojtaba; Saeedi, Hassan; Jalali, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Creating a socket with proper fit is an important factor to ensure the comfort and control of prosthetic devices. Several techniques are commonly used to cast transtibial stumps but their effect on stump shape deformation is not well understood. This study compares the dimensions, circumferences and volumes of the positive casts and also the socket comfort between two casting methods. Our hypothesis was that the casts prepared by air pressure method have less volume and are more comfortable than those prepared by weight bearing method. Methods: Fifteen transtibial unilateral amputees participated in the study. Two weight bearing and air pressure casting methods were utilized for their residual limbs. The diameters and circumferences of various areas of the residual limbs and positive casts were compared. The volumes of two types of casts were measured by a volumeter and compared. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used to measure the sockets fit comfort. Results: Circumferences at 10 and 15 cm below the patella on the casts were significantly smaller in air pressure casting method compared to the weight bearing method (p=0.00 and 0.01 respectively). The volume of the cast in air pressure method was lower than that of the weight bearing method (p=0.006). The amputees found the fit of the sockets prepared by air pressure method more comfortable than the weight bearing sockets (p=0.015). Conclusion: The air pressure casting reduced the circumferences of the distal portion of residual limbs which has more soft tissue and because of its snug fit it provided more comfort for amputees, according to the VAS measurements. PMID:27390711

  16. Calculation of the upper flammability limit of methane/air mixtures at elevated pressures and temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Schoor, F; Verplaetsen, F; Berghmans, J

    2008-05-30

    Four different numerical methods to calculate the upper flammability limit of methane/air mixtures at initial pressures up to 10 bar and initial temperatures up to 200 degrees C are evaluated by comparison with experimental data. Planar freely propagating flames are calculated with the inclusion of a radiation heat loss term in the energy conservation equation to numerically obtain flammability limits. Three different reaction mechanisms are used in these calculations. At atmospheric pressure, the results of these calculations are satisfactory. At elevated pressures, however, large discrepancies are found. The spherically expanding flame calculations only show a marginal improvement compared with the planar flame calculations. On the other hand, the application of a limiting burning velocity with a pressure dependence Su,lim approximately p(-1/2) is found to predict the pressure dependence of the upper flammability limit very well, whereas the application of a constant limiting flame temperature is found to slightly underestimate the temperature dependence of the upper flammability limit.

  17. Heat transfer and pressure distributions on hemisphere-cylinders in methane-air combustion products at Mach 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, I.

    1973-01-01

    Heat-transfer and pressure distributions were measured over the surfaces of three hemisphere-cylinder models tested at a nominal Mach number of 7 in the Langley 8-foot high-temperature structures tunnel which uses methane-air products of combustion as a test medium. The results showed that the heat-transfer and pressure distributions over the surface of the models were in good agreement with experimental data obtained in air and also with theoretical predictions.

  18. Characterization of atmospheric pressure plasma treated pure cashmere and wool/cashmere textiles: Treatment in air/water vapor mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanini, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.zanini@mib.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, p.za della Scienza, 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Grimoldi, Elisa [Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, p.za della Scienza, 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Citterio, Attilio [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali ed Ingegneria Chimica “G. Natta”, Via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy); Riccardi, Claudia, E-mail: riccardi@mib.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, p.za della Scienza, 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We treated cashmere and wool/cashmere textiles with atmospheric pressure plasma. • Wettability of the fabrics was increased. • The increment in wettability derived from a surface oxidation of the fibers. • Only minor etching effects were observed with scanning electron microscopy. - Abstract: We performed atmospheric pressure plasma treatments of pure cashmere and wool/cashmere textiles with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in humid air (air/water vapor mixtures). Treatment parameters have been optimized in order to enhance the wettability of the fabrics without changing their bulk properties as well as their touch. A deep characterization has been performed to study the wettability, the surface morphologies, the chemical composition and the mechanical properties of the plasma treated textiles. The chemical properties of the plasma treated samples were investigated with attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FTIR/ATR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS). The analyses reveal a surface oxidation of the treated fabrics, which enhances their surface wettability. Morphological characterization of the treated fibers with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals minor etching effects, an essential feature for the maintenance of the textile softness.

  19. Antimicrobial nanoparticle-coated electrostatic air filter with high filtration efficiency and low pressure drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kyoung Mi; Park, Hyun-Seol; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Jung, Jae Hee

    2015-11-15

    In this study, we demonstrated an antimicrobial nanoparticle-coated electrostatic (ES) air filter. Antimicrobial natural-product Sophora flavescens nanoparticles were produced using an aerosol process, and were continuously deposited onto the surface of air filter media. For the electrostatic activation of the filter medium, a corona discharge electrification system was used before and after antimicrobial treatment of the filter. In the antimicrobial treatment process, the deposition efficiency of S. flavescens nanoparticles on the ES filter was ~12% higher than that on the pristine (Non-ES) filter. In the evaluation of filtration performance using test particles (a nanosized KCl aerosol and submicron-sized Staphylococcus epidermidis bioaerosol), the ES filter showed better filtration efficiency than the Non-ES filter. However, antimicrobial treatment with S. flavescens nanoparticles affected the filtration efficiency of the filter differently depending on the size of the test particles. While the filtration efficiency of the KCl nanoparticles was reduced on the ES filter after the antimicrobial treatment, the filtration efficiency was improved after the recharging process. In summary, we prepared an antimicrobial ES air filter with >99% antimicrobial activity, ~92.5% filtration efficiency (for a 300-nm KCl aerosol), and a ~0.8 mmAq pressure drop (at 13 cm/s). This study provides valuable information for the development of a hybrid air purification system that can serve various functions and be used in an indoor environment.

  20. Technology Solutions Case Study: Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Rudd and D. Bergey

    2015-08-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs.

  1. A Comprehensive Probabilistic Framework to Learn Air Data from Surface Pressure Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of probabilistic techniques has been demonstrated to learn air data parameters from surface pressure measurements. Integration of numerical models with wind tunnel data and sequential experiment design of wind tunnel runs has been demonstrated in the calibration of a flush air data sensing anemometer system. Development and implementation of a metamodeling method, Sequential Function Approximation (SFA, are presented which lies at the core of the discussed probabilistic framework. SFA is presented as a tool capable of nonlinear statistical inference, uncertainty reduction by fusion of data with physical models of variable fidelity, and sequential experiment design. This work presents the development and application of these tools in the calibration of FADS for a Runway Assisted Landing Site (RALS control tower. However, the multidisciplinary nature of this work is general in nature and is potentially applicable to a variety of mechanical and aerospace engineering problems.

  2. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-2 Upper Air Network Standard Pressure Level Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters interpolated at 0.5 kiloPascal increments of atmospheric pressure from data collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  3. Deactivating bacteria with RF Driven Hollow Slot Microplasmas in Open Air at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zengqi; Pruden, Amy; Sharma, Ashish; Collins, George

    2003-10-01

    A hollow slot discharge operating in open air at atmospheric pressure has demonstrated its ability to deactivate bacterial growth on nearby surfaces exposed to the RF driven plasma. The cold plasma exits from a hollow slot with a width of 0.2 mm and variable length of 1-35 cm. An internal electrode was powered by 13.56 MHz radio-frequency power at a voltage below 200 V. External electrically grounded slots face the work piece. The plasma plume extends millimeters to centimeter beyond the hollow slot toward the work piece to be irradiated. Argon-Oxygen gas mixtures, at 33 liters per minute flow, were passed through the electrodes and the downstream plasma was employed for the process, with treatment exposure time varied from 0.06 to 0.18 seconds. Bacterial cultures were fixed to 0.22 micron cellulose filter membranes and passed under the plasma at a controlled rate at a distance of about 5-10 millimeters from the grounded slot electrode. Preliminary studies on the effectiveness of the plasma for sterilization were carried out on E. coli. Cultures were grown overnight on the membranes after exposure and the resulting colony forming units (cfu) were determined in treated and untreated groups. In the plasma treated group, a 98.2% kill rate was observed with the lowest exposure time, and increased to 99.8% when the exposure time was tripled. These studies clearly demonstrate the ability of the RF-driven hollow slot atmospheric plasma to inhibit bacterial growth on surfaces.

  4. Finite element modelling of high air pressure forming processes for polymer sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, W.-G.; Warby, M. K.; Whiteman, J. R.; Abbott, S.; Shorter, W.; Warwick, P.; Wright, T.; Munro, A.; Munro, B.

    In this paper we describe the mathematical modelling and computational simulation of the high air pressure (HAP) thermoforming process which is used in the creation of thin walled polymeric structures. This involves, using data from material tests, an elastic-plastic constitutive equation valid for large deformations and a constrained deformation in which there is frictional contact between the polymeric sheet and a constraining surface (the mould surface). Despite a number of simplifying assumptions and some uncertainities in the mathematical model the finite element computations presented predict quite well the actual shape and thickness distribution which are found on sample products.

  5. Integrated LTCC Pressure/Flow/Temperature Multisensor for Compressed Air Diagnostics†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Yannick; Maeder, Thomas; Boutinard-Rouelle, Grégoire; Barras, Aurélie; Craquelin, Nicolas; Ryser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD) technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues. PMID:22163518

  6. Integrated LTCC pressure/flow/temperature multisensor for compressed air diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Yannick; Maeder, Thomas; Boutinard-Rouelle, Grégoire; Barras, Aurélie; Craquelin, Nicolas; Ryser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD) technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues.

  7. Pressurized air injection in an axial hydro-turbine model for the mitigation of tip leakage cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivetti, A.; Angulo, M.; Lucino, C.; Liscia, S.

    2015-12-01

    Tip leakage vortex cavitation in axial hydro-turbines may cause erosion, noise and vibration. Damage due to cavitation can be found at the tip of the runner blades on the low pressure side and the discharge ring. In some cases, the erosion follows an oscillatory pattern that is related to the number of guide vanes. That might suggest that a relationship exists between the flow through the guide vanes and the tip vortex cavitating core that induces this kind of erosion. On the other hand, it is known that air injection has a beneficial effect on reducing the damage by cavitation. In this paper, a methodology to identify the interaction between guide vanes and tip vortex cavitation is presented and the effect of air injection in reducing this particular kind of erosion was studied over a range of operating conditions on a Kaplan scale model. It was found that air injection, at the expense of slightly reducing the efficiency of the turbine, mitigates the erosive potential of tip leakage cavitation, attenuates the interaction between the flow through the guide vanes and the tip vortex and decreases the level of vibration of the structural components.

  8. Investigation of Nanosecond Pulsed Discharge and Its Audio Characteristics in Atmospheric-pressure Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Chengyan; RAN Huijuan; WANG Jue; WANG Tao; YAN Ping

    2013-01-01

    There was no well-resolved mechanism of audible noise caused by corona discharge on UHV transmission lines.Hence we measured the sound pressure of pulsed discharges between needle-plane electrodes under different discharge conditions in air,for revealing the intrinsic relationship between discharge and its audible noise(AN).The relationship between discharge parameters and audio characteristics was drawn from the analysis of the electric and sound signals obtained in experiments.Experiment results showed that nanosecond pulsed discharges produce the sound pressure with a microsecond pulse lagging behind the discharge pulse in their waveforms.The peak value of the sound pulse decreases and its high frequency component gradually attenuates,when the measuring distance from discharges increases.The sound pulses correlate with the discharge current and voltage significantly,especially the current.The audible noise produced by repetitive pulsed discharge increases with the strength,duration,and pulse repetition rate of discharge.

  9. Bifurcation and Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Externally Pressurized Double Air Films Bearing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chi Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the chaotic and nonlinear dynamic behaviors of a rigid rotor supported by externally pressurized double air films (EPDAF bearing system. A hybrid numerical method combining the differential transformation method and the finite difference method is used to calculate pressure distribution of EPDAF bearing system and bifurcation phenomenon of rotor center orbits. The results obtained for the orbits of the rotor center are in good agreement with those obtained using the traditional finite difference approach. The results presented summarize the changes which take place in the dynamic behavior of the EPDAF bearing system as the rotor mass and bearing number are increased and therefore provide a useful guideline for the bearing system.

  10. Effect of high pressure on mesophilic lactic fermentation streptococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reps, A.; Kuźmicka, M.; Wiśniewska, K.

    2008-07-01

    The research concerned the effect of high pressure on mesophilic lactic fermentation streptococci, present in two cheese-making commercial inocula produced by Christian-Hansen. Water solutions of inocula were pressurized at 50-800 MPa, at room temperature, for 30-120 min. Pressurization at 50-100 MPa slightly increased or reduced the number of lactic streptococci, depending on the inoculum and pressurization time. Pressurization at 200 MPa caused a reduction in the number of streptococci by over 99.9%, whereas the pressure of 400 MPa and above almost completely inactivated streptococci. Pressurization also reduced the dynamics of microorganism growth and acidification, to the degree depending on the pressure.

  11. Fast step-response settling of micro electrostatic actuators operated at low air pressure using input shaping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, L.; Rocha, L.A.; Cretu, E.; Wolffenbuttel, R.F.

    2009-01-01

    Squeeze-film damping is highly inadequate in low-pressure systems or in systems where air pressure and/or gap dimensions are poorly defined. Input shaping has been used to circumvent the oscillations typically associated with under-damped mass-spring-damper systems and drastically decrease the settl

  12. Field test of two high-pressure, direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume I. Air/diesel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, B.W.

    1983-05-01

    As a part of the Project DEEP STEAM to develop technology to more efficiently utilize steam for the recovery of heavy oil from deep reservoirs, a field test of a downhole steam generator (DSG) was performed. The DSG burned No. 2 diesel fuel in air and was a direct-contact, high pressure device which mixed the steam with the combustion products and injected the resulting mixture directly into the oil reservoir. The objectives of the test program included demonstration of long-term operation of a DSG, development of operational methods, assessment of the effects of the steam/combustion gases on the reservoir and comparison of this air/diesel DSG with an adjacent oxygen/diesel direct contact generator. Downhole operation of the air/diesel DSG was started in June 1981 and was terminated in late February 1982. During this period two units were placed downhole with the first operating for about 20 days. It was removed, the support systems were slightly modified, and the second one was operated for 106 days. During this latter interval the generator operated for 70% of the time with surface air compressor problems the primary source of the down time. Thermal contact, as evidenced by a temperature increase in the production well casing gases, and an oil production increase were measured in one of the four wells in the air/diesel pattern. Reservoir scrubbing of carbon monoxide was observed, but no conclusive data on scrubbing of SO/sub x/ and NO/sub x/ were obtained. Corrosion of the DSG combustor walls and some other parts of the downhole package were noted. Metallurgical studies have been completed and recommendations made for other materials that are expected to better withstand the downhole combustion environment. 39 figures, 8 tables.

  13. Effects of Lingual Effort on Swallow Pressures Following Radiation Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenius, Kerry; Stierwalt, Julie; LaPointe, Leonard L.; Bourgeois, Michelle; Carnaby, Giselle; Crary, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article investigated the effects of increased oral lingual pressure on pharyngeal pressures during swallowing in patients who have undergone radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. It was hypothesized that increased oral lingual pressure would result in increased pharyngeal pressures. Method: A within-subject experimental design was…

  14. Traffic-related air pollution - the health effects scrutinized

    OpenAIRE

    Nijland, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have been published on the health effects associated with exposure to air pollution. Air pollution is acknowledged as a public health risk and air quality regulations are set for specific air pollutants to protect human health. A major pollutant, well known for its adverse health impact, is particulate matter (PM) of which road traffic is a major source. Therefore, the health effects of traffic-related air pollution have been under considerable scrutiny. We examined in vivo t...

  15. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Jim; Gogna, Gurusharan; Daniels, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure atomic oxygen number density [O] in an air Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ). A novel technique based on photolysis of O2 is used to calibrate the TALIF system ensuring the same species (O) is probed during calibration and measurement. As a result, laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power region without affecting calibration reliability as any high intensity saturation effects will be identical for calibration and experiment. Higher laser intensity gives stronger TALIF signals helping overcome weak TALIF signals often experienced at atmospheric pressure due to collisional quenching. O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting [O] are both achieved within the same laser pulse. The photolysis [O] is spatially non-uniform and time varying. To allow valid comparison with [O] in a plasma, spatial and temporal correction factors are required. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I0(t), and wavelength allows correction factors to be found using a rate equation model. The air flow into the jet was fixed and the RF power coupled into the system varied. The resulting [O] was found to increase with RF power.

  16. 磨煤机出口风压及风温的热控安装%Thermal control installation of air pressure and air temperature of pulverizer outlet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任强

    2011-01-01

    According to the operation ot ZGM-95 type pulverizer produced by Beijing electric power equipment factory great used in northern region, formation and factors of air pressure and air temperature of pulverizer outlet, this paper made induction and analysis, and made technical reformation to the problems influence of the accuracy of air pressure and air temperature of pulverizer outlet, made its accurate measurement, normal operation.%针对北方地区大量使用的北京电力设备总厂生产的ZGM-95型磨煤机在运行过程中,磨出口风压及风温的形成关系和因素,归纳和分析,对影响磨出口风压及风温准确性的问题进行技术改造,使其测量准确,运行正常。

  17. Traffic-related air pollution - the health effects scrutinized

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have been published on the health effects associated with exposure to air pollution. Air pollution is acknowledged as a public health risk and air quality regulations are set for specific air pollutants to protect human health. A major pollutant, well known for its adverse health im

  18. Mining seams liable to spontaneous combustion using a system of automatic regulation of air pressure in a ventilation section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golik, A.S.; Churikov, Yu.V.; Troyan, N.P.

    1980-01-01

    In mining coal seams liable to spontaneous combustion, the possibility of underground fire increases with growing depth of mining, as air depression in lower seams can suck the air from the goaf of upper levels through cracks and fissures in the roof. To preclude this possibility a system of automatic control of air pressure in a ventilated section of a coal mine has been worked out. The system, called SReDA-1, consists in complete isolation of the ventilated section from other workings by conventional means and in exact maintenance of air pressure equal to atmospheric pressure. Technical specifications of ventilating machines used in the SReDA-1 system are given. Scheme of ventilated section using the system is also shown. (In Russian)

  19. Extended effects of air pollution on cardiopulmonary mortality in Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, Manfred; Rabczenko, Daniel; Moshammer, Hanns

    BackgroundCurrent standards for fine particulates and nitrogen dioxide are under revision. Patients with cardiovascular disease have been identified as the largest group which need to be protected from effects of urban air pollution. MethodsWe sought to estimate associations between indicators of urban air pollution and daily mortality using time series of daily TSP, PM 10, PM 2.5, NO 2, SO 2, O 3 and nontrauma deaths in Vienna (Austria) 2000-2004. We used polynomial distributed lag analysis adjusted for seasonality, daily temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure and incidence of influenza as registered by sentinels. ResultsAll three particulate measures and NO 2 were associated with mortality from all causes and from ischemic heart disease and COPD at all ages and in the elderly. The magnitude of the effect was largest for PM 2.5 and NO 2. Best predictor of mortality increase lagged 0-7 days was PM 2.5 (for ischemic heart disease and COPD) and NO 2 (for other heart disease and all causes). Total mortality increase, lagged 0-14 days, per 10 μg m -3 was 2.6% for PM 2.5 and 2.9% for NO 2, mainly due to cardiopulmonary and cerebrovascular causes. ConclusionAcute and subacute lethal effects of urban air pollution are predicted by PM 2.5 and NO 2 increase even at relatively low levels of these pollutants. This is consistent with results on hospital admissions and the lack of a threshold. While harvesting (reduction of mortality after short increase due to premature deaths of most sensitive persons) seems to be of minor importance, deaths accumulate during 14 days after an increase of air pollutants. The limit values for PM 2.5 and NO 2 proposed for 2010 in the European Union are unable to prevent serious health effects.

  20. A Novel Constant-Pressure Pumped Hydro Combined with Compressed Air Energy Storage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erren Yao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As intermittent renewable energy is receiving increasing attention, the combination of intermittent renewable energy with large-scale energy storage technology is considered as an important technological approach for the wider application of wind power and solar energy. Pumped hydro combined with compressed air energy storage system (PHCA is one of the energy storage systems that not only integrates the advantages but also overcomes the disadvantages of compressed air energy storage (CAES systems and pumped hydro energy storage systems to solve the problem of energy storage in China’s arid regions. Aiming at the variable working conditions of PHCA system technology, this study proposes a new constant-pressure PHCA. The most significant characteristics of this system were that the water pump and hydroturbine work under stable conditions and this improves the working efficiency of the equipment without incurring an energy loss. In addition, the constant-pressure PHCA system was subjected to energy and exergy analysis, in expectation of exploring an attractive solution for the large-scale storage of existing intermittent renewable energy.

  1. Two-Dimensional Electron Density Measurement of Positive Streamer Discharge in Atmospheric-Pressure Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Yuki; Ono, Ryo; Kumada, Akiko; Hidaka, Kunihiko; Maeyama, Mitsuaki

    2016-09-01

    The electron density of streamer discharges propagating in atmospheric-pressure air is crucially important for systematic understanding of the production mechanisms of reactive species utilized in wide ranging applications such as medical treatment, plasma-assisted ignition and combustion, ozone production and environmental pollutant processing. However, electron density measurement during the propagation of the atmospheric-pressure streamers is extremely difficult by using the conventional localized type measurement systems due to the streamer initiation jitters and the irreproducibility in the discharge paths. In order to overcome the difficulties, single-shot two-dimensional electron density measurement was conducted by using a Shack-Hartmann type laser wavefront sensor. The Shack-Hartmann sensor with a temporal resolution of 2 ns was applied to pulsed positive streamer discharges generated in an air gap between pin-to-plate electrodes. The electron density a few ns after the streamer initiation was 7*1021m-3 and uniformly distributed along the streamer channel. The electron density and its distribution profile were compared with a previous study simulating similar streamers, demonstrating good agreement. This work was supported in part by JKA and its promotion funds from KEIRIN RACE. The authors like to thank Mr. Kazuaki Ogura and Mr. Kaiho Aono of The University of Tokyo for their support during this work.

  2. Solubility and effects of natural gas and air in crude oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dow, D.B.; Calkin, L.P.

    1926-02-01

    This document includes data obtained in investigating the effect of pressure and temperature on the amounts of natural gas and air that can be held in solution in different crude and refined oils, as well as the effect on gravity and volume.

  3. Effects of a continuous lateral turning device on pressure relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Nam Ho; Kim, Deog Young; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Choi, Jong Hyun; Joo, So Young; Kang, Na Kyung; Baek, Yoon Su

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the pressure-relieving effects of a continuous lateral turning device on common pressure ulcer sites. [Subjects] Twenty-four healthy adults participated. [Methods] The design of our continuous lateral turning device was motivated by the need for an adequate pressure-relieving device for immobile and/or elderly people. The procedure of manual repositioning is embodied in our continuous lateral turning device. The interface pressure and time were measured, and comfort grade was evaluated during sessions of continuous lateral turning at 0°, 15°, 30°, and 45°. We quantified the pressure-relieving effect using peak pressure, mean pressure, and pressure time integration. [Results] Participants demonstrated pressure time integration values below the pressure-time threshold at 15°, 30°, and 45° at all the common pressure ulcer sites. Moreover, the most effective angles for pressure relief at the common pressure ulcer sites were 30° at the occiput, 15° at the left scapula, 45° at the right scapula, 45° at the sacrum, 15° at the right heel, and 30° at the left heel. However, angles greater than 30° induced discomfort. [Conclusion] Continuous lateral turning with our specially designed device effectively relieved the pressure of targeted sites. Moreover, the suggested angles of continuous lateral turning can be used to relieve pressure at targeted sites.

  4. Effects of vegetarian diets on blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama Y

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Yoko Yokoyama,1,2 Kazuo Tsubota,2,3 Mitsuhiro Watanabe1,2,4,5 1Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, 2Health Science Laboratory, 3Department of Ophthalmology, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 5Faculty of Environment and Information Studies, Keio University, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan Abstract: Hypertension is a major independent risk factor for coronary artery diseases, and the prevalence of hypertension is continuously increasing. Diet is an important factor that can be modified to prevent hypertension. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, dietary patterns are defined as the quantities, proportions, and variety or combinations of different foods and beverages in diets and the frequency with which they are habitually consumed. In this review, the vegetarian dietary pattern is introduced with a focus on the effect on blood pressure (BP. Although the available evidence is limited, according to a previous meta-analysis of controlled trials, vegetarian dietary patterns significantly reduced systolic and diastolic BPs. One of the common features of a vegetarian diet is weight loss, which might, at least partially, explain the effect on BP. Other possible factors such as sodium, potassium, protein, amino acids, vitamin B-12, antioxidants, fiber, and the microbiome are introduced as possible mechanisms. Further studies are needed with non-Western populations to determine the most effective vegetarian dietary pattern and to explore the exact mechanisms by which these dietary patterns affect BP. Keywords: vegetarian diet, plant-based diet, blood pressure, hypertension, meta-analysis

  5. Numerical Estimation of Incident Wave Parameters Based on the Air Pressure Measurements in Pico OWC Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Crom, I.; Brito-Melo, A.; Newman, F. Sarmento, A. [Wave Energy Centre, Av. Manuel da Maia, 36, r/c D., Lisbon (Portugal)

    2009-07-01

    The present study aims at assessing the key spectral parameters of the incident wave on a fixed oscillating water column (OWC) device, based on the air pressure measurements inside the chamber and on the numerical hydrodynamic coefficients of the device. The methodology is based on the equation of continuity of the air in the time-domain and linear decomposition of the air flow in the usual terms of radiation and diffraction flows. By applying the Fast Fourier Transform, the time-domain equation is transposed to the respective frequency-domain equation. This methodology was applied to the 400 kW OWC power plant, on the Island of Pico, Azores, which has been monitored since 2005 by the Wave Energy Centre. The numerical hydrodynamic coefficients obtained by the 3D radiation-diffraction boundary element code, AQUADYN-OWC, were used in this study. No measurements of the incident wave in front of the plant are available; therefore the results obtained for a set of records are compared with forecast estimations for the site of Pico plant provided by INETI and also with the measurements of two directional wave rider buoys offshore Pico and Terceira islands. These data are provided by the Centre of Climate, Meteorology and Global Changes and propagated via the SWAN spectral wave model to the zone of interest. Final objective is to improve the control of the Pico plant by assessing its performance for a range of sea states.

  6. Simulation and experimental study of high pressure switching expansion reduction considering real gas effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗语溪; 张彦军; 高玉宝; 王宣银; 徐志鹏

    2014-01-01

    Switching expansion reduction (SER) uses a switch valve instead of the throttle valve to realize electronically controlled pressure reduction for high pressure pneumatics. A comprehensive and interactive pneumatic simulation model according to the experimental setup of SER has been built. The mathematical model considers heat exchanges, source air pressure and temperature, environmental temperatures and heat transfer coefficients variations. In addition, the compensation for real gas effect is used in the model building. The comparison between experiments and simulations of SER indicates that, to compensate the real gas effect in high pressure discharging process, the thermal capacity of air supply container in simulation should be less than the actual value. The higher the pressure range, the greater the deviation. Simulated and experimental results are highly consistent within pressure reduction ratios ranging from 1.4 to 20 and output air mass flow rates ranging from 3.5 to 132 g/s, which verifies the high adaptability of SER and the validity of the mathematic model and the compensation method.

  7. Frequency characteristic of response of surface air pressure to changes in flux of cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, M. B.

    2014-11-01

    We compare the series of daily-average values of the surface air pressure for De Bilt and Lugano meteorological stations with subtracted linear trends and seasonal harmonics, as well as the series of the flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) at Jungfraujoch station with subtracted moving average over 200 days. Using the method of superposed epochs, we show that the Forbush decreases at both stations are accompanied by increased pressure. Spectral analysis allows us to conclude that the analyzed series are characterized by nonzero coherence in almost the entire frequency range: from 0.02 day-1 day up to the Nyquist frequency of 0.5 day-1. Using changes in the GCR flux as a probing signal, we obtain amplitude-frequency characteristics of the pressure reaction. For both stations, these characteristics are in qualitative agreement with each other and indicate that the atmospheric response can be described by a second-order linear dynamic system that has wide resonance with a maximum at a frequency of 0.15 day-1.

  8. Atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet induced bacterial inactivation in aqueous environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Gonzales, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet is designed to inactivate bacteria in aqueous media in direct and indirect exposure modes of treatment. The resistive barrier plasma jet is designed to operate at both dc and standard 50-60 Hz low frequency ac power input and the ambient air at 50% humidity level was used as the operating gas. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma jet were analyzed and the operating frequency of the discharge was measured to be 20 kHz and the plasma power was measured to be 26 W. The plasma jet rotational temperatures (Trot) are obtained from the optical emission spectra, from the N2C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the Spectra Air (SPECAIR) simulation spectra. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species were measured using optical emission spectroscopy and gas analyzers, for direct and indirect treatment modes. The nitric oxides (NO) were observed to be the predominant long lived reactive nitrogen species produced by the plasma. Three different bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive), Escherichia coli (Gram-negative), and Neisseria meningitidis (Gram-negative) were suspended in an aqueous media and treated by the resistive barrier air plasma jet in direct and indirect exposure modes. The results show that a near complete bacterial inactivation was achieved within 120 s for both direct and indirect plasma treatment of S. aureus and E. coli bacteria. Conversely, a partial inactivation of N. meningitidis was observed by 120 s direct plasma exposure and insignificant inactivation was observed for the indirect plasma exposure treatment. Plasma induced shifts in N. meningitidis gene expression was analyzed using pilC gene expression as a representative gene and the results showed a reduction in the expression of the pilC gene compared to untreated samples suggesting that the observed protection against NO may be regulated by other genes.

  9. Air pollution epidemiology. Assessment of health effects and risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsouyanni, K. [Athens Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Hygiene and Epidemiology

    1995-12-31

    Air pollution epidemiology is the study of the occurrence and distribution of health outcomes in association with community air pollution exposure. It is therefore specific in the exposure variable. Air pollution health effects became evident during high air pollution episodes which occurred in the first decades of our century. Since then, legal and other control measures have led to lower air pollution levels. However, recent results from several studies indicate that lower levels of air pollution than the previously considered safe have serious adverse health effects. Although, there is increasingly agreement that air pollution, at levels measured today, affects health, there is still a lot to be understood concerning specific causal pollutants, biologic mechanisms involved and sensitive groups of individuals. The extent of potential confounding, time-considerations in air pollution effects, individual variation in air pollution exposure and exposure misclassification are some factors which complicate the study of these issues. (author)

  10. The effect of initial pressure on detonation propagation across a mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Chung Hsu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study determines the effect of the initial pressure on the propagation of a Chapman–Jouguet detonation wave from a stoichiometric C3H8/O2 mixture (donor to a stoichiometric C3H8/air mixture (acceptor. Depending on the initial pressure ratio in the donor and the acceptor, the result can be a smooth transmission, a re-initiated detonation wave, or a transmitted shock wave. When the donor is divided into a driver donor and a driven donor, the degree of overdrive in a driven donor varies with the donor pressure ratio. There must be a greater degree of overdrive in the driven donor for re-initiation of a detonation wave in the acceptor, particularly if the initial pressure in the driven donor is lower than the Chapman–Jouguet pressure in the acceptor. The bi-dimensional effect is also another major factor.

  11. Numerical Modelling of Soot Formation in Laminar Axisymmetric Ethylene-Air Coflow Flames at Atmospheric and Elevated Pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Rakha, Ihsan Allah

    2015-05-01

    The steady coflow diffusion flame is a widely used configuration for studying combustion kinetics, flame dynamics, and pollutant formation. In the current work, a set of diluted ethylene-air coflow flames are simulated to study the formation, growth, and oxidation of soot, with a focus on the effects of pressure on soot yield. Firstly, we assess the ability of a high performance CFD solver, coupled with detailed transport and kinetic models, to reproduce experimental measurements, like the temperature field, the species’ concentrations and the soot volume fraction. Fully coupled conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy, and species mass fractions are solved using a low Mach number formulation. Detailed finite rate chemistry describing the formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons up to cyclopenta[cd]pyrene is used. Soot is modeled using a moment method and the resulting moment transport equations are solved with a Lagrangian numerical scheme. Numerical and experimental results are compared for various pressures. Reasonable agreement is observed for the flame height, temperature, and the concentrations of various species. In each case, the peak soot volume fraction is predicted along the centerline as observed in the experiments. The predicted integrated soot mass at pressures ranging from 4-8 atm, scales as P2.1, in satisfactory agreement with the measured integrated soot pressure scaling (P2.27). Significant differences in the mole fractions of benzene and PAHs, and the predicted soot volume fractions are found, using two well-validated chemical kinetic mechanisms. At 4 atm, one mechanism over-predicts the peak soot volume fraction by a factor of 5, while the other under-predicts it by a factor of 5. A detailed analysis shows that the fuel tube wall temperature has an effect on flame stabilization.

  12. THE EFFECTS OF AREA CONTRACTION ON SHOCK WAVE STRENGTH AND PEAK PRESSURE IN SHOCK TUBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Mohsen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation into the effects of area contraction on shock wave strength and peak pressure in a shock tube. The shock tube is an important component of the short duration, high speed fluid flow test facility, available at the Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN, Malaysia. The area contraction was facilitated by positioning a bush adjacent to the primary diaphragm section, which separates the driver and driven sections. Experimental measurements were performed with and without the presence of the bush, at various diaphragm pressure ratios, which is the ratio of air pressure between the driver (high pressure and driven (low pressure sections. The instantaneous static pressure variations were measured at two locations close to the driven tube end wall, using high sensitivity pressure sensors, which allow the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure to be analysed. The results reveal that the area contraction significantly reduces the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure. At a diaphragm pressure ratio of 10, the shock wave strength decreases by 18%, the peak pressure decreases by 30% and the shock wave speed decreases by 8%.

  13. Treatment of poly(ethylene terephthalate) foils by atmospheric pressure air dielectric barrier discharge and its influence on cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzminova, Anna [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovickách 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Vandrovcová, Marta [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vídeňská 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Shelemin, Artem [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovickách 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Kylián, Ondřej, E-mail: ondrej.kylian@gmail.com [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovickách 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Choukourov, Andrei; Hanuš, Jan [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovickách 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Bačáková, Lucie [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vídeňská 1083, 142 20 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Slavínská, Danka; Biederman, Hynek [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovickách 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Effect of atmospheric pressure DBD plasma on PET foils was investigated. • DBD treatment causes increase in surface density of O-containing functional groups. • DBD plasma causes increase of wettability, roughness and complex modulus of PET. • DBD treatment positively influences cells growth on PET. • Enhancement of cell growth on treated PET depends on the cell type. - Abstract: In this contribution an effect of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) sustained in air at atmospheric pressure on surface properties of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) foils is studied. It is found that exposure of PET to DBD plasma leads to rapid changes of surface chemical composition, wettability, surface morphology as well as mechanical properties of PET surface. In addition, based on biological tests that were performed using two cell types (Saos-2 human osteoblast-like cells and HUVEC human umbilical vein endothelial cells), it may be concluded that DBD plasma treatment positively influences cell growth on PET. This effect was found to be connected predominantly with increased surface energy and oxygen content of the surface of treated PET foils.

  14. Atmospheric effects on extensive air showers observed with the Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters, such as pressure (P), temperature (T) and density, affect the development of extensive air showers initiated by energetic cosmic rays. We have studied the impact of atmospheric variations on extensive air showers by means of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The rate of events shows a ~10% seasonal modulation and ~2% diurnal one. We find that the observed behaviour is explained by a model including the effects associated with the variations of pressure and density. The former affects the longitudinal development of air showers while the latter influences the Moliere radius and hence the lateral distribution of the shower particles. The model is validated with full simulations of extensive air showers using atmospheric profiles measured at the site of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  15. Interaction of high-power microwave with air breakdown plasma at low pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pengcheng; Guo, Lixin; Shu, Panpan

    2016-09-01

    The high-power microwave breakdown at the low air pressure (about 0.01 atm) is simulated numerically using the one-dimensional model coupling Maxwell's equations with plasma fluid equations. The accuracy of the model is validated by comparing the breakdown prediction with the experimental data. We find that a diffuse plasma with a stationary front profile forms due to the large electron diffusion. Most of the incident wave energy is absorbed and reflected by the plasma when the plasma front achieves a stationary profile. The front propagation velocity remains almost unchanged with time and increases when the incident wave amplitude increases or the incident wave frequency decreases. With the incident wave frequency increasing, the maximum density of the stationary plasma front increases, while the ratio of the reflected wave power to the incident wave power remains almost unchanged. At a higher incident wave amplitude, the maximum density and reflectance become large.

  16. Synthesis of ammonia directly from air and water at ambient temperature and pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Rong; Irvine, John T S; Tao, Shanwen

    2013-01-01

    The N≡N bond (225 kcal mol⁻¹) in dinitrogen is one of the strongest bonds in chemistry therefore artificial synthesis of ammonia under mild conditions is a significant challenge. Based on current knowledge, only bacteria and some plants can synthesise ammonia from air and water at ambient temperature and pressure. Here, for the first time, we report artificial ammonia synthesis bypassing N₂ separation and H₂ production stages. A maximum ammonia production rate of 1.14 × 10⁻⁵ mol m⁻² s⁻¹ has been achieved when a voltage of 1.6 V was applied. Potentially this can provide an alternative route for the mass production of the basic chemical ammonia under mild conditions. Considering climate change and the depletion of fossil fuels used for synthesis of ammonia by conventional methods, this is a renewable and sustainable chemical synthesis process for future.

  17. Atmospheric pressure air direct current glow discharge ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Can; Wang, Weiguo; Li, Haiyang

    2008-05-15

    A new atmospheric pressure air direct current glow discharge (DCGD) ionization source has been developed for ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) to overcome the regularity problems associated with the conventional (63)Ni source and the instability of the negative corona discharge. Its general electrical characteristics were experimentally investigated. By equipping it to IMS, a higher sensitivity was obtained compared to that of a (63)Ni source and corona discharge, and a linear dynamic range from 20 ppb to 20 ppm was obtained for m-xylene. Primary investigations showed that alkanes, such as pentane, which are nondetectable or insensitively detectable with (63)Ni-IMS, can be efficiently detected by DCGD-IMS and the detection limit of 10 ppb can be reached. The preliminary results have shown that the new DCGD ionization source has great potential applications in IMS, such as online monitoring of environment pollutants and halogenated compounds.

  18. Instabilities and soot formation in spherically expanding, high pressure, rich, iso-octane-air flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockett, R D [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, Northampton Square, London EC1V OHB (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    Flame instabilities, cellular structures and soot formed in high pressure, rich, spherically expanding iso-octane-air flames have been studied experimentally using high speed Schlieren cinematography, OH fluorescence, Mie scattering and laser induced incandescence. Cellular structures with two wavelength ranges developed on the flame surface. The larger wavelength cellular structure was produced by the Landau-Darrieus hydrodynamic instability, while the short wavelength cellular structure was produced by the thermal-diffusive instability. Large negative curvature in the short wavelength cusps caused local flame quenching and fracture of the flame surface. In rich flames with equivalence ratio {phi} > 1.8, soot was formed in a honeycomb-like structure behind flame cracks associated with the large wavelength cellular structure induced by the hydrodynamic instability. The formation of soot precursors through low temperature pyrolysis was suggested as a suitable mechanism for the initiation of soot formation behind the large wavelength flame cracks.

  19. Characteristics of a Normal Glow Discharge Excited by DC Voltage in Atmospheric Pressure Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuechen; Zhao, Huanhuan; Jia, Pengying

    2013-11-01

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharges were generated in an air gap between a needle cathode and a water anode. Through changing the ballast resistor and gas gap width between the electrodes, it has been found that the discharges are in normal glow regime judged from the current-voltage characteristics and visualization of the discharges. Results indicate that the diameter of the positive column increases with increasing discharge current or increasing gap width. Optical emission spectroscopy is used to calculate the electron temperature and vibrational temperature. Both the electron temperature and the vibrational temperature increases with increasing discharge current or increasing gap width. Spatially resolved measurements show that the maxima of electron temperature and vibrational temperature appeared in the vicinity of the needle cathode.

  20. Integrated LTCC Pressure/Flow/Temperature Multisensor for Compressed Air Diagnostics†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Craquelin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues.

  1. Temperature dependence of evaporation coeffcient of water in air and nitrogen under atmospheric pressure; study in water droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Zientara, M; Kolwas, K; Kolwas, M

    2008-01-01

    The evaporation coefficients of water in air and nitrogen were found as a function of temperature, by studying the evaporation of pure water droplet. The droplet was levitated in an electrodynamic trap placed in a climatic chamber maintaining atmospheric pressure. Droplet radius evolution and evaporation dynamics were studied with high precision by analyzing the angle-resolved light scattering Mie interference patterns. A model of quasi-stationary droplet evolution, accounting for the kinetic effects near the droplet surface was applied. In particular, the effect of thermal effusion (a short range analogue of thermal diffusion) was discussed and accounted for. The evaporation coefficient \\alpha in air and in nitrogen were found equal. \\alpha was found to decrease from ~ 0.18 to ~ 0.13 for the temperature range from 273.1 K to 293.1 K and follow the trend given by Arrhenius formula. The agreement with condensation coefficient values obtained with essentially different method by Li et al.[1] was found excellent...

  2. Novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen: reduction of microbial-contaminants and OH radicals in the air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojima, Hideo; Park, Rae-Eun; Kwon, Jun-Hyoun; Suh, Inseon; Jeon, Junsang; Ha, Eunju; On, Hyeon-Ki; Kim, Hye-Ryung; Choi, Kyoung Hui; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Seong, Baik-Lin; Jung, Hoon; Kang, Shin Jung; Namba, Shinichi; Takiyama, Ken

    2007-01-01

    A novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen has been developed. This device has specific properties such as (1) deactivation of airborne microbial-contaminants, (2) neutralization of indoor OH radicals and (3) being harmless to the human body. It consists of a ceramic plate as a positive ion generation electrode and a needle-shaped electrode as an electron emission electrode. Release of atomic hydrogen from the device has been investigated by the spectroscopic method. Optical emission of atomic hydrogen probably due to recombination of positive ions, H+(H2O)n, generated from the ceramic plate electrode and electrons emitted from the needle-shaped electrode have been clearly observed in the He gas (including water vapour) environment. The efficacy of the device to reduce airborne concentrations of influenza virus, bacteria, mould fungi and allergens has been evaluated. 99.6% of airborne influenza virus has been deactivated with the operation of the device compared with the control test in a 1 m3 chamber after 60 min. The neutralization of the OH radical has been investigated by spectroscopic and biological methods. A remarkable reduction of the OH radical in the air by operation of the device has been observed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The cell protection effects of the device against OH radicals in the air have been observed. Furthermore, the side effects have been checked by animal experiments. The harmlessness of the device has been confirmed.

  3. Soot Surface Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Soot surface oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round fuel jets burning in coflowing dry air considering acetylene-nitrogen, ethylene, propyiene-nitrogen, propane and acetylene-benzene-nitrogen in the fuel stream. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of major stable gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8, and C6H6) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. For present test conditions, it was found that soot surface oxidation rates were not affected by fuel type, that direct rates of soot surface oxidation by O2 estimated from Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962) were small compared to observed soot surface oxidation rates because soot surface oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 3% by volume, and that soot surface oxidation rates were described by the OH soot surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.14 and an uncertainty (95% confidence) of +/- 0.04 when allowing for direct soot surface oxidation by O2, which is in reasonably good agreement with earlier observations of soot surface oxidation rates in both premixed and diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure.

  4. An air-pressure-free elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Wooseok; Barrett, Matthew; Brooks, Carla; Rivera, Andrew; Birdsell, Dawn N.; Wagner, David M.; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2015-12-01

    We present a new elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis. The valve functions include metering to capture a designated volume of biological sample into a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber, sealing to preserve the sample during PCR cycling, and transfer of the PCR-products and on-chip formamide post-processing for the analysis of DNA fragments by capillary gel electrophoresis. This new valve differs from prior art polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) valves in that the valve is not actuated externally by air-pressure or vacuum so that it simplifies a DNA analysis system by eliminating the need for an air-pressure or vacuum source, and off-cartridge solenoid valves, control circuit boards and software. Instead, the new valve is actuated by a thermal cycling peltier assembly integrated within the hardware instrument that tightly comes in contact with a microfluidic cartridge for thermal activation during PCR, so that it spontaneously closes the valve without an additional actuator system. The valve has bumps in the designated locations so that it has a self-alignment that does not require precise alignment of a valve actuator. Moreover, the thickness of the new valve is around 600 μm with an additional bump height of 400 μm so that it is easy to handle and very feasible to fabricate by injection molding compared to other PDMS valves whose thicknesses are around 30-100 μm. The new valve provided over 95% of metering performance in filling the fixed volume of the PCR chamber, preserved over 97% of the sample volume during PCR, and showed very comparable capillary electrophoresis peak heights to the benchtop assay tube controls with very consistent transfer volume of the PCR-product and on-chip formamide. The new valve can perform a core function for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis.

  5. Localized etching of polymer films using an atmospheric pressure air microplasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Honglei; Liu, Jingquan; Yang, Bin; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    A direct-write process device based on the atmospheric pressure air microplasma jet (AμPJ) has been developed for the localized etching of polymer films. The plasma was generated by the air discharge ejected out through a tip-nozzle (inner diameter of 100 μm), forming the microplasma jet. The AμPJ was capable of reacting with the polymer surface since it contains a high concentration of oxygen reactive species and thus resulted in the selective removal of polymer films. The experimental results demonstrated that the AμPJ could fabricate different microstructures on a parylene-C film without using any masks or causing any heat damage. The etch rate of parylene-C reached 5.1 μm min-1 and microstructures of different depth and width could also be realized by controlling two process parameters, namely, the etching time and the distance between the nozzle and the substrate. In addition, combining XPS analysis and oxygen-induced chemical etching principles, the potential etching mechanism of parylene-C by the AμPJ was investigated. Aside from the etching of parylene-C, micro-holes on the photoresist and polyimide film were successfully created by the AμPJ. In summary, maskless pattern etching of polymer films could be achieved using this AμPJ.

  6. Targeting cancer cells with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by atmospheric-pressure air plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hak Jun Ahn

    Full Text Available The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for cancer. Anticancer activity of plasma has been reported to involve mitochondrial dysfunction. However, what constituents generated by plasma is linked to this anticancer process and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we report that the therapeutic effects of air plasma result from generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS including H2O2, Ox, OH-, •O2, NOx, leading to depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Simultaneously, ROS/RNS activate c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK and p38 kinase. As a consequence, treatment with air plasma jets induces apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants, JNK and p38 inhibitors, or JNK and p38 siRNA abrogates the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and impairs the air plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that the ROS/RNS generated by plasma trigger signaling pathways involving JNK and p38 and promote mitochondrial perturbation, leading to apoptosis. Therefore, administration of air plasma may be a feasible strategy to eliminate cancer cells.

  7. Pressure ratio effects on self-similar scalar mixing of high-pressure turbulent jets in a pressurized volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Adam; Pickett, Lyle; Frank, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    Many real world combustion devices model fuel scalar mixing by assuming the self-similar argument established in atmospheric free jets. This allows simple prediction of the mean and rms fuel scalar fields to describe the mixing. This approach has been adopted in super critical liquid injections found in diesel engines where the liquid behaves as a dense fluid. The effect of pressure ratio (injection to ambient) when the ambient is greater than atmospheric pressure, upon the self-similar collapse has not been well characterized, particularly the effect upon mixing constants, jet spreading rates, and virtual origins. Changes in these self-similar parameters control the reproduction of the scalar mixing statistics. This experiment investigates the steady state mixing of high pressure ethylene jets in a pressurized pure nitrogen environment for various pressure ratios and jet orifice diameters. Quantitative laser Rayleigh scattering imaging was performed utilizing a calibration procedure to account for the pressure effects upon scattering interference within the high-pressure vessel.

  8. Experimental study on the flow regimes and pressure gradients of air-oil-water three-phase flow in horizontal pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadhrami, Luai M; Shaahid, S M; Tunde, Lukman O; Al-Sarkhi, A

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the flow regimes and pressure gradients of air-oil-water three-phase flows in 2.25 ID horizontal pipe at different flow conditions. The effects of water cuts, liquid and gas velocities on flow patterns and pressure gradients have been studied. The experiments have been conducted at 20 °C using low viscosity Safrasol D80 oil, tap water and air. Superficial water and oil velocities were varied from 0.3 m/s to 3 m/s and air velocity varied from 0.29 m/s to 52.5 m/s to cover wide range of flow patterns. The experiments were performed for 10% to 90% water cuts. The flow patterns were observed and recorded using high speed video camera while the pressure drops were measured using pressure transducers and U-tube manometers. The flow patterns show strong dependence on water fraction, gas velocities, and liquid velocities. The observed flow patterns are stratified (smooth and wavy), elongated bubble, slug, dispersed bubble, and annular flow patterns. The pressure gradients have been found to increase with the increase in gas flow rates. Also, for a given superficial gas velocity, the pressure gradients increased with the increase in the superficial liquid velocity. The pressure gradient first increases and then decreases with increasing water cut. In general, phase inversion was observed with increase in the water cut. The experimental results have been compared with the existing unified Model and a good agreement has been noticed.

  9. Microwave air plasmas in capillaries at low pressure I. Self-consistent modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coche, P.; Guerra, V.; Alves, L. L.

    2016-06-01

    This work presents the self-consistent modeling of micro-plasmas generated in dry air using microwaves (2.45 GHz excitation frequency), within capillaries (model couples the system of rate balance equations for the most relevant neutral and charged species of the plasma to the homogeneous electron Boltzmann equation. The maintenance electric field is self-consistently calculated adopting a transport theory for low to intermediate pressures, taking into account the presence of O- ions in addition to several positive ions, the dominant species being O{}2+ , NO+ and O+ . The low-pressure small-radius conditions considered yield very-intense reduced electric fields (˜600-1500 Td), coherent with species losses controlled by transport and wall recombination, and kinetic mechanisms strongly dependent on electron-impact collisions. The charged-particle transport losses are strongly influenced by the presence of the negative ion, despite its low-density (˜10% of the electron density). For electron densities in the range (1-≤ft. 4\\right)× {{10}12} cm-3, the system exhibits high dissociation degrees for O2 (˜20-70%, depending on the working conditions, in contrast with the  ˜0.1% dissociation obtained for N2), a high concentration of O2(a) (˜1014 cm-3) and NO(X) (5× {{10}14} cm-3) and low ozone production (<{{10}-3}% ).

  10. Ambient air quality and the effects of air pollutants on otolaryngology in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengying; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Ziying; Meng, Haiying; Wang, Li; Lu, Jinmei; Wang, Wuyi; Krafft, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    To investigate temporal patterns, pollution concentrations and the health effects of air pollutants in Beijing we carried out time-series analyses on daily concentrations of ambient air pollutants and daily numbers of outpatient visits for otolaryngology over 2 years (2011-2012) to identify possible health effects of air pollutants. The results showed that PM10 was the major air pollutant in Beijing and that air quality was slightly better in 2012 than in 2011. Seasonal differences were apparent for SO2 and NO2. Both the background and urban areas of Beijing experienced particulate matter pollution in 2011. In addition to local air pollution, Beijing was also affected by pollutants transported from other regions, especially during heavy air pollution episodes. PM10, NO2, and SO2 concentrations showed positive associations with numbers of outpatient visits for otolaryngology during winter. NO2 and SO2 also had adverse ear, nose, and throat health effects outside of winter. The ear, nose, and throat health risks caused by air pollutants were higher during the winter than during the summer. NO2 had stronger influence on increased the likelihood of outpatient visits than SO2. The findings provide additional information about air quality and health effects of air pollution in Beijing.

  11. An Ultrasonic and Air Pressure Sensing System for Detection of Behavior before Getting out of Bed Aided by Fuzzy Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hayato; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Kazuhiko; Kobashi, Syoji; Hata, Yutaka

    This paper proposes a sensing system for a behavior detection system using an ultrasonic oscillosensor and an air pressure sensor. The ultrasonic oscillosensor sensor has a cylindrical tank filled with water. It detects the vibration of the target object from the signal reflected from the water surface. This sensor can detect a biological vibration by setting to the bottom bed frame. The air pressure sensor consists of a polypropylene sheet and an air pressure sensor, and detects the pressure information by setting under the bed's mattress. An increase (decrease) in the load placed on the bed is detected by the increase (decrease) in the pressure of the air held in the tube attached to the sheet. We propose a behavior detection system using both sensors, complementally. The system recognizes three states (nobody in bed, keeping quiet in bed, moving in bed) using both sensors, and we detect the behavior before getting out of bed by recognized these states. Fuzzy logic plays a primary role in the system. As the fundamental experiment, we applied the system to five healthy volunteers, the system successfully recognized three states, and detected the behavior before getting out of bed. As the clinical experiment, we applied the system to four elderly patients with dementia, the system exactly detected the behavior before getting out of the bed with enough time for medical care support.

  12. Effect of Pressure on Minimum Fluidization Velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Zhiping; Na Yongjie; Lu Qinggang

    2007-01-01

    Minimum fluidization velocity of quartz sand and glass bead under different pressures of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 Mpa were investigated. The minimum fluidization velocity decreases with the increasing of pressure. The influence of pressure to the minimum fluidization velocities is stronger for larger particles than for smaller ones.Based on the test results and Ergun equation, an experience equation of minimum fluidization velocity is proposed and the calculation results are comparable to other researchers' results.

  13. Effects of a continuous lateral turning device on pressure relief

    OpenAIRE

    Do, Nam Ho; Kim, Deog Young; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Choi, Jong Hyun; Joo, So Young; Kang, Na Kyung; Baek, Yoon Su

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the pressure-relieving effects of a continuous lateral turning device on common pressure ulcer sites. [Subjects] Twenty-four healthy adults participated. [Methods] The design of our continuous lateral turning device was motivated by the need for an adequate pressure-relieving device for immobile and/or elderly people. The procedure of manual repositioning is embodied in our continuous lateral turning device. The interface pressure and time we...

  14. Chiral selective effects of doxazosin enantiomers on blood pressure and urinary bladder pressure in anesthetized rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-ping MA; Lei-ming REN; Ding ZHAO; Zhong-ning ZHU; Miao WANG; Hai-gang LU; Li-hua DUAN

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study chiral selective effects of doxazosin enantiomers on blood pressure and urinary bladder pressure in anesthetized rats. Methods: In anesthetized rats, the carotid blood pressure, left ventricular pressure of the heart and the urinary bladder pressure were recorded. Results: Administration of S-doxazosin at 0.25, 2.5, 25, and 250 nmol/kg iv produced a dose-dependent decrease in blood pressure, but its depressor effect was significantly weaker than that induced by R-doxazosin and racemic-doxazosin (rac-doxazosin), and the ED30 values (producing a 30% decrease in mean arterial pressure) of R-doxazosin, rac-doxazosin and S-doxazosin were 15.64,45.93, and 128.81, respectively. Rac-doxazosin and its enantiomers administered cumulatively in anesthetized rats induced a dose-dependent decrease in the left ventricular systolic pressure and ±dp/dtmax, and the potency order of the 3 agents was R-doxazosin >rac-doxazosin >S-doxazosin. Rac-doxazosin and its enantiomers decreased the vesical micturition pressure dose-dependently at 2.5,25, and 250 nmol/kg, and the inhibitory potency among the 3 agents was not significantly different. Conclusion: S-doxazosin decreases the carotid blood pressure and left ventricular pressure of the heart less than R-doxazosin and rac-doxazosin, but its effect on the vesical micturition pressure is similar to R-doxazosin and rac-doxazosin, indicating that S-doxazosin has chiral selectivity between cardiovascular system and urinary system in anesthetized rats.

  15. Wave effects on a pressure sensor

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; DeSa, E.J.; Desa, E.; McKeown, J.; Peshwe, V.B.

    Wave flume experiments indicated that for waves propagating on quiescent waters the sensor's performance improved (i.e. the difference Delta P between the average hydrostatic and measured pressures was small and positive) when the inlet...

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Interference of Spontaneous Raman Scattering in High-Pressure Fuel-Rich H2-Air Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Jun; Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2004-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the spectral interferences in the spontaneous Raman scattering spectra of major combustion products in 30-atm fuel-rich hydrogen-air flames. An effective methodology is introduced to choose an appropriate line-shape model for simulating Raman spectra in high-pressure combustion environments. The Voigt profile with the additive approximation assumption was found to provide a reasonable model of the spectral line shape for the present analysis. The rotational/vibrational Raman spectra of H2, N2, and H2O were calculated using an anharmonic-oscillator model using the latest collisional broadening coefficients. The calculated spectra were validated with data obtained in a 10-atm fuel-rich H2-air flame and showed excellent agreement. Our quantitative spectral analysis for equivalence ratios ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 revealed substantial amounts of spectral cross-talk between the rotational H2 lines and the N2 O-/Q-branch; and between the vibrational H2O(0,3) line and the vibrational H2O spectrum. We also address the temperature dependence of the spectral cross-talk and extend our analysis to include a cross-talk compensation technique that removes the nterference arising from the H2 Raman spectra onto the N2, or H2O spectra.

  17. Kinetic studies of NO formation in pulsed air-like low-pressure dc plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, M.; Gortschakow, S.; Guaitella, O.; Marinov, D.; Rousseau, A.; Röpcke, J.; Loffhagen, D.

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the formation of NO in pulsed air-like dc plasmas at a pressure of 1.33 mbar and mean currents between 50 and 150 mA of discharge pulses with 5 ms duration has been investigated both experimentally and by self-consistent numerical modelling. Using time-resolved quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy, the densities of NO, NO2 and N2O have been measured in synthetic air as well as in air with 0.8% of NO2 and N2O, respectively. The temporal evolution of the NO density shows four distinct phases during the plasma pulse and the early afterglow in the three gas mixtures that were used. In particular, a steep density increase during the ignition phase and after termination of the discharge current pulse has been detected. The NO concentration has been found to reach a constant value of 0.57× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , 1.05× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , and 1.3× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} for mean plasma currents of 50 mA, 100 mA and 150 mA, respectively, in the afterglow. The measured densities of NO2 and N2O in the respective mixture decrease exponentially during the plasma pulse and remain almost constant in the afterglow, especially where the admixture of NO2 has a remarkable impact on the NO production during the ignition. The numerical results of the coupled solution of a set of rate equations for the various heavy particles and the time-dependent Boltzmann equation of the electrons agree quite well with the experimental findings for the different air-like plasmas. The main reaction processes have been analysed on the basis of the model calculations and the remaining differences between the experiment and modelling especially during the afterglow are discussed.

  18. Gas Phase Pressure Effects on the Apparent Thermal Conductivity of JSC-1A Lunar Regolith Simulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Kleinhenz, Julie E.

    2011-01-01

    Gas phase pressure effects on the apparent thermal conductivity of a JSC-1A/air mixture have been experimentally investigated under steady state thermal conditions from 10 kPa to 100 kPa. The result showed that apparent thermal conductivity of the JSC-1A/air mixture decreased when pressure was lowered to 80 kPa. At 10 kPa, the conductivity decreased to 0.145 W/m/degree C, which is significantly lower than 0.196 W/m/degree C at 100 kPa. This finding is consistent with the results of previous researchers. The reduction of the apparent thermal conductivity at low pressures is ascribed to the Knudsen effect. Since the characteristic length of the void space in bulk JSC-1A varies over a wide range, both the Knudsen regime and continuum regime can coexist in the pore space. The volume ratio of the two regimes varies with pressure. Thus, as gas pressure decreases, the gas volume controlled by Knudsen regime increases. Under Knudsen regime the resistance to the heat flow is higher than that in the continuum regime, resulting in the observed pressure dependency of the apparent thermal conductivity.

  19. A new air quality perception scale for global assessment of air pollution health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguen, Séverine; Ségala, Claire; Pédrono, Gaëlle; Mesbah, Mounir

    2012-12-01

    Despite improvements in air quality in developed countries, air pollution remains a major public health issue. To fully assess the health impact, we must consider that air pollution exposure has both physical and psychological effects; this latter dimension, less documented, is more difficult to measure and subjective indicators constitute an appropriate alternative. In this context, this work presents the methodological development of a new scale to measure the perception of air quality, useful as an exposure or risk appraisal metric in public health contexts. On the basis of the responses from 2,522 subjects in eight French cities, psychometric methods are used to construct the scale from 22 items that assess risk perception (anxiety about health and quality of life) and the extent to which air pollution is a nuisance (sensorial perception and symptoms). The scale is robust, reproducible, and discriminates between subpopulations more susceptible to poor air pollution perception. The individual risk factors of poor air pollution perception are coherent with those findings in the risk perception literature. Perception of air pollution by the general public is a key issue in the development of comprehensive risk assessment studies as well as in air pollution risk management and policy. This study offers a useful new tool to measure such efforts and to help set priorities for air quality improvements in combination with air quality measurements.

  20. Cellular attachment and differentiation on titania nanotubes exposed to air- or nitrogen-based non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Yeon Seo

    Full Text Available The surface topography and chemistry of titanium implants are important factors for successful osseointegration. However, chemical modification of an implant surface using currently available methods often results in the disruption of topographical features and the loss of beneficial effects during the shelf life of the implant. Therefore, the aim of this study was to apply the recently highlighted portable non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ, elicited from one of two different gas sources (nitrogen and air, to TiO2 nanotube surfaces to further improve their osteogenic properties while preserving the topographical morphology. The surface treatment was performed before implantation to avoid age-related decay. The surface chemistry and morphology of the TiO2 nanotube surfaces before and after the NTAPPJ treatment were determined using a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a surface profiler, a contact angle goniometer, and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. The MC3T3-E1 cell viability, attachment and morphology were confirmed using calcein AM and ethidium homodimer-1 staining, and analysis of gene expression using rat mesenchymal stem cells was performed using a real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that both portable nitrogen- and air-based NTAPPJ could be used on TiO2 nanotube surfaces easily and without topographical disruption. NTAPPJ resulted in a significant increase in the hydrophilicity of the surfaces as well as changes in the surface chemistry, which consequently increased the cell viability, attachment and differentiation compared with the control samples. The nitrogen-based NTAPPJ treatment group exhibited a higher osteogenic gene expression level than the air-based NTAPPJ treatment group due to the lower atomic percentage of carbon on the surface that resulted from treatment. It was concluded that NTAPPJ treatment of TiO2 nanotube surfaces results in an increase in

  1. Effective efficiency prediction for discrete type of ribs used in solar air heaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneesh Sethi, Mridul Sharma, Varun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of an artificial roughness on a surface is an effective technique to enhance the heat transfer from the collector plate to the air in a solar air heater duct. However, artificial roughness leads to even more fluid pressure thereby increasing the pumping power. Number of geometries of roughness elements has been investigated on the heat transfer and friction characteristics of solar air heater ducts. This paper presents a comparison of effective efficiency of solar air heaters having different types of geometry of roughness elements (discrete ribs on the absorber plate. The effective efficiency has been computed by using the correlations for heat transfer and friction factor developed by various investigators within the investigated range of operating and system parameters.

  2. Effects on health of air pollution: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Harari, Sergio; Martinelli, Ida; Franchini, Massimo

    2015-09-01

    Air pollution is a complex and ubiquitous mixture of pollutants including particulate matter, chemical substances and biological materials. There is growing awareness of the adverse effects on health of air pollution following both acute and chronic exposure, with a rapidly expanding body of evidence linking air pollution with an increased risk of respiratory (e.g., asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer) and cardiovascular disease (e.g., myocardial infarction, heart failure, cerebrovascular accidents). Elderly subjects, pregnant women, infants and people with prior diseases appear especially susceptible to the deleterious effects of ambient air pollution. The main diseases associated with exposure to air pollutants will be summarized in this narrative review.

  3. Method transfer from high-pressure liquid chromatography to ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography. II. Temperature and pressure effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åsberg, Dennis; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Leśko, Marek; Cavazzini, Alberto; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2015-07-03

    The importance of the generated temperature and pressure gradients in ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) are investigated and compared to high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The drug Omeprazole, together with three other model compounds (with different chemical characteristics, namely uncharged, positively and negatively charged) were used. Calculations of the complete temperature profile in the column at UHPLC conditions showed, in our experiments, a temperature difference between the inlet and outlet of 16 °C and a difference of 2 °C between the column center and the wall. Through van't Hoff plots, this information was used to single out the decrease in retention factor (k) solely due to the temperature gradient. The uncharged solute was least affected by temperature with a decrease in k of about 5% while for charged solutes the effect was more pronounced, with k decreases up to 14%. A pressure increase of 500 bar gave roughly 5% increase in k for the uncharged solute, while omeprazole and the other two charged solutes gave about 25, 20 and 15% increases in k, respectively. The stochastic model of chromatography was applied to estimate the dependence of the average number of adsorption/desorption events (n) and the average time spent by a molecule in the stationary phase (τs) on temperature and pressure on peak shape for the tailing, basic solute. Increasing the temperature yielded an increase in n and decrease in τs which resulted in less skew at high temperatures. With increasing pressure, the stochastic modeling gave interesting results for the basic solute showing that the skew of the peak increased with pressure. The conclusion is that pressure effects are more pronounced for both retention and peak shape than the temperature effects for the polar or charged compounds in our study.

  4. High pressure effects on allergen food proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somkuti, Judit; Smeller, László

    2013-12-15

    There are several proteins, which can cause allergic reaction if they are inhaled or ingested. Our everyday food can also contain such proteins. Food allergy is an IgE-mediated immune disorder, a growing health problem of great public concern. High pressure is known to affect the structure of proteins; typically few hundred MPa pressure can lead to denaturation. That is why several trials have been performed to alter the structure of the allergen proteins by high pressure, in order to reduce its allergenicity. Studies have been performed both on simple protein solutions and on complex food systems. Here we review those allergens which have been investigated under or after high pressure treatment by methods capable of detecting changes in the secondary and tertiary structure of the proteins. We focus on those allergenic proteins, whose structural changes were investigated by spectroscopic methods under pressure in correlation with the observed allergenicity (IgE binding) changes. According to this criterion we selected the following allergen proteins: Mal d 1 and Mal d 3 (apple), Bos d 5 (milk), Dau c 1 (carrot), Gal d 2 (egg), Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 (peanut), and Gad m 1 (cod).

  5. Manufacturers of Copper Tube for Central Air Conditioner Use Face Mounting Pressure in the Final Quarter of the Year

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>This year,the investment growth rate of real estate industry continued to slow down,sold area of commercial housing also dropped significantly,which brought huge pressure to the domestic air conditioning manufactures.In the first half of the year,by relying on high growth in national financial expenditure,along with investment in public infrastructure

  6. Collective effects in the radiation pressure force

    CERN Document Server

    Bachelard, R; Guerin, W; Kaiser, R

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the role of diffuse, Mie and cooperative scattering on the radiation pressure force acting on the center of mass of a cloud of cold atoms. Even though a mean-field Ansatz (the `timed Dicke state'), previously derived from a cooperative scattering approach, has been shown to agree satisfactorily with experiments, diffuse scattering also describes very well most features of the radiation pressure force on large atomic clouds. We compare in detail an incoherent, random walk model for photons and a diffraction approach to the more complete description based on coherently coupled dipoles. We show that a cooperative scattering approach, although it provides a quite complete description of the scattering process, is not necessary to explain the previous experiments on the radiation pressure force.

  7. High-pressure effects on intramolecular electron transfer compounds

    CERN Document Server

    He Li Ming; Li Hong; Zhang Bao Wen; Li Yi; Yang Guo Qiang

    2002-01-01

    We explore the effect of pressure on the fluorescence spectra of the intramolecular electron transfer compound N-(1-pyrenylmethyl), N-methyl-4-methoxyaniline (Py-Am) and its model version, with poly(methyl methacrylate) blended in, at high pressure up to 7 GPa. The emission properties of Py-Am and pyrene show distinct difference with the increase of pressure. This difference indicates the strength of the charge transfer interaction resulting from the adjusting of the conformation of Py-Am with increase of pressure. The relationship between the electronic state of the molecule and pressure is discussed.

  8. Blood pressure monitor with a position sensor for wrist placement to eliminate hydrostatic pressure effect on blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hironori; Koshimizu, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Shingo; Ogura, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Accurate measurement of blood pressure at wrist requires the heart and wrist to be kept at the same level to avoid the effects of hydrostatic pressure. Although a blood pressure monitor with a position sensor that guides appropriate forearm angle without use of a chair and desk has already been proposed, a similar functioning device for measuring upper arm blood pressure with a chair and desk is needed. In this study, a calculation model was first used to explore design of such a system. The findings were then implemented into design of a new blood pressure monitor. Results of various methods were compared. The calculation model of the wrist level from arthrosis angles and interarticulars lengths was developed and considered using published anthropometric dimensions. It is compared with 33 volunteer persons' experimental results. The calculated difference of level was -4.1 to 7.9 (cm) with a fixed chair and desk. The experimental result was -3.0 to 5.5 (cm) at left wrist and -2.1 to 6.3(cm) at right wrist. The absolute difference level equals ±4.8 (mmHg) of blood pressure readings according to the calculated result. This meets the AAMI requirements for a blood pressure monitor. In the conclusion, the calculation model is able to effectively evaluate the difference between the heart and wrist level. Improving the method for maintaining wrist to heart level will improve wrist blood pressure measurement accuracy when also sitting in the chair at a desk. The leading angle of user's forearm using a position sensor is shown to work for this purpose.

  9. The association of annual air pollution exposure with blood pressure among patients with sleep-disordered breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Te; Lee, Kang-Yun; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Wu, Dean; Juang, Jer-Nan; Chuang, Kai-Jen

    2016-02-01

    While sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), high blood pressure (BP) and air pollution exposure have separately been associated with increased risk of cardiopulmonary mortality, the association linking air pollution exposure to BP among patients with sleep-disordered breathing is still unclear. We collected 3762 participants' data from the Taipei Medical University Hospital's Sleep Center and air pollution data from the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration. Associations of 1-year mean criteria air pollutants [particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters ≤10 μm (PM10), particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3)] with systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) were investigated by generalized additive models. After controlling for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), temperature and relative humidity, we observed that increases in air pollution levels were associated with decreased SBP and increased DBP. We also found that patients with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥30 showed a stronger BP response to increased levels of air pollution exposure than those with AHIpollution exposure on BP were found in overweight participants than in participants with normal BMI. We concluded that annual exposure to air pollution was associated with change of BP among patients with sleep-disordered breathing. The association between annual air pollution exposure and BP could be modified by AHI and BMI.

  10. Study of heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of air heat exchanger using PCM for free cooling applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalaiselvam Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Free cooling is the process of storing the cool energy available in the night ambient air and using it during the day. The heat exchanger used in this work is a modular type which is similar to the shell and tube heat exchanger. The shell side is filled with Phase Change Materials (PCM and air flow is through the tubes in the module. The modules of the heat exchanger are arranged one over other with air spacers in between each module. The air space provided in between the module in-creases the retention time of the air for better heat transfer. Transient Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling is carried out for single air passage in a modular heat exchanger. It shows that the PCM phase transition time in the module in which different shape of fins is adopted. The module with rectangular fins has 17.2 % reduction in solidification compared with the plain module. Then steady state numerical analysis is accomplished to the whole module having the fin of high heat transfer, so that pressure drop, flow and thermal characteristics across the module and the air spacers are deter-mined for various air inlet velocities of 0.4 to 1.6 m/s. To validate the computational results, experiments are carried out and the agreement was found to be good.

  11. Students' Pressure, Time Management and Effective Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hechuan; Yang, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to survey the status quo of the student pressure and the relationship between their daily time management and their learning outcomes in three different types of higher secondary schools at Shenyang, the capital city of Liaoning Province in mainland China. Design/methodology/approach: An investigation was carried out in 14…

  12. 3-D numerical study of the effect of Reynolds number and baffle angle on heat transfer and pressure drop of turbulent flow of air through rectangular duct of very small height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Paul

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Present article illustrates a computational study of three-dimensional steady state heat transfer and high turbulent flow characteristics through a rectangular duct with constant heat fluxed upper wall and single rectangular cross-sectioned baffle insertion at different angles. RNG k–ɛ model along with standard wall function based computations has been accomplished applying the finite volume method, and SIMPLE algorithm has been executed for solving the governing equations. For a Reynolds number, Re of 10,000 to 50,000, Prandtl Number, Pr of 0.707 and baffle angle, α of 30°, 60°, 90°, 120°, 150°, computational studies are executed, centred onto the hydraulic diameter, Dh, test section and hydrodynamic entry length of the duct. Flow field has been solved using Ansys Fluent 14.0 software. Study exposes that baffled rectangular duct has a higher average Nusselt number, Nu and Darcy friction factor, f compared to a smooth rectangular duct. Nu as well as f are found to be maximum at 90° baffle angle. Results illustrate that both α and Re play a significant role in heat transfer as well as flow characteristics and also effects TEF. The correctness of the results attained in this study is corroborated by comparing the results with those existing in the literature for smooth rectangular duct within a precision of ±2% for f and ±4% for Nu.

  13. Pressure Relief, Visco-Elastic Foam with Inflated Air? A Pilot Study in a Dutch Nursing Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Van Leen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There is still little evidence regarding the type of mattress that is the best for preventing pressure ulcers (PUs. In a Dutch nursing home, a new type of overlay mattress (air inflated visco-elastic foam was tested to analyze the opportunity for replacement of the normally used static air overlay mattress in its three-step PU prevention protocol In this small pilot the outcome measures were: healing of a category one pressure ulcer, new development or deterioration of a category one PU and need for repositioning. Methods: We included 20 nursing home residents with a new category one pressure ulcer, existing for no longer than 48 h following a consecutive sampling technic. All residents were staying for more than 30 days in the nursing home and were lying on a visco-elastic foam mattress without repositioning (step one of the 3-step protocol at the start of the pilot study. They had not suffered from a PU in the month before. The intervention involved use of an air inflated foam overlay instead of a static air overlay (normally step 2 of the 3-step protocol. At the start; the following data were registered: age; gender; main diagnosis and presence of incontinence. Thereafter; all participating residents were checked weekly for PU healing tendency; deterioration of PUs; new PUs and need of repositioning. Only when residents showed still a category one PU after 48 h or deterioration of an existing pressure ulcer or if there was development of a new pressure ulcer, repositioning was put into practice (step 3 of the PU protocol. All residents participated during 8 weeks. Results: Seven residents developed a new pressure ulcer category one and still had a category one pressure ulcer at the end of the study period. One resident developed a pressure ulcer category 2. Fifteen residents needed repositioning from one week after start of the study until the end of the study. Conclusions: Overall 40% of the residents developed a pressure ulcer

  14. Acute effects of consumption of energy drinks on intraocular pressure and blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilechie AA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A Alex Ilechie, Sandra TettehDepartment of Optometry, University of Cape Coast, GhanaBackground: Energy drinks contain a wide variety of ingredients including caffeine, for which there have been conflicting reports regarding its effects on intraocular pressure (IOP and blood pressure. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of an energy drink (Red Bull® on the IOP and blood pressure of healthy young adults.Methods: Thirty healthy university students of either gender, aged 18–30 (mean 23.20 ± 2.81 years were randomly selected to participate in this study. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups (experimental and control and were asked to abstain from caffeine for 48 hours prior to and during the study. Baseline IOP and blood pressure were measured. The experimental group (n = 15 consumed one can of the energy drink (containing 85 mg of caffeine in 250 mL and measurements were repeated at 30, 60, and 90 minutes, while the control group drank 250 mL of water and were tested over the same time period.Results: When compared with baseline, a significant decrease (P < 0.05 in mean IOP at 60 and 90 minutes was observed in the experimental group. There was no corresponding change in systolic or diastolic blood pressure.Conclusion: Our results suggest that energy drinks (ie, Red Bull produce a significant reduction in IOP but have no effect on blood pressure. These findings may be interpreted as reflecting the effect of the combination of caffeine and taurine in the Red Bull energy drink. This effect may result from the known hypotensive effect of taurine, and warrants further study.Keywords: acute effect, intraocular pressure, blood pressure, glaucoma, caffeine, taurine

  15. Atmospheric Effects on Cosmic Ray Air Showers Observed with HAWC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma Ray detector (HAWC), currently under construction on the Sierra Negra volcano near Puebla, Mexico, can be used to study solar physics with its scaler data acquisition system. Increases in the scaler rates are used to observe GeV cosmic rays from solar flares while decreases in the rates show the heliospheric disturbances associated with coronal mass ejections. However, weather conditions and height-dependent state variables such as pressure and temperature affect the production of extensive particle air showers that can be detected by the scaler system. To see if these atmospheric effects can be removed, we obtained local weather data from the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) and the local weather station at HAWC. The scaler pulse rates were then correlated to the pressure and temperature. We present data from a Forbush decrease observed by HAWC following a significant coronal mass ejection in April 2013, and describe our efforts to remove atmospheric variations from the scaler counts. This work was partially supported by the National Science Foundation’s REU program through NSF Award AST-1004881 to the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  16. Air plasma effect on dental disinfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, S.; Murata, R. M.; Saxena, D. [Department of Basic Sciences and Craniofacial Biology, College of Dentistry, New York University, New York, New York 10010 (United States); Kuo, S. P.; Chen, C. Y.; Huang, K. J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11202 (United States); Popovic, S. [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    A nonthermal low temperature air plasma jet is characterized and applied to study the plasma effects on oral pathogens and biofilms. Experiments were performed on samples of six defined microorganisms' cultures, including those of gram-positive bacteria and fungi, and on a cultivating biofilm sample of Streptococcus mutans UA159. The results show that the plasma jet creates a zone of microbial growth inhibition in each treated sample; the zone increases with the plasma treatment time and expands beyond the entire region directly exposed to the plasma jet. With 30s plasma treatment twice daily during 5 days of biofilm cultivation, its formation was inhibited. The viability of S. mutans cells in the treated biofilms dropped to below the measurable level and the killed bacterial cells concentrated to local regions as manifested by the fluorescence microscopy via the environmental scanning electron microscope. The emission spectroscopy of the jet indicates that its plasma effluent carries an abundance of reactive atomic oxygen, providing catalyst for the observed plasma effect.

  17. Air plasma effect on dental disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, S.; Kuo, S. P.; Murata, R. M.; Chen, C. Y.; Saxena, D.; Huang, K. J.; Popovic, S.

    2011-07-01

    A nonthermal low temperature air plasma jet is characterized and applied to study the plasma effects on oral pathogens and biofilms. Experiments were performed on samples of six defined microorganisms' cultures, including those of gram-positive bacteria and fungi, and on a cultivating biofilm sample of Streptococcus mutans UA159. The results show that the plasma jet creates a zone of microbial growth inhibition in each treated sample; the zone increases with the plasma treatment time and expands beyond the entire region directly exposed to the plasma jet. With 30s plasma treatment twice daily during 5 days of biofilm cultivation, its formation was inhibited. The viability of S. mutans cells in the treated biofilms dropped to below the measurable level and the killed bacterial cells concentrated to local regions as manifested by the fluorescence microscopy via the environmental scanning electron microscope. The emission spectroscopy of the jet indicates that its plasma effluent carries an abundance of reactive atomic oxygen, providing catalyst for the observed plasma effect.

  18. [The direct health effects of air pollution in Vratsa in 1991].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabakova, S; Koleva, Ts; Petrov, P; Simeonov, G

    1993-01-01

    The effect of air pollution in the town of Vratsa on the daily morbidity of the population has been studied during the first half of 1991. Studies are performed on the correlation between the daily dynamics in the pollution according to specific for the town indices ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, sulphur dioxide, nitric oxides, dust, meteorological parameters temperature of the air, relative humidity, air velocity, barometric pressure and some respiratory and allergic diseases among the population. It is already established that the level of the air pollution in the town of Vratsa, among which dominate ammonia and hydrogen sulfide, have a direct effect on the acute respiratory morbidity, more expressed among the children. This influence is traced both in episodes of increased pollution, and in the course of several days afterwards and is conductive by the combination of unfavourable meteorological conditions, hindering the dispersion of the atmospheric pollutants.

  19. Effect of pressurization on antibacterial properties of Lactobacillus strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Agnieszka; Grześkiewicz, Aleksandra; Wiśniewska, Krystyna; Reps, Arnold

    2010-03-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of high pressures on antibacterial properties of selected strains of the Lactobacillus species. Cultures of 22 strains were subjected to high-pressure treatment at 30, 60, 90, and 300 MPa/1 min/18 °C. The susceptibility of the bacteria pressurized at 30-90 MPa was diversified and depended on the strain and not on its species affiliation. When compared with pressures of 30-90 MPa, the pressure treatment at 300 MPa caused the inhibition of the acidifying activity of the strains analyzed. In turn, the pressures applied had no impact on the quantity of hydrogen peroxide synthesized. An increase in pressure was accompanied by a diminishing antibacterial activity of the investigated Lactobacillus strains.

  20. Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharges in Air at Atmospheric Pressure -- Experiment and Theory of Regime Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, David; Lacoste, Deanna; Laux, Christophe

    2009-10-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and inter-electrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. Notably, there is a minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime that increases with decreasing gas temperature. A theory is developed to describe the Corona-to-Glow (C-G) and Glow-to-Spark (G-S) transitions for NRP discharges. The C-G transition is shown to depend on the Avalanche-to-Streamer Transition (AST) as well as the electric field strength in the positive column. The G-S transition is due to the thermal ionization instability. The minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime can be understood by considering that the applied voltage of the AST must be lower than that of the thermal ionization instability. This is a previously unknown criterion for generating glow discharges, as it does not correspond to the Paschen minimum or to the Meek-Raether criterion.

  1. Preliminary Investigation of a Dielectric Barrier Discharge Lamp in Open Air at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Feng; WANG Wei-Wei; CHANG Xi-Jiang; LIANG Rong-Qing

    2011-01-01

    @@ A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) lamp is investigated by using sinusoidal power with a 10 kHz frequency in open air at atmospheric pressure.With increasing applied voltages, the different discharge phenomena appear.At relatively low voltages, the discharge states are general stochastic filamentary discharges with weak light.However, at relatively high voltages, the walls of quartz tubes are heated sharply by plasma, and then the dazzling light is emitted very quickly to form the DBD Lamp, corresponding to the low maintaining voltage that is lower than the ignited voltage.The discharge state or mode of the DBD lamp that corresponds to the glow discharge is deduced according to the wave form of the circuit current, which is evidently different from the filamentary discharges.Under these conditions, the spectrum of the DBD lamp is continuous in the range 400-932nm, which is scanned in the range 300-932nm.It is also shown that there is another discharge state or mode that is different from the traditional filamentary discharges.Therefore, it is concluded that the discharge state or mode of the DBD lamp is a glow discharge.

  2. High pressure air jet in the endoscopic preparation room: risk of noise exposure on occupational health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, King-Wah; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun

    2015-01-01

    After high-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscopes, they are hung to dry in order to prevent residual water droplets impact on patient health. To allow for quick drying and clinical reuse, some endoscopic units use a high pressure air jet (HPAJ) to remove the water droplets on the endoscopes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the excessive noise exposure with the use of HPAJ in endoscopic preparation room and to investigate the risk to occupational health. Noise assessment was taken during 7 automatic endoscopic reprocessors (AERs) and combined with/without HPAJ use over an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA). Analytical procedures of the NIOSH and the ISO for noise-induced hearing loss were estimated to develop analytic models. The peak of the noise spectrum of combined HPAJ and 7 AERs was significantly higher than that of the 7 AERs alone (108.3 ± 1.36 versus 69.3 ± 3.93 dBA, P risk of hearing loss (HL > 2.5 dB) was 2.15% at 90 dBA, 11.6% at 95 dBA, and 51.3% at 100 dBA. The odds ratio was 49.1 (95% CI: 11.9 to 203.6). The noise generated by the HPAJ to work over TWA seriously affected the occupational health and safety of those working in an endoscopic preparation room.

  3. Atmospheric pressure He-air plasma jet: Breakdown process and propagation phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Begum

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper He-discharge (plasma jet/bullet in atmospheric pressure air and its progression phenomenon has been studied experimentally using ICCD camera, optical emission spectroscopy (OES and calibrated dielectric probe measurements. The repetitive nanosecond pulse has applied to a plasma pencil to generate discharge in the helium gas channel. The discharge propagation speed was measured from the ICCD images. The axial electric field distribution in the plasma jet is inferred from the optical emission spectroscopic data and from the probe measurement. The correlation between the jet velocities, jet length with the pulse duration is established. It shows that the plasma jet is not isolated from the input voltage along its propagation path. The discharge propagation speed, the electron density and the local and average electric field distribution along the plasma jet axis predicted from the experimental results are in good agreement with the data predicted by numerical simulation of the streamer propagation presented in different literatures. The ionization phenomenon of the discharge predicts the key ionization parameters, such as speed, peak electric field in the front, and electron density. The maximum local electric field measured by OES is 95 kV/cm at 1.3 cm of the jet axis, and average EF measured by probe is 24 kV/cm at the same place of the jet. The average and local electron density estimated are in the order of 1011 cm-3 and it reaches to the maximum of 1012 cm-3.

  4. Research of air-cushion isolation effects on high arch dam reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Jie; Chen, Jiang; Zhang, Yuan-Ze; Liu, Hao-Wu

    2011-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of air-cushion isolated arch dam is presented with the nonlinear gas-liquid-solid multi-field dynamic coupling effect taken into account. In this model, the displacement formulation in Lagrange method, pressure formulation in Euler method, nonlinear contact model based on Coulomb friction law are applied to the air-cushion, reservoir and contraction joint domain, respectively. The dynamic response of Jinping I arch dam with a height of 305 m is analyzed using the seismic records of the Wenchuan Earthquake in 2008. Numerical results show that the air-cushion isolation reduces significantly the hydrodynamic pressure as well as the opening width for the contraction joints of high arch dam.

  5. Auto-ignition of lubricating oil working at high pressures in a compressor for an air conditioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chul Jin; Choi, Hyo Hyun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Chae Hoon, E-mail: chsohn@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    Auto-ignition of lubricating oil working in a compressor for an air conditioner is studied experimentally. The adopted lubricating oil is an unknown mixture with multi-components and known to have flash point temperature of 170 deg. C. First, its auto-ignition temperature is measured 365 deg. C at atmospheric pressure. The lubricating oil works under high-pressure condition up to 30 atm and it is heated and cooled down repeatedly. Accordingly, auto-ignition temperatures or flammable limits of lubricating oil are required at high pressures with respect to fire safety. Because there is not a standard test method for the purpose, a new ignition-test method is proposed in this study and thereby, auto-ignition temperatures are measured over the pressure range below 30 atm. The measured temperatures range from 215 deg. C to 255 deg. C and they strongly depend on pressure of gas mixture consisting of oil vapor, nitrogen, and oxygen. They are close to flash point temperature and the lubricating oil can be hazardous when it works for high-pressure operating condition and abundant air flows into a compressor.

  6. Observations of the 18.6-year cycle of air pressure and a theoretical model to explain certain aspects of this signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, D. P.; Currie, R. G.

    1993-07-01

    Evidence from barometric data in Japan, USSR, southern Europe, southern Africa, and South America shows that air pressure variations with period near 18.6-years can attain amplitudes as high as 0.9 mb, and are identified as induced by the luni-solar constituent tide M n (M for moon and n for nodal). Luni-solar waveforms commonly exhibit modulation effects due to the superposition of a longer period component with 180° changes in phase. Thus, the waveform amplitudes can be highly nonstationary. Pressure gradients at this period over subcontinental distances show that the amplitudes imply nonequilibrium conditions. A theoretical coupling mechanism between E-W and N-S wind systems and the Coriolis force is envoked to explain the sub-continental extent and the, sometimes abrupt, amplitude changes of the pressure systems over small distances.

  7. Pressure effects in multiple resonant multiphoton transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maïnos, C.; Le Duff, Y.; Castex, M. C.; Boursey, E.

    1989-02-01

    Although the rotational structure of a multiphoton process generally remains unaltered over a large range of gas pressure, this is not the case when multiple resonances are present. The rotational structure observed through intermediate rotational levels in a multiphoton process depends strongly on the resonance conditions. We show, for the NO molecule, that this structure changes drastically when the resonance conditions are modified by intermolecular collisions.

  8. Probabilistic Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Effects on Optic Nerve Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, Andrew J.; Raykin, Julia; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Altered intracranial pressure (ICP) is involved/implicated in several ocular conditions: papilledema, glaucoma and Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. The biomechanical effects of altered ICP on optic nerve head (ONH) tissues in these conditions are uncertain but likely important. We have quantified ICP-induced deformations of ONH tissues, using finite element (FE) and probabilistic modeling (Latin Hypercube Simulations (LHS)) to consider a range of tissue properties and relevant pressures.

  9. Effect of Superimposed Hydrostatic Pressure on Bendability of Sheet Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. X.; Wu, P. D.; Lloyd, D. J.

    2010-06-01

    The effect of superimposed hydrostatic pressure on fracture under three-point bending is studied numerically using the finite element method based on the Gurson damage model. It is demonstrated that superimposed hydrostatic pressure significantly increases the bendability and bending fracture strain due to the fact that a superimposed pressure delays or completely eliminates the nucleation, growth and coalescence of microvoids or microcracks. Numerical results are found to be in good agreement with experimental observations.

  10. The effect of pressure on annular flow pressure drop in a small pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Bertodano, M.A.L.; Beus, S.G.; Shi, Jian-Feng

    1996-09-01

    New experimental data was obtained for pressure drop and entrainment for annular up-flow in a vertical pipe. The 9.5 mm. pipe has an L/D ratio of 440 to insure fully developed annular flow. The pressure ranged from 140 kPa to 660 kPa. Therefore the density ratio was varied by a factor of four approximately. This allows the investigation of the effect of pressure on the interfacial shear models. Gas superficial velocities between 25 and 126 m/s were tested. This extends the range of previous data to higher gas velocities. The data were compared with well known models for interfacial shear that represent the state of the art. Good results were obtained when the model by Asali, Hanratty and Andreussi was modified for the effect of pressure. Furthermore an equivalent model was obtained based on the mixing length theory for rough pipes. It correlates the equivalent roughness to the film thickness.

  11. Full scale measurements of pressure equalization on air permeable facade elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, C.A. van; Geurts, C.P.W.

    2015-01-01

    Wind-induced pressure differences over rain screens are determined by the external pressures and the pressures inside the cavity. Minimizing this pressure difference decreases the risk of water leakage and also helps to minimize the local loads on the façade elements. Current rules to determine the

  12. Air Quality Modeling in Support of the Near-Road Exposures and Effects of Urban Air Pollutants Study (NEXUS)

    OpenAIRE

    Vlad Isakov; Saravanan Arunachalam; Stuart Batterman; Sarah Bereznicki; Janet Burke; Kathie Dionisio; Val Garcia; David Heist; Steve Perry; Michelle Snyder; Alan Vette

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in traffic-related air pollution exposure studies is the lack of information regarding pollutant exposure characterization. Air quality modeling can provide spatially and temporally varying exposure estimates for examining relationships between traffic-related air pollutants and adverse health outcomes. A hybrid air quality modeling approach was used to estimate exposure to traffic-related air pollutants in support of the Near-Road Exposures and Effects of Urban Air Pollutan...

  13. Low-pressure catalytic wet-air oxidation of a high-strength industrial wastewater using Fenton's reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biçaksiz, Zeliha; Aytimur, Gülin; Atalay, Süheyda

    2008-06-01

    Wastewater from the Afyon Alkaloids Factory (Afyon, Turkey) was subjected to low-pressure catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) using Fenton's reagent, and the optimal reaction conditions were investigated. The CWAO using Fenton's reagent was applied to the factory effluent, diluted factory effluent, and aerobically pretreated wastewater. To find the optimum quantities of reagents, ferrous iron (Fe(+2))-to-substrate ratios of 1:10, 1:25, and 1:50 and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-to-Fe(+2) ratios of 1, 5, and 10 were investigated, and the treatment was carried out at different temperatures. High chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals were obtained at 50 degrees C, with the Fe(+2)-to-substrate ratio range between 1:10 and 1:25. The change in H2O2-to-Fe(+2) ratios did not cause any considerable effect. Also, the percentages of COD removals were nearly the same, so the ratio H2O2:Fe(+2):1 is recommended. Aerobic pretreatment seems to be effective. On the other hand, no enhancement was observed in the case of the diluted wastewater.

  14. Committee on air pollution effects research: 40 years of UK air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, David; Dise, Nancy; Sheppard, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    The UK Committee on Air Pollution Effects Research (CAPER) was established 40 years ago. This special section was compiled to mark this anniversary. During this time there have been dramatic changes in the composition of the air over the UK. The four papers in this special section of Environmental Pollution represent the current air pollution effects research focus on ozone and nitrogen deposition, two related issues and are proving from a policy perspective to be quite intractable issues. The UK CAPER research community continues to advance the underpinning science and engages closely with the user community in government departments.

  15. Building America Case Study: Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts, Tyler, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-08-01

    ?Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy.

  16. Pressure Effects on the Thermal De-NOx Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Karsten; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    1996-01-01

    The effect of pressure on the thermal de-NOx process has been investigated in flow reactor experiments. The experiments were performed at pressures from 1 to 10 bar and temperatures ranging from 925 to 1375 K. The inlet O-2 level was varied from 1000 ppm to 10%, while NH3 and NO were maintained a...... of Miller and Glarborg show satisfactory agreement. The implications of the results for application of thermal de-NOx in high-pressure systems, such as pressurized fluidized bed combustion and gas turbines, are discussed....

  17. Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Engineering Technology; Lipinski, R.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue.

  18. Microwave air plasmas in capillaries at low pressure II. Experimental investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancu, G. D.; Leroy, O.; Coche, P.; Gadonna, K.; Guerra, V.; Minea, T.; Alves, L. L.

    2016-11-01

    This work presents an experimental study of microwave (2.45 GHz excitation frequency) micro-plasmas, generated in dry air (N2 80%: O2 20%) within a small radius silica capillary (345 µm inner radius) at low pressure (300 Pa) and low powers (80-130 W). Experimental diagnostics are performed using optical emission spectroscopy calibrated in absolute intensity. Axial-resolved measurements (50 µm spatial resolution) of atomic transitions N(3p4S)  →  N(3s4P) O(3p5P)  →  O(3s5S) and molecular transitions N2(C,v‧)  →  N2(B,v″) \\text{N}2+ (B,v‧)  →  \\text{N}2+ (X,v″) allow us to obtain, as a function of the coupled power, the absolute densities of N(3p4S), O(3p5P), N2(C), N2(B) and \\text{N}2+ (B), as well as the gas (rotational) temperature (700-1000 K), the vibrational temperature of N2(C,v) (7000-10 000 K) and the excitation temperatures of N2(C) and N2(B) (11 000 K). The analysis of the H β line-width gives an upper limiting value of 1013 cm-3 for the electron density; its axial variation (4  ×  1011-6  ×  1012 cm-3) being estimated by solving the wave electrodynamics equations for the present geometry, plasma length and electron-neutral collision frequency. The experimental results were compared with the results from a 0D model, presented in companion paper I [1], which couples the system of rate balance equations for the dominant neutral and charged plasma species to the homogeneous two-term electron Boltzmann equation, taking the measured gas temperature and the estimated electron density as input parameters. Good qualitative agreement is found between the measurements and calculations of the local species densities for various powers and axial positions. The dissociation degree of oxygen is found above 10%. Moreover, both the measurements and calculations show evidence of the non-equilibrium behavior of low-temperature plasmas, with vibrational and excitation temperatures at least

  19. Effects of intake air temperature on homogenous charge compression ignition combustion and emissions with gasoline and n-heptane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jianyong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a port fuel injection engine, Optimized kinetic process (OKP technology is implemented to realize HCCI combustion with dual-fuel injection. The effects of intake air temperature on HCCI combustion and emissions are investigated. The results show that dual-fuel control prolongs HCCI combustion duration and improves combustion stability. Dual-fuel HCCI combustion needs lower intake air temperature than gasoline HCCI combustion, which reduces the requirements on heat management system. As intake air temperature decreases, air charge increases and maximum pressure rising rate decreases. When intake air temperature is about 55ºC, HCCI combustion becomes worse and misfire happens. In fixed dual fuel content condition, HC and CO emission decreases as intake air temperature increases. The combination of dual-fuel injection and intake air temperature control can expand operation range of HCCI combustion.

  20. Effects of pressure and temperature on gate valve unwedging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damerell, P.S.; Harrison, D.H.; Hayes, P.W.; Simons, J.W.; Walker, T.A.

    1996-12-01

    The stem thrust required to unwedge a gate valve is influenced by the pressure and temperature when the valve is closed and by the changes in these conditions between closure and opening. {open_quotes}Pressure locking{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}thermal binding{close_quotes} refer to situations where pressure and temperature effects cause the unwedging load to be much higher than normal. A model of these phenomena has been developed. Wedging (closure) is modeled as developing an {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes} between the disk and its seat rings in the valve. The effects of pressure and temperature are analyzed to determine the change in this disk-to-seat {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes}. Flexibilities, of the disk, body, stem and yoke strongly influence the unwedging thrust. Calculations and limited comparisons to data have been performed for a range of valve designs and scenarios. Pressure changes can increase the unwedging load when there is either a uniform pressure decrease, or a situation where the bonnet pressure exceeds the pressures in the adjacent piping. Temperature changes can increase the unwedging load when: (1) valve closure at elevated system temperature produces a delayed stem expansion, (2) a temperature increase after closure produces a bonnet pressure increase, or (3) a temperature change after closure produces an increase in the disk-to-seat {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes} or disk-to-seat friction.

  1. Atmospheric effects on extensive air showers observed with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Argirò, S.; Arisaka, K.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonçalves Do Amaral, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Luna García, R.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Martello, D.; Martínez, J.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ortolani, F.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; PeĶala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, A.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tuci, V.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2009-09-01

    Atmospheric parameters, such as pressure (P), temperature (T) and density (ρ∝P/T), affect the development of extensive air showers initiated by energetic cosmic rays. We have studied the impact of atmospheric variations on extensive air showers by means of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The rate of events shows a ˜10% seasonal modulation and ˜2% diurnal one. We find that the observed behaviour is explained by a model including the effects associated with the variations of P and ρ. The former affects the longitudinal development of air showers while the latter influences the Molière radius and hence the lateral distribution of the shower particles. The model is validated with full simulations of extensive air showers using atmospheric profiles measured at the site of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  2. Weather induced effects on extensive air showers observed with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Bleve, Carla

    2007-01-01

    The rate of events measured with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is found to be modulated by the weather conditions. This effect is due to the increasing amount of matter traversed by the shower as the ground pressure increases and to the inverse proportionality of the Moliere radius to the air density near ground. Air-shower simulations with different realistic profiles of the atmosphere support this interpretation of the observed effects.

  3. Changes in foot pressure elicited by 3D air balance exercise and pelvic stability exercise for functional leg-length discrepancy in adult women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Hoon; Kim, Jeong-Ja; Kim, Chan-Kyu

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to examine the effect of pelvic stabilization exercise and 3D equipment exercise on adult women with Functional Leg-Length Discrepancy (FLLD). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty female students in their 20's having FLLD without Structural Leg Length Discrepancy were selected. Exercise was performed for 50 min per session, three times a week, for six weeks. The Pelvic stabilization exercise (PSE) group performed pelvic stabilization exercises for 50 minutes, and the 3D exercise (3DE) group performed 3D Air Balance exercise for 10 minutes after performing the pelvic stabilization exercise program for 40 minutes. [Results] The PSE group showed statistically significant differences in tape measure method (TMM) and maximum pressure between pre-test and post-test, and 3DE showed statistically significant differences in TMM, the difference in maximum pressure, the difference in average pressure, and the difference in support area. At the end of the 6-week intervention, TMM, difference in maximum pressure, difference in average pressure, and difference in support area showed significantly greater reduction in the 3DE group. [Conclusion] The results show that 3D stabilization exercise was more effective at improving the stabilization of the deep muscles surrounding the pelvis and left-right muscular balance. We consider that 3D exercise should be included in exercise programs for improving pelvic cavity and spinal stability in the future.

  4. Spatiotemporally resolved characteristics of a gliding arc discharge in a turbulent air flow at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas; Aldén, Marcus; Larsson, Anders; Kusano, Yukihiro; Li, Zhongshan

    2017-01-01

    A gliding arc discharge was generated in a turbulent air flow at atmospheric pressure driven by a 35 kHz alternating current (AC) electric power. The spatiotemporally resolved characteristics of the gliding arc discharge, including glow-type discharges, spark-type discharges, short-cutting events and transitions among the different types of discharges, were investigated using simultaneously optical and electrical diagnostics. The glow-type discharge shows sinusoidal-like voltage and current waveforms with a peak current of hundreds of milliamperes. The frequency of the emission intensity variation of the glow-type discharge is the same as that of the electronic power dissipated in the plasma column. The glow-type discharge can transfer into a spark discharge characterized by a sharp peak current of several amperes and a sudden increase of the brightness in the plasma column. Transitions can also be found to take place from spark-type discharges to glow-type discharges. Short-cutting events were often observed as the intermediate states formed during the spark-glow transition. Three different types of short-cutting events have been observed to generate new current paths between two plasma channel segments, and between two electrodes, as well as between the channel segment and the electrodes, respectively. The short-cut upper part of the plasma column that was found to have no current passing through can be detected several hundreds of microseconds after the short-cutting event. The voltage recovery rate, the period of AC voltage-driving signal, the flow rates and the rated input powers were found to play an important role in affecting the transitions among the different types of discharges.

  5. Liquid Steel at Low Pressure: Experimental Investigation of a Downward Water Air Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumfart, Maria

    2016-07-01

    In the continuous casting of steel controlling the steel flow rate to the mould is critical because a well-defined flow field at the mould level is essential for a good quality of the cast product. The stopper rod is a commonly used device to control this flow rate. Agglomeration of solid material near the stopper rod can lead to a reduced cross section and thus to a decreased casting speed or even total blockage (“clogging”). The mechanisms causing clogging are still not fully understood. Single phase considerations of the flow in the region of the stopper rod result in a low or even negative pressure at the smallest cross section. This can cause degassing of dissolved gases from the melt, evaporation of alloys and entrainment of air through the porous refractory material. It can be shown that the degassing process in liquid steel is taking place mainly at the stopper rod tip and its surrounding. The steel flow around the stopper rod tip is highly turbulent. In addition refractory material has a low wettability to liquid steel. So the first step to understand the flow situation and transport phenomena which occur near the stopper is to understand the behaviour of this two phase (steel, gas) flow. To simulate the flow situation near the stopper rod tip, water experiments are conducted using a convergent divergent nozzle with three different wall materials and three different contact angles respectively. These experiments show the high impact of the wettability of the wall material on the actual flow structure at a constant gas flow rate.

  6. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Ethylene/Air Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; Sunderland, P. B.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Soot formation was studied within laminar premixed ethylene/air flames (C/O ratios of 0.78-0.98) stabilized on a flat-flame burner operating at atmospheric pressure. Measurements included soot volume fractions by both laser extinction and gravimetric methods, temperatures by multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscopy, major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of condensable hydrocarbons by gravimetric sampling. and velocities by laser velocimetry. These data were used to find soot surface growth rates and primary soot particle nucleation rates along the axes of the flames. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates were correlated successfully by predictions based on typical hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall. These results suavest that reduced soot surface growth rates with increasing residence time seen in the present and other similar flames were mainly caused by reduced rates of surface activation due to reduced H atom concentrations as temperatures decrease as a result of radiative heat losses. Primary soot particle nucleation rates exhibited variations with temperature and acetylene concentrations that were similar to recent observations for diffusion flames; however, nucleation rates in the premixed flames were significantly lower than in, the diffusion flames for reasons that still must be explained. Finally, predictions of yields of major gas species based on mechanisms from both Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt were in good agreement with present measurements and suggest that H atom concentrations (relevant to HACA mechanisms) approximate estimates based on local thermodynamic equilibrium in the present flames.

  7. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix J

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation--O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  8. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  9. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  10. Atmospheric pressure He-air plasma jet: Breakdown process and propagation phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, Asma [Independent University, Bangladesh, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Bashundhara, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Laroussi, Mounir [Old Dominion University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Norfolk, Virginia (United States); Pervez, Mohammad Rasel [Master Mind College, Department of Physics, Dhanmondi, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2013-06-15

    In this paper He-discharge (plasma jet/bullet) in atmospheric pressure air and its progression phenomenon has been studied experimentally using ICCD camera, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and calibrated dielectric probe measurements. The repetitive nanosecond pulse has applied to a plasma pencil to generate discharge in the helium gas channel. The discharge propagation speed was measured from the ICCD images. The axial electric field distribution in the plasma jet is inferred from the optical emission spectroscopic data and from the probe measurement. The correlation between the jet velocities, jet length with the pulse duration is established. It shows that the plasma jet is not isolated from the input voltage along its propagation path. The discharge propagation speed, the electron density and the local and average electric field distribution along the plasma jet axis predicted from the experimental results are in good agreement with the data predicted by numerical simulation of the streamer propagation presented in different literatures. The ionization phenomenon of the discharge predicts the key ionization parameters, such as speed, peak electric field in the front, and electron density. The maximum local electric field measured by OES is 95 kV/cm at 1.3 cm of the jet axis, and average EF measured by probe is 24 kV/cm at the same place of the jet. The average and local electron density estimated are in the order of 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and it reaches to the maximum of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}.

  11. Beneficial cardiovascular effects of reducing exposure to particulate air pollution with a simple facemask

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jing

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to air pollution is an important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and is associated with increased blood pressure, reduced heart rate variability, endothelial dysfunction and myocardial ischaemia. Our objectives were to assess the cardiovascular effects of reducing air pollution exposure by wearing a facemask. Methods In an open-label cross-over randomised controlled trial, 15 healthy volunteers (median age 28 years walked on a predefined city centre route in Beijing in the presence and absence of a highly efficient facemask. Personal exposure to ambient air pollution and exercise was assessed continuously using portable real-time monitors and global positional system tracking respectively. Cardiovascular effects were assessed by continuous 12-lead electrocardiographic and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Results Ambient exposure (PM2.5 86 ± 61 vs 140 ± 113 μg/m3; particle number 2.4 ± 0.4 vs 2.3 ± 0.4 × 104 particles/cm3, temperature (29 ± 1 vs 28 ± 3°C and relative humidity (63 ± 10 vs 64 ± 19% were similar (P > 0.05 for all on both study days. During the 2-hour city walk, systolic blood pressure was lower (114 ± 10 vs 121 ± 11 mmHg, P vs 88 ± 11/min; P > 0.05. Over the 24-hour period heart rate variability increased (SDNN 65.6 ± 11.5 vs 61.2 ± 11.4 ms, P vs 816 ± 340 ms2, P Conclusion Wearing a facemask appears to abrogate the adverse effects of air pollution on blood pressure and heart rate variability. This simple intervention has the potential to protect susceptible individuals and prevent cardiovascular events in cities with high concentrations of ambient air pollution.

  12. Fast step-response settling of micro electrostatic actuators operated at low air pressure using input shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, L.; Rocha, L. A.; Cretu, E.; Wolffenbuttel, R. F.

    2009-07-01

    Squeeze-film damping is highly inadequate in low-pressure systems or in systems where air pressure and/or gap dimensions are poorly defined. Input shaping has been used to circumvent the oscillations typically associated with under-damped mass-spring-damper systems and drastically decrease the settling time. The proposed method does not rely on feedback but solely on the system dynamics. The required input signal is derived analytically from the differential equation describing the system. The resulting device response is simulated and experimentally verified on an electrostatically actuated microstructure. Settling occurs even faster than for an equivalent critically damped system.

  13. The Adverse Effects of Air Pollution on the Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    Sermin Genc; Zeynep Zadeoglulari; Fuss, Stefan H.; Kursad Genc

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution is a serious and common public health concern associated with growing morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the last decades, the adverse effects of air pollution on the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems have been well established in a series of major epidemiological and observational studies. In the recent past, air pollution has also been associated with diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s dise...

  14. An asperity-deformation model for effective pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangi, Anthony F.; Carlson, Richard L.

    1996-05-01

    Variations of the mechanical and transport properties of cracked and/or porous rocks under isotropic stress depend on both the confining pressure ( Pc) and the pore-fluid pressure ( Pp). To a first approximation, these rock properties are functions of the differential pressure, Pd = Pc - Pp; at least for low differential pressures. However, at higher differential pressures, the properties depend in a more complicated way upon the two pressures. The concept of effective pressure, Pe, is used to denote this variation and it is defined as Pe( Pc, Pp) = Pc - n( Pc, Pp) Pp. If n = 1 (and therefore, is independent of Pc and Pp), the effective pressure is just the differential pressure. We have used an asperity-deformation model and a force-balance equation to derive expressions for the effective pressure. We equate the total external force (in one direction), Fc, to the total force on the asperities, Fa, and the force of the fluid, Fp, acting in that same direction. The fluid force, Fp, acts only on the parts of the crack (or pore-volume) faces which are not in contact. Then, the asperity pressure, Pa, is the average force per unit area acting on the crack (or grain) contacts P a = {F a}/{A} = {F c}/{A} - {F p}/{A} = P c - (1 - {A c}/{A})P p, where A is the total area over which Fc acts and Ac is the area of contact of the crack asperities or the grains. Thus, the asperity pressure, Pa, is greater than the differential pressure, Pd, because Pp acts on a smaller area, A- Ac, than the total area, A. For elastic asperities, the area of contact Ac and the strain (e.g., crack and pore openings) remain the same, to a high degree of approximation, at constant asperity pressure. Therefore, transport properties such as permeability, resistivity, thermal conductivity, etc. are constant, to the same degree of approximation, at constant asperity pressure. For these properties, the asperity pressure is, very accurately, the effective pressure, Pc. Using this model, we find that the

  15. High intensity interior aircraft noise increases the risk of high diastolic blood pressure in Indonesian Air Force pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minarma Siagian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyze the effects of aircraft noise, resting pulse rate, and other factors on the risk of high diastolic blood pressure (DBP in Indonesian Air Force pilots.Methods: A nested case-control study was conducted using data extracted from annual medical check-ups indoctrination aerophysiologic training records at the Saryanto Aviation and Aerospace Health Institute (LAKESPRA in Jakarta from January 2003 – September 2008. For analysis of DBP: the case group with DBP ≥ 90 mmHg were compared with contral group with DBP < 79 mmHG. One case matched to 12 controls.Results: Out of 567 pilots, 544 (95.9% had complete medical records. For this analysis there were 40 cases of high DBP and 480 controls for DBP. Pilots exposed to aircraft noise 90-95 dB rather than 70-80 dB had a 2.7-fold increase for high DBP [adjusted odds ratio (ORa = 2.70; 95% confi dence interval (CI = 1.05-6.97]. Pilots with resting pulse rates of ≥ 81/minute rather than ≤ 80/minute had a 2.7-fold increase for high DBP (ORa = 2.66; 95% CI = 1.26-5.61. In terms of total fl ight hours, pilots who had 1401-11125 hours rather than 147-1400 hours had a 3.2-fold increase for high DBP (ORa = 3.18; 95% CI = 1.01-10.03.Conclusion: High interior aircraft noise, high total flight hours,  and high resting pulse rate, increased risk for high DBP. Self assessment of resting pulse rate can be used to control the risk of high DBP. (Med J Indones 2009; 276: 276-82Keywords: diastolic blood pressure, aircraft noise, resting pulse rate, military pilots

  16. The effect of ignition location on explosion venting of hydrogen-air mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y.; Guo, J.; Hu, K.; Xie, L.; Li, B.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of ignition location and vent burst pressure on the internal pressure-time history and external flame propagation was investigated for vented explosions of hydrogen-air mixtures in a small cylindrical vessel. A high-speed camera was used to record videos of the external flame while pressure transducers were used to record pressure-time histories. It was found that central ignition always leads to the maximum internal peak overpressure, and front ignition resulted in the lowest value of internal peak overpressure. The internal peak overpressures are increased corresponding to the increase in the vent burst pressure in the cases of central and rear ignition. Because of the effect of acoustic oscillations, the phenomenon of oscillations is observed in the internal pressure profile for the case of front ignition. The pressure oscillations for the cases of rear and central ignition are triggered by external explosions. The behavior of flames outside the chamber is significantly associated with the internal pressure of the chamber so that the velocity of the jet flame is closely related to the internal overpressure peak.

  17. Diffusion air effects on the soot axial distribution concentration in a premixed acetylene/air flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fassani, Fabio Luis; Santos, Alex Alisson Bandeira; Goldstein Junior, Leonardo [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia Termica e de Fluidos]. E-mails: fassani@fem.unicamp.br; absantos@fem.unicamp.br; leonardo@fem.unicamp.br; Ferrari, Carlos Alberto [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Eletronica Quantica]. E-mail: ferrari@ifi.unicamp.br

    2000-07-01

    Soot particles are produced during the high temperature pyrolysis or combustion of hydrocarbons. The emission of soot from a combustor, or from a flame, is determined by the competition between soot formation and its oxidation. Several factors affect these processes, including the type of fuel, the air-to-fuel ratio, flame temperature, pressure, and flow pattern. In this paper, the influence of the induced air diffusion on the soot axial distribution concentration in a premixed acetylene/air flame was studied. The flame was generated in a vertical axis burner in which the fuel - oxidant mixture flow was surrounded by a nitrogen discharge coming from the annular region between the burner tube and an external concentric tube. The nitrogen flow provided a shield that protected the flame from the diffusion of external air, enabling its control. The burner was mounted on a step-motor driven, vertical translation table. The use of several air-to-fuel ratios made possible to establish the sooting characteristics of this flame, by measuring soot concentration along the flame height with a non-intrusive laser light absorption technique. (author)

  18. Effect of blank holder pressure on viscous pressure forming aluminum alloy ladder parts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王忠金; 王新云; 王仲仁

    2002-01-01

    Viscous pressure forming (VPF), is suitable for forming difficult-to-form sheet metal parts. An investigation in the effect of blank holder pressure (BHP) on VPF aluminum alloy ladder parts was conducted. Based on experimental and numerical simulation results of the effect of BHP on dimensional accuracy, wall-thickness reduction, forming pressure, material flow and defects (such as wrinkling and fracture) of specimens, the effect patterns of BHP load path on VPF ladder parts were explained. The limits of BHP corresponding to specimens with no defect and with wrinkling or fracture defect were determined. In the limits of formable BHP, the variable load path of BHP was beneficial to drawing blank into the die and decreasing wall-thickness reduction of specimens. The experimental results show that the ladder parts of good surface fineness and high dimensional accuracy can be obtained by variable load paths of BHP.

  19. Motor control of sound frequency in birdsong involves the interaction between air sac pressure and labial tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Rodrigo; Goller, Franz; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2014-03-01

    Frequency modulation is a salient acoustic feature of birdsong. Its control is usually attributed to the activity of syringeal muscles, which affect the tension of the labia responsible for sound production. We use experimental and theoretical tools to test the hypothesis that for birds producing tonal sounds such as domestic canaries (Serinus canaria), frequency modulation is determined by both the syringeal tension and the air sac pressure. For different models, we describe the structure of the isofrequency curves, which are sets of parameters leading to sounds presenting the same fundamental frequencies. We show how their shapes determine the relative roles of syringeal tension and air sac pressure in frequency modulation. Finally, we report experiments that allow us to unveil the features of the isofrequency curves.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of Intensive Blood Pressure Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richman, Ilana B; Fairley, Michael; Jørgensen, Mads Emil

    2016-01-01

    Importance: Among high-risk patients with hypertension, targeting a systolic blood pressure of 120 mm Hg reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality compared with a higher target. However, intensive blood pressure management incurs additional costs from treatment and from adverse events......-effectiveness of intensive blood pressure management among 68-year-old high-risk adults with hypertension but not diabetes. We used the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) to estimate treatment effects and adverse event rates. We used Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Life Tables to project age....... Interventions: Treatment of hypertension to a systolic blood pressure goal of 120 mm Hg (intensive management) or 140 mm Hg (standard management). Main Outcomes and Measures: Lifetime costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), discounted at 3% annually. Results: Standard management yielded 9.6 QALYs...

  1. Effects of Gamma-Ray Irradiation on Dielectric Surface Breakdown of Polybutylene Naphthalate and Polybutylene Terephthalate Under Reduced Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    With the increasing application of electric and electronic devices in space and nuclear power stations, the polymeric insulation materials are inevitably exposed to various kinds of environments. Accordingly, it becomes necessary to investigate the effects of the radiation and air pressure on insulation materials. This paper describes the effects of gamma-ray irradiation and reduced pressure on dielectric breakdown of polybutylene naphthalate (PBN) and polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) by applying a DC pulse voltage. Both PBN and PBT were irradiated in air up to 100 kGy and then up to 1 000 kGy with a dose rate of 10 kGy/h by using a 60Co gamma-source. The effects of total dose and reduced pressure on the time to dielectric breakdown and discharge quantity were discussed. Obtained results show that, while increasing the total dose, the discharge quantity decreased with PBN, but increased with PBT. With decreasing the air pressure, the discharge quantity increased with PBN, but decreased with PBT. With increasing the total dose, the time to dielectric breakdown increased with PBN, but decreased with PBT. With decreasing the air pressure, the time to dielectric breakdown increased with both PBN and PBT. The experimental results suggest that the chemical structure of polybutylene polymers plays a main role in the result of radiation reaction,which is related to cross-linking and degradation reaction.

  2. Respiratory effects of air pollution on children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldizen, Fiona C; Sly, Peter D; Knibbs, Luke D

    2016-01-01

    A substantial proportion of the global burden of disease is directly or indirectly attributable to exposure to air pollution. Exposures occurring during the periods of organogenesis and rapid lung growth during fetal development and early post-natal life are especially damaging. In this State of the Art review, we discuss air toxicants impacting on children's respiratory health, routes of exposure with an emphasis on unique pathways relevant to young children, methods of exposure assessment and their limitations and the adverse health consequences of exposures. Finally, we point out gaps in knowledge and research needs in this area. A greater understanding of the adverse health consequences of exposure to air pollution in early life is required to encourage policy makers to reduce such exposures and improve human health.

  3. Transitions between corona, glow, and spark regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Pai, David,; Lacoste, Deanna,; Laux, C.

    2010-01-01

    International audience; In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and interelectrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. In particular, the experimental conditions necessary for the glow regime of NRP discharges have been determine...

  4. Optimal frequency selection of multi-channel O2-band different absorption barometric radar for air pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Min, Qilong

    2017-02-01

    Through theoretical analysis, optimal selection of frequencies for O2 differential absorption radar systems on air pressure field measurements is achieved. The required differential absorption optical depth between a radar frequency pair is 0.5. With this required value and other considerations on water vapor absorption and the contamination of radio wave transmission, frequency pairs of present considered radar system are obtained. Significant impacts on general design of differential absorption remote sensing systems are expected from current results.

  5. A survey of energy efficient strategies for effective air conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rabghi, O.M.; Akyurt, M.M. [King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Several methods are presented for lowering the energy consumed during air conditioning of buildings. Some of these strategies can be implemented during the design stage; others can be used to retrofit existing AC systems; and still others can be applied with hardly any changes on existing equipment. The methods that are discussed include heat recovery and utilization, absorption refrigeration systems, thermal cool storage, liquid (refrigerant) pressure amplification, reprogramming of the AC control systems, economical methods of removal of moisture from the air and initiation of awareness programs for the conservation of A/C energy. (author)

  6. The Effects of Temperature, Pressure, and Humidity Variations on 100 Meter Sprint Performances

    CERN Document Server

    Mureika, J R

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that ``equivalent'' sprint race times run with different accompanying wind speeds or at different altitudes are anything but equivalent races. The drag force acting on a sprinter is a function of air density and the relative wind speed, where the former has traditionally been calculated using the race venue's elevation above sea level. However, air density variation is dependent on more than just altitude. This work will quantify how changes in air temperature, barometric pressure, and humidity levels influence 100 m sprint performances. When these effects are considered in combination, the corrections to performances can be very large. The results suggest that a non-negligible difference in race times can be expected for ``equivalent'' performances run with the same wind speed at the same venue or physical altitude, but under different atmospheric conditions.

  7. Influence of pulsed nanosecond volume discharge in atmospheric-pressure air on the electrical characteristics of MCT epitaxial films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryev, Denis V.; Voitsekhovskii, Alexandr V.; Lozovoy, Kirill A.; Nesmelov, Sergey N.; Dzyadukh, Stanislav M.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Shulepov, Michail A.; Dvoretskii, Sergei A.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was investigating the effect of volume nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure on the electro-physical properties of the HgCdTe (MCT) epitaxial films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Hall measurements of electro-physical parameters of MCT samples after irradiation have shown that there is a layer of epitaxial films exhibiting n-type conductivity that is formed in the near-surface area. After more than 600 pulses of influence parameters and thickness of the resulting n-layer is such that the measured field dependence of Hall coefficient corresponds to the material of n-type conductivity. Also it is shown that the impact of the discharge leads to significant changes in electro-physical characteristics of MIS structures. This fact is demonstrated by increase in density of positive fixed charge, change in the hysteresis type of the capacitance-voltage characteristic, an increase in density of surface states. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies of the controlled change in the properties of MCT.

  8. Development of hydrophilic dental wax without surfactant using a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hee; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2014-06-01

    Dental wax (DW), a low-melting and high-molecular-weight organic mixture, is widely used in dentistry for forming moulds of teeth. Hydrophilicity is an important property for DW, as a wet dental investment is used to surround the wax before wax burnout is performed. However, recent attempts to improve the hydrophilicity of DW using a surfactant have resulted in the reduced mechanical properties of the dental investment, leading to the failure of the dental restoration. This study applied a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (AAPPJ) for DW surface treatment and investigated its effect on both DW hydrophilicity and the dental investment's mechanical properties. The results showed that the application of the AAPPJ significantly improved the hydrophilicity of the DW, and that the results were similar to that of cleaner-treated DW using commercially available products with surfactant. A surface chemical analysis indicated that the improvement of hydrophilicity was related to an increase in the number of oxygen-related bonds on the DW surface following the removal of carbon hydrate in both AAPPJ and cleaner-treated DW. However, cleaner treatment compromised the mechanical property of the dental investment when the dental investment was in contact with the treated DW, while the AAPPJ treatment did not. Therefore, the use of AAPPJ to treat DW is a promising method for accurate dental restoration, as it induces an improvement in hydrophilicity without harming the dental investment.

  9. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Effect of Air Stability on Exhaled Air Dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chunwen; Gong, Guangcai; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm;

    2014-01-01

    was used for experimental study, and a numerical person was built to simulate the manikin. The velocity, temperature and concentration of tracer gas in exhaled air are affected by air stability to different degrees. The similarity of this effect among these parameters can also be observed through numerical...... studies. As the thermal stratification under displacement ventilation blocks the vertical movement of exhaled air, the exhaled contaminant may be trapped between temperature stratifications. As the dispersion of contaminant is closely related to the health of human indoors, the temperature structure...

  10. Human activity under high pressure: A case study on fluctuation scaling of air traffic controller's communication behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanjun; Zhang, Qiqian; Zhu, Chenping; Hu, Minghua; Duong, Vu

    2016-01-01

    Recent human dynamics research has unmasked astonishing statistical characteristics such as scaling behaviors in human daily activities. However, less is known about the general mechanism that governs the task-specific activities. In particular, whether scaling law exists in human activities under high pressure remains an open question. In air traffic management system, safety is the most important factor to be concerned by air traffic controllers who always work under high pressure, which provides a unique platform to study human activity. Here we extend fluctuation scaling method to study air traffic controller's communication activity by investigating two empirical communication datasets. Taken the number of controlled flights as the size-like parameter, we show that the relationships between the average communication activity and its standard deviation in both datasets can be well described by Taylor's power law, with scaling exponent α ≈ 0.77 ± 0.01 for the real operational data and α ≈ 0.54 ± 0.01 for the real-time training data. The difference between the exponents suggests that human dynamics under pressure is more likely dominated by the exogenous force. Our findings may lead to further understanding of human behavior.

  11. SCALE EFFECT OF IMPINGING PRESSURE CAUSED BY SUBMERGED JET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Zhong; XU Wei-lin; WANG Wei; LIU Shan-jun; DONG Jian-wei

    2005-01-01

    The characteristics of the impinging pressure at the jet equipment where the maximum jet velocity can reach 50m/s were studied. By comparing the impinging pressure with the one measured at the low velocity conditions, two conclusions of the scale effect are drawn: firstly, the velocity attenuation degree is smaller than that of low-velocity jet, and secondly, the relative impinging width is narrower than that of low-velocity jet. The reasons of the scale effect of the impinging pressure were elucidated through numerical simulation.

  12. Personal computers pollute indoor air: effects on perceived air quality, SBS symptoms and productivity in offices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bako-Biro, Zsolt; Wargocki, Pawel; Weschler, Charles J.

    2002-01-01

    Perceived air quality and Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms were studied in a low-polluting office space ventilated at an air change rate of 2 h-1 (10 L/s per person with 6 people present) with and without personal computers (PCs). Other environmental parameters were kept constant. Thirty...... female subjects were exposed for 4.8 h to each of the two conditions in the office and performed simulated office work. They remained thermally neutral by adjusting their clothing and were blind to the interventions. In the absence of PCs in the office the perceived air quality improved, odour intensity...... was reduced and air freshness increased; all effects were significant. In the presence of PCs the performance of text typing significantly decreased. The sensory pollution load of the PCs was found to be 3 olf per PC, i.e. three times the load of the occupants. Present results indicate negative effects of PCs...

  13. Normalization effect of sports training on blood pressure in hypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Liang; Liu, Yuh-Feng; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Shin-Da; Chan, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Chiu-Chou; Harris, Brennan; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2010-02-01

    Exercise is recommended as a lifestyle intervention in preventing hypertension based on epidemiological findings. However, previous intervention studies have presented mixed results. This discrepancy could be associated with shortcomings related to sample sizes or the inclusion of normotensive participants. The aim of this prospective cohort study (N = 463) was to compare the chronic effect of increasing sports training time on resting blood pressure for normotensives and hypertensives. We assessed systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) for 69 untreated hypertensive patients (age 20.6 +/- 0.1 years, systolic blood pressure >140 mmHg) and 394 normotensive controls (age 20.6 +/- 0.1 years) before training and at follow-up visits at 12 months. All participants enrolled in various sports training lessons for 8 hours a week. The baseline BMI and HOMA-IR in the hypertensive group were significantly higher than those in the control group. For the normotensive control group, no significant changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure were observed after training. However, for the hypertensives, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly reduced after training by approximately 15 mmHg and approximately 4 mmHg, respectively, and HOMA-IR was reduced by approximately 25%. In conclusion, the effect of sports training to lower blood pressure was confined to the group of hypertensives, which may account for the overall minimal reduction in blood pressure observed in previous intervention studies.

  14. Trace analysis of organics in air by corona discharge atmospheric pressure ionization using an electrospray ionization interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Eugene; Riter, Leah S; Laughlin, Brian C; Handberg, Eric; Cooks, R Graham

    2004-01-01

    A corona discharge ion source operating at atmospheric pressure in the point-to-plane configuration was constructed by reconfiguring the ion source of a commercial electrospray ionization (ESI) quadrupole mass spectrometer. This new source allows direct air analysis without modification to the mass spectrometer. Detection and quantitation of semi-volatile compounds in air is demonstrated. The analytical performance of the system was established using the chemical warfare agent simulants methyl salicylate and dimethyl methylphosphonate. Limits of detection are 60 pptr in the negative-ion mode and 800 pptr in the positive-ion mode for methyl salicylate and 800 pptr in the negative-ion mode and 3.6 ppb in the positive-ion mode for dimethyl methylphosphonate. A linear response was observed from 60 pptr to 8 ppb for methyl salicylate in air in the negative-ionization mode. Cluster ion formation versus production of analyte ions was investigated and it was found that dry air or an elevated capillary interface temperature (130 degrees C) was needed to avoid extensive clustering, mostly of water. Reagent gases are not needed as proton sources, as is usually the case for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, and this, together with the simplicity, sensitivity and speed of the technique, makes it promising for miniaturization and future field studies.

  15. Measuring air core characteristics of a pressure-swirl atomizer via a transparent acrylic nozzle at various Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun J.; Oh, Sang Youp; Kim, Ho Y.; Yoon, Sam S. [Dept. of Mechanical, Korea University Anamdong, 5-Ga, Sungbukgu, 136-713 Seoul (Korea); James, Scott C. [Thermal/Fluid Science and Engineering, Sandia National Labs, PO Box 969, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Because of thermal fluid-property dependence, atomization stability (or flow regime) can change even at fixed operating conditions when subject to temperature change. Particularly at low temperatures, fuel's high viscosity can prevent a pressure-swirl (or simplex) atomizer from sustaining a centrifugal-driven air core within the fuel injector. During disruption of the air core inside an injector, spray characteristics outside the nozzle reflect a highly unstable, nonlinear mode where air core length, Sauter mean diameter (SMD), cone angle, and discharge coefficient variability. To better understand injector performance, these characteristics of the pressure-swirl atomizer were experimentally investigated and data were correlated to Reynolds numbers (Re). Using a transparent acrylic nozzle, the air core length, SMD, cone angle, and discharge coefficient are observed as a function of Re. The critical Reynolds numbers that distinguish the transition from unstable mode to transitional mode and eventually to a stable mode are reported. The working fluids are diesel and a kerosene-based fuel, referred to as bunker-A. (author)

  16. Analysis of Environmental Effects on Leaf Temperature under Sunlight, High Pressure Sodium and Light Emitting Diodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob A Nelson

    Full Text Available The use of LED technology is commonly assumed to result in significantly cooler leaf temperatures than high pressure sodium technology. To evaluate the magnitude of this effect, we measured radiation incident to and absorbed by a leaf under four radiation sources: clear sky sunlight in the field, sunlight in a glass greenhouse, and indoor plants under either high pressure sodium or light emitting diodes. We then applied a common mechanistic energy-balance model to compare leaf to air temperature difference among the radiation sources and environments. At equal photosynthetic photon flux, our results indicate that the effect of plant water status and leaf evaporative cooling is much larger than the effect of radiation source. If plants are not water stressed, leaves in all four radiation sources were typically within 2°C of air temperature. Under clear sky conditions, cool sky temperatures mean that leaves in the field are always cooler than greenhouse or indoor plants-when photosynthetic photon flux, stomatal conductance, wind speed, vapor pressure deficit, and leaf size are equivalent. As water stress increases and cooling via transpiration decreases, leaf temperatures can increase well above air temperature. In a near-worst case scenario of water stress and low wind, our model indicates that leaves would increase 6°, 8°, 10°, and 12°C above air temperature under field, LED, greenhouse, and HPS scenarios, respectively. Because LED fixtures emit much of their heat through convection rather than radiative cooling, they result in slightly cooler leaf temperatures than leaves in greenhouses and under HPS fixtures, but the effect of LED technology on leaf temperature is smaller than is often assumed. Quantifying the thermodynamic outputs of these lamps, and their physiological consequences, will allow both researchers and the horticulture industry to make informed decisions when employing these technologies.

  17. 变频器在空压机恒压供气改造中的应用%Inverter in Transformation of Air Compressor Constant Pressure Air Supply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟世宽

    2012-01-01

    Exist for traditional air compressor control to no-load operating power factor is low, serious power waste and two-cylinder temperature rise higher defect, through the use of inverter control system of the air compressor, piston compressor actual operation constant pressure air supply energy-saving air compressor running after the transformation was complete, stable, significant energy savings, and also to meet the requirements of production process.%针对空压机传统控制方式存在空载运行功率因数低、电能浪费严重及二级缸温升高等缺陷,同时根据活塞式空压机实际运行情况,通过采用变频器对空压机控制系统进行恒压供气节能改造.改造完成后,空压机运行稳定、节能效果明显,也满足了生产工艺的要求.

  18. Surface treatment of polypropylene (PP) film by 50 Hz dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ujjwal Man; Subedi, Deepak Prasad

    2015-07-01

    Thin films of polypropylene (PP) are treated for improving hydrophilicity using non-thermal plasma generated by 50 Hz line frequency dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure. PP samples before and after the treatments are studied using contact angle measurements, surface free energy calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distilled water (H2O), glycerol (C3H8O3) and diiodomethane (CH2I2) are used as test liquids. The contact angle measurements between test liquids and PP samples are used to determine total surface free energy using sessile drop technique. PP films show a remarkable increase in surface free energy after plasma treatment. SEM analysis of the plasma-treated PP films shows that plasma treatment introduces greater roughness on the surface leading to the increased surface free energy. Furthermore, it is found that introducing a small quantity of argon can enhance the surface treatment remarkably.

  19. Surface treatment of high density polyethylene (HDPE film by 50 Hz dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Ujjwal Man

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of high density polyethylene (HDPE are treated for improving hydrophilicity using non-thermal plasma generated by 50 Hz line frequency dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure. HDPE samples before and after the treatment are studied using contact angle measurements, surface free energy calculations and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Distilled water (H2O, glycerol (C3H8O3 and diiodomethane (CH2I2 are used as test liquids. The contact angle measurements between test liquids and HDPE samples are used to determine total surface free energy using sessile drop technique. HDPE films show a remarkable increase in surface free energy after plasma treatment. AFM analysis of the plasma-treated HDPE films shows that plasma treatment introduces greater roughness on the surface leading to the increased surface free energy. Furthermore, it is found that introducing a small quantity of argon can enhance the surface treatment remarkably.

  20. Household air pollution and its effects on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Komalkirti; Salvi, Sundeep

    2016-01-01

    Household air pollution is a leading cause of disability-adjusted life years in Southeast Asia and the third leading cause of disability-adjusted life years globally. There are at least sixty sources of household air pollution, and these vary from country to country. Indoor tobacco smoking, construction material used in building houses, fuel used for cooking, heating and lighting, use of incense and various forms of mosquito repellents, use of pesticides and chemicals used for cleaning at home, and use of artificial fragrances are some of the various sources that contribute to household air pollution. Household air pollution affects all stages of life with multi-systemic health effects, and its effects are evident right from pre-conception to old age. In utero exposure to household air pollutants has been shown to have health effects which resonate over the entire lifetime. Exposures to indoor air pollutants in early childhood also tend to have repercussions throughout life. The respiratory system bears the maximum brunt, but effects on the cardiovascular system, endocrine system, and nervous system are largely underplayed. Household air pollutants have also been implicated in the development of various types of cancers. Identifying household air pollutants and their health implications helps us prepare for various health-related issues. However, the real challenge is adopting changes to reduce the health effects of household air pollution and designing innovative interventions to minimize the risk of further exposure. This review is an attempt to understand the various sources of household air pollution, the effects on health, and strategies to deal with this emergent risk factor of global mortality and morbidity.

  1. Effects of air pollution on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidman, G.

    1965-01-01

    Weather, automobile exhaust, waste dumps and industrial activities are major factors in the creation of air pollution problems. The first indication of an air pollution problem is often the injury that appears on comparatively sensitive vegetation. Sulfur dioxide causes both acute and chronic plant injury. Plants especially sensitive to SO/sub 2/ are alfalfa, cosmos, sweet pea, bachelor's button, and blackberry. Fluoride causes characteristic injury on plants. Plants sensitive to fluoride injury are gladiolus, azalea, tulip, and young needles of pine. Ethylene damage to plants was initially noted in greenhouses using artificial gas for heating. Orchids and carnations are sensitive to ethylene. Ozone is highly reactive and causes typical spotting injury to the upper surface of leaves. PAN causes injury to vegetation, especially petunia and lettuce. Other pollutants also cause plant injury. Mercury vapor, chlorine gas, ammonia, H/sub 2/S, CO, and nitrogen oxides are minor hazards. Susceptibility of vegetation to air pollution depends on various things such as variety of plants, amount of moisture available to the plants, temperature, and amount of sunlight during the period of air pollution. 8 references.

  2. Management of Total Pressure Recovery, Distortion and High Cycle Fatigue in Compact Air Vehicle Inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Baust, Henry D.; Agrell, Johan

    2002-01-01

    It is the purpose of this study to demonstrate the viability and economy of Response Surface Methods (RSM) and Robustness Design Concepts (RDC) to arrive at micro-secondary flow control installation designs that maintain optimal inlet performance over a range of the mission variables. These statistical design concepts were used to investigate the robustness properties of 'low unit strength' micro-effector installations. 'Low unit strength' micro-effectors are micro-vanes set at very low angles-of-incidence with very long chord lengths. They were designed to influence the near wall inlet flow over an extended streamwise distance, and their advantage lies in low total pressure loss and high effectiveness in managing engine face distortion.

  3. Magnetic Ignition of Pulsed Gas Discharges in Air of Low Pressure in a Coaxial Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Karlheinz; Norwood, Joseph, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    The effect of an axial magnetic field on the breakdown voltage of a coaxial system of electrodes has been investigated by earlier workers. For low values of gas pressure times electrode spacing, the breakdown voltage is decreased by the application of the magnetic field. The electron cyclotron radius now assumes the role held by the mean free path in nonmagnetic discharges and the breakdown voltage becomes a function of the magnetic flux density. In this paper the dependence of the formative time lag as a function of the magnetic flux density is established and the feasibility of using a magnetic field for igniting high-voltage, high-current discharges is shown through theory and experiment. With a 36 microfarad capacitor bank charged to 48,000 volts, a peak current of 1.3 x 10( exp 6) amperes in a coaxial type of plasma gun was achieved with a current rise time of only 2 microseconds.

  4. Effect of pressure on the performance of plasma synthetic jet actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Xia, ZhiXun; Luo, ZhenBing; Zhang, Yu

    2014-12-01

    The effects of the ambient air pressure level on the performance of plasma synthetic jet actuator have been investigated through electrical and optical diagnostics. Pressures from 1 atm down to 0.1 atm were tested with a 10 Hz excitation. The discharge measurement demonstrates that there is a voltage range to make the actuator work reliably. Higher pressure level needs a higher breakdown voltage, and a higher discharge current and energy deposition are produced. But when the actuator works with the maximum breakdown voltage, the fraction of the initial capacitor energy delivered to the arc is almost invariable. This preliminary study also confirms the effectiveness of the plasma synthetic jet at low pressure. Indeed, the maximum velocities of the precursor shock and the plasma jet induced by the actuator with maximum breakdown voltage are independent of the ambient pressure level; reach about 530 and 460 m/s respectively. The mass flux of the plasma jet increases with ambient pressure increasing, but the strength of the precursor shock presents a local maximum at 0.6 atm.

  5. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Vitiated Air Effects on Hydrogen-fueled Supersonic Combustor Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Feiteng; SONG Wenyan; ZHANG Zhiqiang; LI Weiqiang; LI Jianping

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the vitiation effects of test air on the scramjet performance in the ground combustion heated facilities.The primary goal is to evaluate the effects of H2O and CO2,the two major vitiated species generated by combustion heater,on hydrogen-fueled supersonic combustor performance with experimental and numerical approaches.The comparative experiments in the clean air and vitiated air are conducted by using the resistance heated direct-connected facility,with the typical Mach 4 flight conditions simulated.The H2O and CO2 species with accurately controlled contents are added to the high enthalpy clean air from resistance heater,to synthesize the vitiated air of a combustion-type heater.Typically,the contents of H2O species can be varied within the range of 3.5%-30o% by mole,and 3.0%-10% for CO2 species.The total temperature,total pressure,Mach number and O2 mole fraction at the combustor entrance are well-matched between the clean air and vitiated air.The combustion experiments are completed at the fuel equivalence ratios of 0.53 and 0.42 respectively.Furthermore,three-dimensional (3D) reacting flow simulations of combustor towpath are performed to provide insight into flow field structures and combustion chemistry details that cannot resolved by experimental instruments available.Finally,the experimental data,combined with computational results,are employed to analyze the effects of H2O and CO2 vitiated air on supersonic combustion characteristics and performance.It is concluded that H2O and CO2 contaminants can significantly inhibit the combustion induced pressure rise measured from combustor wall,and the pressure profile decreases with the increasing H2O and CO2 contents in nonlinear trend;simulation results agree well with experimental data and the overall vitiation effects are captured; direct extrapolation of the results from vitiated air to predict the performance of actual flight conditions could result in over-fueling the combustor

  6. Bench experiments comparing simulated inspiratory effort when breathing helium-oxygen mixtures to that during positive pressure support with air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Andrew R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhalation of helium-oxygen (He/O2 mixtures has been explored as a means to lower the work of breathing of patients with obstructive lung disease. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV with positive pressure support is also used for this purpose. The bench experiments presented herein were conducted in order to compare simulated patient inspiratory effort breathing He/O2 with that breathing medical air, with or without pressure support, across a range of adult, obstructive disease patterns. Methods Patient breathing was simulated using a dual-chamber mechanical test lung, with the breathing compartment connected to an ICU ventilator operated in NIV mode with medical air or He/O2 (78/22 or 65/35%. Parabolic or linear resistances were inserted at the inlet to the breathing chamber. Breathing chamber compliance was also varied. The inspiratory effort was assessed for the different gas mixtures, for three breathing patterns, with zero pressure support (simulating unassisted spontaneous breathing, and with varying levels of pressure support. Results Inspiratory effort increased with increasing resistance and decreasing compliance. At a fixed resistance and compliance, inspiratory effort increased with increasing minute ventilation, and decreased with increasing pressure support. For parabolic resistors, inspiratory effort was lower for He/O2 mixtures than for air, whereas little difference was measured for nominally linear resistance. Relatively small differences in inspiratory effort were measured between the two He/O2 mixtures. Used in combination, reductions in inspiratory effort provided by He/O2 and pressure support were additive. Conclusions The reduction in inspiratory effort afforded by breathing He/O2 is strongly dependent on the severity and type of airway obstruction. Varying helium concentration between 78% and 65% has small impact on inspiratory effort, while combining He/O2 with pressure support provides an additive

  7. Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a slot air jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adimurthy, M.; Katti, Vadiraj V.

    2016-06-01

    Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a normal slot air jet is experimental investigated. Present study focuses on the influence of jet-to-plate spacing (Z/D h ) (0.5-10) and Reynolds number (2500-20,000) on the fluid flow and heat transfer distribution. A single slot jet with an aspect ratio (l/b) of about 22 is chosen for the current study. Infrared Thermal Imaging technique is used to capture the temperature data on the target surface. Local heat transfer coefficients are estimated from the thermal images using `SMART VIEW' software. Wall static pressure measurement is carried out for the specified range of Re and Z/D h . Wall static pressure coefficients are seen to be independent of Re in the range between 5000 and 15,000 for a given Z/D h . Nu values are higher at the stagnation point for all Z/D h and Re investigated. For lower Z/D h and higher Re, secondary peaks are observed in the heat transfer distributions. This may be attributed to fluid translating from laminar to turbulent flow on the target plate. Heat transfer characteristics are explained based on the simplified flow assumptions and the pressure data obtained using Differential pressure transducer and static pressure probe. Semi-empirical correlation for the Nusselt number in the stagnation region is proposed.

  8. Pressure Drop in Cyclone Separator at High Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    For the design of pressurized circulating fluidized beds, experiments were conducted in a small cyclone with 120 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height at high pressures and at atmospheric temperatures. Influence of air leakage from the stand pipe into the cyclone was specially focused. A semi-empirical model was developed for the predic tion of the pressure drop of the cyclone separator at different operate pressures with the effect of air leakage and inlet solid loading. The operate pressure, air leakage and inlet solid loading act as significant roles in cyclone pressure drop. The pressure drop increases with the increasing of pressure and decreases with the increasing of the flow rate of air leakage from the standpipe and with the increasing of the inlet solid loading.

  9. Effects of hyperbaric air exposure on the functions of mouse peritoneal macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Hai-sheng; TAO Heng-yi; XU Wei-gang; JIANG Chun-lei; TAO Kai-zhong; GUO Ming-zhu

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of hyperbaric air exposure on the functions of peritoneal macrophages of mice. Methods: Forty-eight mice were equally randomized to 6 groups: (1) normal air group (NA); (2) hyperbaric air group 1 (HA1); (3) hyperbaric air group 2 (HA2); (4) hyperbaric air group 3 (HA3); (5) hyperbaric oxygen group (HO); (6) hyperbaric nitrogen group (HN). Every group was exposed to corresponding pressure for 60 min, twice a day for 3 d. Peritoneal macrophages were obtained at the corresponding time to observe the changes of phagocytosis, acid phosphatase, antigen presentation function and the produce of NO and TNF-α. Results: Compared with those in NA group, the activity of phagocytosis, acid phosphatase, antigen presentation function and the produce of NO and TNF-α were markedly inhibited in hyperbaric oxygen group and hyperbaric air group l ( P < 0.05, P < 0.01) and they changed little in HN group. These changes could disappear in 3 - 5 d. Conclusion: The functions of mice peritoneal macrophages were obviously inhibited in simulated air diving environment and hyperoxia may play an important role in it.

  10. Pressures and Energies in Magnetized Vacuum and in Casimir effect

    CERN Document Server

    Rojas, H P

    2004-01-01

    We study vacuum pressures and energies for electron-positron vacuum zero point energy in a strong magnetic field $B$ and for photon vacuum in Casimir effect, by a common method. Vacuum becomes magnetized, and due to it, the pressure transversal to $B$ is negative, whereas along $B$ an usual positive pressure arises. Similarly, in addition to the usual negative Casimir pressure perpendicular to the plates, the existence of a positive pressure along the plates is predicted. Both vacua bear the property of leading to a negative energy-momentum tensor trace ${\\cal T}_{\\mu}^{\\mu}<0$, which may lead to a repulsive gravity typical of dark energy. By assuming a space distribution of magnetic and/or Casimir domains, cosmological implications are also discussed.

  11. Effect of ambient-pressure reduction on multibubble sonochemiluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuziuti, Toru; Hatanaka, Shin-ichi; Yasui, Kyuichi; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Mitome, Hideto

    2002-04-01

    The effect of ambient-pressure reduction on multibubble sonochemiluminescence (MBSCL) is studied experimentally with a luminol solution through measurements of MBSCL intensity as a function of ultrasound irradiation time, applied voltage to a transducer and ultrasonic frequencies to accomplish high efficiency in chemical reactions. From the measurement of ambient-pressure dependence, it is shown that there is an ambient pressure that produces the maximum intensity of the MBSCL and the maximum intensity appears at higher ambient pressure as the applied voltage to the transducer increases. The highest intensity of MBSCL is obtained by appropriate reduction of ambient pressure both for various applied voltages and frequencies. This is caused by both the number of bubbles induced with supersaturation of the gas in a luminol solution and the variation in bubble dynamics.

  12. The bleaching efficiency and the effect on enamel surface:low concentration hydrogen peroxide assisted by cold atmospheric-pressure air plasma micro-jet%大气压低温等离子体辅助低浓度过氧化氢漂白牙齿的效果及对釉质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王争; 潘洁

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the tooth bleaching efficiency and effect on enamel with low concentration hy-drogen peroxide(H2O2) assisted by cold atmospheric-pressure air plasma micro-jet(PMJ). Methods Thirty premolars were divided randomly into three groups (n=10), 6% H2O2+PMJ, 35% H2O2 only, and gas only. The treatment time was 20 minutes. The bleaching efficiency and stability were evaluated by spectrophotometer. The microhardness and rough-ness of enamel surface were investigated under different treatment. Results 6% H2O2+PMJ has the best bleaching effi-ciency (ΔE*=4.96), which is better than 35%H2O2 group (ΔE*=1.86) and gas only group (ΔE*=0.4)(P 0.05). Conclusion Tooth bleaching with low concentration hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) assisted by cold atmospheric-pressure air plasma micro-jet has ideal whitening efficiency with accepted enamel surface change. Plasma could be a new tooth bleaching method in the near future.%目的:观察大气压低温等离子体协同低浓度过氧化氢漂白牙齿的效果和对釉质的影响。方法将30颗因正畸需要拔除的前磨牙随机分为3组,每组10颗:低温等离子体与6%过氧化氢凝胶联合处理组、35%过氧化氢凝胶处理组和空白气体组,处理时间均为20 min,使用Crestaleye比色仪评价各组牙齿漂白的即刻效果和1年后的效果;同时分析不同处理条件下釉质表面显微硬度和粗糙度的变化。结果低温等离子体辅助6%过氧化氢组处理20 min后ΔE*=4.96,优于35%过氧化氢凝胶处理组(ΔE*=1.86)和空白气体组(ΔE*=0.44)(P0.05),与空白气体组及35%过氧化氢凝胶处理组变化量相比,其差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论低温等离子体辅助低浓度(6%)过氧化氢进行牙齿美白效果显著稳定,对釉质表面结构无不良影响,为牙齿美白提供了新的思路。

  13. Research Update: Direct conversion of h-BN into pure c-BN at ambient temperatures and pressures in air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdish Narayan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a direct conversion of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN into pure cubic boron nitride (c-BN by nanosecond laser melting at ambient temperatures and atmospheric pressure in air. According to the phase diagram, the transformation from h-BN into c-BN can occur only at high temperatures and pressures, as the hBN-cBN-Liquid triple point is at 3500 K/9.5 GPa. Using nanosecond laser melting, we have created super undercooled state and shifted this triple point to as low as 2800 K and atmospheric pressure. The rapid quenching from super undercooled state leads to formation of super undercooled BN (Q-BN. The c-BN phase is nucleated from Q-BN depending upon the time allowed for nucleation and growth.

  14. Research Update: Direct conversion of h-BN into pure c-BN at ambient temperatures and pressures in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Jagdish, E-mail: narayan@ncsu.edu; Bhaumik, Anagh [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Centennial Campus, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7907 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We report a direct conversion of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) into pure cubic boron nitride (c-BN) by nanosecond laser melting at ambient temperatures and atmospheric pressure in air. According to the phase diagram, the transformation from h-BN into c-BN can occur only at high temperatures and pressures, as the hBN-cBN-Liquid triple point is at 3500 K/9.5 GPa. Using nanosecond laser melting, we have created super undercooled state and shifted this triple point to as low as 2800 K and atmospheric pressure. The rapid quenching from super undercooled state leads to formation of super undercooled BN (Q-BN). The c-BN phase is nucleated from Q-BN depending upon the time allowed for nucleation and growth.

  15. Standard Test Method for Water Penetration of Flat Plate Solar Collectors by Uniform Static Air Pressure Difference

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1986-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the resistance of flat plate solar collectors to water penetration when water is applied to their outer surfaces with a static air pressure at the outer surface higher than the pressure at the interior of the collector. 1.2 This test method is applicable to any flat plate solar collector. 1.3 The proper use of this test method requires a knowledge of the principles of pressure and deflection measurement. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Specific precautionary information is contained in Section 6.

  16. An Air Quality Data Analysis System for Interrelating Effects, Standards and Needed Source Reductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ralph I.

    1973-01-01

    Makes recommendations for a single air quality data system (using average time) for interrelating air pollution effects, air quality standards, air quality monitoring, diffusion calculations, source-reduction calculations, and emission standards. (JR)

  17. Which ornamental plant species effectively remove benzene from indoor air?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Ju; Mu, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Ding, Hui; Crystal Arens, Nan

    Phytoremediation—using plants to remove toxins—is an attractive and cost effective way to improve indoor air quality. This study screened ornamental plants for their ability to remove volatile organic compounds from air by fumigating 73 plant species with 150 ppb benzene, an important indoor air pollutant that poses a risk to human health. The 10 species found to be most effective at removing benzene from air were fumigated for two more days (8 h per day) to quantify their benzene removal capacity. Crassula portulacea, Hydrangea macrophylla, Cymbidium Golden Elf., Ficus microcarpa var. fuyuensis, Dendranthema morifolium, Citrus medica var. sarcodactylis, Dieffenbachia amoena cv. Tropic Snow; Spathiphyllum Supreme; Nephrolepis exaltata cv. Bostoniensis; Dracaena deremensis cv. Variegata emerged as the species with the greatest capacity to remove benzene from indoor air.

  18. Aging Characteristics on Epoxy Resin Surface Under Repetitive Microsecond Pulses in Air at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qing; Liu, Xiong; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Ruixue; Rao, Zhangquan; Shao, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Research on aging characteristics of epoxy resin (EP) under repetitive microsecond pulses is important for the design of insulating materials in high power apparatus. It is because that very fast transient overvoltage always occurs in a power system, which causes flashover and is one of the main factors causing aging effects of EP materials. Therefore, it is essential to obtain a better understanding of the aging effect on an EP surface resulting from flashover. In this work, aging effects on an EP surface were investigated by surface flashover discharge under repetitive microsecond pulses in atmospheric pressure. The investigations of parameters such as the surface micro-morphology and chemical composition of the insulation material under different degrees of aging were conducted with the aid of measurement methods such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that with the accumulation of aging energy on the material surface, the particles formed on the material surface increased both in number and size, leading to the growth of surface roughness and a reduction in the water contact angle; the surface also became more absorbent. Furthermore, in the aging process, the molecular chains of EP on the surface were broken, resulting in oxidation and carbonisation. supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province (No. E2015502081), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51222701, 51307060), and the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2014CB239505-3)

  19. EFFECT OF POWER SUPPLY AND DUTY CONTROL IN CRANKCASE FLOW (CRANKCASE PRESSURE PORT OF ECV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MD. IQBAL MAHMUD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The electromagnetic control valve (ECV operated by solenoid in the external variable compressor with the swash plate type is the rising phenomenon. ECV controls the air conditioning compressor for automobile on the basis of the input signal of the pulse width modulation (PWM that supplied from the external controller. PWM technique is used to encode the information for transmission; its main use is to allow the control of the power to be supplied to electrical devices, especially to inertial loads. The mechanism changes the swash plate angle inside the compressor by increasing or reducing the pressure of swash plate chamber by use of the functions of different pressure port within the ECV. Increasing and reducing the swash plate angle finally depends on the solenoid force acting on the rate of supply of current. This research paper investigates the effect of power supply and duty control during the crankcase flowing at Pc pressure port of ECV.

  20. Effect of citicoline on blood pressure variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Ostroumova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors give the results of their investigation dealing with citicoline therapy in patients with hypertension and cognitive impairments.Objective: to determine the efficiency of citicoline therapy on the level and variability of both systolic and diastolic blood pressures (BP (SBP and DBP.Patients and methods. The investigation covered 60 patients with Stage II hypertension and a goal BP of < 140/90 mm Hg within ≥3 months before their inclusion. The patients were randomized into 2 groups: 30 patients in the study group were assigned to receive a cycle of 10 injections of citicoline in a daily dose of 1000 mg dropwise intravenously, then 1000 mg/day orally for as long as 3 months. 30 patients comprised the control group.Results and discussion. 24-hour BP monitoring indicated that during 4-week citicoline therapy there were significant (p<0.05 reductions in average nocturnal SBP (by 4.1±2.24 mm Hg, average daytime (-1.5±0.39 mm Hg and average nighttime (-1.5±0.37 mm Hg BP variabilities; such changes were not found in the control group. In the study group, normal daytime SBP variability at baseline (≤15 mm Hg was seen in 15 (50% patients; that after citicoline treatment was in 21 (70%; in the control group, this was in 15 (50% and 14 (46.7% patients before and after 4-week therapy, respectively. In the study group, normal nocturnal SBP variability at baseline (≤ 15 mm Hg was seen in 15 (50% patients; that after citicoline treatment was in 23 (76.7%; in the control group, this was in 15 (50% and 16 (53.3% patients, respectively.Twenty-one (70% patients in each group had baseline normal daytime DBP variability (<14 mm Hg; following 4 weeks of treatment, the number of patients with normal daytime DBP variability remained unchanged in the control group and that increased by one patient (n = 22 (73.3% in the citicoline group. Normal nocturnal DBP variability at baseline (<12 mm Hg was observed in 19 (63.3% patients in each group

  1. Effects of shifting time on pressure impact in hydraulic systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhen-cai; CHEN Guo-an

    2005-01-01

    The limitations in existing measures for absorbing pressure impact in hydraulic systems were summarized in this paper. Based on the forming principle of the oil in a hydrostatic closed pressure chamber, the underlying reasons of the pressure impact were analyzed theoretically, the intrinsic laws that the extent of the pressure impact in hydraulic oil lines are affected by some factors, such as oil elastic modulus, oil line's geometrical volume, and changing rate of oil volume versus time etc, were discussed. Experimental investigations into pressure impact in all pressure chambers because of shifting were conducted under different working conditions by employing a special experimental system. The effects of shifting time on pressure impact were studied. A new concept with universal meaning, i.e. optimal shifting time, and its characterizing parameter and the methods of shifting at optimal shifting time were also proposed. The results show that shifting time lag △t is of rationality and maneuverablility. The higher the working pressure, the shorter the shifting time.

  2. Cytologic Effects of Air Force Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    amounts of methylated guanine residues in the DNA. The DNA samples were hydrolyzed and chromatographed using high pressure liquid chromatography ( HPLC ...induced in freshly isolated lymphocytes by four chemicals, 4NQO, MMS, HN2 and mitomycin C (MMC). The differences in DRS are probably due to the chemical

  3. Experimental Investigation on the Effect of Phase Change Materials on Compressed Air Expansion in CAES Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Castellani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The integration of renewable energy in the electrical grid is challenging due to the intermittent and non-programmable generated electric power and to the transmission of peak power levels. Several energy storage technologies have been studied to find a solution to these issues. In particular, compressed air energy storage (CAES plants work by pumping and storing air into a vessel or in an underground cavern; then when energy is needed, the pressurized air is expanded in an expansion turbine. Several CAES configurations have been proposed: diabatic, adiabatic and isothermal. The isothermal process seems to be the most promising to improve the overall efficiency. It differs from conventional CAES approaches as it employs near-isothermal compression and expansion. Currently, there are no commercial isothermal CAES implementations worldwide, but several methods are under investigation. In this paper, the use of phase change materials (PCM for isothermal air expansion is discussed. Air expansion tests in presence of PCM were carried out in a high-pressure vessel in order to analyze the effect of PCM on the process. Results show that in presence of PCM near isothermal expansion conditions occur and therefore they affect positively the value of the obtainable expansion work.

  4. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Contrasting characteristics of sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air and atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen glow discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J. L.; Liu, D. X.; Iza, F.; Rong, M. Z.; Kong, M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Glow discharges in air are often considered to be the ultimate low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas for numerous chamber-free applications. This is due to the ubiquitous presence of air and the perceived abundance of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in air plasmas. In this paper, sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air plasmas are shown to produce a low concentration of excited oxygen atoms but an abundance of excited nitrogen species, UV photons and ozone molecules. This contrasts sharply with the efficient production of excited oxygen atoms in comparable helium-oxygen discharges. Relevant reaction chemistry analysed with a global model suggests that collisional excitation of O2 by helium metastables is significantly more efficient than electron dissociative excitation of O2, electron excitation of O and ion-ion recombination. These results suggest different practical uses of the two oxygen-containing atmospheric discharges, with air plasmas being well suited for nitrogen and UV based chemistry and He-O2 plasmas for excited atomic oxygen based chemistry.

  5. Anomalous Effects in Air While Cooling Water

    CERN Document Server

    Sardo, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    Water is a unique compound with many anomalies and properties not fully understood. Designing an experiment in the laboratory to study such anomalies, we set up a series of experiments where a tube was placed inside a sealed container with thermocouples attached to the outer surface of the tube and in the air adjacent to the tube. Alternately, deionized water and other compounds were added to the tube and cooled to freezing. Several of the thermocouples suspended in the air and adjacent to the tube showed thermal oscillations as the overall temperature of the container was decreasing. The temperature of the thermocouples increased and decreased in a sinusoidal way during part of the cool down to freezing. Thermal oscillations as large as 3 degrees Celsius were recorded with typical frequencies of about 5 oscillations per minute.

  6. Effect of humidity on the filter pressure drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendel, J.; Letourneau, P. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1995-02-01

    The effects of humidity on the filter pressure drop have been reported in some previous studies in which it is difficult to draw definite conclusions. These studies show contradictory effects of humidity on the pressure drop probably due to differences in the hygroscopicity of the test aerosols. The objective of this paper is to present experimental results on the evolution of the filter pressure drop versus mass loading, for different test aerosols and relative humidities. Present results are compared to those found in various publication. An experimental device has been designed to measure filter pressure drop as the function of the areal density for relative humidity varying in the range of 9 % to 85 %. Experiments have been conducted with hygroscopic: (CsOH) and nonhygroscopic aerosols (TiO{sub 2}). Cesium hydroxyde (CsOH) of size of 2 {mu} M AMMD has been generated by an ultrasonic generator and the 0.7 {mu}m AMMD titanium oxyde has been dispersed by a {open_quotes}turn-table{close_quotes} generator. As it is noted in the BISWAS`publication [3], present results show, in the case of nonhygroscopic aerosols, a linear relationship of pressure drop to mass loading. For hygroscopic aerosols two cases must be considered: for relative humidity below the deliquescent point of the aerosol, the relationship of pressure drop to mass loading remains linear; above the deliquescent point, the results show a sudden increase in the pressure drop and the mass capacity of the filter is drastically reduced.

  7. Effect of high pressure on physicochemical properties of meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckow, Roman; Sikes, Anita; Tume, Ron

    2013-01-01

    The application of high pressure offers some interesting opportunities in the processing of muscle-based food products. It is well known that high-pressure processing can prolong the shelf life of meat products in addition to chilling but the pressure-labile nature of protein systems limits the commercial range of applications. High pressure can affect the texture and gel-forming properties of myofibrillar proteins and, hence, has been suggested as a physical and additive-free alternative to tenderize and soften or restructure meat and fish products. However, the rate and magnitude at which pressure and temperature effects take place in muscles are variable and depend on a number of circumstances and conditions that are still not precisely known. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of the effects of high pressure on muscle tissue over a range of temperatures as it relates to meat texture, microstructure, color, enzymes, lipid oxidation, and pressure-induced gelation of myofibrillar proteins.

  8. Influence of surface emission processes on a fast-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechereau, François; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Bourdon, Anne

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents simulations of an atmospheric pressure air discharge in a point-to-plane geometry with a dielectric layer parallel to the cathode plane. Experimentally, a discharge reignition in the air gap below the dielectrics has been observed. With a 2D fluid model, it is shown that due to the fast rise of the high voltage applied and the sharp point used, a first positive spherical discharge forms around the point. Then this discharge propagates axially and impacts the dielectrics. As the first discharge starts spreading on the upper dielectric surface, in the second air gap with a low preionization density of {{10}4}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , the 2D fluid model predicts a rapid reignition of a positive discharge. As in experiments, the discharge reignition is much slower, a discussion on physical processes to be considered in the model to increase the reignition delay is presented. The limit case with no initial seed charges in the second air gap has been studied. First, we have calculated the time to release an electron from the cathode surface by thermionic and field emission processes for a work function φ \\in ≤ft[3,4\\right] eV and an amplification factor β \\in ≤ft[100,220\\right] . Then a 3D Monte Carlo model has been used to follow the dynamics of formation of an avalanche starting from a single electron emitted at the cathode. Due to the high electric field in the second air gap, we have shown that in a few nanoseconds, a Gaussian cloud of seed charges is formed at a small distance from the cathode plane. This Gaussian cloud has been used as the initial condition of the 2D fluid model in the second air gap. In this case, the propagation of a double headed discharge in the second air gap has been observed and the reignition delay is in rather good agreement with experiments.

  9. Investigating the Effects of Traffic on Air Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sharon

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of bringing scientists into the classroom to collaborate with children on environmental research projects. Describes one collaborative project that focused on the effects of traffic on air pollution. (DDR)

  10. Pressure effects on lipids and bio-membrane assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Brooks

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Membranes are amongst the most important biological structures; they maintain the fundamental integrity of cells, compartmentalize regions within them and play an active role in a wide range of cellular processes. Pressure can play a key role in probing the structure and dynamics of membrane assemblies, and is also critical to the biology and adaptation of deep-sea organisms. This article presents an overview of the effect of pressure on the mesostructure of lipid membranes, bilayer organization and lipid–protein assemblies. It also summarizes recent developments in high-pressure structural instrumentation suitable for experiments on membranes.

  11. Boost Pressure Control Strategy to Account for Transient Behavior and Pumping Losses in a Two-Stage Turbocharged Air Path Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thivaharan Albin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly complex air path concepts are investigated to achieve a substantial reduction in fuel consumption while improving the vehicle dynamics. One promising technology is the two-stage turbocharging for gasoline engines, where a high pressure and a low pressure turbocharger are placed in series. For exploiting the high potential, a control concept has to be developed that allows for coordinated management of the two turbocharger stages. In this paper, the control strategy is investigated. Therefore, the effect of the actuated values on transient response and pumping losses is analyzed. Based on these findings, an optimization-based control algorithm is developed that allows taking both requirements into account. The developed new controller allows achieving a fast transient response, while at the same time reducing pumping losses in stationary operation.

  12. Effects of sintered metal distributor on fluidization quality of the air dense medium fluidized bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xuliang; Zhao Yuemin; Luo Zhenfu; Chen Zengqiang; Song Shulei

    2011-01-01

    Dry coal beneficiation using an air dense medium fluidized bed (ADMFB) requires the formation of a stable and uniform bed from the dense medium.Others have shown that the structure and geometric parameters of the air distributor have a significant influence on the experimentally observed fluidization quality.In this study we used a sintered metal distributor (SMD) in the ADMFB separator and study its effect on the fluidization quality.The results show that for the same open area ratio (OAR),a smaller aperture in the SMD will provide improved fluidization quality.If aperture size is held constant bigger open area ratios result in improved fluidization quality.And,the fluidization quality also improves when the pressure drop across the SMD increases.A model relating distributor pressure drop and the geometric parameters of the SMD is also proposed.

  13. 29 CFR 1915.172 - Portable air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... 1915.172 Section 1915.172 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR... Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Rules for Construction of Unfired Pressure...

  14. The manifold pressure gauge in the automotive air conditioning failure diagnosis application analysis%歧管压力计在汽车空调故障诊断中的应用分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉群; 马越群

    2011-01-01

    空调歧管压力计是对汽车空调系统整体工作性能进行分析的一种常用且有效的工具,它不仅应用于制冷剂的加注,而且也是一种故障诊断工具。文中就歧管压力计在空调系统中不同压力显示时的故障原因进行分析,为技术人员用歧管压力计对空调系统的运行状况及其故障进行诊断与排除提供相应的理论与实践借鉴,以保证或维持空调系统正常运行。%Air manifold pressure gauge is the overall performance of automotive air conditioning system for analysis of a common and effective tool,It is not only used in the filling of refrigerant,but also a troubleshooting tool.In this paper,manifold pressure gauge pressure in the air conditioning system is displayed in different analysis of the causes of failure,For the technical staff with the manifold pressure gauge on the air conditioning system operation and fault diagnosis and rule out the theory and practice to provide the corresponding reference,To ensure the normal operation or maintenance of air conditioning systems.

  15. The adverse effects of air pollution on the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, Sermin; Zadeoglulari, Zeynep; Fuss, Stefan H; Genc, Kursad

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution is a serious and common public health concern associated with growing morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the last decades, the adverse effects of air pollution on the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems have been well established in a series of major epidemiological and observational studies. In the recent past, air pollution has also been associated with diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and neurodevelopmental disorders. It has been demonstrated that various components of air pollution, such as nanosized particles, can easily translocate to the CNS where they can activate innate immune responses. Furthermore, systemic inflammation arising from the pulmonary or cardiovascular system can affect CNS health. Despite intense studies on the health effects of ambient air pollution, the underlying molecular mechanisms of susceptibility and disease remain largely elusive. However, emerging evidence suggests that air pollution-induced neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, microglial activation, cerebrovascular dysfunction, and alterations in the blood-brain barrier contribute to CNS pathology. A better understanding of the mediators and mechanisms will enable the development of new strategies to protect individuals at risk and to reduce detrimental effects of air pollution on the nervous system and mental health.

  16. The Adverse Effects of Air Pollution on the Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Genc

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to ambient air pollution is a serious and common public health concern associated with growing morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the last decades, the adverse effects of air pollution on the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems have been well established in a series of major epidemiological and observational studies. In the recent past, air pollution has also been associated with diseases of the central nervous system (CNS, including stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and neurodevelopmental disorders. It has been demonstrated that various components of air pollution, such as nanosized particles, can easily translocate to the CNS where they can activate innate immune responses. Furthermore, systemic inflammation arising from the pulmonary or cardiovascular system can affect CNS health. Despite intense studies on the health effects of ambient air pollution, the underlying molecular mechanisms of susceptibility and disease remain largely elusive. However, emerging evidence suggests that air pollution-induced neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, microglial activation, cerebrovascular dysfunction, and alterations in the blood-brain barrier contribute to CNS pathology. A better understanding of the mediators and mechanisms will enable the development of new strategies to protect individuals at risk and to reduce detrimental effects of air pollution on the nervous system and mental health.

  17. Surface Roughness Effects on Vortex Torque of Air Supported Gyroscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yingchun; LIU Jingshi; SUN Yazhou; LU Lihua

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the drift precision of air supported gyroscope, effects of surface roughness magnitude and direction on vortex torque of air supported gyroscope are studied. Based on Christensen's rough surface stochastic model and consistency transformation method, Reynolds equation of air supported gyroscope containing surface roughness information is established.Also effects of mathematical models of main machining errors on vortex torque are established. By using finite element method,the Reynolds equation is solved numerically and the vortex torque in the presence of machining errors and surface roughness is calculated. The results show that surface roughness of slit has a significant effect on vortex torque. Transverse surface roughness makes vortex torque greater, while longitudinal surface roughness makes vortex torque smaller. The maximal difference approaches 11.4% during the range analyzed in this article. However surface roughness of journal influences vortex torque insignificantly. The research is of great significance for designing and manufacturing air supported gyroscope and predicting its performance.

  18. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  19. Pressure effects on crystal and electronic structure of bismuth tellurohalides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinov, I. P.; Menshchikova, T. V.; Sklyadneva, I. Yu; Heid, R.; Bohnen, K.-P.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2016-11-01

    We study the possibility of pressure-induced transitions from a normal semiconductor to a topological insulator (TI) in bismuth tellurohalides using density functional theory and tight-binding method. In BiTeI this transition is realized through the formation of an intermediate phase, a Weyl semimetal, that leads to modification of surface state dispersions. In the topologically trivial phase, the surface states exhibit a Bychkov-Rashba type dispersion. The Weyl semimetal phase exists in a narrow pressure interval of 0.2 GPa. After the Weyl semimetal-TI transition occurs, the surface electronic structure is characterized by gapless states with linear dispersion. The peculiarities of the surface states modification under pressure depend on the band-bending effect. We have also calculated the frequencies of Raman active modes for BiTeI in the proposed high-pressure crystal phases in order to compare them with available experimental data. Unlike BiTeI, in BiTeBr and BiTeCl the topological phase transition does not occur. In BiTeBr, the crystal structure changes with pressure but the phase remains a trivial one. However, the transition appears to be possible if the low-pressure crystal structure is retained. In BiTeCl under pressure, the topological phase does not appear up to 18 GPa due to a relatively large band gap width in this compound.

  20. Evaluation of Low-Pressure Drop Antimicrobial and Hybrid Air Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Pass Bioaerosol Removal Efficiencies of a Room Air Cleaner,” Karin K. Foarde, James T. Hanley, David S. Ensor , Peter Roessler Aerosol Science...Karin K. Foarde, James T. Hanley, Alan C. Veeck ASHRAE Journal 52-58 (2000) “Determine the Efficacy of Antimicrobial Treatments of Fibrous...Air Filters,” Karin K. Foarde, James T. Hanley ASHRAE Transactions: Research 4429 (RP-909): 156–170. “Development of a Method for Measuring Single

  1. Optimally accurate thermal-wave cavity photopyroelectric measurements of pressure-dependent thermophysical properties of air: theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Chi-Hang; Matvienko, Anna; Mandelis, Andreas

    2007-10-01

    An experimental technique for the measurement of thermal properties of air at low pressures using a photopyroelectric (PPE) thermal-wave cavity (TWC) was developed. In addition, two theoretical approaches, a conventional one-dimensional thermal-wave model and a three-dimensional theory based on the Hankel integral, were applied to interpret the thermal-wave field in the thermal-wave cavity. The importance of radiation heat transfer mechanisms in a TWC was also investigated. Radiation components were added to the purely conductive model by linearizing the radiation heat transfer component at the cavity boundary. The experimental results indicate that the three-dimensional model is necessary to describe the PPE signal, especially at low frequencies where thermal diffusion length is large and sideways propagation of the thermal-wave field becomes significant. Radiation is found to be the dominant contributor of the PPE signal at high frequencies and large cavity lengths, where heat conduction across the TWC length is relatively weak. The three-dimensional theory and the Downhill Simplex algorithm were used to fit the experimental data and extract the thermal diffusivity of air and the heat transfer coefficient in a wide range of pressures from 760 to 2.6 Torr. It was shown that judicious adjustments of cavity length and computational best fits to frequency-scanned data using three-dimensional photopyroelectric theory lead to optimally accurate value measurements of thermal diffusivity and heat transfer coefficient at various pressures.

  2. Effect of pressure on secondary structure of proteins under ultra high pressure liquid chromatographic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Alexey; LoBrutto, Rosario; Karpinski, Paul

    2013-11-29

    There are several spectroscopic techniques such as IR and CD, that allow for analyzing protein secondary structure in solution. However, a majority of these techniques require using purified protein, concentrated enough in the solution, to produce a relevant spectrum. Fundamental principles for the usage of reversed-phase ultra high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) as an alternative technique to study protein secondary structures in solution were investigated. Several "model" proteins, as well as several small ionizable and neutral molecules, were used for these studies. The studies were conducted with UHPLC in isocratic mode, using premixed mobile phases at constant flow rate and temperature. The pressure was modified by a backpressure regulator from about 6000psi to about 12,000psi. It was found that when using a mobile phase composition at which proteins were fully denatured (loss of alpha-helix secondary structure), the retention factors of the proteins increased upon pressure increase in the same manner as non-proteins. When using a mobile phase composition in which proteins were not fully denatured, it was observed that the retention factors of the proteins displayed a much steeper (by one order of magnitude) increase in retention upon pressure increase. It was concluded that in a mobile phase in which the protein is not initially fully denatured, the increase of pressure may facilitate the folding back of the protein to its native state (alpha-helix secondary structure). The impact of different mobile phase compositions on the denaturation of the proteins was studied using CD (Circular Dichroism). Moreover, the effect of flow rate on retention of proteins and small molecules was studied at constant pressure on the different pore size silicas and the impact of internal frictional heating was evaluated.

  3. Study of a Filamentary Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Air at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestin, Sebastien; Zeghondy, Barbar; Guaitella, Olivier; Bourdon, Anne; Rousseau, Antoine

    2006-10-01

    Dielectric Barrier Discharges (DBD) at atmospheric pressure have many applications, for instance ozone production, surface treatment, and waste gas treatment. Generally, such a discharge is filamentary but it can be diffuse under particular conditions. Understanding the formation of the filament, which is an ionization wave or so-called ``streamer'', is very hard theoretically, numerically, and experimentally. This is due, first, to the non-linearity of the equations concerned, and second, because of the scaling in space and time of this phenomenon: a streamer has a radius on the order of a few microns, and propagates through distances of several centimeters in a few nanoseconds. In this study we will present the results obtained in experiments and in simulations for a plane-to-plane DBD. We electrically characterized this device and have observed collective effects that are still poorly understood. A point-to-plane DBD has also been studied for producing a much more localized discharge. In parallel with the experimental study we have developed a numerical model based on the Immersed Boundary Method (IBM) to introduce an electrode having a complex geometry into a structured Cartesian mesh. The first results of the code will be discussed.

  4. Define and Quantify the Physics of Air Flow, Pressure Drop and Aerosol Collection in Nuclear Grade HEPA Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Murray E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-23

    Objective: Develop a set of peer-review and verified analytical methods to adjust HEPA filter performance to different flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. Experimental testing will measure HEPA filter flow rate, pressure drop and efficiency to verify the analytical approach. Nuclear facilities utilize HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters to purify air flow for workspace ventilation. However, the ASME AG-1 technical standard (Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment) does not adequately describe air flow measurement units for HEPA filter systems. Specifically, the AG-1 standard does not differentiate between volumetric air flow in ACFM (actual cubic feet per minute)compared to mass flow measured in SCFM (standard cubic feet per minute). More importantly, the AG-1 standard has an overall deficiency for using HEPA filter devices at different air flow rates, temperatures, and altitudes. Technical Approach: The collection efficiency and pressure drops of 18 different HEPA filters will be measured over a range of flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. The experimental results will be compared to analytical scoping calculations. Three manufacturers have allocated six HEPA filters each for this effort. The 18 filters will be tested at two different flow rates, two different temperatures and two different altitudes. The 36 total tests will be conducted at two different facilities: the ATI Test facilities (Baltimore MD) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos NM). The Radiation Protection RP-SVS group at Los Alamos has an aerosol wind tunnel that was originally designed to evaluate small air samplers. In 2010, modifications were started to convert the wind tunnel for HEPA filter testing. (Extensive changes were necessary for the required aerosol generators, HEPA test fixtures, temperature control devices and measurement capabilities.) To this date, none of these modification activities have been funded through a specific DOE or NNSA program. This is

  5. Effects of high pressure on unsaturated fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povedano, Isabel; Guignon, Bérengère; Montoro, Óscar R.; Sanz, Pedro D.; Taravillo, Mercedes; Baonza, Valentín G.

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of high pressure processing on the molecular structure of some unsaturated fatty acids. Samples of elaidic acid, linoleic acid, ZE and EE conjugated linoleic acid are treated at 293 or 333 K at pressures up to 700 MPa. It is observed that the adiabatic heat generated from compression is able to bring the sample temperature above 373 K after 700 MPa. These relatively extreme conditions are of great interest for food sterilization, but they may induce undesirable change in fatty acid quality characteristics. To check for structural changes, Raman spectra of the samples are analysed after treatments. The comparison with Raman spectra of samples kept at atmospheric pressure shows that pressure induces some conformational changes at the hydrocarbon skeleton in solid samples, while the liquid ones remain unchanged. No cis/trans isomerization occurs, but gauche conformers are likely to be present.

  6. Effects of temperature and pressure on Rhizomucor miehei lipase stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Marilyne; Combes, Didier

    2003-04-10

    Both high temperature and high hydrostatic pressure induce irreversible deactivation of enzymes. They enable the enzyme's thermodynamic parameters to be determined and are used to study the mechanisms involved in biochemical systems. The effect of these two factors on the stability of Rhizomucor miehei lipase have been investigated. The stability criterion used was residual hydrolytic activity of the lipase. Experimental and theoretical parameters, obtained by linear regression analysis, were compared with theoretical kinetics in order to validate the series-type inactivation model. The lipase of R. miehei was deactivated by either thermal or pressure treatment. Moreover conformational studies made by fluorescence spectroscopy suggest that the conformational changes induced by pressure were different from those induced by temperature. In addition they show that after thermal deactivation there were less intermolecular hydrogen bonded structures formed than was the case for deactivation by high pressure.

  7. Effect of pressure on the phonon properties of europium chalcogenides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U K Sakalle; P K Jha; S P Sanyal

    2000-06-01

    Lattice vibrational properties of europium chalcogenides have been investigated at high pressure by using a simple lattice dynamical model theory viz. the three-body force rigid ion model (TRIM) which includes long range three-body interaction arising due to charge transfer effects. The dispersion curves for the four Eu-chalcogenides agree reasonably well with the available experimental data. Variation of LO, TO, LA and TA phonons with pressure have also been studied at the symmetry points of the brillouin zone (BZ) for Euchalcogenides for the first time by using a lattice dynamical model theory. We have also calculated the one phonon density of states and compared them with the first order Raman scattering results. The calculation of one phonon density of states for Eu-chalcogenides has also been extended up to the phase transition pressure. We observed a pronounced shift in phonon spectrum as pressure is increased.

  8. On the permanent hip-stabilizing effect of atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prietzel, Torsten; Hammer, Niels; Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Kaßebaum, Eric; Farag, Mohamed; von Salis-Soglio, Georg

    2014-08-22

    Hip joint dislocations related to total hip arthroplasty (THA) are a common complication especially in the early postoperative course. The surgical approach, the alignment of the prosthetic components, the range of motion and the muscle tone are known factors influencing the risk of dislocation. A further factor that is discussed until today is atmospheric pressure which is not taken into account in the present THA concepts. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of atmospheric pressure on hip joint stability. Five joint models (Ø 28-44 mm), consisting of THA components were hermetically sealed with a rubber capsule, filled with a defined amount of fluid and exposed to varying ambient pressure. Displacement and pressure sensors were used to record the extent of dislocation related to intraarticular and ambient pressure. In 200 experiments spontaneous dislocations of the different sized joint models were reliably observed once the ambient pressure was lower than 6.0 kPa. Increasing the ambient pressure above 6.0 kPa immediately and persistently reduced the joint models until the ambient pressure was lowered again. Displacement always exceeded half the diameter of the joint model and was independent of gravity effects. This experimental study gives strong evidence that the hip joint is permanently stabilized by atmospheric pressure, confirming the theories of Weber and Weber (1836). On basis of these findings the use of larger prosthetic heads, capsular repair and the deployment of an intracapsular Redon drain are proposed to substantially decrease the risk of dislocation after THA.

  9. 40 CFR 53.56 - Test for effect of variations in ambient pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... creating an additional pressure drop of 55 mm Hg in the sampler to simulate a heavily loaded filter, such... through the sample filter, measured in actual volume units at the temperature and pressure of the air as... pressure drop shall be installed for the duration of these tests. The sampler's ambient...

  10. Application technology in coffee (Coffea arabica L.: effect of air assistance with manually driven equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Miguel Francisco Ruas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Small farmers in various parts of Brazil, based the application of pesticides exclusively by a coastal manual sprayers. How it is simple equipment, there are few resources available to improve the quality of the application. The aim of this paper was to study the effect of air assistance, with manual override, in the deposition and percentage of coverage applied on the leaves of coffee plants, situated internally and externally. The equipment consisted of a sprayer coastal pressurized by CO2 attached to an air assistance equipment. At the exit of air assistance equipment a hose was adapted for driving the air flow emitted to the nozzle of the sprayer coastal (XR 110-02, expanded jet plane. It was used a solution of water + potassium chloride + fluorescent dye to the application. The levels of deposits were measured by electrical conductivity of the solution from the washing leaves and the percentage of coverage by ultraviolet light. The deposition was higher in leaves positioned externally to the plant, as well as the coverage percentage. The percentage of coverage was greater for the adaxial side of the coffee leaves. There was no difference for the use or not of the air assistance. Improvements in the generation and distribution of air in manually equipments may be necessary, in order to improve its use in the application of spray liquids.

  11. Health effects of air quality regulations in Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Andrew; Kumar, Naresh

    2011-03-01

    This, the first systematic study, quantifies the health effects of air quality regulations in Delhi, which adopted radical measures to improve air quality, including, for example, the conversion of all commercial vehicles to compressed natural gas (CNG), and the closure of polluting industries in residential areas from 2000 to 2002. Air pollution data, collected at 113 sites (spread across Delhi and its neighboring areas) from July-December 2003, were used to compute exposure at the place of residence of 3989 subjects. A socio-economic and respiratory health survey was administered in 1576 households. This survey collected time-use, residence histories, demographic information, and direct measurements of lung function with subjects. The optimal interpolation methods were used to link air pollution and respiratory health data at the place of their residence. Resident histories, in combination with secondary data, were used to impute cumulative exposure prior to the air-quality interventions, and the effects of recent air quality measures on lung function were then evaluated. Three important findings emerge from the analysis. First, the interventions were associated with a significant improvement in respiratory health. Second, the effect of these interventions varied significantly by gender and income. Third, consistent with a causal interpretation of these results, effects were the strongest among those individuals who spend a disproportionate share of their time out-of-doors.

  12. Ocular surface adverse effects of ambient levels of air pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Augusto Miranda Torricelli

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized today that outdoor air pollution can affect human health. Various chemical components that are present in ambient pollution may have an irritant effect on the mucous membranes of the body, particularly those of the respiratory tract. Much less attention has been focused on the adverse effect on the ocular surface, despite the fact that this structure is even more exposed to air pollution than the respiratory mucosa since only a very thin tear film separates the corneal and conjunctival epithelia from the air pollutants. So far, clinical data are the more widespread tools used by ophthalmologists for assessing possible aggression to the ocular surface; however, clinical findings alone appears not to correlate properly with the complaints presented by the patients pointing out the need for further clinical and laboratory studies on the subject. The purpose of this study is to review signs and symptoms associated with chronic long-term exposure to environmental air pollutants on the ocular structures currently defined as the ocular surface and to review clinical and laboratory tests used to investigate the adverse effects of air pollutants on such structures. We also review previous studies that investigated the adverse effects of air pollution on the ocular surface and discuss the need for further investigation on the subject.

  13. A Remote Sensing Method for Estimating Surface Air Temperature and Surface Vapor Pressure on a Regional Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renhua Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of estimating regional distributions of surface air temperature (Ta and surface vapor pressure (ea, which uses remotely-sensed data and meteorological data as its inputs. The method takes into account the effects of both local driving force and horizontal advection on Ta and ea. Good correlation coefficients (R2 and root mean square error (RMSE between the measurements of Ta/ea at weather stations and Ta/ea estimates were obtained; with R2 of 0.77, 0.82 and 0.80 and RMSE of 0.42K, 0.35K and 0.20K for Ta and with R2 of 0.85, 0.88, 0.88 and RMSE of 0.24hpa, 0.35hpa and 0.16hpa for ea, respectively, for the three-day results. This result is much better than that estimated from the inverse distance weighted method (IDW. The performance of Ta/ea estimates at Dongping Lake illustrated that the method proposed in the paper also has good accuracy for a heterogeneous surface. The absolute biases of Ta and ea estimates at Dongping Lake from the proposed method are less than 0.5Kand 0.7hpa, respectively, while the absolute biases of them from the IDW method are more than 2K and 3hpa, respectively. Sensitivity analysis suggests that the Ta estimation method presented in the paper is most sensitive to surface temperature and that the ea estimation method is most sensitive to available energy.

  14. The reconstruction of air pressure in Gdańsk in the period of instrumental observations, 1739-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipiak, Janusz

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the paper is to characterise the details of reconstruction of air pressure in Gdańsk in the whole period of regular instrumental records spanning the period 1739-2012. Gdańsk pressure series has been reconstructed by joining air pressure observations of 15 local shorter series. The entire instrumental series can be divided into three sub-periods: the Early Observers period, lasting to 1806, the First Meteorological Networks, covering the years from 1807 to 1875 and Modern Measurements begun in 1876. During the first period, observations were made from two to four times per day, sometimes even at midnight. In the 19th century and up to 1945 thrice-daily barometer readings were a standard, in the last few decades the density of data is much denser. A serious gap in the original daily data exists for the period 1849-1875, where it appears that no original source of data have survived. Selected data are presented in the form of five-day or monthly averages. Numerous errors made probably during the re-writing of original observers' data by their assistants were discovered during digitalization. Despite this the quality of observations can be regarded as good. Data have been corrected to provide a monthly-mean measure of atmospheric pressure in the unit of hPa at standard conditions, i.e. standard gravity, 0 °C and at sea level. Some inconsistencies may still arise as the procedure of the homogenization of air temperature is not completed and in case of a few oldest series air temperature was estimated. Numerous breakpoints were identified in the homogenisation of the series and they cannot be always linked to known causes. A reasonably detailed station history has been compiled by incorporating metadata contained in various written sources. These metadata have facilitated the homogenisation of the data series. Mean annual atmospheric pressure in Gdańsk in period 1739-2012 calculated on the basis of homogenized series was 1014.9 hPa. Mean seasonal

  15. Cold-air atmospheric pressure plasma against Clostridium difficile spores: a potential alternative for the decontamination of hospital inanimate surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claro, Tânia; Cahill, Orla J; O'Connor, Niall; Daniels, Stephen; Humphreys, Hilary

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile spores survive for months on environmental surfaces and are highly resistant to decontamination. We evaluated the effect of cold-air plasma against C. difficile spores. The single-jet had no effect while the multi-jet achieved 2-3 log10 reductions in spore counts and may augment traditional decontamination.

  16. Influence of effective stress on swelling pressure of expansive soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baille Wiebke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The volume change and shear strength behaviour of soils are controlled by the effective stress. Recent advances in unsaturated soil mechanics have shown that the effective stress as applicable to unsaturated soils is equal to the difference between the externally applied stress and the suction stress. The latter can be established based on the soil-water characteristic curve (SWCC of the soil. In the present study, the evolution of swelling pressure in compacted bentonite-sand mixtures was investigated. Comparisons were made between magnitudes of applied suction, suction stress, and swelling pressure.

  17. Impact of Spatial Resolution on Wind Field Derived Estimates of Air Pressure Depression in the Hurricane Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linwood Jones

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the near surface horizontal wind field in a hurricane with spatial resolution of order 1–10 km are possible using airborne microwave radiometer imagers. An assessment is made of the information content of the measured winds as a function of the spatial resolution of the imager. An existing algorithm is used which estimates the maximum surface air pressure depression in the hurricane eye from the maximum wind speed. High resolution numerical model wind fields from Hurricane Frances 2004 are convolved with various HIRAD antenna spatial filters to observe the impact of the antenna design on the central pressure depression in the eye that can be deduced from it.

  18. The effect of external pressure on the magnetocaloric effect of Ni-Mn-In alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V K; Chattopadhyay, M K; Roy, S B

    2011-09-14

    The martensitic transition in Ni(50)Mn(34)In(16) alloy has been studied by measuring the magnetization of the alloy as a function of temperature, magnetic field and pressure. Magnetic field and pressure have opposite effects on the martensitic transition in this alloy; the martensitic transition temperature decreases with increasing magnetic field but it increases with increasing pressure. The effect of pressure on the magnetocaloric properties of this large magnetocaloric effect alloy has been investigated in detail. The magnitude of the peak in the isothermal magnetic entropy change in Ni(50)Mn(34)In(16) increases with pressure. The temperature at which the magnetocaloric effect reaches the peak value in this alloy increases from near 240 K under ambient pressure to near 280 K under an external pressure of 9.5 kbar. The temperature corresponding to the peak in the isothermal magnetic entropy change increases with increasing pressure at a rate which matches the rate of increase of the martensite start temperature with increasing pressure. The temperature dependence of the isothermal magnetic entropy change under different pressures is found to follow a universal curve for a particular magnetic field change. These results show that pressure as a control parameter can be used to tune the temperature regime of the magnetocaloric effect in the alloy. The effect of pressure on the martensitic transition also gives a clue as regards the possibility of tuning this temperature regime with elemental substitution.

  19. Effects of fasting on Blood pressure in normotensive males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Samad

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Muslims all over the world fast in the holy month of Ramadan. Fasting means abstinence from drinking any liquids, eating, smoking and taking anything parenterally.  It is intermittent in nature from the start of dawn to end at dusk. Fasting has various physiological effects on different biological parameters of the human body. Previous studies that look at effect of Ramadan fasting on blood pressure have focused mainly on hypertensive patients and patients with already established heart disease.(1,2There is very limited data regarding the effect of fasting on the normal population. (3,4 A few previous studies have advocated a hypotensive role of fasting.(5 In our study published in Journal of Ayub Medical College Abbottabad (JAMC in 2015, “Effects of Ramadan Fasting on Blood pressure in normotensive males”, we investigated the effect of Ramadan fasting on blood pressure of normotensive men. We conducted a repeated measure observational study in Karachi, Pakistan on 70 individuals who were normotensive, non-smokers between the ages of 18–50 years. . Blood pressure, pulse, BMI of each participant was recorded one week before the start of Ramadan and in the first, second and third week of Ramadan. The results of our study show that intermittent fasting has a hypotensive effect in normotensive males as proven in animal models and certain human population. There was an average drop of 8/3 mmHg and while the results are significant, their clinical relevance needs to be analysed. Studies on animal models have suggested atrial natriuretic peptide, catecholamines, opiates and body mass index as possible reasons for the decrease in blood pressure due to fasting.(3, 6  Dewanti et al suggested that the cause of drop in blood pressure was the drop in BMI however in our study we found that a drop in BMI only occurred before Iftar towards the end of the fast. There was no significant drop in post-Iftar BMI although there was a significant drop in blood

  20. The effects of cycling shoe stiffness on forefoot pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboe, Nathan Edward; Quesada, Peter M

    2003-10-01

    Plantar pressure data were recorded in two different shoe types to determine the effect of cycling shoe stiffness on peak plantar forefoot pressure in cyclists. Two pairs of shoes of the same size and manufacturer, identical except for outsole material and stiffness, were tested. Shoe stiffness measurements were collected under controlled conditions and in two different configurations using a dynamic hydraulic tensile testing machine. Measurements of plantar pressure were done using Pedar capacitive-based sensor insoles while subjects pedaled in a seated position at a controlled power output. Power output was set at a constant value of 400 W across all subjects by a magnetic resistance trainer unit. The pressure distribution in carbon-fiber-composite shoes during cycling was compared to cycling shoes made with plastic soles. Carbon fiber shoes presented stiffness values 42% and 550% higher than plastic shoes in longitudinal bending and three-point bending, respectively. The shoes made with carbon fiber produced peak plantar pressures 18% higher than those of plastic design (121 kPa vs. 103 kPa, p = .005). Competitive or professional cyclists suffering from metatarsalgia or ischemia should be especially careful when using carbon fiber cycling shoes because the shoes increase peak plantar pressure, which may aggravate these foot conditions.

  1. Electron properties and air mixing in radio frequency driven argon plasma jets at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gessel, Bram van; Bruggeman, Peter [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Ronny [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP Greifswald), Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-08-05

    A time modulated radio frequency (RF) plasma jet operated with an Ar mixture is investigated by measuring the electron density and electron temperature using Thomson scattering. The measurements have been performed spatially resolved for two different electrode configurations and as a function of the plasma dissipated power and air concentration admixed to the Ar. Time resolved measurements of electron densities and temperatures during the RF cycle and after plasma power switch-off are presented. Furthermore, the influence of the plasma on the air entrainment into the effluent is studied using Raman scattering.

  2. Effects of Indoor Air Pollution on Human Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berglund, B.; Brunekreef, B.; Knöppel, H.

    1992-01-01

    This article contains a summary discussion of human health effects linked to indoor air pollution (UP) in homes and other non-industrial environments. Rather than discussing the health effects of the many different pollutants which can be found in indoor air, the approach has been to group broad...... categories of adverse health effects in separate chapters, and describe the relevant indoor exposures which may give rise to these health effects. The following groups of effects have been comdered: effects on the respiratory system; allergy and other effects on the immune system; cancer and effects...... the principal agents and sources, evidence linking IAP to the effects, susceptible groups, the public health relevance, methods for assessment, and major research needs are briefly discussed. For some groups of effects, clear relationships with exposure to IAP have been reported in the world literature. Among...

  3. Glottal airflow and transglottal air pressure measurements for male and female speakers in soft, normal, and loud voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, E B; Hillman, R E; Perkell, J S

    1988-08-01

    Measurements on the inverse filtered airflow waveform (the "glottal waveform") and of estimated average transglottal pressure and glottal airflow were made from noninvasive recordings of productions of syllable sequences in soft, normal, and loud voice for 25 male and 20 female speakers. Statistical analyses showed that with change from normal to loud voice, both males and females produced loud voice with increased pressure, accompanied by increased ac flow and increased maximum airflow declination rate. With change from normal voice, soft voice was produced with decreased pressure, ac flow and maximum airflow declination rate, and increased dc and average flow. Within the loudness conditions, there was no significant male-female difference in air pressure. Several glottal waveform parameters separated males and females in normal and loud voice. The data indicate higher ac flow and higher maximum airflow declination rate for males. In soft voice, the male and female glottal waveforms were more alike, and there was no significant difference in maximum airflow declination rate. The dc flow did not differ significantly between males and females. Possible relevance to biomechanical differences and differences in voice source characteristics between males and females and across loudness conditions is discussed.

  4. Effect of Residual Noncondensables on Pressurization and Pressure Control of a Zero-Boil-Off Tank in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Hylton, Sonya; Kartizova, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiment is a small-scale experiment that uses a transparent ventless Dewar and a transparent simulant phase-change fluid to study sealed tank pressurization and pressure control with applications to on-surface and in-orbit storage of propellant cryogens. The experiment will be carried out under microgravity conditions aboard the International Space Station in the 2014 timeframe. This paper presents preliminary results from ZBOT's ground-based research that focuses on the effects of residual noncondensable gases in the ullage on both pressurization and pressure reduction trends in the sealed Dewar. Tank pressurization is accomplished through heating of the test cell wall in the wetted and un-wetted regions simultaneously or separately. Pressure control is established through mixing and destratification of the bulk liquid using a temperature controlled forced jet flow with different degrees of liquid jet subcooling. A Two-Dimensional axisymmetric two-phase CFD model for tank pressurization and pressure control is also presented. Numerical prediction of the model are compared to experimental 1g results to both validate the model and also indicate the effect of the noncondensable gas on evolution of pressure and temperature distributions in the ullage during pressurization and pressure control. Microgravity simulations case studies are also performed using the validated model to underscore and delineate the profound effect of the noncondensables on condensation rates and interfacial temperature distributions with serious implications for tank pressure control in reduced gravity.

  5. Interactive Effect of Air-Water Ratio and Temperature on the Air Stripping of Benzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Abdullahi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available High cost of pilot scale studies has led engineers to use simulation to study the factors that affect process performance. This study focuses on the interactive effect of air water ratio and temperature on the removal of volatile organic compounds from polluted water using packed column air stripper taking benzene as a case study. The process governing equations developed based on two-film model of mass transfer were solved using MATLAB and a surface response plot was done. The mass transfer coefficient increased from 0.1237x10-5 to 0.1932x10-5 s-1 as the temperature was raised from 293 to 323 K. Also, the Henry’s constant increased from 228.59 to 883.36 K as the temperature was raised from 293 to 323 K. Benzene removal efficiencies of over 99% were obtained for all combinations of temperature and air-water ratio. The result also indicated that air stripping of benzene from wastewater is most dependent on temperature and moderately on air-water ratio.

  6. Atmospheric pressure loading effects on Global Positioning System coordinate determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandam, Tonie M.; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Heflin, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Earth deformation signals caused by atmospheric pressure loading are detected in vertical position estimates at Global Positioning System (GPS) stations. Surface displacements due to changes in atmospheric pressure account for up to 24% of the total variance in the GPS height estimates. The detected loading signals are larger at higher latitudes where pressure variations are greatest; the largest effect is observed at Fairbanks, Alaska (latitude 65 deg), with a signal root mean square (RMS) of 5 mm. Out of 19 continuously operating GPS sites (with a mean of 281 daily solutions per site), 18 show a positive correlation between the GPS vertical estimates and the modeled loading displacements. Accounting for loading reduces the variance of the vertical station positions on 12 of the 19 sites investigated. Removing the modeled pressure loading from GPS determinations of baseline length for baselines longer than 6000 km reduces the variance on 73 of the 117 baselines investigated. The slight increase in variance for some of the sites and baselines is consistent with expected statistical fluctuations. The results from most stations are consistent with approximately 65% of the modeled pressure load being found in the GPS vertical position measurements. Removing an annual signal from both the measured heights and the modeled load time series leaves this value unchanged. The source of the remaining discrepancy between the modeled and observed loading signal may be the result of (1) anisotropic effects in the Earth's loading response, (2) errors in GPS estimates of tropospheric delay, (3) errors in the surface pressure data, or (4) annual signals in the time series of loading and station heights. In addition, we find that using site dependent coefficients, determined by fitting local pressure to the modeled radial displacements, reduces the variance of the measured station heights as well as or better than using the global convolution sum.

  7. Effect on Blood Pressure of Daily Lemon Ingestion and Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoji Kato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent studies suggest that the daily intake of lemon (Citrus limon has a good effect on health, but this has not been confirmed in humans. In our previous studies, it was observed that people who are conscious of their health performed more lemon intake and exercise. An analysis that took this into account was required. Methodology. For 101 middle-aged women in an island area in Hiroshima, Japan, a record of lemon ingestion efforts and the number of steps walked was carried out for five months. The change rates (Δ% of the physical measurements, blood test, blood pressure, and pulse wave measured value during the observation period were calculated, and correlations with lemon intake and the number of steps walked were considered. As a result, it was suggested that daily lemon intake and walking are effective for high blood pressure because both showed significant negative correlation to systolic blood pressure Δ%. Conclusions. As a result of multiple linear regression analysis, it was possible that lemon ingestion is involved more greatly with the blood citric acid concentration Δ% and the number of steps with blood pressure Δ%, and it was surmised that the number of steps and lemon ingestion are related to blood pressure improvement by different action mechanisms.

  8. Pressure effects in Debye-Waller factors and in EXAFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen Van Hung, E-mail: hungnv@vnu.edu.v [University of Science, VNU Hanoi, 334 Nguyen Trai, Thanh Xuan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Vu Van Hung [Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Ho Khac Hieu [University of Science, VNU Hanoi, 334 Nguyen Trai, Thanh Xuan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); National University of Civil Engineering, 55 Giai Phong, Hai Ba Trung, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Frahm, Ronald R. [Bergische Universitaet-Gesamthochschule Wuppertal, FB: 8-Physik, Gauss Strasse 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2011-02-01

    Anharmonic correlated Einstein model (ACEM) and statistical moment method (SMM) have been developed to derive analytical expressions for pressure dependence of the lattice bond length, effective spring constant, correlated Einstein frequency and temperature, Debye-Waller factors (DWF) or second cumulant, first and third cumulants in Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) at a given temperature. Numerical results for pressure-dependent DWF of Kr and Cu agree well with experiment and other theoretical values. Simulated EXAFS of Cu and its Fourier transform magnitude using our calculated pressure-induced change in the 1st shell are found to be in a reasonable agreement with those using X-ray diffraction (XRD) experimental results. -- Research Highlights: {yields} We have developed anharmonic correlated Einstein model and statistical moment method. {yields} The pressure effects in cumulants including DWF and in EXAFS has been investigated. {yields} Calculated pressure-dependent DWF for Kr, Cu agree with experiment and other results. {yields} Simulated EXAFS and Fourier transform magnitude of Cu agree with those using XRD data.

  9. Slider Posture Effects on Air Bearing in a Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyaw Sett Myo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the effects of slider posture on the slider bearing in a heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR system with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC method. In this HAMR system, the heat issues on the slider bearings are assumed to be caused by a heated spot on the disk and/or slider body itself at various pitch angles. The simulation results show that with a heated spot on the disk, the air bearing pressure and air bearing force that acted on the slider surface will increase when the pitch angle becomes larger. It is also found that the bearing force increases with the heated spot size and the effects of a heated spot become more obvious at a larger pitch angle. On the other hand, the slider body temperature is observed to have a noticeable effect on air bearing pressure and force. The smaller pitch angle enlarges the tendency of bearing force variations with the slider temperature and makes the slider more sensitive to its temperature changes.

  10. "Deflategate": Time, Temperature, and Moisture Effects on Football Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Jack; Beljak, Lauren; Macatangay, Dahlia-Marie; Helmuth-Malone, Lilly; McWilliams, Catharina; Raptis, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper in "The Physics Teacher (TPT)", DiLisi and Rarick used the National Football League "Deflategate" controversy to introduce to physics students the physics of a bouncing ball. In this paper, we measure and analyze the environmental effects of time, ambient temperature, and moisture on the internal pressure of…

  11. Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

    2006-09-30

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum

  12. Rigid-flexible outer sheath model using slider linkage locking mechanism and air pressure for endoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Akihiko; Matsumiya, Kiyoshi; Masamune, Ken; Liao, Hongen; Dohi, Takeyoshi

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop an outer sheath for flexible endoscopic manipulators. This sheath can switch two states including flexible and rigid, and make a rigid curved path for inserting manipulators. The flexible mode can be curved into a required shape. The rigid mode can hold the shape of the sheath, and then keep the path for instruments. Through the managed path, the flexible manipulators become easy to reach the target. We proposed a serial multi joint model to realize the flexible mechanism. This model is composed of a set of frame units which are connected serially. Each unit can be rotated to a given angle around the center of the joint. We developed a slider-link mechanism and a gear stopper controlled by air pressure for rigid mode. We designed and fabricated the prototype with a diameter of 16 mm and length of 290 mm. The experiment showed that the device could be switched from the flexible mode to the rigid mode when the air pressure was over 150 kPa, and each joint could hold its angle against the maximum 400 mNm. The phantom experiment showed that the flexible devices are possible to transmit the wire tension to the endpoint of the manipulator without changing the curving shape with by the developed outer sheath device.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON HEAT TRANSFER AND PRESSURE DROP CHARACTERISTICS OF AIR FLOW OVER A STAGGERED FLAT TUBE BANK IN CROSSFLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ishak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation into the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of air flow in a staggered flat tube bank in crossflow with laminar-forced convection. Measurements were conducted for sixteen tubes in the direction of flow and four tubes in rows. The air velocity varies between 0.6–1.0 m/s and the Reynolds number varied from 373 to 623. The total heat flux supplied in all tubes are changed from 967.92 to 3629.70 W/m2. The results indicate that the average Nusselt number for all the flat tubes increased by 11.46–46.42%, with the Reynolds numbers varying from 373 to 623 at the fixed heat flux. The average Nusselt number increased by 21.39–84%, and the total heat flux varyied between 967.92–3629.70 W/m2 with a constant Reynolds number Re = 498. In addition, the pressure drop decreased with an increase in the Reynolds number. A new mean Nusselt number-Reynolds number correlation was found, and the correlation yielded good predictions for the measured data with a confidence interval of 98.9%.

  14. Surface treatment of polypropylene (PP) film by 50 Hz dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Ujjwal Man, E-mail: umjoshi@gmail.com; Subedi, Deepak Prasad, E-mail: deepaksubedi2001@yahoo.com [Department of Natural Sciences (Physics), School of Science, Kathmandu University P. O. Box No. 6250, Dhulikhel, Kathmandu, Nepal (India)

    2015-07-31

    Thin films of polypropylene (PP) are treated for improving hydrophilicity using non-thermal plasma generated by 50 Hz line frequency dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure. PP samples before and after the treatments are studied using contact angle measurements, surface free energy calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distilled water (H{sub 2}O), glycerol (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}O{sub 3}) and diiodomethane (CH{sub 2}I{sub 2}) are used as test liquids. The contact angle measurements between test liquids and PP samples are used to determine total surface free energy using sessile drop technique. PP films show a remarkable increase in surface free energy after plasma treatment. SEM analysis of the plasma-treated PP films shows that plasma treatment introduces greater roughness on the surface leading to the increased surface free energy. Furthermore, it is found that introducing a small quantity of argon can enhance the surface treatment remarkably.

  15. Effect of pressurized steam on AA1050 aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jariyaboon, Manthana; Møller, Per; Ambat, Rajan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to understand the effect of pressurized steam on surface changes, structures of intermetallic particles and corrosion behavior of AA1050 aluminium. Design/methodology/approach - Industrially pure aluminium (AA1050, 99.5 per cent) surfaces were exposed...... reactivities was observed due to the formation of the compact oxide layer. Originality/value - This paper reveals a detailed investigation of how pressurized steam can affect the corrosion behaviour of AA1050 aluminium and the structure of Fe-containing intermetallic particles....

  16. Air cleaning efficiency of deodorant materials under dynamic conditions: effect of air flow rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mizutani, Chiyomi; Bivolarova, Mariya Petrova; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2014-01-01

    was evaluated as deodorant materials neutralising ammonia in air. The deodorant material efficiency was tested in a special experimental set-up consisting of a straight pipe section, an ammonia gas generator, a fan and a textile frame. The deodorant materials, placed in the pipe, were exposed to a flow of air...... mixed with ammonia gas at a concentration of 20 ppm and velocities of 0.05, 0.15, 0.3 and 1.2 m/s. The activated carbon fibers treated with acid had a high deodorizing effect for ammonia (0.8) at a velocity of 0.05 m/s. The deodorizing effect of this material decreased with the increase in the velocity....... The porous activated carbon fiber fabric did not have a deodorant effect....

  17. New pressure and temperature effects on bacterial spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathys, A; Knorr, D [Berlin University of Technology, Department of Food Biotechnology and Food Process Engineering, Koenigin-Luise-Str. 22, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Heinz, V [German Institute of Food Technology, p. o. box 1165, D-49601, Quackenbrueck (Germany)], E-mail: alexander.mathys@tu-berlin.de

    2008-07-15

    with 37 deg. C, and then dual stained with the fluorescent dyes SYTO 16 and propidium iodide. For pressure treated spores four distinct populations were detected by flow cytometry, and for these we suggest a three step model of inactivation involving a germination step following hydrolysis of the spore cortex, an unknown step, and finally an inactivation step with physical compromise of the spore inner membrane. An understanding of these effects and mechanisms will aid the safety assessment of pressure assisted thermal sterilisation, in turn facilitating the adoption by industry and commercialisation of such processes.

  18. New pressure and temperature effects on bacterial spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathys, A.; Heinz, V.; Knorr, D.

    2008-07-01

    C, and then dual stained with the fluorescent dyes SYTO 16 and propidium iodide. For pressure treated spores four distinct populations were detected by flow cytometry, and for these we suggest a three step model of inactivation involving a germination step following hydrolysis of the spore cortex, an unknown step, and finally an inactivation step with physical compromise of the spore inner membrane. An understanding of these effects and mechanisms will aid the safety assessment of pressure assisted thermal sterilisation, in turn facilitating the adoption by industry and commercialisation of such processes.

  19. Numerical Simulation and Validation Test of Air Age in Pressurization Room of Space Station%空间站密封舱空气龄分布数值模拟及试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴一飞; 苏新明

    2012-01-01

    The theory of air age was introduced. The effect of air age in pressurization room air quality evaluation of space station was discussed. Research progress of numerical simulation and validation test of air age distribution in pressurization room of space station domestic and abroad was summarized. Suggestions were put forward for numerical simulation and validation test of air age in pressurization room of space station.%介绍了空气龄理论,阐述了空气龄在空间站密封舱内空气品质评价方面的作用,对国内外在空间站密封舱内空气龄数值模拟、空气龄分布验证试验的研究进展进行了综述,并给出了对空间站密封舱进行空气龄数值模拟及试验研究的建议.

  20. 大气压空气介质阻挡汤森放电%Townsend Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Atmospheric Pressure Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗海云; 冉俊霞; 王新新

    2012-01-01

    In order to experimentally study the possibility of homogenous dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in atmospheric pressure air as well as its characteristics, the homogenous DBD in 3 mm air gap was obtained at atmospheric pressure, using 1-2 kHz sinusoidal high voltage and no less than 1. 5 mm thick alumina as the dielectrics. The discharge was proven as an atmospheric pressure Townsend discharge after analyzing the 10 ns exposure high-speed photographs and the current waveform. The steady breakdown voltage for 3 mm air DBD was calculated to be about 5. 7 kV, much lower than 11. 2 kV, the static breakdown voltage of 3 mm air gap; Extraordinary extinction was also observed in air just like in nitrogen. Both the two phenomena indicated the existence of the shallow traps and consequently the second-electron emissidn in the alumina surface, which were important for ignition and maintaining stage of Townsend DBD. It is found that the thickness of alumina is important for air DBD, and the thickness less than 1.5 mm can not avoid the filamentary discharge. If two 1 mm thick quartz plates are used instead of alumina, it is impossible to get homogenous DBD at 670 PaN 0. 1 MPa in air. The mechanism of Townsend DBD in 3 mm air gap is attributed to the combined effects of the unique shallow traps in the alumina surface and the current-limitation of the dielectrics.%为了实验研究大气压空气介质阻挡均匀放电的可能性,使用1.5mm以上厚度的A120s陶瓷片作为阻挡介质及1-2kHz的高压激励,在大气压3mm空气平板间隙中获得均匀放电。通过ICCD高速摄影得到的放电图像以及电流波形的分析表明这种放电是汤森放电。3mm空气间隙的稳态击穿电压仅约为5.7kV,远低于静态击穿电压11.2kv;还发现了类似氮气DBD汤森放电的“反常熄灭”现象,这两个现象表明陶瓷表面可能存在浅位阱及二次电子发射机制,这对空气汤森放电的起始和维持阶段都

  1. EFFECT OF INJECTION PRESSURE ON PERFORMANCE AND EMISSIONS OF CNG DIESEL DUAL FUEL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.NAGESWARA RAO

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A single-cylinder diesel engine has been converted into a dual-fuel engine to operate with natural gas together with a pilot injection of diesel fuel used to ignite the CNG–air charge. The CNG was inducted into the combustion chamber via intake manifold. The engine, operating in dual-fuel mode, has been tested on a wide range of operating conditions spanning different values of engine load at constant speed at different injector opening pressures for the pilot fuel (diesel. For all the tested operating conditions, the effect of CNG and diesel fuel injection pressure, together with the amount of fuel injected during the pilot injection, were analyzed on the engine performance, in terms of brake thermal efficiency and emission levels. An experimental investigation was carried out to find out the effect of injection pressure on performance and emissions of a diesel engine operated with CNG inducted into the engine. Behavior of the dual fuel engine at 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% substitution of CNG with respect to diesel was examined and compared them at different injection pressures

  2. Surface modification of polyester fabrics by atmospheric-pressure air/He plasma for color strength and adhesion enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunming; Zhao, Meihua; Wang, Libing; Qu, Lijun; Men, Yajing

    2017-04-01

    Surface properties of water-based pigmented inks for ink-jet printed polyester fabrics were modified with atmospheric-pressure air/He plasma to improve the color strength and pigment adhesion of the treated surfaces. The influence of various parameters, including the surface morphology, chemical compositions, surface energy and dynamic contact angles of the control and plasma treated samples was studied. Color strength and edge definition were used to evaluate the ink-jet printing performance of fabrics. The change in pigment adhesion to polyester fibers was analyzed by SEM (scanning electron microscopy). AFM (Atomic force microscope) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) analyses indicated the increase in surface roughness and the oxygen-containing polar groups(Cdbnd O, Csbnd OH and COOH) reinforced the fixation of pigments on the fiber surface. The result from this study suggested that the improved pigment color yield was clearly affected by alteration of pigment adhesion enhanced by plasma surface modification. Polyester fabrics exhibited better surface property and ink-jet printing performance after the air/He mixture plasma treatment comparing with those after air plasma treatment.

  3. Effects of sterilization on the Tekscan digital pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agins, Howard J; Harder, Valerie S; Lautenschlager, Eugene P; Kudrna, James C

    2003-11-01

    Investigations into the effects of sterilization on a new biomechanical pressure sensor are necessary before contemplating in vivo use. Ten, designated Experimental, "K-Scan" digital pressure sensor arrays were sterilized with ethylene oxide gas (EtO), and their ability to accurately and reproducibly measure an applied load of 2225 N (500 lb) was assessed. Simultaneously, 10 un-sterilized sensor arrays, designated Control, were assessed. Each array was loaded 10 times inside a two-dimensional curved surface, and all arrays exhibited high reproducibility (coefficients of variation0.05, beta0.05, beta<0.05). Results suggest that, following EtO sterilization, accurate and reproducible pressure measurements can be obtained from K-Scan sensors when calibration is performed at time of use.

  4. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on elastic properties of ZDTP tribofilms

    CERN Document Server

    Demmou, Karim; Loubet, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the elastic properties of Zinc Dialkyl-dithiophosphate (ZDTP) tribofilms measured by nanoindentation increase versus applied pressure (Anvil effect) [1, 2]. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that, up to 8 GPa, this increase is a reversible phenomenon. A ZDTP tribofilm has been produced on "AISI 52100" steel substrate using a Cameron-Plint tribometer. After its formation, a hydrostatic pressure of about 8 GPa was applied during one minute on the tribofilm using a large radius steel ball ("Brinell-like" test). Nanoindentation tests were performed with a Berkovich tip on pads in order to measure and compare the mechanical properties of the tribofilm inside and outside the macroscopic plastically deformed area. Careful AFM observations have been carried out on each indent in order to take into account actual contact area. No difference in elastic properties was observed between the two areas: tribofilm modulus and pressure sensitivity are the same inside and outside the resi...

  5. Effects of fasting on Blood pressure in normotensive males

    OpenAIRE

    Fatima Samad

    2016-01-01

    Muslims all over the world fast in the holy month of Ramadan. Fasting means abstinence from drinking any liquids, eating, smoking and taking anything parenterally.  It is intermittent in nature from the start of dawn to end at dusk. Fasting has various physiological effects on different biological parameters of the human body. Previous studies that look at effect of Ramadan fasting on blood pressure have focused mainly on hypertensive patients and patients with already established heart disea...

  6. THE EFFECT OF CORE EXERCISES ON TRANSDIAPHRAGMATIC PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Strongoli

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal exercises, such as sit ups and leg lifts, are used to enhance strength of the core muscles. An overlooked aspect of abdominal exercises is the compression the abdomen, leading to increased diaphragmatic work. We hypothesized that core exercises would produce a variety of transdiaphragmatic pressures. We also sought to determine if some of the easy exercises would produce pressures sufficient for a training stimulus to the diaphragm. We evaluated the effect of 13 different abdominal exercises, ranging in difficulty, on transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi, an index of diaphragmatic activity. Six healthy subjects, aged 22 to 53, participated. Each subject was instrumented with two balloon-tipped catheters to obtain gastric and esophageal pressures, from which Pdi was calculated. Prior to initiating the exercises, each subject performed a maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP maneuver. Resting Pdi was also measured. The exercises were performed from least to most difficult, with five repetitions each. There was a significant difference between the exercises and the MIP Pdi, as well as between the exercises and resting Pdi (p 50% of the Pdi during the MIP maneuver, which may provide a training stimulus to the diaphragm if used as a regular exercise. The Pdi measurements also provide insight into diaphragm recruitment during different core exercises, and may aid in the design of exercises to improve diaphragm strength and endurance

  7. Effect of pressure on the physical properties of magnetorheological fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Spaggiari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, several applications of magnetorheological (MR fluids are present in the industrial world, nonetheless system requirements often needs better material properties. In technical literature a previous work shows that MR fluids exhibit a pressure dependency called squeeze strengthen effect. Since a lot of MR fluid based devices are rotary devices, this paper investigates the behaviour of MR fluids under pressure when a rotation is applied to shear the fluid. The system is designed in order to apply both the magnetic field and the pressure and follows a Design of Experiment approach. The experimental apparatus comprises a cylinder in which a piston is used both to apply the pressure and to shear the fluid. The magnetic circuit is designed to provide a nearly constant induction field in the MR fluid. The experimental apparatus measures the torque as a function of the variables considered and the yield shear stress is computed. The analysis of the results shows that there is a positive interaction between magnetic field and pressure, which enhances the MR fluid performances more than twice.

  8. Effects of 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives on intraocular pressure in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Takashi; Ohnuma, Shin-ya; Uemoto, Kazuhiro; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Endo, Kazuki; Hosokawa, Tomokazu; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2004-02-23

    We evaluated the activities of 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives, relatively selective adenosine A2 receptor agonists, in the intraocular pressure regulation in rabbits. An adenosine A2 receptor agonist 2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS-21680) decreased intraocular pressure, while another A2 receptor agonist 2-(phenylamino)adenosine transiently increased it. The first group of 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives (1-hexyn-1-yl derivatives) caused a transient increase followed by decrease in intraocular pressure, while the second group (1-octyn-1-yl and 6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl derivatives) only decreased it. The second group is also effective in the ocular hypertensive models induced by water-loading and alpha-chymotrypsin. The outflow facility was increased by a 1-octyn-1-yl derivative. Both increase and decrease in intraocular pressure induced by 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives were inhibited by an adenosine A2 receptor antagonist 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine, but not by an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropyl xanthine. These findings suggest that 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives may affect intraocular pressure via adenosine A2 receptor, and 2-alkynyladenosine derivative-induced ocular hypotension is due to the increase of outflow facility.

  9. Measurement of thermoelectric, galvanomagnetic, and thermomagnetic effects at ultrahigh pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikov, Sergey V.; Shchennikov, Vladimir V.

    2003-04-01

    Lead chalcogenides are successfully applied at sensors of infrared radiation, thermoelectrical devices, thermogenerator, photoresistances, photodiodes, lasers, tensometers etc. Under high pressures above 2.5 - 6 GPa lead chaclogenides are known to suffer phase transitions, but up to now the thermoelectric properties of these materials at high pressure were unknown. In recent papers it was shown that heterophase state of material, which is being forming in the vicinity of semiconductor-metal phase transformations may be considered as a model of layer fabricated systems. As the most properties being dependent on the concentration and configuration of phases inclusions these materials may be used in engineering. For example, semiconductor-metal phase transitions induced by nanosecond heating and cooling of small regions of the memory cell are known to be using for nonvolatile memory develop. Recently the new technique of thermomagnetic measurements allowing to test a micro-samples of semiconductors have been developed at high pressure up to 30 GPa. The technique was applied for determination of scattering mechanisms and mobilities of charge carriers of direct-gap semiconductors Te, Se at ultrahigh pressure up to 30 GPa. The above measurements seems to be perspective for implementation to microelectronic manufacturing and MEMS technologies, for example, in modeling, quality control or testing of integrated circuit (IC). In present paper the thermo- and galvanomagnetic properties of micro-samples ~ 200×200×20 mkm of lead chalcogenides (PbS, PbSe, PbTe) at high pressure are investigated. The data of transverse magnetoresistance (MR) and also transverse and longitudinal Nernst-Ettingshausen (N-E) effects of lead chalcogenides both for initial and new phases, and also for heterophase states in the vicinity of phase transformations at high pressure are presented. One may suppose that the effects observed will find an interesting applications in thermosense industry. The

  10. Uptake of chemicals from indoor air: Pathways and health effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Building occupants are exposed to manufactured chemicals. Exposure in the indoor environment can occur via non-dietary ingestion (e.g. indoor dust), inhalation and dermal absorption including dermal uptake directly from air. The extent of dermal uptake from air has been previously studied...... intake from inhalation. Further experiments have been conducted with nicotine and the results are similar. Some of the SVOCs present indoors may have adverse health effects or are categorized as potential endocrine-disrupting compounds. It has been suggested that the health effects of a chemical may...

  11. Basement Kind Effects on Air Temperature of a Solar Chimney in Baghdad - Iraq Weather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miqdam Tariq Chaichan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A solar updraft tower power plant (solar tower is a solar thermal power plant that utilizes a combination of solar air collector and central updraft tube to generate an induced convective flow which drives pressure staged turbines to generate electricity. This paper presents practical results of a prototype of a solar chimney with thermal mass, where the glass surface is replaced by transparence plastic cover. The study focused on chimney's basements kind effect on collected air temperatures. Three basements were used: concrete, black concrete and black pebbles basements. The study was conducted in Baghdad from August to November 2009. The results show that the best chimney efficiency attained was 49.7% for pebbles base. The highest collected air temperature reached was 49ºC when using the black pebbles basement also.also, the maximum basement temperature measured was 59ºC for black pebbles. High increaments in collected air temperatures were achieved in comparison with the ambient air temperatures for the three basement kinds. The highest temperature difference reached was 22ºC with the pebble ground.

  12. Effects of phosphoric acid sprayed into an incinerator furnace on the flue gas pressure drop at fabric filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigetoshi; Hwang, In-Hee; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2016-06-01

    Fabric filters are widely used to remove dust from flue gas generated by waste incineration. However, a pressure drop occurs at the filters, caused by growth of a dust layer on the filter fabric despite regular cleaning by pulsed-jet air. The pressure drop at the fabric filters leads to energy consumption at induced draft fan to keep the incinerator on negative pressure, so that its proper control is important to operate incineration facility efficiently. The pressure drop at fabric filters decreased whenever phosphoric acid wastewater (PAW) was sprayed into an incinerator for treating industrial waste. Operational data obtained from the incineration facility were analyzed to determine the short- and long-term effects of PAW spraying on the pressure drop. For the short-term effect, it was confirmed that the pressure drop at the fabric filters always decreased to 0.3-1.2kPa within about 5h after spraying PAW. This effect was expected to be obtained by about one third of present PAW spraying amount. However, from the long-term perspective, the pressure drop showed an increase in the periods of PAW spraying compared with periods for which PAW spraying was not performed. The pressure drop increase was particularly noticeable after the initial PAW spraying, regardless of the age and type of fabric filters used. These results suggest that present PAW spraying causes a temporary pressure drop reduction, leading to short-term energy consumption savings; however, it also causes an increase of the pressure drop over the long-term, degrading the overall operating conditions. Thus, appropriate PAW spraying conditions are needed to make effective use of PAW to reduce the pressure drop at fabric filters from a short- and long-term point of view.

  13. Surface Treatment of Polypropylene Films Using Homogeneous DBD Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure in Air%Surface Treatment of Polypropylene Films Using Homogeneous DBD Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure in Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Zhi; CAI Ling-ling; LEI Xiao; QIU Yu-chang; Kuffel Edmund

    2011-01-01

    The homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in atmospheric air is most favorable for polymer sur- face modification due to the low cost of operation and the ability of ambient on-line continuous uniform processing. In this paper, polypropylene (PP) films are treated using a homogeneous DBD plasma in atmospheric air. The surface properties of PP films are studied using contact angle and surface energy measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier trailsformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and the aging effect after treatment when the treated materials are exposed to open air is also studied, with the modification mechanism being discussed. It is demonstrated that non thermal plasmas generated by homogeneous DBD in atmospheric air is an effective way to enhance the surface properties of PP films. After the pIasma treatment, the surface of PP film is etched, and oxygen-containing polar groups are introduced into the surface. These two processes can induce a remarkable decrease in water contact angle and a remarkable increase in surface energy, and the surface properties of PP films are improved accordingly.

  14. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-15

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8{approx}2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4{approx}2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure.

  15. Evaluation of the constant pressure panel method (CPM) for unsteady air loads prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appa, Kari; Smith, Michael J. C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper evaluates the capability of the constant pressure panel method (CPM) code to predict unsteady aerodynamic pressures, lift and moment distributions, and generalized forces for general wing-body configurations in supersonic flow. Stability derivatives are computed and correlated for the X-29 and an Oblique Wing Research Aircraft, and a flutter analysis is carried out for a wing wind tunnel test example. Most results are shown to correlate well with test or published data. Although the emphasis of this paper is on evaluation, an improvement in the CPM code's handling of intersecting lifting surfaces is briefly discussed. An attractive feature of the CPM code is that it shares the basic data requirements and computational arrangements of the doublet lattice method. A unified code to predict unsteady subsonic or supersonic airloads is therefore possible.

  16. Evaluation of analytical methodology for hydrocarbons in high pressure air and nitrogen systems. [data aquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Information regarding the safety limits of hydrocarbons in liquid and gaseous oxygen, the steps taken for hydrocarbon removal from liquified gases, and the analysis of the contaminants was searched and the results are presented. The safety of hydrocarbons in gaseous systems was studied, and the latest hydrocarbon test equipment and methodology is reviewed. A detailed sampling and analysis plan is proposed to evaluate high pressure GN2 and LOX systems.

  17. Effect of air-entry angle on performance of a 2-stroke-cycle compression-ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, Sherod L; Dutee, Francis J

    1937-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the effect of variations in the horizontal and vertical air-entry angles on the performance characteristics of a single-cylinder 2-stroke-cycle compression-ignition test engine. Performance data were obtained over a wide range of engine speed, scavenging pressure, fuel quantity, and injection advance angle with the optimum guide vanes. Friction and blower-power curves are included for calculating the indicated and net performances. The optimum horizontal air-entry angle was found to be 60 degrees from the radial and the optimum vertical angle to be zero, under which conditions a maximum power output of 77 gross brake horsepower for a specific fuel consumption of 0.52 pound per brake horsepower-hour was obtained at 1,800 r.p.m. and 16-1/2 inches of Hg scavenging pressure. The corresponding specific output was 0.65 gross brake horsepower per cubic inch of piston displacement. Tests revealed that the optimum scavenging pressure increased linearly with engine speed. The brake mean effective pressure increased uniformly with air quantity per cycle for any given vane angle and was independent of engine speed and scavenging pressure.

  18. Acute effects of winter air pollution on respiratory health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der S.

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis, acute respiratory health effects of exposure to winter air pollution are investigated in panels of children (7-11 yr) and adults (50-70 yr) with and without chronic respiratory symptoms, living in urban and non-urban areas in the Netherlands. The study was performed during three cons

  19. Effects of air velocity on laying hen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermal conditions play a major role in production efficiency in commercial poultry production. Mitigation of thermal stress can improve productivity, but must be achieved economically. Weather and system design can limit effectiveness of evaporative cooling and increased air movement has been sho...

  20. The Effects of a Blizzard on Urban Air Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Armando; Bein, Frederick L.

    1981-01-01

    The chronology and effects of a 1978 blizzard on Indianapolis' air pollution levels (ozone, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide) are used as a case study for geography classes. Photographs, graphs, and maps are provided as examples of meteorological data collection and interpretation. (AM)

  1. A Study of the Effects of Air Pollution on Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Irene B.

    1970-01-01

    An investigation of the possible effects of air pollution on the absenteeism of elementary school children showed that a greater percent of absences occurred in the test group than in a comparable group. There is little question as to the importance that such information should have for educators, informed parents, and other adults in community…

  2. Effect of air-conditioner exposure on semen quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min-LiLu; Jun-QingWu; Qiu-YingYang; Wei-JinZhou; Er-ShengGao

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of air-conditioner exposure on semen quality. Methods: The data came from the healthy male volunteers, aged 22 to 30 years, who went to centers for maternity and children health for premarital physical examination in Shanghai,Henan, Zbejiang and Hebei from December 1998 to February 2000.

  3. Discussion on Feasibility of Roto -jet Pressurizing Dissolving Air Method%射流旋喷加压溶气系统的可行性探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新

    2012-01-01

    溶气系统是气浮净水系统中的重要组成部分,关系到溶气水的形成及能耗问题等,论述了射流器供气和旋喷泵加压两种溶气方式,集两种方式的优点提出了射流旋喷加压溶气新装置,并对装置在气浮净水中的可行性进行分析。%Dissolved air system is an important part of air - floatation water purification, it affects the formation of dissolved air and energy consumption. This paper introduced two ways: dissolving air by jet eductor and dissolving air by jet bump. on the basis, a new method: roto -jet pressurizing dissolving air is proposed, and then its feasibility is analyzed.

  4. Clearing the air: a review of the effects of particulate matter air pollution on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jonathan O; Thundiyil, Josef G; Stolbach, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that particulate matter (PM) air pollution contributes to approximately 800,000 premature deaths each year, ranking it the 13th leading cause of mortality worldwide. However, many studies show that the relationship is deeper and far more complicated than originally thought. PM is a portion of air pollution that is made up of extremely small particles and liquid droplets containing acids, organic chemicals, metals, and soil or dust particles. PM is categorized by size and continues to be the fraction of air pollution that is most reliably associated with human disease. PM is thought to contribute to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease by the mechanisms of systemic inflammation, direct and indirect coagulation activation, and direct translocation into systemic circulation. The data demonstrating PM's effect on the cardiovascular system are strong. Populations subjected to long-term exposure to PM have a significantly higher cardiovascular incident and mortality rate. Short-term acute exposures subtly increase the rate of cardiovascular events within days of a pollution spike. The data are not as strong for PM's effects on cerebrovascular disease, though some data and similar mechanisms suggest a lesser result with smaller amplitude. Respiratory diseases are also exacerbated by exposure to PM. PM causes respiratory morbidity and mortality by creating oxidative stress and inflammation that leads to pulmonary anatomic and physiologic remodeling. The literature shows PM causes worsening respiratory symptoms, more frequent medication use, decreased lung function, recurrent health care utilization, and increased mortality. PM exposure has been shown to have a small but significant adverse effect on cardiovascular, respiratory, and to a lesser extent, cerebrovascular disease. These consistent results are shown by multiple studies with varying populations, protocols, and regions. The data demonstrate a dose

  5. Effect of balanced low pressure drying of curcuma longa leaf on skin immune activation activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wooseok; Lim, Hye Won; Lee, Hyeon Yong

    2014-01-01

    The effect of balanced low pressure drying pretreatment associated with ultrasonication extraction (BU) on the enhancement of skin immune modulatory activities of Curcuma longa leaf was studied by comparing with conventional hot air drying (HE), freeze drying (FE) and balanced low pressure drying (BE) pretreatment processes. In considering skin immune activation activities such as the inhibition of hyaluronidase activity, the BU extract showed ca. 10% higher than those of HE, and even higher than that of the FE extract. Nitric oxide production from macrophage of the BU extract in adding 1.0 mg/mL was increased up to 16.5 μM. When measuring inhibition of IL-6 and TNF-a production from the human T lymphocytes (T cell), the BU extract also showed 53% and 78% of inhibition effect, respectively. It is found that the BU extract could effectively suppress the expression levels of skin inflammation related genes such as Cox-2 and iNOS, down to 80% and 85% compared to the control, respectively. Balanced low pressure drying process was especially active on dehydration of the leaves with minimizing the destruction and making easier elution of the bioactive substances, which resulted in higher extraction yield and better biological activities.

  6. Experimental investigation of perforations interactions effects under high sound pressure levels

    CERN Document Server

    Tayong, Rostand

    2009-01-01

    Most models for predicting the acoustic response of perforated panels are based on the assumption that there is no interactions between the holes. The common way of taking into account the perforates effects is the use of Fok's functions. The few papers that deal with these effects study the case of low sound pressure levels. This paper investigates the Holes Interaction Effects (HIE) of perforated and micro-perforated panels when submitted to high sound pressure levels. Analysis of the data yields to the fact that even with HIE, the nonlinear reactance dependency with velocity is very slight. The HIE can provide good absorption of the perforated panel backed by an air cavity at low and high sound pressure levels if the holes positions are well configured. Perforated panels of holes diameters less than 2 millimeters were built out of steel with different interstices (distance between two adjacent holes) and tested. Experimental results (performed with an impedance tube) in the cases of interaction are done an...

  7. Compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs: effects of porous media and gas mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, C. M.; Pan, L.

    2015-12-01

    Although large opportunities exist for compressed air energy storage (CAES) in aquifers and depleted natural gas reservoirs, only two grid-scale CAES facilities exist worldwide, both in salt caverns. As such, experience with CAES in porous media, what we call PM-CAES, is lacking and we have relied on modeling to elucidate PM-CAES processes. PM-CAES operates similarly to cavern CAES. Specifically, working gas (air) is injected through well(s) into the reservoir compressing the cushion gas (existing air in the reservoir). During energy recovery, high-pressure air from the reservoir flows first into a recuperator, then into an expander, and subsequently is mixed with fuel in a combustion turbine to produce electricity, thereby reducing compression costs. Energy storage in porous media is complicated by the solid matrix grains which provide resistance to flow (via permeability in Darcy's law); in the cap rock, low-permeability matrix provides the seal to the reservoir. The solid grains also provide storage capacity for heat that might arise from compression, viscous flow effects, or chemical reactions. The storage of energy in PM-CAES occurs variably across pressure gradients in the formation, while the solid grains of the matrix can release/store heat. Residual liquid (i.e., formation fluids) affects flow and can cause watering out at the production well(s). PG&E is researching a potential 300 MW (for ten hours) PM-CAES facility in a depleted gas reservoir near Lodi, California. Special considerations exist for depleted natural gas reservoirs because of mixing effects which can lead to undesirable residual methane (CH4) entrainment and reactions of oxygen and CH4. One strategy for avoiding extensive mixing of working gas (air) with reservoir CH4 is to inject an initial cushion gas with reduced oxygen concentration providing a buffer between the working gas (air) and the residual CH4 gas. This reduces the potential mixing of the working air with the residual CH4

  8. Improving the Validity of Squeeze Film Air-Damping Model of MEMS Devices with Border Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Bai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of squeezed film air damping is critical in the design and control of dynamic MEMS devices. The published squeezed film air damping models are generally derived from the analytical solutions of Reynolds equation or its other modified forms under the supposition of trivial pressure boundary conditions on the peripheral borders. These treatments ignoring the border effect can not give faithful result for structure with smaller air venting gap or the double-gimbaled structure in which the inner frame and outer one affect the air venting. In this paper, we use Green’s function to solve the nonlinear Reynolds equation with inhomogeneous boundary conditions. For two typical normal motion cases of parallel plate, the analytical models of squeeze film damping force with border effect are established. The viscous and inertial losses with real values and image values acoustic impedance are all included in the model. These models reduced the time consumption while giving satisfactory result. Without multifield coupling analysis, the estimation of the dynamic behavior of MEMS device is also allowed, and the simulation of the system performance is more convenient.

  9. Effect of chymase on intraocular pressure in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Takashi; Maruichi, Midori; Takai, Shinji; Oku, Hidehiro; Sugiyama, Tetsuya; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Ikeda, Tsunehiko; Miyazaki, Mizuo

    2005-11-01

    Chymase is a chymotrypsin-like serine protease that is stored exclusively in the secretory granules of mast cells and converts big endothelins to endothelin-1 (1-31). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chymase on intraocular pressure in rabbits. Chymase injection (3 and 10 mU) resulted in a trend toward increased intraocular pressure and a significant increase in intraocular pressure at a dose of 10 mU compared with the control. A specific chymase inhibitor, Suc-Val-Pro-Phe(P)(OPh)(2), attenuated the ocular hypertension induced by chymase. Endothelin-1 (1-31) also caused ocular hypertension, which was inhibited by a selective endothelin ET(A) receptor antagonist, cyclo(D-Asp-Pro-D-Val-Leu-D-Trp) (BQ-123). Moreover, chymase-induced ocular hypertension was inhibited by BQ-123. These results suggest that chymase influences the regulation of intraocular pressure, and it is likely that the formation of endothelin-1 (1-31) and subsequent activation of endothelin ET(A) receptors are involved in the development of ocular hypertension induced by chymase.

  10. Effective local dynamic routing strategy for air route networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Wenjun; Zhao Lingxi

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of air transportation, network service ability has attracted a lot of attention in academe. Aiming to improve the throughput of the air route network (ARN), we propose an effective local dynamic routing strategy in this paper. Several factors, such as the rout-ing distance, the geographical distance and the real-time local traffic, are taken into consideration. When the ARN is in the normal free-flow state, the proposed strategy can recover the shortest path routing (SPR) strategy. When the ARN undergoes congestion, the proposed strategy changes the paths of flights based on the real-time local traffic information. The throughput of the Chinese air route network (CARN) is evaluated. Results confirm that the proposed strategy can significantly improve the throughput of CARN. Meanwhile, the increase in the average flying distance and time is tiny. Results also indicate the importance of the distance related factors in a routing strategy designed for the ARN.

  11. OH concentration in an atmospheric-pressure methane-air flame from molecular-beam mass spectrometry and laser-absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cattolica, R.J.; Yoon, S.; Knuth, E.L.

    1980-12-01

    The concentration of the OH radical in a stoichiometric methane-air flat flame at atmospheric pressure was measured with both laser-absorption spectroscopy and molecular-beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). The nonequilibrium peak OH concentrations and the OH decay rate measured from the two techniques were in good agreement. The OH profile from the MBMS measurements, however, was shifted downstream from the absorption measurements by approximately 5 times the sampling-orifice diameter. A comparison of temperature profiles from thermocouple measurements and from a molecular-beam time-of-flight technique exhibited a similar downstream shift. The MBMS measurements effectively sampled the gas properties approximately five orifice diameters ahead of the sampling-probe tip. Perturbation of the OH concentration profile using various sampling probes indicate the importance of minimizing the length of the sampling-orifice channel to reduce composition relaxation during sampling.

  12. Simulation of the propagation and reignition of atmospheric pressure air discharges behind a dielectric plane obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechereau, Francois; Jansky, Jaroslav; Bourdon, Anne

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, experimental studies on flue gas treatment have demonstrated the efficiency of plasma assisted catalysis for the treatment of a wide range of pollutants at a low energetic cost. In plasma reactors, usual catalyst supports are pellets, monoliths or porous media, and then atmospheric pressure discharges have to interact with many obstacles and to propagate in microcavities and pores. As a first step to better understand atmospheric pressure discharge dynamics in these complex geometries, in this work, we have carried out numerical simulations using a 2D-axisymmetric fluid model for a point-to-plane discharge with a dielectric plane obstacle placed in the path of the discharge. First, we have simulated the discharge ignition at the point electrode, its propagation in the gap and its impact and expansion on the dielectric plane. Depending on the applied voltage, the dielectric plane geometry and permittivity, we have identified conditions for the reignition of a second discharge behind the plane obstacle. These conditions will be discussed and compared with recent experimental results on the same configuration.

  13. Effects of the mid-air collision on sand saltation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    As to the fact that the effects of saltating particles’ mid-air collision on the sand transport rate are often neglected in the current theoretical models describing sand saltation movement,expressions to calculate velocity diversity of saltating parti-cles after mid-air collision are presented through collision theory of hard ball in this paper. Then,the theoretical model of the wind blown sand movement at the steady state,taking account of coupled interaction between saltation particles and wind,is combined with the model of the mid-air collision probability to calculate the sal-tating particles’ mass flux at heights,the sand transport rate,and further,their changing rules. The comparison of the results with those when the mid-air collision is not considered suggests that the mass flux at heights and the sand transport rate in this paper are less,and much closer,respectively,to the corresponding experi-mental values. The difference between the sand mass fluxes without and with con-sideration of mid-air collision increases at first,and then decreases as the height increases,exhibiting the stratified characteristics.

  14. Application of post-discharge region of atmospheric pressure argon and air plasma jet in the contamination control of Candida albicans biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anelise Cristina Osório Cesar Doria

    Full Text Available Introduction:Candida species are responsible for about 80% of hospital fungal infections. Non-thermal plasmas operated at atmospheric pressure are increasingly used as an alternative to existing antimicrobial strategy. This work investigates the action of post-discharge region of a non-thermal atmospheric plasma jet, generated by a gliding arc reactor, on biofilms of standard strain of Candida albicans grown on polyurethane substrate. Methods Samples were divided into three groups: (i non-treated; (ii treated with argon plasma, and (iii treated with argon plus air plasma. Subsequently to plasma treatment, counting of colony-forming units (CFU/ml and cell viability tests were performed. In addition, the surface morphology of the samples was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and optical profilometry (OP. Results Reduction in CFU/ml of 85% and 88.1% were observed in groups ii and iii, respectively. Cell viability after treatment also showed reduction of 33% in group ii and 8% in group iii, in comparison with group i (100%. The SEM images allow observation of the effect of plasma chemistry on biofilm structure, and OP images showed a reduction of its surface roughness, which suggests a possible loss of biofilm mass. Conclusion The treatment in post-discharge region and the chemistries of plasma jet tested in this work were effective in controlling Candida albicans biofilm contamination. Finally, it was evidenced that argon plus air plasma was the most efficient to reduce cell viability.

  15. Investigating the electron density of multi-MeV X-ray-induced air plasmas at low pressures based on electromagnetic resonant cavity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribière, M.; d'Almeida, T.; Cessenat, O.; Maulois, M.; Pouzalgues, R.; Crabos, B.; Delbos, C.; Garrigues, A.; Azaïs, B.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate air plasmas generated by multi-MeV pulsed X-rays at pressures ranging from 10-5 to 10-1 mbar. The experimental approach used for these studies is based on measurements of resonant frequencies damping and shift for different electromagnetic modes within a cylindrical cavity. Time-integrated electron densities in X-ray-induced air plasmas are inferred from the damping rate of the measured magnetic fields and their corresponding frequency shifts. In the present study, electron densities ranging from 108 to 109 cm-3 at pressures ranging from 10-3 to 10-1 mbar have been measured. Experimental results were confronted to 3D Maxwell-Vlasov Particle-In-Cell simulations incorporating a radiation-induced electric conductivity model. The method used in this work enables determining microscopic and macroscopic physical quantities within low pressure air plasmas generated by pulsed X-ray.

  16. Experimental study of air distribution and ventilation effectiveness in a room heated by warm air and/or floor heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Krajčík, Michal

    2010-01-01

    effectiveness depend on position of supply and exhaust device and on the difference between supply and room air temperature. Among other, for warm air heating the ventilation effectiveness is always less than 1 and it can be as low as 0.4. This would then require increased amount of ventilation. But how much...... higher ventilation rate is needed? And will it be sufficient to heat a low energy house alone with warm air heating? The performance of an experimental residential room, heated by only a warm air system or by a combination of a ventilation system and floor heating, has been studied....

  17. Over-pressurized bioreactors: application to microbial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Marlene; Belo, Isabel; Mota, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    In industrial biotechnology, microbial cultures are exposed to different local pressures inside bioreactors. Depending on the microbial species and strains, the increased pressure may have detrimental or beneficial effects on cellular growth and product formation. In this review, the effects of increased air pressure on various microbial cultures growing in bioreactors under moderate total pressure conditions (maximum, 15 bar) will be discussed. Recent data illustrating the diversity of increased air pressure effects at different levels in microbial cells cultivation will be presented, with particular attention to the effects of oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures on cellular growth and product formation, and the concomitant effect of oxygen pressure on antioxidant cellular defense mechanisms.

  18. Atmospheric Pressure Corrections in Geodesy and Oceanography: a Strategy for Handling Air Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, Rui M.; Ray, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    Global pressure data are often needed for processing or interpreting modern geodetic and oceanographic measurements. The most common source of these data is the analysis or reanalysis products of various meteorological centers. Tidal signals in these products can be problematic for several reasons, including potentially aliased sampling of the semidiurnal solar tide as well as the presence of various modeling or timing errors. Building on the work of Van den Dool and colleagues, we lay out a strategy for handling atmospheric tides in (re)analysis data. The procedure also offers a method to account for ocean loading corrections in satellite altimeter data that are consistent with standard ocean-tide corrections. The proposed strategy has immediate application to the on-going Jason-1 and GRACE satellite missions.

  19. Pressure effects on dynamics behavior of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talebian, Taha [Faculty of Engineering, Neyshabur Branch, Islamic Azad University, Neyshabur (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The dynamic behavior of Multiwall boron nitride nanotubes (MWBNNTs) is investigated by employing multiple elastic shells model. The influences of van der Waals interactions on layers are shown as nonlinear functions of the interlayer distance of MWBNNTs. Governing equations are solved by using the developed finite element method and by employing time history diagrams. The radial wave speed from the outermost layer to the innermost layer is computed. The effects of geometrical factors such as diameter-to-thickness ratio on dynamic behavior of MWBNNTs are determined. The magnification aspects of MWBNNTs are computed, and the effects of surrounding pressures on wave speed and magnification aspect of MWBNNTs are discussed.

  20. The aerodynamic effects of wheelspace coolant injection into the mainstream flow of a high pressure gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Christopher Elliot

    Modern gas turbine engines operate with mainstream gas temperatures exceeding 1450°C in the high-pressure turbine stage. Unlike turbine blades, rotor disks and other internal components are not designed to withstand the extreme temperatures found in mainstream flow. In modern gas turbines, cooling air is pumped into the wheelspace cavities to prevent mainstream gas ingestion and then exits through a seal between the rotor and the nozzle guide vane (NGV) thereby mixing with the mainstream flow. The primary purpose for the wheelspace cooling air is the cooling of the turbine wheelspace. However, secondary effects arise from the mixing of the spent cooling air with the mainstream flow. The exiting cooling air is mixed with the hot mainstream flow effecting the aerodynamic and performance characteristics of the turbine stage. The physics underlying this mixing process and its effects on stage performance are not yet fully understood. The relative aerodynamic and performance effects associated with rotor - NGV gap coolant injections were investigated in the Axial Flow Turbine Research Facility (AFTRF) of the Center for Gas Turbines and Power of The Pennsylvania State University. This study quantifies the secondary effects of the coolant injection on the aerodynamic and performance character of the turbines main stream flow for root injection, radial cooling, and impingement cooling. Measurement and analysis of the cooling effects were performed in both stationary and rotational frames of reference. The AFTRF is unique in its ability to perform long duration cooling measurements in the stationary and rotating frames. The effects of wheelspace coolant mixing with the mainstream flow on total-to-total efficiency, energy transport, three dimensional velocity field, and loading coefficient were investigated. Overall, it was found that a small quantity (1%) of cooling air can have significant effects on the performance character and exit conditions of the high pressure stage

  1. Development of high hydrostatic pressure in biosciences: pressure effect on biological structures and potential applications in biotechnologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivalain, Nolwennig; Roquain, Jean; Demazeau, Gérard

    2010-01-01

    Compared to temperature, the development of pressure as a tool in the research field has emerged only recently (at the end of the XIXth century). Following several developments in Physics and Chemistry during the first half of the XXth century (in particular the synthesis of diamond in 1953-1954), high pressures were applied in Food Science, especially in Japan. The main objective was then to achieve the decontamination of foods while preserving their organoleptic properties. Now, a new step is engaged: the biological applications of high pressures, from food to pharmaceuticals and biomedical applications. This paper will focus on three main points: (i) a brief presentation of the pressure parameter and its characteristics, (ii) a description of the pressure effects on biological constituents from simple to more complex structures and (iii) a review of the different domains for which the application of high pressures is able to initiate potential developments in Biotechnologies.

  2. Anomalous Response in Heteroacene-Based Organic Field Effect Transistors under High Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Sakai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Carrier transport properties of organic field effect transistors in dinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene single crystals have been investigated under high pressure. In contrast to the typical pressure effect of monotonic increase in charge transfer rates according to the application of external hydrostatic pressure, it is clarified that the present organic semiconductor devices exhibit nonmonotonic pressure response, such as negative pressure effect. X-ray diffraction analysis under high pressure reveals that on-site molecular orientation and displacement in the heteroacene molecule is assumed to be the origin for the anomalous pressure effects.

  3. Hydrostatic pressure effect on magnetic phase transition and magnetocaloric effect of metamagnetic TmZn compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingwei; Hu, Guanghui; Qi, Yang; Umehara, Izuru

    2017-02-01

    The magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is an intrinsic thermal response of all magnetic solids which has a direct and strong correlation with the corresponding magnetic phase transition. It has been well recognized that the magnetic phase transition can be tuned by adjusting applied pressure. Therefore, we perform the high hydrostatic pressure magnetization measurements (up to 1.4 GPa) on a recently reported giant MCE material of TmZn. The results indicate that the Curie temperature of TC increases from 8.4 K at the ambient pressure to 11.5 K under the pressure of 1.4 GPa. The field-induced first order metamagnetic transition is getting weak with increasing pressure, which results in a reduction of MCE. The hydrostatic pressure effect on the magnetic phase transition and MCE in the metamagnetic TmZn is discussed.

  4. Health effects of SRS non-radiological air emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, J.

    1997-06-16

    This report examines the potential health effects of non radiological emissions to the air resulting from operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The scope of this study was limited to the 55 air contaminants for which the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has quantified risk by determining unit risk factors (excess cancer risks) and/or reference concentrations (deleterious non cancer risks). Potential health impacts have been assessed in relation to the maximally exposed individual. This is a hypothetical person who resides for a lifetime at the SRS boundary. The most recent (1994) quality assured SRS emissions data available were used. Estimated maximum site boundary concentrations of the air contaminants were calculated using air dispersion modeling and 24-hour and annual averaging times. For the emissions studied, the excess cancer risk was found to be less than the generally accepted risk level of 1 in 100,000 and, in most cases, was less than 1 in 1,000,000. Deleterious non cancer effects were also found to be very unlikely.

  5. EFFECTS OF COMPRESSED AIR FOAM APPLICATION ON HEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam THOMITZEK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates the knowledge obtained in firefighting tests using compressed air foam system (CAFS within a confined space. Six experiments were conducted for verification during the cooling of rooms and the self-extinguishing effect. The simulation was for a fully developed fire within a room. The fuel was chosen to simulate ordinary combustible materials utilized in residential areas. Mantel thermocouples were placed in the rooms to record the temperature changes. Compressed air foam was first applied with a standard fire hose nozzle to the ceiling and then to the epicenter of fire. Fire extinguishing was initiated after reaching the desired temperature in the room. The temperature for the start of fire extinguishing matched the third phase of development of a fire. Fire extinguishing was terminated after no obvious signs of fire were shown in epicenter of fire. The outputs of the experiments were evaluated on the basis of the amount of time passed for the temperature to drop below the suggested limit. Individual experiments were also conducted with various different admixing foaming agents over different locations. In the experiments, it has been verified that the application of compressed air foam has a positive effect on room cooling. Use of a compressed air foaming agent does not allow for the development of steam that can scald firefighters and reduce visibility. Furthermore, the extinguishing agent used is more efficient utilizing less water flow out of the fire area.

  6. Effect of Burstiness on the Air Transportation System

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    The effect of burstiness in complex networks has received considerable attention. In particular, its effect on temporal distance and delays in the air transportation system is significant owing to their huge impact on our society. Therefore, in this paper, we propose two indexes of temporal distance based on passengers' behavior and analyze the effect. As a result, we find that burstiness shortens the temporal distance while delays are increased. Moreover, we discover that the positive effect of burstiness is lost when flight schedules get overcrowded.

  7. Effect of Intake Air Filter Condition on Vehicle Fuel Economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, Kevin M [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL

    2009-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) jointly maintain a fuel economy website (www.fueleconomy.gov), which helps fulfill their responsibility under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to provide accurate fuel economy information [in miles per gallon (mpg)] to consumers. The site provides information on EPA fuel economy ratings for passenger cars and light trucks from 1985 to the present and other relevant information related to energy use such as alternative fuels and driving and vehicle maintenance tips. In recent years, fluctuations in the price of crude oil and corresponding fluctuations in the price of gasoline and diesel fuels have renewed interest in vehicle fuel economy in the United States. (User sessions on the fuel economy website exceeded 20 million in 2008 compared to less than 5 million in 2004 and less than 1 million in 2001.) As a result of this renewed interest and the age of some of the references cited in the tips section of the website, DOE authorized the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC) to initiate studies to validate and improve these tips. This report documents a study aimed specifically at the effect of engine air filter condition on fuel economy. The goal of this study was to explore the effects of a clogged air filter on the fuel economy of vehicles operating over prescribed test cycles. Three newer vehicles (a 2007 Buick Lucerne, a 2006 Dodge Charger, and a 2003 Toyota Camry) and an older carbureted vehicle were tested. Results show that clogging the air filter has no significant effect on the fuel economy of the newer vehicles (all fuel injected with closed-loop control and one equipped with MDS). The engine control systems were able to maintain the desired AFR regardless of intake restrictions, and therefore fuel consumption was not increased. The carbureted engine did show a decrease in

  8. Hypobaric Hypoxia: Effects on Intraocular Pressure and Corneal Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Nebbioso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study focused on understanding the mechanisms underlying ocular hydrodynamics and the changes which occur in the eyes of subjects exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (HH to permit the achievement of more detailed knowledge in glaucomatous disease. Methods. Twenty male subjects, aged 32±5 years, attending the Italian Air Force, were enrolled for this study. The research derived from hypobaric chamber, using helmet and mask supplied to jet pilotes connected to oxygen cylinder and equipped with a preset automatic mixer. Results. The baseline values of intraocular pressure (IOP, recorded at T1, showed a mean of 16±2.23 mmHg, while climbing up to 18,000 feet the mean value was 13.7±4.17 mmHg, recorded at T2. The last assessment was performed returning to sea level (T4 where the mean IOP value was 12.8±2.57 mmHg, with a significant change (P<0.05 compared to T1. Pachymetry values related to corneal thickness in conditions of hypobarism revealed a statistically significant increase (P<0.05. Conclusions. The data collected in this research seem to confirm the increasing outflow of aqueous humor (AH in the trabecular meshwork (TM under conditions of HH.

  9. The Healing Effect of Low-Temperature Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma in Pressure Ulcer: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuangsuwanich, Apirag; Assadamongkol, Tananchai; Boonyawan, Dheerawan

    2016-08-31

    Pressure ulcers are difficult to treat. Recent reports of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma (LTAPP) indicated its safe and effectiveness in chronic wound care management. It has been shown both in vitro and vivo studies that LTAPP not only helps facilitate wound healing but also has antimicrobial efficacy due to its composition of ion and electron, free radicals, and ultraviolet ray. We studied the beneficial effect of LTAPP specifically on pressure ulcers. In a prospective randomized study, 50 patients with pressure ulcers were divided into 2 groups: Control group received standard wound care and the study group was treated with LTAPP once every week for 8 consecutive weeks in addition to standard wound care. We found that the group treated with LTAPP had significantly better PUSH (Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing) scores and exudate amount after 1 week of treatment. There was also a reduction in bacterial load after 1 treatment regardless of the species of bacteria identified.

  10. Peripheral and Central Effects of Melatonin on Blood Pressure Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Pechanova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The pineal hormone, melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, shows potent receptor-dependent and -independent actions, which participate in blood pressure regulation. The antihypertensive effect of melatonin was demonstrated in experimental and clinical hypertension. Receptor-dependent effects are mediated predominantly through MT1 and MT2 G-protein coupled receptors. The pleiotropic receptor-independent effects of melatonin with a possible impact on blood pressure involve the reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging nature, activation and over-expression of several antioxidant enzymes or their protection from oxidative damage and the ability to increase the efficiency of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Besides the interaction with the vascular system, this indolamine may exert part of its antihypertensive action through its interaction with the central nervous system (CNS. The imbalance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic vegetative system is an important pathophysiological disorder and therapeutic target in hypertension. Melatonin is protective in CNS on several different levels: It reduces free radical burden, improves endothelial dysfunction, reduces inflammation and shifts the balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic system in favor of the parasympathetic system. The increased level of serum melatonin observed in some types of hypertension may be a counter-regulatory adaptive mechanism against the sympathetic overstimulation. Since melatonin acts favorably on different levels of hypertension, including organ protection and with minimal side effects, it could become regularly involved in the struggle against this widespread cardiovascular pathology.

  11. The glow discharge inception and post-discharge relaxation of charged and neutral active particles in synthetic air at low pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, A. P.; Marković, V. Lj; Stamenković, S. N.; Stankov, M. N.

    2015-11-01

    The study of dc glow discharge inception and post-discharge relaxation of charged and neutral active particles in synthetic air at low pressure is presented. The breakdown time delay dependence as a function of relaxation time \\overline{{{t}\\text{d}}}(τ ) (the memory curve) is measured and modelled from milliseconds to the saturation region determined by the cosmic rays and natural radioactivity level. Due to fast conversion \\text{N}2++{{\\text{O}}2}\\to {{\\text{N}}2}+\\text{O}2+ , relaxation of dc discharge in synthetic air in the time interval from one to about ninety milliseconds is dominated by the diffusion decay of molecular oxygen {{O}}_2^ + ions. The change of regimes, from ambipolar to the free diffusion limit, is investigated and the variation of effective diffusion coefficients is determined. The late relaxation is explained by the kinetics of nitrogen atoms, recombining on the surfaces of gas discharge tube and stainless steel electrodes and relevant surface recombination coefficients are determined.

  12. Microwave assisted catalytic wet air oxidation of H-acid in aqueous solution under the atmospheric pressure using activated carbon as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo; Zhao, Yazhi; Yang, Fenglin

    2006-09-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) is a promising method for the treatment of heavily contaminated wastewater. However, its application is restricted due to severe operation conditions (high pressure and high temperature). A microwave (MW) assisted oxidation method was investigated aiming to treat heavily contaminated wastewater under milder conditions. H-acid (1-amino-8-naphthol-3, 6-disulfonic acid) was selected as target compound to evaluate the performance of this novel process. The removal of H-acid and TOC (total organic carbon) for H-acid solution of 3000 mg/L reached as high as 92.6% in 20 min and 84.2% in 60 min, respectively under optimal conditions. The existence of activated carbon and oxygen proved to be critical for effective treatment. The activated carbon acted not only as a catalyst for H-acid decomposition, but also as a special material for the absorption of MW energy. Air was supplied to the reactor as an oxygen source at constant flows. The amino group in H-acid was converted ultimately into nitrate, and sulfonic group into sulfate. This observation gave an evidence of H-acid mineralization although other organic intermediates were unable to be determined. The value of BOD(5)/COD (ratio of 5d biochemical oxygen demand to chemical oxygen demand) increased from 0.008 to 0.467 indicating a significant improvement of biodegradability for the solution, which is beneficial for the further biological treatment of the wastewater.

  13. Effect of air pollution on athlete health and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundell, Kenneth William

    2012-05-01

    Unfavourable effects on the respiratory and the cardiovascular systems from short-term and long-term inhalation of air pollution are well documented. Exposure to freshly generated mixed combustion emissions such as those observed in proximity to roadways with high volumes of traffic and those from ice-resurfacing equipment are of particular concern. This is because there is a greater toxicity from freshly generated whole exhaust than from its component parts. The particles released from emissions are considered to cause oxidative damage and inflammation in the airways and the vascular system, and may be related to decreased exercise performance. However, few studies have examined this aspect. Several papers describe deleterious effects on health from chronic and acute air pollution exposure. However, there has been no research into the effects of long-term exposure to air pollution on athletic performance and a paucity of studies that describe the effects of acute exposure on exercise performance. The current knowledge of exercising in the high-pollution environment and the consequences that it may have on athlete performance are reviewed.

  14. Climate Change and Air Pollution: Effects on Respiratory Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amato, Gennaro; Pawankar, Ruby; Vitale, Carolina; Lanza, Maurizia; Molino, Antonio; Stanziola, Anna; Sanduzzi, Alessandro; Vatrella, Alessandro; D'Amato, Maria

    2016-09-01

    A body of evidence suggests that major changes involving the atmosphere and the climate, including global warming induced by anthropogenic factors, have impact on the biosphere and human environment. Studies on the effects of climate change on respiratory allergy are still lacking and current knowledge is provided by epidemiological and experimental studies on the relationship between allergic respiratory diseases, asthma and environmental factors, such as meteorological variables, airborne allergens, and air pollution. Urbanization with its high levels of vehicle emissions, and a westernized lifestyle are linked to the rising frequency of respiratory allergic diseases and bronchial asthma observed over recent decades in most industrialized countries. However, it is not easy to evaluate the impact of climate changes and air pollution on the prevalence of asthma in the general population and on the timing of asthma exacerbations, although the global rise in asthma prevalence and severity could also be an effect of air pollution and climate change. Since airborne allergens and air pollutants are frequently increased contemporaneously in the atmosphere, an enhanced IgE-mediated response to aeroallergens and enhanced airway inflammation could account for the increasing frequency of respiratory allergy and asthma in atopic subjects in the last 5 decades. Pollen allergy is frequently used to study the relationship between air pollution and respiratory allergic diseases, such as rhinitis and bronchial asthma. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that urbanization, high levels of vehicle emissions, and westernized lifestyle are correlated with an increased frequency of respiratory allergy prevalently in people who live in urban areas in comparison with people living in rural areas. Climatic factors (temperature, wind speed, humidity, thunderstorms, etc.) can affect both components (biological and chemical) of this interaction.

  15. Effect of high pressure treatment on liquid whole egg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Csaba; Dalmadi, István; Mráz, Balázs; Friedrich, László; Zeke, Ildikó; Juhász, Réka; Suhajda, Ágnes; Balla, Csaba

    2012-06-01

    In our tests, we artificially infected liquid whole egg samples with Salmonella enteritidis, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, and then treated the samples in "Food Lab900" high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) instrument for 3-17 min at 200-400 MPa. Subsequently, the change of the viable cell count of the specific bacteria has been tested. In addition to the samples infected with various bacteria, non-infected samples were also treated in each test and the change in viable cell count, colour and viscosity of the samples upon the effect of the treatment. In summary, it can be concluded that in each test of our investigations, the viable cell count of S. enteritidis critical for egg products is reduced significantly, while the reduction of the total viable cell count was around two magnitudes. Additionally, based on our results, microbial destruction, reduction of enthalpy (denaturation of egg white) caused by the treatment at HPP, and colour change are primarily affected by the pressure level, while the changes in rheological properties are also significantly affected by the duration of high pressure treatment (p<0.05).

  16. Fe Analysis of Effect of Tyre Overload and Inflation Pressure on Rolling Loss in Cars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyadari Ramesh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Rolling loss or rolling resistance is an ever important property for the tyre and automotive industries because of its practical implication. Fuel consumption and tyre rolling loss in all types of automobiles have become increasingly important because of adverse environmental effects (air pollution and global warming and economic costs (high petroleum price. In this thesis, the effect of rolling resistance and overload on fuel consumption of automobile car tyres is discussed. The investigations are made on two tyre models of automobile cars Skoda Rapid and Ford Classic. Theoretical calculations are also done to determine the rolling resistance due to inflation pressure. The default weight is considered for 5 persons and also the tyre overload is considered by taking 6 and 7 people’s weight.

  17. Effect of the aggregate grading on the concrete air permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argiz, C.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Great durability problems are being found in concrete structures related to the penetrability of aggressive agents through the concrete (ie. chloride penetration, sulphate attack, carbonation, freezing and thawing, and so on. Air permeability coefficient is used as an effective tool to estimate the potential durability of concrete structures due to its direct relation with the microstructure and the moisture content. This paper discusses the effect of the aggregate grading and water/cement ratio on the air permeability coefficient. An aggregate grading with more sand than coarse aggregates has resulted more beneficial from the point of view of concrete air permeability. This fact can be attributed to a denser skeleton formed by the finer aggregates. With fine aggregates, the higher water/cement ratio, the lower air permeability. However, the contrary was found with coarse aggregates. Overall, a temperature increase from 20 °C to 60 °C during preconditioning led to a Dair increase of 40–80%.Se han encontrado una gran cantidad de problemas de durabilidad de estructuras de hormigón relacionados con la penetración de agentes agresivos externos (es decir, penetración de cloruros, ataque por sulfatos, carbonatación, hielo-deshielo, etc.. El coeficiente de permeabilidad al aire se utiliza como una herramienta eficaz para estimar la durabilidad potencial de las estructuras de hormigón debido a su relación directa con su microestructura y contenido de humedad. Se discute el efecto de la gradación de los áridos y relación agua/cemento en el coeficiente de permeabilidad al aire. Con áridos más finos que gruesos, el resultado es más beneficioso, lo que se atribuye a que la arena forma un esqueleto más denso. Con áridos más finos, al aumentar la relación agua/cemento, disminuye la permeabilidad al aire; pero con áridos más gruesos se ha observado lo contrario. Cuando se pre-acondiciona de 20 °C a 60 °C, se produce un aumento del Dair

  18. Effect of low emission sources on air quality in Cracow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedoma, J. [EKOPOL Environmental Engineering Studies and Design Office, Co. Ltd., Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents calculation of power engineering low emission and results of stimulation of the effect of this emission on air quality in Cracow, Poland. It has been stated that the segment of low emission in central areas of the town makes up ca. 40% of the observed concentration of sulfur dioxide. Furthermore it has been stated that the capital investment must be concentrated in the central part of the town in order to reach noticeable improvement of air quality in Cracow. Neither the output of a separate power source nor the emission level and its individual harmful effect, but the location of the source and especially packing density of the sources must decide the priority of upgrading actions.

  19. Effectiveness of national air pollution control policies on the air quality in metropolitan areas of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuxiao; Xing, Jia; Zhao, Bin; Jang, Carey; Hao, Jiming

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effectiveness of national air pollution controls is important for control policy design to improve the future air quality in China. This study evaluated the effectiveness of major national control policies implemented recently in China through a modeling analysis. The sulfur dioxide (SO2) control policy during the 11th Five Year Plan period (2006-2010) had succeeded in reducing the national SO2 emission in 2010 by 14% from its 2005 level, which correspondingly reduced ambient SO2 and sulfate (SO4(2-)) concentrations by 13%-15% and 8%-10% respectively over east China. The nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) control policy during the 12th Five Year Plan period (2011-2015) targets the reduction of the national NO(x) emission in 2015 by 10% on the basis of 2010. The simulation results suggest that such a reduction in NO(x) emission will reduce the ambient nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrate (NO3(-)), 1-hr maxima ozone (O3) concentrations and total nitrogen deposition by 8%, 3%-14%, 2% and 2%-4%, respectively over east China. The application of new emission standards for power plants will further reduce the NO2, NO3(-), 1-hr maxima O(3 concentrations and total nitrogen deposition by 2%-4%, 1%-6%, 0-2% and 1%-2%, respectively. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the inter-provincial impacts of emission reduction in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei and the Yangtze River Delta, which indicated the need to implement joint regional air pollution control.

  20. A total pressure-saturation formulation of two-phase flow incorporating dynamic effects in the capillary-pressure-saturation relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahle, H.K.; Celia, M.A.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; Karlsen, K.H.

    2002-07-01

    preliminary assessment was made regarding the magnitude of the proportionality coefficient in the dynamic equation, identifying ranges that produce significant modification to infiltration results. While the work presented by Hassanizadeh et al. provides a foundation for this problem, it only co considered the specific case of flow in unsaturated soils, under the assumption that the air phase remains at essentially atmospheric pressure everywhere in the domain. In the present work, we expand this earlier work to include the general two-phase flow case, using a fractional flow formulation for the governing equations. Into these equations are embedded the dynamic capillary pressure terms. The equations are then written in dimensionless form, and a brief discussion of the mathematical properties of the enhanced governing equations is presented. A numerical algorithm for their solution is given, and a numerical simulation is presented to demonstrate the effects of the dynamic terms. Finally the implication of these results is discussed, and a few comments on future directions for research are given.