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Sample records for ainse radiation chemistry

  1. 13th AINSE radiation chemistry conference, 12-14 November 1986, Lucas Heights - AINSE Theatre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of papers are given which cover the fields of radiolysis in aqueous solutions, solids and gases, radiation polymerisation and degradation, excitation in solids and gases, and industrial applications of radiation chemistry

  2. AINSE conference on radiation biology and chemistry. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference handbook contains 60 oral and poster presentations dealing with recent advances in radiation chemistry applied to biological studies, radiopharmaceuticals, radiosensitizers as well as to solid state chemical physics

  3. AINSE conference on radiation biology and chemistry. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The conference handbook contains 60 oral and poster presentations dealing with recent advances in radiation chemistry applied to biological studies, radiopharmaceuticals, radiosensitizers as well as to solid state chemical physics.

  4. Radiation research in AINSE-affiliated universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) has enabled research workers from its member universities to make extensive use of the (sometimes unique) radiation facilities at Lucas Heights. This has resulted in a better understanding of the action of gamma, X-ray and electron beam radiation on physical, chemical and biological systems, and of the radical and excited species which are produced. A selection of the ensuing first class publications is described. Over the years the emphasis has changed from the obtaining of a fundamental understanding of the science and the refining of the techniques to utilising these in attacking problems in other fields. Examples are given of the use of radiation chemistry techniques in metal-organic, polymer, excited state and biological chemistry. In radiation biology, the early emphasis on genetics and on the production of chromosomal aberrations by radiation has given way to molecular biology and cancer treatment studies. In all of this, AAEC/ANSTO and CSIRO have played major roles. In addition, AINSE has organised a continuing series of specialist conferences which has facilitated interaction between research groups within the universities and involved other investigators in Australia, New Zealand and the rest of the world

  5. Radiation research in AINSE-affiliated universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangster, D. R. [Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). School of Chemistry

    1997-12-31

    The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) has enabled research workers from its member universities to make extensive use of the (sometimes unique) radiation facilities at Lucas Heights. This has resulted in a better understanding of the action of gamma, X-ray and electron beam radiation on physical, chemical and biological systems, and of the radical and excited species which are produced. A selection of the ensuing first class publications is described. Over the years the emphasis has changed from the obtaining of a fundamental understanding of the science and the refining of the techniques to utilising these in attacking problems in other fields. Examples are given of the use of radiation chemistry techniques in metal-organic, polymer, excited state and biological chemistry. In radiation biology, the early emphasis on genetics and on the production of chromosomal aberrations by radiation has given way to molecular biology and cancer treatment studies. In all of this, AAEC/ANSTO and CSIRO have played major roles. In addition, AINSE has organised a continuing series of specialist conferences which has facilitated interaction between research groups within the universities and involved other investigators in Australia, New Zealand and the rest of the world. 27 refs.

  6. AINSE`s 40th anniversary conference. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    Highlights of 40 years of activity of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) were the main focus of this conference. Topics covered include nuclear physics, plasma physics, radiation chemistry, radiation biology, neutron diffraction, nuclear techniques of analysis and other relevant aspects of nuclear science and technology. The conference handbook contains the summaries of the 78 papers and posters presented and the list of participants

  7. AINSE's 40th anniversary conference. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of 40 years of activity of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) were the main focus of this conference. Topics covered include nuclear physics, plasma physics, radiation chemistry, radiation biology, neutron diffraction, nuclear techniques of analysis and other relevant aspects of nuclear science and technology. The conference handbook contains the summaries of the 78 papers and posters presented and the list of participants

  8. 13th AINSE radiation biology conference: conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The forty one papers presented at this conference covered the areas of radiation induced lesions, apoptosis, genetics and radiobiological consequences of low level radiation exposure, clinical applications of radiation, mammalian cells radiosensitivity and radiation-activated proteins

  9. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    was found to be ∼0.3mm. DISCUSSION and CONCLUSIONS: The use of transmitted dose maps, instead of EPID raw pixel values, is not only able to detect the slight MLC shifts and uncertainties, but also is able to predict the amount of the variation of the delivered dose to the surrounding tissues that are to be protected during the radiation course. The simplicity, accuracy, efficiency and additional information about delivered dose are the advantages of this technique

  10. Radiation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  11. AINSE - The years between 1988 and 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This paper traces the history of AINSE between the years 1988 and 1998. It was a time of great change for AINSE. At the beginning of this period the Government implemented major structural reforms of the higher education system and new mechanisms for research infrastructure support followed a year later. This culminated in 1993 with a major restructuring of AINSE which had continued with little change since its inception in 1958. This was followed in 1994 with a comprehensive review and reorganisation of ANSTO, which also had a significant effect on AINSE. These events will be described and will include some of AINSE, considerable achievements and successes which saw the organisation, in partnership with ANSTO, in a strong position at the end of this ten year period

  12. Radiation chemistry of oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : Primary investigations have been conducted at the end of the 1950th years in the area of radiation chemistry of the oils, the physical-chemical properties of crude oil have been investigated the influence of ionizing rays. This report by M. Malikzadeh is about the results of investigations carried out in the field of development of radiation chemistry. The power of the radiation dose and temperature-thermal effect of the collapse of Phentadekan -Oil, and oil fractions (200-400 degrees Celsium, 230-310 degrees Celsium) of radiation-thermal separation of olefins - Conversion of hydrogen from the transormation of black oil, bitumen and tar Kinetics of the above-mentioned processes was studied, the technical-economic indicators of the products were determined

  13. An historical review and perspective of AINSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ophel, T.R. [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, (Australia). Department of Nuclear Physics

    1998-12-31

    Full text: ANSTO was formed in 1958 as a cooperative venture of modest scope, involving the newly established AAEC (created by the Atomic Energy Act of 1953 with facilities at Lucas Heights being formally opened in 1955) and the eight universities that existed at the time. Research emphasis was very much nuclear, with the two reactors MOATA and HIFAR and possible future nuclear energy developments defining it. Two accelerators, added in the early sixties - the 3 MV Van de Graaff and the 1.3 MV electron machine, were to sustain those original activities of the AAEC. It would probably be true to say that AINSE in those early days placed much importance on the general support of nuclear science throughout Australia, whereas now of course the facilitation of the use of ANSTO facilities has become the main function. Thereafter, both AINSE and the AAEC have undergone dramatic change. The number of universities expanded to 19 in the late sixties, along with more support and encouragement for research at both the new institutions and the original group of eight. University use of Lucas Heights facilities, through the agency of AINSE, expanded and began to diversify somewhat into other disciplines - a trend that has continued apace ever since. In the nineties, the Dawkins revolution led to a doubling of the number of tertiary institutions, so that once again AINSE experienced a quantum jump in size, with of course matching complexity. In parallel, AAEC broadened its activities to embrace a wide range of nuclear and energy related areas, though basic research began to taper off. Finally, the organization was given a new charter in 1985 and re-named ANSTO. A much expanded university system, the `new` ANSTO, the rise of economic rationalism and the creation of the Australian Research Council have combined to provide a succession of challenges to AINSE. From the original small, club-like beginning with narrow interests, AINSE has emerged with more than a four-fold increase in

  14. 15th AINSE radiation chemistry conference, 5-7 November, 1990: conference handbook (programme, abstracts and general information)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference was held in association with the Polymer Division of the Royal Chemical Institute. The handbook includes abstracts of 40 papers from which 37 have been separately indexed. Three items were considered to be outside of the subject scope of INIS

  15. The radiation chemistry of macromolecules

    CERN Document Server

    1973-01-01

    The Radiation Chemistry of Macromolecules, Volume II is a collection of papers that discusses radiation chemistry of specific systems. Part 1 deals with radiation chemistry of substituted vinyl polymers, particularly polypropylene (PP) as its structure is intermediate between polyethylene and polyisobutylene. This part also discusses polypropylene oxide (PPOx) for it can be prepared in the atactic, isotactic, and optically active forms. One paper focuses on the fundamental chemical processes and the changes in physical properties that give rise to many different applications of polystyrene. An

  16. Radiation Chemistry Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1973-12-31

    The know how'' for the manufacture of gas chromatographic accessories such as the T. C. detector, E. C. detector, pyrolyzer and gas sampling valve was released to industry. An automatic preparative gas chromatograph working on repeat cycle principle was designed and fabricated. The instrument can be programmed to automatically inject the sample and collect any five separated components. A portable hydrogen monitor was developed for the Defence Ministry. In order to produce biodegradable detergents through the hydrolysis of alkyl sulfonylchloride, a hydrocarbon mixture was sulfochlorinated under the influence of gamma -radiation in 5 kg lots, in PANBIT facility. The results were quite encouraging. Terylene fibers and cloth have been grafted with acrylic acid under radiation and the resulting products have shown remarkably good dyeing properties and moisture uptake. An interesting observation was made in the case of radiation damage caused by iodine or bromine undergoing nuclear reactions of the type (n, 2n), (I. T.) and BETA -decay wherein the scavenger 12 or Br/sub 2/ consumption has been estimated per nuclear event. The results show that except in the case of BETA -decay, a surprisingly large number ( approximates 10/sup delta ) of molecules of the scavenger are consumed per nuclear event. In the field of ion exchange studies, the thermodynamic theory of ion exchange equilibria in nonaqueous solvents reported previously was experimentally verified for the first time. The change of medium from water to water-methanol mixture in lithium isotope studies in ion exchange equilibria resulted in a reversal of the isotope effect. Transport, activation, and redeposition of corrosion products in the recirculation and the clean-up loop systems of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station was hindering the regular and shut down maintenance jobs. In order to examine the possibility of chemical decontamination both laboratory and on-site experiments were carried out in

  17. Nuclear research in the tertiary sector: the role of AINSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering is a national organisation with a 45 year track record of collaboration and facilitation of the interaction of universities and one of the major Publicly Funded Research Agencies, ANSTO. AINSE supports research and training in fields that utilise the techniques and instrumentation of nuclear physics. AINSE currently has 37 Australian university members as well as the University of Auckland and the New Zealand Institute for Geological and Nuclear Sciences. Income is primarily obtained from members in the form of membership fees, ANSTO and a Commonwealth government contribution (also paid through ANSTO). Each university pays in proportion to the benefit received and the aggregate university augmented by equal contributions from ANSTO and the Federal Government (through ANSTO). This is seen as an essential element of this model which allows individual researchers to access the facilities irrespective of any funding from other major funding bodies. The replacement reactor for HIFAR will bring further impetus to AINSE collaborations with ANSTO. The new Tandetron accelerator that will come on-line this year is another collaborative AINSE initiative with ANSTO. Its use as an accelerator mass-spectrometer will provide a state-of-the art facility for dating and general ion-beam analysis experiments. AINSE supports research projects over a very wide range of disciplines, ranging from biomedical science/biotechnology, environmental science, material properties and engineering, archaeology and geosciences to material structure and dynamics. AINSE currently supports over 200 active projects

  18. Radiation chemistry of ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionic liquids are expected as a replacement of processing media for the nuclear fuel cycle. Therefore, an understanding of the interactions of ionizing radiations and photons with ionic liquids is strongly needed. However, the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids is still a relatively unexplored topic although there has been a significant increase in the number of researchers in the field recently. (author)

  19. Polymer radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reviews some of the work carried out in the Polymer and Radiation Group at the University of Queensland over the past ten years. The objective of the work has been to investigate the relationships between polymer structure and sensitivity towards high energy radiation, including 60Co gamma radiation, electron beams and UV radiation. A range of synthetic polymers containing carboxyl groups, acrylate groups, sulfone groups, amide linkages and aromatic residues have been investigated. (author). 18 refs, 2 figs, 4 tabs

  20. Radiation chemistry of heavy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical aspects of the energy deposit of fast particles in matter initiate chemical effects which are merged with the early physical processes. Here only radiation chemistry and its relationship to the initial energy deposit are of concern. The primary objective of our track studies is, however, application to biology. In the radiolytic decomposition of water energy is absorbed almost exclusively in water, and the principal chemistry is that of radiation decomposition of water. The track structure in water is expected to be virtually the same as that in a biological system. The study of radiation chemistry of dilute solutions, therefore, provides another method to investigate the structure of tracks as they are likely to be present in an irradiated biological system but at times much longer than they are accessible to purely physical measurements

  1. Chitosan and radiation chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.

    2010-03-01

    Chitosan as a raw material with special properties has drawn attention of scientists working in the field of radiation processing and natural polymer products development, and also of specialists working in the field of radiation protection and oncologists. Especially the applications concern reduced molecular weight chitosan which still retain its chemical structure; such form of the compound is fostering biological, physical and chemical reactivity of the product. Chitosan degrades into fragments under γ-ray or electron beam irradiation. Antibacterial properties of the product are applied in manufacturing hydrogel for wound dressing and additional healing properties can be achieved by incorporating in the hydrogel matrix chitosan bonded silver clusters. Another possible application of chitosan is in reducing radiation damage to the radiation workers or radiation cured patients. In the case of radioisotopes oral or respiratory chitosan-based materials can be applied as chelators. Applications of chitosan in oncology are also reported.

  2. Chitosan and radiation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G., E-mail: a.chmielewski@ichtj.waw.p [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-03-15

    Chitosan as a raw material with special properties has drawn attention of scientists working in the field of radiation processing and natural polymer products development, and also of specialists working in the field of radiation protection and oncologists. Especially the applications concern reduced molecular weight chitosan which still retain its chemical structure; such form of the compound is fostering biological, physical and chemical reactivity of the product. Chitosan degrades into fragments under gamma-ray or electron beam irradiation. Antibacterial properties of the product are applied in manufacturing hydrogel for wound dressing and additional healing properties can be achieved by incorporating in the hydrogel matrix chitosan bonded silver clusters. Another possible application of chitosan is in reducing radiation damage to the radiation workers or radiation cured patients. In the case of radioisotopes oral or respiratory chitosan-based materials can be applied as chelators. Applications of chitosan in oncology are also reported.

  3. Chitosan and radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitosan as a raw material with special properties has drawn attention of scientists working in the field of radiation processing and natural polymer products development, and also of specialists working in the field of radiation protection and oncologists. Especially the applications concern reduced molecular weight chitosan which still retain its chemical structure; such form of the compound is fostering biological, physical and chemical reactivity of the product. Chitosan degrades into fragments under γ-ray or electron beam irradiation. Antibacterial properties of the product are applied in manufacturing hydrogel for wound dressing and additional healing properties can be achieved by incorporating in the hydrogel matrix chitosan bonded silver clusters. Another possible application of chitosan is in reducing radiation damage to the radiation workers or radiation cured patients. In the case of radioisotopes oral or respiratory chitosan-based materials can be applied as chelators. Applications of chitosan in oncology are also reported.

  4. Radiation chemistry of biopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies have been made on biopolymers in the solid state (direct effect) and in dilute aqueous solution (indirect effect). In vivo the state of biopolymers lies somewhere between fluid and solid, and to understand the radiation effects, one must interpolate between the two extremes. Evidence is quite strong that hydroxyl radicals are involved in mammalian and bacterial cell killing. The structure of DNA and many proteins is now clearly defined. With this knowledge and with the development of fast reaction techniques, the sites of reaction of the primary aqueous radicals and the reaction mechanisms in these biopolymers are well understood. The identification of the radiation products has been hampered by lack of sensitive analytical methodologies. Recent developments in analytical techniques, such as capillary gas chromatography (GC), mass spectrometry (MS), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), have provided means of monitoring small changes in amino acids and DNA bases, and of detecting radiation products formed in low yields. The focus of this chapter is indirect effects of the primary aqueous radicals in forming organic radicals in biopolymers and on the mechanisms of termination of these radicals to produce damage and radiation products

  5. Radiation chemistry and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rather strong and many-sided pollution of the environment (atmosphere, water resources, soil) as a consequence of human activities is summarized. The solution of the arised problems by application of radiation chemistry methods and the utilization of modern environmentally ''clean'' and economical technologies, founded on electron beam processing, are mentioned. Some basic environmental problems and their solution are briefly discussed: i) Removal of CO2 from flue gases and its radiation induced utilization. ii) Principals for degradation of aqueous pollutants by electron beam processing in the presence of ozone (synergistic effect). The radiation chemistry as a modern and manifold discipline with very broad applications can also essentially contribute in the conservation of the environment

  6. Radiation chemistry research using PULAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Parimal; Priyadarsini, K. I.; Rao, B. S. M.

    2008-10-01

    The details of the recently installed 7 MeV Pune University LINAC Facility (PULAF) coupled with the optical absorption technique for pulse radiolysis studies at the National Centre for Free Radical Research, Department of Chemistry, University of Pune, Pune, India are described. The facility has a selection of electron pulse widths in the range 10 ns-3 μs with corresponding doses of about 5-144 Gy per pulse. The operation of the machine and the detection system are fully automated. Several researchers from various Indian universities and national laboratories use the PULAF and some of the projects that are currently undertaken by our group and others include the radiation chemistry of indole and chalcone derivatives, herbal antioxidants, structure-reactivity studies in cinnamates, redox chemistry of inorganic metal complexes, studies on oxidation of pyrimidine analogues and aromatic sulphur compounds. Some of them are briefly discussed here.

  7. Radiation chemistry research using PULAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaikwad, Parimal [National Centre for Free Radical Research, Department of Chemistry, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Priyadarsini, K.I. [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Rao, B.S.M. [National Centre for Free Radical Research, Department of Chemistry, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)], E-mail: bsmr@chem.unipune.ernet.in

    2008-10-15

    The details of the recently installed 7 MeV Pune University LINAC Facility (PULAF) coupled with the optical absorption technique for pulse radiolysis studies at the National Centre for Free Radical Research, Department of Chemistry, University of Pune, Pune, India are described. The facility has a selection of electron pulse widths in the range 10 ns-3 {mu}s with corresponding doses of about 5-144 Gy per pulse. The operation of the machine and the detection system are fully automated. Several researchers from various Indian universities and national laboratories use the PULAF and some of the projects that are currently undertaken by our group and others include the radiation chemistry of indole and chalcone derivatives, herbal antioxidants, structure-reactivity studies in cinnamates, redox chemistry of inorganic metal complexes, studies on oxidation of pyrimidine analogues and aromatic sulphur compounds. Some of them are briefly discussed here.

  8. Nitrogen Compounds in Radiation Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water radiolysis in presence of N2 is probably the topic the most controversy in the field of water radiolysis. It still exists a strong discrepancy between the different reports of ammonia formation by water radiolysis in presence of N2 and moreover in absence of oxygen there is no agreement on the formation or not of nitrogen oxide like NO2- and NO3-. These discrepancies come from multiple sources: - the complexity of the reaction mechanisms where nitrogen is involved - the experimental difficulties - and, the irradiation conditions. The aim of the workshop is to capitalize the knowledge needed to go further in simulations and understanding the problems caused (or not) by the presence of nitrogen / water in the environment of radioactive materials. Implications are evident in terms of corrosion, understanding of biological systems and atmospheric chemistry under radiation. Topics covered include experimental and theoretical approaches, application and fundamental researches: - Nitrate and Ammonia in radiation chemistry in nuclear cycle; - NOx in biological systems and atmospheric chemistry; - Formation of Nitrogen compounds in Nuclear installations; - Nitrogen in future power plant projects (Gen4, ITER...) and large particle accelerators. This document gathers the transparencies available for 7 of the presentations given at this workshop. These are: - H.E SIMS: 'Radiation Chemistry of Nitrogen Compounds in Nuclear Power Plant'; - G.R. DEY: 'Nitrogen Compounds Formation in the Radiolysis of Aqueous Solutions'; - C.E. VAUDEY et al.: 'Radiolytic corrosion of nuclear graphite studied with the dedicated gas irradiation cell of IPNL'; - J.L. BOUCHER: 'Roles and biosynthesis of NO in eukaryotes and prokaryotes'; - W.H. KOPPENOL: 'Chemistry of NOx'; - E. JANATA: 'Yield of OH in N2O saturated aqueous solution'; - V. DAUVOIS: 'Analytical strategy for the study of radiolysis gases'

  9. Nitrogen Compounds in Radiation Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, H.E. [NNL Sellafield (United Kingdom); Dey, G.R. [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Vaudey, C.E.; Peaucelle, C. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon - IPNL, 69 - Lyon (France); Boucher, J.L. [Lab. de Chimie et Biochimie Pharmacologiques et Toxicologiques, UMR 8601 CNRS 45 rue des Saints Peres, 75270 Paris cedex 06, Univ Paris 5, 75 (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (France); Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique CEA/DEN, Centre de Saclay (France); Bererd, N. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (France); IUT Departement Chimie, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1 (France); Koppenol, W.H. [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Janata, E. [Helmholtz-Zentrum fuer Materialien und Energie, Solar Energy Research, Berlin (Germany); Dauvois, V.; Durand, D.; Legand, S.; Roujou, J.L.; Doizi, D.; Dannoux, A.; Lamouroux, C. [Laboratoire de Speciation des Radionucleides et des Molecules, DEN/DPC/Service d' Etude du Comportement des Radionucleides, CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur yvette (France)

    2009-07-01

    Water radiolysis in presence of N{sub 2} is probably the topic the most controversy in the field of water radiolysis. It still exists a strong discrepancy between the different reports of ammonia formation by water radiolysis in presence of N{sub 2} and moreover in absence of oxygen there is no agreement on the formation or not of nitrogen oxide like NO{sub 2}- and NO{sub 3}-. These discrepancies come from multiple sources: - the complexity of the reaction mechanisms where nitrogen is involved - the experimental difficulties - and, the irradiation conditions. The aim of the workshop is to capitalize the knowledge needed to go further in simulations and understanding the problems caused (or not) by the presence of nitrogen / water in the environment of radioactive materials. Implications are evident in terms of corrosion, understanding of biological systems and atmospheric chemistry under radiation. Topics covered include experimental and theoretical approaches, application and fundamental researches: - Nitrate and Ammonia in radiation chemistry in nuclear cycle; - NOx in biological systems and atmospheric chemistry; - Formation of Nitrogen compounds in Nuclear installations; - Nitrogen in future power plant projects (Gen4, ITER...) and large particle accelerators. This document gathers the transparencies available for 7 of the presentations given at this workshop. These are: - H.E SIMS: 'Radiation Chemistry of Nitrogen Compounds in Nuclear Power Plant'; - G.R. DEY: 'Nitrogen Compounds Formation in the Radiolysis of Aqueous Solutions'; - C.E. VAUDEY et al.: 'Radiolytic corrosion of nuclear graphite studied with the dedicated gas irradiation cell of IPNL'; - J.L. BOUCHER: 'Roles and biosynthesis of NO in eukaryotes and prokaryotes'; - W.H. KOPPENOL: 'Chemistry of NOx'; - E. JANATA: 'Yield of OH in N{sub 2}O saturated aqueous solution'; - V. DAUVOIS: 'Analytical strategy for the study of radiolysis gases'

  10. 10th AINSE-ANBUG Neutron Scattering Symposium (AANSS) 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This year sees the AINSE/ANBUG Neutron Scattering Symposium reach its tenth anniversary. It seems appropriate that this landmark occurs in the same year that the OPAL reactor reaches its fifth year in operation and allows the Australian neutron scattering community an opportunity to reflect on the remarkable achievements that have been made possible using the world-class facilities that we are so fortunate to have on our doorstep. The AANSS meetings are unique on the annual conference calendar. Rather than focus on a specific scientific discipline, these meetings highlight the diversity of science that can be carried out by firing neutral, sub-atomic particles at 'things'. It is the assortment of 'things' that we all place in the path of neutron beams that adds variety to these meetings and greatly broadens our appreciation of the techniques at our disposal. Talks this year cover topics from welding stress to electromagnons and from membrane fluidity to gas-storing materials. The meeting ensures that there is something for everyone but also allows us to explore areas with which we are much less familiar and broaden our horizons. As has now become normal for this meeting, the sessions are divided into distinct themes: Contrast for Biology, Materials - Oxides, Polymer and Self-Assembly, Chemistry, Biological Membranes, Instrument Concepts, Condensed Matter, Materials — Stress and Strain and Beamline Updates. The meeting also includes the award of the ANBUG prize and the ANBUG AGM which all members are encouraged to attend. The meeting encompasses a range of presenters from those who are well-established in the Australian (and global) neutron scattering community to students and ECRs who are just beginning their careers. What all of these talks and posters have in common is that they highlight excellent scientific achievements that have primarily resulted from OPAL and showcase the wide array of neutron scattering techniques and applications.

  11. Radiation applications of physical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many chemical energy problems have a physical chemistry nature connected with chemical kinetics and thermodynamics. In our country, the development in this field is associated with the name N.N. Semenov, who was involved in a large number of fundamental and applied physical chemistry problems.Energy development during the last decades created or sharpened new problems. Our new Institute, the Institute of Energy problems of Chemical Physics, USSR Academy of Sciences, is dealing with some of them. The present article is an overview of our work on radiation applications. Examples of the use of radiation in power industry (such as coal gasification), tire production, mechanical joints, metal powder production and sterilization of pharmaceutical products are given. Methods and problems involved in these applications are discussed and the great potential for vast utilization is demonstrated. (authors)

  12. Radiation chemistry and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years considerable progress has been made in understanding the fundamental chemical reactions that occur when materials are irradiated. This has followed from the development of new techniques for studying these reactions. The International Atomic Energy Agency held a Panel on Radiation Chemistry in Vienna on 17-21 April 1967, to review the current status of various sources, new techniques in radiation chemistry, and their applications. The main sources mentioned by the Panel were isotope sources, electron accelerators, and chemonuclear reactors. Among the basic techniques discussed were pulsed radiolysis, flash photolysis, fast ESR methods, irradiation at liquid helium temperatures, electric discharge methods and far ultra-violet methods. Interesting industrial applications were discussed, such as the development of wood-plastic combinations, and a paper was given on the curing of paints and thin films Refs, figs and tabs

  13. New trends and developments in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation chemistry is a branch of chemistry that studies chemical transformations in materials exposed to high-energy radiations. It uses radiation as the initiator of chemical reactions. Practical applications of radiation chemistry today extend to many fields, including health care, food and agriculture, manufacturing, industrial pollution abatement, biotechnology and telecommunications. The important advantage of radiation chemistry lies in its ability to be used to produce, and study, almost any reactive atomic and molecular species playing a part in chemical reactions, synthesis, industrial processes, or in biological systems. The techniques are applicable to gaseous, liquid, solid, and heterogeneous systems. By combining different techniques of radiation chemistry with analytical chemistry, the reaction mechanism and kinetics of chemical reactions are studied. In November 1988 in Bologna, Italy, the IAEA convened an advisory group meeting to assess new trends and developments in radiation chemistry. The present publication includes most of the contributions presented at the meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. 20. AINSE plasma science and technology conference. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 20th AINSE plasma science and technology conference was held at Flinders University of South Australia on 13-14 February 1995. Topics under discussion included plasma physics studies, current status of rotamak devices, plasma processing and material studies. The handbook contains the conference program, 54 abstracts and a list of participants

  15. 20. AINSE plasma science and technology conference. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The 20th AINSE plasma science and technology conference was held at Flinders University of South Australia on 13-14 February 1995. Topics under discussion included plasma physics studies, current status of rotamak devices, plasma processing and material studies. The handbook contains the conference program, 54 abstracts and a list of participants.

  16. Scientific projection paper for radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Together with radiation physics, an understanding of radiation chemistry is necessary for full appreciation of biological effects of high and low energy radiations, and for the development of prophylactic, therapeutic and potentiating methods and techniques in biological organisms. Areas covered in some detail in this report include: the early chemical events involved in the deposition of radiation energy; the kinetics of free radical and excited state reactions; the application of radiation chemistry to radiation biology; and the availability of instrumentation

  17. 8th 'Tihany' Symposium on Radiation Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several aspects of radiation chemistry and radiation effects on various substances have been treated at the meeting, short communications of papers are presented in this publication. All items within the scope of INIS database were indexed individually

  18. AINSE's role in tertiary sector applied nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) is a collaboration between the Universities and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). Its aim is to foster research and training in areas associated with the applications of Nuclear Science and allied techniques. AINSE is now into the fifth decade of this unique association and in 2001 can claim the active membership of thirty-six of the publicly funded Universities in Australia plus the University of Auckland and its NZ government partner the Institute for Geological and Nuclear Sciences (IGNS). The widespread membership has brought with it a breadth of research areas and the traditional domains of fundamental nuclear science and allied engineering have found that they are now the stable platforms from which are launched environmental, archaeological, biomedical and novel-materials science. ANSTO's fifth decade will see the replacement of HIFAR with a state of the art research reactor that will bring biological applications to a sharper focus. A new accelerator-mass spectrometer will be commissioned during 2002 and is funded, in part, by a $1 M RIEF grant which itself recognises the quality and track record of all AINSE members' research. It will significantly assist a wide range of dating applications and also provide support to ion beam analysis (IBA) experiments. AINSE will continue to aid community collaboration with its conferences, workshops and participation in national conferences such as the AIP Congress, Vacuum Society, etc. On the international scene it is actively participating in major conferences to be held in Australia. The winter school is a venture into the undergraduate sphere

  19. Advanced radiation chemistry research: Current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation chemistry is a branch of chemistry that studies chemical transformations in materials exposed to high-energy radiations. It is based on the use of ionizing radiation as the initiator or catalyst in chemical reactions. The most significant advantage of radiation chemistry lies in its ability to be used in the production and study of almost any reactive atomic and molecular species playing a part in chemical reaction, synthesis, industrial processes, or in biological systems. Over the the last few years a number of meetings have taken place, under the auspices of the IAEA, in order to evaluate recent developments in radiation chemistry as well as the trends indicated by the results obtained. Radiation chemists from different countries have participated at these meetings. The present publication, a companion to the previous publication - New Trends and Development in Radiation Chemistry, IAEA-TECDOC-527 (1989) - includes some of the important contributions presented at these meetings. It is hoped that it will provide a useful overview of current activities and of emerging trends in this field, thus promoting better understanding of potential contributions of radiation chemistry to other fields of knowledge as well as to practical applications in industry, medicine and agriculture. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Introduction to radiation chemistry of polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topics briefly discussed are 1. What are radiation chemistry 2. Type of ionising radiation 3. gamma rays versus electron beam 4. Interaction of radiation with matters 5. What is polymers 6. Techniques of crosslinking 7. Crosslinking of polymers i.e. polyethylene, ethylene copolymer, polypropylene, polyamides, polyvinyl chloride, natural rubber

  1. International meeting on radiation chemistry and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference heard 76 papers; the abstracts of 74 of them were inputted in INIS. They deal with the basic principles and mechanisms of radiation chemistry, with radiolysis, radiation cross-linking of polymers, with methods and instruments for irradiation beam dosimetry, and with radiation application in the irradiation of foods and wastes. (M.D.)

  2. Electron collision cross sections and radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey is given of the cross section data needs in radiation chemistry, and of the recent progress in electron impact studies on dissociative excitation of molecules. In the former some of the important target species, processes, and collision energies are presented, while in the latter it is demonstrated that radiation chemistry is a source of new ideas and information in atomic collision research. 37 references, 4 figures

  3. Radiation Chemistry and the Radiation Preservation of Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1981-01-01

    Describes common features in the radiation chemistry of food components, and illustrates how product yields are predicted. Presents data that pertain to the radiolysis of the nitrate ion, metmyoglobin, myosin, and tripalmitin. (CS)

  4. 2010 Gordon Research Conference On Radiation Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Radiation Chemistry will present cutting edge research regarding the study of radiation-induced chemical transformations. Radiation Chemistry or 'high energy' chemistry is primarily initiated by ionizing radiation: i.e. photons or particles with energy sufficient to create conduction band electrons and 'holes', excitons, ionic and neutral free radicals, highly excited states, and solvated electrons. These transients often interact or 'react' to form products vastly different than those produced under thermal equilibrium conditions. The non-equilibrium, non-thermal conditions driving radiation chemistry exist in plasmas, star-forming regions, the outer solar system, nuclear reactors, nuclear waste repositories, radiation-based medical/clinical treatment centers and in radiation/materials processing facilities. The 2010 conference has a strong interdisciplinary flavor with focus areas spanning (1) the fundamental physics and chemistry involved in ultrafast (atto/femtosecond) energy deposition events, (2) radiation-induced processes in biology (particularly spatially resolved studies), (3) radiation-induced modification of materials at the nanoscale and cosmic ray/x-ray mediated processes in planetary science/astrochemistry. While the conference concentrates on fundamental science, topical applied areas covered will also include nuclear power, materials/polymer processing, and clinical/radiation treatment in medicine. The Conference will bring together investigators at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present work in poster format or as contributors to the Young Investigator session. The program and format provides excellent avenues to promote cross-disciplinary collaborations.

  5. Basic radiation physics and chemistry of composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composites are increasingly more important in the applied and fundamental polymer science, and the participation of radiation processing of these systems increase. In presented paper the newest achievements of radiation physics and chemistry of composites are reviewed. It is stressed, that although main experimental effort is directed towards the development of composites as such, and investigation of their specific properties, mechanical, physicochemical and physical, the radiation processing will enter the field on the wider scale, especially as concerns specialized plastics

  6. Radiation chemistry of biologically compatible polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Poly (2-hydroxy ethyl methacrylate) [PHEMA] and poly (2-ethoxy ethyl methacrylate) [PEEMA] are of biomedical and industrial interest due to their biocompatibility with living tissue. In this paper the effect of high energy radiation on these polymers is reported. PHEMA and PEEMA have similar molecular structures to poly (methyl methacrylate)[PMMA], and the γ irradiation of this polymer is well understood. Hence the radiation chemistry of PMMA is used as model system for the the analysis of the radiation chemistry of these polymers. The mechanism of the radiation induced chemistry of the polymers has been investigated using a range of techniques including electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) to establish free radical pathways, GC to identify small molecule volatile products, NMR to identify small molecule radiation products and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC) to determine molecular weight changes. Whilst much of the major part of the radiation chemistry can be attributed to similar reactions which can be observed in PMMA, there are a number of new radicals which are present as a result of the influence of the side chain interactions which reduces the mobility of the polymer chain

  7. Radiation chemistry of biologically compatible polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, D.J. T.; Pomery, P.J.; Saadat, G.; Whittaker, A.K. [Queensland Univ., St. Lucia, QLD (Australia). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-12-31

    Full text: Poly (2-hydroxy ethyl methacrylate) [PHEMA] and poly (2-ethoxy ethyl methacrylate) [PEEMA] are of biomedical and industrial interest due to their biocompatibility with living tissue. In this paper the effect of high energy radiation on these polymers is reported. PHEMA and PEEMA have similar molecular structures to poly (methyl methacrylate)[PMMA], and the {gamma} irradiation of this polymer is well understood. Hence the radiation chemistry of PMMA is used as model system for the the analysis of the radiation chemistry of these polymers. The mechanism of the radiation induced chemistry of the polymers has been investigated using a range of techniques including electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) to establish free radical pathways, GC to identify small molecule volatile products, NMR to identify small molecule radiation products and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC) to determine molecular weight changes. Whilst much of the major part of the radiation chemistry can be attributed to similar reactions which can be observed in PMMA, there are a number of new radicals which are present as a result of the influence of the side chain interactions which reduces the mobility of the polymer chain.

  8. Macromolecular lesions and cellular radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our studies of the interaction of densely ionizing particles with macromolecules in the living cell may be divided into four parts: characterization of lesions to cellular DNA in the unmodified Bragg ionization curve; characterization of lesions to cellular DNA in the spread Bragg curve as used in radiation therapy; elucidation of the cellular radiation chemistry characteristic of high vs. low LET radiation qualities; and the introduction of novel techniques designed to give a better understanding of the fundamental properties of induction of lesions and their repair potentials in high LET radiation

  9. Radiation chemistry of major food components

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter summarizes radiolysis of lipids, proteins, carbohydrates and vitamins. The major focuses of the chapter are on recent developments in radiation chemistry and the use of irradiation to reduce undesirable chemicals in foods. Specifically, formation of volatile sulfur compounds from...

  10. Radiation chemistry for modern nuclear energy development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Szołucha, Monika M.

    2016-07-01

    Radiation chemistry plays a significant role in modern nuclear energy development. Pioneering research in nuclear science, for example the development of generation IV nuclear reactors, cannot be pursued without chemical solutions. Present issues related to light water reactors concern radiolysis of water in the primary circuit; long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel; radiation effects on cables and wire insulation, and on ion exchangers used for water purification; as well as the procedures of radioactive waste reprocessing and storage. Radiation effects on materials and enhanced corrosion are crucial in current (II/III/III+) and future (IV) generation reactors, and in waste management, deep geological disposal and spent fuel reprocessing. The new generation of reactors (III+ and IV) impose new challenges for radiation chemists due to their new conditions of operation and the usage of new types of coolant. In the case of the supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR), water chemistry control may be the key factor in preventing corrosion of reactor structural materials. This paper mainly focuses on radiation effects on long-term performance and safety in the development of nuclear power plants.

  11. 12. 'Tihany' symposium on radiation chemistry. Program and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 12th 'Tihany' symposium on radiation chemistry was held in Zalakaros in the organization of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Isotope and Surface Chemistry. The scientific program of the Symposium will cover all the major disciplines of both basic and applied radiation chemistry. The topics were the fundamental processes in radiation chemistry, the different irradiations ways, radiolysis of inorganic and organic systems, nanoscale and the macromolecular systems. Also could be seen presentations in the subject of the food irradiation, the environmental protection, biomedical materials radiation, about the resistant materials, the radiation sterilization and the dosimetry. (S.I.)

  12. Radiation chemistry and origins of life on earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagorski, Z.P. E-mail: zagorski@orange.ichtj.waw.pl

    2003-04-01

    An introduction to problems of the working group at the European COST programme D-27 (Prebiotic Chemistry and Early Evolution) is presented. The neglected role of radiation chemistry in that field is discussed.

  13. Radiation Chemistry of Advanced TALSPEAK Flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, Bruce; Peterman, Dean; Mcdowell, Rocklan; Olson, Lonnie; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2013-08-28

    This report summarizes the results of initial experiments designed to understand the radiation chemistry of an Advanced TALSPEAK process for separating trivalent lanthanides form the actinides. Biphasic aerated samples were irradiated and then analyzed for post-irradiation constituent concentrations and solvent extraction distribution ratios. The effects of irradiation on the TALSPEAK and Advanced TALSPEAK solvents were similar, with very little degradation of the organic phase extractant. Decomposition products were detected, with a major product in common for both solvents. This product may be responsible for the slight increase in distribution ratios for Eu and Am with absorbed dose, however; separation factors were not greatly affected.

  14. Radiation chemistry in exploration of Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems of exploration of Mars are seldom connected with radiation research. Improvements in such approach, more and more visible, are reported in this paper, written by the present author working on prebiotic chemistry and origins of life on Earth. Objects on Mars subjected to radiation are very different from those on Earth. Density of the Martian atmosphere is by two orders smaller than over Earth and does not protect the surface of Mars from ionizing radiations, contrary to the case of Earth, shielded by the equivalent of ca. 3 meters of concrete. High energy protons from the Sun are diverted magnetically around Earth, and Mars is deprived of that protection. The radiolysis of martian '' air '' (95.3% of carbon dioxide) starts with the formation of CO2+, whereas the primary product over Earth is N2+ ion radical. The lack of water vapor over Mars prevents the formation of many secondary products. The important feature of Martian regolith is the possibility of the presence of hydrated minerals, which could have been formed milliards years ago, when (probably) water was present on Mars. The interface of the atmosphere and the regolith can be the site of many chemical reactions, induced also by intensive UV, which includes part of the vacuum UV. Minerals like sodalite, discovered on Mars can contribute as reagents in many reactions. Conclusions are dedicated to questions of the live organisms connected with exploration of Mars; from microorganisms, comparatively resistant to ionizing radiation, to human beings, considered not to be fit to manned flight, survival on Mars and return to Earth. Pharmaceuticals proposed as radiobiological protection cannot improve the situation. Exploration over the distance of millions of kilometers performed successfully without presence of man, withstands more easily the presence of ionizing radiation. (author)

  15. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Selenium is an environmentally relevant trace metal, recognised not only for its role as an essential trace nutrient in living systems, but also for its devastating impacts at elevated concentrations, including fish deformities and death from selenium-laden waters and sediment. There are escalating concerns that the consumption of selenium-contaminated foods (e.g. fish and bivalves) will have an impact on human health. A comprehensive understanding of organic and inorganic selenium tissue concentrations is required if we are to assess the toxic effects of selenium in marine organisms and the flow-on effects to human consumers. Currently, whole sediment bioassays measuring total metal concentration effects are being used to assess the toxicity of metal contaminated sediments. However, for most sediment-dwelling organisms, sediments particles, pore waters and overlying waters, as well as food sources (e.g. algae) may all contribute to the accumulation of metal contaminants. Furthermore, the species of metal (and not the total metal concentration) in each of these compartments will also modify metal toxicity and uptake rates. For most species routinely used in toxicity tests, the relative importance of the different contaminant exposure pathways (overlying waters, sediment, food) has not been evaluated. If we know which compartment(s) induce toxic responses in the test organisms, we can use that knowledge to more effectively manage contaminated environments. The radiotracer 75Se produced in HIFAR was used to determine the uptake routes and accumulation sites in biological organisms. Comparatively, high sensitivity of gamma counter techniques and minimal sample preparation to ICP-MS and AAS provided for a faster and more efficient method to monitor the uptake of selenium. Biodistribution studies evaluating the bioavailability of Se from water, sediment and algae in the endemic Australian marine bivalve Anadara trapezia is presently under investigation and progress to date be reported

  16. Radiation 2006. In association with the Polymer Division, Royal Australian Chemical Institute. Incorporating the 21st AINSE Radiation Chemistry Conference and the 18th Radiation Biology Conference, conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In Australia there have been reported more than 200 species of Biological Soil Crusts (BSC) including: cyanobacteria, mosses and lichens. Working at the species level of BSC poses particular difficulties for different aspects of environmental management because of the problems caused by in taxonomy, small size, lack of experts for identification and the intermixing of taxa. From the 1970s BSC classification based on the morphology has been utilised for ecological studies. This study explores the possibility of spectral classification of BSC components for ecological studies and considers the use of hyperspectral remote sensing techniques. Although, in some locations the percentage cover of BSC exceeds 70% of land cover, many previous remote sensing studies of land cover have either neglected BSC, or considered it as one group. In this study visible and near-infrared (350-1100 nm) reflectance spectra of BSC were collected with a UniSpec PPSystem spectrometer in the laboratory under a 1000 W Halogen lamp. Biological components varied in chlorophyll, physiological status, colour and other pigment contents. The measured spectra demonstrate considerable variation both within and between species. Factors contributing to spectral variation were identified by principal components analysis. Functional, taxonomic and morphological groups of BSC species were classified using discriminant analysis of the narrow-bands (3.3 nm) spectra. Both principal components and discriminant analysis showed promising results for grouping BSC variation and finally 9 groups from 21 field groups (33 species) were classified

  17. Chemistry of radiation damage to wire chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, J.

    1992-08-01

    Proportional counters are used to study aspects of radiation damage to wire chambers (wire aging). Principles of low-pressure, rf plasma chemistry are used to predict the plasma chemistry in electron avalanches (1 atm, dc). (1) Aging is studied in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gas mixtures. Wire deposits are analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. An apparent cathode aging process resulting in loss of gain rather than in a self-sustained current is observed in CF{sub 4}-rich gases. A four-part model considering plasma polymerization of the hydrocarbon, etching of wire deposits by CF{sub 4}, acceleration of deposition processes in strongly etching environments, and reactivity of the wire surface is developed to understand anode wire aging in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gases. Practical guidelines suggested by the model are discussed. (2) Data are presented to suggest that trace amounts of Freons do not affect aging rates in either dimethyl ether or Ar/C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Apparent loss of gain is explained by attachment of primary electrons to a continuously increasing concentration of Freon 11 (CCl{sub 3}F) in the counter gas. An increase in the concentration of Freon 11 in dimethyl ether is caused by a distillation process in the gas supply bottle and is a natural consequence of the unequal volatilities of the two compounds.

  18. Chemistry of radiation damage to wire chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proportional counters are used to study aspects of radiation damage to wire chambers (wire aging). Principles of low-pressure, rf plasma chemistry are used to predict the plasma chemistry in electron avalanches (1 atm, dc). (1) Aging is studied in CF4/iC4H10 gas mixtures. Wire deposits are analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. An apparent cathode aging process resulting in loss of gain rather than in a self-sustained current is observed in CF4-rich gases. A four-part model considering plasma polymerization of the hydrocarbon, etching of wire deposits by CF4, acceleration of deposition processes in strongly etching environments, and reactivity of the wire surface is developed to understand anode wire aging in CF4/iC4H10 gases. Practical guidelines suggested by the model are discussed. (2) Data are presented to suggest that trace amounts of Freons do not affect aging rates in either dimethyl ether or Ar/C2H6. Apparent loss of gain is explained by attachment of primary electrons to a continuously increasing concentration of Freon 11 (CCl3F) in the counter gas. An increase in the concentration of Freon 11 in dimethyl ether is caused by a distillation process in the gas supply bottle and is a natural consequence of the unequal volatilities of the two compounds

  19. Theoretical study of reaction dynamics in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The period from late 1950's to early 1970's was golden age of radiation chemistry. During this period the hydrated electron was discovered, various new phenomena were found in ionic processes in liquid hydrocarbons, and the trapped electron and electron tunneling were discovered in organic glasses. In those days radiation chemistry was a vast treasure-house of theoretical problems. We could find not only problems special to radiation chemistry but also many problems interesting as general physical chemistry. In this review I explain how some theoretical problems discovered in the field of radiation chemistry have evolved into those of general physical chemistry, with special emphasis on my own work. (author)

  20. 10. 'Tihany' symposium on radiation chemistry. Program and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 10th 'Tihany' Symposium on Radiation Chemistry was held between August 31 and September 5, 2002, in Sopron, Hungary. An oral presentation section and two poster sections were organized, in every aspects of Radiation Chemistry and Radiochemistry. All presentation have been processed in abstracts form in the INIS database. (R.P.)

  1. Research needs and opportunities in radiation chemistry workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbara, Paul F

    1998-04-19

    There is a growing urgency for forefront basic research on ionizing radiation-induced chemical reactions, due to the relevance of these reactions in such areas of critical national need as environmental waste management, environmental remediation, nuclear energy production, and medical diagnosis and radiation therapy. Fortunately, the emergence of new theoretical and experimental tools for the study of radiation-induced chemical and physical processes, i.e. Radiation Chemistry, makes future progress quite promising. Nevertheless, a recent decline in he number of young investigators in radiation chemistry, as well as a natural obsolescence of large research facilities in radiation chemistry are serious obstacles to further progress. Understanding radiation-induced processes is of vital significance in such diverse fields as waste remediation in environmental cleanup, radiation processing of polymers and food, medical diagnosis and therapy, catalysis of chemical reactions, environmentally benign synthesis, and nuclear energy production. Radiation chemistry provides for these fields fundamental quantitative data, such as reaction rate coefficients, diffusion coefficients, radiation chemical yields, etc. As well as providing useful quantitative information of technological and medical importance, radiation chemistry is also a valuable tool for solving fundamental problems in chemistry and in material sciences. Exploiting the many facets of radiation chemistry requires a thorough and comprehensive understanding of the underlying chemical and physical processes. An understanding of the structure and dynamics of “tracks” produced by ionizing radiation is a central issue in the field. There is a continuing need to study the ultrafast processes that link the chemistry and physics of radiation-induced phenomena. This is especially true for practically important, but less well understood, nonstandard environments such as interfacial systems, supercritical media, and

  2. The 22nd AINSE plasma science and technology conference. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings contain the extended abstracts of the papers and posters presented at the 22nd AINSE plasma science and technology conference hosted by the Australian National University in Canberra. Topics under discussion included: fusion devices and experiments; plasma production; plasma confinement; plasma heating and current drive; plasma waves; plasma diagnostics; basic collisionless plasma physics; laser produced plasmas and inertial confinement; low-temperature plasmas and interferometry. The individual papers were indexed separately

  3. 7th Nuclear Chemistry, Radiochemistry and Radiation Chemistry Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference heard a total of 58 papers of which 56 were incorporated in INIS, namely those dealing with radioimmunoassay, radiation shielding materials, and radiochemistry of technetium, iodine, uranium, rare earths and actinides. (MR)

  4. Selected aspects of the chemistry and radiation chemistry of lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lignin was subjected to electron and gamma radiation as part of a study to determine the effects of radiation on its structure. Some of the factors that influence the outcome of the treatment are the dose, the nature of the atmosphere surrounding the sample, and the physical state and nature of the irradiated lignin itself. Our data describe some of the free radical intermediates formed during irradiation and how the variation of certain factors affects the magnitude and direction of the effects induced by irradiation. The data were obtained using electron spin resonance spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography and other high performance liguid chromatography techniques and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis. The substrates used were Indulin AT and pyrolysed lignin. Depending on the experimental conditions, radiation treatment may lead to either polymerisation or degradation processes. The factors that determine the outcome are discussed in terms of substrate structures and the chemical processes that take place. (author) 12 refs

  5. RADIATION CHEMISTRY 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE JULY 18-23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Orlando

    2010-07-23

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Radiation Chemistry will present cutting edge research regarding the study of radiation-induced chemical transformations. Radiation Chemistry or 'high energy' chemistry is primarily initiated by ionizing radiation: i.e. photons or particles with energy sufficient to create conduction band electrons and 'holes', excitons, ionic and neutral free radicals, highly excited states, and solvated electrons. These transients often interact or 'react' to form products vastly different than those produced under thermal equilibrium conditions. The non-equilibrium, non-thermal conditions driving radiation chemistry exist in plasmas, star-forming regions, the outer solar system, nuclear reactors, nuclear waste repositories, radiation-based medical/clinical treatment centers and in radiation/materials processing facilities. The 2010 conference has a strong interdisciplinary flavor with focus areas spanning (1) the fundamental physics and chemistry involved in ultrafast (atto/femtosecond) energy deposition events, (2) radiation-induced processes in biology (particularly spatially resolved studies), (3) radiation-induced modification of materials at the nanoscale and cosmic ray/x-ray mediated processes in planetary science/astrochemistry. While the conference concentrates on fundamental science, topical applied areas covered will also include nuclear power, materials/polymer processing, and clinical/radiation treatment in medicine. The Conference will bring together investigators at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present work in poster format or as contributors to the Young Investigator session. The program and format provides excellent avenues to promote cross-disciplinary collaborations.

  6. The radiation chemistry of advanced polymeric materials containing fluorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsythe, J.S.; Hill, D.J.T.; Whittaker, A.K. [Queensland Univ., St. Lucia, QLD (Australia). Dept. of Chemistry; Logothetis, A.L. [Du Pont, Central Research and Development, Experimental Station, Wilmington, DE (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Full text: TFE/PMVE (tetrafluoroethylene/perfluoromethylvinyl ether) is a commercial perfluoroelastomer marketed by the Du Pont Company under the trade-name Kalrez. Very little is known about the radiation chemistry of this fluoropolymer which in general is consistent with all fluoropolymers. In 1984, Uschold, while attempting to graft vinyl monomers onto irradiated TFE/PMVE, found that the fluoroelastomer crosslinked forming and insoluble network. Unfortunately, Uschold found that the mechanical properties of irradiated TFE/PMVE were inferior when compared to the chemically crosslinked analogues because of the simultaneous radiation scissioning of the polymer chain. This chemical curing is described elsewhere. The radiation crosslinking of TFE/PMVE was also briefly studied by Luo et al. and later by Sun et al. but they exclusively looked at the sol/gel behaviour. Recently Lyons reviewed the radiation chemistry of fluoropolymers and showed that most research solely focused on the physical properties of the cured material and little attention placed on the development of mechanisms of radiation chemistry. In this study, we have employed both physical and chemical techniques such as tensile tests and {sup 19}F NMR to formulate a radiation mechanism describing both chain scission and crosslinking processes. {sup 19}F NMR identified and quantified new functionalities such as carboxylic acid and saturated chain ends. The crosslinking reaction has been tentatively postulated for the first time. Factors affecting the radiation chemistry such as the presence of oxygen and irradiation temperature will be briefly discussed. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Radiation Chemistry of Organic Liquids: Saturated Hydrocarbons

    CERN Document Server

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Trifunac, A D

    2004-01-01

    In this review (124 refs), several problems in radiolysis of saturated hydrocarbons are examined. Special attention is paid to the chemistry of radical cations, high-mobility holes, excited state and spur dynamics, magnetic field and spin effects, and optically detected magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  8. Radiation chemistry and origins of life on earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Radiation chemistry is involved in mechanisms of origins of life on Earth in three aspects: 1. The formation of prebiotic 'soup' of organic compounds related to future life, 2. Possible role in formation of pure enantiomers of chiral compounds, 3. Role in rejection of hypothesis of Life transported from the outside worlds (Panspermia). As concerns 1, radiation chemistry explains better the formation of proper prebiotic 'soup' than Miller hypothesis of electric discharges in gaseous atmosphere. Radiation-induced reactions proceeded in liquid phase, also in the presence of solid state and as specific surface reactions, all at the ambient temperature. As concerns 2, radiation chemistry offers limited possibilities, but papers still are published to that effect and efforts are needed to tell facts from artifacts. As concerns 3, radiation chemistry and its cousin - radiobiology speak out definitively, that any transportation of life, even of low organisation, from the outer space is impossible. The main reason is irreversible dehydrogenation even at very low temperatures, during the travel lasting for years and light-years. The same applies in higher degree to the well organised life, making an appearance of 'ET' on Earth not likely. Even the manned travels to Mars and living in houses at the surface, can end with radiation sickness and premature death

  9. The radiation chemistry of polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dole, Malcolm

    With the use of plastics in the construction of space satellites which may be exposed in geosynchronous orbit to 100 MGy (10,000 Mrad) of high-energy radiation in 30 years of use, the effect of these radiations on the polymer becomes of practical importance. To understand the effects we consider first various radiation-resistant groups that are incorporated into the polymer and their relative effectiveness in reducing molecular scissions due to the radiation. The location of such groups in the polymer is also discussed. Next the chemical structures of a number of resins such as epoxies, polyimides, etc. are described followed by a detailed account of methods of improving the radiation resistance of plastics by the incorporation of carbon or glass fibers. Finally, the role of oxygen in causing chain scissions and other effects during irradiation which reduce the mechanical strength of the plastics and the fiber resin composites are also considered.

  10. The radiation chemistry of polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the use of plastics in the construction of space satellites which may be exposed in geosynchronous orbit to 100 MGy (10,000 Mrad) of high-energy radiation in 30 years of use, the effect of these radiations on the polymer becomes of practical importance. To understand the effects we consider first various radiation-resistant groups that are incorporated into the polymer and their relative effectiveness in reducing molecular scissions due to the radiation. The location of such groups in the polymer is also discussed. Next the chemical structures of a number of resins such as epoxies, polyimides, etc. are described followed by a detailed account of methods of improving the radiation resistance of plastics by the incorporation of carbon or glass fibers. Finally, the role of oxygen in causing chain scissions and other effects during irradiation which reduce the mechanical strength of the plastics and the fiber resin composites are also considered. (author)

  11. The chemistry of UV and EB radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of photopolymerisation (UV) and electron beam (EB) technologies in radiation rapid cure (RRC) processing is discussed. The chemistry associated with such reactions and the mechanisms of the processes are treated. The occurrence of concurrent grafting to substrate with radiation curing of film is shown to be an advantage in enhancing the properties of certain finished products. The parameters influencing the optimum grafting yield in such RRC processes are discussed. In many applications, the chemistry of the process combined with the machine, expecially for EB, is shown a so-called ''turn-key'' operation. (author)

  12. Evaluation of radiation scheme performance within chemistry climate models

    OpenAIRE

    Forster, P. M.; Mayer, B.; et, al.

    2011-01-01

    This paper evaluates global mean radiatively important properties of chemistry climate models (CCMs). We evaluate stratospheric temperatures and their 1980�2000 trends, January clear sky irradiances, heating rates, and greenhouse gas radiative forcings from an offline comparison of CCM radiation codes with line�by�line models, and CCMs� representation of the solar cycle. CCM global mean temperatures and their change can give an indication of errors in radiative trans...

  13. 3. Bakh conference on radiation chemistry. Abstracts of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern tendencies of development of radiation chemistry as in regions of fundamental investigations so in applied directions are presented. Basic theme of reports presented is mechanism of radiolytic transformations of polymeric compositions and creation of new materials with specified properties. Problems of use of radiation chemical methods for processing of wastes containing extraharmful chemical toxicants (dioxanes), determination of toxicity and sterilization of medical preparations are covered. Problems of radiation resistance to ionizing radiation of materials used in aerospace technology, nuclear power engineering are studied

  14. The effects of temperature on the radiation chemistry of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, D.J.T. [Queensland Univ., Brisbane, QLD (Australia)

    1995-03-01

    The effects of high energy radiation on polymers is dependent on a number of factors. One of the most important factors is the radiolysis temperature. This paper discusses the effects of the {alpha}-transition and the other secondary transitions, as well as the ceiling and melting temperatures, on the nature of the radiolysis reactions which occur for a number of polymers. Some implications of changes in the radiation chemistry of polymers with a change in the temperature are also considered. (author).

  15. The effects of temperature on the radiation chemistry of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of high energy radiation on polymers is dependent on a number of factors. One of the most important factors is the radiolysis temperature. This paper discusses the effects of the α-transition and the other secondary transitions, as well as the ceiling and melting temperatures, on the nature of the radiolysis reactions which occur for a number of polymers. Some implications of changes in the radiation chemistry of polymers with a change in the temperature are also considered. (author)

  16. Some applications of radiation chemistry to biochemistry and radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter illustrate the use of radiation chemistry as a tool in investigating biologically important radical reactions, and also outline some studies of models for radiobiological damage. Because aqueous solutions usually offer the most important matrix, an appreciation of the main features of water radiolysis will be essential. Most of the illustrations involve pulse radiolysis, and some familiarity with chemical kinetics is assumed. In addition to these and other chapters in this book, readers find the proceedings of a recent NATO Advanced Study Institute most useful. The authors shall not try to review here all the applications of radiation chemistry to biochemistry and biology, but they will illustrate, using selected examples, the main principles and practical advantages and problems. Another recent volume covers the main contributions of flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis to the chemistry of biology and medicine, complementing earlier reviews. Papers from symposia on radical processes in radiobiology and carcinogenesis, and on super-oxide dismutases, and proceedings of recent international congresses of radiation research, together with the other publications referred to above will enable the reader to gain a comprehensive overview of the role of radicals in biological processes and the contributions of radiation chemistry

  17. 9. 'Tihany' symposium on radiation chemistry. Programme and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various aspects of radiation chemistry has been covered on the symposium, consisting of 19 sessions plus a poster session. 85 items has been reproduced as full text and indexed for the INIS database selected from the 69 short communications of the talks plus the 57 posters. (R.P.)

  18. Radiation chemistry of aromatic dimer radical cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    π-π Interactions of aromatic molecules are paid attention much in many fields, especially biology, chemistry, and applied physics, represented as protein, DNA, electron donor-accepter complexes, charge transfers, and self assembly molecules. Aromatic molecules including benzene rings are the simplest case to study the π-π interactions. To interpret the charge resonance (CR) structure in the dimer radical cations, spectroscopic and ESR methods have been carried out. The spectroscopic study on the dimer radical ion of molecules with two chromophores would be profitable to identify the electronic and configurational properties. In this article, dynamics of the dimer radical cation of benzenes, polystyrenes, and resist polymers is described on the basis of direct observation of CR band by the nanosecond pulse radiolysis and low temperature γ-radiolysis methods. (author)

  19. Radiation Chemistry Studies on Chemotherapeutic Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gohn, M.; Getoff, N.; Bjergbakke, Erling

    1977-01-01

    Adrenalin has been studied as a model radiation protective agent by means of pulse radiolysis in aqueous solutions. The rate constants for the reactions of adrenalin with e–aq and OH were determined : k(e–aq+ adr—NH+2)= 7.5 × 108 dm3 mol–1 s–1, k(e–aq+ adr—NH)= 2.5 × 108 dm3 mol–1 s–1, and k...

  20. The high energy radiation chemistry of some fluorinated elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsythe, J.S.; Hill, D.J.T.; Whittaker, A.K. [The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia). Polymer Materials and Radiation Group, Department of Chemistry

    1998-12-31

    Fluorinated polymers are characterized by their excellent resistance to chemical attack and good thermal stability. Therefore they have found applications where resistance to harsh chemical and thermal environments is a fundamental requirement. One such application of poly- (tetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluoropropylene), TFE/PMVE, is in the microelectronics industry as an O-ring material for applications where oxygen atom processing is used. For this application the polymer is radiation crosslinked. In this paper the radiation chemistry of TFE/PMVE will discussed and the radiation chemical yields for new structure formation will be reported

  1. Radiation physical chemistry effects on organic detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, C.H.; Duarte, C.L.; Hamada, M.M. E-mail: mmhamada@net.ipen.br

    2003-06-01

    The radiation damage effect on a liquid scintillating system was evaluated in the PPO and POPOP solutes. Samples containing PPO (1%w/v) and POPOP (0.2%w/v) diluted in toluene were irradiated at different doses, using a {sup 60}Co irradiator at 1.8 Gy/s. The transmittance and the chemical degradation of those solutes were evaluated as a function of dose. The PPO transmittance at 360 nm decayed exponentially with the dose, while the POPOP transmittance at 420 nm decayed linearly. The chemical degradation on the PPO and POPOP was fitted to a bi-exponential mathematical model as a function of dose. The first exponential (fast slope) was interpreted as damage produced by toluene radiolytics whereas the second exponential (slow slope) was interpreted as the damage caused by primary interaction of the {gamma}-radiation with targets, i.e., {gamma} photons that hit PPO and POPOP directly. The w (eV/damage molecule) and G (damaged molecules/100 eV) parameters were estimated in this paper.

  2. Mechanistic aspects of polymer chemistry for radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemistry of polymer production has been reviewed for the purpose of identifying suitable uses for high-energy electron accelerators in the plastics industry. High-energy radiation produces free radicals, electrons and ions in irradiated materials. These species initiate polymerization and cross-linking reactions in a manner analogous to that of chemical agents. The chemical mechanisms of radiation-induced polymerization, co-polymerization and cross-linking are compared with those of chemical and thermal initiation. Radiation polymerization can be a very fast process, but the polymerization reactions are quite exothermic, and temperature increases of up to 400 degrees Celcius may result if insufficient cooling is provided. Several approaches to reducing the temperature increase during radiation curing are presented. Chemical kinetic simulations of the radiation-induced cationic polymerization of styrene have shown that the effect of water inhibition on the rate of polymerization may be eliminated at the high dose rates available from high power accelerators. 25 refs

  3. The radiation chemistry of symmetric aliphatic polyesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Naturally occurring, symmetric polyesters, including polyglycolic acid, polylactic acid and polyhydroxybutyrate, have found biomedical applications in areas as diverse as the controlled release of pharmaceuticals and the manufacture of surgical sutures. As biomedical products, the materials require sterilization by high energy radiation. This has provided the motivation for the present work. D'Alelio et al. have reported that linear, asymmetric polyesters undergo scission on irradiation, but that branched polyesters containing a methyl group in the diol segments undergo crosslinking. However, for the symmetric polyhydroxybutyrate, Carswell-Pomerantz et al. have reported that only scission occurs on radiolysis, with the evolution of CO and CO2 as a result of the loss of ester linkages. These workers also found that G(CO + CO2) was approximately equal to G(S) for this polyester. By contrast, Collett et al. have reported that G(S) = 1.26 and G(X) = 0.53 for polylactic acid, which indicates that the polymer undergoes nett crosslinking on radiolysis to form a gel. They have also reported that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) should form a gel on radiolysis, since G(S) = 1.66 and G(X) = 0.65 for a 1:1 copolymer composition. In the present work the radiolysis of polylactic acid and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) have been reinvestigated in order to resolve the differences between the work of Collett et al. and that of Carswell-Pomerantz et al. In these studies, ESR has been used to study the radicals formed, GPC has been used to investigate scission and crosslinking, GC has been used to study the small molecule volatile products and NMR spectroscopy has been used to identify and measure the new chemical structures formed in the polymers

  4. The radiation chemistry of symmetric aliphatic polyesters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babanalbandi, A.; Hill, D.J.T.; Pomery, P.J.; Whittaker, A.K. [Queensland Univ., St. Lucia, QLD (Australia). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-12-31

    Full text: Naturally occurring, symmetric polyesters, including polyglycolic acid, polylactic acid and polyhydroxybutyrate, have found biomedical applications in areas as diverse as the controlled release of pharmaceuticals and the manufacture of surgical sutures. As biomedical products, the materials require sterilization by high energy radiation. This has provided the motivation for the present work. D`Alelio et al. have reported that linear, asymmetric polyesters undergo scission on irradiation, but that branched polyesters containing a methyl group in the diol segments undergo crosslinking. However, for the symmetric polyhydroxybutyrate, Carswell-Pomerantz et al. have reported that only scission occurs on radiolysis, with the evolution of CO and CO{sub 2} as a result of the loss of ester linkages. These workers also found that G(CO + CO{sub 2}) was approximately equal to G(S) for this polyester. By contrast, Collett et al. have reported that G(S) = 1.26 and G(X) = 0.53 for polylactic acid, which indicates that the polymer undergoes nett crosslinking on radiolysis to form a gel. They have also reported that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) should form a gel on radiolysis, since G(S) = 1.66 and G(X) = 0.65 for a 1:1 copolymer composition. In the present work the radiolysis of polylactic acid and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) have been reinvestigated in order to resolve the differences between the work of Collett et al. and that of Carswell-Pomerantz et al. In these studies, ESR has been used to study the radicals formed, GPC has been used to investigate scission and crosslinking, GC has been used to study the small molecule volatile products and NMR spectroscopy has been used to identify and measure the new chemical structures formed in the polymers. 4 refs.

  5. The radiation chemistry of ionic liquids: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionic liquids have received increasing attention as media for radiochemical separations. Recent literature includes examinations of the efficiencies and mechanisms of the solvent extraction of lanthanides, actinides and fission products into ionic liquid solutions. For radiochemical applications, including as replacement solvents for nuclear fuel reprocessing, a thorough understanding of the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids will be required. Such an understanding can be achieved based on a combination of steady-state radiolysis experiments coupled with post-irradiation product identification and pulse-radiolysis experiments to acquire kinetic information. These techniques allow for the elucidation of radiolytic mechanisms. This contribution reviews the current ionic liquid radiation chemistry literature as it affects separations, with these considerations in mind

  6. Radiation chemistry in solvent etxraction: FY2011 research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-09-01

    This report summarizes work accomplished under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) program in the area of radiation chemistry during FY 2011. The tasks assigned during FY 2011 included: (1) Continue measurements free radical reaction kinetics in the organic phase; (2) Continue development of an alpha-radiolysis program and compare alpha and gamma radiolysis for CMPO; (3) Initiate an effort to understand dose rate effects in radiation chemistry; and (4) Continued work to characterize TALSPEAK radiation chemistry, including the examination of metal complexed ligand kinetics. Progress made on each of these tasks is reported here. Briefly, the method developed to measure the kinetics of the reactions of the NO3 radical with solvent extraction ligands in organic solution during FY10 was extended here to a number of compounds to better understand the differences between radical reactions in the organic versus aqueous phases. The alpha-radiolysis program in FY11 included irradiations of CMPO solutions with 244Cm, 211At and the He ion beam, for comparison to gamma irradiations, and a comparison of the gamma irradiation results for CMPO at three different gamma dose rates. Finally, recent results for TALSPEAK radiolysis are reported, summarizing the latest in an effort to understand how metal complexation to ligands affects their reaction kinetics with free radicals.

  7. Radiation chemistry in solvent extraction: FY2010 Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce J. Mincher; Leigh R. Martin; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes work accomplished under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) program in the area of radiation chemistry during FY 2010. The tasks assigned during FY 2010 included: • Development of techniques to measure free radical reaction kinetics in the organic phase. • Initiation of an alpha-radiolysis program • Initiation of an effort to understand dose rate effects in radiation chemistry • Continued work to characterize TALSPEAK radiation chemistry Progress made on each of these tasks is reported here. Briefly, a method was developed and used to measure the kinetics of the reactions of the •NO3 radical with solvent extraction ligands in organic solution, and the method to measure •OH radical reactions under the same conditions has been designed. Rate constants for the CMPO and DMDOHEMA reaction with •NO3 radical in organic solution are reported. Alpha-radiolysis was initiated on samples of DMDOHEMA in alkane solution using He ion beam irradiation and 211At isotope irradiation. The samples are currently being analyzed for comparison to DMDOHEMA ?-irradiations using a custom-developed mass spectrometric method. Results are also reported for the radiolytic generation of nitrous acid, in ?-irradiated nitric acid. It is shown that the yield of nitrous acid is unaffected by an order-of-magnitude change in dose rate. Finally, recent results for TALSPEAK radiolysis are reported, summarizing the effects on solvent extraction efficiency due to HDEHP irradiation, and the stable products of lactic acid and DTPA irradiation. In addition, results representing increased scope are presented for the radiation chemistry program. These include an investigation of the effect of metal complexation on radical reaction kinetics using DTPA as an example, and the production of a manuscript reporting the mechanism of Cs-7SB radiolysis. The Cs-7SB work takes advantage of recent results from a current LDRD program to understand the fundamental chemistry

  8. The 15th AINSE nuclear and particle conference at the 6th APPC and 11th AIP congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1994 AINSE conference was held in Brisbane, at Griffith University in conjunction with the 6th APPC and the 11th Australian Institute of Physics Congress. It focused on physics of elementary particles and fields, nuclear reactions and scattering, neutrinos and dark matter. The proceedings booklet contains the conference programme and talks summaries. Seventy one papers out of the 73 contributions were indexed separately for inclusion in the INIS database

  9. Radiation Physics and Chemistry in Heavy-ion Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura, M.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Heavy ions, such as carbon and oxygen ions, are classified as high-LET radiations, and produce a characteristic dose-depth distribution different from that of low-LET radiations such as γ-rays, xrays and electrons. Heavy ions lose less energy at the entrance to an irradiated biological system up to some depth than the low-LET radiations, while they deposit a large amount of dose within a very narrow range at a certain depth, producing the characteristic sharp peak called the Bragg peak. Therefore, by controlling the Bragg peak, it becomes possible to irradiate only the tumor region in a pin-point manner, while avoiding irradiation of the normal tissue, thus making heavyion therapy ideal for deep-seated tumor treatment. Clinical results on more than 2400 patients are very encouraging. However, very little is known about what is going on in terms of physics and chemistry inside the Bragg peak. In this paper the current status of our understanding of heavy-ion interactions and remaining problems of physics and chemistry for the heavy-ion treatment are explored, particularly in the Bragg peak region. Specially, the survey of the basic physical quantity, the mean energy required to form an ion pair (Wvalue for heavy ions of interest for radiotherapy is presented. Finally, the current clinical status of heavy-ion therapy is presented.

  10. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1987 through March 31, 1988. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: (i) studies on surface phenomena under electron and ion irradiations and (ii) studies on radiation chemistry of high polymers and radiation dosimetry. (J.P.N.)

  11. Bibliographies on radiation chemistry: II. Studies of the chemistry of semiquinones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swallow, A. John; Ross, Alberta B.; Helman, W. Phillip

    It has been known for half a century that the interconversion between quinones and hydroquinones is capable of proceeding through the formation of highly resonance-stabilized free radical intermediates called semiquinones. These semiquinones play a vital role in many processes including the biologically important processes of photosynthesis and mitochondrial electron transport. By the 1950s and 1960s, radiation chemistry and photochemistry had developed sufficiently for techniques such as pulse radiolysis and flash photolysis to be used to obtain reliable quantitative information about the chemistry of organic free radicals, and semiquinones were among the first to be studied. This bibliography (1) lists about 280 papers dealing with the formation, properties and reactions of free radicals containing the 1 ,2- or 1 ,4-benzosemiquinone moiety. Related species such as those prepared from camphorquinone, quinone methides and aromatic compounds like flavins and certain dyestuffs are excluded. The bibliography is almost completely confined to studies of semiquinones produced in irradiated systems. Chemical, biological and electrochemical generation of the intermediates are not covered. Papers on reduction of quinones or oxidation of hydroquinones containing no quantitative information on the semiquinone intermediates are likewise not included. The bibliography was prepared by a search of the Radiation Chemistry Data Center bibliographic data base using the keywords semiquinones, quinones, hydroquinones, pulse radiolysis and flash photolysis. The keywords gamma rays (radiolysis), photolysis and quinones also yielded some pertinent references, and inspection of several reviews and the cited references in a few papers revealed additional references. While earlier references known to the authors have been included, the bibliography mainly contains references since 1970 and coverage extends through August, 1980. The references are listed in approximately chronological order

  12. Radiation chemistry of salicylic and methyl substituted salicylic acids: Models for the radiation chemistry of pharmaceutical compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahi, Shakiba; Kalnina, Daina; Song, Weihua; Turks, Maris; Cooper, William J.

    2013-11-01

    Salicylic acid and its derivatives are components of many medications and moieties found in numerous pharmaceutical compounds. They have been used as models for various pharmaceutical compounds in pharmacological studies, for the treatment of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), and, reactions with natural organic matter (NOM). In this study, the radiation chemistry of benzoic acid, salicylic acid and four methyl substituted salicylic acids (MSA) is reported. The absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants for hydroxyl radical reaction with benzoic and salicylic acids as well as 3-methyl-, 4-methyl-, 5-methyl-, and 6-methyl-salicylic acid were determined (5.86±0.54)×109, (1.07±0.07)×1010, (7.48±0.17)×109, (7.31±0.29)×109, (5.47±0.25)×109, (6.94±0.10)×109 (M-1 s-1), respectively. The hydrated electron reaction rate constants were measured (3.02±0.10)×109, (8.98±0.27)×109, (5.39±0.21)×109, (4.33±0.17)×109, (4.72±0.15)×109, (1.42±0.02)×109 (M-1 s-1), respectively. The transient absorption spectra for the six model compounds were examined and their role as model compounds for the radiation chemistry of pharmaceuticals investigated.

  13. Radiation chemistry of salicylic and methyl substituted salicylic acids: Models for the radiation chemistry of pharmaceutical compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salicylic acid and its derivatives are components of many medications and moieties found in numerous pharmaceutical compounds. They have been used as models for various pharmaceutical compounds in pharmacological studies, for the treatment of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), and, reactions with natural organic matter (NOM). In this study, the radiation chemistry of benzoic acid, salicylic acid and four methyl substituted salicylic acids (MSA) is reported. The absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants for hydroxyl radical reaction with benzoic and salicylic acids as well as 3-methyl-, 4-methyl-, 5-methyl-, and 6-methyl-salicylic acid were determined (5.86±0.54)×109, (1.07±0.07)×1010, (7.48±0.17)×109, (7.31±0.29)×109, (5.47±0.25)×109, (6.94±0.10)×109 (M−1 s−1), respectively. The hydrated electron reaction rate constants were measured (3.02±0.10)×109, (8.98±0.27)×109, (5.39±0.21)×109, (4.33±0.17)×109, (4.72±0.15)×109, (1.42±0.02)×109 (M−1 s−1), respectively. The transient absorption spectra for the six model compounds were examined and their role as model compounds for the radiation chemistry of pharmaceuticals investigated. - Highlights: • Free radical chemistry of salicylic and 4 methyl salicylic acids is investigated. • The transient absorptions spectra for model compounds are measured. • Absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants for hydroxyl radical are determined. • Solvated electron reaction rate constants are calculated. • The use of salicylic acids as models for pharmaceuticals is explored

  14. Proceedings of the 8th Japan-China bilateral symposium on radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue is the collection of papers presented at The 8th Japan-China Bilateral Symposium on Radiation Chemistry held on October 25-29, 1999 at Kyodai Kaikan in Kyoto. The total number of the contributed papers is 69 which consists of 41 and 28 papers for oral and poster presentations, respectively. The papers presented are classified into five categories: A: Radiation Chemistry - Fundament (21 papers), B: Radiation Chemistry - Polymer (10 papers), C: Radiation Chemistry - Biological System (8 papers), D: Radiation Processing (19 papers), and E: Advanced Radiation Chemistry - Ion Beams and Positron (11 papers). The output of the Symposium and the history of the Bilateral Symposium were compiled in the Closing. (J.P.N.)

  15. Proceedings of the 8th Japan-China bilateral symposium on radiation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Hase, Hirotomo; Makuuchi, Keizou [eds.

    2000-03-01

    This issue is the collection of papers presented at The 8th Japan-China Bilateral Symposium on Radiation Chemistry held on October 25-29, 1999 at Kyodai Kaikan in Kyoto. The total number of the contributed papers is 69 which consists of 41 and 28 papers for oral and poster presentations, respectively. The papers presented are classified into five categories: A: Radiation Chemistry - Fundament (21 papers), B: Radiation Chemistry - Polymer (10 papers), C: Radiation Chemistry - Biological System (8 papers), D: Radiation Processing (19 papers), and E: Advanced Radiation Chemistry - Ion Beams and Positron (11 papers). The output of the Symposium and the history of the Bilateral Symposium were compiled in the Closing. (J.P.N.)

  16. Response of the AMOC to reduced solar radiation – the modulating role of atmospheric-chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Muthers, Stefan; Raible, Christoph C.; Thomas F Stocker

    2016-01-01

    The influence of reduced solar forcing (grand solar minimum or geoengineering scenarios like solar radiation management) on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is assessed in an ensemble of atmosphere-ocean-chemistry-climate model simulations. Ensemble sensitivity simulations are performed with and without interactive chemistry. Without chemistry-climate interaction the AMOC is intensified in the course of the solar radiation reduction (SRR), which is ...

  17. IONIC LIQUIDS: RADIATION CHEMISTRY, SOLVATION DYNAMICS AND REACTIVITY PATTERNS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WISHART,J.F.

    2007-10-01

    energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are generally nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increases the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alters product distributions. Parallel studies of IL solvation phenomena using coumarin-153 dynamic Stokes shifts and polarization anisotropy decay rates are done to compare with electron solvation studies and to evaluate the influence of ILs on charge transport processes. Methods. Picosecond pulse radiolysis studies at BNL

  18. IONIC LIQUIDS: RADIATION CHEMISTRY, SOLVATION DYNAMICS AND REACTIVITY PATTERNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are generally nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increases the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alters product distributions. Parallel studies of IL solvation phenomena using coumarin-153 dynamic Stokes shifts and polarization anisotropy decay rates are done to compare with electron solvation studies and to evaluate the influence of ILs on charge transport processes. Methods. Picosecond pulse radiolysis studies at BNL

  19. Ionic Liquids: Radiation Chemistry, Solvation Dynamics and Reactivity Patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a rapidly expanding family of condensed-phase media with important applications in energy production, nuclear fuel and waste processing, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. ILs are generally nonvolatile, noncombustible, highly conductive, recyclable and capable of dissolving a wide variety of materials. They are finding new uses in chemical synthesis, catalysis, separations chemistry, electrochemistry and other areas. Ionic liquids have dramatically different properties compared to conventional molecular solvents, and they provide a new and unusual environment to test our theoretical understanding of charge transfer and other reactions. We are interested in how IL properties influence physical and dynamical processes that determine the stability and lifetimes of reactive intermediates and thereby affect the courses of chemical reactions and product distributions. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments, where their safety advantages could be significant, requires an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of IL radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material. An understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry will also facilitate pulse radiolysis studies of general chemical reactivity in ILs, which will aid in the development of applications listed above. Very early in our radiolysis studies it became evident that slow solvation dynamics of the excess electron in ILs (which vary over a wide viscosity range) increases the importance of pre-solvated electron reactivity and consequently alters product distributions. Parallel studies of IL solvation phenomena using coumarin-153 dynamic Stokes shifts and polarization anisotropy decay rates are done to compare with electron solvation studies and to evaluate

  20. Radiation Chemistry 2008 Gordon Research Conference - July 6-11, 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation Chemistry is chemistry initiated by ionizing radiation: i.e. photons or particles with energy sufficient to create charge pairs and/or free radicals in a medium. The important transients include conduction band electrons and 'holes', excitons, ionic and neutral free radicals, highly excited states, and solvated electrons. Effects of radiation span timescales from the energy deposition in femtoseconds, through geminate recombination in picoseconds and nanoseconds, to fast radical chemistry in microseconds and milliseconds, and ultimately to processes like cancer occurring decades later. The radiation sources used to study these processes likewise run from femtosecond lasers to nanosecond accelerators to years of gamma irradiation. As a result the conference has a strong interdisciplinary flavor ranging from fundamental physics to clinical biology. While the conference focuses on fundamental science, application areas highlighted in the present conference will include nuclear power, polymer processing, and extraterrestrial chemistry.

  1. Radiation Chemistry 2008 Gordon Research Conference - July 6-11, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David M. Bartels

    2009-05-15

    Radiation Chemistry is chemistry initiated by ionizing radiation: i.e. photons or particles with energy sufficient to create charge pairs and/or free radicals in a medium. The important transients include conduction band electrons and 'holes', excitons, ionic and neutral free radicals, highly excited states, and solvated electrons. Effects of radiation span timescales from the energy deposition in femtoseconds, through geminate recombination in picoseconds and nanoseconds, to fast radical chemistry in microseconds and milliseconds, and ultimately to processes like cancer occurring decades later. The radiation sources used to study these processes likewise run from femtosecond lasers to nanosecond accelerators to years of gamma irradiation. As a result the conference has a strong interdisciplinary flavor ranging from fundamental physics to clinical biology. While the conference focuses on fundamental science, application areas highlighted in the present conference will include nuclear power, polymer processing, and extraterrestrial chemistry.

  2. Time-resolved techniques. Useful tools for fundamental investigations in radiation chemistry of derivatives of polysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved techniques such as pulse radiolysis with electron linear accelerator and flash photolysis with excimer laser have been utilized as useful tools for fundamental investigations in radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of derivatives of polysaccharides. (author)

  3. Proceedings of the Scientific Meeting on Application of Isotopes and Radiation: Book 2. Chemistry, Environment, Radiation Process, And Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the 10th Meeting of the Isotope and Radiation Application is to disseminate the result of research on application of nuclear techniques on agriculture, animal, biology, chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry. The meeting was held in Jakarta, 18-19 February 1998, and there were 6 invited papers and 52 papers indexed individually. This proceeding is divided by two volumes. Volume I and volume II consists of agriculture, animal, biology and chemistry, environment, radiation process and industry, respectively.(ID)

  4. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation of biological systems leads to the formation of radiolytic species such as H(raised dot), (raised dot)OH, H2, H2O2, e(sup -)(sub aq), etc.[1]. These species react with neighboring molecules, which result in damage in biological molecules such as DNA. Radiation chemistry is there for every important to understand the radiobiological consequences of radiation[2]. In this work, we discuss an approach based on the exact Green Functions for diffusion-influenced reactions which may be used to simulate radiation chemistry and eventually extended to study more complex systems, including DNA.

  5. New approaches to chemical reaction mechanisms by means of radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since active species generated during radiolysis can be used as oxidative or reductive regents of various organic and inorganic compounds, radiation chemistry has been applied to wide range of research fields. We have studied charge-delocalization process in molecular systems, properties of intermediates in the excited states, mechanism of light emitting device, photo-catalyst for degradation of toxic compounds and so on by means of radiation chemistry. In the present paper, we summarize our recent research results. (author)

  6. The radiation chemistry of aqueous sodium terephthalate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation chemistry of cobalt-60 gamma-irradiated aqueous sodium terephthalate solutions has been studied. In aerated 4 x 10-4M sodium hydroxide solutions, the main products are hydroxyterephthalate (HTA) (G = 0.99 +- 0.01), carbonate (G = 1.31 +- 0.08), and peroxides (G = 2.84 +- 0.04). The HTA and carbonate species are both formed as a result of hydroxyl radical attack and account for approximately 90 per cent of hydroxyl radical reactions. Oxygen needs to be present for efficient conversion of the terephthalate-OH radical adduct to HTA and oxygenation increases G(HTA) above the aerated solution value. G(HTA) is unaffected by changes in terephthalate concentration between 1 x 10-4M and 1 x 10-2M in sodium hydroxide solutions at pH 10. Decreasing the solution pH does however affect G(HTA). In phosphate buffered solutions pH 6.85, G(HTA) is 0.93 +- 0.01 and lower values are obtained with further decrease in solution pH. The lowering of the G(HTA) value is attributed to recombination reactions between the terephthalate-OH radical products and reducing radical products. Experimental evidence supporting the recombination postulate was obtained from the measurement of a parallel decrease in the peroxide yield and the observation of a dose rate effect on G(HTA). Competition kinetic studies with the added solutes carbonate and bicarbonate gave the rate ratios k (OH + TA2-) : k(OH + CO32-) : k(OH + HCO3-) = 1 : 0.105 : 0.0036

  7. Absorbed dose measurements of mixed pile radiation in aqueous radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To use a nuclear reactor as a radiation source in the radiation chemistry of water and aqueous solutions, reliable routine dosimetry techniques are of basic importance. For this purpose we have tried to develop a calorimetric device and a chemical system. The differential calorimeter described here permits simultaneous measurements of energy absorption in different materials. From these values the relative contributions from gammas and non-thermalized neutrons to the total absorbed dose can be calculated. The possibility of inserting a liquid sample into the calorimeter makes it very convenient for radiation chemical studies of aqueous solutions or, generally, liquid systems. For a period of about two years, reliable values for the absorbed doses in different materials have been obtained, which are in good agreement with other physical measurements in the RA research reactor at Vinca. The chemical system described is an aqueous solution of oxalic acid. Its advantages are: the possibility of measurements in the multi-megarad region and negligible induced radioactivity. The results of calorimetric and chemical measurements are presented

  8. The 2009 nobel prize in chemistry and the importance of synchrotron radiation technology in biochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of the structure of prokaryote ribosome, which was awarded the 2009 Nobel price in Chemistry, is reviewed. In the 20-year long history of this effort, synchrotron radiation facilities played an essential role. Such large scale scientific facilities are now indispensable in frontier research. Through the example of ribosome, the regional features of the support provided by synchrotron radiation is described. (authors)

  9. Chemistry and pharmacology of the prophylactic agents against radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ssuvorov, N.N.; Shashkov, V.S.

    The chemistry and pharmacology of radioprotectors are discussed. The first chapter is devoted to aminothiols and other sulfur containing compounds, covering the synthesis, physical-chemical and pharmacological properties, biosynthesis, metabolism and mechanism of action--a pattern repeated throughout the book. The later chapters are devoted to mediators of vegetative nervous system, indolalkylamines, histamine and acetylcholine respectively.

  10. Modeling of iodine radiation chemistry in the presence of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taghipour, Fariborz; Evans, Greg J. E-mail: evansg@chem-eng.toronto.edu

    2002-06-01

    A kinetic-based model was developed that simulates the radiation chemistry of iodine in the presence of organic compounds. The model's mechanistic description of iodine chemistry and generic semi-mechanistic reactions for various classes of organics, provided a reasonable representation of experimental results. The majority of the model and experimental results of iodine volatilization rates were in agreement within an order of magnitude.

  11. 2012 RADIATION CHEMISTRY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE AND GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR, JULY 28, - AUGUST 3, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    y LaVerne

    2012-08-03

    The overarching objective of this conference is to catalyze the interchange of new ideas and recent discoveries within the basic radiation sciences of physics, chemistry, and biology, and to facilitate translating this knowledge to applications in medicine and industry. The 9 topics for the GRC are: "œFrom Energy Absorption to Disease", "œBiodosimetry after a Radiological Incident," "œTrack Structure and Low Energy Electrons," "Free Radical Processes in DNA and Proteins," "Irradiated Polymers for Industrial/ Medical Applications," "Space Radiation Chemistry/Biology," "Nuclear Power and Waste Management," "Nanoparticles and Surface Interfaces", and the "Young Investigator" session.

  12. Radiation physics and chemistry in heavy-ion cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, M; Krajcar Bronic, I.

    2007-01-01

    Heavy ions, such as carbon and oxygen ions, are classified as high-LET radiations, and produce a characteristic dose-depth distribution different from that of low-LET radiations such as γ-rays, xrays and electrons. Heavy ions lose less energy at the entrance to an irradiated biological system up to some depth than the low-LET radiations, while they deposit a large amount of dose within a very narrow range at a certain depth, producing the characteristic sharp peak called the Bragg peak. There...

  13. Basic radiation chemistry for the ionising energy treatment of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before we can understand the chemistry involved in the irradiation of complex substances such as food we need to have some appreciation of the reactions involved and the products formed when ionising energy interacts with the simple substances such as water and dilute solutions. Reactions involving hydrated electrons, hydrogen atoms and hydroxyl radicals are examined and methods for minimising radiolytic effects in foods are discussed

  14. Applications of radio and radiation chemistry to chemical evolution studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma radiolysis of malonic acid, succinic acid and their corresponding nitriles was carried out over a wide range of radiation doses. The radiolytic products detected were H2, CO2, CO, NH3 and carboxylic acids. The results obtained supported the hypothesis that in the prebiotic milieu, ionizing radiation might have contributed to the synthesis of compounds of relevance in biological systems. (author) 11 refs

  15. Several interfaces between radiation physics and chemistry that could pleasure each other more

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper offers an overview of currently active areas in Radiation Chemistry that may be pertinent to what Radiation Physicists can calculate. It begins with an overlapping topic, the nonhomogeneous kinetics of reactions in spurs followed by electron thermalization distances and thermal electron mobilities in fluids, electron scattering in gases, and finally, a possible new approach to calculating the energies and shapes of the optical absorption bands of solvated electrons. 18 figures, 2 tables

  16. 9. International symposium on nuclear chemistry, radiochemistry and radiation chemistry. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents the abstracts of 30 contributions covering mainly photochemical reactions, irradiation of organic chemicals, gamma-radiation in wastewater treatment, PIXE analysis, and some aspects of nuclear spectroscopic instrumentation in radiochemical analysis

  17. Effect of coolant chemistry on PWR radiation transport processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of various PWR-type coolant chemistry regimes on the behavior of corrosion products has been studied in the DIDO Water Loop at Harwell. While the extent of in-core spinel deposition is influenced by pH in a manner to be expected from the temperature coefficient of solubility of nickel-iron spinel, there is evidence that boric acid plays a role apart from its influence on pH. Out-of-core deposition of active cobalt on stainless steel takes place largely in the chromium-rich inner oxide layer, and there is also significant uptake of corrosion products into the film on Zircaloy. Deposition depends on flow characteristics in different ways for different elements. The evidence suggests that in DWL soluble species are dominant in out-of-core deposition processes for corrosion products. The adsorption of cobalt in zirconium oxide provides a route for deposition on fuel elements which may in some circumstances be more significant than spinel deposition. A most important factor governing deposition behavior is surface condition; the influence of weld regions and the effect of varying pretreatment conditions have both been demonstrated. Some alternative chemistry regimes have been explored, but do not appear to offer any advantages with respect to activity transport control over the more conventional regime based on lithium hydroxide and hydrogen dosing. 8 refs., 26 figs., 28 tabs

  18. How radiation chemistry can help understand primary processes in the energy deposition process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One uncertainty in the pre-chemical period is the travel of the electron prior to thermalization. It is shown that radiation chemistry, while unable to determine the distribution of ions, can act as a sensitive test for distributions. Chemical evolution in the pre-chemical times may also be inferred

  19. Radiation Chemistry Data Center: information services produced from the bibliographic data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bibliographic data base covering radiation chemistry and photochemistry and currently containing 50,000 references is used to generate current-awareness publications, literature searches and other reference aids. The content and structure of the data base are described along with procedures for storage, retrieval and reformatting of information therefrom. (author)

  20. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiolytic species are formed approximately 1 ps after the passage of ionizing radiation through matter. After their formation, they diffuse and chemically react with other radiolytic species and neighboring biological molecules, leading to various oxidative damage. Therefore, the simulation of radiation chemistry is of considerable importance to understand how radiolytic species damage biological molecules [1]. The step-by-step simulation of chemical reactions is difficult, because the radiolytic species are distributed non-homogeneously in the medium. Consequently, computational approaches based on Green functions for diffusion-influenced reactions should be used [2]. Recently, Green functions for more complex type of reactions have been published [3-4]. We have developed exact random variate generators of these Green functions [5], which will allow us to use them in radiation chemistry codes. Moreover, simulating chemistry using the Green functions is which is computationally very demanding, because the probabilities of reactions between each pair of particles should be evaluated at each timestep [2]. This kind of problem is well adapted for General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPGPU), which can handle a large number of similar calculations simultaneously. These new developments will allow us to include more complex reactions in chemistry codes, and to improve the calculation time. This code should be of importance to link radiation track structure simulations and DNA damage models.

  1. Chemistry and radiation in oxy-fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    -flame measurement data are available; the other is a conventional 609MW utility boiler which is assumed to be operating under oxy-fuel combustion condition with dry flue gas recycle. A new model for gaseous radiative properties is developed, validated, and then implemented in the CFD simulations. The CFD results...

  2. Radiation chemistry and origins of life on earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of radiation chemical processes in prebiotic time of earth history and their influence on arise of organic life on Earth has been discussed. The formation of chiral compounds in prebioticsoup' and its further evolution for creation of bioorganic molecules was also presented and discussed as an alternative of existing hypothesis of cosmic origin of biologic life in the Earth

  3. Solid state radiation chemistry of the DNA backbone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long term goal of this program is to determine the fundamental rules needed to predict the type and yield of damage produced in DNA due to direct effects of ionizing radiation. The focus is on damage to the sugar-phosphate backbone, damage that would lead to strand breaks. Model systems have been chosen that permit various aspects of this problem to be investigated. The emphasis will be on single crystals of monosaccharides, nucleosides, and nucleotides but will also include some powder work on polynucleotides. In these model systems, free radical products and reactions are observed by electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) techniques. The information thus gained is used in constructing rules that predict what primary free radicals are formed in single crystals of model compounds and the reactions stemming from the primary radicals. The formulation of a set of rules that work in model systems will represent a major advance toward formulating a set of rules that predict the direct damage in DNA itself. In a broader context this program is part of the effort to understand and predict the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation received at low dose rates over long periods of time. Assessment of low dose effects requires a basic understanding of the action of radiation at the molecular level. By contributing to that basic understanding, this program will help solve the problems of risk assessment under low dose conditions. 5 refs., 3 figs

  4. The radiation chemistry of some poly(arylene phosphene oxide)s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The poly(arylene phosphene oxide)s are a class of thermoplastics with high glass transition temperature, high modulus and inherent flame retardancy. These properties make them good candidates for use in high energy radiation environments, such as occur in space and in the nuclear industry. In this paper the high energy radiation chemistry of a series of these polymers will be discussed, including studies of the radicals formed, the molecular weight changes and the changes in chemical structure evident through NMR spectroscopy. The radiation sensitivity of the polymers will be compared with that of the related poly(arylene sulfone)s and poly(arylene ether ether ketone)s

  5. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (No. 26)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during the fiscal year of 1992 (April 1, 1992 - March 31, 1993) are described. The research activities were conducted under the two research programs: the study on laser-induced organic chemical reactions and the study on basic radiation technology for functional materials. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: laser-induced organic synthesis, modification of polymer surface by laser irradiation, radiation-induced polymerization, preparation of fine particles by gamma ray irradiation, and electron beam dosimetry. The operation report of the irradiation facilities is also included. (author)

  6. Radiation protection relevant to nuclear chemistry in the light of recent international recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper discusses the requirements for radiation protection in nuclear chemistry which are related to the recent recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. These recommendations have been incorporated into the updated International Basic Safety Standards issued by the International Atomic Energy Agency as well as into new relevant Directives of the European Union based on which the legislation of the EU Member States has to be updated. The new international requirements are aimed at the further improvement of strict control of radiation sources, their safety and security as well as the minimization of exposure to workers and members of the public. It would be appropriate for the nuclear chemistry community to become familiar with the changes in radiation protection so that it would be easier for nuclear chemists to adopt new requirements in their everyday practical work. (author)

  7. Radiation chemistry of salt-mine brines and hydrates. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenks, G.H.; Walton, J.R.; Bronstein, H.R.; Baes, C.F. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Certain aspects of the radiation chemistry of NaCl-saturated MgCl/sub 2/ solutions and MgCl/sub 2/ hydrates at temperatures in the range of 30 to 180/sup 0/C were investigated through experiments. A principal objective was to establish the values for the yields of H/sub 2/ (G(H/sub 2/)) and accompanying oxidants in the gamma-ray radiolysis of concentrated brines that might occur in waste repositories in salt. We concluded that G(H/sub 2/) from gamma-irradiated brine solution into a simultaneously irradiated, deaerated atmosphere above the solution is between 0.48 and 0.49 over most of the range 30 to 143/sup 0/C. The yield is probably somewhat lower at the lower end of this range, averaging 0.44 at 30 to 45/sup 0/C. Changes in the relative amounts of MgCl/sub 2/ and NaCl in the NaCl-saturated solutions have negligible effects on the yield. The yield of O/sub 2/ into the same atmosphere averages 0.13, independent of the temperature and brine composition, showing that only about 50% of the radiolytic oxidant that was formed along with the H/sub 2/ was present as O/sub 2/. We did not identify the species that compose the remainder of the oxidant. We concluded that the yield of H/sub 2/ from a gamma-irradiated brine solution into a simultaneously irradiated atmosphere containing 5 to 8% air in He may be greater than the yield in deaerated systems by amounts ranging from 0% for temperatures of 73 to 85/sup 0/C, to about 30 and 40% for temperatures in the ranges 100 to 143/sup 0/C and 30 to 45/sup 0/C, respectively. We did not establish the mechanism whereby the air affected the yields of H/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/. The values found in this work for G(H/sub 2/) in deaerated systems are in approximate agreement with the value of 0.44 for the gamma-irradiation yield of H/sub 2/ in pure H/sub 2/O at room temperature. They are also in agreement with the values predicted by extrapolation from the findings of previous researchers for the value for G(H/sub 2/) in 2 M NaCl solutions

  8. Chemistry and Radiative Transfer of Water in Cold, Dense Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Keto, Eric; Caselli, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory's recent detections of water vapor in the cold, dense cloud L1544 allow a direct comparison between observations and chemical models for oxygen species in conditions just before star formation. We explain a chemical model for gas phase water, simplified for the limited number of reactions or processes that are active in extreme cold ($<$ 15 K). In this model, water is removed from the gas phase by freezing onto grains and by photodissociation. Water is formed as ice on the surface of dust grains from O and OH and released into the gas phase by photodesorption. The reactions are fast enough with respect to the slow dynamical evolution of L1544 that the gas phase water is in equilibrium for the local conditions thoughout the cloud. We explain the paradoxical radiative transfer of the H$_2$O ($1_{10}-1_{01}$) line. Despite discouragingly high optical depth caused by the large Einstein A coefficient, the subcritical excitation in the cold, rarefied H$_2$ causes the line brightnes...

  9. Chemistry and radiative shielding in star forming galactic disks

    CERN Document Server

    Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Kim, Chang-Goo; Ostriker, Eve C; Klein, Richard I; Li, Shule; McKee, Christopher F; Stone, James M

    2016-01-01

    To understand the conditions under which dense, molecular gas is able to form within a galaxy, we post-process a series of three-dimensional galactic-disk-scale simulations with ray-tracing based radiative transfer and chemical network integration to compute the equilibrium chemical and thermal state of the gas. In performing these simulations we vary a number of parameters, such as the ISRF strength, vertical scale height of stellar sources, cosmic ray flux, to gauge the sensitivity of our results to these variations. Self-shielding permits significant molecular hydrogen (H2) abundances in dense filaments around the disk midplane, accounting for approximately ~10-15% of the total gas mass. Significant CO fractions only form in the densest, n>~10^3 cm^-3, gas where a combination of dust, H2, and self-shielding attenuate the FUV background. We additionally compare these ray-tracing based solutions to photochemistry with complementary models where photo-shielding is accounted for with locally computed prescript...

  10. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1980 through March 31, 1981. The latest report, for 1980, is JAERI-M 9214. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  11. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (no. 20)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1986 through March 31, 1987. The latest report, for 1985, is JAERI-M 87-046. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on surface phenomena under electron and ion irradiations; polymerization under the irradiation of electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  12. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, No. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1976 through March 31, 1977. The latest report, for 1976, is JAERI-M 6702. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide and hydrogen; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (auth.)

  13. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (no.19)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1985 through March 31, 1986. The latest report, for 1984, is JAERI-M 86-051. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on surface phenomena under electron and ion irradiations; polymerization under the irradiation of electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  14. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, No. 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1978 through March 31, 1979. The latest report, for 1978, is JAERI-M 7949. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: studies on reactions of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane; polymerization under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers, degradation, cross-linking, and grafting. (author)

  15. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (No. 8)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes research activities in Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during the one year period from April 1, 1974 through March 31, 1975. The major research field covers the following subjects: studies related to reactions of carbon monoxide and hydrogen; polymerization studies under the irradiation of high dose rate electron beams; modification of polymers; fundamental studies on polymerization, degradation, crosslinking, and grafting. (auth.)

  16. Radiation Protection Aspects of Primary Water Chemistry and Source-term Management Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the beginning of the 1990's, occupational exposures in nuclear power plant has strongly decreased, outlining efforts achieved by worldwide nuclear operators in order to reach and maintain occupational exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) in accordance with international recommendations and national regulations. These efforts have focused on both technical and organisational aspects. According to many radiation protection experts, one of the key features to reach this goal is the management of the primary system water chemistry and the ability to avoid dissemination of radioactivity within the system. It outlines the importance for radiation protection staff to work closely with chemistry staff (as well as operation staff) and thus to have sufficient knowledge to understand the links between chemistry and the generation of radiation field. This report was prepared with the primary objective to provide such knowledge to 'non-chemist'. The publication primarily focuses on three topics dealing with water chemistry, source term management and remediation techniques. One key objective of the report is to provide current knowledge regarding these topics and to address clearly related radiation protection issues. In that mind, the report prepared by the EGWC was also reviewed by radiation protection experts. In order to address various designs, PWRs, VVERs, PHWRs and BWRs are addressed within the document. Additionally, available information addressing current operating units and lessons learnt is outlined with choices that have been made for the design of new plants. Chapter 3 of this report addresses current practices regarding primary chemistry management for different designs, 'how to limit activity in the primary circuit and to minimise contamination'. General information is provided regarding activation, corrosion and transport of activated materials in the primary circuit (background on radiation field generation). Primary chemistry aspects that

  17. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical research and development efforts related to the design and ultimate operation of molten-salt breeder reactor systems are concentrated on fuel- and coolant-salt chemistry, including the development of analytical methods for use in these systems. The chemistry of tellurium in fuel salt is being studied to help elucidate the role of this element in the intergranular cracking of Hastelloy N. Studies were continued of the effect of oxygen-containing species on the equilibrium between dissolved UF3 and dissolved UF4, and, in some cases, between the dissolved uranium fluorides and graphite, and the UC2. Several aspects of coolant-salt chemistry are under investigation. Hydroxy and oxy compounds that could be formed in molten NaBF4 are being synthesized and characterized. Studies of the chemistry of chromium (III) compounds in fluoroborate melts were continued as part of a systematic investigation of the corrosion of structural alloys by coolant salt. An in-line voltammetric method for determining U4+/U3+ ratios in fuel salt was tested in a forced-convection loop over a six-month period. (LK)

  18. Hahn-Meitner-Institute, Division of Radiation Chemistry. Scientific report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1982, the follow radiation chemistry projects were carried out by HMI: 1. interface surface processes and energy transfer (fast chemical reactions at the interface surfaces, application to the storage and conversion of solar energy); 2. pulse radiolysis and kinematics (generation and investigation of short-lived high-activity chemical particles; interaction of low-energy ions, atoms, molecules and molecule aggregate bodies); 3. insulators and plastics (investigation of electronic and ionic primary processes in negatively electric gases; radiation-induced variations of dielectric properties; radiation damage and the underlying processes of decomposition by oxidation in natural and synthetic polymers; photo-induced polymerization). To round off the report there is a comprehensive list of publications and lectures. (RB)

  19. 3D radiative hydrodynamic simulations of protostellar collapse with H-C-O dynamical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Dzyurkevich, Natalia; Lesaffre, Pierre; Semenov, Dimitry

    2016-01-01

    Combining the co-evolving chemistry, hydrodynamics and radiative transfer is an important step for star formation studies. It allows both a better link to observations and a self-consistent monitoring of the magnetic dissipation in the collapsing core. Our aim is to follow a chemo-dynamical evolution of collapsing dense cores with a reduced gas-grain chemical network. We present the results of radiative hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations of 1 M$_\\odot$ isolated dense core collapse. The physical setup includes RHD and dynamical evolution of a chemical network. To perform those simulations, we merged the multi-dimensional adaptive-mesh-refinement code RAMSES and the thermo-chemistry Paris-Durham shock code. We simulate the formation of the first hydro-static core (FHSC) and the co-evolution of 56 species describing mainly H-C-O chemistry. Accurate benchmarking is performed, testing the reduced chemical network against a well-establiched complex network. We show that by using a compact set of reactions, one can matc...

  20. Radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins in relation to the radiation sterilization of high-protein foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important source of information on the question of whether or not toxic or other deleterious substances are formed in the radiation sterilization of foods is the chemical study of reaction products and reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of individual food components. The present evaluation of the radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins outlines the various radiation-induced processes which lead to amino acid degradation and to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of higher molecular weight. Among the latter are the α,α'-diamino dicarboxylic acids which are formed as major products in the radiolysis of peptides both in aqueous solution and in the solid state. The α,α'-diamino acids are of particular interest as irradiation products because they represent a class of compounds not normally encountered in plant and animal protein sources. Such compounds have, however, been isolated from certain types of bacteria and pathogenic toxins. All of the available data strongly suggest that the α,α'-diamino acids are produced in significant yield in the radiation sterilization of high protein foods. The importance of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of these and of other high molecular weight products in irradiated food is emphasized

  1. Radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins in relation to the radiation sterilization of high-protein foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important source of information on the question of whether or not toxic or other deleterious substances are formed in the radiation sterilization of foods is the chemical study of reaction products and reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of individual food components. The present evaluation of the radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides, and proteins outlines the various radiation-induced processes which lead to amino acid degradation and to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of higher molecular weight. Among the latter are the α,α'-diamino dicarboxylic acids which are formed as major products in the radiolysis of peptides both in aqueous solution and in the solid state. The α,α'-diamino acids are of particular interest as irradiation products because they represent a class of compounds not normally encountered in plant and animal protein sources. Such compounds have, however, been isolated from certain types of bacteria and bacterial products. All of the available data strongly suggest that the α,α'-diamino acids are produced in significant yield in the radiation sterilization of high protein foods. The importance of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of these and of other high molecular weight products in irradiated food is emphasized

  2. The radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins in relation to the radiation sterilization of high-protein foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important source of information on the question of whether or not toxic or other deleterious substances are formed in the radiation sterilization of foods is the chemical study of reaction products and reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of individual food components. The present evaluation of the radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins outlines the various radiation-induced processes which lead to amino acid degradation and to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of higher molecular weight. Among the latter are the α,α'-diamino dicarboxylic acids which are formed as major products in the radiolysis of peptides both in aqueous solution and in the solid state. The α,α'-diamino acids are of particular interest as irradiation products because they represent a class of compounds not normally encountered in plant and animal protein sources. Such compounds have, however, been isolated from certain types of bacteria and bacterial products. All of the available data strongly suggest that the α,α'-diamino acids are produced in significant yield in the radiation sterilization of high protein foods. The importance of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of these and of other high molecular weight products in irradiated food is emphasised. (author)

  3. Radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins in relation to the radiation sterilization of high-protein foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, W. M.

    1981-12-01

    An important source of information on the question of whether or not toxic or other deleterious substances are formed in the radiation sterilization of foods is the chemical study of reaction products and reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of individual food components. The present evaluation of the radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides, and proteins outlines the various radiation-induced processes which lead to amino acid degradation and to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of higher molecular weight. Among the latter are the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino dicarboxylic acids which are formed as major products in the radiolysis of peptides both in aqueous solution and in the solid state. The ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino acids are of particular interest as irradiation products because they represent a class of compounds not normally encountered in plant and animal protein sources. Such compounds have, however, been isolated from certain types of bacteria and bacterial products. All of the available data strongly suggest that the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino acids are produced in significant yield in the radiation sterilization of high protein foods. The importance of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of these and of other high molecular weight products in irradiated food is emphasized.

  4. Sulfur cycle and sulfate radiative forcing simulated from a coupled global climate-chemistry model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.-C. Tsai

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The sulfur cycle and radiative effects of sulfate aerosol on climate are studied with a Global tropospheric Climate-Chemistry Model in which chemistry, radiation and dynamics are fully coupled. Production and removal mechanisms of sulfate are analyzed for the conditions of natural and anthropogenic sulfur emissions. Results show that the 1985 anthropogenic emission doubled the global SO2 and sulfate loadings from its natural value of 0.15 and 0.27 Tg S, respectively. Under natural conditions, the fraction of sulfate produced in-cloud is 87%, and the lifetime of SO2 and sulfate are 1.8 and 4.0 days, respectively; whereas with anthropogenic emissions, changes in in-cloud sulfate production are small, while SO2 and sulfate lifetimes are significant reduced (1.0 and 2.4 days, respectively. The doubling of sulfate results in a direct radiative forcing of −0.32 and −0.14 W m−2 under clear-sky and all-sky conditions, respectively, and a significant first indirect forcing of −1.69 W m−2. The first indirect forcing is sensitive to the relationship between aerosol concentration and cloud droplet number concentration. Two aspects of chemistry-climate interaction are addressed. Firstly, the coupling effects lead to 10% and 2% decreases in sulfate loading, respectively, for the cases of natural and anthropogenic added sulfur emissions. Secondly, only the indirect effect of sulfate aerosols yields significantly stronger signals in changes of near surface temperature and sulfate loading than changes due to intrinsic climate variability, while other responses to the indirect effect and all responses to the direct effect are weak.

  5. Sulfur cycle and sulfate radiative forcing simulated from a coupled global climate-chemistry model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.-C. Tsai

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The sulfur cycle and radiative effects of sulfate aerosol on climate are studied with a Global tropospheric Climate-Chemistry Model in which chemistry, radiation and dynamics are fully coupled. Production and removal mechanisms of sulfate are analyzed for the conditions of natural and anthropogenic sulfur emissions. Results show that the 1985 anthropogenic emission tripled the global SO2 and sulfate loadings from its natural value of 0.16 and 0.10 Tg S, respectively. Under natural conditions, the fraction of sulfate produced in-cloud is 74%; whereas with anthropogenic emissions, the fraction of in-cloud sulfate production slightly increased to 76%. Lifetimes of SO2 and sulfate under polluted conditions are estimated to be 1.7 and 2.0 days, respectively. The tripling of sulfate results in a direct radiative forcing of −0.43 W m−2 (clear-sky or −0.24 W m−2 (all-sky, and a significant first indirect forcing of −1.85 W m−2, leading to a mean global cooling of about 0.1 K. Regional forcing and responses are significantly stronger than the global values. The first indirect forcing is sensitive to the relationship between aerosol concentration and cloud droplet number concentration which requires further investigation. Two aspects of chemistry-climate interaction are addressed. Firstly, the coupling effects lead to a slight decrease of 1% in global sulfate loading for both the cases of natural and anthropogenic added sulfur emissions. Secondly, only the indirect effect of sulfate aerosols yields significantly stronger signals in changes of near surface temperature and sulfate loading than changes due to intrinsic climate variability, while other responses to the indirect effect and all responses to the direct effect are below noise level.

  6. Radiation and Chemistry in Nuclear Waste: The NOx System and Organic Aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe results that advance the understanding of radiation effects in HLW stored at DOE sites. The scientific issues on which we focus include: a. reactions of primary radicals (e-, OH, and H) of water radiolysis with NO3-/NO2-, b. redox chemistry of NOx radicals and ions, c. degradation mechanisms and kinetics of organic components of HLW, and d. interfacial radiolysis effects in aqueous suspensions and at crystalline NaNO3 interfaces. Understanding these effects and the chemical reacations they induce have contributed to resolving safety issues and setting waste management guidelines at Hanford.

  7. Radiation and Chemistry in Nuclear Waste: The NOx System and Organic Aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisel, Daniel; Camaioni, Donald M.; Orlando, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    We describe results that advance the understanding of radiation effects in HLW stored at DOE sites. The scientific issues on which we focus include: a) reactions of primary radicals (e-, OH, and H) of water radiolysis with NO3-/NO2-, b) redox chemistry of NOx radicals and ions, c) degradation mechanisms and kinetics of organic components of HLW, and d) interfacial radiolysis effects in aqueous suspensions and at crystalline NaNO3 interfaces. Understanding these effects and the chemical reacations they induce have contributed to resolving safety issues and setting waste management guidelines at Hanford.

  8. Chemistry of a protoplanetary disk with grain settling and Lyman alpha radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fogel, Jeffrey K J; Bergin, Edwin A; Calvet, Nuria; Semenov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    We present results from a model of the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks. In our models we directly calculate the changing propagation and penetration of a high energy radiation field with Lyman alpha radiation included. We also explore the effect on our models of including dust grain settling. We find that, in agreement with earlier studies, the evolution of dust grains plays a large role in determining how deep the UV radiation penetrates into the disk. Significant grain settling at the midplane leads to much smaller freeze-out regions and a correspondingly larger molecular layer, which leads to an increase in column density for molecular species such as CO, CN and SO. The inclusion of Lyman alpha radiation impacts the disk chemistry through specific species that have large photodissociation cross sections at 1216 A. These include HCN, NH3 and CH4, for which the column densities are decreased by an order of magnitude or more due to the presence of Lyman alpha radiation in the UV spectrum. A few spe...

  9. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research progress is reported in programs on fuel-salt chemistry, properties of compounds in the Li--Te system, Te spectroscopy UF4--H equilibria, porous electrode studies of molten salts, fuel salt-coolant salt reactions, thermodynamic properties of transition-metal fluorides, and properties of sodium fluoroborate. Developmental work on analytical methods is summarized including in-line analysis of molten MSBR fuel, analysis of coolant-salts for tritium, analysis of molten LiF--BeF2--ThF4 for Fe and analysis of LiF--BeF--ThF4 for Te

  10. The radiation chemistry of heterogeneous and homogeneous nitrogen and water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements were made of the radiation chemical products such as nitric acid formed when nitrogen gas mixtures in the presence of water vapour and liquid were irradiated with the mixed neutron/gamma field of the BEPO reactor to doses of ca 1021 to 1023 eVg-1. The water was analysed for NO3-, NO2- and NH4+ ions, also for H2O2, NH2OH and N2H4. The investigation was aimed at obtaining information relevant to the DIDO and PLUTO reactors, but the results are of more general interest. The results are discussed in terms of reactions to be expected, especially those of N atoms, and are compared with those of other work on radiation and gas discharge chemistry. (author)

  11. HMI Department of Radiation Chemistry: Results of scientific activities in 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the radiation chemistry department of the Hahn-Meitner-Institute in Berlin, 4 subjects are treated largely the progress of which made in 1984 is herein reported: 1) Interface processes and energy conversion (reaction pathways of photoinduced charge carriers and their in energy conversion mechanisms); 2) Pulse radiolysis (generation and investigation of shortlived chemically quick-reacting particles); 3) Kinematics (reciprocal action with ion, atom and molecule collisions; clarification of the dynamics of chemical reactions; 4) Insulators and plastics/physical and chemical primary processes when these materials are subjected to high-energy radiation, light or UV light). A list of publications and lectures is added to complement the description of results gained from R and D work. (BR)

  12. Dosimetry requirements in support of an in-reactor radiation chemistry programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactors are now used as radiation sources in a wide range of studies. In some, the changes observed result from the interaction of the irradiated material with only one type of radiation present in the reactor; in others, a number of different radiations may produce the observed effect. In any investigation of the effects of radiation on matter, it is necessary to know the spectrum of the radiation used. This information should be available in the form of the variation of photon or particle flux density with photon or particle energy. The amount of change observed in an irradiated material will always be the product of the radiation flux density and an interaction function, integrated over the radiation spectrum. The nature of this interaction function will vary with the type of study being performed. The radiation spectra in reactors are complex in form and cover wide ranges of photon and particle energies. Given sufficient information about the fission reaction, and about the geometry and materials of construction of a reactor, it is possible, in principle, to calculate the spectra of the reactor radiations. It is then possible, in principle, to calculate the rates of production of change in irradiated materials. In this paper the conventions used in radiation chemistry are discussed. This is followed by a discussion of the various types of calorimeters which can be used for dosimetry, with some remarks about their limitations. The reasons for choosing an isothermal-type calorimeter for the work at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE) are given, followed by a description of the construction, characteristics, and calibration of the calorimeters in use. It is shown that under the proper conditions these calorimeters measure the ideal absorbed dose-rate, or kerma rate. By the use of three calorimeters, as described, containing respectively graphite, anthracene, and an empty can, measurements were made of the dose rates in graphite and in anthracene, and

  13. Application of Radiation Chemistry to Some Selected Technological Issues Related to the Development of Nuclear Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrowski, Krzysztof; Skotnicki, Konrad; Szreder, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    The most important contributions of radiation chemistry to some selected technological issues related to water-cooled reactors, reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes, and fuel evolution during final radioactive waste disposal are highlighted. Chemical reactions occurring at the operating temperatures and pressures of reactors and involving primary transients and stable products from water radiolysis are presented and discussed in terms of the kinetic parameters and radiation chemical yields. The knowledge of these parameters is essential since they serve as input data to the models of water radiolysis in the primary loop of light water reactors and super critical water reactors. Selected features of water radiolysis in heterogeneous systems, such as aqueous nanoparticle suspensions and slurries, ceramic oxides surfaces, nanoporous, and cement-based materials, are discussed. They are of particular concern in the primary cooling loops in nuclear reactors and long-term storage of nuclear waste in geological repositories. This also includes radiation-induced processes related to corrosion of cladding materials and copper-coated iron canisters, dissolution of spent nuclear fuel, and changes of bentonite clays properties. Radiation-induced processes affecting stability of solvents and solvent extraction ligands as well oxidation states of actinide metal ions during recycling of the spent nuclear fuel are also briefly summarized.

  14. Application of Radiation Chemistry to Some Selected Technological Issues Related to the Development of Nuclear Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrowski, Krzysztof; Skotnicki, Konrad; Szreder, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    The most important contributions of radiation chemistry to some selected technological issues related to water-cooled reactors, reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes, and fuel evolution during final radioactive waste disposal are highlighted. Chemical reactions occurring at the operating temperatures and pressures of reactors and involving primary transients and stable products from water radiolysis are presented and discussed in terms of the kinetic parameters and radiation chemical yields. The knowledge of these parameters is essential since they serve as input data to the models of water radiolysis in the primary loop of light water reactors and super critical water reactors. Selected features of water radiolysis in heterogeneous systems, such as aqueous nanoparticle suspensions and slurries, ceramic oxides surfaces, nanoporous, and cement-based materials, are discussed. They are of particular concern in the primary cooling loops in nuclear reactors and long-term storage of nuclear waste in geological repositories. This also includes radiation-induced processes related to corrosion of cladding materials and copper-coated iron canisters, dissolution of spent nuclear fuel, and changes of bentonite clays properties. Radiation-induced processes affecting stability of solvents and solvent extraction ligands as well oxidation states of actinide metal ions during recycling of the spent nuclear fuel are also briefly summarized. PMID:27573502

  15. Development of evaluation tool for radiation dose rate distribution in PCV of Hamaoka BWR plants based on water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed an evaluation tool for the radiation dose rate distribution of the work areas in the primary containment vessel (PCV) of Units 3, 4 (BWR5) and 5 (ABWR) at Hamaoka NPS. This tool has been constructed based on the transport behavior of radioactive corrosion products in the primary cooling water of BWR. This tool can be used to evaluate quantitatively the effects of the dose reduction methods by water chemistry control or radiation management. It is composed of two calculation codes; water chemistry code (ACTTUBE) and radiation dose rate code (RADTUBE). ACTTUBE calculates the piping dose rates based on the mass balance of corrosion products, 6 kinds of metal and 5 kinds of radionuclide, among the parts of primary cooling water, such as reactor water, feed water, fuel rod surface and out-of-core piping surface. RADTUBE calculates the dose rate distribution based on the radiation shielding calculation from a calculation result of ACTTUBE. Additionally, this tool has a visualization function of calculated radiation dose rate distribution in the PCV by using a wireless controller and 3D glasses/monitor in order to improve user convenience. The accuracy of the tool's calculation results was evaluated using the water chemistry data and radiation dose rate data of the Hamaoka plants. As a result, it was confirmed that this tool had sufficient accuracy to be used in the evaluation of radiation dose rates for the radiation management of actual plants. (author)

  16. A Radiation Chemistry Code Based on the Greens Functions of the Diffusion Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation produces several radiolytic species such as.OH, e-aq, and H. when interacting with biological matter. Following their creation, radiolytic species diffuse and chemically react with biological molecules such as DNA. Despite years of research, many questions on the DNA damage by ionizing radiation remains, notably on the indirect effect, i.e. the damage resulting from the reactions of the radiolytic species with DNA. To simulate DNA damage by ionizing radiation, we are developing a step-by-step radiation chemistry code that is based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE), which is able to follow the trajectories of all particles and their reactions with time. In the recent years, simulations based on the GFDE have been used extensively in biochemistry, notably to simulate biochemical networks in time and space and are often used as the "gold standard" to validate diffusion-reaction theories. The exact GFDE for partially diffusion-controlled reactions is difficult to use because of its complex form. Therefore, the radial Green's function, which is much simpler, is often used. Hence, much effort has been devoted to the sampling of the radial Green's functions, for which we have developed a sampling algorithm This algorithm only yields the inter-particle distance vector length after a time step; the sampling of the deviation angle of the inter-particle vector is not taken into consideration. In this work, we show that the radial distribution is predicted by the exact radial Green's function. We also use a technique developed by Clifford et al. to generate the inter-particle vector deviation angles, knowing the inter-particle vector length before and after a time step. The results are compared with those predicted by the exact GFDE and by the analytical angular functions for free diffusion. This first step in the creation of the radiation chemistry code should help the understanding of the contribution of the indirect effect in the

  17. Radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of acetonitrile and propionitrile in the megarad dose range. [. gamma. Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draganic, Z.D.; Draganic, I.G.; Shushtarian, M.J.

    1976-04-01

    A study was made of the radiolytic behavior of dilute, neutral, oxygen-free aqueous solutions of CH/sub 3/CN and C/sub 2/H/sub 5/CN. Small-molecular products were identified as RCHO, NH/sub 3/, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/. The decomposition of nitrile is followed by high yields of formation of the nonvolatile nitrogen-containing compounds, G(N). The ..gamma..-irradiated solutions exhibit a positive biuret reaction. Several amino acids were identified among radiolytic products, and glycine and alanine were found to be the most abundant for CH/sub 3/CN and C/sub 2/H/sub 5/CH, respectively. Their yields increased after strong acid hydrolysis of the irradiated samples. The free radicals formed by reactions of RCN with H, OH, and e/sub aq/- were found to be important for the phenomena observed. It is suggested that the positive biuret reaction, ir spectra, and the release of amino acids on acid hydrolysis provide some evidence on the formation of peptidic materials and might be of interest for the evaluation of the role that ionizing radiation might have played in prebiotic chemical evolution in aqueous media.

  18. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities dealing with the chemical problems related to design and ultimate operation of molten-salt reactor systems are described. An experimental test stand was constructed to expose metallurgical test specimens to Te2 vapor at defined temperatures and deposition rates. To better define the chemistry of fluoroborate coolant, several aspects are being investigated. The behavior of hydroxy and oxy compounds in molten NaBF4 is being investigated to define reactions and compounds that may be involved in corrosion and/or could be involved in methods for trapping tritium. Two corrosion products of Hastelloy N, Na3CrF6 and Na5Cr3F14, were identified from fluoroborate systems. The evaluation of fluoroborate and alternate coolants continued. Research on the behavior of hydrogen and its isotopes is summarized. The solubilities of hydrogen, deuterium, and helium in Li2BeF4 are very low. The sorption of tritium on graphite was found to be significant (a few milligrams of tritium per kilogram of graphite), possibly providing a means of sequestering a portion of the tritium produced. Development of analytical methods continued with emphasis on voltammetric and spectrophotometric techniques for the in-line analysis of corrosion products such as Fe2+ and Cr3+ and the determination of the U3+/U4+ ratio in MSBR fuel salt. Similar studies were conducted with the NaBF4--NaF coolant salt. Information developed during the previous operation of the CSTF has been assessed and used to formulate plans for evaluation of in-line analytical methods in future CSTF operations. Electroanalytical and spectrophotometric research suggests that an electroactive protonic species is present in molten NaBF4--NaF, and that this species rapidly equilibrates with a volatile proton-containing species. Data obtained from the CSTF indicated that tritium was concentrated in the volatile species. (JGB)

  19. Primary processes in radiation chemistry. LET (Linear Energy Transfer) effect in water radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of ionizing radiations on aqueous solutions leads to water ionization and then to the formation of radical species and molecular products (e-aq, H., OH., H2O2, H2). It has been shown that the stopping power, characterized by the LET value (Linear Energy Transfer) becomes different when the nature of the ionizing radiations is different. Few data are nowadays available for high LET radiations such as protons and high energy heavy ions. These particles have been used to better understand the primary processes in radiation chemistry. The yield of a chemical dosimeter (the Fricke dosimeter) and those of the hydrogen peroxide have been determined for different LET. The effect of the dose rate on the Fricke dosimeter yield and on the H2O2 yield has been studied too. When the dose rate increases, an increase of the molecular products yield is observed. At very high dose rate, this yield decreases on account of the attack of the molecular products by radicals. The H2O2 yield in alkaline medium decreases when the pH reaches 12. This decrease can be explained by a slowing down of the H2O2 formation velocity in alkaline medium. Superoxide radical has also been studied in this work. A new detection method: the time-resolved chemiluminescence has been perfected for this radical. This technique is more sensitive than the absorption spectroscopy. Experiments with heavy ions have allowed to determine the O2.- yield directly in the irradiation cell. The experimental results have been compared with those obtained with a Monte Carlo simulation code. (O.M.)

  20. Can a coupled meteorology–chemistry model reproduce the historical trend in aerosol direct radiative effects over the Northern Hemisphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of a coupled meteorology–chemistry model, i.e., Weather Research and Forecast and Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ), to reproduce the historical trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and clear-sky shortwave radiation (SWR) over the Northern Hemisphere h...

  1. Comparative Experimental Investigation of Titan's Atmospheric Chemistry Driven by Solar EUV Radiation and Energetic Electron Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanaka, Hiroshi; Lavvas, P.; Yelle, R. V.; Smith, M. A.

    2010-10-01

    The observations by the Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) clearly demonstrate the importance of complex organic chemistry in the upper atmosphere of Titan; a complex coupling of neutral and ion chemistry for organic aerosol generation induced by EUV photons and Saturn's magnetospheric charged particles. To understand the dominant energy source for aerosol formation and its formation chemistry, we comparatively investigate the chemical mechanism in N2/CH4 gas mixtures resulting from EUV-VUV synchrotron radiation (50-150 nm) and tunable mono-energetic electron beam irradiation (5 eV - 2000 eV). These excitation energy sources cover the dominant energy source available in Titan's upper atmosphere. Our previous study of the EUV-VUV photolysis of N2/CH4 gas mixtures revealed the unique role of nitrogen photoionization in the catalytic formation of complex hydrocarbons and in the major nitrogen fixation process in Titan's upper atmosphere (Imanaka and Smith, 2007, 2009, 2010). However, relative roles of ion-molecule reactions and radical/neutral reactions in such complex chemistry remain to be determined. We characterized the electron energy distribution by conducting the Langmuir probe measurements. Degradation of the primary photoelectron from N2 photoionization at 20.6 eV photons is clearly observed, and the electron density rapidly decreases down to 109-10 cm-3, which suggests the complex coupling of ion-molecular reactions and dissociative ion-electron recombination reactions for the observed development of complex organic molecules. The electron beam irradiation experiments at energy larger than 200 eV shows distinct gaseous product distribution with nitrogenated gaseous species from those with EUV irradiation products. The generation of secondary electrons and multiple inelastic collisions of fast electrons might increases the nitrogen fixation efficiency. The much less stringent spin selection rules could

  2. Fast response methods in the radiation chemistry of lethal damage in intact cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation-induced lethal damage in bacteria and mammalian cells involves some important chemical processes which extend up to about 10-2s after the initiating energy deposition. The gas explosion technique, analogous to the use of flash photolysis in photochemistry and pulse radiolysis in radiation chemistry, was applied to examine the kinetics of some of the fast processes within intact cells. The time resolution of this technique is about 100 μs. Five nanosecond electron pulses and the rapid transition from virtually anoxic (2) to well oxygenated (>105 ppm O2) conditions can be used as the fast probes to determine the time scale of the radiosensitization by oxygen. The apparent differences between the observed intracellular kinetics of the reactions of O2 and of TAN (triacetoneamine-N-oxyl) with target damage and the reactions of these agents with DNA radicals support the view that O2 is not sensitized by reacting directly with DNA damage. In general, the processes described in this review appear to conform to simple bimolecular reaction kinetics. The intracellular reaction rates of the various agents tested are all slower than those expected from the rates of their reactions with radicals in dilute aqueous solution probably due to the complex structure of the cells. (Yamashita, S.)

  3. A review of the radiation chemistry of iodine compounds in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large amounts of radioactive iodine are formed in the fission of uranium in nuclear reactors. Some of this may be released to the coolant from the fuel either by diffusion through the canning material, or following the failure of a fuel pin. The iodine, which is released mainly as I2 and methyl iodide, is transported with the coolant and, in direct cycle water cooled reactors, some is carried over with the steam to the turbines, where contamination may build up in the vicinity of steam leaks. Any assessment of the mechanism of the transport of iodine requires a knowledge of the relative amounts of the various oxidation states present, and must consider not only the thermal behaviour of iodine in water, but also the radiation chemical effects. A review is presented of the radiation chemistry of inorganic iodine compounds and methyl iodide in aqueous solutions. A number of unstable intermediates have been identified including species with iodide in valency states II, IV, VI and VIII. A considerable number of discrepancies exist in the literature data, and requirements for further work are identified. (author)

  4. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 22. April 1, 1988 - March 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1988 through March 31, 1989. The latest report, for 1987, is JAERI-M 90-054. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects : (i) studies on laser-induced organic chemical reactions and (ii) studies on radiation chemistry of high polymers and radiation dosimetry. (J.P.N.)

  5. The effects of UV radiation, litter chemistry, and drought on desert litter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.; Nieto, B.; Hewins, D. B.; Barnes, P. W.; McDowell, N. G.; Pockman, W.; Rahn, T.; Throop, H. L.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that photodegradation by solar UV radiation can be a major driver of litter decomposition in dryland ecosystems. The importance of photodegradation in litter decomposition appears to decline with precipitation, suggesting that the relative importance of photodegradation may increase given current projections of future increases in drought severity in the southwestern USA. Several previous studies indicate that UV-B radiation (280-320 nm) is the most effective waveband in breaking chemical bonds forming organic material, but whether UV-B exposure may facilitate subsequent decomposition by microbes (i.e., photo-priming) has received little attention. In this study, we tested the effects of pre-exposure UV radiation (photo-priming), litter chemistry (lignin and cellulose content and nitrogen content), and drought on the rate of litter decomposition in a semi-arid ecosystem. To understand the effects of UV radiation on litter decomposition, we pre-exposed litter to three radiation treatments: control (no radiation), UV-A+visible, UV-A+UV-B+visible. Litter was exposed to the equivalent of three months' solar radiation of southern New Mexico prior to microbial decomposition. There were three litter types: basswood sheets (high lignin content), pure cellulose filter paper, and mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) leaflets. Following radiation treatment, litter was placed in mesh litterbags that were buried within a large-scale precipitation manipulation experiment at the Sevilleta Long-Term Ecological Research site: control (ambient precipitation), elevated precipitation (x2 ambient precipitation), and drought (x0.5 ambient precipitation). We collected a subset of bags at 0, 1, 3, and 6 months and measured mass remaining and carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content. After 6 months, mass remaining of filter paper and basswood sheets did not differ from the initial mass, but mesquite mass remaining declined over 30%. The pre-exposure UV effects had minimal

  6. Annual reports of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (No. 23, 24, 25)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during three year period from April 1, 1989 through March 31, 1992 are described. The latest report. for 1988, is JAERI-M 91-054. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: laser-induced organic synthesis, modification of polymer surface by laser irradiation, polymerization and modification of polymers by electron beam, and electron beam dosimetry. (author) 77 refs

  7. Evolution of energy deposition processes in anthracene single crystal from photochemistry to radiation chemistry under excitation with synchrotron radiation from 3 to 700 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absolute values of quantum yield Φ(hν) of singlet exciton formation in anthracene single crystals were measured as a function of photon energy hν, with the usage of synchrotron radiation (SR) in 3-700 eV region. Values of Φ(hν) were found to increase linearly for hν≥75 eV. For hν≤40 eV, values of Φ(hν) gave a wealth of structures and are not linear to hν. Because number of secondary electrons produced by radiation is thought to increase in proportional to the incident photon energy, it is natural to conclude that the radiation chemistry effect becomes dominant above 75 eV. On the other hand, values of Φ(hν) showed response due to resonance rather than linear dependence with hν, which implies that the photochemical effect is dominant below 40 eV

  8. he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keene, William C. [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia

    2013-05-20

    This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry's MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences

  9. Primary water chemistry monitoring from the point of view of radiation build-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic operational principles of a computer code system calculating the primary circuit corrosion product activities based on actual measured plant chemistry data are presented. The code system consists of two parts: FeSolub.prg: calculates the characteristic iron solubilities based on actual primary water chemistry (H3BO3KOH, ... etc.) and plant load (MW) data. A developed solubility calculation method has been applied fitted to magnetite solubility data of several authors; RADTRAN.exe: calculates primary circuit water and surface corrosion product activities based on results of FeSolub.prg or planned water chemistry data up to the next shutdown. The computer code system is going to be integrated into a general primary water chemistry monitoring and surveillance system. (author). 15 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  10. The Lampedusa supersite of ChArMex: observing aerosol-radiation interactions and gas phase chemistry in the Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formenti, Paola; di Sarra, Alcide Giorgio

    2014-05-01

    Within the frame of the ADRIMED (Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact in the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region) project of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean experiment (ChArMex), the ENEA Laboratory for Climate Study "Roberto Sarao" (WMO/GAW/NDACC) on the Island of Lampedusa (35°31'N, 12°37°E) has been augmented to one of the supersites of the first phase of the Special Observing Period 1 by the measurements of the in situ properties of aerosols and trace gases by the of the PortablE Gas and Aerosol Sampling Units (PEGASUS) mobile station. The ground-based measurements have been completed by several coordinated overpasses of the ATR-42 and the F20 of SAFIRE. In this paper we present the first highlights of operations, which took place between June 6 and July 8 2013. Insights on the data provide with an unprecedented characterisation of the physico-chemical and properties aerosols and gas phase chemistry on air masses of various origins (pollution, marine, mineral dust, …..). The effect of aerosols on radiation fields is ascertained by coupling ground-based and aircraft measurements during dedicated overpasses providing with measurements of upwelling and downwelling shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes together with the properties of the aerosol load resolved on the column. Coordination with CALIPSO overpasses will also be explored.

  11. Application of ionic liquid as a reaction field of radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced polymerizations and reductions in ionic liquids are introduced in this report. Ionic liquids are suitable substitutes not only for organic solvents as media for radiation induced reactions but also enhance their reactivities. (author)

  12. Effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on plant chemistry: nutritional consequences for a specialist and generalist lagomorph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thines, Nicole J; Shipley, Lisa A; Bassman, John H; Fellman, John K; Mattison, D Scott; Slusser, James R; Gao, Wei

    2007-05-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation has been increasing in temperate latitudes in recent decades and is expected to continue rising for some time. Enhanced UV-B radiation can change plant chemistry, yet the effects of these changes on mammalian herbivores are unknown. To examine the influence of enhanced UV-B radiation on nutrition of a specialist and generalist hindgut fermenter, we measured nutritional and chemical constituents of three common North American range plants, big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), yarrow (Achillea millefolium), and bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoregneria spicata), and how these changes influenced in vitro dry matter digestibility and in vivo digestibility by pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis) and eastern cottontails (Sylvilagus floridanus). Forages were irradiated for 3 mo with ambient (1x) or supplemental (1.6x) UV-B radiation representing a 15% ozone depletion for Pullman, WA, USA. Enhanced UV-B radiation had minimal effects on the nutritional content and the tannin-binding capacity of forages. Similarly, the terpene concentration in sagebrush and yarrow was not affected by higher UV-B irradiances. Flavonoid compounds increased in sagebrush but decreased in yarrow. Rabbit preference and intake was not affected by treatment levels for any forage species and no differences were found between treatments for dry matter, fiber, protein digestibility, and apparent digestible energy. PMID:17406969

  13. The effects of metallicity, UV radiation and non-equilibrium chemistry in high-resolution simulations of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richings, A. J.; Schaye, Joop

    2016-05-01

    We present a series of hydrodynamic simulations of isolated galaxies with stellar mass of 109 M⊙. The models use a resolution of 750 M⊙ per particle and include a treatment for the full non-equilibrium chemical evolution of ions and molecules (157 species in total), along with gas cooling rates computed self-consistently using the non-equilibrium abundances. We compare these to simulations evolved using cooling rates calculated assuming chemical (including ionization) equilibrium, and we consider a wide range of metallicities and UV radiation fields, including a local prescription for self-shielding by gas and dust. We find higher star formation rates and stronger outflows at higher metallicity and for weaker radiation fields, as gas can more easily cool to a cold (few hundred Kelvin) star-forming phase under such conditions. Contrary to variations in the metallicity and the radiation field, non-equilibrium chemistry generally has no strong effect on the total star formation rates or outflow properties. However, it is important for modelling molecular outflows. For example, the mass of H2 outflowing with velocities {>}50 {km} {s}^{-1} is enhanced by a factor ˜20 in non-equilibrium. We also compute the observable line emission from C II and CO. Both are stronger at higher metallicity, while C II and CO emission are higher for stronger and weaker radiation fields, respectively. We find that C II is generally unaffected by non-equilibrium chemistry. However, emission from CO varies by a factor of ˜2-4. This has implications for the mean XCO conversion factor between CO emission and H2 column density, which we find is lowered by up to a factor ˜2.3 in non-equilibrium, and for the fraction of CO-dark molecular gas.

  14. A two-dimensional atmospheric chemistry modeling investigation of Earth's Phanerozoic O3 and near-surface ultraviolet radiation history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfoot, Michael B. J.; Beerling, David J.; Lomax, Barry H.; Pyle, John A.

    2007-04-01

    We use the Cambridge two-dimensional (2-D) chemistry-radiation transport model to investigate the implications for column O3 and near-surface ultraviolet radiation (UV), of variations in atmospheric O2 content over the Phanerozoic (last 540 Myr). Model results confirm some earlier 1-D model investigations showing that global annual mean O3 column increases monotonically with atmospheric O2. Sensitivity studies indicate that changes in temperature and N2O exert a minor influence on O3 relative to O2. We reconstructed Earth's O3 history by interpolating the modeled relationship between O3 and O2 onto two Phanerozoic O2 histories. Our results indicate that the largest variation in Phanerozoic column O3 occurred between 400 and 200 Myr ago, corresponding to a rise in atmospheric O2 to ˜1.5 times the present atmospheric level (PAL) and subsequent fall to ˜0.5 PAL. The O3 response to this O2 decline shows latitudinal differences, thinning most at high latitudes (30-40 Dobson units (1 DU = 0.001 atm cm) at 66°N) and least at low latitudes (5-10 DU at 9°N) where a "self-healing" effect is evident. This O3 depletion coincides with significant increases in the near-surface biologically active UV radiation at high latitudes, +28% as weighted by the Thimijan spectral weighting function. O3 and UV changes were exacerbated when we incorporated a direct feedback of the terrestrial biosphere on atmospheric chemistry, through enhanced N2O production as the climate switched from an icehouse to a greenhouse mode. On the basis of a summary of field and laboratory experimental evidence, we suggest that these UV radiation increases may have exerted subtle rather than catastrophic effects on ecosystem processes.

  15. Effects of hydrogen water chemistry on radiation field buildup in BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of boiling water reactor (BWR) plants worldwide are currently operating under hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). In some reactors, when switching from normal water chemistry (NWC) to HWC, an increase in the recirculation piping dose rates has been observed. Understanding the key factors which affect the dose rate increase is the subject of our current investigation. Laboratory experiments have been conducted under controlled chemistry conditions to examine the rates of 60Co deposition and the characteristic of oxide films formed on stainless steel surfaces. The activity buildup data obtained from two operating BWRs are carefully reviewed and discussed in this paper. Based on both laboratory and reactor data, a plausible mechanism of enhanced activity buildup under HWC conditions is hypothesized. (orig.)

  16. Radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins in relation to the radiation sterilization of high-protein foods. [106 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, W.M.

    1979-03-01

    An important source of information on the question of whether or not toxic or other deleterious substances are formed in the radiation sterilization of foods is the chemical study of reaction products and reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of individual food components. The present evaluation of the radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins outlines the various radiation-induced processes which lead to amino acid degradation and to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of higher molecular weight. Among the latter are the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino dicarboxylic acids which are formed as major products in the radiolysis of peptides both in aqueous solution and in the solid state. The ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino acids are of particular interest as irradiation products because they represent a class of compounds not normally encountered in plant and animal protein sources. Such compounds have, however, been isolated from certain types of bacteria and pathogenic toxins. All of the available data strongly suggest that the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino acids are produced in significant yield in the radiation sterilization of high protein foods. The importance of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of these and of other high molecular weight products in irradiated food is emphasized.

  17. Discussion meeting on nuclear-, radio- and radiation chemistry - basics and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following fields have been represented at this meeting: 1. nuclear reactions and properties of the formed products; 2. geo- and cosmochemistry; 3. chemistry of actinides and other radioisotopes; 4. radioanalysis; 5. isotope applications; 6. nuclear fuel cycle. Single papers are listed under appropriate categories. (RB)

  18. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) summer 2013 campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Mallet, Marc; Dulac, François; Formenti, Paola; Nabat, Pierre; Sclare, J.; Roberts, Gregory; Pelon, Jacques; Ancellet, Gérard; Tanré, Didier; Parol, Frédéric; A. di Sarra; Alados, L.; Arndt, J.; Auriol, Frédérique; L. Blarel

    2015-01-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a collaborative research program federating international activities to investigate Mediterranean regional chemistry-climate interactions. A special observing period (SOP-1a) including intensive airborne measurements was performed in the framework of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ADRIMED) project during the Mediterranean dry season over the western and central Mediterr...

  19. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) summer 2013 campaign

    OpenAIRE

    M. Mallet; Dulac, F.; Formenti, P.; P. Nabat; Sciare, J; Roberts, G; Pelon, J.; G. Ancellet; Tanré, D.; F. Parol; A. di Sarra; Alados, L.; Arndt, J; F. Auriol; Blarel, L.

    2015-01-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a collaborative research program federating international activities to investigate Mediterranean regional chemistry-climate interactions. A special observing period (SOP-1a) including intensive airborne measurements was performed in the framework of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ADRIMED) project during the Mediterranean dry season ove...

  20. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) summer 2013 campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Mallet, Marc; DULAC, FRANÇOIS; Formenti, Paola; Nabat, Pierre; Sclare, J.; Roberts, Gregory; Pelon, Jacques; Ancellet, Gérard; Tanré, Didier; Parol, Frédéric; A. Di Sarra; L. Alados; Arndt, J; Auriol, Frédérique; Blarel, L.

    2015-01-01

    International audience The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a collaborative research program federating international activities to investigate Mediterranean regional chemistry-climate interactions. A special observing period (SOP-1a) including intensive airborne measurements was performed in the framework of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ADRIMED) project during the Mediterranean dry season over the we...

  1. Some progress on radiation chemistry of substances of biological interests and biological applications of radiation technology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies in China on the detection method of irradiated food, mechanism of DNA damage induced by peroxidation, radiolysis of natural products and herbs are reviewed on the update open literature, and some progress on applications of radiation technology is summarized. (author)

  2. Nonequilibrium radiation and chemistry models for aerocapture vehicle flowfields, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: the development of detailed nonequilibrium radiation models for molecules along with appropriate models for atoms; the inclusion of nongray radiation gasdynamic coupling in the VSL (Viscous Shock Layer) code; the development and evaluation of various electron-electronic energy models; and an examination of the effects of shock slip.

  3. Radiation chemistry of L-Alanine: application to EPR dosimetry (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy ionizing radiation leaves stable radicals to certain organic materials, such as alanine and tartrate. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the identification and quantification of these radiation-induced radicals. An EPR method has been applied to study the radical characteristics of L-alanine after gamma radiation dose in the range of ∼mGy to 60 kGy. The free radicals induced by gamma radiation were fairly stable, and EPR intensity, radical concentration, was proportional to the absorbed dose up to 60 kGy. From the results of our EPR measurements, it can be concluded that an alanine/EPR method is a useful technique for gamma radiation dosimetry from very low to high dose range

  4. Lightning-driven inner radiation belt energy deposition into the atmosphere: implications for ionisation-levels and neutral chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Lightning-generated whistlers lead to coupling between the troposphere, the Van Allen radiation belts and the lower-ionosphere through Whistler-induced electron precipitation (WEP. Lightning produced whistlers interact with cyclotron resonant radiation belt electrons, leading to pitch-angle scattering into the bounce loss cone and precipitation into the atmosphere. Here we consider the relative significance of WEP to the lower ionosphere and atmosphere by contrasting WEP produced ionisation rate changes with those from Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR and solar photoionisation. During the day, WEP is never a significant source of ionisation in the lower ionosphere for any location or altitude. At nighttime, GCR is more significant than WEP at altitudes <68 km for all locations, above which WEP starts to dominate in North America and Central Europe. Between 75 and 80 km altitude WEP becomes more significant than GCR for the majority of spatial locations at which WEP deposits energy. The size of the regions in which WEP is the most important nighttime ionisation source peaks at ~80 km, depending on the relative contributions of WEP and nighttime solar Lyman-α. We also used the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry (SIC model to consider the atmospheric consequences of WEP, focusing on a case-study period. Previous studies have also shown that energetic particle precipitation can lead to large-scale changes in the chemical makeup of the neutral atmosphere by enhancing minor chemical species that play a key role in the ozone balance of the middle atmosphere. However, SIC modelling indicates that the neutral atmospheric changes driven by WEP are insignificant due to the short timescale of the WEP bursts. Overall we find that WEP is a significant energy input into some parts of the lower ionosphere, depending on the latitude/longitude and altitude, but does not play a significant role in the neutral chemistry of the mesosphere.

  5. Lightning-driven inner radiation belt energy deposition into the atmosphere: implications for ionisation-levels and neutral chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, C. J.; Enell, C.-F.; Turunen, E.; Clilverd, M. A.; Thomson, N. R.; Verronen, P. T.

    2007-08-01

    Lightning-generated whistlers lead to coupling between the troposphere, the Van Allen radiation belts and the lower-ionosphere through Whistler-induced electron precipitation (WEP). Lightning produced whistlers interact with cyclotron resonant radiation belt electrons, leading to pitch-angle scattering into the bounce loss cone and precipitation into the atmosphere. Here we consider the relative significance of WEP to the lower ionosphere and atmosphere by contrasting WEP produced ionisation rate changes with those from Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) and solar photoionisation. During the day, WEP is never a significant source of ionisation in the lower ionosphere for any location or altitude. At nighttime, GCR is more significant than WEP at altitudes WEP starts to dominate in North America and Central Europe. Between 75 and 80 km altitude WEP becomes more significant than GCR for the majority of spatial locations at which WEP deposits energy. The size of the regions in which WEP is the most important nighttime ionisation source peaks at ~80 km, depending on the relative contributions of WEP and nighttime solar Lyman-α. We also used the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry (SIC) model to consider the atmospheric consequences of WEP, focusing on a case-study period. Previous studies have also shown that energetic particle precipitation can lead to large-scale changes in the chemical makeup of the neutral atmosphere by enhancing minor chemical species that play a key role in the ozone balance of the middle atmosphere. However, SIC modelling indicates that the neutral atmospheric changes driven by WEP are insignificant due to the short timescale of the WEP bursts. Overall we find that WEP is a significant energy input into some parts of the lower ionosphere, depending on the latitude/longitude and altitude, but does not play a significant role in the neutral chemistry of the mesosphere.

  6. Effect of Space Radiation Processing on Lunar Soil Surface Chemistry: X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukes, C.; Loeffler, M.J.; Baragiola, R.; Christoffersen, R.; Keller, J.

    2009-01-01

    Current understanding of the chemistry and microstructure of the surfaces of lunar soil grains is dominated by a reference frame derived mainly from electron microscopy observations [e.g. 1,2]. These studies have shown that the outermost 10-100 nm of grain surfaces in mature lunar soil finest fractions have been modified by the combined effects of solar wind exposure, surface deposition of vapors and accretion of impact melt products [1,2]. These processes produce surface-correlated nanophase Feo, host grain amorphization, formation of surface patinas and other complex changes [1,2]. What is less well understood is how these changes are reflected directly at the surface, defined as the outermost 1-5 atomic monolayers, a region not easily chemically characterized by TEM. We are currently employing X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to study the surface chemistry of lunar soil samples that have been previously studied by TEM. This work includes modification of the grain surfaces by in situ irradiation with ions at solar wind energies to better understand how irradiated surfaces in lunar grains change their chemistry once exposed to ambient conditions on earth.

  7. Evaluation of updated nitric acid chemistry on ozone precursors and radiative effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Seltzer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study shows that revising the reaction rate of NO2 + HO• → HNO3 improves simulated nitrogen partitioning and adjusts the simulated radiative effects of several radiative forcing variables. Both laboratory and field study analysis have found that the reaction rate should be reduced by 13–30% from current recommendations. We evaluate the GEOS-Chem model over North America with and without the recommended update. Revising the NO2 + HO• → HNO3 rate coefficient improves model performance by increasing NOx concentrations in the upper troposphere and decreasing HNO3 throughout the troposphere. The downward revision of the NO2 + HO• → HNO3 rate increases the lifetime of NOx, increases O3 concentrations and increases the simulated radiative effects of tropospheric ozone. These findings demonstrate the influence the rate revision has on the composition of the atmosphere, the benefits it provides when compared to observations and the simulated radiative effects that the reduction induces.

  8. Advances in radiation chemistry of polymers. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting on radiation effects on polymers was held at the Radiation Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame to review and discuss advances in the radiation processing of polymers. The trends in the basic research, research and development, and industrial applications were reported. The scope of more applied uses of irradiation involving polymers ranged from discussions of the curing of materials for dental applications, to the effects on polyolefins, the most broadly used class of polymers prevalent in industrial radiation processing, and to emerging interests in hydrogels, carbon fiber composites, heterogeneous mixtures based on material by-products (scrap plastic and wood fragments), grafted materials and materials for electronic uses. In addition, the emerging interests in the use of recently developed high power x ray systems for industrial use were presented. The document contains 12 individual papers, each of them was indexed and abstracted separately

  9. On the Green's function of the partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction for radiation chemistry codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plante, Ianik, E-mail: ianik.plante-1@nasa.gov [Wyle Science, Technology & Engineering, 1290 Hercules, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Devroye, Luc, E-mail: lucdevroye@gmail.com [School of Computer Science, McGill University, 3480 University Street, Montreal H3A 0E9 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Several computer codes simulating chemical reactions in particles systems are based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE). Indeed, many types of chemical systems have been simulated using the exact GFDE, which has also become the gold standard for validating other theoretical models. In this work, a simulation algorithm is presented to sample the interparticle distance for partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction. This algorithm is considered exact for 2-particles systems, is faster than conventional look-up tables and uses only a few kilobytes of memory. The simulation results obtained with this method are compared with those obtained with the independent reaction times (IRT) method. This work is part of our effort in developing models to understand the role of chemical reactions in the radiation effects on cells and tissues and may eventually be included in event-based models of space radiation risks. However, as many reactions are of this type in biological systems, this algorithm might play a pivotal role in future simulation programs not only in radiation chemistry, but also in the simulation of biochemical networks in time and space as well.

  10. On the Green's function of the partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction for radiation chemistry codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc

    2015-09-01

    Several computer codes simulating chemical reactions in particles systems are based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE). Indeed, many types of chemical systems have been simulated using the exact GFDE, which has also become the gold standard for validating other theoretical models. In this work, a simulation algorithm is presented to sample the interparticle distance for partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction. This algorithm is considered exact for 2-particles systems, is faster than conventional look-up tables and uses only a few kilobytes of memory. The simulation results obtained with this method are compared with those obtained with the independent reaction times (IRT) method. This work is part of our effort in developing models to understand the role of chemical reactions in the radiation effects on cells and tissues and may eventually be included in event-based models of space radiation risks. However, as many reactions are of this type in biological systems, this algorithm might play a pivotal role in future simulation programs not only in radiation chemistry, but also in the simulation of biochemical networks in time and space as well.

  11. The effects of metallicity, UV radiation and non-equilibrium chemistry in high-resolution simulations of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Richings, Alexander J

    2015-01-01

    We present a series of hydrodynamic simulations of isolated galaxies with stellar mass of $10^{9} \\, \\rm{M}_{\\odot}$. The models use a resolution of $750 \\, \\rm{M}_{\\odot}$ per particle and include a treatment for the full non-equilibrium chemical evolution of ions and molecules (157 species in total), along with gas cooling rates computed self-consistently using the non-equilibrium abundances. We compare these to simulations evolved using cooling rates calculated assuming chemical (including ionisation) equilibrium, and we consider a wide range of metallicities and UV radiation fields, including a local prescription for self-shielding by gas and dust. We find higher star formation rates and stronger outflows at higher metallicity and for weaker radiation fields, as gas can more easily cool to a cold (few hundred Kelvin) star forming phase under such conditions. Contrary to variations in the metallicity and the radiation field, non-equilibrium chemistry generally has no strong effect on the total star formati...

  12. Novel metal containing polymers: characterization, radiation chemistry, and evaluation of utility for electron lithography. [Polymeric dicarboxylato-dioxouranium (VI) species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardiman, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Polymeric dicarboxylato-dioxouranium(VI) species have been synthesized by two different methods. An equilibrium controlled solution relation has been devised where bis(acetato)dioxouranium(VI) undergoes an acid interchange reaction with a simple dicarboxylic acid. The materials synthesized in this manner have been characterized by several methods. An end group analysis is possible by high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance detection of the acetate reactant fragment. The concentration of acetate relative to bridging ligand can be used to calculate number average molecular weights. The gel permeation chromatographic method has been calibrated with poly((3,3-dimethylpentanedioato)(dimethylsulfoxide)dioxouranium(VI)) and gives a simple relation of molecular weight versus milliliters of retention volume. Inclusion of the respective intrinsic viscosities and a comparison to the universal calibration curve, based on polystyrene, shows no significant difference. The net radiation chemistry of the polymeric materials has been evaluated with gel permeation chromatography. Solid samples were irradiated with TXCs gamma radiation and the change in molecular weight with dose determined. These studies indicate that many of the uranium containing polymers possess unusually high sensitivities to radiation.

  13. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, No. 29. April 1, 1995 - March 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual research activities of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI, during the fiscal year 1995, are reported. The research activities were conducted under two research programs: the study on laser-induced organic chemical reactions and the study on basic radiation technology for functional materials. Detailed description of the activities are presented as reviews on the following subjects: laser-induced chemical transformation, laser-induced reaction of polymer surface, photochemical separation of stable isotopes, microprocessing by radiation-induced polymerization, preparation of fine metal particles by gamma-ray irradiation, and electron beam dosimetry. The operation report of the irradiation facility is also included. In October 1995, the Osaka Laboratory was dissolved into the Kansai Research Establishment which was newly inaugurated to promote advanced photon research. Therefore, this is the final issue of the annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry. (author)

  14. Fervent: chemistry-coupled, ionizing and non-ionizing radiative feedback in hydrodynamical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczynski, C.; Glover, S. C. O.; Klessen, R. S.

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a radiative transfer code module for the magnetohydrodynamical adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH 4. It is coupled to an efficient chemical network which explicitly tracks the three hydrogen species H, H2, H+ as well as C+ and CO. The module is geared towards modelling all relevant thermal feedback processes of massive stars, and is able to follow the non-equilibrium time-dependent thermal and chemical state of the present-day interstellar medium as well as that of dense molecular clouds. We describe in detail the implementation of all relevant thermal stellar feedback mechanisms, i.e. photoelectric, photoionization and H2 dissociation heating as well as pumping of molecular hydrogen by UV photons. All included radiative feedback processes are extensively tested. We also compare our module to dedicated photodissociation region (PDR) codes and find good agreement in our modelled hydrogen species once our radiative transfer solution reaches equilibrium. In addition, we show that the implemented radiative feedback physics is insensitive to the spatial resolution of the code and show under which conditions it is possible to obtain well-converged evolution in time. Finally, we briefly explore the robustness of our scheme for treating combined ionizing and non-ionizing radiation.

  15. Sensitivity studies on the photolysis rates calculation in Amazonian atmospheric chemistry ? Part I: The impact of the direct radiative effect of biomass burning aerosol particles

    OpenAIRE

    Albuquerque, L. M. M.; Longo, K. M.; S. R. Freitas; Tarasova, T.; Plana Fattori, A.; Nobre, C.; Gatti, L. V.

    2005-01-01

    International audience The impact of the direct radiative effect of the aerosol particles on the calculation of the photolysis rates and consequently on the atmospheric chemistry in regional smoke clouds due to biomass burning over the Amazon basin is addressed in this work. It explores a case study for 19 September 2002 at LBA-RACCI-SMOCC (The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere experiment in Amazonia ? Radiation, Cloud, and Climate Interactions ? Smoke, Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climat...

  16. Nonequilibrium radiation and chemistry models for aerocapture vehicle flowfields, volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1991-01-01

    The computer programs developed to calculate the shock wave precursor and the method of using them are described. This method calculated the precursor flow field in a nitrogen gas including the effects of emission and absorption of radiation on the energy and composition of gas. The radiative transfer is calculated including the effects of absorption and emission through the line as well as the continuum process in the shock layer and through the continuum processes only in the precursor. The effects of local thermodynamic nonequilibrium in the shock layer and precursor regions are also included in the radiative transfer calculations. Three computer programs utilized by this computational scheme to calculate the precursor flow field solution for a given shock layer flow field are discussed.

  17. Tropospheric ozone changes, radiative forcing and attribution to emissions in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Stevenson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ozone (O3 from 17 atmospheric chemistry models taking part in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP has been used to calculate tropospheric ozone radiative forcings (RFs. All models applied a common set of anthropogenic emissions, which are better constrained for the present-day than the past. Future anthropogenic emissions follow the four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP scenarios, which define a relatively narrow range of possible air pollution emissions. We calculate a value for the pre-industrial (1750 to present-day (2010 tropospheric ozone RF of 410 mW m−2. The model range of pre-industrial to present-day changes in O3 produces a spread (±1 standard deviation in RFs of ±17%. Three different radiation schemes were used – we find differences in RFs between schemes (for the same ozone fields of ±10%. Applying two different tropopause definitions gives differences in RFs of ±3%. Given additional (unquantified uncertainties associated with emissions, climate-chemistry interactions and land-use change, we estimate an overall uncertainty of ±30% for the tropospheric ozone RF. Experiments carried out by a subset of six models attribute tropospheric ozone RF to increased emissions of methane (44±12%, nitrogen oxides (31 ± 9%, carbon monoxide (15 ± 3% and non-methane volatile organic compounds (9 ± 2%; earlier studies attributed more of the tropospheric ozone RF to methane and less to nitrogen oxides. Normalising RFs to changes in tropospheric column ozone, we find a global mean normalised RF of 42 mW m−2 DU−1, a value similar to previous work. Using normalised RFs and future tropospheric column ozone projections we calculate future tropospheric ozone RFs (mW m−2; relative to 1750 for the four future scenarios (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6.0 and RCP8.5 of 350, 420, 370 and 460 (in 2030, and 200, 300, 280 and 600 (in 2100. Models show some coherent responses of ozone to climate change

  18. Tropospheric Ozone Changes, Radiative Forcing and Attribution to Emissions in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D.S.; Young, P.J.; Naik, V.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Shindell, D. T.; Voulgarakis, A.; Skeie, R. B.; Dalsoren, S. B.; Myhre, G.; Berntsen, T. K.; Folberth, G. A.; Rumbold, S. T.; Collins, W. J.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Doherty, R. M.; Zeng, G.; vanNoije, T. P. C.; Strunk, A.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Plummer, D. A.; Strode, S. A.; Horowitz, L.; Lee, Y. H.; Szopa, S.; Sudo, K.; Nagashima, T.; Josse, B.; Cionni, I.; Righi, M.; Eyring, V.; Conley, A.; Bowman, K. W.; Wild, O.; Archibald, A.

    2013-01-01

    Ozone (O3) from 17 atmospheric chemistry models taking part in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) has been used to calculate tropospheric ozone radiative forcings (RFs). All models applied a common set of anthropogenic emissions, which are better constrained for the present-day than the past. Future anthropogenic emissions follow the four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios, which define a relatively narrow range of possible air pollution emissions. We calculate a value for the pre-industrial (1750) to present-day (2010) tropospheric ozone RF of 410 mW m-2. The model range of pre-industrial to present-day changes in O3 produces a spread (+/-1 standard deviation) in RFs of +/-17%. Three different radiation schemes were used - we find differences in RFs between schemes (for the same ozone fields) of +/-10 percent. Applying two different tropopause definitions gives differences in RFs of +/-3 percent. Given additional (unquantified) uncertainties associated with emissions, climate-chemistry interactions and land-use change, we estimate an overall uncertainty of +/-30 percent for the tropospheric ozone RF. Experiments carried out by a subset of six models attribute tropospheric ozone RF to increased emissions of methane (44+/-12 percent), nitrogen oxides (31 +/- 9 percent), carbon monoxide (15 +/- 3 percent) and non-methane volatile organic compounds (9 +/- 2 percent); earlier studies attributed more of the tropospheric ozone RF to methane and less to nitrogen oxides. Normalising RFs to changes in tropospheric column ozone, we find a global mean normalised RF of 42 mW m(-2) DU(-1), a value similar to previous work. Using normalised RFs and future tropospheric column ozone projections we calculate future tropospheric ozone RFs (mW m(-2); relative to 1750) for the four future scenarios (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6.0 and RCP8.5) of 350, 420, 370 and 460 (in 2030), and 200, 300, 280 and 600 (in 2100). Models show some

  19. Effects of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption on the chemistry, radiative, and transport processes in the stratosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volcanic eruptions can significantly impact trace gas distribution in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Massive eruptions, produce large quantities of SO2, H2O, chlorine compounds, and particulates. Modeling the effects of these impulsive increases in traces gases and comparing the results with observations from ground and satellite measurements provide unique opportunities to test current multi-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport models of the global atmosphere. Since these models are currently being used in assessment studies for future anthropogenic emissions of trace gases quantitative understanding of the accuracy of these models is essential. In this study, we have used observed data from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) aboard the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) to realistically represent both the time dependent change in aerosol surface area density and wavelength dependent extinction values from the Mt. Pinatubo Eruption. Increases in the aerosol loading increase the rate of important heterogeneous chemical reactions converting odd nitrogen in both ClONO2 and N2O5 to HNO3. Radiative effects of increases aerosol optical thickness include changes to net radiative heating rates and to actinic fluxes. Changes to heating rates will indirectly change chemical reaction rates via changes in atmospheric temperatures. changes in actinic fluxes will directly modify photodissociation rates

  20. The Radiative Decay of Green and Red Photoluminescent Phosphors: An Undergraduate Kinetics Experiment for Materials Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposti, C. Degli; Bizzocchi, L.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a laboratory experiment that allows the students to investigate the radiative properties of the green and red emitting phosphors that are employed in commercial fluorescent lamps. Making use of a spectrofluorometer, students first record the emission spectrum of a fluorescent lamp under normal operating conditions, and then…

  1. Radiation methods for upgrading and refining of feedstock for oil chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Upgrading and deep processing of heavy natural and artificial hydrocarbon mixes is a serious technological problem. Such countries as Canada, Kazakhstan, Russia, USA, and Venezuela are extremely rich with heavy hydrocarbon reserves such as heavy oil or bitumen, the giant Athabaska oil sand deposits. Commercial development of these resources has a global strategic importance. However, the presently applied classic thermocatalytic processing technology of bitumen and heavy oil has several serious technological problems is hamped further development of these fields because: Produced bitumen extracts and/or original heavy crudeoil are poorly flowing substances and can not be directly transported through pipelines - most effective transportation systems. They must be physically (using diluent) and/or chemically (by cracking) transformed into moveable substances. Nonupgraded bitumen extract and originally heavy crude are of low market value and also cannot be processed by majority existing refineries even in the countries of developed oil industry. When refined, non-upgraded bitumen extracts and heavy crude produces relatively small amounts of market valuable and satisfying environmental requirement products. Methods for oil feedstock radiation-induced conversion developed by the authors of the paper are based on original experiments on radiation processing of heavy and high-viscous oil, refining residue, heavy oil, oil product wastes, etc. Our analysis shows that radiation technology of hydrocarbon processing with its low capital and operational costs that several times lower than those for a conventional refinery, shall allow economically, technologically and environmentally overcoming noted problems by the most effective way. In this paper we discuss only applications of oil radiation processing for solution of transportation and refining problems of heavy oil crude and bitumen extract. Numerous laboratory experiments have

  2. Nonequilibrium radiation and chemistry models for aerocapture vehicle flowfields, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1991-01-01

    A technique was developed for predicting the character and magnitude of the shock wave precursor ahead of an entry vehicle and the effect of this precursor on the vehicle flow field was ascertained. A computational method and program were developed to properly model this precursor. Expressions were developed for the mass production rates of each species due to photodissociation and photoionization reactions. Also, consideration was given to the absorption and emission of radiation and how it affects the energy in each of the energy modes of both the atomic and diatomic species. A series of parametric studies were conducted covering a range of entry conditions in order to predict the effects of the precursor on the shock layer and the radiative heat transfer to the body.

  3. Fervent: Chemistry-coupled, ionising and non-ionising radiative feedback in magnetohydrodynamical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Baczynski, C; Klessen, R S

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a radiative transfer code module for the magnetohydrodynamical adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH 4. It is coupled to an efficient chemical network which explicitly tracks the three hydrogen species H, H_2, H+ as well as C+ and CO. The module is geared towards modeling all relevant thermal feedback processes of massive stars, and is able to follow the non-equilibrium time-dependent thermal and chemical state of the present-day interstellar medium as well as that of dense molecular clouds. We describe in detail the implementation of all relevant thermal stellar feedback mechanisms, i.e. photoelectric, photoionization and H_2 dissociation heating as well as pumping of molecular hydrogen by UV photons. All included radiative feedback processes are extensively tested. We also compare our module to dedicated photon-dominated region (PDR) codes and find good agreement in our modeled hydrogen species once our radiative transfer solution reaches equilibrium. In addition, we show that the implemented rad...

  4. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (No. 28). April 1, 1994 - March 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The annual research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during the fiscal year of 1994 (April 1, 1994 - March 31, 1995) are described. The research activities were conducted under two research programs: the study on laser-induced organic chemical reactions and the study on basic radiation technology for functional materials. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented as reviews on the following subjects: laser-induced chemical transformation, laser-induced reaction of polymer surface, microprocessing by radiation-induced polymerization, preparation of fine metal particles by gamma ray irradiation, and electron beam dosimetry. The operation report of the irradiation facilities is also included. (author).

  5. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (No. 28). April 1, 1994 - March 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during the fiscal year of 1994 (April 1, 1994 - March 31, 1995) are described. The research activities were conducted under two research programs: the study on laser-induced organic chemical reactions and the study on basic radiation technology for functional materials. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented as reviews on the following subjects: laser-induced chemical transformation, laser-induced reaction of polymer surface, microprocessing by radiation-induced polymerization, preparation of fine metal particles by gamma ray irradiation, and electron beam dosimetry. The operation report of the irradiation facilities is also included. (author)

  6. Radiative Effect of Clouds on Tropospheric Chemistry in a Global Three-Dimensional Chemical Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyu; Crawford, James H.; Pierce, Robert B.; Norris, Peter; Platnick, Steven E.; Chen, Gao; Logan, Jennifer A.; Yantosca, Robert M.; Evans, Mat J.; Kittaka, Chieko; Feng, Yan; Tie, Xuexi

    2006-01-01

    Clouds exert an important influence on tropospheric photochemistry through modification of solar radiation that determines photolysis frequencies (J-values). We assess the radiative effect of clouds on photolysis frequencies and key oxidants in the troposphere with a global three-dimensional (3-D) chemical transport model (GEOS-CHEM) driven by assimilated meteorological observations from the Goddard Earth Observing System data assimilation system (GEOS DAS) at the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). We focus on the year of 2001 with the GEOS-3 meteorological observations. Photolysis frequencies are calculated using the Fast-J radiative transfer algorithm. The GEOS-3 global cloud optical depth and cloud fraction are evaluated and generally consistent with the satellite retrieval products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). Results using the linear assumption, which assumes linear scaling of cloud optical depth with cloud fraction in a grid box, show global mean OH concentrations generally increase by less than 6% because of the radiative effect of clouds. The OH distribution shows much larger changes (with maximum decrease of approx.20% near the surface), reflecting the opposite effects of enhanced (weakened) photochemistry above (below) clouds. The global mean photolysis frequencies for J[O1D] and J[NO2] in the troposphere change by less than 5% because of clouds; global mean O3 concentrations in the troposphere increase by less than 5%. This study shows tropical upper tropospheric O3 to be less sensitive to the radiative effect of clouds than previously reported (approx.5% versus approx.20-30%). These results emphasize that the dominant effect of clouds is to influence the vertical redistribution of the intensity of photochemical activity while global average effects remain modest, again contrasting with previous studies. Differing vertical distributions

  7. Can a coupled meteorology-chemistry model reproduce the historical trend in aerosol direct radiative effects over the Northern Hemisphere?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xing

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a coupled meteorology-chemistry model, i.e., WRF-CMAQ, in reproducing the historical trend in AOD and clear-sky short-wave radiation (SWR over the Northern Hemisphere has been evaluated through a comparison of 21 year simulated results with observation-derived records from 1990–2010. Six satellite retrieved AOD products including AVHRR, TOMS, SeaWiFS, MISR, MODIS-terra and -aqua as well as long-term historical records from 11 AERONET sites were used for the comparison of AOD trends. Clear-sky SWR products derived by CERES at both TOA and surface as well as surface SWR data derived from seven SURFRAD sites were used for the comparison of trends in SWR. The model successfully captured increasing AOD trends along with the corresponding increased TOA SWR (upwelling and decreased surface SWR (downwelling in both eastern China and the northern Pacific. The model also captured declining AOD trends along with the corresponding decreased TOA SWR (upwelling and increased surface SWR (downwelling in eastern US, Europe and northern Atlantic for the period of 2000–2010. However, the model underestimated the AOD over regions with substantial natural dust aerosol contributions, such as the Sahara Desert, Arabian Desert, central Atlantic and north Indian Ocean. Estimates of aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE at TOA are comparable with those derived by measurements. Compared to GCMs, the model exhibits better estimates of surface- aerosol direct radiative efficiency (Eτ. However, surface-DRE tends to be underestimated due to the underestimated AOD in land and dust regions. Further investigation of TOA-Eτ estimations as well as the dust module used for estimates of windblown-dust emissions is needed.

  8. Can a coupled meteorology-chemistry model reproduce the historical trend in aerosol direct radiative effects over the Northern Hemisphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, J.; Mathur, R.; Pleim, J.; Hogrefe, C.; Gan, C.-M.; Wong, D. C.; Wei, C.

    2015-09-01

    The ability of a coupled meteorology-chemistry model, i.e., Weather Research and Forecast and Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ), to reproduce the historical trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and clear-sky shortwave radiation (SWR) over the Northern Hemisphere has been evaluated through a comparison of 21-year simulated results with observation-derived records from 1990 to 2010. Six satellite-retrieved AOD products including AVHRR, TOMS, SeaWiFS, MISR, MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua as well as long-term historical records from 11 AERONET sites were used for the comparison of AOD trends. Clear-sky SWR products derived by CERES at both the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface as well as surface SWR data derived from seven SURFRAD sites were used for the comparison of trends in SWR. The model successfully captured increasing AOD trends along with the corresponding increased TOA SWR (upwelling) and decreased surface SWR (downwelling) in both eastern China and the northern Pacific. The model also captured declining AOD trends along with the corresponding decreased TOA SWR (upwelling) and increased surface SWR (downwelling) in the eastern US, Europe and the northern Atlantic for the period of 2000-2010. However, the model underestimated the AOD over regions with substantial natural dust aerosol contributions, such as the Sahara Desert, Arabian Desert, central Atlantic and northern Indian Ocean. Estimates of the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) at TOA are comparable with those derived by measurements. Compared to global climate models (GCMs), the model exhibits better estimates of surface-aerosol direct radiative efficiency (Eτ). However, surface-DRE tends to be underestimated due to the underestimated AOD in land and dust regions. Further investigation of TOA-Eτ estimations as well as the dust module used for estimates of windblown-dust emissions is needed.

  9. Evolution of ozone, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston using a fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Barnard, James C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Grell, Georg A.; Peckham, Steven E.

    2006-11-01

    A new fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model is used to simulate the urban- to regional-scale variations in trace gases, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston over a 5 day summer period. Model performance is evaluated using a wide range of meteorological, chemistry, and particulate measurements obtained during the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study. The predicted trace gas and particulate distributions were qualitatively similar to the surface and aircraft measurements with considerable spatial variations resulting from urban, power plant, and industrial sources of primary pollutants. Sulfate, organic carbon, and other inorganics were the largest constituents of the predicted particulates. The predicted shortwave radiation was 30 to 40 W m-2 closer to the observations when the aerosol optical properties were incorporated into the shortwave radiation scheme; however, the predicted hourly aerosol radiative forcing was still underestimated by 10 to 50 W m-2. The predicted aerosol radiative forcing was larger over Houston and the industrial ship channel than over the rural areas, consistent with surface measurements. The differences between the observed and simulated aerosol radiative forcing resulted from transport errors, relative humidity errors in the upper convective boundary layer that affect aerosol water content, secondary organic aerosols that were not yet included in the model, and uncertainties in the primary particulate emission rates. The current model was run in a predictive mode and demonstrates the challenges of accurately simulating all of the meteorological, chemical, and aerosol parameters over urban to regional scales that can affect aerosol radiative forcing.

  10. Radiation-field buildup at Monticello BWR with hydrogen water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary recirculation piping at Monticello Nuclear Generating Plant was replaced in 1984. In November 1988, approximately midway through the third fuel cycle after pipe replacement, Monticello initiated hydrogen addition to mitigate the possibility of stress corrosion cracking. Due to expectedly high activity levels of Cobalt-60 observed in April of 1989, Northern States Power elected to decontaminate the entire primary system during the August 1989 refueling outage at the end of the third fuel cycle after pipe replacement. At the beginning of the fourth fuel cycle after pipe replacement, Monticello also initiated GEZIP in an effort to reduce future radiation level build-up. Four isotopic measurement campaigns of the Monticello recirculation system were performed since the system was decontaminated in 1989. These measurement campaigns and the radiation build-up at MNGP during fuel cycle 14 are the subject of this report. Northern States Power Company also performed a primary system decontamination at the end of cycle 14. the decontamination process was also monitored and the final report documenting these measurements, RCT-9107-2403, is appended to this report. 4 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs

  11. A Radiation Chemistry Code Based on the Green's Function of the Diffusion Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic radiation track structure codes are of great interest for space radiation studies and hadron therapy in medicine. These codes are used for a many purposes, notably for microdosimetry and DNA damage studies. In the last two decades, they were also used with the Independent Reaction Times (IRT) method in the simulation of chemical reactions, to calculate the yield of various radiolytic species produced during the radiolysis of water and in chemical dosimeters. Recently, we have developed a Green's function based code to simulate reversible chemical reactions with an intermediate state, which yielded results in excellent agreement with those obtained by using the IRT method. This code was also used to simulate and the interaction of particles with membrane receptors. We are in the process of including this program for use with the Monte-Carlo track structure code Relativistic Ion Tracks (RITRACKS). This recent addition should greatly expand the capabilities of RITRACKS, notably to simulate DNA damage by both the direct and indirect effect.

  12. Highly-acidic aqueous solution as a medium for radiation chemical studies: redox chemistry of phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the aqueous medium is a common choice for radiation induced generation of a variety of transients (radicals), typically a non-aqueous solvent (or even a frozen matrix) is employed to study a transient with a labile H+ (TrH.+), mainly to maintain low propensity of its deprotonation reaction TrH.+→Tr. + H+, that otherwise occur promptly in an aqueous type medium. However, in addition to the relative difficulty encountered in routine handling of such specific non-aqueous reaction media, low transient yield (GTrH.+) therein also restrict their use. Furthermore, any comparative study of the two species TrH.+ and Tr. remains unattainable. In this context we have probed the highly acidic aqueous solution as an alternative medium for radiation induced generation and subsequent chemical studies of acidic radical cation, TrH.+ vis-a-vis the de-protonated radical Tr.. This presentation highlights these results in three parts deals with (a) measurement of oxidizing and reducing radical yields for reactions in H2SO4 and HClO4 solutions, with highest acidity maintained at ∼14 M or Hammett acidity constant H0 - 7 in case of former and ∼10 M or H0 -5.2 in case of the latter; (b) measurement of the H-atom (the sole reducing radical) scavenging efficiency of dissolved O2 in such solution for maintaining exclusive oxidizing condition; and (c) employing these results, oxidation of phenol (C6H5OH) in such medium was probed and the reactions of its radical cation C6H5OH.+ against the phenoxyl radical C6H5O. were compared. Consequently, these studies also revealed an error in the previous measurement of the C6H5OH.+ pKa value (-2.0) which was corrected to -2.75. Details of these studies will be presented to show the efficacy of highly-acidic aqueous solutions as a regular medium for radiation chemical studies. (authors)

  13. Utilization of synchrotron radiation in analytical chemistry. Hard X-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper takes up X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) method, which has widely spread due to the energy selectivity of radiation, and fluorescent X-ray spectroscopy, which is utilized in non-destructive screening analysis and high precision quantitative analysis method for bulk materials due to the popularity of commercialized devices that usually use X-ray sources, and explains their devices, measurement principle, and applications. As the device, it introduces X-ray fluorescence spectrometer that was installed in SPring-8 beamline (BL05SS). As the application examples of fluorescent X-ray spectroscopy, it introduces the analysis of heavy elements due to high-energy X-ray excitation, and fluorescent X-ray analysis using microbeams. As the example of the use of XAFS method, it introduces the in-situ observation of the charging/discharging process of lithium battery. (A.O.)

  14. Radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of hydrogen cyanide in the megarad dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiolytic behavior of HCN was studied in dilute (0.1 M) oxygen-free solutions at their natural pH and at pH 2.4. The solutions were exposed to high doses of 60Co gamma rays (up to 16 Mrad) causing large decompositions (up to 90 percent). The decomposition yield, G(-HCN), and the radiation-chemical yields of formation of NH3, HCHO, H2, CO2, and of seven amino acids were determined. Also, the total yields of nitrogen in nitrogen-containing nonvolatile compounds, G(N), were measured. The irradiated solutions exhibited positive biuret reaction and the absorbancies depend on both the dose and the initial pH. Histidine, aspartic acid, threonine, serine, glutamic acid, alanine, and glycine were found in irradiated samples. Glycine was found to be the most abundant among the radiolytically produced amino acids; strong acid hydrolysis increases its yield by one or two orders of magnitude in samples irradiated initially at pH 2.4 as well as at their natural pH. The release of amino acids on hydrolysis and the positive biuret reaction suggest the presence of peptidic material in irradiated samples both at acid and neutral pH's. To account for these findings the formation of polymers (or their segments) having a peptidic structure was taken into consideration. The polymerization reactions were assumed to be initiated by the free radicals which were produced by HCN reactions with H, OH, ad e/sub aq/-species. It is concluded that the radiolysis of dilute aqueous solutions of HCN offers significant information on the eventual role of ionizing radiation in prebiotic chemical evolution in aqueous media

  15. Describing the direct and indirect radiative effects of atmospheric aerosols over Europe by using coupled meteorology-chemistry simulations: a contribution from the AQMEII-Phase II exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Guerrero, Pedro; Balzarini, Alessandra; Baró, Rocío; Curci, Gabriele; Forkel, Renate; Hirtl, Marcus; Honzak, Luka; Langer, Matthias; Pérez, Juan L.; Pirovano, Guido; San José, Roberto; Tuccella, Paolo; Werhahn, Johannes; Zabkar, Rahela

    2014-05-01

    The study of the response of the aerosol levels in the atmosphere to a changing climate and how this affects the radiative budget of the Earth (direct, semi-direct and indirect effects) is an essential topic to build confidence on climate science, since these feedbacks involve the largest uncertainties nowadays. Air quality-climate interactions (AQCI) are, therefore, a key, but uncertain contributor to the anthropogenic forcing that remains poorly understood. To build confidence in the AQCI studies, regional-scale integrated meteorology-atmospheric chemistry models (i.e., models with on-line chemistry) that include detailed treatment of aerosol life cycle and aerosol impacts on radiation (direct effects) and clouds (indirect effects) are in demand. In this context, the main objective of this contribution is the study and definition of the uncertainties in the climate-chemistry-aerosol-cloud-radiation system associated to the direct radiative forcing and the indirect effect caused by aerosols over Europe, using an ensemble of fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry model simulations with the WRF-Chem model run under the umbrella of AQMEII-Phase 2 international initiative. Simulations were performed for Europe for the entire year 2010. According to the common simulation strategy, the year was simulated as a sequence of 2-day time slices. For better comparability, the seven groups applied the same grid spacing of 23 km and shared common processing of initial and boundary conditions as well as anthropogenic and fire emissions. With exception of a simulation with different cloud microphysics, identical physics options were chosen while the chemistry options were varied. Two model set-ups will be considered here: one sub-ensemble of simulations not taking into account any aerosol feedbacks (the baseline case) and another sub-ensemble of simulations which differs from the former by the inclusion of aerosol-radiation feedback. The existing differences for meteorological

  16. An electron spin resonance study of the radiation chemistry of poly(hydroxybutyrate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carswell-Pomerantz, T.; Hill, D.J.T.; O`Donnell, J.H.; Pomery, P.J. [Queensland Univ., St. Lucia, QLD (Australia). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-05-01

    The spectra of the radical species resulting from gamma irradiation of poly(hydroxybutyrate) and its copolymers with hydroxyvalerate have been obtained after radiolysis at 77 and 303 K, and the corresponding radiation chemical yields have been calculated. Photobleaching and annealing experiments have allowed the major radical species to be identified and their reactivities to be assessed. Radical anions, as well as neutral radicals, were observed to be present at 77 K, but the radial anions were found to decay to neutral radicals at temperatures around 140K. Above about 250 K a multi-line component of the spectrum was lost, but the radical associated with this spectral change has not been unequivocally assigned, though it is believed to be a radical resulting from chain scission. Annealing over the temperature range 300-350 K resulted in the loss of a triplet, which accounts for most of the radicals present. This triplet has been assigned to a radical located on the carbon atom adjacent to the carbonyl group. This radical is believed to exist in two possible conformations. All of the radicals decayed at temperatures above 400 K. (author).

  17. An electron spin resonance study of the radiation chemistry of poly(hydroxybutyrate)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectra of the radical species resulting from gamma irradiation of poly(hydroxybutyrate) and its copolymers with hydroxyvalerate have been obtained after radiolysis at 77 and 303 K, and the corresponding radiation chemical yields have been calculated. Photobleaching and annealing experiments have allowed the major radical species to be identified and their reactivities to be assessed. Radical anions, as well as neutral radicals, were observed to be present at 77 K, but the radial anions were found to decay to neutral radicals at temperatures around 140K. Above about 250 K a multi-line component of the spectrum was lost, but the radical associated with this spectral change has not been unequivocally assigned, though it is believed to be a radical resulting from chain scission. Annealing over the temperature range 300-350 K resulted in the loss of a triplet, which accounts for most of the radicals present. This triplet has been assigned to a radical located on the carbon atom adjacent to the carbonyl group. This radical is believed to exist in two possible conformations. All of the radicals decayed at temperatures above 400 K. (author)

  18. Radiation-induced chemistry of poly(4-[(tert-butoxycarbonyl)oxy]styrene-co-sulfur dioxide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copolymers of 4-[(tert-butoxycarbonyl)oxy]styrene (TBS) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) have been found to act as sensitive X-ray (λ = 14 angstrom) single-component, chemically amplified, aqueous-base-soluble positive-acting resists. The X-ray response of these materials was a function of copolymer composition and independent of molecular weight. It was observed that increasing the SO2 content enhanced the resist sensitivity. Initial investigation into the radiation-induced reaction mechanism provided evidence that acid formation occurs via polymer main-chain scission. It is proposed that at the scission sites radical species are produced which in turn are responsible for the formation of the acid moieties. Heat treatment of resist films after exposure converted copolymers to poly(4-hydroxystyrene sulfone) and permitted exposed film areas to be developed in an aqueous base solution. Preliminary lithographic evaluation has resolved 0.5-μm line and space patterns in 0.65-μm-thick 1.75/1 TBS/SO2 resist films using an X-ray dose of 10 mJ/cm2. No change in X-ray dose was required to resolve the same width feature in the same resist having a film thickness of 1.0 μm

  19. Radiation-induced chemistry of poly(4-[(tert-butoxycarbonyl)oxy]styrene-co-sulfur dioxide)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novembre, A.E.; Tai, W.W.; Kometani, J.M.; Hanson, J.E.; Nalamasu, O.; Taylor, G.N.; Reichmanis, E.; Thompson, L.F. (AT T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States))

    Copolymers of 4-[(tert-butoxycarbonyl)oxy]styrene (TBS) and sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) have been found to act as sensitive X-ray ([lambda] = 14 [angstrom]) single-component, chemically amplified, aqueous-base-soluble positive-acting resists. The X-ray response of these materials was a function of copolymer composition and independent of molecular weight. It was observed that increasing the SO[sub 2] content enhanced the resist sensitivity. Initial investigation into the radiation-induced reaction mechanism provided evidence that acid formation occurs via polymer main-chain scission. It is proposed that at the scission sites radical species are produced which in turn are responsible for the formation of the acid moieties. Heat treatment of resist films after exposure converted copolymers to poly(4-hydroxystyrene sulfone) and permitted exposed film areas to be developed in an aqueous base solution. Preliminary lithographic evaluation has resolved 0.5-[mu]m line and space patterns in 0.65-[mu]m-thick 1.75/1 TBS/SO[sub 2] resist films using an X-ray dose of 10 mJ/cm[sup 2]. No change in X-ray dose was required to resolve the same width feature in the same resist having a film thickness of 1.0 [mu]m.

  20. Radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of acetonitrile and propionitrile in the megarad dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of the radiolytic behavior of dilute, neutral, oxygen-free aqueous solutions of CH3CN and C2H5CN. Small-molecular products were identified as RCHO, NH3, CO2, and H2. The decomposition of nitrile is followed by high yields of formation of the nonvolatile nitrogen-containing compounds, G(N). The γ-irradiated solutions exhibit a positive biuret reaction. Several amino acids were identified among radiolytic products, and glycine and alanine were found to be the most abundant for CH3CN and C2H5CH, respectively. Their yields increased after strong acid hydrolysis of the irradiated samples. The free radicals formed by reactions of RCN with H, OH, and e/sub aq/- were found to be important for the phenomena observed. It is suggested that the positive biuret reaction, ir spectra, and the release of amino acids on acid hydrolysis provide some evidence on the formation of peptidic materials and might be of interest for the evaluation of the role that ionizing radiation might have played in prebiotic chemical evolution in aqueous media

  1. Radiation chemistry of H6+ isotopic substituents and trapped electrons in solid parahydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven new hydrogen ion radicals as H2+-core H6+ and its isotopic substituents have been identified by electron spin resonance spectroscopy in γ-ray irradiated solid parahydrogen (p-H2) at 4.2 K. The isotopic substituents such as H2+-core H4D2+, H2+-core H5D+ and HD+-core H5D+ showed asymmetric hyperfine coupling constants on the core atoms due to anharmonicity in the potential energy curve. H2+-core H6+ and H2+-core H4D2+ are in large precessional motion in solid p-H2 at 4.2 K. The motion quenched at 1.7 K for H2+-core H4D2+ but still in the motion for H2+-core H6+. Finally, H6+ can diffuse in solid p-H2 via hole hopping and stabilize to produce the isotopic substituents as isotope condensation reaction. Electrons produced by ionizing radiation can be trapped by hydrogen isotopic molecules with dipole and quadrupole interaction. (author)

  2. Utilization of synchrotron radiation in analytical chemistry. X-ray reflectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper takes up X-ray reflectivity method that is suitable for surface layer, thin layer, and multilayer films, as well as oblique incidence X-ray analysis technique, explains the fundamental principles in detail, and introduces the application cases of the reflectivity measurement using synchrotron radiation. As an example of ultrathin film, there is the very thin gate insulating film of MOSFET. When depositing HfO2 thin films on a silicon substrate, the thickness of the SiO2 formed between HfO2 layers and interfacial roughness change depending on film formation conditions. It was found that depending on oxygen partial pressure at the time of formation, when the partial pressure is large, both HfO2 and SiO2 films became thinner, and when the partial pressure is small, their film thickness became thicker. When oxygen partial pressure was small, oxygen radicals increased, which entered the interface, and both HfO2 and SiO2 layers became thicker. The example of electrochemical interface is the electrode surface of a battery. When X-ray reflectivity was measured by adapting the redox reaction of the electrode surface to the changes in the response current value, the film thickness changes, and changes in surface roughness appeared. The authors are further examining in this field the X-ray reflectivity method in the microscopic region, as well as X-ray reflectivity method with ultrahigh speed that can track the changing process. (A.O.)

  3. Radiation chemistry in alanine irradiated with γ-rays and ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to extend the application of alanine dosimetry, the behavior of free radicals in solid α-alanine irradiated with γ-rays and with ion beams was studied by electron spin resonance. Stable neutral radicals are produced through the decomposition of originally generated ion radicals in alanine irradiated at 300 K, while at 77 K the ion radicals are stable, and also do not decompose. The rate of the combination reaction of the neutral radicals and of the ion radicals was studied by measuring the saturation behavior of the radical concentration in γ-radiolysis at 300 and at 77 K. The yield of the neutral radicals was compared between 0.5, 1,2 and 3 MeV H+, 0.5, 1, and 3 MeV He+, 175 MeV Ar8+ and 460 MeV Ar13+ ion irradiations. Dependence of the radical yield on the radiation quality is understood more in terms of the rate of the combination reaction between the ion radicals than with that between the neutral radicals, and has to do with high local dose within the ion tracks. (Author)

  4. Radiation chemistry in alanine irradiated with {gamma}-rays and ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, Hitoshi; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Yoshida, Hiroshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-01-01

    In order to extend the application of alanine dosimetry, the behavior of free radicals in solid {alpha}-alanine irradiated with {gamma}-rays and with ion beams was studied by electron spin resonance. Stable neutral radicals are produced through the decomposition of originally generated ion radicals in alanine irradiated at 300 K, while at 77 K the ion radicals are stable, and also do not decompose. The rate of the combination reaction of the neutral radicals and of the ion radicals was studied by measuring the saturation behavior of the radical concentration in {gamma}-radiolysis at 300 and at 77 K. The yield of the neutral radicals was compared between 0.5, 1,2 and 3 MeV H{sup +}, 0.5, 1, and 3 MeV He{sup +}, 175 MeV Ar{sup 8+} and 460 MeV Ar{sup 13+} ion irradiations. Dependence of the radical yield on the radiation quality is understood more in terms of the rate of the combination reaction between the ion radicals than with that between the neutral radicals, and has to do with high local dose within the ion tracks. (Author).

  5. Molecular environmental science using synchrotron radiation:Chemistry and physics of waste form materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindle, Dennis W.; Shuh, David K.

    2005-02-28

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization [1]. Specially formulated glass compositions, many of which have been derived from glass developed for commercial purposes, and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites, will be the main recipients for these wastes. The performance characteristics of waste-form glasses and ceramics are largely determined by the loading capacity for the waste constituents (radioactive and non-radioactive) and the resultant chemical and radiation resistance of the waste-form package to leaching (durability). There are unique opportunities for the use of near-edge soft-x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate speciation of low-Z elements forming the backbone of waste-form glasses and ceramics. Although nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the primary technique employed to obtain speciation information from low-Z elements in waste forms, NMR is incompatible with the metallic impurities contained in real waste and is thus limited to studies of idealized model systems. In contrast, NEXAFS can yield element-specific speciation information from glass constituents without sensitivity to paramagnetic species. Development and use of NEXAFS for eventual studies of real waste glasses has significant implications, especially for the low-Z elements comprising glass matrices [5-7]. The NEXAFS measurements were performed at Beamline 6.3.1, an entrance-slitless bend-magnet beamline operating from 200 eV to 2000 eV with a Hettrick-Underwood varied-line-space (VLS) grating monochromator, of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL. Complete characterization and optimization of this beamline was conducted to enable high-performance measurements.

  6. Molecular Environmental Science Using Synchrotron Radiation: Chemistry and Physics of Waste Form Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindle, Dennis W.

    2011-04-21

    Production of defense-related nuclear materials has generated large volumes of complex chemical wastes containing a mixture of radionuclides. The disposition of these wastes requires conversion of the liquid and solid-phase components into durable, solid forms suitable for long-term immobilization. Specially formulated glass compositions and ceramics such as pyrochlores and apatites are the main candidates for these wastes. An important consideration linked to the durability of waste-form materials is the local structure around the waste components. Equally important is the local structure of constituents of the glass and ceramic host matrix. Knowledge of the structure in the waste-form host matrices is essential, prior to and subsequent to waste incorporation, to evaluate and develop improved waste-form compositions based on scientific considerations. This project used the soft-x-ray synchrotron-radiation-based technique of near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) as a unique method for investigating oxidation states and structures of low-Z elemental constituents forming the backbones of glass and ceramic host matrices for waste-form materials. In addition, light metal ions in ceramic hosts, such as titanium, are also ideal for investigation by NEXAFS in the soft-x-ray region. Thus, one of the main objectives was to understand outstanding issues in waste-form science via NEXAFS investigations and to translate this understanding into better waste-form materials, followed by eventual capability to investigate “real” waste-form materials by the same methodology. We conducted several detailed structural investigations of both pyrochlore ceramic and borosilicate-glass materials during the project and developed improved capabilities at Beamline 6.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to perform the studies.

  7. Radiation chemistry of hydrocarbon and alkyl halide systems. Progress report, August 30, 1979-July 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report covers experiments on pulse radiolysis of methyl iodide, radiation induced reactions in H2-CO mixtures and photochemistry and mass spectrometry of CF3I-CH3I systems. In the pulse radiolysis of alkyl iodide, it was possible to follow rate processes involving atomic iodine in the 2P/sub 1/2/ excited state and 2P/sub 3/2/ ground state resulting from irradiation of these compounds. The excited state proved easy to follow, since it can be observed in a strong transition at 206.2 nm. Observation of atomic iodine in the 2P/sub 3/2/ ground state proved difficult, since it must be observed at 178.3 nm, well into the vacuum ultraviolet. Several design improvements in the pulse radiolysis apparatus were made to achieve a reliable measurement of the I*/I production ratio. The physical arrangement of the apparatus which was adopted is illustrated. A remaining problem which stands in the way of measuring I*/I ratios is the lack of information on extinction coefficients of 2P/sub 1/2/ and 2P/sub 3/2/ atomic iodine at 206 and 178 nm. It is expected that indirect calculations and/or computer modelling will be employed. In the H2-CO system, investigation of the effect of total pressure in the homogeneous gas phase was made, concentrating on the 3:1 H2-CO mixtures. Measurements were made as a function of pressure in the range of 250 to 3300 torr for saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbon in the C1 to C6 range. Two trends were exhibited; yields of all products dropped markedly as system pressure was increased; and yields in the nickel vessels were generally in excess of yields in the stainless vessels. Photolysis of CF3I-CH3I gas phase showed a substantial yield of the product CH2I2. High pressure mass spectrometry of CF3-CH3I mixtures revealed (CH3ICH3)+, I2+, CF3I2+, (CF3I)2+, and unique species such as CF3ICH3 and CF2ICH2+

  8. Fundamental studies on the radiation chemical dose-response with use of thymine. Is activation of the surface between radiation biology and radiation chemistry possible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The review described the importance and difficulty of radiation chemical assessment of dose-response. The assessment has the tasks of the unit, low dose region evaluation and direct/indirect effects in biology. The authors' vacuum evaporated thymine for G-value determination is appropriate for XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structures) measurement with monochromic ultrasoft X-rays (-550 eV photon) generated by SPring-8. However, the data of yielded thymine derivatives as well as those yielded after 60Co γ-ray (1.5 MeV photon) irradiation are not suitable for direct application in DNA damage evaluation of living cells due to trans-scientific uncertainty. Efforts are required for reducing the uncertainty present in dose-response assessment. (K.H.)

  9. Selecting ethanol as a model organic solvent in radiation chemistry--3. Radiolysis of glycyrrhetinic acid (GL)-ethanol system and structure modification of GL by γ radiation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CH3CHOH, H·, esolv- are the main active radicals in the ethanol system irradiated by γ-ray without the presence of oxygen. In this study, GL ethanolic solution saturated with nitrogen was γ-irradiated, the radiolytic products were isolated by HPLC and the molecular structure was determined with UV, IR, MS spectra and elementary analysis methods. In this system GL reacts with H· and CH3CHOH radicals. CH3CHOH adds to the C-C double bond of GL, then the formed radicals disproportionate to the final products RP1 (olean 29-oic acid,3-hydroxy-11-oxo-12-ethoxyl-13-hydro-,(3β, 20β)-) and RP3. H· reacts with GL in the similar way. The rate constant of H· reacting with GL was obtained as kGL+H·=2.0x1010 dm3 mol-1 s-1. The rate constant of CH3CHOH reacting with GL was calculated as result of (1.2±0.1)x104 dm3 mol-1 s-1 by using steady state method and by using the numerical quadrature method with computer. G(-GL), G(H2 ), G(2,3-butanediol), G(CH3CHO) and G values of the radiolytic products of ethanolic solution with different GL concentration were measured. A material balance was obtained. Results show that the active site of a GL molecule is the C-C double bond. The radiation chemistry technique can be used to modify the structure of glycyrrhetinic acid

  10. HMI scientific report - chemistry 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the R and D activities of the Radiation Chemistry Department, Hahn-Meitner-Institut, are reported, primarily dealing with the following subjects: Interface processes and energy conversion, high-energy photochemistry and radiation chemistry as well as trace elements chemistry. A list of publications and lectures is added and gives a view on results obtained in research and development. (EF)

  11. Radiation instrumentation: radiological chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Program efforts were concentrated in the following areas: development of low-level radiochemical laboratory techniques, in situ monitoring techniques, and activation analysis technology. Four different techniques were evaluated for borehole analysis of uranium and thorium ores. These involved the detection of fission product photons after 252Cf activation, the detection of low-energy gamma rays, the direct measurement of the 1001 keV photon from /sup 242m/Pa, a 238U daughter, and isotopic excitation x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and detection of uranium daughter photons allowed 0.01% uranium to be detected. X-ray spectrometry of rare earth elements following activation analysis also allowed better elemental detection sensitivities to be obtained than did the detection of high-energy photons identified with a Ge(Li) detector in typical instrumental neutron activation analysis. An activation analysis facility is under development utilizing 252Cf in a 235U-fueled subcritical assembly. This assembly will be used to develop cyclic activation analysis techniques for some 65 elements in environmental matrices with sensitivities varying from parts per million to parts per billion. A study was initiated to identify instrumentation required for the measurement of transuranium elements associated with power reactor fuels. Transuranium isotopes, 237Pu, 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am, and 244Cm can be identified through low energy photons or x-rays emitted following alpha emission with planar intrinsic Ge detectors

  12. A study of uncertainties in the sulfate distribution and its radiative forcing associated with sulfur chemistry in a global aerosol model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Goto

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The direct radiative forcing by sulfate aerosols is still uncertain, mainly because the uncertainties are largely derived from differences in sulfate column burdens and its vertical distributions among global aerosol models. One possible reason for the large difference in the computed values is that the radiative forcing delicately depends on various simplifications of the sulfur processes made in the models. In this study, therefore, we investigated impacts of different parts of the sulfur chemistry module in a global aerosol model, SPRINTARS, on the sulfate distribution and its radiative forcing. Important studies were effects of simplified and more physical-based sulfur processes in terms of treatment of sulfur chemistry, oxidant chemistry, and dry deposition process of sulfur components. The results showed that the difference in the aqueous-phase sulfur chemistry among these treatments has the largest impact on the sulfate distribution. Introduction of all the improvements mentioned above brought the model values noticeably closer to in-situ measurements than those in the simplified methods used in the original SPRINTARS model. At the same time, these improvements also brought the computed sulfate column burdens and its vertical distributions into good agreement with other AEROCOM model values. The global annual mean radiative forcing due to the direct effect of anthropogenic sulfate aerosol was thus estimated to be −0.26 W m−2 (−0.30 W m−2 with a different SO2 inventory, whereas the original SPRINTARS model showed −0.18 W m−2 (−0.21 W m−2 with a different SO2 inventory. The magnitude of the difference between original and improved methods was approximately 50% of the uncertainty among estimates by the world's global aerosol models reported by the IPCC-AR4 assessment report. Findings in the present study, therefore, may suggest that the model differences in the

  13. “Modeling Trends in Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects over the Northern Hemisphere using a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model”

    Science.gov (United States)

    While aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, the verification of the spatial and temporal variability of the magnitude and directionality of aerosol radiative forcing has remained challengi...

  14. DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. This volume contains the following modules: reactor water chemistry (effects of radiation on water chemistry, chemistry parameters), principles of water treatment (purpose; treatment processes [ion exchange]; dissolved gases, suspended solids, and pH control; water purity), and hazards of chemicals and gases (corrosives [acids, alkalies], toxic compounds, compressed gases, flammable/combustible liquids)

  15. Lightning-driven inner radiation belt energy deposition into the atmosphere: implications for ionisation-levels and neutral chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Rodger, C. J.; Enell, C.-F.; Turunen, E; M. A. Clilverd; Thomson, N. R.; Verronen, P. T.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Lightning-generated whistlers lead to coupling between the troposphere, the Van Allen radiation belts and the lower-ionosphere through Whistler-induced electron precipitation (WEP). Lightning produced whistlers interact with cyclotron resonant radiation belt electrons, leading to pitch-angle scattering into the bounce loss cone and precipitation into the atmosphere. Here we consider the relative significance of WEP to the lower ionosphere and atmosphere by contrasting ...

  16. Computational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  17. Effects of stron UV-B radiation on air chemistry and climate; Auswirkungen verstaerkter UV-B-Strahlung auf Luftchemie und Klima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenemeyer, T.; Seidl, W.; Forkel, R.; Kuhn, M.; Wehrhahn, J.; Grell, G.

    1998-07-01

    Effects of enhanced UV radiation on air chemistry, climate and climate change were investigated, and its interactions with other environmental problems like acidification of soil and surface water, reduction in the variety of species, and desertification were gone into. [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurden die bisher vorliegenden Erkenntnisse ueber die Auswirkungen erhoehter UV-Strahlung infolge des Abbaus von Ozon in der Stratosphaere auf Luftchemie und Klima zusammengetragen. Die Problematik wird in ihrer ganzen Breite beleuchtet und dabei deutlich gemacht, ueber welche zahlreichen Mechanismen eine erhoehte UV-Strahlung auch zu Klimaaenderungen fuehren kann. Dies unterstreicht die Notwendigkeit, Verknuepfungen mit anderen Umweltproblemen wie der Versauerung des Bodens und von Gewaessern, der Abnahme der Artenvielfalt sowie der zunehmenden Wuestenbildung herzustellen. (orig.)

  18. Modeling Trends in Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects over the Northern Hemisphere using a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, R.; Pleim, J.; Wong, D.; Hogrefe, C.; Xing, J.; Wei, C.; Gan, M.

    2013-12-01

    While aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, the verification of the spatial and temporal variability of the magnitude and directionality of aerosol radiative forcing has remained challenging. A detailed investigation of the processes regulating aerosol distributions, their optical properties, and their radiative effects and verification of their simulated effects for past conditions relative to measurements is needed in order to build confidence in the estimates of the projected impacts arising from changes in both anthropogenic forcing and climate change. Anthropogenic emissions of primary aerosol and gaseous precursors have witnessed dramatic changes over the past two decades across the northern hemisphere. During the period 1990-2010, SO2 and NOx emissions across the US have reduced by about 66% and 50%, respectively, mainly due to Title IV of the U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments (CAA). In contrast, anthropogenic emissions have increased dramatically in many developing regions during this period. We conduct a systematic investigation of changes in anthropogenic emissions of primary aerosols and gaseous precursors over the past two decades, their impacts on trends and spatial heterogeneity in anthropogenic aerosol loading across the northern hemisphere troposphere, and subsequent impacts on regional radiation budgets. The coupled WRF-CMAQ model is applied for selected time periods spanning the period 1990-2010 over a domain covering the northern hemisphere and a nested finer resolution continental U.S. domain. The model includes detailed treatment of direct effects of aerosols on photolysis rates as well as on shortwave radiation. Additionally, treatment of aerosol indirect effects on clouds has also recently been implemented. A methodology is developed to consistently estimate U.S. emission inventories for the 20-year period accounting for air quality regulations as well as

  19. Impact of resolution on aerosol radiative feedbacks with in online-coupled chemistry/climate simulations (WRF-Chem) for EURO-CORDEX compliant domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Romero, Jose Maria; Baró, Rocío; Palacios-Peña, Laura; Jerez, Sonia; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro; Montávez, Juan Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have shown that a high spatial resolution in atmospheric model runs improves the simulation of some meteorological variables, such as precipitation, particularly extreme events and in regions with complex orography [1]. However, increasing model spatial resolution makes the computational time rise exponentially. Hence, very high resolution experiments on large domains can hamper the execution of climatic runs. This problem shoots up when using online-coupled chemistry climate models, making a careful evaluation of improvements versus costs mandatory. Under this umbrella, the objective of this work is to investigate the sensitivity of aerosol radiative feedbacks from online-coupled chemistry regional model simulations to the spatial resolution. For that, the WRF-Chem [2] model is used for a case study to simulate the episode occurring between July 25th and August 15th of 2010. It is characterized by a high loading of atmospheric aerosol particles coming mainly from wildfires over large European regions (Russia, Iberian Peninsula). Three spatial resolutions are used defined for Euro-Cordex compliant domains [3]: 0.44°, 0.22° and 0.11°. Anthropogenic emissions come from TNO databases [4]. The analysis focuses on air quality variables (mainly PM10, PM2.5), meteorological variables (temperature, radiation) and other aerosol optical properties (aerosol optical depth). The CPU time ratio for the different domains is 1 (0.44°), 4(0.22°) and 28(0.11°) (normalized times). Comparison among simulations and observations are analyzed. Preliminary results show the difficulty to justify the much larger computational cost of high-resolution experiments when comparing with observations from a meteorological point of view, despite the finer spatio-temporal detail of the obtained pollutant fields. [1] Prein, A. F. (2014, December). Precipitation in the EURO-CORDEX 0.11° and 0.44° simulations: high resolution, high benefits?. In AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts (Vol

  20. Role of the local environment on the radiation chemistry of biological molecules: proline in single crystals. Progress report, August 1, 1984-July 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the nature of local influences on the radiation-induced chemistry of biological molecules. The long-range idea is that radiation biology results from molecular events. However, study of molecular events is most effectively performed using model systems. On the other hand, biological systems present a complex molecular environment to any single molecular system. Thus, extrapolation of the results from model systems to truly biological ones requires knowledge of the possible effects arising from neglect of the true environment. Efforts in this study are focussed on the amino acid proline. This system was chosen for primarily pragmatic reasons. In several preliminary studies evidence was found that the local environment (e.g., water, HCl) affected the quantity and type of end products. Moreover, the proline system was available in several different environments which had been fully characterized structurally by x-ray or neutron diffraction. As discussed more fully in this report, additional results from the proline family have been obtained. Also, significant results were obtained from a non-proline system, guanine hydrochloride monohydrate. 4 reference, 2 figures

  1. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED summer 2013 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mallet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr is a collaborative research program federating international activities to investigate Mediterranean regional chemistry-climate interactions. A special observing period (SOP-1a including intensive airborne measurements was performed in the framework of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ADRIMED project during the Mediterranean dry season over the western and central Mediterranean basins, with a focus on aerosol-radiation measurements and their modeling. The SOP-1a took place from 11 June to 5 July 2013. Airborne measurements were made by both the ATR-42 and F-20 French research aircraft operated from Sardinia (Italy and instrumented for in situ and remote-sensing measurements, respectively, and by sounding and drifting balloons, launched in Minorca. The experimental set-up also involved several ground-based measurement sites on islands including two ground-based reference stations in Corsica and Lampedusa and secondary monitoring sites in Minorca and Sicily. Additional measurements including lidar profiling were also performed on alert during aircraft operations at EARLINET/ACTRIS stations at Granada and Barcelona in Spain, and in southern Italy. Remote sensing aerosol products from satellites (MSG/SEVIRI, MODIS and from the AERONET/PHOTONS network were also used. Dedicated meso-scale and regional modelling experiments were performed in relation to this observational effort. We provide here an overview of the different surface and aircraft observations deployed during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED period and of associated modeling studies together with an analysis of the synoptic conditions that determined the aerosol emission and transport. Meteorological conditions observed during this campaign (moderate temperatures and southern flows were not favorable to produce high level of atmospheric pollutants nor intense biomass burning events in

  2. Bad chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Petsko, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    General chemistry courses haven't changed significantly in forty years. Because most basic chemistry students are premedical students, medical schools have enormous influence and could help us start all over again to create undergraduate chemistry education that works.

  3. Chemistry and deposition driven by monoenergetic synchrotron radiation: Initial studies of condensed silanes and water on noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors extend previous work in broadband synchrotron radiation (SR) excitation of condensed multilayers to the study of reactions driven by monoenergetic SR. The long term goal of this work is to understand the importance of core-level excitation on the reactions that lead to materials growth. Results are presented for two systems of interest: formation of silica from Si(CH3)4 and H2O mixtures with 90 eV irradiation (below the core levels) and the energy dependence of the reaction of SiH4 and H2O

  4. Electrochemical behaviour of stainless steel under radiation and exposed to representative chemistry in pressurised water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissertation focuses on the behaviour of stainless steel under irradiation and exposed to primary PWR conditions. The electrochemical potential of austenitic 316L stainless steel and the environmental parameters (hydrogen pressure, temperature, etc.,) have been measured continuously at high temperature (HT) and high pressure (HP) under irradiation, using a unique experimental HTHP working cell. Two sources of irradiation, proton and electron beams, have been employed in the study. A high similarity of electrochemical behaviour under both types of irradiations has been observed: (i) an oxidative potential response under irradiation (few tens of milli-volts); (ii) an increase in the hydrogen pressure reduces the oxidative potential response; (iii) a synergetic effect of thermal ageing and fluence leading to a decrease of the oxidative response under irradiation. The observations of the oxide film showed that without irradiation, metallic nickel in the inner and outer oxide films has been observed under a high hydrogen pressure. Under irradiation, um scale cavities (pits) have been observed in the strongly electron irradiated oxide film formed on 316L stainless steel. These defects are induced by the effect of irradiation of the passive film and water radiolysis. It is also shown that water radiolysis influences the PWR water chemistry by making it become a stronger oxidant at the oxide/solution interface. As a result, the release of metallic cations is increased and a-Fe2O3 hematite has been observed on the irradiated outer oxide film where cavities were formed. (author)

  5. Third working meeting on radiation interaction. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics have been discussed during the meeting: elementary processes in radiation chemistry and physics (theory, inorganic and organic systems); applied radiation chemistry and radiation processing; techniques, methods and instrumentation used in radiation chemistry and radiation processing; and irradiation of food, agricultural products, pharmaceutical products, domestic and industrial wastes. 52 papers are included in part 1

  6. Third working meeting on radiation interaction. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics have been discussed during the meeting: elementary processes in radiation chemistry and physics (theory, inorganic and organic systems); applied radiation chemistry and radiation processing; techniques, methods and instrumentation used in radiation chemistry and radiation processing; and irradiation of food, agricultural products, pharmaceutical products, domestic and industrial wastes. 55 papers are included in part 2

  7. Nature of oxygen containing radicals in radiation chemistry and photochemistry of aqueous solutions. Annual progress report, September 1978--July 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed research is a continuation of the work conducted under this contract and is outlined. During this year, the main emphasis will be given to study further the properties of HO2 and O2- and OH, mainly in their role in biological systems. We will continue to study and elucidate how O2- reacts in biological systems. The toxicity of O2- is quite well established, but the mechanism is still obscure. The Haber Weiss reaction most probably can not account for the toxicity of O2- nor for the formation of singlet oxygen, nor of OH. We will study if reduction of Fe3+ complexes by O2- in biological systems does catalyze the Haber Weiss reaction and if OH is formed in this mechanism. The role of oxygen, radiosensitizers in radiation damage of bacteriophages and cells will be further studied, as well as on E. Coli and Enzymes. We will try to elucidate the formation and role of OH, O2- and O2 in these systems as well as the relative contribution of endogenous and exogenous damage, and the role of direct and indirect radiation damage to cells. We intend also to study if SOD (super oxide dismutase) does react only with O2- or also with biological peroxides (RO2) and Hydroperoxides (RO2H). Further studies of O2- and O2 with various cytochromes, and hemoglobins is planned

  8. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  9. Nature of oxygen containing radicals in radiation chemistry and photochemistry of aqueous solutions. Annual progress report, September 1978--July 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czapski, G

    1979-01-01

    The proposed research is a continuation of the work conducted under this contract and is outlined. During this year, the main emphasis will be given to study further the properties of HO/sub 2/ and O/sub 2//sup -/ and OH, mainly in their role in biological systems. We will continue to study and elucidate how O/sub 2//sup -/ reacts in biological systems. The toxicity of O/sub 2//sup -/ is quite well established, but the mechanism is still obscure. The Haber Weiss reaction most probably can not account for the toxicity of O/sub 2//sup -/ nor for the formation of singlet oxygen, nor of OH. We will study if reduction of Fe/sup 3 +/ complexes by O/sub 2//sup -/ in biological systems does catalyze the Haber Weiss reaction and if OH is formed in this mechanism. The role of oxygen, radiosensitizers in radiation damage of bacteriophages and cells will be further studied, as well as on E. Coli and Enzymes. We will try to elucidate the formation and role of OH, O/sub 2//sup -/ and O/sub 2/ in these systems as well as the relative contribution of endogenous and exogenous damage, and the role of direct and indirect radiation damage to cells. We intend also to study if SOD (super oxide dismutase) does react only with O/sub 2//sup -/ or also with biological peroxides (RO/sub 2/) and Hydroperoxides (RO/sub 2/H). Further studies of O/sub 2//sup -/ and O/sub 2/ with various cytochromes, and hemoglobins is planned.

  10. Nature of oxygen containing radicals in radiation chemistry and photochemistry of aqueous solutions. Annual progress report, September 1979-July 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During this year, emphasis will be given on the properties of HO2 and O2- and OH, mainly in their role in biological systems. We will continue to study and elucidate how O2- reacts in biological systems. The toxicity of O2- is quite well established but the mechanism is still obscure. One way O2- is toxic is that OH is formed from O2- through reduction of Fe3+, and subsequently the reaction of Fe2+ with H2O2 (Fenton reaction). This mechanism is sometimes called the Haber Weiss Reaction. We will study if reduction of Fe3+ complexes by O2- in biological systems does catalyze the Haber Weiss reaction and if OH is formed in this mechanism. The role of oxygen, radiosensitizers in radiation damage of bacteriophages and cells will be further studied, as well as on E. coli and enzymes. Use of different mutants, such as ones with repair deficiencies, or others which are deficient in glutathione will help to elucidate the role of O2- and O2 toxicity. We will try to elucidate the formation and role of OH, O2- and O2 in these systems as well as the relative contribution of endogenous and exogenous damage, and the role of direct and indirect radiation damage to cells. As there is some doubt how and if SOD protects cells from irradiation as literature results show lots of conflict, we will try to clear this point, in studies with E. coli mutants, and adding SOD endogenously and exogenously. We also intend to study if SOD (super oxide dismutase) does react only with O2- or also with biological peroxides (RO2) and hydroperoxides (RO2H). Further studies of O2- and O2 with various cytochromes, and hemoglobins is planned

  11. Mathematical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Trinajstić, Nenad; Gutman, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    A brief description is given of the historical development of mathematics and chemistry. A path leading to the meeting of these two sciences is described. An attempt is made to define mathematical chemistry, and journals containing the term mathematical chemistry in their titles are noted. In conclusion, the statement is made that although chemistry is an experimental science aimed at preparing new compounds and materials, mathematics is very useful in chemistry, among other things, to produc...

  12. Nature of oxygen containing radicals in radiation chemistry and photochemistry of aqueous solutions. Annual progress report, September 1979-July 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czapski, G.

    1980-01-01

    During this year, emphasis will be given on the properties of HO/sub 2/ and O/sub 2//sup -/ and OH, mainly in their role in biological systems. We will continue to study and elucidate how O/sub 2//sup -/ reacts in biological systems. The toxicity of O/sub 2//sup -/ is quite well established but the mechanism is still obscure. One way O/sub 2//sup -/ is toxic is that OH is formed from O/sub 2//sup -/ through reduction of Fe/sup 3 +/, and subsequently the reaction of Fe/sup 2 +/ with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ (Fenton reaction). This mechanism is sometimes called the Haber Weiss Reaction. We will study if reduction of Fe/sup 3 +/ complexes by O/sub 2//sup -/ in biological systems does catalyze the Haber Weiss reaction and if OH is formed in this mechanism. The role of oxygen, radiosensitizers in radiation damage of bacteriophages and cells will be further studied, as well as on E. coli and enzymes. Use of different mutants, such as ones with repair deficiencies, or others which are deficient in glutathione will help to elucidate the role of O/sub 2//sup -/ and O/sub 2/ toxicity. We will try to elucidate the formation and role of OH, O/sub 2//sup -/ and O/sub 2/ in these systems as well as the relative contribution of endogenous and exogenous damage, and the role of direct and indirect radiation damage to cells. As there is some doubt how and if SOD protects cells from irradiation as literature results show lots of conflict, we will try to clear this point, in studies with E. coli mutants, and adding SOD endogenously and exogenously. We also intend to study if SOD (super oxide dismutase) does react only with O/sub 2//sup -/ or also with biological peroxides (RO/sub 2/) and hydroperoxides (RO/sub 2/H). Further studies of O/sub 2//sup -/ and O/sub 2/ with various cytochromes, and hemoglobins is planned.

  13. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) summer 2013 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, M.; Dulac, F.; Formenti, P.; Nabat, P.; Sciare, J.; Roberts, G.; Pelon, J.; Ancellet, G.; Tanré, D.; Parol, F.; Denjean, C.; Brogniez, G.; di Sarra, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Arndt, J.; Auriol, F.; Blarel, L.; Bourrianne, T.; Chazette, P.; Chevaillier, S.; Claeys, M.; D'Anna, B.; Derimian, Y.; Desboeufs, K.; Di Iorio, T.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand, P.; Féron, A.; Freney, E.; Gaimoz, C.; Goloub, P.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Grand, N.; Hamonou, E.; Jankowiak, I.; Jeannot, M.; Léon, J.-F.; Maillé, M.; Mailler, S.; Meloni, D.; Menut, L.; Momboisse, G.; Nicolas, J.; Podvin, T.; Pont, V.; Rea, G.; Renard, J.-B.; Roblou, L.; Schepanski, K.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Sellegri, K.; Sicard, M.; Solmon, F.; Somot, S.; Torres, B.; Totems, J.; Triquet, S.; Verdier, N.; Verwaerde, C.; Waquet, F.; Wenger, J.; Zapf, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a collaborative research program federating international activities to investigate Mediterranean regional chemistry-climate interactions. A special observing period (SOP-1a) including intensive airborne measurements was performed in the framework of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region (ADRIMED) project during the Mediterranean dry season over the western and central Mediterranean basins, with a focus on aerosol-radiation measurements and their modeling. The SOP-1a took place from 11 June to 5 July 2013. Airborne measurements were made by both the ATR-42 and F-20 French research aircraft operated from Sardinia (Italy) and instrumented for in situ and remote-sensing measurements, respectively, and by sounding and drifting balloons, launched in Minorca. The experimental setup also involved several ground-based measurement sites on islands including two ground-based reference stations in Corsica and Lampedusa and secondary monitoring sites in Minorca and Sicily. Additional measurements including lidar profiling were also performed on alert during aircraft operations at EARLINET/ACTRIS stations at Granada and Barcelona in Spain, and in southern Italy. Remote-sensing aerosol products from satellites (MSG/SEVIRI, MODIS) and from the AERONET/PHOTONS network were also used. Dedicated meso-scale and regional modeling experiments were performed in relation to this observational effort. We provide here an overview of the different surface and aircraft observations deployed during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED period and of associated modeling studies together with an analysis of the synoptic conditions that determined the aerosol emission and transport. Meteorological conditions observed during this campaign (moderate temperatures and southern flows) were not favorable to producing high levels of atmospheric pollutants or intense biomass burning

  14. NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Authors, Various

    1971-05-01

    Papers are presented for the following topics: (1) Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Properties - (a) Nuclear Spectroscopy and Radioactivity; (b) Nuclear Reactions and Scattering; (c) Nuclear Theory; and (d) Fission. (2) Chemical and Atomic Physics - (a) Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy; and (b) Hyperfine Interactions. (3) Physical, Inorganic, and Analytical Chemistry - (a) X-Ray Crystallography; (b) Physical and Inorganic Chemistry; (c) Radiation Chemistry; and (d) Chemical Engineering. (4) Instrumentation and Systems Development.

  15. Effects of gamma radiation of Cobalt-60 on arabica and conillon seeds coffea: physic-chemistry evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazil is the largest producer and exporter of coffee in the world. The coffee bean is one of the main products of the Brazilian trade balance. Two species of coffee are the most economically important: the Coffea arabica L. and Coffea canephora Pierre is the largest representative of the Coffea canephora Pierre is the coffea conillon. Food irradiation is an area of research that aims to increase the shelf life of foods and controlling pests. This study aimed to verify the physicochemical variables of Arabica coffee and conillon were affected when exposed to doses of gamma radiation from cobalt-60. The samples were provided by Polo in Coffee Quality Technology, Federal University of Lavras - UFLA. The coffee samples were subjected to irradiation doses: 0 (control), 5 kGy and 10 kGy, a multipurpose irradiator of IPEN - Research Institute of Nuclear Energy and the University of São Paulo, at a rate of 7.5 kGy / hour. For irradiation the samples were vacuum-packed in appropriate packaging aluminised. After the process of irradiation the samples were stored at a temperature of 15 ± 1 deg C and relative humidity of 17 ± 1%. The following analyzes were performed: levels of total sugars, glucose, sucrose, caffeine, humidity, pH, total acidity, electrical conductivity and fibers. Analyses were performed 1, 30, 60 and 90 days after irradiation, and the results were submitted to analysis of variance and means were compared by Tukey test at 5%. It was observed that the analysis results of the samples irradiated with 5 kGy and 10 kGy showed values similar to the control. It was concluded that irradiation did not induce deleterious effects on arabica coffee seeds and conillon irradiated with 5 kGy and 10 kGy to 90 days after irradiation. (author)

  16. HMI scientific report - chemistry 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the R and D activities are reported, dealing with the following subjects: Interface processes and energy conversion, high-energy photochemistry and radiation chemistry as well as trace elements chemistry. A list of publications and lectures is added and gives a view on results obtained in research and development. (EF)

  17. Chemistry Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  18. Colour Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, J.; Rattee, I. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the course offerings in pure color chemistry at two universities and the three main aspects of study: dyestuff chemistry, color measurement, and color application. Indicates that there exists a constant challenge to ingenuity in the subject discipline. (CC)

  19. Positronium chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Green, James

    1964-01-01

    Positronium Chemistry focuses on the methodologies, reactions, processes, and transformations involved in positronium chemistry. The publication first offers information on positrons and positronium and experimental methods, including mesonic atoms, angular correlation measurements, annihilation spectra, and statistical errors in delayed coincidence measurements. The text then ponders on positrons in gases and solids. The manuscript takes a look at the theoretical chemistry of positronium and positronium chemistry in gases. Topics include quenching, annihilation spectrum, delayed coincidence

  20. Combinatorial chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John

    1994-01-01

    An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds.......An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds....

  1. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) summer 2013 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, M.; Dulac, F.; Formenti, P.; Nabat, P.; Sciare, J.; Roberts, G.; Pelon, J.; Ancellet, G.; Tanré, D.; Parol, F.; Denjean, C.; Brogniez, G.; di Sarra, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Arndt, J.; Auriol, F.; Blarel, L.; Bourrianne, T.; Chazette, P.; Chevaillier, S.; Claeys, M.; D'Anna, B.; Derimian, Y.; Desboeufs, K.; Di Iorio, T.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand, P.; Féron, A.; Freney, E.; Gaimoz, C.; Goloub, P.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Grand, N.; Hamonou, E.; Jankowiak, I.; Jeannot, M.; Léon, J.-F.; Maillé, M.; Mailler, S.; Meloni, D.; Menut, L.; Momboisse, G.; Nicolas, J.; Podvin, T.; Pont, V.; Rea, G.; Renard, J.-B.; Roblou, L.; Schepanski, K.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Sellegri, K.; Sicard, M.; Solmon, F.; Somot, S.; Torres, B.; Totems, J.; Triquet, S.; Verdier, N.; Verwaerde, C.; Waquet, F.; Wenger, J.; Zapf, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a collaborative research program federating international activities to investigate Mediterranean regional chemistry-climate interactions. A special observing period (SOP-1a) including intensive airborne measurements was performed in the framework of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region (ADRIMED) project during the Mediterranean dry season over the western and central Mediterranean basins, with a focus on aerosol-radiation measurements and their modeling. The SOP-1a took place from 11 June to 5 July 2013. Airborne measurements were made by both the ATR-42 and F-20 French research aircraft operated from Sardinia (Italy) and instrumented for in situ and remote-sensing measurements, respectively, and by sounding and drifting balloons, launched in Minorca. The experimental setup also involved several ground-based measurement sites on islands including two ground-based reference stations in Corsica and Lampedusa and secondary monitoring sites in Minorca and Sicily. Additional measurements including lidar profiling were also performed on alert during aircraft operations at EARLINET/ACTRIS stations at Granada and Barcelona in Spain, and in southern Italy. Remote-sensing aerosol products from satellites (MSG/SEVIRI, MODIS) and from the AERONET/PHOTONS network were also used. Dedicated meso-scale and regional modeling experiments were performed in relation to this observational effort. We provide here an overview of the different surface and aircraft observations deployed during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED period and of associated modeling studies together with an analysis of the synoptic conditions that determined the aerosol emission and transport. Meteorological conditions observed during this campaign (moderate temperatures and southern flows) were not favorable to producing high levels of atmospheric pollutants or intense biomass burning

  2. Progress report, Chemistry and Materials Division, October 1 to December 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interim research results are reported in solid state science (ion penetration, electron microscopy, radiation damage and metal physics, nuclear methods of analysis), general chemistry (analytical chemistry, hydrogen-water exchange, radioactivity measurements, electrochemistry), physical chemistry (radiation and isotope chemistry), materials science (surface chemistry and metal physics), and university research (deuterium exchange and zirconium alloy properties). (E.C.B.)

  3. Aerosol chemistry and the effect of aerosol water content on visibility impairment and radiative forcing in Guangzhou during the 2006 Pearl River Delta campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinsang; Lee, Hanlim; Kim, Young J; Liu, Xingang; Zhang, Yuanhang; Gu, Jianwei; Fan, Shaojia

    2009-08-01

    Optical and chemical aerosol measurements were obtained from 2 to 31 July 2006 at an urban site in the metropolitan area of Guangzhou (China) as part of the Program of Regional Integrated Experiment of Air Quality over Pearl River Delta (PRIDE-PRD2006) to investigate aerosol chemistry and the effect of aerosol water content on visibility impairment and radiative forcing. During the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign, the average contributions of ammonium sulfate, organic mass by carbon (OMC), elemental carbon (EC), and sea salt (SS) to total PM(2.5) mass were measured to be 36.5%, 5.7%, 27.1%, 7.8%, and 3.7%, respectively. Compared with the clean marine period, (NH(4))(2)SO(4), NH(4)NO(3), and OMC were all greatly enhanced (by up to 430%) during local haze periods via the accumulation of a secondary aerosol component. The OMC dominance increased when high levels of biomass burning influenced the measurement site while (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and OMC did when both biomass burning and industrial emissions influenced it. The effect of aerosol water content on the total light-extinction coefficient was estimated to be 34.2%, of which 25.8% was due to aerosol water in (NH(4))(2)SO(4), 5.1% that in NH(4)NO(3), and 3.3% that in SS. The average mass-scattering efficiency (MSE) of PM(10) particles was determined to be 2.2+/-0.6 and 4.6+/-1.7m(2)g(-1) under dry (RHalbedo (SSA) was 0.80+/-0.08 and 0.90+/-0.04 under dry and ambient conditions, respectively. Not only are the extinction and scattering coefficients greatly enhanced by aerosol water content, but MSE and SSA are also highly sensitive. It can be concluded that sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol, as well as aerosol water content, play important roles in the processes that determine visibility impairment and radiative forcing in the ambient atmosphere of the Guangzhou urban area. PMID:19523748

  4. Radiation effects on living systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography includes papers and reports by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited scientists concerning radiation effects on living systems. It is divided into three sections: Radiobiology, Radiation Biochemistry and Radiation Chemistry. (auth)

  5. General chemistry students' understanding of the chemistry underlying climate science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versprille, Ashley N.

    The purpose of this study is to investigate first-semester general chemistry students' understanding of the chemistry underlying climate change. The first part of this study involves the collection of qualitative data from twenty-four first-semester general chemistry students from a large Midwestern research institution. The semi-structured interview protocol was developed based on alternative conceptions identified in the research literature and the essential principles of climate change outlined in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) document which pertain to chemistry (CCSP, 2003). The analysis and findings from the interviews indicate conceptual difficulties for students, both with basic climate literacy and underlying chemistry concepts. Students seem to confuse the greenhouse effect, global warming, and the ozone layer, and in terms of chemistry concepts, they lack a particulate level understanding of greenhouse gases and their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, causing them to not fully conceptualize the greenhouse effect and climate change. Based on the findings from these interviews, a Chemistry of Climate Science Diagnostic Instrument (CCSI) was developed for use in courses that teach chemistry with a rich context such as climate science. The CCSI is designed for professors who want to teach general chemistry, while also addressing core climate literacy principles. It will help professors examine their students' prior knowledge and alternative conceptions of the chemistry concepts associated with climate science, which could then inform their teaching and instruction.

  6. Bioinorganic Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bertini, Ivano; Gray, Harry B.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Valentine, Joan Selverstone

    1994-01-01

    This book covers material that could be included in a one-quarter or one-semester course in bioinorganic chemistry for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students in chemistry or biochemistry. We believe that such a course should provide students with the background required to follow the research literature in the field. The topics were chosen to represent those areas of bioinorganic chemistry that are mature enough for textbook presentation. Although each chapter presents material...

  7. Organic chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-08-15

    This book with sixteen chapter explains organic chemistry on linkage isomerism such as alkane, cycloalkane, alkene, aromatic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, aromatic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, organic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, organic halogen compound, alcohol, ether, aldehyde and ketone, carboxylic acid, dicarboxylic acid, fat and detergent, amino, carbohydrate, amino acid and protein, nucleotide and nucleic acid and spectroscopy, a polymer and medical chemistry. Each chapter has introduction structure and characteristic and using of organic chemistry.

  8. Social Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Lichtfouse, Eric; Schwarzbauer, Jan; Robert, Didier

    2012-01-01

    International audience This article is both an essay to propose social chemistry as a new scientific discipline, and a preface of the book Environmental Chemistry for a Sustainable World. Environmental chemistry is a fast emerging discipline aiming at the understanding the fate of pollutants in ecosystems and at designing novel processes that are safe for ecosystems. Past pollution should be cleaned, future pollution should be predicted and avoided (Lichtfouse et al., 2005a). Such advices ...

  9. Computational chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Truhlar, Donald G.; McKoy, Vincent

    2000-01-01

    Computational chemistry has come of age. With significant strides in computer hardware and software over the last few decades, computational chemistry has achieved full partnership with theory and experiment as a tool for understanding and predicting the behavior of a broad range of chemical, physical, and biological phenomena. The Nobel Prize award to John Pople and Walter Kohn in 1998 highlighted the importance of these advances in computational chemistry. With massively parallel computers ...

  10. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The INCT 2002 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics, nucleonic control systems and accelerators

  11. Good chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Petsko, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    The subject matter in chemistry courses reflects almost nothing of the issues that chemists are interested in. It is important to formulate a set of topics - and a Medical College Admissions Test reflecting them - that would leave chemistry departments no choice but to change their teaching.

  12. Quantum mechanics in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Schatz, George C

    2002-01-01

    Intended for graduate and advanced undergraduate students, this text explores quantum mechanical techniques from the viewpoint of chemistry and materials science. Dynamics, symmetry, and formalism are emphasized. An initial review of basic concepts from introductory quantum mechanics is followed by chapters examining symmetry, rotations, and angular momentum addition. Chapter 4 introduces the basic formalism of time-dependent quantum mechanics, emphasizing time-dependent perturbation theory and Fermi's golden rule. Chapter 5 sees this formalism applied to the interaction of radiation and matt

  13. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    1993-01-01

    Praised for its appealing writing style and clear pedagogy, Lowe's Quantum Chemistry is now available in its Second Edition as a text for senior undergraduate- and graduate-level chemistry students. The book assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry, thus enabling students to comprehend much of the current chemical literature in which quantum chemical methods or concepts are used as tools. The book begins with a six-chapter introduction of standard one-dimensional systems, the hydrogen atom,

  14. Materials Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Fahlman, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The 2nd edition of Materials Chemistry builds on the strengths that were recognized by a 2008 Textbook Excellence Award from the Text and Academic Authors Association (TAA). Materials Chemistry addresses inorganic-, organic-, and nano-based materials from a structure vs. property treatment, providing a suitable breadth and depth coverage of the rapidly evolving materials field. The 2nd edition continues to offer innovative coverage and practical perspective throughout. After briefly defining materials chemistry and its history, seven chapters discuss solid-state chemistry, metals, semiconducting materials, organic "soft" materials, nanomaterials, and materials characterization. All chapters have been thoroughly updated and expanded with, for example, new sections on ‘soft lithographic’ patterning, ‘click chemistry’ polymerization, nanotoxicity, graphene, as well as many biomaterials applications. The polymer and ‘soft’ materials chapter represents the largest expansion for the 2nd edition. Each ch...

  15. Introductory Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Mark; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Jose; Stevens, Gary; Gray, Nathan; Atherton, Thomas; Winn, Joss

    2010-01-01

    Teaching and Learning resources for the 1st Year Introductory Chemistry course (Forensic Science). 30 credits. These are Open Educational Resources (OER), made available for re-use under a Creative Commons license.

  16. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is comprised of nineteen chapters, which describes introduction of analytical chemistry, experimental error and statistics, chemistry equilibrium and solubility, gravimetric analysis with mechanism of precipitation, range and calculation of the result, volume analysis on general principle, sedimentation method on types and titration curve, acid base balance, acid base titration curve, complex and firing reaction, introduction of chemical electro analysis, acid-base titration curve, electrode and potentiometry, electrolysis and conductometry, voltammetry and polarographic spectrophotometry, atomic spectrometry, solvent extraction, chromatograph and experiments.

  17. Green Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collison, Melanie

    2011-05-15

    Green chemistry is the science of chemistry used in a way that will not use or create hazardous substances. Dr. Rui Resendes is working in this field at GreenCentre Canada, an offshoot of PARTEQ Innovations in Kingston, Ontario. GreenCentre's preliminary findings suggest their licensed product {sup S}witchable Solutions{sup ,} featuring 3 classes of solvents and a surfactant, may be useful in bitumen oil sands extraction.

  18. Cluster Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Cansisting of eight scientists from the State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Xiamen University, this creative research group is devoted to the research of cluster chemistry and creation of nanomaterials.After three-year hard work, the group scored a series of encouraging progresses in synthesis of clusters with special structures, including novel fullerenes, fullerene-like metal cluster compounds as well as other related nanomaterials, and their properties study.

  19. Theory and practice of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book deals with theory of the atomic energy; nuclear physics, radiochemistry, radiation chemistry and radiobiology. Also it says about protection radiation, management of waste of radiation, dealing of radiation including measuring the radiation energy and a neutron content and explanation of the laws and ordinances of nuclear energy. This is a book of preparations for examinations.

  20. Introduction to radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is arranged in a logical sequence, starting from radiation physics and radiation chemistry, followed by molecular, subcellular and cellular effects and going on to the level of organism. Topics covered include applied radiobiology like modifiers of radiosensitivity, predictive assay, health physics, human genetics and radiopharmaceuticals. The topics covered are : 1. Radiation Physics, 2. Detection and Measurement of Radiation, 3. Radiation Chemistry, 4. DNA Damage and Repair, 5. Chromosomal Aberrations and Gene Mutations, 6. Cellular Radiobiology 7. Acute Radiation Effects, 8. Delayed Effects of Radiation, 9. Biological Basis of Radiotherapy, 10. Chemical Modifiers of Radiosensitivity, 11. Hyperthermia, 12. High LET Radiations in Cancer, Therapy, 13. Predictive Assays, 14. Radiation Effects on Embryos, 15. Human Radiation Genetics, 16. Radiolabelled Compounds in Biology and Medicine and 17. Radiological Health

  1. Current status of radiation chemistry in India with perspective to antioxidants and metal nanoparticles%印度辐射化学研究现状--抗氧化剂与纳米金属研究展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tulsi Mukherjee

    2005-01-01

    In the world scenario understanding radiation chemistry in the time domain of hundreds of nano seconds to milliseconds started with the inception of pulse radiolysis technique. In India also research on time-resolved radiation chemistry started after the linear accelerator based pulse radiolysis system was set up in 1986 in Chemistry Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. In the initial years the basic understanding of the mechanisms underlying redox reactions of organic compounds was the main area of research. The basic thrust was in characterizing the transients, determination of redox potentials, rate constants, ionic equilibria, etc.One important current area of research is the study of antioxidant properties of natural and synthetic organic molecules in relation to the mechanistic path and products formed. Most of these compounds are either established drugs/antioxidants or new ones. Some of the compounds studied are gingeroids, eurcuminoids, meroterpene (bakuchiol), fiavonoids, melatonine, sesamol, etc. Results from our research group conclusively demonstrated that besides phenolic groups, the moieties like β-diketone, allylic side chain and unsaturation in the α-β position of an organic molecule can play a crucial role in the antioxidant action. Moreover, folic acid, a B-group vitamin, was first time coined as an antioxidant.Another important area of research is that of metal nanoparticles. Formation, characterization and studies on the catalytic properties of these particles in solid as well as in solution were initiated in early nineties. Metal nanoparticles of Au, Ag, Pd, Pt, Co, Ni, Cu, Cd, Tl and bimetallic particles of Cu-Cd, Ag-Tl were prepared in aqueous solutions, microemulsions, as self-supporting powder, in polymer matrix and dispersed on the surface of A12O3 and SiO2 using radiolytic, photolytic and chemical reduction methods. The steps involved in the formation of clusters from precursor metal ions were detected as a function of time. The

  2. Polymer Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  3. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    2006-01-01

    Lowe's new edition assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry. It can serve as a primary text in quantum chemistry courses, and enables students and researchers to comprehend the current literature. This third edition has been thoroughly updated and includes numerous new exercises to facilitate self-study and solutions to selected exercises.* Assumes little initial mathematical or physical sophistication, developing insights and abilities in the context of actual problems* Provides thorough treatment

  4. Aqueous chemistry of iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemistry of iodine has been examined in aqueous solutions of pH 6 to 10 containing 2500 ppM boron as H3BO3 at temperatures up to 1500C using absorption spectrophotometry to identify and monitor the iodine species present. Kinetic rate constants for the disproportionation of the HOI intermediate, 3HOI= IO3- + 2I- + 3H+, have been measured as a function of pH even though no direct spectral evidence for HOI itself has been observed. An HOI partition coefficient >104 has been estimated; results of ionic strength tests are consistent with HOI being present as an uncharged triatomic species in solution. Redox and radiation effects on the aqueous iodine chemistry have also been described. 11 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Advances in BWR water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews recent advances in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) water chemistry control with examples of plant experiences at U.S. designed BWRs. Water chemistry advances provide some of the most effective methods for mitigating materials degradation, reducing fuel performance concerns and lowering radiation fields. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of materials remains a high priority and improved techniques that have been demonstrated in BWRs will be reviewed, specifically hydrogen injection combined with noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) and the newer on-line noble metal application process (OLNC). Hydrogen injection performance, an important part of SCC mitigation, will also be reviewed for the BWR fleet, highlighting system improvements that have enabled earlier injection of hydrogen including the potential for hydrogen injection during plant startup. Water chemistry has been significantly improved by the application of pre-filtration and optimized use of ion exchange resins in the CP (condensate polishing) and reactor water cleanup (RWCU) systems. EPRI has monitored and supported water treatment improvements to meet water chemistry goals as outlined in the EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines, particularly those for SCC mitigation of reactor internals and piping, minimization of fuel risk due to corrosion and crud deposits and chemistry control for radiation field reduction. In recent years, a significant reduction has occurred in feedwater corrosion product input, particularly iron. A large percentage of plants are now reporting <0.1 ppb feedwater iron. The impacts to plant operation and chemistry of lower feedwater iron will be explored. Depleted zinc addition is widely practiced across the fleet and the enhanced focus on radiation reduction continues to emphasize the importance of controlling radiation source term. In addition, shutdown chemistry control is necessary to avoid excessive release of activated corrosion products from fuel

  6. Investigation of Multi-decadal Trends in Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects over North America using a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, R.; Pleim, J.; Wong, D.; Wei, C.; Xing, J.; Gan, M.; Yu, S.; Binkowski, F.

    2012-12-01

    While aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, there has been little effort devoted to verification of the spatial and temporal variability of the magnitude and directionality of aerosol radiative forcing. A comprehensive investigation of the processes regulating aerosol distributions, their optical properties, and their radiative effects and verification of their simulated effects for past conditions relative to measurements is needed in order to build confidence in the estimates of the projected impacts arising from changes in both anthropogenic forcing and climate change. This study aims at addressing this issue through a systematic investigation of changes in anthropogenic emissions of SO2 and NOx over the past two decades in the United States, their impacts on anthropogenic aerosol loading in the North American troposphere, and subsequent impacts on regional radiation budgets. A newly developed 2-way coupled meteorology and air pollution model composed of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is being run for 20 years (1990 - 2010) on a 12 km resolution grid that covers most of North America including the entire conterminous US. During this period US emissions of SO2 and NOx have been reduced by about 66% and 50%, respectively, mainly due to Title IV of the U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments (CAA) that aimed to reduce emissions that contribute to acid deposition. A methodology is developed to consistently estimate emission inventories for the 20-year period accounting for air quality regulations as well as population trends, economic conditions, and technology changes in motor vehicles and electric power generation. The coupled WRF-CMAQ model includes detailed treatment of direct effects of aerosols on photolysis rates as well as on shortwave radiation and the direct effects of tropospheric ozone on the long

  7. Organic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the mycotoxin research group are discussed. This includes the isolation and structure determination of mycotoxins, plant products, the biosyntheris of mycotoxins, the synthesis and characteristics of steroids, the synthesis and mechanistic aspects of heterocyclic chemistry and the functionality of steroids over long distances. Nmr spectra and mass spectroscopy are some of the techniques used

  8. Reinventing Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Whitesides, George McClelland

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is in a period of change, from an era focused on molecules and reactions, to one in which manipulations of systems of molecules and reactions will be essential parts of controlling larger systems. This Essay traces paths from the past to possible futures.

  9. Fundamentals of radiation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain papers dealing with current trends in radiation technologies, the basic concepts of radiation technologies, the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter, and the foundations of radiation chemistry. Also described are the technical and economic principles of design and the use of radionuclide radiation sources and electron accelerators. The problems are discussed of radiosterilization, the radiation processing of polymers and their degradation, and the radiopreservation of cultural and museum objects. Also dealt with is the irradiation of foods and the impact of radiation technologies on the environment including radiation chemistry problems of nuclear power plants. The basic principles are explained of work safety in handling sources of ionizing radiation. (J.C.)

  10. Primary processes in radiation chemistry. LET (Linear Energy Transfer) effect in water radiolysis; Processus primaires en chimie sous rayonnement. Influence du transfert d'energie lineique sur la radiolyse de l'eau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trupin-Wasselin, V

    2000-07-11

    The effect of ionizing radiations on aqueous solutions leads to water ionization and then to the formation of radical species and molecular products (e{sup -}{sub aq}, H{sup .}, OH{sup .}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}). It has been shown that the stopping power, characterized by the LET value (Linear Energy Transfer) becomes different when the nature of the ionizing radiations is different. Few data are nowadays available for high LET radiations such as protons and high energy heavy ions. These particles have been used to better understand the primary processes in radiation chemistry. The yield of a chemical dosimeter (the Fricke dosimeter) and those of the hydrogen peroxide have been determined for different LET. The effect of the dose rate on the Fricke dosimeter yield and on the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} yield has been studied too. When the dose rate increases, an increase of the molecular products yield is observed. At very high dose rate, this yield decreases on account of the attack of the molecular products by radicals. The H{sub 2}O{sub 2} yield in alkaline medium decreases when the pH reaches 12. This decrease can be explained by a slowing down of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} formation velocity in alkaline medium. Superoxide radical has also been studied in this work. A new detection method: the time-resolved chemiluminescence has been perfected for this radical. This technique is more sensitive than the absorption spectroscopy. Experiments with heavy ions have allowed to determine the O{sub 2}{sup .-} yield directly in the irradiation cell. The experimental results have been compared with those obtained with a Monte Carlo simulation code. (O.M.)

  11. Nanoscale surface chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Madey, Theodore E.; Pelhos, Kalman; WU, QIFEI; Barnes, Robin; Ermanoski, Ivan; Chen, Wenhua; Kolodziej, Jacek J.; Rowe, John E.

    2002-01-01

    We report evidence in several experiments for nanometer-size effects in surface chemistry. The evidence concerns bimetallic systems, monolayer films of Pt or Pd on W(111) surfaces. Pyramidal facets with {211} faces are formed on annealing on physical monolayer of Pt, Pd on a W(111) substrate, and facet sizes increase with annealing temperature. We used synchrotron radiation-based soft x-ray photoemission to show that monolayer films of Pt, Pd, on W “float” on the outer surface, whereas multil...

  12. Radiochemistry and nuclear chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Choppin, Gregory; RYDBERG, JAN; Ekberg, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Radiochemistry or nuclear chemistry is the study of radiation from an atomic and molecular perspective, including elemental transformation and reaction effects, as well as physical, health and medical properties. This revised edition of one of the earliest and best-known books on the subject has been updated to bring into teaching the latest developments in research and the current hot topics in the field. To further enhance the functionality of this text, the authors have added numerous teaching aids, examples in MathCAD with variable quantities and options, hotlinks to relevant text secti

  13. Cold ion-atom chemistry driven by spontaneous radiative relaxation: a case study for the formation of the YbCa+ molecular ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using both quantum and semi-classical methods, we calculate the rates for radiative association and charge transfer in cold collisions of Yb+ with Ca. We demonstrate the fidelity of the local optical potential method in predictions for the total radiative relaxation rates. We find a large variation in the isotope dependence of the cross sections at ultra-cold gas temperatures. However, at cold temperatures, 1 mK −15 cm3 s−1. It is about five orders of magnitude smaller than the chemical reaction rate measured in Rellergert et al (2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 107 243201). (paper)

  14. Progress report 1983-1984 Reactor Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description of the activity developed by the Reactor Chemistry Department of the National Atomic Energy Commission during the period 1983-1984 in its four divisions: Chemical Control; Moderator and Refrigerant Chemistry; Radiation Chemistry and Nuclear Power Plant's Service. A list of the publications made by the personnel during this period is also included. (M.E.L.)

  15. Organometallic chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bashkin, James K.; M.L.H. Green; Dr. M. L. H. Green

    1982-01-01

    Transition metal organometallic chemistry is a rapidly expanding field, which has an important relationship to industrial problems of petrochemical catalysis. This thesis describes studies of fundamental organometallic reaction processes, such as C-H and C-C bond formation and cleavage, and investigations of the structure and bonding of organometallic compounds. A number of techniques were used to pursue these studies, including synthesis, X-ray crystallography, and semi-em...

  16. Disk Chemistry*

    OpenAIRE

    Thi Wing-Fai

    2015-01-01

    The chemical species in protoplanetary disks react with each other. The chemical species control part of the thermal balance in those disks. How the chemistry proceeds in the varied conditions encountered in disks relies on detailed microscopic understanding of the reactions through experiments or theoretical studies. This chapter strives to summarize and explain in simple terms the different types of chemical reactions that can lead to complex species. The first part of the chapter deals wit...

  17. Interstellar chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Klemperer, William

    2006-01-01

    In the past half century, radioastronomy has changed our perception and understanding of the universe. In this issue of PNAS, the molecular chemistry directly observed within the galaxy is discussed. For the most part, the description of the molecular transformations requires specific kinetic schemes rather than chemical thermodynamics. Ionization of the very abundant molecular hydrogen and atomic helium followed by their secondary reactions is discussed. The rich variety of organic species o...

  18. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The INCT 2001 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology in Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics, nucleonic control systems and accelerators and nuclear analytical methods

  19. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The INCT 1999 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics and nucleonic control systems and accelerators

  20. Annual Report 2004 of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The INCT 2004 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics, nucleonic control systems and accelerators, radiobiology and nuclear analytical methods

  1. Recent developments in BWR water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water chemistry is of critical importance to the operation and economic viability of the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). A successful water chemistry program will satisfy the following goals: - Minimize the incidence and growth of SCC/IASCC, - Minimize plant radiation fields controllable by chemistry, -Maintain fuel integrity by minimizing cladding corrosion, - Minimize flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) in balance-of-plant components. The impact of water chemistry on each of these goals is discussed in more detail in this paper. It should be noted that water chemistry programs also include surveillance and operating limits for other plant water systems (e.g., service water, closed cooling water systems, etc.) but these are out of the scope of this paper. This paper reviews developments in water chemistry guidelines for U.S. BWR nuclear power plants. (author). 2 figs., 2 tabs., 7 refs

  2. Theoretical chemistry periodicities in chemistry and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Henry

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical Chemistry: Periodicities in Chemistry and Biology, Volume 4 covers the aspects of theoretical chemistry. The book discusses the stably rotating patterns of reaction and diffusion; the chemistry of inorganic systems exhibiting nonmonotonic behavior; and population cycles. The text also describes the mathematical modeling of excitable media in neurobiology and chemistry; oscillating enzyme reactions; and oscillatory properties and excitability of the heart cell membrane. Selected topics from the theory of physico-chemical instabilities are also encompassed. Chemists, mechanical engin

  3. Computational chemistry and aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, D. M.; Jaffe, R. L.; Arnold, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the radiative heating phenomena encountered during a typical aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle (AOTV) trajectory was made to determine the potential impact of computational chemistry on AOTV design technology. Both equilibrium and nonequilibrium radiation mechanisms were considered. This analysis showed that computational chemistry can be used to predict (1) radiative intensity factors and spectroscopic data; (2) the excitation rates of both atoms and molecules; (3) high-temperature reaction rate constants for metathesis and charge exchange reactions; (4) particle ionization and neutralization rates and cross sections; and (5) spectral line widths.

  4. Surface chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Desai, KR

    2008-01-01

    The surface Chemistry of a material as a whole is crucially dependent upon the Nature and type of surfaces exposed on crystallites. It is therefore vitally important to independently Study different, well - defined surfaces through surface analytical techniques. In addition to composition and structure of surface, the subject also provides information on dynamic light scattering, micro emulsions, colloid Stability control and nanostructures. The present book endeavour to bring before the reader that the understanding and exploitation of Solid state phenomena depended largely on the ability to

  5. Annual Report 2003 of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The INCT 2003 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies, nucleonic control systems and accelerators

  6. Progress report, Chemistry and Materials Division, April 1 to June 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research results are reported in such areas as ion penetration, electron microscopy, metal physics and radiation damage, nuclear methods of analysis, fuel analysis, and general analytical chemistry, electrochemistry, radiation chemistry, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, and surface chemistry of nuclear materials like zirconium base alloys. (E.C.B.)

  7. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S. Gaffney

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric chemistry is an important discipline for understanding air pollution and its impacts. This mini-review gives a brief history of air pollution and presents an overview of some of the basic photochemistry involved in the production of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere. Urban air quality issues are reviewed with a specific focus on ozone and other oxidants, primary and secondary aerosols, alternative fuels, and the potential for chlorine releases to amplify oxidant chemistry in industrial areas. Regional air pollution issues such as acid rain, long-range transport of aerosols and visibility loss, and the connections of aerosols to ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate chemistry are examined. Finally, the potential impacts of air pollutants on the global-scale radiative balances of gases and aerosols are discussed briefly.

  8. Cyclodextrin chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemistry of cyclodextrins was studied. This study included synthesising some cyclodextrin derivatives, preparing selected inclusion complexes with cyclodextrin and investigating the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins and certain linear oligosaccharides. This report presents a brief review of the structure and properties of cyclodextrins, the synthesis of cyclodextrin derivatives, their complexation and applications. This is followed by a description of the synthesis of some cyclodextrin derivatives and the preparation of inclusion complexes of cyclodextrin with some organic compounds. Finally, the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins, some of their derivatives and certain structurally related carbohydrates are discussed. The gamma irradiation studies were carried out for two reasons: to study the effects of gamma irradiation on cyclodextrins and their derivatives; and to investigate selectivity during the gamma irradiation of cyclodextrin derivatives

  9. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  10. Public perception of chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Stražar, Alenka

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with the perception of chemistry among the public, which reflects the stereotypes that people have about chemistry. It presents the existing classification of stereotypes about chemistry and their upgrade. An analysis of movies that reflect the existing perception of chemistry in the public is written. Literature on selected aspects of the application of chemistry in movies is collected and analyzed. A qualification of perception of chemistry in the movies is presented based ...

  11. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  12. Surveys of research in the Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazis, B.M. [ed.

    1992-11-01

    Research reports are presented on reactive intermediates in condensed phase (radiation chemistry, photochemistry), electron transfer and energy conversion, photosynthesis and solar energy conversion, metal cluster chemistry, chemical dynamics in gas phase, photoionization-photoelectrons, characterization and reactivity of coal and coal macerals, premium coal sample program, chemical separations, heavy elements coordination chemistry, heavy elements photophysics/photochemistry, f-electron interactions, radiation chemistry of high-level wastes (gas generation in waste tanks), ultrafast molecular electronic devices, and nuclear medicine. Separate abstracts have been prepared. Accelerator activites and computer system/network services are also reported.

  13. Surveys of research in the Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazis, B.M. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    Research reports are presented on reactive intermediates in condensed phase (radiation chemistry, photochemistry), electron transfer and energy conversion, photosynthesis and solar energy conversion, metal cluster chemistry, chemical dynamics in gas phase, photoionization-photoelectrons, characterization and reactivity of coal and coal macerals, premium coal sample program, chemical separations, heavy elements coordination chemistry, heavy elements photophysics/photochemistry, f-electron interactions, radiation chemistry of high-level wastes (gas generation in waste tanks), ultrafast molecular electronic devices, and nuclear medicine. Separate abstracts have been prepared. Accelerator activites and computer system/network services are also reported.

  14. Trace Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and

  15. Migration chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migration chemistry, the influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour of pollutants in the environment, is an interplay between the actual natur of the pollutant and the characteristics of the environment, such as pH, redox conditions and organic matter content. The wide selection of possible pollutants in combination with varying geological media, as well as the operation of different chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions compleactes the prediction of the influence of these processes on the mobility of pollutants. The report summarizes a wide range of potential pollutants in the terrestrial environment as well as a variety of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions, which can be expected to influence the migration behaviour, comprising diffusion, dispersion, convection, sorption/desorption, precipitation/dissolution, transformations/degradations, biochemical reactions and complex formation. The latter comprises the complexation of metal ions as well as non-polar organics to naturally occurring organic macromolecules. The influence of the single types of processes on the migration process is elucidated based on theoretical studies. The influence of chemical -, biochemical - and physico-chemical reactions on the migration behaviour is unambiguous, as the processes apparently control the transport of pollutants in the terrestrial environment. As the simple, conventional KD concept breaks down, it is suggested that the migration process should be described in terms of the alternative concepts chemical dispersion, average-elution-time and effective retention. (AB) (134 refs.)

  16. Radiation effects on living systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography includes papers and reports by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited scientists concerning radiation effects on living systems. It is divided into three sections: Radiobiology, Radiation Biochemistry and Radiation Chemistry. It is intended that the bibliography will be updated regularly

  17. Surface chemistry in photodissociation regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplugues, G. B.; Cazaux, S.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.; Caselli, P.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The presence of dust can strongly affect the chemical composition of the interstellar medium. We model the chemistry in photodissociation regions (PDRs) using both gas-phase and dust-phase chemical reactions. Aims: Our aim is to determine the chemical compositions of the interstellar medium (gas/dust/ice) in regions with distinct (molecular) gas densities that are exposed to radiation fields with different intensities. Methods: We have significantly improved the Meijerink PDR code by including 3050 new gas-phase chemical reactions and also by implementing surface chemistry. In particular, we have included 117 chemical reactions occurring on grain surfaces covering different processes, such as adsorption, thermal desorption, chemical desorption, two-body reactions, photo processes, and cosmic-ray processes on dust grains. Results: We obtain abundances for different gas and solid species as a function of visual extinction, depending on the density and radiation field. We also analyse the rates of the formation of CO2 and H2O ices in different environments. In addition, we study how chemistry is affected by the presence/absence of ice mantles (bare dust or icy dust) and the impact of considering different desorption probabilities. Conclusions: The type of substrate (bare dust or icy dust) and the probability of desorption can significantly alter the chemistry occurring on grain surfaces, leading to differences of several orders of magnitude in the abundances of gas-phase species, such as CO, H2CO, and CH3OH. The type of substrate, together with the density and intensity of the radiation field, also determine the threshold extinction to form ices of CO2 and H2O. We also conclude that H2CO and CH3OH are mainly released into the gas phase of low, far-ultraviolet illuminated PDRs through chemical desorption upon two-body surface reactions, rather than through photodesorption.

  18. Industrial Chemistry and School Chemistry: Making Chemistry Studies More Relevant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstein, Avi; Kesner, Miri

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present the development and implementation over the period of more than 15 years of learning materials focusing on industrial chemistry as the main theme. The work was conducted in the Department of Science Teaching at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. The project's general goal was to teach chemistry concepts in the…

  19. From Matter to Life:Chemistry?Chemistry!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Marie; LEHN

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Animate as well as inanimate matter,living organisms as well as materials,are formed of molecules and of the organized entities resulting from the interaction of molecules with each other.Chemistry provides the bridge between the molecules of inanimate matter and the highly complex molecular architectures and systems which make up living organisms. Synthetic chemistry has developed a very powerful set of methods for constructing ever more complex molecules.Supramolecular chemistry seeks to con...

  20. Green chemistry: A tool in Pharmaceutical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Smita Talaviya; Falguni Majumdar

    2012-01-01

    Green chemistry expresses an area of research developing from scientific discoveries about pollution awareness and it utilizes a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in all steps of particular synthesis or process. Chemists and medicinal scientists can greatly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by following all the valuable principles of green chemistry. The most simple and direct way to apply green chemistry in pharmaceut...

  1. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The report is the collection of short communications being the review of the scientific activity of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology - Warsaw in 1997. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics; radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general; radiobiology; nuclear technologies and methods. The annual report of INCT-1997 contains also the general information about INCT as well as the full list of scientific papers being published by the staff in 1997

  2. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is the collection of short communications being the review of the scientific activity of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology - Warsaw in 1997. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics; radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general; radiobiology; nuclear technologies and methods. The annual report of INCT-1997 contains also the general information about INCT as well as the full list of scientific papers being published by the staff in 1997

  3. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  4. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research at the Radiological Research Laboratory is a blend of physics, chemistry, and biology, involving research at the basic level with the admixture of a small proportion of pragmatic or applied research in support of radiation protection and/or radiotherapy. Current research topics include: oncogenic transformation assays, mutation studies involving interactions between radiation and environmental contaminants, isolation, characterization and sequencing of a human repair gene, characterization of a dominant transforming gene found in C3H 10T1/2 cells, characterize ab initio the interaction of DNA and radiation, refine estimates of the radiation quality factor Q, a new mechanistic model of oncogenesis showing the role of long-term low dose medium LET radiation, and time dependent modeling of radiation induced chromosome damage and subsequent repair or misrepair

  5. Chemistry Of Atmospheric Brown Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2015-05-27

    Organic carbon (OC) accounts for a large fraction of atmospheric aerosol and has profound effects on air quality, atmospheric chemistry and climate forcing. Molecular composition of the OC and its evolution during common processes of atmospheric aging have been a subject of extensive research over the last decade (see reviews of Ervens et al.,1 Hallquist et al.,2 Herckes et al.,3 Carlton et al.,4 Kroll and Seinfeld,5 Rudich et al.,6 and Kanakidou et al.7). Even though many fundamental advances have been reported in these studies, our understanding of the climate-related properties of atmospheric OC is still incomplete and the specific ways in which OC impacts atmospheric environment and climate forcing are just beginning to be understood. This review covers one topic of particular interest in this area –environmental chemistry of light-absorbing aerosol OC and its impact on radiative forcing.

  6. Constitutional dynamic chemistry: bridge from supramolecular chemistry to adaptive chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry aims at implementing highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces and effecting molecular recognition, catalysis and transport processes. A further step consists in the investigation of chemical systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibility, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels.CDC introduces a paradigm shift with respect to constitutionally static chemistry. The latter relies on design for the generation of a target entity, whereas CDC takes advantage of dynamic diversity to allow variation and selection. The implementation of selection in chemistry introduces a fundamental change in outlook. Whereas self-organization by design strives to achieve full control over the output molecular or supramolecular entity by explicit programming, self-organization with selection operates on dynamic constitutional diversity in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation.The merging of the features: -information and programmability, -dynamics and reversibility, -constitution and structural diversity, points to the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry, towards a chemistry of complex matter.

  7. Tropospheric Halogen Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Glasow, R.; Crutzen, P. J.

    2003-12-01

    so far highest atmospheric mixing ratios of BrO were measured (Hebestreit et al., 1999). Volcanoes are sources of halogens as well, mainly in the form of HCl. Biomass burning releases halogens as do industrial processes.So far we have only mentioned chlorine, bromine, and iodine. This is justified because chemistry of fluorine is of no consequence, as very unreactive HF is efficiently formed in the atmosphere, e.g., via the reaction F+H2O→HF+OH. However, several fluorine-containing gases of anthropogenic origin are potentially powerful greenhouse gases, because they absorb strongly in the infrared atmospheric window region near 10 μm. Fully fluorinated gases - such as SF6, CF4, and C2F6 - have atmospheric lifetimes of the order of thousands of years and thus possess very high global warming potential (GWP). Although their abundance in the atmosphere has not yet grown large enough to be of concern for Earth's climate, their production must ultimately be curtailed in the future. The most abundant fully fluorinated gas, CF4, had an atmospheric volume mixing ratio of ˜75 pmol mol-1 in 1995 (Warneck, 1999). Because of their higher concentrations in the atmosphere, about 270 pmol mol-1 and 530 pmol mol-1, respectively, the CFC gases, CFCl3 and CF2Cl2, already exert a significant radiative greenhouse forcing (Ramanathan, 1975) on Earth's climate. For further discussion about atmospheric fluorine, the reader is referred to a thorough review article by Harnisch (1999).Several overview articles have been published on tropospheric halogen chemistry since the early 1980s, starting with Cicerone (1981). Wayne et al. (1995) list in great detail reaction paths, laboratory data, and atmospheric implications of halogen oxides. A good overview on laboratory measurements was also given by de Haan et al. (1999). Reaction cycles involved in tropospheric halogen chemistry and measurements are also thoroughly discussed by Platt (2000) and Platt and Hönninger (2003). Important

  8. Temperature dependence of radiation chemistry of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical reactions which occur during radiolysis of polymers usually show an increase in rate with increasing temperature that can be described by an Arrhenius relationship. The magnitude of the activation energy can vary widely and is affected by physical, as well as chemical, factors. Different reaction rates may be expected in crystalline and amorphous morphologies, and in glassy and rubbery regions. The temperature dependence of radiolysis reactions can be expected to show discontinuities at the glass and melting transitions, Tg and Tm. The ceiling temperature, Tc, for polymerization/depolymerization will also affect the rate of degradation, especially for depropagation to monomer. The temperature for this effect depends on the molecular structure of the polymer. The temperature dependence of free radical reactions can be studied by cryogenic trapping and ESR spectroscopy during thermal profiling. Increased degradation rates at high dose rates can be due to increased temperatures resulting from energy absorption

  9. CAREM-25: considerations about primary coolant chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    World operating experience, in conjunction with basic studies has been modifying chemistry specifications for the primary coolant of water cooled nuclear reactors along with the reactor type and structural materials involved in the design. For the reactor CAREM-25, the following sources of information have been used: 1) Experience gained by the Chemistry Department of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA, Argentina); 2) Participation of the Chemistry Department (CNEA) in international cooperation projects; 3) Guidelines given by EPRI, Siemens-KWU, AECL, etc. Given the main objectives: materials integrity, low radiation levels and personnel safety, which are in turn a balance between the lowest corrosion and activity transport achievable and considering that the CAREM-25 is a pressurized vessel integrated reactor, a group of guidelines for the chemistry and additives for the primary coolant have been given in the present work. (author)

  10. Progress report, Chemistry and Materials Division, October 1 to December 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is given of research largely centering around radiation effects on materials, radiation and analytical chemistry, surface studies, and materials science, esp. zirconium base alloys and their problems and properties in nuclear service. (E.C.B.)

  11. Green chemistry: A tool in Pharmaceutical Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Talaviya

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Green chemistry expresses an area of research developing from scientific discoveries about pollution awareness and it utilizes a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in all steps of particular synthesis or process. Chemists and medicinal scientists can greatly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by following all the valuable principles of green chemistry. The most simple and direct way to apply green chemistry in pharmaceuticals is to utilize eco-friendly, non-hazardous, reproducible and efficient solvents and catalysts in synthesis of drug molecules, drug intermediates and in researches involving synthetic chemistry. Microwave synthesis is also an important tool of green chemistry by being an energy efficient process.

  12. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  13. CHINESE JOURNAL OF CHEMISTRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@Chinese Journal of Chemistry is an international journal published in English by the Chinese Chemical Society with its editorial office hosted by Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  14. Water chemistry experiences with VVERs at Kudankulam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project - 1 and 2 (Kudankulam NPP - 1 and 2) are pressurised water cooled VVERs of 1000 MWe each. Kudankulam NPP Unit - 1 is presently on its first cycle of operation and Kudankulam NPP Unit - 2 is on the advanced stage of commissioning with the successful completion of hot run related Functional tests. Water Chemistry aspects during various phases of commissioning of Kudankulam NPP Unit - 1 such as Hot Run, Boric acid flushing, initial fuel Loading (IFL), First approach to Criticality (FAC) are discussed. The main objectives of the use of controlled primary water chemistry programme during the hot functional tests are reviewed. The importance of the relevant water chemistry parameters were ensured to have the quality of the passive layer formed on the primary coolant system surfaces. The operational experiences during the 1st cycle of operation of primary water chemistry, radioactivity transport and build-up are presented. The operational experience of some VVER units in the field of the primary water chemistry, radioactivity transport and build-up are presented as a comparison to VVER at Kudankulam NPP. The effects of the initial passivated layer formed on metal surfaces during hot run, activated corrosion products levels in the primary coolant under controlled water chemistry regime and the contamination/radiation situation are discussed. This report also includes the water chemistry related issues of secondary water systems. (author)

  15. Organic chemistry experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Seok Sik

    2005-02-15

    This book deals with organic chemistry experiments, it is divided five chapters, which have introduction, the way to write the experiment report and safety in the laboratory, basic experiment technic like recrystallization and extraction, a lot of organic chemistry experiments such as fischer esterification, ester hydrolysis, electrophilic aromatic substitution, aldol reaction, benzoin condensation, wittig reaction grignard reaction, epoxidation reaction and selective reduction. The last chapter introduces chemistry site on the internet and way to find out reference on chemistry.

  16. Frontiers in Gold Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Basic chemistry of gold tells us that it can bond to sulfur, phosphorous, nitrogen, and oxygen donor ligands. The Frontiers in Gold Chemistry Special Issue covers gold complexes bonded to the different donors and their fascinating applications. This issue covers both basic chemistry studies of gold complexes and their contemporary applications in medicine, materials chemistry, and optical sensors. There is a strong belief that aurophilicity plays a major role in the unending applications of g...

  17. Various aspects of lyoluminescence studies in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyoluminescence is the emission of light during the dissolution of irradiated organic and inorganic solids in suitable solvents. This phenomenon has attracted interdisciplinary research involving radiation physics, radiation chemistry and physical chemistry. This paper presents an overall view of the various aspects of lyoluminescence studies in the field of radiation research. (author). 14 refs

  18. Atmospheric chemistry-climate feedbacks

    OpenAIRE

    Raes, Frank; Liao, Hong; Chen, Wei-Ting; Seinfeld, John H.

    2010-01-01

    We extend the theory of climate feedbacks to include atmospheric chemistry. A change in temperature caused by a radiative forcing will include, in general, a contribution from the chemical change that is fed back into the climate system; likewise, the change in atmospheric burdens caused by a chemical forcing will include a contribution from the associated climate change that is fed back into the chemical system. The theory includes two feedback gains, G_(che) and G_(cli). G_(che) is defined ...

  19. Green Chemistry and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjeresen, Dennis L.; Schutt, David L.; Boese, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    Many students today are profoundly interested in the sustainability of their world. Introduces Green Chemistry and its principles with teaching materials. Green Chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention and the design of chemical products and processes that are environmentally benign. (ASK)

  20. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actual edition of Annual Report is a full review of scientific activities of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT), Warsaw, in 1998. The abstracts are presented in the following group of subjects: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies (26); radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general (25); radiobiology (11); nuclear technologies and methods - process engineering (5); material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics (9); nucleonic control systems (7). The edition also included the list of INCT scientific publications and patents as well as information on conferences organized or co-organized by the INCT in 1998

  1. Surface chemistry essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Birdi, K S

    2013-01-01

    Surface chemistry plays an important role in everyday life, as the basis for many phenomena as well as technological applications. Common examples range from soap bubbles, foam, and raindrops to cosmetics, paint, adhesives, and pharmaceuticals. Additional areas that rely on surface chemistry include modern nanotechnology, medical diagnostics, and drug delivery. There is extensive literature on this subject, but most chemistry books only devote one or two chapters to it. Surface Chemistry Essentials fills a need for a reference that brings together the fundamental aspects of surface chemistry w

  2. Microfluidics in radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increased demand for molecular imaging tracers useful in assessing and monitoring diseases has stimulated research towards more efficient and flexible radiosynthetic routes, including newer technologies. The traditional vessel-based approach suffers from limitations concerning flexibility, reagent mass needed, hardware requirements, large number of connections and valves, repetitive cleaning procedures and overall big footprint to be shielded from radiation. For these reasons, several research groups have started to investigate the application of the fast growing field of microfluidic chemistry to radiosynthetic procedures. After the first report in 2004, many scientific papers have been published and demonstrated the potential for increased process yields, reduced reagent use, improved flexibility and general ease of setup. This review will address definitions occurring in microfluidics as well as analyze the different approaches under two macro-categories: microvessel and microchannel. In this perspective, several works will be collected, involving the use of positron emitting species (11C, 18F, 64Cu) and the fewer examples of gamma emitting radionuclides (99mTc, 125/131I). New directions in microfluidic research applied to PET radiochemistry, future developments and challenges are also discussed. -- Graphical abstract: Display Omitted

  3. The New Color of Chemistry: Green Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal GERÇEK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Green chemistry which is the new application of chemistry rules provides solutions to problems that mankind is faced with climate changes, sustainable agriculture, energy, toxics, depletion of natural sources e.g. designing new chemicals and processes that production and utilization of hazardous matters. So, it is the indispensible tool for sustainable development. Current and future chemists should consider the human health and ecological issues in their professional life. In order to provide a solution for this requirement, green chemistry rules and under standings should be primarily taken in the university curriculum and at all educational levels.

  4. Annual report 1984 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1984 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry , environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, geochemistry and waste disposal, radical chemistry, positron annihilation, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  5. Workshop on the interface between radiation chemistry and radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-four papers are grouped under the session headings: measurements of physical and chemical properties, track structure modeling, spurs and track structure, and the 10-16 to 10-12 second region. Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the papers; four of the remaining papers had previously been abstracted

  6. Workshop on the interface between radiation chemistry and radiation physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-03-01

    Twenty-four papers are grouped under the session headings: measurements of physical and chemical properties, track structure modeling, spurs and track structure, and the 10/sup -16/ to 10/sup -12/ second region. Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the papers; four of the remaining papers had previously been abstracted. (DLC)

  7. The New Color of Chemistry: Green Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    GERÇEK, Zuhal

    2012-01-01

    Green chemistry which is the new application of chemistry rules provides solutions to problems that mankind is faced with climate changes, sustainable agriculture, energy, toxics, depletion of natural sources e.g. designing new chemicals and processes that production and utilization of hazardous matters. So, it is the indispensible tool for sustainable development. Current and future chemists should consider the human health and ecological issues in their professional life. In order to provid...

  8. Philosophy of Chemistry or Philosophy with Chemistry?

    OpenAIRE

    Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry deserves more philosophical attention not so much to do justice to a long-neglected science or to enhance its cultural prestige, but to undermine a number of taken-for-granted assumptions about scientific rationality and more importantly to diversify our metaphysical views of nature and reality. In brief, this paper does not make the case for a philosophy of chemistry. It rather urges philosophers of science to listen to chemists and discuss what they learn from them. Because over t...

  9. Proceedings of the Fourth Working Meeting on Radiation Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting aimed at the exchange of information and experiences both in basic and applied research in radiation chemistry, radiation physics, and radiation biology including radiation processing, irradiation plants and techniques, methods and instrumentation as well as radiation dosimetry. Author and subject indexes are included

  10. Annual Report of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The INCT 2000 Annual Report is the review of scientific activities in all branches being developed in the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology Warsaw. The studies are connected in general with the following fields: radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general, radiobiology, process engineering, material engineering, structural studies and diagnostics and nucleonic control systems and accelerators

  11. Surface chemistry in photodissociation regions

    CERN Document Server

    Esplugues, G B; Meijerink, R; Spaans, M; Caselli, P

    2016-01-01

    The presence of dust can strongly affect the chemical composition of the interstellar medium. We model the chemistry in photodissociation regions (PDRs) using both gas-phase and dust-phase chemical reactions. Our aim is to determine the chemical compositions of the interstellar medium (gas/dust/ice) in regions with distinct (molecular) gas densities that are exposed to radiation fields with different intensities. We have significantly improved the Meijerink PDR code by including 3050 new gas-phase chemical reactions and also by implementing surface chemistry. In particular, we have included 117 chemical reactions occurring on grain surfaces covering different processes, such as adsorption, thermal desorption, chemical desorption, two-body reactions, photo processes, and cosmic-ray processes on dust grains. We obtain abundances for different gas and solid species as a function of visual extinction, depending on the density and radiation field. We also analyse the rates of the formation of CO2 and H2O ices in d...

  12. ChemSession'06 - 3rd Seminary of Warsaw PhD Students in Chemistry. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3rd Annual Seminary of Warsaw PhD Students in Chemistry presented the latest achievements in chemistry, obtained in all Warsaw universities and scientific institutes. In 2006 participants presented 4 plenary lectures, and 109 posters. Among others, posters covered four disciplines related to the nuclear sciences: (a) radiobiology and radiotherapy, (b) radiation chemistry and photochemistry, (c) isotopic effects in chemistry, and (d) chemical technology

  13. Progress report, Chemistry and Materials Division, 1 April to 30 June, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research results are reported by groups investigating ion penetration, nuclear methods of analysis, accelerator operation, general analytical chemistry, radoactivity measurement, deuterium analysis, electrochemistry, mass spectrometry and fuel analysis, radiation chemistry and laser photochemistry, hydrogen-water exchange, isotope chemistry, surface chemistry, and electron microscopy. Work in an associated laboratory at the University of Toronto on isotopic changes in reaction rates is reported. (L.L.)

  14. ChemSession'07 - 4th Seminary of Warsaw PhD Students in Chemistry. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    4th Annual Seminary of Warsaw PhD Students in Chemistry presented the latest achievements in chemistry, obtained in all Warsaw universities and scientific institutes. In 2007 participants presented 4 plenary lectures, and 101 posters. Among others, posters covered four disciplines related to the nuclear sciences: (a) radiobiology and radiotherapy, (b) radiation chemistry and photochemistry, (c) isotopic effects in chemistry, and (d) chemical technology

  15. Journal of Business Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The Journal of Business Chemistry examines issues associated with leadership and management for chemists and managers working in chemical research or industry. This journal is devoted to improving and developing the field of Business Chemistry. The Journal of Business Chemistry publishes peer-reviewed papers (including case studies) and essays. Areas for possible publication in include: leadership issues in the chemical and biochemical industry, such as teamwork, team building, mentoring, coa...

  16. Mathematical Thinking in Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    José L. Villaveces; Guillermo Restrepo

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical chemistry is often thought to be a 20th-century subdiscipline of chemistry, but in this paper we discuss several early chemical ideas and some landmarks of chemistry as instances of the mathematical way of thinking; many of them before 1900. By the mathematical way of thinking, we follow Weyl's description of it in terms of functional thinking, i.e. setting up variables, symbolizing them, and seeking for functions relating them. The cases we discuss are Plato's triangles, Geoffro...

  17. Orbital interactions in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Albright, Thomas A; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Explains the underlying structure that unites all disciplines in chemistry Now in its second edition, this book explores organic, organometallic, inorganic, solid state, and materials chemistry, demonstrating how common molecular orbital situations arise throughout the whole chemical spectrum. The authors explore the relationships that enable readers to grasp the theory that underlies and connects traditional fields of study within chemistry, thereby providing a conceptual framework with which to think about chemical structure and reactivity problems. Orbital Interactions

  18. The Chemistry Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Fontecave, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry at the Collège de France has received particular attention over the last few years. After the departures of Profs Jean-Marie Lehn and Jacques Livage, new ambition for developing this discipline has led to the creation of several Chairs: Prof. Marc Fontecave’s Chair of Chemistry of Biological Processes in 2008, Prof. Clément Sanchez’ Chair of Chemistry of Hybrid Materials in 2011, and the Chair of Chemistry of Materials and Energy, which Prof. Jean-Marie Tarascon has held since 2014....

  19. Group theory and chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, David M

    1993-01-01

    Group theoretical principles are an integral part of modern chemistry. Not only do they help account for a wide variety of chemical phenomena, they simplify quantum chemical calculations. Indeed, knowledge of their application to chemical problems is essential for students of chemistry. This complete, self-contained study, written for advanced undergraduate-level and graduate-level chemistry students, clearly and concisely introduces the subject of group theory and demonstrates its application to chemical problems.To assist chemistry students with the mathematics involved, Professor Bishop ha

  20. Advances in quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Sabin, John R

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features detailed reviews written by leading international researchers. This volume focuses on the theory of heavy ion physics in medicine.Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features

  1. Science Update: Analytical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1980-01-01

    Briefly discusses new instrumentation in the field of analytical chemistry. Advances in liquid chromatography, photoacoustic spectroscopy, the use of lasers, and mass spectrometry are also discussed. (CS)

  2. 2. Working Meeting on Radiation Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics have been discussed during the meeting: (1) elementary processes of radiation chemistry, (2) particle-induced x-ray emission, (3) special radiation-induced physical and chemical phenomena in matter, and (4) industrial application of radiation techniques. 104 summaries are included

  3. Open access and medicinal chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Swain Chris

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Chemistry Central is a new open access website for chemists publishing peer-reviewed research in chemistry from a range of open access journals. A new addition, Chemistry Central Journal, will cover all of chemistry and will be broken down into discipline-specific sections, and Im delighted that Medicinal Chemistry will be a key discipline in this new journal.

  4. Annual report 1988 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. The names and abstracts of all articles and reports published and lectures given in 1988 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, chemical reactivity, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  5. Annual report 1989 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. The names and abstracts of all articles and reports published and lectures given in 1989 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, chemical reactivity, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  6. Annual report 1986 chemistry department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1986 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, radical chemistral, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  7. Chemistry Division progress report for the period January 1, 1977 - December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development work of the Chemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, during the period 1977-1980 is reported in the form of individual summaries under the headings: basic research including radiation chemistry, photochemistry, kinetic and electrochemical studies, ion exchange and sorption behaviour, chemistry of metal complexes (in particular, of uranium complexes), radiation damage in solids, heterogeneous catalysts, studies in magnetism, physical properties, solid state studies, theoretical studies, reactor related programmes (including reactor chemistry, lubricants and sealants, surface studies, water chemistry), applied research and development (including materials development, purification and analytical techniques, apolied radiation chemistry etc.), and instrumentation. Work of service facilities such as workshop, analytical se services, and repair and maintenance of instruments is described. Lists of training programmes, staff publications and divisional seminars, are given. At the end a sectionwise list of staff members is also given. (M.G.B.)

  8. Physical Chemistry of Molecular

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Established in 2009, the group consists of six researchers and more than 70 research assistants and graduate students from the CAS Key Laboratory of Molecular Nanostructures and Nanotechnologies at the CAS Institute of Chemistry.Its research focuses on the physical chemistry involved in molecular assembly, molecular nanostructures, functional nanomaterials and conceptual nano-devices.

  9. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  10. The Breath of Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josephsen, Jens

    The present preliminary text is a short thematic presentation in biological inorganic chemistry meant to illustrate general and inorganic (especially coordination) chemistry in biochemistry. The emphasis is on molecular models to explain features of the complicated mechanisms essential to breathing...

  11. Career Options in Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloli, Robert C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a credit/no credit course which focuses on career options in chemistry. The course (consisting of 15 one-hour seminar-type sessions) includes guest speakers for several sessions and an emphasis (in introductory sessions) on graduate school in chemistry, the chemical industry, resumes, and interviews. Also briefly describes an internship…

  12. Exercises in Computational Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A selection of HyperChem© PC-exercises in computational chemistry. Answers to most questions are appended (Roskilde University 2014-16).......A selection of HyperChem© PC-exercises in computational chemistry. Answers to most questions are appended (Roskilde University 2014-16)....

  13. Chemistry of americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W.W.

    1976-01-01

    Essential features of the descriptive chemistry of americium are reviewed. Chapter titles are: discovery, atomic and nuclear properties, collateral reading, production and uses, chemistry in aqueous solution, metal, alloys, and compounds, and, recovery, separation, purification. Author and subject indexes are included. (JCB)

  14. EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BWRVIP-190: BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines – 2008 Revision has been revised. The revision committee consisted of U.S. and non-U.S. utilities (members of the BWR Vessel and Internals Protection (BWRVIP) Mitigation Committee), reactor system manufacturers, fuel suppliers, and EPRI and industry experts. The revised document, BWRVIP-190 Revision 1, was completely reformatted into two volumes, with a simplified presentation of water chemistry control, diagnostic and good practice parameters in Volume 1 and the technical bases in Volume 2, to facilitate use. The revision was developed in parallel and in coordination with preparation of the Fuel Reliability Guidelines Revision 1: BWR Fuel Cladding Crud and Corrosion. Guidance is included for plants operating under normal water chemistry (NWC), moderate hydrogen water chemistry (HWC-M), and noble metal application (GE-Hitachi NobleChem™) plus hydrogen injection. Volume 1 includes significant changes to BWR feedwater and reactor water chemistry control parameters to provide increased assurance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) mitigation of reactor materials and fuel reliability during all plant conditions, including cold shutdown (≤200°F (93°C)), startup/hot standby (>200°F (93°C) and ≤ 10%) and power operation (>10% power). Action Level values for chloride and sulfate have been tightened to minimize environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of all wetted surfaces, including those not protected by hydrogen injection, with or without noble metals. Chemistry control guidance has been enhanced to minimize shutdown radiation fields by clarifying targets for depleted zinc oxide (DZO) injection while meeting requirements for fuel reliability. Improved tabular presentations of parameter values explicitly indicate levels at which actions are to be taken and required sampling frequencies. Volume 2 provides the technical bases for BWR water chemistry control for control of EAC, flow accelerated corrosion

  15. BWR and PWR chemistry operating experience and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well recognized that proper control of water chemistry plays a critical role in ensuring the safe and reliable operation of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce general and localized corrosion of reactor coolant system, steam cycle equipment, and fuel cladding materials; ensure continued integrity of cycle components; and reduce radiation fields. Once a particular nuclear plant component has been installed or plant system constructed, proper water chemistry provides a global tool to mitigate materials degradation problems, thereby reducing the need for costly repairs or replacements. Recognizing the importance of proper chemistry control and the value in understanding the relationship between chemistry guidance and actual operating experience, EPRI continues to collect, monitor, and evaluate operating data from BWRs and PWRs around the world. More than 900 cycles of valuable BWR and PWR operating chemistry data has been collected, including online, startup and shutdown chemistry data over more than 10 years (> 20 years for BWRs). This paper will provide an overview of current trends in BWR and PWR chemistry, focusing on plants in the U.S.. Important chemistry parameters will be highlighted and discussed in the context of the EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines requirements (i.e., those parameters considered to be of key importance as related to the major goals identified in the EPRI Guidelines: materials integrity; fuel integrity; and minimizing plant radiation fields). Perspectives will be provided in light of recent industry initiatives and changes in the EPRI BWR and PWR Water Chemistry Guidelines. (author)

  16. Mathematical Thinking in Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Villaveces

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical chemistry is often thought to be a 20th-century subdiscipline of chemistry, but in this paper we discuss several early chemical ideas and some landmarks of chemistry as instances of the mathematical way of thinking; many of them before 1900. By the mathematical way of thinking, we follow Weyl's description of it in terms of functional thinking, i.e. setting up variables, symbolizing them, and seeking for functions relating them. The cases we discuss are Plato's triangles, Geoffroy's affinity table, Lavoisier's classification of substances and their relationships, Mendeleev's periodic table, Cayley's enumeration of alkanes, Sylvester's association of algebra and chemistry, and Wiener's relationship between molecular structure and boiling points. These examples show that mathematical chemistry has much more than a century of history.

  17. Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perliski, Lori

    Because radiative transfer cuts across many scientific disciplines with applications including remote sensing, climate, atmospheric chemistry, and photobiology, there is a need for comprehensive books on this subject that can appeal to a wide readership. While Atmospheric Radiative Transfer takes strides toward filling this niche by addressing a broad range of topics, it is dry reading and suffers from lack of detail. The book was based on a graduate-level course taught at the University of Sciences and Technologies in Lille, France, and indeed, the text reads much like an expanded outline perhaps derived from lecture notes.Part one deals with general radiative transfer, and part two covers Earth's radiation budget, the climate system, and remote sensing techniques. The radiative transfer equation and solutions for absorbing and scattering atmospheres are discussed as are the details of absorption, such as energy levels, line strengths, line intensities, equivalent widths, and weak- and strong-line limits.

  18. System approach to chemistry course

    OpenAIRE

    Lorina E. Kruglova; Valentina G. Derendyaeva

    2010-01-01

    The article considers the raise of chemistry profile for engineers and constructors training, discloses the system approach to chemistry course and singles out the most important modules from the course of general chemistry for construction industry.

  19. Radiative heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Modest, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    This introduction reviews why combustion and radiation are important, as well as the technical challenges posed by radiation. Emphasis is on interactions among turbulence, chemistry and radiation (turbulence-chemistry-radiation interactions – TCRI) in Reynolds-averaged and large-eddy simulations. Subsequent chapters cover: chemically reacting turbulent flows; radiation properties, Reynolds transport equation (RTE) solution methods, and TCRI; radiation effects in laminar flames; TCRI in turbulent flames; and high-pressure combustion systems. This Brief presents integrated approach that includes radiation at the outset, rather than as an afterthought. It stands as the most recent developments in physical modeling, numerical algorithms, and applications collected in one monograph.

  20. Muons as hyperfine interaction probes in chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghandi, Khashayar, E-mail: kghandi@triumf.ca; MacLean, Amy [Mount Allison University, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    Spin polarized positive muons injected in matter serve as magnetic probes for the investigation of physical and chemical properties of free radicals, mechanisms of free radical reactions and their formations, and radiation effects. All muon techniques rely on the evolution of spin polarization (of the muon) and in that respect are similar to conventional magnetic resonance techniques. The applications of the muon as a hyperfine probe in several fields in chemistry are described.

  1. Bibliography of astatine chemistry and biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overall bibliography is presented on astatine chemistry and on the biomedical applications of its 211At isotope. The references were grouped in the following chapters: General reviews; Discovery, Natural Occurence; Nuclear Data; Preparation, Handling, Radiation Risk; Physico-chemical Properties; Astatine Compounds and Chemical Reactions; Biological Effects and Applications. Entries are sorted alphabetically by authors name in each chapter, and cross-references to other chapters are provided if appropriate. (R.P.)

  2. Korean Kimchi Chemistry: A Multicultural Chemistry Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murfin, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Connecting science with different cultures is one way to interest students in science, to relate science to their lives, and at the same time to broaden their horizons in a variety of ways. In the lesson described here, students make kimchi, a delicious and popular Korean dish that can be used to explore many important chemistry concepts,…

  3. Annual report 1987 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. The names and abstracts of all articles and reports published and lectures given in 1987 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, radical chemistry, mineral processing, and general. 13 ills., (author)

  4. Annual report 1982 chemistry department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work going on in the Risoe National Laboratory, Chemistry Department is briefly surveyed by a presentation of all articles and reports published in 1982. The facilities and equipment are barely mentioned. The papers are divided into eight activities: 1. neutron activation analysis 2. analytical- and organic chemistry 3. environmental chemistry 4. polymer chemistry 5. geochemistry 6. radical chemistry 7. poitron annihilation 8. uranium process chemistry. (author)

  5. Annual Report 1984. Chemistry Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funck, Jytte; Nielsen, Ole John

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1984 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, an......, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, geochemistry and waste disposal, radical chemistry, positron annihilation, mineral processing, and general.......This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1984 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry...

  6. Radiative Forcing of Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

    2001-10-01

    Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

  7. Modeling the Explicit Chemistry of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Organic Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madronich, Sasha [Univ. Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-12-09

    The atmospheric burden of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) remains one of the most important yet uncertain aspects of the radiative forcing of climate. This grant focused on improving our quantitative understanding of SOA formation and evolution, by developing, applying, and improving a highly detailed model of atmospheric organic chemistry, the Generation of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) model. Eleven (11) publications have resulted from this grant.

  8. Radtech Asia'95 radiation curing conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radtech Asia'95 Radiation Curing Conference was held in November, 20-24, 1995 in Guilin, China. The subjects include chemistry, application, Measurement and Equipment, and Material modification. Out of 86 titles, some 30 papers are in INIS scope

  9. Moderator Chemistry Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department's moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation

  10. Moderator Chemistry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department's moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  11. Moderator Chemistry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department`s moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  12. Radiation processing in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungary has 10.7 million population in 100,000 km2 territory. The gross national product is about $3,000 per capita per year. Hungary is a country with highly developed agriculture and medium degree developed industries. The Hungarian economy is an open economy because more than 40% of the national income is earned by export. The research and development works on various radiation processing have been performed for 25 years. In the Central Research Institute for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, a laboratory was organized for the basic research of radiation chemistry and the moderator materials for nuclear reactors. Also the activities in the Central Research Institute for Chemistry, the Institute of Isotopes, the Research Institute for Plastics Industry, and the Central Research Institute for Food Industry are briefly reported. The largest radiation processing unit in Hungary is the automatic sterilization plant of Medicor Works in Debrecen with 350 kCi Co-60 source. The second important field of radiation processing is the irradiation of foods and agricultural products, and the radiation unit with 150 kCi Co-60 source is in the Central Research Institute for Food Industry. Radiation cross-linked polyethylene production, the production of wood-unsaturated polyester composite and enzyme immobilization are performed. (Kako, I.)

  13. Gas phase ion chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Michael T

    1979-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 1 covers papers on the advances of gas phase ion chemistry. The book discusses the advances in flow tubes and the measurement of ion-molecule rate coefficients and product distributions; the ion chemistry of the earth's atmosphere; and the classical ion-molecule collision theory. The text also describes statistical methods in reaction dynamics; the state selection by photoion-photoelectron coincidence; and the effects of temperature and pressure in the kinetics of ion-molecule reactions. The energy distribution in the unimolecular decomposition of ions, as well

  14. Experiments in physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, J M; Denaro, A R

    1968-01-01

    Experiments in Physical Chemistry, Second Edition provides a compilation of experiments concerning physical chemistry. This book illustrates the link between the theory and practice of physical chemistry. Organized into three parts, this edition begins with an overview of those experiments that generally have a simple theoretical background. Part II contains experiments that are associated with more advanced theory or more developed techniques, or which require a greater degree of experimental skill. Part III consists of experiments that are in the nature of investigations wherein these invest

  15. DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemistry Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. The handbook includes information on the atomic structure of matter; chemical bonding; chemical equations; chemical interactions involved with corrosion processes; water chemistry control, including the principles of water treatment; the hazards of chemicals and gases, and basic gaseous diffusion processes. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the chemical properties of materials and the way these properties can impose limitations on the operation of equipment and systems

  16. Spatially Resolved Artificial Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellermann, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Although spatial structures can play a crucial role in chemical systems and can drastically alter the outcome of reactions, the traditional framework of artificial chemistry is a well-stirred tank reactor with no spatial representation in mind. Advanced method development in physical chemistry has...... made a class of models accessible to the realms of artificial chemistry that represent reacting molecules in a coarse-grained fashion in continuous space. This chapter introduces the mathematical models of Brownian dynamics (BD) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) for molecular motion and reaction...

  17. Mathematics for physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mortimer, Robert G

    2013-01-01

    Mathematics for Physical Chemistry is the ideal supplementary text for practicing chemists and students who want to sharpen their mathematics skills while enrolled in general through physical chemistry courses. This book specifically emphasizes the use of mathematics in the context of physical chemistry, as opposed to being simply a mathematics text. This 4e includes new exercises in each chapter that provide practice in a technique immediately after discussion or example and encourage self-study. The early chapters are constructed around a sequence of mathematical topics, wit

  18. Advances in radiation processing of polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we review recent advances in industrial applications of electron-beam irradiation in the field of polymer processing at the Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment (TRCRE) of JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute), and the Whiteshell Laboratories of AECL Research, Canada. Irradiation of a substrate with ionizing radiation produces free radicals through ionization and excitation events. The subsequent chemistry of these radicals is used in radiation processing as a substitute for conventional processing techniques based on heating and/or the addition of chemicals. The advantages of radiation processing include the formation of novel products with desirable material properties, favourable overall process economics and, often, environmental benefits

  19. Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The report is a collection of short communications being a review of scientific activity of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT), Warsaw, in 1995. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics (15); radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general (23); radiobiology (7); nuclear technologies and methods (21); nucleonic control systems (5). The Annual Report of INCT - 1995 contains also a general information about the staff and organization of the Institute, the full list of scientific publications and patents, conferences organized by INCT, thesis and list of projects granted by Polish and international organizations.

  20. Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology annual report 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is a collection of short communications being a review of scientific activity of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT), Warsaw, in 1995. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics (15); radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general (23); radiobiology (7); nuclear technologies and methods (21); nucleonic control systems (5). The Annual Report of INCT - 1995 contains also a general information about the staff and organization of the Institute, the full list of scientific publications and patents, conferences organized by INCT, thesis and list of projects granted by Polish and international organizations

  1. Polycylcic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH's) in dense cloud chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Wakelam, Valentine; Herbst, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Accepted to ApJ Virtually all detailed gas-phase models of the chemistry of dense interstellar clouds exclude polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's). This omission is unfortunate because from the few studies that have been done on the subject, it is known that the inclusion of PAH's can affect the gas-phase chemistry strongly. We have added PAH's to our network to determine the role they play in the chemistry of cold dense cores. In the models presented here, we include radiative attachm...

  2. Yearly scientific meeting: chemistry in human health and environment protection. Bialystok'92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference has been divided into 12 sections devoted to following topics: analytical chemistry; environmental chemistry; chemistry of natural compounds; chemistry of pharmaceutics and toxic compounds; chemistry in medicine; electrochemistry; young scientists forum; didactics and history of chemistry; chemistry and industry - technologies environment friendly; new trends in polymer science; crystallochemistry; pro-ecological actions in leather industry. Different analytical methods for determination of heavy methods and rare earths have been presented. Some of them have been successfully applied for the examination of environmental and biological materials. The basic chemical and physico-chemical studies including thermodynamic, crystal structure, coordination chemistry, sorption properties etc. have been extensively resented. The existence of radioactive elements in environment has been also investigated, especially in respect to municipal and industrial wastes and products of their processing. The radiation effects for different materials have been reported and discussed as well

  3. Chemistry at large

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy. K.M. Sanders

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A new book introduces young researchers to supramolecular chemistry, starting from the basics and working up to the more complicated aspects of the topic. While the text is inspiring for new graduates, it lacks a critical view.

  4. Chemistry for Kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Sanae; Majoros, Bela

    1988-01-01

    Reports two methods for interesting children in chemistry. Describes a method for producing large soap bubbles and films for study. Examines the use of simple stories to explain common chemical concepts with example given. Lists titles of available stories. (ML)

  5. Bringing chemistry to life

    OpenAIRE

    Boyce, Michael; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2011-01-01

    Bioorthogonal chemistry allows a wide variety of biomolecules to be specifically labeled and probed in living cells and whole organisms. Here we discuss the history of bioorthogonal reactions and some of the most interesting and important advances in the field.

  6. Beauty in chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Atkins

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Though hard going for the general reader and highly personal in its selectivity, Elegant Solutions: Ten Beautiful Experiments in Chemistry provides reflections of a thoughtful author that will delight chemists

  7. Magnetism in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, R. W.; McFadyen, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the technical aspects of paramagnetism and an electrostatic model called Crystal Field Theory (CFT), very often used in the case of transition metal compounds. Suggests that this discussion be included as an option for college chemistry courses. (MLH)

  8. Beauty in chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Atkins

    2006-01-01

    Though hard going for the general reader and highly personal in its selectivity, Elegant Solutions: Ten Beautiful Experiments in Chemistry provides reflections of a thoughtful author that will delight chemists

  9. Supplemental instruction in chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundeberg, Mary A.

    This study was designed to measure some effects of supplemental instruction in chemistry. Supplemental instruction is a peer-led cooperative learning program that encourages students to develop conceptual understanding by articulating both understandings and misconceptions in a think-aloud fashion. Supplemental instruction was offered three hours weekly outside of class and lab time for students in four classes of General Organic and Biological Chemistry. Over a two-year period 108 students volunteered to participate in this program; 45 students did not participate. As measured by final grades in chemistry and responses to a questionnaire, supplemental instruction was effective in increasing students' achievement in chemistry. Further research is needed to determine the in-depth effects of supplemental instruction on students' learning, problem solving, and self-esteem.

  10. Chemistry at large

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Jeremy K. M.

    2007-01-01

    A new book introduces young researchers to supramolecular chemistry, starting from the basics and working up to the more complicated aspects of the topic. While the text is inspiring for new graduates, it lacks a critical view.

  11. Water Chemistry: Seeking Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfino, Joseph J.

    1977-01-01

    A survey of the available literature in water chemistry is presented. Materials surveyed include: texts, reference books, bibliographic resources, journals, American Chemical Society publications, proceedings, unpublished articles, and reports. (BT)

  12. Applications of EPR in radiation research

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Applications of EPR in Radiation Research is a multi-author contributed volume presented in eight themes: I. Elementary radiation processes (in situ and low temperature radiolysis, quantum solids); II: Solid state radiation chemistry (crystalline, amorphous and heterogeneous systems); III: Biochemistry, biophysics and biology applications (radicals in biomaterials, spin trapping, free-radical-induced DNA damage); IV: Materials science (polymeric and electronic materials, materials for treatment of nuclear waste, irradiated food); V: Radiation metrology (EPR-dosimetry, retrospective and medical

  13. Gas phase ion chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Michael T

    1979-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 2 covers the advances in gas phase ion chemistry. The book discusses the stabilities of positive ions from equilibrium gas-phase basicity measurements; the experimental methods used to determine molecular electron affinities, specifically photoelectron spectroscopy, photodetachment spectroscopy, charge transfer, and collisional ionization; and the gas-phase acidity scale. The text also describes the basis of the technique of chemical ionization mass spectrometry; the energetics and mechanisms of unimolecular reactions of positive ions; and the photodissociation

  14. Fundamentals of quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    House, J E

    2004-01-01

    An introduction to the principles of quantum mechanics needed in physical chemistry. Mathematical tools are presented and developed as needed and only basic calculus, chemistry, and physics is assumed. Applications include atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, alpha decay, tunneling, and superconductivity. New edition includes sections on perturbation theory, orbital symmetry of diatomic molecules, the Huckel MO method and Woodward/Hoffman rules as well as a new chapter on SCF and Hartree-Fock methods. * This revised text clearly presents basic q

  15. Quantitative analysis chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is about quantitative analysis chemistry. It is divided into ten chapters, which deal with the basic conception of material with the meaning of analysis chemistry and SI units, chemical equilibrium, basic preparation for quantitative analysis, introduction of volumetric analysis, acid-base titration of outline and experiment examples, chelate titration, oxidation-reduction titration with introduction, titration curve, and diazotization titration, precipitation titration, electrometric titration and quantitative analysis.

  16. Forensic Chemistry Training

    OpenAIRE

    GERÇEK, Zuhal

    2012-01-01

    Increasing the types of terrorism and crime nowadays, the importance of the forensic sciences can be bett er understood. Forensic science is the application of the wide spectrum of science to answer the question of legal system. It contains the application of the principles, techniques and methods of basic sciences and its main aim is the determination of the physical facts which are important in legal situations. Forensic chemistry is the branch of chemistry which performs the chemical analy...

  17. Applications of supramolecular chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Hans-Jörg

    2012-01-01

    ""The time is ripe for the present volume, which gathers thorough presentations of the numerous actually realized or potentially accessible applications of supramolecular chemistry by a number of the leading figures in the field. The variety of topics covered is witness to the diversity of the approaches and the areas of implementation…a broad and timely panorama of the field assembling an eminent roster of contributors.""-Jean-Marie Lehn, 1987 Noble Prize Winner in Chemistry

  18. Impact of surface chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2010-01-01

    The applications of molecular surface chemistry in heterogeneous catalyst technology, semiconductor-based technology, medical technology, anticorrosion and lubricant technology, and nanotechnology are highlighted in this perspective. The evolution of surface chemistry at the molecular level is reviewed, and the key roles of surface instrumentation developments for in situ studies of the gas–solid, liquid–solid, and solid–solid interfaces under reaction conditions are emphasized.

  19. Annual report 1983 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1983 are presented. The facilities and equipment are barely mentioned. The activities are divided into nine groups: 1. radioisotope chemistry 2. analytical- and organic chemistry 3. environmental chemistry 4. polymer chemistry 5. geochemistry and waste disposal 6. radical chemstry 7. positron annihilation 8. mineral processing 9. general. (author)

  20. Mathematical problems for chemistry students

    CERN Document Server

    Pota, Gyorgy

    2006-01-01

    Mathematical Problems for Chemistry Students has been compiled and written (a) to help chemistry students in their mathematical studies by providing them with mathematical problems really occurring in chemistry (b) to help practising chemists to activate their applied mathematical skills and (c) to introduce students and specialists of the chemistry-related fields (physicists, mathematicians, biologists, etc.) into the world of the chemical applications. Some problems of the collection are mathematical reformulations of those in the standard textbooks of chemistry, other

  1. Ion Chemistry in Atmospheric and Astrophysical Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgarno, A.; Fox, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    There are many differences and also remarkable similarities between the ion chemistry and physics of planetary ionospheres and the ion chemistry and physics of astronomical environments beyond the solar system. In the early Universe, an expanded cooling gas of hydrogen and helium was embedded in the cosmic background radiation field and ionized by it. As the Universe cooled by adiabatic expansion, recombination occurred and molecular formation was driven by catalytic reactions involving the relict electrons and protons. Similar chemical processes are effective in the ionized zones of gaseous and planetary nebulae and in stellar winds where the ionization is due to radiation from the central stars, in the envelopes of supernovae where the ionization is initiated by the deposition of gamma-rays, in dissociative shocks where the ionization arises from electron impacts in a hot gas and in quasar broad-line region clouds where the quasar is responsible for the ionization. At high altitudes in the atmospheres of the Jovian planets, the main constituents are hydrogen and helium and the ion chemistry and physics is determined by the same processes, the source of the ionization being solar ultraviolet radiation and cosmic rays. After the collapse of the first distinct astronomical entities to emerge from the uniform flow, heavy elements were created by nuclear burning in the cores of the collapsed objects and distributed throughout the Universe by winds and explosions. The chemistry and physics became more complicated. Over 90 distinct molecular species have been identified in interstellar clouds where they are ionized globally by cosmic ray impacts and locally by radiation and shocks associated with star formation and evolution. Complex molecules have also been found in circumstellar shells of evolved stars. At intermediate and low altitudes in the Jovian atmospheres, the ion chemistry is complicated by the increasing abundance of heavy elements such as carbon, and an

  2. Radiation enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... often are no good treatments for chronic radiation enteritis that is more severe. Medicines such as cholestyramine, ...

  3. Physics and chemistry of irradiated protostars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Johan

    not resemble so-called hot corinos or warm carbon-chain chemistry sources (the previously known types of low-mass Class 0 objects as defined by their chemistry). The absence of complex organic molecules in combination with high abundances of radicals such as cyanide (CN) and hydroxyl (OH) suggest...... that the chemistry is dominated by radiation from R CrA. In the high-resolution interferometry data we also detect signs of a 100 AU Keplerian disc around the Class 0/I object IRS7B. The disc may be responsible for the lack of detections of complex organic molecules on the smaller scales as it may have flattened......) and chemistry (such as molecular abundances) in low-mass protostellar envelopes is studied. The work studies the nearby low-mass star-forming region Corona Australis, in which a large proportion of the youngest low-mass protostars (so-called Class 0 and Class I objects) are located in a dense cloud situated...

  4. Online coupled meteorology and chemistry models: history, current status, and outlook

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    International audience The climate-chemistry-aerosol-cloud-radiation feedbacks are important processes occurring in the atmosphere. Accurately simulating those feedbacks requires fully-coupled meteorology, climate, and chemistry models and presents significant challenges in terms of both scientific understanding and computational demand. This paper reviews the history and current status of the development and application of online-coupled meteorology and chemistry models, with a focus on f...

  5. Scientometric Dimensions of Innovation Communication Productivity of the Chemistry Division at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Kademani, B. S.; Surwase, Ganesh; Anil Sagar, *; Lalit Mohan; Gaderao, C. R.; Anil Kumar; Kalyane, V. L.; Prakasan, E.R.; Vijai Kumar, *

    2005-01-01

    Scientrometric analysis of 1733 papers published by the teams comprising total of 926 participating scientists at Chemistry Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) during 1970-1999 in the domains: Radiation & Photochemistry and Chemical Dynamics (649), Solid State Studies (558), Inorganic, Structural and Materials Chemistry (460) and Theoretical Chemistry (66) were analysed for yearwise productivity, authorship pattern and collaboration. The highest number of publicationsin a year we...

  6. Collaborative Physical Chemistry Projects Involving Computational Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whisnant, David M.; Howe, Jerry J.; Lever, Lisa S.

    2000-02-01

    The physical chemistry classes from three colleges have collaborated on two computational chemistry projects using Quantum CAChe 3.0 and Gaussian 94W running on Pentium II PCs. Online communication by email and the World Wide Web was an important part of the collaboration. In the first project, students used molecular modeling to predict benzene derivatives that might be possible hair dyes. They used PM3 and ZINDO calculations to predict the electronic spectra of the molecules and tested the predicted spectra by comparing some with experimental measurements. They also did literature searches for real hair dyes and possible health effects. In the final phase of the project they proposed a synthetic pathway for one compound. In the second project the students were asked to predict which isomer of a small carbon cluster (C3, C4, or C5) was responsible for a series of IR lines observed in the spectrum of a carbon star. After preliminary PM3 calculations, they used ab initio calculations at the HF/6-31G(d) and MP2/6-31G(d) level to model the molecules and predict their vibrational frequencies and rotational constants. A comparison of the predictions with the experimental spectra suggested that the linear isomer of the C5 molecule was responsible for the lines.

  7. Introductory quantum chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book on quantum chemistry is primarily intended for university students at the senior undergraduate level. It serves as an aid to the basic understanding of the important concepts of quantum mechanics introduced in the field of chemistry. Various chapters of the book are devoted to the following : (i) Waves and quanta, (ii) Operator concept in quantum chemistry, (iii) Wave mechanics of some simple systems, (iv) Perturbation theory, (v) Many-electron atoms and angular momenta (vi) Molecular orbital theory and its application to the electronic structure of diatomic molecules, (vii) Chemical bonding in polyatomic molecules and (viii) Chemical applications of Hellmann-Feynman theorem. At the end of each chapter, a set of problems is given and the answers to these problems are given at the end of the book. (A.K.)

  8. Uranium triamidoamine chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Benedict M; Liddle, Stephen T

    2015-07-01

    Triamidoamine (Tren) complexes of the p- and d-block elements have been well-studied, and they display a diverse array of chemistry of academic, industrial and biological significance. Such in-depth investigations are not as widespread for Tren complexes of uranium, despite the general drive to better understand the chemical behaviour of uranium by virtue of its fundamental position within the nuclear sector. However, the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes is characterised by the ability to stabilise otherwise reactive, multiply bonded main group donor atom ligands, construct uranium-metal bonds, promote small molecule activation, and support single molecule magnetism, all of which exploit the steric, electronic, thermodynamic and kinetic features of the Tren ligand system. This Feature Article presents a current account of the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes.

  9. Mathematics for physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mortimer, Robert G

    2005-01-01

    Mathematics for Physical Chemistry, Third Edition, is the ideal text for students and physical chemists who want to sharpen their mathematics skills. It can help prepare the reader for an undergraduate course, serve as a supplementary text for use during a course, or serve as a reference for graduate students and practicing chemists. The text concentrates on applications instead of theory, and, although the emphasis is on physical chemistry, it can also be useful in general chemistry courses. The Third Edition includes new exercises in each chapter that provide practice in a technique immediately after discussion or example and encourage self-study. The first ten chapters are constructed around a sequence of mathematical topics, with a gradual progression into more advanced material. The final chapter discusses mathematical topics needed in the analysis of experimental data.* Numerous examples and problems interspersed throughout the presentations * Each extensive chapter contains a preview, objectives, and ...

  10. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  11. Chemistry of plutonium revealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1941 one goal of the Manhattan Project was to unravel the chemistry of the synthetic element plutonium as rapidly as possible. In this paper the work carried out at Berkeley from the spring of 1942 to the summer of 1945 is described briefly. The aqueous chemistry of plutonium is quite remarkable. Important insights were obtained from tracer experiments, but the full complexity was not revealed until macroscopic amounts (milligrams) became available. Because processes for separation from fission products were based on aqueous solutions, such solution chemistry was emphasized, particularly precipitation and oxidation-reduction behavior. The latter turned out to be unusually intricate when it was discovered that two more oxidation states existed in aqueous solution than had previously been suspected. Further, an equilibrium was rapidly established among the four aqueous oxidation states, while at the same time any three were not in equilibrium. These and other observations made while doing a crash study of a previously unknown element are reported

  12. Air Composition and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimblecombe, Peter

    1996-01-01

    This book is about the atmosphere and humanity's influence on it. For this new edition, Brimblecombe has rewritten and updated much of the book. In the early chapters, he discusses the geochemical, biological and maritime sources of the trace gases. Next, he examines the chemistry of atmospheric gases, suspended particles, and rainfall. After dealing with the natural atmosphere, he examines the sources of air pollution and its effects, with all scenarios updated from the last edition. Scenarios include decline in health, damage to plants and animals, indoor pollution, and acid rain. The final chapters, also revised, are concerned with the chemistry and evolution of the atmospheres of the planets of the solar system. Students with an interest in chemistry and the environmental sciences will find this book highly valuable.

  13. ChemSession'09 - 6. Warsaw Seminar of the PhD Students in Chemistry - Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Book of Abstracts contains short descriptions of presentations 3 lectures and 105 posters presented during ChemSession'09 - 6th Warsaw Seminar of the PhD Students in Chemistry. Several posters were devoted to the radiochemistry, radiochemical analysis, radiation chemistry and radiobiology. Some posters on the material science dealing with materials important to nuclear sciences can be also found

  14. ChemSession'08 - 5. Warsaw Seminar of the PhD Students in Chemistry - Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Book of Abstracts consists of short descriptions of presentations: 5 lectures and 127 posters presented during ChemSession'08 - 5th Warsaw Seminar of the PhD Students in Chemistry. Several posters were devoted to the radiochemistry, radiochemical analysis, radiation chemistry and radiobiology. Some posters on the material science dealing with materials important to nuclear sciences can be also found

  15. Radiation produced biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical advances that have prolonged the average life span have generated increased need for new materials that can be used as tissue and organ replacements, drug delivery systems and/or components of devices related to therapy and diagnosis. The first man-made plastic used as surgical implant was celluloid, applied for cranial defect repair. However, the first users applied commercial materials with no regard for their purity, biostability and post-operative interaction with the organism. Thus, these materials evoked a strong tissue reaction and were unacceptable. The first polymer which gained acceptance for man-made plastic was poly(methyl methacrylate). But the first polymer of choice, precursor of the broad class of materials known today as hydrogels, was poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) synthesized in the fifties by Wichterle and Lim. HEMA and its various combinations with other, both hydrophilic and hydrophobic, polymers are till now the most often used hydrogels for medical purposes. In the early fifties, the pioneers of the radiation chemistry of polymers began some experiments with radiation crosslinking, also with hydrophilic polymers. However, hydrogels were analyzed mainly from the point of view of phenomena associated with mechanism of reactions, topology of network, and relations between radiation parameters of the processes. Fundamental monographs on radiation polymer physics and chemistry written by Charlesby (1960) and Chapiro (1962) proceed from this time. The noticeable interest in application of radiation to obtain hydrogels for biomedical purposes began in the late sixties as a result of the papers and patents published by Japanese and American scientists. Among others, the team of the Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment headed by Kaetsu as well as Hoffman and his colleagues from the Center of Bioengineering, University of Washington have created the base for spreading interest in the field of biomaterials formed by means of

  16. Nanophotonics and supramolecular chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Hill, Jonathan P.

    2013-10-01

    Supramolecular chemistry has become a key area in emerging bottom-up nanoscience and nanotechnology. In particular, supramolecular systems that can produce a photonic output are increasingly important research targets and present various possibilities for practical applications. Accordingly, photonic properties of various supramolecular systems at the nanoscale are important in current nanotechnology. In this short review, nanophotonics in supramolecular chemistry will be briefly summarized by introducing recent examples of control of photonic responses of supramolecular systems. Topics are categorized according to the fundamental actions of their supramolecular systems: (i) self-assembly; (ii) recognition; (iii) manipulation.

  17. Solvent effects in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Buncel, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces the concepts, theory and experimental knowledge concerning solvent effects on the rate and equilibrium of chemical reactions of all kinds.  It begins with basic thermodynamics and kinetics, building on this foundation to demonstrate how a more detailed understanding of these effects may be used to aid in determination of reaction mechanisms, and to aid in planning syntheses. Consideration is given to theoretical calculations (quantum chemistry, molecular dynamics, etc.), to statistical methods (chemometrics), and to modern day concerns such as ""green"" chemistry, where ut

  18. The chemistry of silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Rochow, E G; Emeléus, H J; Nyholm, Ronald

    1975-01-01

    Pergamon Texts in Organic Chemistry, Volume 9: The Chemistry of Silicon presents information essential in understanding the chemical properties of silicon. The book first covers the fundamental aspects of silicon, such as its nuclear, physical, and chemical properties. The text also details the history of silicon, its occurrence and distribution, and applications. Next, the selection enumerates the compounds and complexes of silicon, along with organosilicon compounds. The text will be of great interest to chemists and chemical engineers. Other researchers working on research study involving s

  19. Spins in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    McWeeny, Roy

    2004-01-01

    Originally delivered as a series of lectures, this volume systematically traces the evolution of the ""spin"" concept from its role in quantum mechanics to its assimilation into the field of chemistry. Author Roy McWeeny presents an in-depth illustration of the deductive methods of quantum theory and their application to spins in chemistry, following the path from the earliest concepts to the sophisticated physical methods employed in the investigation of molecular structure and properties. Starting with the origin and development of the spin concept, the text advances to an examination of sp

  20. Chemistry in Second Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Jean-Claude

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review will focus on the current level on chemistry research, education, and visualization possible within the multi-user virtual environment of Second Life. We discuss how Second Life has been used as a platform for the interactive and collaborative visualization of data from molecules and proteins to spectra and experimental data. We then review how these visualizations can be scripted for immersive educational activities and real-life collaborative research. We also discuss the benefits of the social networking affordances of Second Life for both chemists and chemistry students.

  1. Progress in physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Hempelmann, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Progress in Physical Chemistry is a collection of recent ""Review Articles"" published in the ""Zeitschrift für Physikalische Chemie"". The second volume of Progress in Physical Chemistry is a collection of thematically closely related minireview articles written by the members of the Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) 277 of the German Research Foundation (DFG). These articles are based on twelve years of intense coordinated research efforts. Central topics are the synthesis and the characterization of interface-dominated, i.e. nanostructured materials, mainly in the solid state but also as

  2. Chemistry and lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma

    2011-01-01

    This is a unique book, combining chemistry and physics with technology and history in a way that is both enlightening and lively. No other book in the field of lithography has as much breadth. Highly recommended for anyone interested in the broad application of chemistry to lithography. --Chris Mack, Gentleman Scientist. This book provides a comprehensive treatment of the chemical phenomena in lithography in a manner that is accessible to a wide readership. The book presents topics on the optical and charged particle physics practiced in lithography, with a broader view of how the marriage bet

  3. Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisbjerg, Micke

    This thesis is divided into seven chapters, which can all be read individually. The first chapter, however, contains a general introduction to the chemistry used in the remaining six chapters, and it is therefore recommended to read chapter one before reading the other chapters. Chapter 1...... is a general introductory chapter for the whole thesis. The history and concepts of dynamic combinatorial chemistry are described, as are some of the new and intriguing results recently obtained. Finally, the properties of a broad range of hexameric macrocycles are described in detail. Chapter 2 gives...

  4. Revitalizing chemistry laboratory instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Phil Blake

    This dissertation involves research in three major domains of chemical education as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. program in chemistry at Miami University with a major emphasis on chemical education, and concurrent study in organic chemistry. Unit I, Development and Assessment of a Column Chromatography Laboratory Activity, addresses the domain of Instructional Materials Development and Testing. This unit outlines the process of developing a publishable laboratory activity, testing and revising that activity, and subsequently sharing that activity with the chemical education community. A laboratory activity focusing on the separation of methylene blue and sodium fluorescein was developed to demonstrate the effects of both the stationary and mobile phase in conducting a separation. Unit II, Bringing Industry to the Laboratory, addresses the domain of Curriculum Development and Testing. This unit outlines the development of the Chemistry of Copper Mining module, which is intended for use in high school or undergraduate college chemistry. The module uses the learning cycle approach to present the chemistry of the industrial processes of mining copper to the students. The module includes thirteen investigations (three of which are web-based and ten which are laboratory experiments) and an accompanying interactive CD-ROM, which provides an explanation of the chemistry used in copper mining with a virtual tour of an operational copper mine. Unit III, An Alternative Method of Teaching Chemistry. Integrating Lecture and the Laboratory, is a project that addresses the domain of Research in Student Learning. Fundamental Chemistry was taught at Eastern Arizona College as an integrated lecture/laboratory course that met in two-hour blocks on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. The students taking this integrated course were compared with students taking the traditional 1-hour lectures held on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, with accompanying 3-hour lab on

  5. Cloud chemistry on Jupiter

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, B. E.; Prather, M. J.; W. B. Rossow

    1987-01-01

    Aqueous chemistry on Uranus affects the atmospheric abundances of NH3 and H2S below the methane cloud base. Here a complete thermochemical equilibrium model for the H2O-NH3-H2S system is presented. Inclusion of H2S increases the aqueous removal of NH3 to 20-30 percent, but aqueous chemistry alone cannot account for the depletion of NH3 in the 150-200-K region of the atmosphere required to fit microwave observations. Formation of NH4SH clouds can account for the observed depletion provided the...

  6. Computational organometallic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, the author highlights the tremendous impact that density functional theory has had on computational chemistry over the last decade. This robust and efficient theoretical technique (for which John Pople and Walter Kohn were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1998) has opened up many new possibilities for chemists, allowing to study large systems with a degree of reliability hitherto uncontemplated. Examples which illustrate how both density functional theory and hybrid method have been successfully used in solving difficult problems in quantum chemistry of catalysis are briefly discussed

  7. Chemistry in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Le Tiec, Yannick

    2013-01-01

    Microelectronics is a complex world where many sciences need to collaborate to create nano-objects: we need expertise in electronics, microelectronics, physics, optics and mechanics also crossing into chemistry, electrochemistry, as well as biology, biochemistry and medicine. Chemistry is involved in many fields from materials, chemicals, gases, liquids or salts, the basics of reactions and equilibrium, to the optimized cleaning of surfaces and selective etching of specific layers. In addition, over recent decades, the size of the transistors has been drastically reduced while the functionalit

  8. Atmospheric pseudohalogen chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Lary, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    There are at least three reasons why hydrogen cyanide is likely to be significant for atmospheric chemistry. The first is well known, HCN is a product and marker of biomass burning. However, if a detailed ion chemistry of lightning is considered then it is almost certain than in addition to lightning producing NOx, it also produces HOx and HCN. Unlike NOx and HOx, HCN is long-lived and could therefore ...

  9. Chemistry WebBook

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 69 NIST Chemistry WebBook (Web, free access)   The NIST Chemistry WebBook contains: Thermochemical data for over 7000 organic and small inorganic compounds; thermochemistry data for over 8000 reactions; IR spectra for over 16,000 compounds; mass spectra for over 33,000 compounds; UV/Vis spectra for over 1600 compounds; electronic and vibrational spectra for over 5000 compounds; constants of diatomic molecules(spectroscopic data) for over 600 compounds; ion energetics data for over 16,000 compounds; thermophysical property data for 74 fluids.

  10. Chemistry and materials science research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-05-31

    The research reported here in summary form was conducted under the auspices of Weapons-Supporting Research (WSR) and Institutional Research and Development (IR D). The period covered is the first half of FY90. The results reported here are for work in progress; thus, they may be preliminary, fragmentary, or incomplete. Research in the following areas are briefly described: energetic materials, tritium, high-Tc superconductors, interfaces, adhesion, bonding, fundamental aspects of metal processing, plutonium, synchrotron-radiation-based materials science, photocatalysis on doped aerogels, laser-induced chemistry, laser-produced molecular plasmas, chemistry of defects, dta equipment development, electronic structure study of the thermodynamic and mechanical properties of Al-Li Alloys, and the structure-property link in sub-nanometer materials.

  11. Summer Schools In Nuclear Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This the report for the 5 year activities for the ACS Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry. The American Chemical Society's Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry were held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY) and San Jose State University (San Jose, CA) during the award period February 1, 2002 to January 31, 2007. The Summer Schools are intensive, six-week program involving both a lecture component covering fundamental principles of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry and a laboratory component allowing hands-on experience for the students to test many of the basic principles they learn about in lecture. Each site hosted 12 undergraduate students annually, and students received coursework credits towards their undergraduate degrees. Up to 7 student credit hours were earned at San Jose State University, and Brookhaven students received up to 6 college credits through BNL's management partner, SUNY Stony Brook. Funding from the award period covered travel, housing, educational expenses, and student stipends, for the 24 undergraduate participants. Furthermore, funding was also used to cover expenses for lecturers and staff to run the programs at the two facilities. The students were provided with nuclear and radiochemistry training equivalent to a three-hour upper-level undergraduate course along with a two-hour hands-on laboratory experience within the six-week summer period. Lectures were held 5 days per week. Students completed an extensive laboratory sequence, as well as radiation safety training at the start of the Summer Schools. The summer school curriculum was enhanced with a Guest Lecture series, as well as through several one-day symposia and organized field trips to nuclear-related research and applied science laboratories. This enrichment afforded an opportunity for students to see the broader impacts of nuclear science in today's world, and to experience some of the future challenges through formal and informal discussions with

  12. High-Fidelity Kinetics and Radiation Transport for NLTE Hypersonic Flows Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The modeling of NLTE hypersonic flows combines several disciplines: chemistry, kinetics, radiation transport, fluid mechanics, and surface science. No single code...

  13. Proceedings of the 14. Congress of the Maria Sklodowska-Curie Polish Radiation Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held every three years Congress of the Polish Radiation Research Society presents the latest achievements in the radiation research. In 2007 participants presented 9 plenary lectures, 38 section lectures and 61 posters. Communications and posters covered four disciplines: (a) radiobiology and radiotherapy, (b) radiation chemistry and photochemistry, (c) non-ionizing radiation, (d) radioprotection and the environmental radiation

  14. Annual report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is a collection of short communications being a review of the scientific activities of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw in 1996. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics (17); Radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods,chemistry in general (20); radiobiology (9); nuclear technologies and methods (28).The last and biggest chapter has been divided in four smaller groups; process engineering; material engineering,structural studies,diagnostics; radiation technologies; nucleonic control systems. The annual report of INCT-1996 contains also a general information of Institute, the full list of scientific publications and patents, conferences organized by INCT, Ph.D. and D.Sc. thesis, a list of projects granted by Polish Committee of Scientific Research and other organizations

  15. Annual report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The report is a collection of short communications being a review of the scientific activities of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw in 1996. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics (17); Radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods,chemistry in general (20); radiobiology (9); nuclear technologies and methods (28).The last and biggest chapter has been divided in four smaller groups; process engineering; material engineering,structural studies,diagnostics; radiation technologies; nucleonic control systems. The annual report of INCT-1996 contains also a general information of Institute, the full list of scientific publications and patents, conferences organized by INCT, Ph.D. and D.Sc. thesis, a list of projects granted by Polish Committee of Scientific Research and other organizations.

  16. Top Down Chemistry Versus Bottom up Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Takeshi; Witt, Adolf N.

    2016-06-01

    The idea of interstellar top down chemistry (TDC), in which molecules are produced from decomposition of larger molecules and dust in contrast to ordinary bottom up chemistry (BUC) in which molecules are produced synthetically from smaller molecules and atoms in the ISM, has been proposed in the chemistry of PAH and carbon chain molecules both for diffusea,c and dense cloudsb,d. A simple and natural idea, it must have occurred to many people and has been in the air for sometime. The validity of this hypothesis is apparent for diffuse clouds in view of the observed low abundance of small molecules and its rapid decrease with molecular size on the one hand and the high column densities of large carbon molecules demonstrated by the many intense diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) on the other. Recent identification of C60^+ as the carrier of 5 near infrared DIBs with a high column density of 2×1013 cm-2 by Maier and others confirms the TDC. This means that the large molecules and dust produced in the high density high temperature environment of circumstellar envelopes are sufficiently stable to survive decompositions due to stellar UV radiaiton, cosmic rays, C-shocks etc. for a long time (≥ 10^7 year) of their migration to diffuse clouds and seems to disagree with the consensus in the field of interstellar grains. The stability of molecules and aggregates in the diffuse interstellar medium will be discussed. Duley, W. W. 2006, Faraday Discuss. 133, 415 Zhen,J., Castellanos, P., Paardekooper, D. M., Linnartz, H., Tielens, A. G. G. M. 2014, ApJL, 797, L30 Huang, J., Oka, T. 2015, Mol. Phys. 113, 2159 Guzmán, V. V., Pety, J., Goicoechea, J. R., Gerin, M., Roueff, E., Gratier, P., Öberg, K. I. 2015, ApJL, 800, L33 L. Ziurys has sent us many papers beginning Ziurys, L. M. 2006, PNAS 103, 12274 indicating she had long been a proponent of the idea. Campbell, E. K., Holz, M., Maier, J. P., Gerlich, D., Walker, G. A. H., Bohlender, D, 2016, ApJ, in press Draine, B. T. 2003

  17. Application of radiation chemistry to the construction of functional organic materials%辐射化学在功能型有机材料研制中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsuneki Ichikawa; Hitoshi Koizumi; Takahide Kimura; Tohru Shimizu

    2005-01-01

    Although radiation-chemical reactions have been applied to many industrial fields, especially to polymer industries, they are mainly aimed at improving mechanical, thermal and surface properties of the materials. Application of radiation chemical reactions to the construction of functional organic materials, such as electronic and optical materials, is relatively few. However, radiation-chemical reactions have the following characteristics that are advantageous for studying and constructing functional organic materials.(1) The reactions take place even in solid without structural deformation, which is advantageous for modifying chemical and physical properties of precisely shaped solid substances.(2) The reactions take place within the region where the radiation energy is absorbed, so that only a part of a solid substance can be modified with precise spatial resolution. Moreover, the region is controllable three dimensionally by changing the field of exposure and the depth of penetration that depends on energy of the ionizing particles.(3) The reactions can be induced without additives, which is advantageous for maintaining purity of the materials.We would like to show how radiation chemical reactions are useful for the construction of functional organic materials by taking our recent studies on resist polymers for radiation lithography and carbon nano-fibers that are considered to be functional materials for next generation lithography and electronics, respectively.The resist polymers synthesized were polyethylene and poly (methyl acrylate) with benzyl ester of carboxylic acid at the center of the polymer skeleton. Introduction of the benzyl ester to the polymer skeletons changed the polystyrene and the poly (methyl acrylate) from cross-link type to scission type polymers upon γ irradiation.The irradiation of the polymers resulted in binary change of the molecular weight, due to the dissociative capture of secondary electrons by the benzyl ester, asMnR1COOCH(C6H5

  18. Chemistry Education and Mythology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sule Aycan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effect of mythological story in teaching chemistry. To this end the students in the class were divided into two homogenous groups. While the first group was thought in a traditional way, using a mythological story thought the second group. The story used was based on a Mountain just opposite the faculty.

  19. Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy has awarded the 1999 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Ahmed H. Zewail (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA) "for his studies of the transition states of chemical reactions using femtosecond spectroscopy". Zewail's work has taken the study of the rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions to the ultimate degree of detail - the time scale of bond making and bond breaking.

  20. Supramolecular Chemistry in Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oshovsky, Gennady V.; Reinhoudt, David N.; Verboom, Willem

    2007-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry in water is a constantly growing research area because noncovalent interactions in aqueous media are important for obtaining a better understanding and control of the major processes in nature. This Review offers an overview of recent advances in the area of water-soluble sy

  1. Metaphorical Models in Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Stuart; Bhusan, Nalini

    1995-01-01

    What happens when students of chemistry fail to recognize the metaphorical status of certain models and interpret them literally? Suggests that such failures lead students to form perceptions of phenomena that can be misleading. Argues that the key to making good use of metaphorical models is a recognition of their metaphorical status. Examines…

  2. Online Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowicz, Philip A.

    2010-01-01

    This is a comprehensive study of the many facets of an entirely online organic chemistry course. Online homework with structure-drawing capabilities was found to be more effective than written homework. Online lecture was found to be just as effective as in-person lecture, and students prefer an online lecture format with shorter Webcasts. Online…

  3. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Analytical Chemistry and Material Development Group maintains a capability in chemical analysis, materials R&D failure analysis and contamination control. The uniquely qualified staff and facility support the needs of flight projects, science instrument development and various technical tasks, as well as Cal Tech.

  4. Forensic Chemistry Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal GERÇEK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the types of terrorism and crime nowadays, the importance of the forensic sciences can be bett er understood. Forensic science is the application of the wide spectrum of science to answer the question of legal system. It contains the application of the principles, techniques and methods of basic sciences and its main aim is the determination of the physical facts which are important in legal situations. Forensic chemistry is the branch of chemistry which performs the chemical analysis of evidences that used in the courts. Forensic chemist is the professional chemist who analyzes the evidences from crime scene and reaches a result by application of tests. Th us, they have to have a special education. In forensic laboratories candidates who have chemistry/biochemistry undergraduate degree and took biology and forensic chemistry lectures are preferred. It is necessary to design graduate and undergraduate education to train a forensic chemist. Science education should be at the core of the undergraduate education. In addition to this strong laboratory education on both science and forensic science should be given. Th e graduate program of forensic science example should contain forensic science subjects, strong academic lectures on special subjects and research and laboratory components.

  5. Chemistry Cook-Off

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    For this activity, high school chemistry students compete in a cooking contest. They must determine the chemical and physical changes that occur in the food they prepare, present their recipe as a step-by-step procedure similar to a lab procedure, identify chemicals in the food, and present all measurements in both metric and English units. The…

  6. Chromatin chemistry goes cellular.

    OpenAIRE

    W. Fischle; D. Schwarzer; Mootz, H.

    2015-01-01

    Analysing post-translational modifications of histone proteins as they occur within chromatin is challenging due to their large number and chemical diversity. A major step forward has now been achieved by using split intein chemistry to engineer functionalized histones within cells.

  7. Chemistry Education and Mythology

    OpenAIRE

    Sule Aycan

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of mythological story in teaching chemistry. To this end the students in the class were divided into two homogenous groups. While the first group was thought in a traditional way, using a mythological story thought the second group. The story used was based on a Mountain just opposite the faculty.

  8. Chemistry and Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittoria Barbarulo, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Chemistry is the central science, as it touches every aspect of the society we live in and it is intertwined with many aspects of our culture; in particular, the strong link between Chemistry and Archaeology and Art History is being explored, offering a penetrating insight into an area of growing interest from an educational point of view. A series of vital and vibrant examples (i.e., ancient bronzes composition, colour changes due to natural pigment decomposition, marble degradation) has been proposed, on one hand, to improve student understanding of the relationship between cultural and scientific issues arising from the examination, the conservation, and the maintenance of cultural Heritage, on the other, to illustrate the role of the underlying Chemistry. In some case studies, a survey of the most relevant atmospheric factors, which are involved in the deterioration mechanisms, has also been presented to the students. First-hand laboratory experiences have been providing an invaluable means of discovering the full and varied world of Chemistry. Furthermore, the promotion of an interdisciplinary investigation of a famous painting or fresco, involving the study of its nature and significance, the definition of its historical context, any related literature, the chemical knowledge of the materials used, may be an excellent occasion to experiment the Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL). The aim of this approach is to convey the important message that everyone has the responsibility to care for and preserve Heritage for the benefit of present and future generations.

  9. Symmetry in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Jaffé, Hans H

    1977-01-01

    This book, devoted exclusively to symmetry in chemistry and developed in an essentially nonmathematical way, is a must for students and researchers. Topics include symmetry elements and operations, multiple symmetry operations, multiplication tables and point groups, group theory applications, and crystal symmetry. Extensive appendices provide useful tables.

  10. Chemistry in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Henning, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This comprehensive review summarizes our current understanding of the evolution of gas, solids and molecular ices in protoplanetary disks. Key findings related to disk physics and chemistry, both observationally and theoretically, are highlighted. We discuss which molecular probes are used to derive gas temperature, density, ionization state, kinematics, deuterium fractionation, and study organic matter in protoplanetary disks.

  11. Conference 'Chemistry of hydrides' Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This collection of thesis of conference of Chemistry hydrides presents the results of investigations concerning of base questions of chemistry of nonorganic hydrides, including synthesis questions, studying of physical and chemical properties, thermodynamics, analytical chemistry, investigation of structure, equilibriums in the systems of metal-hydrogen, behaviour of nonorganic hydrides in non-water mediums and applying investigations in the chemistry area and technology of nonorganic hydrides

  12. Mathematical problems for chemistry students

    CERN Document Server

    Pota, Gyorgy

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical Problems for Chemistry Students has been compiled and written (a) to help chemistrystudents in their mathematical studies by providing them with mathematical problems really occurring in chemistry (b) to help practising chemists to activate their applied mathematical skills and (c) to introduce students and specialistsof the chemistry-related fields (physicists, mathematicians, biologists, etc.) intothe world of the chemical applications.Some problems of the collection are mathematical reformulations of those in the standard textbooks of chemistry, others we

  13. 11th International Conference of Radiation Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-18

    Topics discussed in the conference included the following: Radiation Physics, Radiation Chemistry and modelling--Radiation physics and dosimetry; Electron transfer in biological media; Radiation chemistry; Biophysical and biochemical modelling; Mechanisms of DNA damage; Assays of DNA damage; Energy deposition in micro volumes; Photo-effects; Special techniques and technologies; Oxidative damage. Molecular and cellular effects-- Photobiology; Cell cycle effects; DNA damage: Strand breaks; DNA damage: Bases; DNA damage Non-targeted; DNA damage: other; Chromosome aberrations: clonal; Chromosomal aberrations: non-clonal; Interactions: Heat/Radiation/Drugs; Biochemical effects; Protein expression; Gene induction; Co-operative effects; ``Bystander'' effects; Oxidative stress effects; Recovery from radiation damage. DNA damage and repair -- DNA repair genes; DNA repair deficient diseases; DNA repair enzymology; Epigenetic effects on repair; and Ataxia and ATM.

  14. RF radiation safety handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio frequency radiation can be dangerous in a number of ways. Hazards include electromagnetic compatibility and interference, electro-explosive vapours and devices, and direct effects on the human body. This book is a general introduction to the sources and nature of RF radiation. It describes the ways in which our current knowledge, based on relevant safety standards, can be used to safeguard people from any harmful effects of RF radiation. The book is designed for people responsible for, or concerned with, safety. This target audience will primarily be radio engineers, but includes those skilled in other disciplines including medicine, chemistry or mechanical engineering. The book covers the problems of RF safety management, including the use of measuring instruments and methods, and a review of current safety standards. The implications for RF design engineers are also examined. (Author)

  15. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  16. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood ''biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons

  17. LAMPF nuclear chemistry data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LAMPF Nuclear Chemistry Data Acquisition System (DAS) is designed to provide both real-time control of data acquisition and facilities for data processing for a large variety of users. It consists of a PDP-11/44 connected to a parallel CAMAC branch highway as well as to a large number of peripherals. The various types of radiation counters and spectrometers and their connections to the system will be described. Also discussed will be the various methods of connection considered and their advantages and disadvantages. The operation of the system from the standpoint of both hardware and software will be described as well as plans for the future

  18. Predictors of General Chemistry Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsogomonyan, Ardas; Loftus, Drew

    1979-01-01

    Chemistry pretest scores, high school chemistry grades and, to a greater extent, math SAT scores were useful predictors of college general chemistry grades. Regression analysis of all these predictors combined was used to construct an expectancy table which is being used to identify and advise underprepared students. (BB)

  19. Division of Analytical Chemistry, 1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    1999-01-01

    The article recounts the 1998 activities of the Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC- formerly the Working Party on Analytical Chemistry, WPAC), which body is a division of the Federation of European Chemical Societies (FECS). Elo Harald Hansen is the Danish delegate, representing The Danish...... Chemical Society/The Society for Analytical Chemistry....

  20. Annual report 1985 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report describes the activities carried out in 1985 by the Chemistry Department in the following fields: Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Physicochemistry (Interphases, Surfaces), General Chemical Analysis, Active Materials Analysis, X Ray Fluorescence Analysis, Mass Spectroscopy (Isotopic Analysis, Instrumentation) and Optical Spectroscopy. A list of publications is enclosed. (M.E.L.)

  1. Interaction of Radiation with Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, D.; Vértes, A.

    The effects of interactions of the various kinds of nuclear radiation with matter are summarized with special emphasis on relations to nuclear chemistry and possible applications. The Bethe-Bloch theory describes the slowing down process of heavy charged particles via ionization, and it is modified for electrons and photons to include radiation effects like bremsstrahlung and pair production. Special emphasis is given to processes involved in particle detection, the Cherenkov effect and transition radiation. Useful formulae, numerical constants, and graphs are provided to help calculations of the stopping power of particles in simple and composite materials.

  2. Advances in nuclear chemistry and its applications in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear chemistry was born almost 120 years ago with the discovery of radioactivity by Antoine Henry Becquerel in 1896. Nuclear chemistry is a subfield of chemistry that deals with radioactivity, nuclear reactions and processes, and nuclear properties. The composition of the nucleus and the changes that occur within the nucleus define the properties of the radioisotope and the nuclear reactions and processes it is involved in. Almost six decades ago, nuclear chemistry established its roots in the Philippines under the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission, presently the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute. The main areas of nuclear chemistry, namely, namely radiochemistry, radiation chemistry, radiation biology, and isotopic chemistry have been studies, and have found applications in food and agriculture, medicine and health, in idustry, and in the protection of the environment. Early work in nuclear chemistry utilized the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) for the production of radioisotopes which were used in either research or direct applications in food and agriculture, health and medicine, and industry. The PRR-1 provided neutrons for the non destructive multi element analysis of various samples using the neutron activation analysis technique. Radioactive materials as sources of ionizing radiation are being used extensively to study the chemical and biological effects of radiation on matter. Current studies involve the irradiation of certain plants and insects causing changes in their DNA which result in mutation for better crop varieties and sterility in insects for quarantine treatment and pest management. Radiation can modify the properties of polymers. Natural polymers such as carrageenan, chitosan and cellulose in abaca and water hyacinth fibers are subjected to gamma irradiation changing their properties and resulting in new products such as wound drressing, hemostatic agents, plant growth promoters, and metal-chelating agents. Radioisotopes are also

  3. Progress report: Chemistry and Materials Division, 1982 April 1 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of the division in the areas of solid state studies, radiation chemistry, isotope separation, analytical chemistry and materials science is described. The solid state science group studied solute atom vacancy trapping in irradiated f.c.c. alloys as well as the rearrangement of atoms in solids bombarded by energetic heavy ions. In radiation chemistry, work was done on the pulse radiolysis of NO in argon. Isotope separation studies were done on fluoroform and uranium. Fuel burnup determination using 148Nd and 139La was investigated. Zirconium alloy studies included work on stress corrosion cracking and the Baushinger effect

  4. Conference Proceedings of RADTECH ASIA '99. Radiation Curing: the technology for the next millenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation curing (i.e. ultraviolet radiation, electron beams, etc) technology were discussed. All aspects of this technology included equipment , applications, chemistry, performance characterization and measurement, market and economic, new breakthrough were discussed and presented in details

  5. Philippine country report on radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was presented during the First National Coordinators Meeting for Radiation Technology, held in Takasaki, Japan, 6-9 September 1993. The report was about the active involvement of Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) in research and development on the application of radiation technology. Activities were on mutation breeding, food irradiation, radiation sterilization, wood-plastic combinations and radiation chemistry. The transfer of technology in the Philippines was supported and assisted by the UNDP/IAEA Industrial Project. With these technologies, many industries were interested in radiation processing

  6. Towards "Bildung"-Oriented Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöström, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    This paper concerns "Bildung"-oriented chemistry education, based on a reflective and critical discourse of chemistry. It is contrasted with the dominant type of chemistry education, based on the mainstream discourse of chemistry. "Bildung"-oriented chemistry education includes not only content knowledge in chemistry, but also…

  7. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Part 2. Physical radiations and biological significance. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report comprises a teaching text, encompassing all physical radiations likely to be of biological interest, and the relevant biological effects and their significance. Topics include human radiobiology, delayed effects, radiation absorption in organisms, aqueous radiation chemistry, cell radiobiology, mutagenesis, and photobiology

  8. Heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryer, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The present conference on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry considers such topics concerning clusters, particles and microparticles as common problems in nucleation and growth, chemical kinetics, and catalysis, chemical reactions with aerosols, electron beam studies of natural and anthropogenic microparticles, and structural studies employing molecular beam techniques, as well as such gas-solid interaction topics as photoassisted reactions, catalyzed photolysis, and heterogeneous catalysis. Also discussed are sulfur dioxide absorption, oxidation, and oxidation inhibition in falling drops, sulfur dioxide/water equilibria, the evidence for heterogeneous catalysis in the atmosphere, the importance of heterogeneous processes to tropospheric chemistry, soot-catalyzed atmospheric reactions, and the concentrations and mechanisms of formation of sulfate in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  9. Medicinal chemistry for 2020.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama D; Hill, Ronald A

    2011-10-01

    Rapid advances in our collective understanding of biomolecular structure and, in concert, of biochemical systems, coupled with developments in computational methods, have massively impacted the field of medicinal chemistry over the past two decades, with even greater changes appearing on the horizon. In this perspective, we endeavor to profile some of the most prominent determinants of change and speculate as to further evolution that may consequently occur during the next decade. The five main angles to be addressed are: protein-protein interactions; peptides and peptidomimetics; molecular diversity and pharmacological space; molecular pharmacodynamics (significance, potential and challenges); and early-stage clinical efficacy and safety. We then consider, in light of these, the future of medicinal chemistry and the educational preparation that will be required for future medicinal chemists. PMID:22004084

  10. Chemistry space–time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Winkler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As Einstein identified so clearly, space and time are intimately related. We discuss the relationship between time and Euclidean space using spectroscopic and radioastronomical studies of interstellar chemistry as an example. Given the finite speed of light, we are clearly studying chemical reactions occurring tens of thousands of years ago that may elucidate the primordial chemistry of this planet several billion years ago. We also explore space of a different kind – chemical space, with many more dimensions than the four we associate as space–time. Vast chemical spaces also need very efficient (computational methods for their exploration to overcome this ‘curse of dimensionality’. We discuss methods by which the time to explore these new spaces can be very substantially reduced, opening the discovery useful new materials that are the key to our future.

  11. Bubble and foam chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Pugh, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    This indispensable guide will equip the reader with a thorough understanding of the field of foaming chemistry. Assuming only basic theoretical background knowledge, the book provides a straightforward introduction to the principles and properties of foams and foaming surfactants. It discusses the key ideas that underpin why foaming occurs, how it can be avoided and how different degrees of antifoaming can be achieved, and covers the latest test methods, including laboratory and industrial developed techniques. Detailing a variety of different kinds of foams, from wet detergents and food foams, to polymeric, material and metal foams, it connects theory to real-world applications and recent developments in foam research. Combining academic and industrial viewpoints, this book is the definitive stand-alone resource for researchers, students and industrialists working on foam technology, colloidal systems in the field of chemical engineering, fluid mechanics, physical chemistry, and applied physics.

  12. Quo vadis, analytical chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcárcel, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an open, personal, fresh approach to the future of Analytical Chemistry in the context of the deep changes Science and Technology are anticipated to experience. Its main aim is to challenge young analytical chemists because the future of our scientific discipline is in their hands. A description of not completely accurate overall conceptions of our discipline, both past and present, to be avoided is followed by a flexible, integral definition of Analytical Chemistry and its cornerstones (viz., aims and objectives, quality trade-offs, the third basic analytical reference, the information hierarchy, social responsibility, independent research, transfer of knowledge and technology, interfaces to other scientific-technical disciplines, and well-oriented education). Obsolete paradigms, and more accurate general and specific that can be expected to provide the framework for our discipline in the coming years are described. Finally, the three possible responses of analytical chemists to the proposed changes in our discipline are discussed.

  13. Supramolecular chemistry and technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HENRIQUE E. TOMA

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Supramolecular chemistry deals with the association of several chemical species, in an organized way and according to well defined purposes. Based on a molecular engineering approach, supramolecular structures can be designed from pre-formed building blocks, providing a promising route from chemistry to molecular nanotechnology. New supramolecular systems have been assembled in our laboratory with the use of bridging unities such as tetrapyridylporphyrins, porphyrazines and polypyrazines, connecting transition metal complexes and clusters. These systems display a very exciting electrochemical and catalytic behavior, and interact with DNA, generating ¹O2 and leading to efficient oxidative clivage for photodynamic terapy applications. Molecular interfaces have been developed, exhibiting photocurrent response in the presence of visible-UV light, and rectifying properties in the presence of electroactive species. Successful applications of the supramolecular species in chemical and bio-sensors have been developed.

  14. Quo vadis, analytical chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcárcel, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an open, personal, fresh approach to the future of Analytical Chemistry in the context of the deep changes Science and Technology are anticipated to experience. Its main aim is to challenge young analytical chemists because the future of our scientific discipline is in their hands. A description of not completely accurate overall conceptions of our discipline, both past and present, to be avoided is followed by a flexible, integral definition of Analytical Chemistry and its cornerstones (viz., aims and objectives, quality trade-offs, the third basic analytical reference, the information hierarchy, social responsibility, independent research, transfer of knowledge and technology, interfaces to other scientific-technical disciplines, and well-oriented education). Obsolete paradigms, and more accurate general and specific that can be expected to provide the framework for our discipline in the coming years are described. Finally, the three possible responses of analytical chemists to the proposed changes in our discipline are discussed. PMID:26631024

  15. Tropical Soil Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borggaard, Ole K.

    and environmental protection. Tropical Soil Chemistry by Ole K. Borggaard provides an overview of the composition, occurrence, properties, processes, formation, and environmental vulnerability of various tropical soil types (using American Soil Taxonomy for classification). The processes and the external factors...... that affect soil processes are the same in tropical soils as in temperate region soils, but because of high temperature year round and occurrence in very stable landscapes, some (but not all) tropical soils possess special composition and properties. These features are highlighted in the book, and general...... soil chemical issues are also presented to assess when, why, and how tropical soils differ from soils in other regions. This knowledge can help agricultural specialists in the tropics establish sustainable crop production. Readers are assumed to be familiar with basic chemistry, physics...

  16. Organic Chemistry in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical observations, theoretical modeling, laboratory simulation and analysis of extraterrestrial material have enhanced our knowledge of the inventory of organic matter in the interstellar medium (ISM) and on small bodies such as comets and asteroids (Ehrenfreund & Charnley 2000). Comets, asteroids and their fragments, meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), contributed significant amounts of extraterrestrial organic matter to the young Earth. This material degraded and reacted in a terrestrial prebiotic chemistry to form organic structures that may have served as building blocks for life on the early Earth. In this talk I will summarize our current understanding of the organic composition and chemistry of interstellar clouds. Molecules of astrobiological relevance include the building blocks of our genetic material: nucleic acids, composed of subunits such as N-heterocycles (purines and pyrimidines), sugars and amino acids. Signatures indicative of inheritance of pristine and modified interstellar material in comets and meteorites will also be discussed.

  17. Carbohydrates in Supramolecular Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbianco, Martina; Bharate, Priya; Varela-Aramburu, Silvia; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-02-24

    Carbohydrates are involved in a variety of biological processes. The ability of sugars to form a large number of hydrogen bonds has made them important components for supramolecular chemistry. We discuss recent advances in the use of carbohydrates in supramolecular chemistry and reveal that carbohydrates are useful building blocks for the stabilization of complex architectures. Systems are presented according to the scaffold that supports the glyco-conjugate: organic macrocycles, dendrimers, nanomaterials, and polymers are considered. Glyco-conjugates can form host-guest complexes, and can self-assemble by using carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions and other weak interactions such as π-π interactions. Finally, complex supramolecular architectures based on carbohydrate-protein interactions are discussed. PMID:26702928

  18. Art and Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Philippe Walter’s teaching, which he delivered as holder of the Liliane Bettencourt Annual Chair of Technological Innovation, was completed with two lectures on “practical work” to deal with a real case. The conditions and challenges of interdisciplinary research combining analytical chemistry, art history and archaeology were thus discussed in relation to specific works. The Holy Family, Constantin Abraham (1785-1855) by Raphaël (aka), Sanzio Raffaello (1483-1520), hard porcelain, Sèvres, C...

  19. Medicinal chemistry for 2020

    OpenAIRE

    Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama D.; Hill, Ronald A

    2011-01-01

    Rapid advances in our collective understanding of biomolecular structure and, in concert, of biochemical systems, coupled with developments in computational methods, have massively impacted the field of medicinal chemistry over the past two decades, with even greater changes appearing on the horizon. In this perspective, we endeavor to profile some of the most prominent determinants of change and speculate as to further evolution that may consequently occur during the next decade. The five ma...

  20. Green chemistry: development trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseev, I. I.

    2013-07-01

    Examples of applications of green chemistry methods in heavy organic synthesis are analyzed. Compounds, which can be produced by the processing of the biomass, and the criteria for the selection of the most promising products are summarized. The current status of the ethanol production and processing is considered. The possibilities of the use of high fatty acid triglycerides, glycerol, succinic acid, and isoprene are briefly discussed. The bibliography includes 67 references.