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Sample records for aids clinical society

  1. European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines for the clinical management and treatment of HIV-infected adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clumeck, N; Pozniak, A; Raffi, F

    2008-01-01

    A working group of the European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) have developed these guidelines for European clinicians to help them in the treatment of adults with HIV infection. This third version of the guidelines includes, as new topics, the assessment of patients at initial and subsequent clinic...... virological failure and the treatment of HIV during pregnancy. In Europe, there is a wide range of clinical practices in antiretroviral therapy depending on various factors such as drug registration, national policies, local availability, reimbursement and access to treatment. These can vary greatly from one...

  2. European AIDS Clinical Society Second Standard of Care Meeting, Brussels 16-17 November 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Wit, S; Battegay, M; D'Arminio Monforte, A

    2018-01-01

    The European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) organized a second meeting on Standard of Care in Europe on November 16-17 th, 2016. The aims of the meeting were to discuss and propose actions on three topics, namely: Adherence to guidelines for treatment initiation, treatment monitoring and outcomes, ...

  3. Essentials from the 2015 European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines for the treatment of adult HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Boesecke, C; Gisler, V

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines are intended for all clinicians involved in the care of HIV-positive persons, and are available in print, online, and as a free App for download for iPhone and Android. GUIDELINE HIGHLIGHTS: The 2015 version of the EACS guidelines...

  4. Essentials from the 2015 European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines for the treatment of adult HIV-positive persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryom, L.; Boesecke, C.; Gisler, V.; Manzardo, C.; Rockstroh, J. K.; Puoti, M.; Furrer, H.; Miro, J. M.; Gatell, J. M.; Pozniak, A.; Behrens, G.; Battegay, M.; Lundgren, J. D.; Lundgren, Jens D.; Ryom, Lene; Gatell, José M.; Pozniak, Anton; Manzardo, Christian; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Arribas, José; Battegay, Manuel; Clumeck, Nathan; Dedes, Nikos; Geretti, Anna Maria; Horban, Andrzej; Katlama, Christina; McCormack, Sheena; Molina, Jean-Michel; Mussini, Cristina; Raffi, François; Reiss, Peter; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Behrens, Georg; Bower, Mark; Cinque, Paola; Collins, Simon; Compston, Juliet; Deray, Gilbert; de Wit, Stéphane; Fux, Christoph A.; Guraldi, Giovanni; Mallon, Patrick; Martinez, Esteban; Marzolini, Catia; Papapoulos, Socrates; Du Pasquier, Renaud; Poulter, Neil; Williams, Ian; Winston, Alan; Rockstroh, Jürgen K.

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundThe European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines are intended for all clinicians involved in the care of HIV-positive persons, and are available in print, online, and as a free App for download for iPhone and Android. Guideline highlightsThe 2015 version of the EACS guidelines contains

  5. Highlights of the 2017 European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) Guidelines for the treatment of adult HIV-positive persons version 9.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryom, L.; Boesecke, C.; Bracchi, M.; Ambrosioni, J.; Pozniak, A.; Arribas, J.; Behrens, G.; Mallon, P. G. M.; Puoti, M.; Rauch, A.; Miro, J. M.; Kirk, O.; Marzolini, C.; Lundgren, J. D.; Battegay, M.; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Clumeck, Nathan; Dedes, Nikos; Gatell, José M.; Horban, Andrzej; Katlama, Christine; McCormack, Sheena; Molina, Jean-Michel; Mussini, Cristina; Raffi, François; Reiss, Peter; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Bower, Mark; Cinque, Paola; Collins, Simon; Compston, Juliet; de Wit, Stéphane; Fabbri, Leonardo M.; Fux, Christoph A.; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Martínez, Esteban; Papapoulos, Socrates; Du Pasquier, Renaud; Poulter, Neil; Williams, Ian; Winston, Alan; Berenguer, Juan; Bhagani, Sanjay; Bruno, Raffaele; Konov, Svilen; Lacombe, Karine; Mauss, Stefan; Mendão, Luís; Peters, Lars; Rockstroh, Jürgen K.

    2018-01-01

    The European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) Guidelines have since 2005 provided multidisciplinary recommendations for the care of HIV-positive persons in geographically diverse areas. Major revisions have been made in all sections of the 2017 Guidelines: antiretroviral treatment (ART), comorbidities,

  6. Highlights of the 2017 European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) Guidelines for the treatment of adult HIV-positive persons version 9.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryom, L; Boesecke, C; Bracchi, M

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) Guidelines have since 2005 provided multidisciplinary recommendations for the care of HIV-positive persons in geographically diverse areas. GUIDELINE HIGHLIGHTS: Major revisions have been made in all sections of the 2017 Guidelines: antiretrov...

  7. [Consensus statement of the National AIDS Plan Secretariat, Spanish Society of Emergency Medicine and AIDS Study Group of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology on Emergency and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Supporting non-HIV specialist professionals in the treatment of patients with urgent diseases resulting from HIV infection. These recommendations have been agreed by an expert panel from the National AIDS Plan Secretariat, the Spanish Society of Emergency Medicine, and the AIDS Study Group. A review has been made of the safety and efficacy results of clinical trials and cohort studies published in biomedical journals (PubMed and Embase) or presented at conferences. The strength of each recommendation (A, B, C) and the level of supporting evidence (I, II, III) are based on a modification of the criteria of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. The data to be collected from the emergency medical history in order to recognize the patient at risk of HIV infection were specified. It stressed the basic knowledge of ART principles and its importance in terms of decline in morbidity and mortality of HIV+ patients and referring to the HIV specialist for follow-up, where appropriate, including drug interactions. Management of different emergency situations that may occur in patients with HIV infection is also mentioned. The non-HIV specialist professional, will find the necessary tools to approach HIV patients with an emergency disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Governing AIDS through aid to civil society: Global solutions meet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article is to explore how international donors influence civil society organisations (CSOs) in Mozambique through funding mechanisms, the creation of partnerships, or inclusion in targeted programmes. The main focus is the relationship between donors and AIDS non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

  9. The social stigma of HIV–AIDS: society's role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kontomanolis EN

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Emmanuel N Kontomanolis, Spyridon Michalopoulos, Grigorios Gkasdaris, Zacharias Fasoulakis Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece Abstract: AIDS is a devastating and deadly disease that affects people worldwide and, like all infections, it comes without warning. Specifically, childbearing women with AIDS face constant psychological difficulties during their gestation period, even though the pregnancy itself may be normal and healthy. These women have to deal with the uncertainties and the stress that usually accompany a pregnancy, and they have to live with the reality of having a life-threatening disease; in addition to that, they also have to deal with discriminating and stigmatizing behaviors from their environment. It is well known that a balanced mental state is a major determining factor to having a normal pregnancy and constitutes the starting point for having a good quality of life. Even though the progress in both technology and medicine is rapid, infected pregnant women seem to be missing this basic requirement. Communities seem unprepared and uneducated to smoothly integrate these people in their societies, letting the ignorance marginalize and isolate these patients. For all the aforementioned reasons, it is imperative that society and medical professionals respond and provide all the necessary support and advice to HIV-positive child bearers, in an attempt to allay their fears and relieve their distress. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the difficulties patients with HIV infection have to deal with, in order to survive and merge into society, identify the main reasons for the low public awareness, discuss the current situation, and provide potential solutions to reducing the stigma among HIV patients. Keywords: AIDS, stigma, pregnancy, HIV, infection, society, social discrimination

  10. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Overview Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV/ ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Last Reviewed: August 25, 2017 ...

  11. Beyond the first 25 years: The International AIDS Society and its role in the global response to AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McClure Craig

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dr. Pedro Cahn, International AIDS Society (IAS President and Mr. Craig McClure, IAS Executive Director, provide their thoughts and analysis on the current and future role of the IAS as part of the global response to HIV/AIDS.

  12. Clinical Criteria for Physician Aid in Dying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orentlicher, David; Pope, Thaddeus Mason; Rich, Ben A

    2016-03-01

    More than 20 years ago, even before voters in Oregon had enacted the first aid in dying (AID) statute in the United States, Timothy Quill and colleagues proposed clinical criteria AID. Their proposal was carefully considered and temperate, but there were little data on the practice of AID at the time. (With AID, a physician writes a prescription for life-ending medication for a terminally ill, mentally capacitated adult.) With the passage of time, a substantial body of data on AID has developed from the states of Oregon and Washington. For more than 17 years, physicians in Oregon have been authorized to provide a prescription for AID. Accordingly, we have updated the clinical criteria of Quill, et al., based on the many years of experience with AID. With more jurisdictions authorizing AID, it is critical that physicians can turn to reliable clinical criteria. As with any medical practice, AID must be provided in a safe and effective manner. Physicians need to know (1) how to respond to a patient's inquiry about AID, (2) how to assess patient decision making capacity, and (3) how to address a range of other issues that may arise. To ensure that physicians have the guidance they need, Compassion & Choices convened the Physician Aid-in-Dying Clinical Criteria Committee, in July 2012, to create clinical criteria for physicians who are willing to provide AID to patients who request it. The committee includes experts in medicine, law, bioethics, hospice, nursing, social work, and pharmacy. Using an iterative consensus process, the Committee drafted the criteria over a one-year period.

  13. The social stigma of HIV-AIDS: society's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontomanolis, Emmanuel N; Michalopoulos, Spyridon; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Fasoulakis, Zacharias

    2017-01-01

    AIDS is a devastating and deadly disease that affects people worldwide and, like all infections, it comes without warning. Specifically, childbearing women with AIDS face constant psychological difficulties during their gestation period, even though the pregnancy itself may be normal and healthy. These women have to deal with the uncertainties and the stress that usually accompany a pregnancy, and they have to live with the reality of having a life-threatening disease; in addition to that, they also have to deal with discriminating and stigmatizing behaviors from their environment. It is well known that a balanced mental state is a major determining factor to having a normal pregnancy and constitutes the starting point for having a good quality of life. Even though the progress in both technology and medicine is rapid, infected pregnant women seem to be missing this basic requirement. Communities seem unprepared and uneducated to smoothly integrate these people in their societies, letting the ignorance marginalize and isolate these patients. For all the aforementioned reasons, it is imperative that society and medical professionals respond and provide all the necessary support and advice to HIV-positive child bearers, in an attempt to allay their fears and relieve their distress. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the difficulties patients with HIV infection have to deal with, in order to survive and merge into society, identify the main reasons for the low public awareness, discuss the current situation, and provide potential solutions to reducing the stigma among HIV patients.

  14. CLINICAL DESCRIPTION AND DIAGNOSIS OF HIV/AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Suryono Suryono; Nasronudin Nasronudin

    2014-01-01

    Infections ofHIV/AIDS currently has become very serious problems for the world health. In the country the first case ofHIV/AIDS was discovered in Bali in 1987, in its progress has not the meaning but after 1985 HIV transmission increased considerably. The complex problem that the living and the increasing number ofcases should indeed, medical practitioners understand more the clinical and how to diagnose infections ofHIV/AIDS. A snapshot ofthe clinical HIV infection/aids can be seen fro...

  15. CLINICAL DESCRIPTION AND DIAGNOSIS OF HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryono Suryono

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections ofHIV/AIDS currently has become very serious problems for the world health. In the country the first case ofHIV/AIDS was discovered in Bali in 1987, in its progress has not the meaning but after 1985 HIV transmission increased considerably. The complex problem that the living and the increasing number ofcases should indeed, medical practitioners understand more the clinical and how to diagnose infections ofHIV/AIDS. A snapshot ofthe clinical HIV infection/aids can be seen from grievances and a disease that often accompanies it, a complaint which is found at HIV/AIDS sufferers in the form of suds retroviral acute: fever, weight loss, diarrhea chronic, disphagi, limpadenopati, infections in the skin respiratory disorders and nervous breakdown center. While a disease that often been gained by those with HIV / AIDS as candidiasis, tuberculosis, pneumonia bakterialis, toksoplasmosis and pneumonia pneumocystic carinii. Diagnose HIV infection created based on clinical symptoms which includes major symptoms and symptoms of minor, and the result ofthe examination ofthe laboratory.

  16. The effects of national and international HIV/AIDS funding and governance mechanisms on the development of civil-society responses to HIV/AIDS in East and Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kevin J; Birdsall, Karen

    2010-01-01

    The study takes stock of the exponential growth in the number of new civil-society organisations (CSOs) working in the HIV/AIDS field in East and Southern Africa during the period 1996-2004. We researched this development through a survey of 439 CSOs in six countries and case studies focused on the evolution of community responses to HIV/AIDS in specific communities in eight countries. We describe the types of CSOs that emerged, their relationships with governments and donors, and their activities, organisational characteristics and funding requirements. The data presented show that the vision of social mobilisation of HIV/AIDS responses through community-level organisations has faced strong external challenges. Evidence from survey data, national HIV/AIDS spending assessments and case studies shows that in some respects the changing international aid environment undermines the prospects for development of the civil-society sector's contributions in HIV/AIDS responses. Of particular interest is to understand how the "Three Ones" and the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness have reshaped international funding for HIV/AIDS responses. There has been relatively little attention paid to the impact of the new management and funding modalities--including national performance frameworks, general budget support, joint funding arrangements and basket funds--on civil-society agencies at the forefront of community HIV/AIDS responses. Evidence is presented to show that in important respects the new modalities limit the unique contribution that CSOs can make to national HIV/AIDS responses. It is also shown that the drive to rapidly intensify the scale of HIV/AIDS responses has involved using community organisations as service providers for externally formulated programmes. We discuss this as a strong threat to the development of sustainable civil-society economies as well as to CSOs' diversity and responsiveness. The ways in which CSOs are responding to these challenges are

  17. Are patient decision aids the best way to improve clinical decision making? Report of the IPDAS Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Nelson, Wendy L; Pignone, Michael; Elwyn, Glyn; Rovner, David R; O'Connor, Annette M; Coulter, Angela; Correa-de-Araujo, Rosaly

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on the International Patient Decision Aid Standards Symposium held in 2006 at the annual meeting of the Society for Medical Decision Making in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The symposium featured a debate regarding the proposition that "decision aids are the best way to improve clinical decision making.'' The formal debate addressed the theoretical problem of the appropriate gold standard for an improved decision, efficacy of decision aids, and prospects for implementation. Audience comments and questions focused on both theory and practice: the often unacknowledged roots of decision aids in expected utility theory and the practical problems of limited patient decision aid implementation in health care. The participants' vote on the proposition was approximately half for and half against.

  18. The Role of Civil Society Organizations in Monitoring the Global AIDS Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Julia; Mallouris, Christoforos; Lee, Kelley; Alfvén, Tobias

    2017-07-01

    Civil society organizations (CSOs) are recognized as playing an exceptional role in the global AIDS response. However, there is little detailed research to date on how they contribute to specific governance functions. This article uses Haas' framework on global governance functions to map CSO's participation in the monitoring of global commitments to the AIDS response by institutions and states. Drawing on key informant interviews and primary documents, it focuses specifically on CSO participation in Global AIDS Response Progress Reporting and in Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria processes. It argues that the AIDS response is unique within global health governance, in that CSOs fulfill both formal and informal monitoring functions, and considers the strengths and weaknesses of these contributions. It concludes that future global health governance arrangements should include provisions and resources for monitoring by CSOs because their participation creates more inclusive global health governance and contributes to strengthening commitments to human rights.

  19. Is HIV-2- induced AIDS different from HIV-1-associated AIDS? Data from a West African clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Steele, Euridice; Awasana, Akum Aveika; Corrah, Tumani; Sabally, Saihou; van der Sande, Marianne; Jaye, Assan; Togun, Toyin; Sarge-Njie, Ramu; McConkey, Samuel J.; Whittle, Hilton; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2007-01-01

    Although AIDS is less frequent following HIV-2 than HIV-1 infection, it is unclear whether the clinical picture and clinical course of AIDS are similar in the two infections. To compare the pattern of AIDS-defining events, CD4 cell count at the time of AIDS diagnosis, survival from time of AIDS, and

  20. AID Biology: A pathological and clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Meenal; Tamrakar, Anubhav; Singh, Amit Kumar; Jain, Monika; Jaiswal, Ankit; Kodgire, Prashant

    2018-01-02

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), primarily expressed in activated mature B lymphocytes in germinal centers, is the key factor in adaptive immune response against foreign antigens. AID is responsible for producing high-affinity and high-specificity antibodies against an infectious agent, through the physiological DNA alteration processes of antibody genes by somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) and functions by deaminating deoxycytidines (dC) to deoxyuridines (dU), thereby introducing point mutations and double-stranded chromosomal breaks (DSBs). The beneficial physiological role of AID in antibody diversification is outweighed by its detrimental role in the genesis of several chronic immune diseases, under non-physiological conditions. This review offers a comprehensive and better understanding of AID biology and its pathological aspects, as well as addresses the challenges involved in AID-related cancer therapeutics, based on various recent advances and evidence available in the literature till date. In this article, we discuss ways through which our interpretation of AID biology may reflect upon novel clinical insights, which could be successfully translated into designing clinical trials and improving patient prognosis and disease management.

  1. Evaluation and Treatment of Hypertriglyceridemia: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Lars; Brunzell, John D.; Goldberg, Anne C.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Sacks, Frank; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Stalenhoef, Anton F. H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to develop clinical practice guidelines on hypertriglyceridemia. Participants: The Task Force included a chair selected by The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee (CGS), five additional experts in the field, and a methodologist. The authors received no corporate funding or remuneration. Consensus Process: Consensus was guided by systematic reviews of evidence, e-mail discussion, conference calls, and one in-person meeting. The guidelines were reviewed and approved sequentially by The Endocrine Society's CGS and Clinical Affairs Core Committee, members responding to a web posting, and The Endocrine Society Council. At each stage, the Task Force incorporated changes in response to written comments. Conclusions: The Task Force recommends that the diagnosis of hypertriglyceridemia be based on fasting levels, that mild and moderate hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides of 150–999 mg/dl) be diagnosed to aid in the evaluation of cardiovascular risk, and that severe and very severe hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides of > 1000 mg/dl) be considered a risk for pancreatitis. The Task Force also recommends that patients with hypertriglyceridemia be evaluated for secondary causes of hyperlipidemia and that subjects with primary hypertriglyceridemia be evaluated for family history of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. The Task Force recommends that the treatment goal in patients with moderate hypertriglyceridemia be a non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level in agreement with National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel guidelines. The initial treatment should be lifestyle therapy; a combination of diet modification and drug therapy may also be considered. In patients with severe or very severe hypertriglyceridemia, a fibrate should be used as a first-line agent. PMID:22962670

  2. AIDS--Challenges to Basic and Clinical Biomedical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1989-01-01

    Clinical trials and access to therapeutic drugs pose dilemmas for researchers, physicians, and AIDS patients. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, recognizing the need for greater access to drugs by a broader spectrum of the infected population, is establishing the Community Programs for Clinical Research on AIDS. (Author/MLW)

  3. Clinical Profile and HIV/AIDS Prevalence of Patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Clinical features of HIV/AIDS and various malignancies are similar. Clinical profiles and HIV/AIDS prevalence in Nigerian cancer patients have been poorly documented. Aim: To identify the patterns of clinical presentations in patients with malignancies and to determine the prevalence of HIV infection in cancer ...

  4. The social stigma of HIV?AIDS: society?s role

    OpenAIRE

    Kontomanolis, Emmanuel N; Michalopoulos, Spyridon; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Fasoulakis, Zacharias

    2017-01-01

    Emmanuel N Kontomanolis, Spyridon Michalopoulos, Grigorios Gkasdaris, Zacharias Fasoulakis Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece Abstract: AIDS is a devastating and deadly disease that affects people worldwide and, like all infections, it comes without warning. Specifically, childbearing women with AIDS face constant psychological difficulties during their gestation period, even though the pregnancy itself may be normal and ...

  5. The impact of HIV infection on society's perception of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, R J

    1994-06-01

    All international codes of research ethics and virtually all national legislation and regulation in the field of research involving human subjects project an attitude of protectionism. Written with the aim of avoiding a repetition of atrocities like those committed by the Nazi physician-researchers, calamities like the thalidomide experience, or ethical violations like those of the Tuskegee syphilis study, their dominant concerns are the protection of individuals from injury and from exploitation. In recent years, however, society's perception of clinical research has shifted dramatically. Now, largely as a consequence of the efforts of the AIDS activists, clinical research is widely perceived as benign and beneficial. Although this shift in attitude has resulted in some important improvements in research policies and practices, this new perception is just as wrong-headed as was the earlier excessive protectionism. It is necessary to maintain a balanced perspective; our policies should encourage the conduct of ethical research while maintaining the vigilance necessary to safeguard the rights and welfare of the subjects.

  6. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  7. Essentials from the 2015 European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines for the treatment of adult HIV-positive persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryom, L; Boesecke, C; Gisler, V; Manzardo, C; Rockstroh, J K; Puoti, M; Furrer, H; Miro, J M; Gatell, J M; Pozniak, A; Behrens, G; Battegay, M; Lundgren, J D

    2016-02-01

    The European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines are intended for all clinicians involved in the care of HIV-positive persons, and are available in print, online, and as a free App for download for iPhone and Android. The 2015 version of the EACS guidelines contains major revisions in all sections; antiretroviral treatment (ART), comorbidities, coinfections and opportunistic diseases. Among the key revisions is the recommendation of ART for all HIV-positive persons, irrespectively of CD4 count, based on the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study results. The recommendations for the preferred and the alternative ART options have also been revised, and a new section on the use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been added. A number of new antiretroviral drugs/drug combinations have been added to the updated tables on drug-drug interactions, adverse drug effects, dose adjustment for renal/liver insufficiency and for ART administration in persons with swallowing difficulties. The revisions of the coinfection section reflect the major advances in anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment with direct-acting antivirals with earlier start of treatment in individuals at increased risk of liver disease progression, and a phasing out of interferon-containing treatment regimens. The section on opportunistic diseases has been restructured according to individual pathogens/diseases and a new overview table has been added on CD4 count thresholds for different primary prophylaxes. The diagnosis and management of HIV infection and related coinfections, opportunistic diseases and comorbidities continue to require a multidisciplinary effort for which the 2015 version of the EACS guidelines provides an easily accessable and updated overview. © 2015 British HIV Association.

  8. [Clinical skills and outcomes of chair-side computer aided design and computer aided manufacture system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q

    2018-04-09

    Computer aided design and computer aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) technology is a kind of oral digital system which is applied to clinical diagnosis and treatment. It overturns the traditional pattern, and provides a solution to restore defect tooth quickly and efficiently. In this paper we mainly discuss the clinical skills of chair-side CAD/CAM system, including tooth preparation, digital impression, the three-dimensional design of prosthesis, numerical control machining, clinical bonding and so on, and review the outcomes of several common kinds of materials at the same time.

  9. The expanding role of civil society in the global HIV/AIDS response: what has the President's Emergency Program For AIDS Relief's role been?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Alex; Roxo, Uchechi; Epino, Henry; Muganzi, Alex; Dorward, Emily; Pick, Billy

    2012-08-15

    Civil society has been part of the HIV/AIDS response from the very beginning of the epidemic, often becoming engaged before national governments. Traditional roles of civil society--advocacy, activism, serving as government watchdog, and acting as community caretaker--have been critical to the response. In addition, civil society organizations (CSOs) play an integral part in providing world-class HIV prevention and treatment services and helping to ensure continuity of care. The President's Emergency Program for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has significantly increased the global scale-up of combination antiretroviral therapy reaching for more than 5 million people in developing countries, as well as implementation of effective evidence-based combination prevention approaches. PEPFAR databases in 5 countries and annual reports from a centrally managed initiative were mined and analyzed to determine the numbers and types of CSOs funded by PEPFAR over a 5-year period (2006-2011). Data are also presented from Uganda showing the overall resource growth in CSO working for HIV. Case studies document the evolution of 3 indigenous CSOs that increased the capacity to implement activities with PEPFAR funding. A legacy of PEPFAR has been the growth of civil society to address social and health issues as well as recognition by governments that partnerships with beneficiaries and civil society result in better outcomes. Scale-up of the global response could not have happened without the involvement of civil society and people living with HIV. This game changing partnership to jointly tackle the problems that countries face may well be the greatest benefit emerging from the HIV epidemic.

  10. Clinical and epidemiological features of AIDS/tuberculosis comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Alice Tung Wan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the relevance of AIDS/tuberculosis comorbidity worldwide, especially in Brazil, this study was developed to describe the clinical and epidemiological features of the comorbid cases identified from 1989 to 1997 by the epidemiology service of the Hospital das Clínicas of the Universidade de São Paulo. METHODS: Databases containing information on all identified AIDS/tuberculosis cases cared for at the hospital were used to gather information on comorbid cases. RESULTS: During the period, 559 patients were identified as presenting with AIDS/tuberculosis comorbidity. Risk behavior for AIDS was primarily heterosexual contact (38.9%, followed by intravenous drug use (29.3% and homosexual/bisexual contact (23.2%. Regarding clinical features, there were higher rates of extrapulmonary tuberculosis when compared to tuberculosis without comorbidity. There was an increase in reporting of AIDS by ambulatory units during the period. Epidemiologically, there was a decrease in the male/female ratio, a predominance in the 20 to 39 year-old age group, and a majority of individuals who had less than 8 years of schooling and had low professional qualifications. CONCLUSIONS: High rates of AIDS/tuberculosis cases at our hospital indicate the need for better attention towards early detection of tuberculosis, especially in its extrapulmonary form. Since the population that attends this hospital tends to be of a lower socioeconomic status, better management of AIDS and tuberculosis is required to increase the rates of treatment adherence and thus lower the social costs.

  11. Political repression, civil society and the politics of responding to AIDS in the BRICS nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Eduardo J; Harris, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    The policy responses to human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) nations have played out amid radically different political environments that have shaped state-civil society relations in critical ways. In contrasting these different environments, this article offers the first comparison of the policy response to AIDS in the BRICS nations and seeks to understand the way in which political context matters for conditioning the response to a major epidemic. Using a comparative historical approach, we find that while collaborative state-civil society relations have produced an aggressive response and successful outcomes in Brazil, democratic openness and state-civil society engagement has not necessarily correlated with an aggressive response or better outcomes in the other cases. Response to the epidemic has been worst by far in democratic South Africa, followed by Russia, where in the former, denialism and antagonistic state-civil society relations fuelled a delayed response and proved extremely costly in terms of human lives. In Russia, a lack of civil societal opportunity for mobilization and non-governmental organization (NGO) growth, political centralization and the state's unwillingness to work with NGOs led to an ineffective government response. Top-down bureaucratic rule and a reluctance to fully engage civil society in democratic India substantially delayed the state's efforts to engage in a successful partnership with NGOs. Nevertheless, China has done surprisingly well, in spite of its repressive approach and narrow engagement with civil society. And in all cases, we find the relationship between state and civil society to be evolving over time in important ways. These findings suggest the need for more research on the links between democratic openness, political repression and policy responses to epidemics. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in

  12. Decision aids for people considering taking part in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Katie; Cotton, Seonaidh C; Brehaut, Jamie C; Politi, Mary C; Skea, Zoe

    2015-11-27

    Several interventions have been developed to promote informed consent for participants in clinical trials. However, many of these interventions focus on the content and structure of information (e.g. enhanced information or changes to the presentation format) rather than the process of decision making. Patient decision aids support a decision making process about medical options. Decision aids support the decision process by providing information about available options and their associated outcomes, alongside information that enables patients to consider what value they place on particular outcomes, and provide structured guidance on steps of decision making. They have been shown to be effective for treatment and screening decisions but evidence on their effectiveness in the context of informed consent for clinical trials has not been synthesised. To assess the effectiveness of decision aids for clinical trial informed consent compared to no intervention, standard information (i.e. usual practice) or an alternative intervention on the decision making process. We searched the following databases and to March 2015: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (OvidSP) (from 1950); EMBASE (OvidSP) (from 1980); PsycINFO (OvidSP) (from 1806); ASSIA (ProQuest) (from 1987); WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/); ClinicalTrials.gov; ISRCTN Register (http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/). We also searched reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews. We contacted study authors and other experts. There were no language restrictions. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing decision aids in the informed consent process for clinical trials alone, or in conjunction with standard information (such as written or verbal) or alongside alternative interventions (e.g. paper-based versus web-based decision aids). Included trials involved

  13. Abortion in a just society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, M E

    1993-01-01

    A female Catholic theologian imagines a just society that does not judge women who decide to undergo an abortion. The Church, practitioners, and the courts must trust that women do make person-enhancing choices about the quality of life. In the last 15 years most progress in securing a woman's right to abortion has been limited to white, well-educated, and middle or upper middle class women. A just society would consider reproductive options a human right. Abortion providers are examples of a move to a just society; they are committed to women's well-being. There are some facts that make one pessimistic about achieving abortion in a just society. The US Supreme Court plans to review important decisions establishing abortion as a civil right. Further, some men insist on suing women who want to make their own reproductive decisions--an anti-choice tactic to wear away women's right to reproductive choice. Bombings of abortion clinics and harassment campaigns by anti-choice groups are common. These behaviors strain pro-choice proponents emotionally, psychically, and spiritually. Their tactics often lead to theologians practicing self-censorship because they fear backlash. Abortion providers also do this. Further, the reaction to AIDS is that sex is bad. Anti-abortion groups use AIDS to further their campaigns, claiming that AIDS is a punishment for sex. Strategies working towards abortion in a just society should be education and persuasion of policymakers and citizens about women's right to choose, since they are the ones most affected by abortion. Moreover, only women can secure their rights to abortion. In a just society, every health maintenance organization, insurance company, and group practice would consider abortion a normal service. A just society provides for the survival needs of the most marginalized.

  14. A history of the American Society for Clinical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    One hundred years ago, in 1909, the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI) held its first annual meeting. The founding members based this new society on a revolutionary approach to research that emphasized newer physiological methods. In 1924 the ASCI started a new journal, the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The ASCI has also held an annual meeting almost every year. The society has long debated who could be a member, with discussions about whether members must be physicians, what sorts of research they could do, and the role of women within the society. The ASCI has also grappled with what else the society should do, especially whether it ought to take a stand on policy issues. ASCI history has reflected changing social, political, and economic contexts, including several wars, concerns about the ethics of biomedical research, massive increases in federal research funding, and an increasingly large and specialized medical environment. PMID:19348041

  15. correlation of who clinical staging with cd4 counts in adult hiv/aids

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-02

    Feb 2, 2011 ... AIDS and HIV/AIDS case definitions for surveillance. (African region) (12). Laboratory and radiological methods were carried out if they were required to make a clinical diagnosis. In the majority of the cases, the HIV clinical events were presumptive diagnosis and based on the WHO clinical staging for ...

  16. The Clinical Features of Paediatric HIV/AIDS at Presentation at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AIDS in African setting was found to be sensitive with low specificity and positive predictive value (PPV). Conclusion: Clinical presentation of paediatric HIV/AIDS appears similar with reports from other centers in spite of the wide variation in ...

  17. Where are clinical trials going? Society and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleight, P

    2004-02-01

    Clinical trials now increasingly impinge on society at large. First there is growing emphasis from health organizations on the need for unbiased evidence about the effectiveness of promoted remedies. Second, as most novel treatments accrue increased costs to society, these need to be evaluated in terms of value for money. Third, there has been confusion and concern about the resolution of conflicting evidence, especially the role of advertising and commercial pressures from a powerful pharmaceutical industry motivated by profit. Fourth, there is concern about research fraud and the ethics of clinical trials. Fifth, there is increasing suspicion of political advice, which sometimes has sought to reassure an anxious public on the basis of complex and possibly inadequate scientific information. Some of these issues are addressed by truly independent and properly constituted data and safety monitoring committees, which are of particular importance when academic investigators or universities have a large financial conflict of interest. This is now more problematic with the current encouragement of investigator-led spin-off companies. These issues are best resolved by independent financial support (from government or other institutions) rather than relying on the commercial sponsor.

  18. The ambiguities of the 'partnership' between civil society and the state in Uganda's AIDS response during the 1990s and 2000s as demonstrated in the development of TASO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebe, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    This article critically investigates state-civil society relations in the Ugandan AIDS response by tracing the history of Uganda's 'multisectoral' and 'partnership' approaches, particularly as it pertains to The AIDS Support Organisation (TASO). It finds that the Ugandan government's reputation for good leadership on AIDS is more ambiguous than commonly supposed and that the much-vaunted 'partnership' approach has not enabled strong critical civil society voices to emerge or prevented the harmful impact of a socially conservative agenda. By the 1990s, TASO had become the most important provider of medical and psychosocial support services to HIV/AIDS patients, but was less effective in influencing policy or holding the state accountable (because the political context prevented a more activist stance). The effectiveness of civil society has been constrained by an authoritarian political culture and institutions that discourage vocal criticism. Despite these limitations, however, state-civil society partnership did contribute to the emergence of a relatively effective coalition for action against HIV/AIDS. Donors were essential in encouraging the emergence of this coalition.

  19. A strategy of clinical tolerance for the prevention of HIV and AIDS in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y

    2000-02-01

    HIV infection and AIDS create many dilemmas in Chinese AIDS/HIV prevention policy. A strategy of clinical tolerance is proposed to address these dilemmas. The immediate purpose of the strategy of clinical tolerance is to win the cooperation of members of stigmatized groups at high risk for contracting HIV infection and AIDS, which occurs as a result of acts done in private and thus beyond the reach of regulation. The strategy of clinical tolerance differs from both tolerance as liberal tolerance and tolerance as a moral ideal of tolerance. A strategy of clinical tolerance does not ask the government, health worker, health official or the public to change either laws or the disapproval of prostitution, homosexuality and drug use. A strategy of clinical tolerance asks, instead, that we weigh what we may regard as the wrong involved in prostitution, homosexuality, and drug use against the greater evil of an HIV/AIDS epidemic. A strategy of clinical tolerance offers the most effective and practical way to confront a growing and significant public health problem in China.

  20. Hormonal Replacement in Hypopituitarism in Adults: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleseriu, Maria; Hashim, Ibrahim A; Karavitaki, Niki; Melmed, Shlomo; Murad, M Hassan; Salvatori, Roberto; Samuels, Mary H

    2016-11-01

    To formulate clinical practice guidelines for hormonal replacement in hypopituitarism in adults. The participants include an Endocrine Society-appointed Task Force of six experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the Pituitary Society, and the European Society of Endocrinology co-sponsored this guideline. The Task Force developed this evidence-based guideline using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. The Task Force commissioned two systematic reviews and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies. One group meeting, several conference calls, and e-mail communications enabled consensus. Committees and members of the Endocrine Society, the American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the Pituitary Society, and the European Society of Endocrinology reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of these guidelines. Using an evidence-based approach, this guideline addresses important clinical issues regarding the evaluation and management of hypopituitarism in adults, including appropriate biochemical assessments, specific therapeutic decisions to decrease the risk of co-morbidities due to hormonal over-replacement or under-replacement, and managing hypopituitarism during pregnancy, pituitary surgery, and other types of surgeries.

  1. Report of the results of the International Clinical Cytometry Society and American Society for Clinical Pathology workload survey of clinical flow cytometry laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolniak, Kristy; Goolsby, Charles; Choi, Sarah; Ali, Asma; Serdy, Nina; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice

    2017-11-01

    Thorough review of current workload, staffing, and testing practices in clinical laboratories allows for optimization of laboratory efficiency and quality. This information is largely missing with regard to clinical flow cytometry laboratories. The purpose of this survey is to provide comprehensive, current, and accurate data on testing practices and laboratory staffing in clinical laboratories performing flow cytometric studies. Survey data was collected from flow cytometry laboratories through the ASCP website. Data was collected on the workload during a 1-year time period of full-time and part-time technical and professional (M.D./D.O./Ph.D. or equivalent) flow cytometry employees. Workload was examined as number of specimens and tubes per full time equivalent (FTE) technical and professional staff. Test complexity, test result interpretation, and reporting practices were also evaluated. There were 205 respondent laboratories affiliated predominantly with academic and health system institutions. Overall, 1,132 FTE employees were reported with 29% professional FTE employees and 71% technical. Fifty-one percent of the testing performed was considered high complexity and 49% was low complexity. The average number of tubes per FTE technologist was 1,194 per year and the average number of specimens per FTE professional was 1,659 per year. The flow cytometry reports were predominantly written by pathologists (57%) and were typically written as a separate report (58%). This survey evaluates the overall status of the current practice of clinical flow cytometry and provides a comprehensive dataset as a framework to help laboratory departments, directors, and managers make appropriate, cost-effective staffing decisions. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  2. Sleep aid toxicosis in dogs: 317 cases (2004-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Adam R; Lee, Justine A; Hovda, Lynn R; Hardy, Brian T; Miyahara, Lee X; Martin, Elizabeth P; Whelan, Megan F

    2011-12-01

    To summarize the signalment, clinical signs observed, time to onset of clinical signs, duration of clinical signs, and the outcome in a large case series of nonbenzodiazepine sleep aid ingestions in dogs, including 2 sleep aids that have not been previously described in the veterinary literature. Retrospective study conducted between 2004 and 2010. An animal poison control center based out of Bloomington, MN. During this time frame, 453 cases were identified involving 467 dogs. Of these cases, 150 cases were excluded due to incomplete medical records, multipet households, or the inability to calculate a dose exposure. A total of 317 dogs with presumed sleep aid medication toxicosis were included. None. Records of dogs with sleep aid medication toxicosis identified by a review of an animal poison control center electronic database were evaluated. The most common sleep aid medications ingested were zolpidem (240/317 [75.7%]), eszopiclone (62/317 [19.5%]), and zaleplon (15/317 [4.7%]). Overall, clinical signs developed in 36% of patients (115/317), while 64% (202/317) remained asymptomatic. The most common organ systems affected and clinical signs seen involved the central nervous system (eg, agitation, sedation) and gastrointestinal tract (eg, anorexia, hypersalivation, vomiting). Overall, the prognosis for dogs with sleep aid medication toxicosis was excellent, and no fatalities were reported in this clinical population. As significant clinical signs can still be seen with ingestion, appropriate decontamination is warranted in asymptomatic patients via emesis or gastric lavage, followed by activated charcoal administration. Symptomatic patients should be hospitalized for monitoring and supportive care for a minimum of 12 hours or until clinical signs resolve. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2011.

  3. [Mutual aid societies for industrial accidents and occupational diseases in the social security service within the framework of the Prevention of Occupational Risk Act].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albalá-Ortiz, M

    The passing of the Prevention of Industrial Risks Act, in force from 9 February 1996 has altered previous ideas on the subject, which is currently considered to be of utmost importance for national and community legislation. In this article we describe the preventive functions of the Mutual Aid Societies for Industrial Accidents and professional diseases of the National Health Service. We have analysed the current legislation so as to clarify the activities of the Mutual Aid Societies in the field of the prevention of industrial accidents, and have defined the actions which may be taken in this field according to the present laws. Two different types of preventive activities are considered: (1) Those which depend on contributions, included in the professional risks cover, and which are obliged to prepare an annual plan of the measures taken to prevent industrial accidents and professional illness, following the guidelines established by the Ministry of Labor and Social Services and according to certain priorities. (2) The functions corresponding to the services for third-party prevention exclusively for their associated companies when the Mutual Aid Society is approved as a service for third party cover. This requires a voluntary or professional contract and the financial cost is borne by the company which requests it. The objective of the current legislation is, amongst other things, to introduce the new preventive approach established by the Prevention of Industrial Risks Act in the workplace and through the Mutual Aid Societies as well as to foment a new culture of prevention.

  4. Interview: Nanomedicine and the fight against HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, André; Swindells, Susan; Bronich, Tatiana; Gendelman, Howard E

    2014-02-01

    Ahead of the 4th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Nanomedicine, this collection of interviews brings together experts from the fields of nanomedicine and HIV/AIDS treatment. Professor André Nel gives us a general introduction and update on the nanomedicine field and how he hopes it will progress. Professor Susan Swindells describes the current challenges faced in the clinic for HIV/AIDS treatment. Professor Tatiana Bronich explains the research efforts being undertaken by the nanomedicine community for the treatment of microbial infections and HIV/AIDS specifically. Finally, Professor Howard Gendelman looks to the future and assesses the potential and challenges of nanomedicine approaches for HIV eradication.

  5. Clinical and Epidemiological Characteristics of HIV Infection/AIDS in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmetagic, Sead; Porobić-Jahic, Humera; Piljic, Dilista; Custovic, Amer; Sabitovic, Damir; Zepic, Denis

    2015-02-01

    More than three decades after recognition of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the United States, the pandemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has dramatically changed the global burden of disease. The main goal of this research is retrospective analysis of epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 28 HIV infected patients, who were diagnosed and treated at the Clinic for Infectious Diseases in University Clinical Center Tuzla in the period from 1996 until the end of 2013. Retrospective analysis was performed using the medical records of 28 HIV-infected persons. Two rapid tests were used for HIV testing: OraQuick Advance test, Vikia HIV1/2, Elisa combo test, HIV RNA test. AIDS disease was determined by using the criteria from WHO. Among a total of 28 HIV-infected persons, 23 (82.14%) were males and 5 (17.86%) were females, with the male: female ratio of 4,6:1. In terms of the transmission route, a large proportion of cases were infected through heterosexual contact 19 (67.86%). At the time of the first visit, 16 (57.15%) patients showed asymptomatic HIV infection, 4 (14.28%) HIV infection with symptoms other than the AIDS defining diseases, and 8 (28.57) had AIDS. At the time of first hospital visit, the CD4 + cells count ranged from 40 to 1795/µl (conducted in 19 patients), and mean value of CD4 + cells was 365,31/µl, and mean HIV RNA titer was 287 118 copies/ml³. Of 28 HIV-infected persons 39 cases of opportunistic diseases developed in 12 patients (42.9%). In terms of the frequency of opportunistic diseases, tuberculosis (12 cases, 42.9%). Among a total of 28 HIV-infected patients, 6 (21.4%) of them died. This study characterizes the epidemiological and clinical patterns of HIV-infected patients in Tuzla region of Bosnia and Herzegovina to accurately understand HIV infection/AIDS in our region, in the hope to contribute in the establishment of effective HIV guidelines in the Tuzla region of B&H in the future.

  6. The clinical research office of the endourological society audit committee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preminger, G.M.; Alken, P.; Habuchi, T.; Wijkstra, H.; Skolarikos, A.; Yin, C.-J.

    2011-01-01

    The Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) conducts large-scale, international, multicenter clinical trials in the field of endourology. One of the major challenges that these trials pose is to ensure that data collected remotely and online within a very short time frame are

  7. The Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy Global Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucuras, Viorel; Gopalakrishnam, Ganesh; Wolf, J Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The study compared characteristics and outcomes in patients with solitary and bilateral kidneys who were treated with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PCNL Global Study.......The study compared characteristics and outcomes in patients with solitary and bilateral kidneys who were treated with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PCNL Global Study....

  8. Functional Hypothalamic Amenorrhea: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Catherine M; Ackerman, Kathryn E; Berga, Sarah L; Kaplan, Jay R; Mastorakos, George; Misra, Madhusmita; Murad, M Hassan; Santoro, Nanette F; Warren, Michelle P

    2017-05-01

    The American Society for Reproductive Medicine, the European Society of Endocrinology, and the Pediatric Endocrine Society. This guideline was funded by the Endocrine Society. To formulate clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA). The participants include an Endocrine Society-appointed task force of eight experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. This evidence-based guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. The task force commissioned two systematic reviews and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies. One group meeting, several conference calls, and e-mail communications enabled consensus. Endocrine Society committees and members and cosponsoring organizations reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of this guideline. FHA is a form of chronic anovulation, not due to identifiable organic causes, but often associated with stress, weight loss, excessive exercise, or a combination thereof. Investigations should include assessment of systemic and endocrinologic etiologies, as FHA is a diagnosis of exclusion. A multidisciplinary treatment approach is necessary, including medical, dietary, and mental health support. Medical complications include, among others, bone loss and infertility, and appropriate therapies are under debate and investigation. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  9. Evaluation and treatment of hypertriglyceridemia: an endocrine society clinical practice guideline.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berglund, L.; Brunzell, J.D.; Goldberg, A.C.; Goldberg, I.J.; Sacks, F.M.; Murad, M.H.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to develop clinical practice guidelines on hypertriglyceridemia. Participants: The Task Force included a chair selected by The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee (CGS), five additional experts in the field, and a methodologist. The authors received no corporate

  10. Computer-aided navigation in dental implantology: 7 years of clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Rolf; Schicho, Kurt; Truppe, Michael; Seemann, Rudolf; Reichwein, Astrid; Figl, Michael; Wagner, Arne

    2004-03-01

    This long-term study gives a review over 7 years of research, development, and routine clinical application of computer-aided navigation technology in dental implantology. Benefits and disadvantages of up-to-date technologies are discussed. In the course of the current advancement, various hardware and software configurations are used. In the initial phase, universally applicable navigation software is adapted for implantology. Since 2001, a special software module for dental implantology is available. Preoperative planning is performed on the basis of prosthetic aspects and requirements. In clinical routine use, patient and drill positions are intraoperatively registered by means of optoelectronic tracking systems; during preclinical tests, electromagnetic trackers are also used. In 7 years (1995 to 2002), 55 patients with 327 dental implants were successfully positioned with computer-aided navigation technology. The mean number of implants per patient was 6 (minimum, 1; maximum, 11). No complications were observed; the preoperative planning could be exactly realized. The average expenditure of time for the preparation of a surgical intervention with navigation decreased from 2 to 3 days in the initial phase to one-half day in clinical routine use with software that is optimized for dental implantology. The use of computer-aided navigation technology can contribute to considerable quality improvement. Preoperative planning is exactly realized and intraoperative safety is increased, because damage to nerves or neighboring teeth can be avoided.

  11. Oral candidiasis as clinical manifestation of HIV/AIDS infection in Airlangga University hospital patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putranti, A.; Asmarawati, T. P.; Rachman, B. E.; Hadi, U.; Nasronudin

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of HIV/AIDS patients with oral candidiasis as its clinical manifestation at Airlangga University Hospital Surabaya. This is a descriptive analytic research with cross-sectional design using Chi-Square statistic test. Samples of this study consist of 34 patients using total sampling methods. Those patients were all HIV/AIDS infected patients with oral candidiasis clinical manifestations, who were admitted to Airlangga University Hospital Surabaya from January 2016 to September 2017. Results showed that mostly HIV/AIDS patients with oral candidiasis are male (79.4%), old age (40-75years) total amounted to 58.8%, heterosexual as main risk factor (70%), clinical stadium mostly in stage IV (61.8%), 26% of patients with chronic diarrhea and 56% with pulmonary TB, clinical stages of patients have a significant relation to the incidence of oral candidiasis infection (p=0.024). The most common oral lesions found in people with HIV are Candidiasis. The best management is through routine dental examination and dental precautions to maintain health and achieve a better quality of life.

  12. Identifying design considerations for a shared decision aid for use at the point of outpatient clinical care: An ethnographic study at an inner city clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajizadeh, Negin; Perez Figueroa, Rafael E; Uhler, Lauren M; Chiou, Erin; Perchonok, Jennifer E; Montague, Enid

    2013-03-06

    Computerized decision aids could facilitate shared decision-making at the point of outpatient clinical care. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a computerized shared decision aid would be feasible to implement in an inner-city clinic by evaluating the current practices in shared decision-making, clinicians' use of computers, patient and clinicians' attitudes and beliefs toward computerized decision aids, and the influence of time on shared decision-making. Qualitative data analysis of observations and semi-structured interviews with patients and clinicians at an inner-city outpatient clinic. The findings provided an exploratory look at the prevalence of shared decision-making and attitudes about health information technology and decision aids. A prominent barrier to clinicians engaging in shared decision-making was a lack of perceived patient understanding of medical information. Some patients preferred their clinicians make recommendations for them rather than engage in formal shared decision-making. Health information technology was an integral part of the clinic visit and welcomed by most clinicians and patients. Some patients expressed the desire to engage with health information technology such as viewing their medical information on the computer screen with their clinicians. All participants were receptive to the idea of a decision aid integrated within the clinic visit although some clinicians were concerned about the accuracy of prognostic estimates for complex medical problems. We identified several important considerations for the design and implementation of a computerized decision aid including opportunities to: bridge clinician-patient communication about medical information while taking into account individual patients' decision-making preferences, complement expert clinician judgment with prognostic estimates, take advantage of patient waiting times, and make tasks involved during the clinic visit more efficient. These findings

  13. Cost consideration in the clinical guidance documents of physician specialty societies in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jennifer A T; Pearson, Steven D

    2013-06-24

    Despite increasing concerns regarding the cost of health care, the consideration of costs in the development of clinical guidance documents by physician specialty societies has received little analysis. To evaluate the approach to consideration of cost in publicly available clinical guidance documents and methodological statements produced between 2008 and 2012 by the 30 largest US physician specialty societies. Qualitative document review. Whether costs are considered in clinical guidance development, mechanism of cost consideration, and the way that cost issues were used in support of specific clinical practice recommendations. Methodological statements for clinical guidance documents indicated that 17 of 30 physician societies (57%) explicitly integrated costs, 4 (13%) implicitly considered costs, 3 (10%) intentionally excluded costs, and 6 (20%) made no mention. Of the 17 societies that explicitly integrated costs, 9 (53%) consistently used a formal system in which the strength of recommendation was influenced in part by costs, whereas 8 (47%) were inconsistent in their approach or failed to mention the exact mechanism for considering costs. Among the 138 specific recommendations in these guidance documents that included cost as part of the rationale, the most common form of recommendation (50 [36%]) encouraged the use of a specific medical service because of equal effectiveness and lower cost. Slightly more than half of the largest US physician societies explicitly consider costs in developing their clinical guidance documents; among these, approximately half use an explicit mechanism for integrating costs into the strength of recommendations. Many societies remain vague in their approach. Physician specialty societies should demonstrate greater transparency and rigor in their approach to cost consideration in documents meant to influence care decisions.

  14. Evaluation of the WHO clinical case definition of AIDS among children in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurprit, Grover; Tripti, Pensi; Gadpayle, A K; Tanushree, Banerjee

    2008-03-01

    The need of a clinical case definition (CCD) for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was felt by public health agencies to monitor diseases resulting from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. To test the statistical significance of the existing World Health Organization (WHO) CCD for the diagnosis of AIDS in areas where diagnostic resources are limited in India, a prospective study was conducted in the Paediatrics department at Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, New Delhi. 360 cases between 18 months-12 years of age satisfying WHO case definitions of AIDS were included in the study group. Informed consent was taken from the parents. The serum of patients was subjected to ELISA to conform the diagnosis of HIV infection. Our study detected 16.66% (60) of HIV prevalence in children visiting paediatrics outpatient clinic. 20% cases manifested 3 major and 2 minor signs. This definition had a sensitivity of 73.33%, specificity of 90.66%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 61.11% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 94.44%. On using stepwise logistic regression analysis weight loss, chronic fever > 1 month and total lymphocyte count of less than 1500 cells/mm3 emerged as important predictors. Cases showing 2 major and 2 minor signs were 86 (23.89%) with a sensitivity and specificity of 86.66% and 88.66% respectively. Based on these findings, we propose a clinical case definition based on 13 clinical signs and symptoms for paediatric AIDS in India with better sensitivity and PPV than the WHO case definition but with almost similar specificity. Thus multicentric studies are further required to modify these criteria in Indian set up.

  15. The NIAID Division of AIDS enterprise information system: integrated decision support for global clinical research programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nitin; Varghese, Suresh; Virkar, Hemant

    2011-01-01

    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Division of AIDS (DAIDS) Enterprise Information System (DAIDS-ES) is a web-based system that supports NIAID in the scientific, strategic, and tactical management of its global clinical research programs for HIV/AIDS vaccines, prevention, and therapeutics. Different from most commercial clinical trials information systems, which are typically protocol-driven, the DAIDS-ES was built to exchange information with those types of systems and integrate it in ways that help scientific program directors lead the research effort and keep pace with the complex and ever-changing global HIV/AIDS pandemic. Whereas commercially available clinical trials support systems are not usually disease-focused, DAIDS-ES was specifically designed to capture and incorporate unique scientific, demographic, and logistical aspects of HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, and vaccine research in order to provide a rich source of information to guide informed decision-making. Sharing data across its internal components and with external systems, using defined vocabularies, open standards and flexible interfaces, the DAIDS-ES enables NIAID, its global collaborators and stakeholders, access to timely, quality information about NIAID-supported clinical trials which is utilized to: (1) analyze the research portfolio, assess capacity, identify opportunities, and avoid redundancies; (2) help support study safety, quality, ethics, and regulatory compliance; (3) conduct evidence-based policy analysis and business process re-engineering for improved efficiency. This report summarizes how the DAIDS-ES was conceptualized, how it differs from typical clinical trial support systems, the rationale for key design choices, and examples of how it is being used to advance the efficiency and effectiveness of NIAID's HIV/AIDS clinical research programs. PMID:21816958

  16. Esophageal stenting for benign and malignant disease : European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaander, Manon C W; Baron, Todd H; Siersema, Peter D; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Schumacher, Brigitte; Escorsell, Àngels; Garcia-Pagán, Juan-Carlos; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Conio, Massimo; de Ceglie, Antonella; Skowronek, Janusz; Nordsmark, Marianne; Seufferlein, Thomas; Van Gossum, André; Hassan, Cesare; Repici, Alessandro; Bruno, Marco J

    2016-01-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), endorsed by the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO), the European Society of Digestive Endoscopy (ESDO), and the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN).

  17. Relating working memory to compression parameters in clinically fit hearing AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Pamela E; Sirow, Lynn

    2014-12-01

    Several laboratory studies have demonstrated that working memory may influence response to compression speed in controlled (i.e., laboratory) comparisons of compression. In this study, the authors explored whether the same relationship would occur under less controlled conditions, as might occur in a typical audiology clinic. Participants included 27 older adults who sought hearing care in a private practice audiology clinic. Working memory was measured for each participant using a reading span test. The authors examined the relationship between working memory and aided speech recognition in noise, using clinically fit hearing aids with a range of compression speeds. Working memory, amount of hearing loss, and age each contributed to speech recognition, but the contribution depended on the speed of the compression processor. For fast-acting compression, the best performance was obtained by patients with high working memory. For slow-acting compression, speech recognition was affected by age and amount of hearing loss but was not affected by working memory. Despite the expectation of greater variability from differences in compression implementation, number of compression channels, or attendant signal processing, the relationship between working memory and compression speed showed a similar pattern as results from more controlled, laboratory-based studies.

  18. [Gdansk HIV-AIDS project, yesterday, today and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, W

    1995-09-01

    established in Poland, thanks to our initiative, in 1990). One of very important units of our Center is the Korczak Orphanage for children aged 0-7 years, which is subjected to Voivodship Health Department. This orphanage is the place for children with positive HIV serology from the whole Poland. Children who need inpatient medical care, among them AIDS children, are admitted to the Clinic for Infectious Diseases and can be diagnosed and consulted in all units of Gdańsk Medical University. In 1992 the co-operation with Gdańsk homosexual society represented by the Gdańsk Initiative (a submit of Lambda organization), was established. Education program is the next very important part of the Clinical and Diagnostic HIV/AIDS Center work. Until now medical staff and Education Department staff were mainly concerned. It is planned to establish Voivodship Social Needs Outpatient Clinic which would continue all hitherto activities, which would be extended by social law counseling. Such outpatient clinic would facilitate education activity. It would be the base for medical research on social pathology and HIV/AIDS related problems.

  19. The Development and Implementation of Cognitive Aids for Critical Events in Pediatric Anesthesia: The Society for Pediatric Anesthesia Critical Events Checklists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clebone, Anna; Burian, Barbara K; Watkins, Scott C; Gálvez, Jorge A; Lockman, Justin L; Heitmiller, Eugenie S

    2017-03-01

    Cognitive aids such as checklists are commonly used in modern operating rooms for routine processes, and the use of such aids may be even more important during critical events. The Quality and Safety Committee of the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) has developed a set of critical-event checklists and cognitive aids designed for 3 purposes: (1) as a repository of the latest evidence-based and expert opinion-based information to guide response and management of critical events, (2) as a source of just-in-time information during critical events, and (3) as a method to facilitate a shared understanding of required actions among team members during a critical event. Committee members, who represented children's hospitals from across the nation, used the recent literature and established guidelines (where available) and incorporated the expertise of colleagues at their institutions to develop these checklists, which included relevant factors to consider and steps to take in response to critical events. Human factors principles were incorporated to enhance checklist usability, facilitate error-free accomplishment, and ensure a common approach to checklist layout, formatting, structure, and design.The checklists were made available in multiple formats: a PDF version for easy printing, a mobile application, and at some institutions, a Web-based application using the anesthesia information management system. After the checklists were created, training commenced, and plans for validation were begun. User training is essential for successful implementation and should ideally include explanation of the organization of the checklists; familiarization of users with the layout, structure, and formatting of the checklists; coaching in how to use the checklists in a team environment; reviewing of the items; and simulation of checklist use. Because of the rare and unpredictable nature of critical events, clinical trials that use crisis checklists are difficult to conduct

  20. Fractures (Broken Bones): First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Fractures (broken bones) Fractures (broken bones): First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A fracture is a ... 10, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-fractures/basics/ART-20056641 . Mayo Clinic ...

  1. Maintaining Life-saving Testing for Patients With Infectious Diseases: Infectious Diseases Society of America, American Society for Microbiology, and Pan American Society for Clinical Virology Recommendations on the Regulation of Laboratory-developed Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliendo, Angela M; Couturier, Marc R; Ginocchio, Christine C; Hanson, Kimberly E; Miller, Melissa B; Walker, Kimberly E; Frank, Gregory M

    2016-07-15

    In 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposed to regulate laboratory-developed tests (LDTs)-diagnostics designed, manufactured, and used within a single laboratory. The Infectious Diseases Society of America, the American Society for Microbiology, and the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology recognize that the FDA is committed to protecting patients. However, our societies are concerned that the proposed regulations will limit access to testing and negatively impact infectious diseases (ID) LDTs. In this joint commentary, our societies discuss why LDTs are critical for ID patient care, hospital infection control, and public health responses. We also highlight how the FDA's proposed regulation of LDTs could impair patient access to life-saving tests and stifle innovation in ID diagnostics. Finally, our societies make specific recommendations for the FDA's consideration to reduce the burden of the proposed new rules on clinical laboratories and protect patients' access to state-of-the art, quality LDTs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. STD Clinic Patients' Awareness of Non-AIDS Complications of HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, José Guillermo; Granovsky, Inna; Jones, Deborah; Weiss, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    Participants were recruited from a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic in Florida and were assessed regarding the knowledge and awareness of non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Questionnaires were administered before and after a brief information session on non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Participants included men (n = 46) and women (n = 51). Prior to the information session, at baseline, only 34% of the participants were worried about HIV infection. Most participants (82%) agreed that HIV could be treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART), while only 38% were aware that HIV-associated conditions cannot be easily treated with ART. After the information session, almost all participants reported they were concerned regarding the risk of HIV infection. High-risk patients may have limited knowledge about the consequences of HIV infection beyond the traditional AIDS-associated conditions. Increased awareness of these less known consequences of HIV infection may decrease the potential for complacency regarding acquiring HIV infection. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Clinical and demographic profile of HIV/AIDS patients diagnosed at a tertiary care centre in Kashmir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mir, M.A.; Ahmad, P.M.; Siddeque, M.A.; Sofi, F.A.; Ahmad, S.N.; Dar, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To study the clinical and demographic profile of HIV/AIDS patients diagnosed at a tertiary care centre. Methods: The study was conducted on a group of 1141 patients suspected of having HIV/AIDS on clinical grounds. Screening was done using different Elisa's as advised by NACO and those confirmed as HIV positive were studied for their clinical spectrum and different demographic parameters. Results: Out of 1141 patients tested, 26 proved to have HIV 1 infection with no case of HIV 2 detected. Mean age of presentation was 40.04 +- 7 years, main age group affected 31-40 years and a male: female ratio of 4.2:1 was observed. More than 42% were non Kashmiris with armed forces outnumbering all other occupational classes. Heterosexual transmission was the commonest with married out numbering unmarried. Fever, asthenia and weight loss were the predominant symptoms and pulmonary tuberculosis and oropharyngeal candidiasis commonest opportunistic infections. Conclusion: The clinical and demographic profile of HIV/AIDS patients in Kashmir is largely similar to the rest of India. Kashmir no longer stands immune to the menace of HIV/AIDS. With increasing globalization, frequent travel and change in social values the state is likely to witness an alarming rise in new cases unless a multi pronged approach is undertaken to control the spread. (author)

  4. 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society Training Standards and Maintenance of Competency in Adult Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Martin S; Guerra, Peter G; Krahn, Andrew D

    2011-01-01

    The last guidelines on training for adult cardiac electrophysiology (EP) were published by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society in 1996. Since then, substantial changes in the knowledge and practice of EP have mandated a review of the previous guidelines by the Canadian Heart Rhythm Society, an affiliate of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Novel tools and techniques also now allow electrophysiologists to map and ablate increasingly complex arrhythmias previously managed with pharmacologic or device therapy. Furthermore, no formal attempt had previously been made to standardize EP training across the country. The 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society Training Standards and Maintenance of Competency in Adult Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology represent a consensus arrived at by panel members from both societies, as well as EP program directors across Canada and other select contributors. In describing program requirements, the technical and cognitive skills that must be acquired to meet training standards, as well as the minimum number of procedures needed in order to acquire these skills, the new guidelines provide EP program directors and committee members with a template to develop an appropriate curriculum for EP training for cardiology fellows here in Canada. Copyright © 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Definition of a core set of quality indicators for the assessment of HIV/AIDS clinical care: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Several organizations and individual authors have been proposing quality indicators for the assessment of clinical care in HIV/AIDS patients. Nevertheless, the definition of a consensual core set of indicators remains controversial and its practical use is largely limited. This study aims not only to identify and characterize these indicators through a systematic literature review but also to propose a parsimonious model based on those most used. Methods MEDLINE, SCOPUS, Cochrane databases and ISI Web of Knowledge, as well as official websites of organizations dealing with HIV/AIDS care, were searched for articles and information proposing HIV/AIDS clinical care quality indicators. The ones that are on patient’s perspective and based on services set were excluded. Data extraction, using a predefined data sheet based on Cochrane recommendations, was done by one of the authors while a second author rechecked the extracted data for any inconsistency. Results A total of 360 articles were identified in our search query but only 12 of them met the inclusion criteria. We also identified one relevant site. Overall, we identified 65 quality indicators for HIV/AIDS clinical care distributed as following: outcome (n=15) and process-related (n=50) indicators; generic (n=36) and HIV/AIDS disease-specific (n=29) indicators; baseline examinations (n=19), screening (n=9), immunization (n=4), prophylaxis (n=5), HIV monitoring (n=16), and therapy (=12) indicators. Conclusions There are several studies that set up HIV clinical care indicators, with only a part of them useful to assess the HIV clinical care. More importantly, HIV/AIDS clinical care indicators need to be valid, reliable and most of all feasible. PMID:23809537

  6. The knowledge and attitude about HIV/AIDS among Jordanian dental students: (Clinical versus pre clinical students at the University of Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayyab Mohammad H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study aimed to address the suspected deficiency in the level of understanding of HIV/AIDS among clinical and pre clinical dental students at the University of Jordan. In this cross-sectional study, structured questionnaires were distributed to fifth year dental students (n = 121 and to third year dental students (n = 144 in the academic year 2008/2009. Findings Significantly higher percentage of fifth-year students compared to third-year students felt that the teaching they received on cross-infection precautions and barrier dentistry was adequate (P Significantly higher proportion of third-year students compared to fifth-year (39.2% vs. 26.3% thought that HIV patients should be referred to other centers or support groups for treatment (P = 0.04. Conclusions The level of knowledge of Jordanian dental students about HIV and AIDS was generally acceptable; there were inadequacies, however, in their understanding regarding some aspects of AIDS epidemic which demands that dental school curriculum needs some improvement.

  7. Skew-t partially linear mixed-effects models for AIDS clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    We propose partially linear mixed-effects models with asymmetry and missingness to investigate the relationship between two biomarkers in clinical studies. The proposed models take into account irregular time effects commonly observed in clinical studies under a semiparametric model framework. In addition, commonly assumed symmetric distributions for model errors are substituted by asymmetric distribution to account for skewness. Further, informative missing data mechanism is accounted for. A Bayesian approach is developed to perform parameter estimation simultaneously. The proposed model and method are applied to an AIDS dataset and comparisons with alternative models are performed.

  8. Gastroenteritis: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Gastroenteritis: First aid Gastroenteritis: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Gastroenteritis is an inflammation of your stomach and intestines. Common causes are: Viruses. Food or water contaminated by ...

  9. Snakebites: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Snakebites: First aid Snakebites: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Most North American snakes aren't dangerous to humans. Some exceptions include the rattlesnake, coral snake, water moccasin ...

  10. Program of financial support of civil society organizations in Tijuana: Building a relationship between civil society and municipal government from a political change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Delhumeau Rivera

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This document analyzes the relations between society and government that took place with the Financial Aid to Civil Society Organizations Program in Tijuana. The decentralization process of social policy in Mexico is revised as the context in which new programs and initiatives are developed promoting a stronger participation of the society in the policy process. The reflection on the social policy of the National Action Party in Baja California since 1989, has lead us to see the new challenges that the Financial Aid to Civil Society Organizations Program presents to the local and state government and the social organizations.

  11. «Dallas Buyers Club (2013» clinical research with drugs for the AIDS epidemic 80

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian de HAAN-BOSCH

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dallas Buyers Club (2013, inspired by true events, tells the story of Ron Woodroof, a middle?aged elec? trician from Dallas (Texas, who is diagnosed with AIDS in 1985. With few treatment options, he estab? lishes the Dallas Buyers Club in order to provide unapproved drugs to the AIDS community. This results in constant business travels, disputes with the FDA and problems with the law and the IRS. The article analyzes the buyers’ clubs phenomenon in the US, the drugs cited in the film and the clinical trial with zidovudine shown in the movie. The film could be useful as a teaching tool providing an introduction to the AIDS epidemic, clinical research and drug development, bioethics of human research and the agen? cies that regulate drug approval and their availability. Finally, the article presents a possible guideline for the use of the film in a teaching environment.

  12. Clinical highlights from the 2016 European Respiratory Society International Congress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Kahn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article contains highlights and a selection of the scientific advances from the European Respiratory Society (ERS Clinical Assembly (Assembly 1 and its six respective groups (Groups 1.1–1.6 that were presented at the 2016 ERS International Congress in London, UK. The most relevant topics for clinicians will be discussed, covering a wide range of areas including clinical problems, rehabilitation and chronic care, thoracic imaging, interventional pulmonology, diffuse and parenchymal lung diseases, and general practice and primary care. In this comprehensive review, the newest research and actual data will be discussed and put into perspective.

  13. Chest Pain: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Chest pain: First aid Chest pain: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Causes of chest pain can vary from minor problems, such as indigestion ... 26, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-chest-pain/basics/ART-20056705 . Mayo ...

  14. Head Trauma: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Head trauma: First aid Head trauma: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Most head trauma involves injuries that are minor and don't require ... 21, 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-head-trauma/basics/ART-20056626 . Mayo ...

  15. Animal Bites: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Animal bites: First aid Animal bites: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff These guidelines can help you care for a minor animal bite, such ... 26, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-animal-bites/basics/ART-20056591 . Mayo ...

  16. Treatment of Cushing's Syndrome: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieman, Lynnette K.; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Findling, James W.; Murad, M. Hassan; Newell-Price, John; Savage, Martin O.; Tabarin, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective is to formulate clinical practice guidelines for treating Cushing's syndrome. Participants: Participants include an Endocrine Society-appointed Task Force of experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The European Society for Endocrinology co-sponsored the guideline. Evidence: The Task Force used the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. The Task Force commissioned three systematic reviews and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies. Consensus Process: The Task Force achieved consensus through one group meeting, several conference calls, and numerous e-mail communications. Committees and members of The Endocrine Society and the European Society of Endocrinology reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of these guidelines. Conclusions: Treatment of Cushing's syndrome is essential to reduce mortality and associated comorbidities. Effective treatment includes the normalization of cortisol levels or action. It also includes the normalization of comorbidities via directly treating the cause of Cushing's syndrome and by adjunctive treatments (eg, antihypertensives). Surgical resection of the causal lesion(s) is generally the first-line approach. The choice of second-line treatments, including medication, bilateral adrenalectomy, and radiation therapy (for corticotrope tumors), must be individualized to each patient. PMID:26222757

  17. Exploring the use of Option Grid™ patient decision aids in a sample of clinics in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalia, Peter; Elwyn, Glyn; Barr, Paul; Song, Julia; Zisman-Ilani, Yaara; Lesniak, Monika; Mullin, Sarah; Kurek, Krzysztof; Bushell, Matt; Durand, Marie-Anne

    2018-05-29

    Research on the implementation of patient decision aids to facilitate shared decision making in clinical settings has steadily increased across Western countries. A study which implements decision aids and measures their impact on shared decision making has yet to be conducted in the Eastern part of Europe. To study the use of Option Grid TM patient decision aids in a sample of Grupa LUX MED clinics in Warsaw, Poland, and measure their impact on shared decision making. We conducted a pre-post interventional study. Following a three-month period of usual care, clinicians from three Grupa LUX MED clinics received a one-hour training session on how to use three Option Grid TM decision aids and were provided with copies for use for four months. Throughout the study, all eligible patients were asked to complete the three-item CollaboRATE patient-reported measure of shared decision making after their clinical encounter. CollaboRATE enables patients to assess the efforts clinicians make to: (i) inform them about their health issues; (ii) listen to 'what matters most'; (iii) integrate their treatment preference in future plans. A Hierarchical Logistic Regression model was performed to understand which variables had an effect on CollaboRATE. 2,048 patients participated in the baseline phase; 1,889 patients participated in the intervention phase. Five of the thirteen study clinicians had a statistically significant increase in their CollaboRATE scores (pOption Grid TM helped some clinicians practice shared decision making as reflected in CollaboRATE scores, but most clinicians did not have a significant increase in their scores. Our study indicates that the effect of these interventions may be dependent on clinic contexts and clinician engagement. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  18. 78 FR 20664 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0001] Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  19. The clinical research office of the endourological society percutaneous nephrolithotomy global study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desai, Mahesh; De Lisa, Antonello; Turna, Burak

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The study compared characteristics and outcomes in patients with staghorn or nonstaghorn stones who were treated with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) within the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PCNL Global Study. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data over a 1-year ...

  20. Plasma HIV-1 Tropism and the Risk of Short-Term Clinical Progression to AIDS or Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casadellà, Maria; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Phillips, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate if plasma HIV-1 tropism testing could identify subjects at higher risk for clinical progression and death in routine clinical management. DESIGN: Nested case-control study within the EuroSIDA cohort. METHODS: Cases were subjects with AIDS or who died from any cause...

  1. Clinical Pharmacology in Denmark in 2016 - 40 Years with the Danish Society of Clinical Pharmacology and 20 Years as a Medical Speciality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøsen, Kim; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Borregaard, Jeanett

    2016-01-01

    new jobs and career opportunities for clinical pharmacologists. As of July 2016, the Danish Society of Clinical Pharmacology has 175 members, and 70 of these are specialists in clinical pharmacology corresponding to approximately 2.5 specialists per 1000 doctors (Denmark has in total 28,000 doctors...

  2. Validation of World Health Organisation HIV/AIDS clinical staging in predicting initiation of antiretroviral therapy and clinical predictors of low CD4 cell count in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Baveewo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The WHO clinical guidelines for HIV/AIDS are widely used in resource limited settings to represent the gold standard of CD4 counts for antiviral therapy initiation. The utility of the WHO-defined stage 1 and 2 clinical factors used in WHO HIV/AIDS clinical staging in predicting low CD4 cell count has not been established in Uganda. Although the WHO staging has shown low sensitivity for predicting CD4<200 cells/mm(3, it has not been evaluated at for CD4 cut-offs of <250 cells/mm(3 or <350 cells/mm(3. OBJECTIVE: To validate the World Health Organisation HIV/AIDS clinical staging in predicting initiation of antiretroviral therapy in a low-resource setting and to determine the clinical predictors of low CD4 cell count in Uganda. RESULTS: Data was collected on 395 participants from the Joint Clinical Research Centre, of whom 242 (61.3% were classified as in stages 1 and 2 and 262 (68% were females. Participants had a mean age of 36.8 years (SD 8.5. We found a significant inverse correlation between the CD4 lymphocyte count and WHO clinical stages. The sensitivity the WHO clinical staging at CD4 cell count of 250 cells/mm(3 and 350 cells/mm(3 was 53.5% and 49.1% respectively. Angular cheilitis, papular pruritic eruptions and recurrent upper respiratory tract infections were found to be significant predictors of low CD4 cell count among participants in WHO stage 1 and 2. CONCLUSION: The WHO HIV/AIDS clinical staging guidelines have a low sensitivity and about half of the participants in stages 1 and 2 would be eligible for ART initiation if they had been tested for CD4 count. Angular cheilitis and papular pruritic eruptions and recurrent upper respiratory tract infections may be used, in addition to the WHO staging, to improve sensitivity in the interim, as access to CD4 machines increases in Uganda.

  3. The clinical research office of the endourological society percutaneous nephrolithotomy global study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuller, Andrew; Razvi, Hassan; Denstedt, John D

    2014-01-01

    in morbidly obese patients was assessed using a prospective database administered by the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES). A multidimensional match of 97 morbidly obese patients with those of normal weight was created using propensity score matching. Student's t-test and Chi...

  4. AWARENESS ABOUT HIV/AIDS IN CLIENTS ATTENDING STI CLINIC: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY FROM SOUTH-EAST RAJASTHAN, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND India bears a large burden of HIV/AIDS on globe. Major weapons against HIV/AIDS are treatment which is not curative, vaccine which is far from reality and accurate & adequate information about the disease which is practically acceptable and cost effective way of prevention in form of social vaccine and is a good tool for HIV/AIDS in developing countries like India. In India there is inadequate & inaccurate knowledge about the disease in general population. AIM In present study we tried to analyze the knowledge & awareness about HIV/AIDS in clients attending the STI clinic at Jhalawar Hospital and Medical College at south east part of Rajasthan, India. MATERIAL & METHODS We assessed 500 clients at STI clinic by using a predesigned questionnaire which gathers their knowledge regarding HIV/AIDS. All the clients above the age of 18 years who attended the STI clinic were enrolled for the study voluntarily. Participants were finally assessed as good/poor or unaware according to their level of knowledge. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS SPSS version 20.0 (trial was used to analyze all the data. Chi square test was used to find association between knowledge and their literacy level & occupation. RESULTS 142(28.4% of the participants had never heard about HIV/AIDS among them females were significantly more than males. Both low level of literacy and unemployment or house wives were associated with unawareness about HIV/AIDS. For the 358(71.6% participants who had heard about HIV/AIDS, mass media was the main source of information (53.07% in which television contributes the major part, followed by friends and colleagues (24.02%. While the knowledge about HIV transmission and prevention was good but the extent of misconceptions was also high (64.8%. CONCLUSION Our study is highly suggestive of the strong need to increase the level of HIV awareness among Indian population via proper education and through various resources on information.

  5. Clinical algorithms to aid osteoarthritis guideline dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, S R F; Goode, A P; Nelson, A E; Lin, J; Jordan, J M; Allen, K D; Bennell, K L; Lohmander, L S; Fernandes, L; Hochberg, M C; Underwood, M; Conaghan, P G; Liu, S; McAlindon, T E; Golightly, Y M; Hunter, D J

    2016-09-01

    Numerous scientific organisations have developed evidence-based recommendations aiming to optimise the management of osteoarthritis (OA). Uptake, however, has been suboptimal. The purpose of this exercise was to harmonize the recent recommendations and develop a user-friendly treatment algorithm to facilitate translation of evidence into practice. We updated a previous systematic review on clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for OA management. The guidelines were assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation for quality and the standards for developing trustworthy CPGs as established by the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). Four case scenarios and algorithms were developed by consensus of a multidisciplinary panel. Sixteen guidelines were included in the systematic review. Most recommendations were directed toward physicians and allied health professionals, and most had multi-disciplinary input. Analysis for trustworthiness suggests that many guidelines still present a lack of transparency. A treatment algorithm was developed for each case scenario advised by recommendations from guidelines and based on panel consensus. Strategies to facilitate the implementation of guidelines in clinical practice are necessary. The algorithms proposed are examples of how to apply recommendations in the clinical context, helping the clinician to visualise the patient flow and timing of different treatment modalities. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of a clinical auditory profile in hearing-aid candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Nicoline; Santurette, Sébastien; Jørgensen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    by default. However, this does not necessary lead to the same HA benefit. This study aimed at identifying clinically relevant tests that may be informative in addition to the audiogram and relate more directly to HA benefit. Twenty-nine HI listeners performed fast tests of loudness perception, spectral...... and temporal resolution, binaural hearing, speech intelligibility in stationary and fluctuating noise, and a working-memory test. Six weeks after HA fitting they answered the International Outcome Inventory – Hearing Aid evaluation. The HI group was homogeneous based on the audiogram, but only one test...

  7. Private pharmacies in an integrated approach to HIV/AIDS services ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African National AIDS Council emphasises that success in tackling HIV/AIDS depends on leadership at every level of society, as well as mobilisation and co-operation in all sectors including government, health care workers and civil society (SANAC, 2006). This may be an acknowledgement that South Africa's ...

  8. [Consensus statement on the clinical management of non-AIDS defining malignancies. GeSIDA expert panel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Jesús; Valencia, Eulalia

    2014-10-01

    This consensus document has been prepared by a panel of experts appointed by GeSIDA. This paper reviews the recommendations on the most important non-AIDS defining malignancies that can affect patients living with AIDS. Lung cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, anal carcinoma and other less frequent malignancies such as breast, prostate, vagina or colon cancers are reviewed. The aim of the recommendations is to make clinicians who attend to this patients aware of how to prevent, diagnose and treat this diseases. The recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy when the patient develops a malignancy are also presented. In support of the recommendations we have used the modified criteria of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of the knowledge and attitudes regarding HIV/AIDS among pre-clinical medical students in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Today’s medical students are the future physicians of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). It is therefore essential that medical students possess the appropriate knowledge and attitudes regarding PLWHA. This study aims to evaluate knowledge and attitudes of pre-clinical Israeli medical students and to assess whether their knowledge and attitudes change throughout their pre-clinical studies. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among all pre-clinical medical students from the four medical schools in Israel during the academic year of 2010/2011 (a total of 1,470 students). A self-administered questionnaire was distributed. The questionnaire sought student responses pertaining to knowledge of HIV transmission and non-transmission routes, basic knowledge of HIV/AIDS treatment and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS. Results The study’s response rate was 62.24 percent. Knowledge among pre-clinical medical students was generally high and showed a statistically significant improvement as students progressed through their pre-clinical studies. However, there were some misconceptions, mostly regarding HIV transmission via breastfeeding and knowledge of HIV prevention after exposure to the virus. Students’ attitudes were found to include stigmatizing notions. Furthermore, the majority of medical students correlated HIV with shame and fear. In addition, students’ attitudes toward HIV testing and providing confidential medical information were contradictory to health laws, protocols and guidelines. Overall, no positive changes in students’ attitudes were observed during the pre-clinical years of medical school. Conclusion The knowledge of pre-clinical medical students in Israel is generally high, although there are some knowledge inadequacies that require more emphasis in the curricula of the medical schools. Contrary to HIV-related knowledge, medical students’ attitudes are unaffected by their progression through medical school. Therefore, medical

  10. Electronic nicotine delivery systems: a policy statement from the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Thomas H; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Hanna, Nasser H; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Herbst, Roy S; Hobin, Jennifer A; Ostroff, Jamie S; Shields, Peter G; Toll, Benjamin A; Tyne, Courtney A; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Warren, Graham W

    2015-02-01

    Combustible tobacco use remains the number one preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), which include e-cigarettes, are devices capable of delivering nicotine in an aerosolized form. ENDS use by both adults and youth has increased rapidly, and some have advocated these products could serve as harm-reduction devices and smoking cessation aids. ENDS may be beneficial if they reduce smoking rates or prevent or reduce the known adverse health effects of smoking. However, ENDS may also be harmful, particularly to youth, if they increase the likelihood that nonsmokers or formers smokers will use combustible tobacco products or if they discourage smokers from quitting. The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recognize the potential ENDS have to alter patterns of tobacco use and affect the public's health; however, definitive data are lacking. AACR and ASCO recommend additional research on these devices, including assessing the health impacts of ENDS, understanding patterns of ENDS use, and determining what role ENDS have in cessation. Key policy recommendations include supporting federal, state, and local regulation of ENDS; requiring manufacturers to register with the FDA and report all product ingredients, requiring childproof caps on ENDS liquids, and including warning labels on products and their advertisements; prohibiting youth-oriented marketing and sales; prohibiting child-friendly ENDS flavors; and prohibiting ENDS use in places where cigarette smoking is prohibited. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research and American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  11. [Evaluation of production and clinical working time of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) custom trays for complete denture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, L; Chen, H; Zhou, Y S; Sun, Y C; Pan, S X

    2017-02-18

    To compare the technician fabrication time and clinical working time of custom trays fabricated using two different methods, the three-dimensional printing custom trays and the conventional custom trays, and to prove the feasibility of the computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) custom trays in clinical use from the perspective of clinical time cost. Twenty edentulous patients were recruited into this study, which was prospective, single blind, randomized self-control clinical trials. Two custom trays were fabricated for each participant. One of the custom trays was fabricated using functional suitable denture (FSD) system through CAD/CAM process, and the other was manually fabricated using conventional methods. Then the final impressions were taken using both the custom trays, followed by utilizing the final impression to fabricate complete dentures respectively. The technician production time of the custom trays and the clinical working time of taking the final impression was recorded. The average time spent on fabricating the three-dimensional printing custom trays using FSD system and fabricating the conventional custom trays manually were (28.6±2.9) min and (31.1±5.7) min, respectively. The average time spent on making the final impression with the three-dimensional printing custom trays using FSD system and the conventional custom trays fabricated manually were (23.4±11.5) min and (25.4±13.0) min, respectively. There was significant difference in the technician fabrication time and the clinical working time between the three-dimensional printing custom trays using FSD system and the conventional custom trays fabricated manually (Pmanufacture custom trays by three-dimensional printing method, there is no need to pour preliminary cast after taking the primary impression, therefore, it can save the impression material and model material. As to completing denture restoration, manufacturing custom trays using FSD system is worth being

  12. [HIV/AIDS masks in a therapist's practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchina, A A; Ponomareva, E Yu; Rebrov, A P

    2015-01-01

    To investigate clinical manifestations and diagnostic difficulties in patients with HIV/AIDS in the practice of therapeutic units of a multidisciplinary hospital. The investigation included 65 HIV/AIDS patients admitted to the therapy units of a Saratov Regional clinical hospital in 2007 to 2011. The clinical features of HIV/AIDS, immunological status, and viral load were studied. The structure of the clinical manifestation of HIV/AIDS showed a preponderance of lung injury in 45 (69%) patients. There were hematological disorders in 38 (58%) patients and nephropathy in 33 (51 %); 11 (17%) patients were diagnosed with infective endocarditis. Rheumatic symptoms and syndromes mimicking HIV/AIDS were found in 10 (15.4%) patients. The degree of immune disorders was most severe in patients with pulmonary dissemination and rheumatic masks and mutually related to the rate of cutaneous manifestations. The specific features of lung injury, infective endocarditis, pulmonary hypertension, rheumatic symptoms, and kidney injury were discussed in HIV/AIDS patients having different causes for admission to specialized therapy units. In connection with the clinical polymorphism of HIV/AIDS, physicians of all specialties should be alert for the possible clinical manifestations of this disease to timely examine patients.

  13. Epidemiological observations in the AIDS clinic at the Hadassah University Hospital in Jerusalem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maayan, S; Engelhard, D; Boger, S; Ganer, A; Morag, A; Shapiro, M; Sacks, T

    1989-06-01

    Of the first 395 attendees at the AIDS clinic in Jerusalem, 32% were homo/bisexuals, 4% i.v. drug abusers (IVDAs), 24% persons with minimal risk for AIDS and 38% were persons having no risk. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody rates were 7% for homosexuals, 29% for IVDAs, 1% for persons with minimal risk and 0% for persons at no risk. Israeli homosexuals had a significantly greater risk for HIV infection (9 of 35) if they had sexual contact with non-Israelis as compared with homosexuals who had contact with local partners only (0/91, P less than 0.001). The mean number of attendees per month increased by 431% during the 4 months following the first prime-time television program on AIDS. The largest mean increases occurred among persons at no risk (1 to 27.2), those with minimal risk (2.5 to 16.5), and among women (1.25 to 20.0). This report indicates that HIV infection among Israeli homosexuals has not yet reached U.S. proportions. It also shows that the TV program raised anxiety concerning AIDS among the general public, and probably encouraged the public to use HIV testing as part of a general health screening program.

  14. Clinical use of patient decision-making aids for stone patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Amy H; Streeper, Necole M; Best, Sara L; Penniston, Kristina L; Nakada, Stephen Y

    2017-08-01

    Patient decision-making aids (PDMAs) help patients make informed healthcare decisions and improve patient satisfaction. The utility of PDMAs for patients considering treatments for urolithiasis has not yet been published. We report our experience using PDMAs developed at our institution in the outpatient clinical setting in patients considering a variety of treatment options for stones. Patients with radiographically confirmed urolithiasis were given PDMAs regarding treatment options for their stone(s) based on their clinical profile. We assessed patients' satisfaction, involvedness, and feeling of making a more informed decision with utilization of the PDMAs using a Likert Scale Questionnaire. Information was also collected regarding previous stone passage, history and type of surgical intervention for urolithiasis, and level of education. Patients (n = 43; 18 males, 23 females and two unknown) 53 +/- 14years old were included. Patients reported that they understood the advantages and disadvantages outlined in the PDMAs (97%), that the PDMAs helped them make a more informed decision (83%) and felt more involved in the decision making process (88%). Patients reported that the aids were presented in a balanced manner and used up-to-date scientific information (100%, 84% respectively). Finally, a majority of the patients prefer an expert's opinion when making a treatment decision (98%) with 73% of patients preferring to form their own opinion based on available information. Previous stone surgery was associated with patients feeling more involved with the decision making process (p = 0.0465). PDMAs have a promising role in shared decision-making in the setting of treatment options for nephrolithiasis.

  15. Malignancies in HIV/AIDS patients attending an outpatient clinic in Vitória, State of Espírito Santo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Ferreira da Silva Pinto Neto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The present study investigated cancer prevalence and associated factors among HIV-infected individuals attending an AIDS outpatient clinic in Vitória, State of Espírito Santo, Brazil. METHODS: A sectional study was conducted among HIV infected adults attending an AIDS outpatient clinic in Vitória, State of Espírito Santo, Brazil. Demographic, epidemiological and clinical data were abstracted from medical records, including cancer diagnoses; nadir and current CD4 cell count, HIV viral load, time on antiretroviral treatment (ART, type of ART and smoking status. RESULTS: A total of 730 (91.3% patients were included in the study. Median age was 44.0 [interquartile range (IQR: 35-50.3] years; median time since HIV diagnosis was 5.5 years (IQR: 2-10; 60% were male; and 59% were white. Thirty (4.1% cases of cancer were identified of which 16 (53% were AIDS defining cancers and 14 (47% were non-AIDS defining malignancies. Patients diagnosed with cancer presented higher chance of being tobacco users [OR 2.2 (95% CI: 1.04-6.24]; having nadir CD4 ≤200 cells/mm³ [OR 3.0 (95% CI: 1.19-7.81] and higher lethality [OR 13,3 (95% CI: 4,57-38,72]. CONCLUSIONS: These results corroborate the importance of screening for and prevention of non-AIDS defining cancers focus in HIV-infected population, as these cancers presented with similar frequency as AIDS defining cancers.

  16. Prosthetic rehabilitation with an implant-supported fixed prosthesis using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing dental technology for a patient with a mandibulectomy: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyung-In; Han, Jung-Suk

    2016-02-01

    The fabrication of dental prostheses with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing shows acceptable marginal fits and favorable treatment outcomes. This clinical report describes the management of a patient who had undergone a mandibulectomy and received an implant-supported fixed prosthesis by using additive manufacturing for the framework and subtractive manufacturing for the monolithic zirconia restorations. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. KEHIDUPAN SOSIAL DAN INTERAKSI ORANG DENGAN HIV-AIDS DI YOGYAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Listiana Listiana

    2016-08-01

    groups is their interaction strategies in strengthening of the existence in the society. The use of symbols in the form of words disguises is valid only for the person who already knows the circumstances of PLWHA (People Living with HIV/AIDS. The disguise of words will not apply when PLWHA (People Living with HIV/AIDS are dealing directly with the public. Common symbols in society will apply to groups of PLWHA (People Living with HIV/AIDS as well as when interacting with the community, but the meaning of these symbols will be different when they interact with other PLWHA (People Living with HIV/AIDS and people who already know it.

  18. Church mobilisation and HIV/AIDS treatment in Ghana and Zambia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... than 50 semi-structured interviews with a range of participants affiliated with HIV/AIDS organisations (e.g. church, secular, government, donor) in Zambia and Ghana. Keywords: Africa, aid policy, civil society, funding, national AIDS councils, political aspects, stigma. African Journal of AIDS Research 2010, 9(4): 407–418 ...

  19. A global, incremental development method for a web-based prostate cancer treatment decision aid and usability testing in a Dutch clinical setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuypers, M.; Lamers, R.E.D.; Kil, P.J.M.; The, R.; Karssen, K.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; de Vries, M.

    2018-01-01

    Many new decision aids are developed while aspects of existing decision aids could also be useful, leading to a sub-optimal use of resources. To support treatment decision-making in prostate cancer patients, a pre-existing evidence-based Canadian decision aid was adjusted to Dutch clinical setting.

  20. mortality after clinical management of aids-associated cryptococcal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-01

    May 1, 2014 ... among HIV/AIDS patients and is becoming a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Africa. The short-term .... of potassium chloride, therapeutic lumbar puncture. (LP), fundoscopy ..... Kenya AIDS Indicator. Survey 2012: ...

  1. Evaluation of epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory features and mortality of 144 HIV/AIDS cases in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Burcu; Yetkin, Meltem A; Bastug, Aliye; But, Ayşe; Aslaner, Halide; Akinci, Esragul; Bodur, Hurrem

    2018-03-22

    Background The number of HIV/AIDS cases in Turkey is increasing rapidly, as is the number of cases worldwide. The aim of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of the clinical and laboratory findings and epidemiological features of HIV/AIDS patients to obtain useful data on the epidemic type and transmission routes associated with Turkey and to identify risk factors for mortality. Methods The patient records of 144 HIV-infected patients who were admitted to our clinic between 2000 and 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. Results Most of the cases (55%) were diagnosed due to the detection of anti-HIV-positive individuals without clinical symptoms. The mean CD4 + lymphocyte count on first admission was 108 cells/μL for those admitted before 2009 and 265 cells/μL for those admitted after 2009 (p = 0.003). When the pre- and post-2009 groups were compared for the status of the disease, 55.6 and 44.4% of patients were in the AIDS stage, respectively (p = 0.04). The most noted opportunistic infection was mycobacterial, and throughout the follow-up, 31.2% of the cases were fatal. Conclusions Early diagnosis of HIV infection can have a direct impact on prognosis and survival. Therefore, screening laboratory investigations should be extended, particularly in high-risk groups.

  2. Development and Pilot Testing of a Decision Aid for Genomic Research Participants Notified of Clinically Actionable Research Findings for Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Amanda M; Smith, Sian K; Meiser, Bettina; Ballinger, Mandy L; Thomas, David M; Tattersall, Martin; Young, Mary-Anne

    2018-02-17

    Germline genomic testing is increasingly used in research to identify genetic causes of disease, including cancer. However, there is evidence that individuals who are notified of clinically actionable research findings have difficulty making informed decisions regarding uptake of genetic counseling for these findings. This study aimed to produce and pilot test a decision aid to assist participants in genomic research studies who are notified of clinically actionable research findings to make informed choices regarding uptake of genetic counseling. Development was guided by published literature, the International Patient Decision Aid Standards, and the expertise of a steering committee of clinicians, researchers, and consumers. Decision aid acceptability was assessed by self-report questionnaire. All 19 participants stated that the decision aid was easy to read, clearly presented, increased their understanding of the implications of taking up research findings, and would be helpful in decision-making. While low to moderate levels of distress/worry were reported after reading the booklet, a majority of participants also reported feeling reassured. All participants would recommend the booklet to others considering uptake of clinically actionable research findings. Results indicate the decision aid is acceptable to the target audience, with potential as a useful decision support tool for genomic research participants.

  3. Clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badowski ME

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Melissa E Badowski,1 Sarah E Perez2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, Section of Infectious Diseases Pharmacotherapy, College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Infectious Diseases Clinic, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, weight loss has been a common complaint for patients. The use of various definitions defining HIV wasting syndrome has made it difficult to determine its actual prevalence. Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, it is estimated that the prevalence of HIV wasting syndrome is between 14% and 38%. HIV wasting syndrome may stem from conditions affecting chewing, swallowing, or gastrointestinal motility, neurologic disease affecting food intake or the perception of hunger or ability to eat, psychiatric illness, food insecurity generated from psychosocial or economic concerns, or anorexia due to medications, malabsorption, infections, or tumors. Treatment of HIV wasting syndrome may be managed with appetite stimulants (megestrol acetate or dronabinol, anabolic agents (testosterone, testosterone analogs, or recombinant human growth hormone, or, rarely, cytokine production modulators (thalidomide. The goal of this review is to provide an in-depth evaluation based on existing clinical trials on the clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV/AIDS. Although total body weight gain varies with dronabinol use (–2.0 to 3.2 kg, dronabinol is a well-tolerated option to promote appetite stimulation. Further studies are needed with standardized definitions of HIV-associated weight loss and clinical outcomes, robust sample sizes, safety and efficacy data on chronic use of dronabinol beyond 52 weeks, and associated virologic and immunologic outcomes. Keywords: dronabinol, weight loss, HIV/AIDS, HIV wasting syndrome, cachexia

  4. Correlation between HIV-1 genotype and clinical progression in HIV/AIDS patients in Surabaya, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachman, B. E.; Khairunisa, S. Q.; Witaningrum, A. M.; Yunifiar, M. Q.; Nasronudin

    2018-03-01

    Several factors such as host and viral factors can affect the progression of HIV/AIDS. This study aims to identify the correlation viral factors, especially the HIV-1 subtype with HIV/AIDS progression. Inpatient HIV/AIDS during the period March to September 2017 and willing to participate are included in the study. Historical data of disease and treatment was taken by medical record. Blood samples were amplified, sequenced and undergone phylogenetic analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to estimate beta coefficient (β) and 95%CI of HIV/AIDS progression (measured by the CD4 change rate, ΔCD4 cell count/time span in months).This study has 17 samples. The HIV-1 subtype was dominated by CRF01_AE (81.8%) followed by subtype B (18.2%). There was significant correlation between subtype HIV-1 (p = 0.04) and body mass index (p = 0.038) with HIV/AIDS clinical stage. Many factors were assumed to be correlated with increased rate of CD4, but we only subtype HIV-1 had a significant correlation (p = 0.024) with it. From multivariate analysis, we also found that subtype HIV-1 had a significant correlation (β = 0.788, 95%CI: 17.5-38.6, p = 0.004).

  5. Development of diagnostic criteria for serious non-AIDS events in HIV clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lifson, Alan R; Belloso, Waldo H; Davey, Richard T

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Serious non-AIDS (SNA) diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality in the HAART era. We describe development of standard criteria for 12 SNA events for Endpoint Review Committee (ERC) use in START, a multicenter international HIV clinical trial. METHODS: SNA definitions were...... was reached. CONCLUSION: HIV clinical trials that include SNA diseases as clinical outcomes should have standardized SNA definitions to optimize event reporting and validation and should have review by an experienced ERC with opportunities for adjudication......., peripheral arterial disease, pulmonary embolism, and stroke. Of 563 potential SNA events reported in ESPRIT and reviewed by an ERC, 72% met "confirmed" and 13% "probable" criteria. Twenty-eight percent of cases initially reviewed by the ERC required follow-up discussion (adjudication) before a final decision...

  6. Hearing aid patients in private practice and public health (Veterans Affairs) clinics: are they different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Robyn M; Alexander, Genevieve C; Gray, Ginger A

    2005-12-01

    In hearing aid research, it is commonplace to combine data across subjects whose hearing aids were provided in different service delivery models. There is reason to question whether these types of patients are always similar enough to justify this practice. To explore this matter, this investigation evaluated similarities and differences in self-report data obtained from hearing aid patients derived from public health (Veterans Affairs, VA) and private practice (PP) settings. The study was a multisite, cross-sectional survey in which 230 hearing aid patients from VA and PP audiology clinic settings provided self-report data on a collection of questionnaires both before and after the hearing aid fitting. Subjects were all older adults with mild to moderately severe hearing loss. About half of them had previous experience wearing hearing aids. All subjects were fitted with wide-dynamic-range-compression instruments and received similar treatment protocols. Numerous statistically significant differences were observed between the VA and PP subject groups. Before the fitting, VA patients reported higher expectations from the hearing aids and more severe unaided problems compared with PP patients with similar audiograms. Three wks after the fitting, VA patients reported more satisfaction with their hearing aids. On some measures VA patients reported more benefit, but different measures of benefit did not give completely consistent results. Both groups reported using the hearing aids an average of approximately 8 hrs per day. VA patients reported age-normal physical and mental health, but PP patients tended to report better than typical health for their age group. These data indicate that hearing aid patients seen in the VA public health hearing services are systematically different in self-report domains from those seen in private practice services. It is therefore risky to casually combine data from these two types of subjects or to generalize research results from one

  7. Clinical Characteristic of the HIV/AIDS Patients with Cryptosporidiosis Referring to Behavioral Diseases Consultation Center, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Rashid; Gholami, Shirzad; Emadi-Kouchak, Hamid; Abdollahi, Alireza; Shahriari, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is known as an opportunist disease-causing agent in man in recent decades. It causes diarrhea and intestinal disorders in the immune deficit and immune competent individuals. This study was aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics of HIV/AIDS patients with cryptosporidiosis infection. This cross-sectional descriptive study was performed on 53 HIV/AIDS patients referred to the Behavior Disease Consultation Center of Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran in 2013. First, the patients were studied clinically and the context data were recorded in a questionnaire for parasitological examination and referred to the laboratory for eosinophil count, and CD4 count per ml of blood. Cryptosporidiosis was observed in 4 (7.6%) of the total 53 HIV/AIDS patients. The highest prevalence of infection was observed in the age range of 30-39 yr. It was observed in different sexes as 5.7% of male and 1.9% of female, but statistically was insignificant (P=0.163).75% of patients had no intestinal symptom, 11.4% with acute diarrhea and 3.8% with chronic diarrhea. Cryptosporidiosis cases were observed in 5.7% of patients without intestinal symptom. Practitioners in the clinical examination for the detection of the opportunistic intestinal protozoan infection should use clinical and paraclinical characteristics of the HIV/AIDS patients for the diagnostic of Cryptosporidium and other opportunistic parasitic diseases.

  8. Free software to analyse the clinical relevance of drug interactions with antiretroviral agents (SIMARV®) in patients with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, N A; Amariles, P; Monsalve, M; Faus, M J

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy has extended the expected lifespan of patients with HIV/AIDS. However, the therapeutic benefits of some drugs used simultaneously with highly active antiretroviral therapy may be adversely affected by drug interactions. The goal was to design and develop a free software to facilitate analysis, assessment, and clinical decision making according to the clinical relevance of drug interactions in patients with HIV/AIDS. A comprehensive Medline/PubMed database search of drug interactions was performed. Articles that recognized any drug interactions in HIV disease were selected. The publications accessed were limited to human studies in English or Spanish, with full texts retrieved. Drug interactions were analyzed, assessed, and grouped into four levels of clinical relevance according to gravity and probability. Software to systematize the information regarding drug interactions and their clinical relevance was designed and developed. Overall, 952 different references were retrieved and 446 selected; in addition, 67 articles were selected from the citation lists of identified articles. A total of 2119 pairs of drug interactions were identified; of this group, 2006 (94.7%) were drug-drug interactions, 1982 (93.5%) had an identified pharmacokinetic mechanism, and 1409 (66.5%) were mediated by enzyme inhibition. In terms of clinical relevance, 1285 (60.6%) drug interactions were clinically significant in patients with HIV (levels 1 and 2). With this information, a software program that facilitates identification and assessment of the clinical relevance of antiretroviral drug interactions (SIMARV ® ) was developed. A free software package with information on 2119 pairs of antiretroviral drug interactions was designed and developed that could facilitate analysis, assessment, and clinical decision making according to the clinical relevance of drug interactions in patients with HIV/AIDS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A clinical decision aid for the selection of antithrombotic therapy for the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaHaye, Stephen Andrew; Gibbens, Sabra Lynn; Ball, David Gerald Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The availability of new antithrombotic agents, each with a unique efficacy and bleeding profile, has introduced a considerable amount of clinical uncertainty with physicians. We have developed a clinical decision aid in order to assist clinicians in determining an optimal antithrombotic regime...

  10. Japanese Society of Medical Oncology Clinical Guidelines: Molecular Testing for Colorectal Cancer Treatment, Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kentaro; Taniguchi, Hiroya; Yoshino, Takayuki; Akagi, Kiwamu; Ishida, Hideyuki; Ebi, Hiromichi; Nakatani, Kaname; Muro, Kei; Yatabe, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Tsuchihara, Katsuya

    2018-06-01

    The Japanese Society of Medical Oncology (JSMO) previously published 2 editions of the clinical guidelines: "Japanese guidelines for testing of KRAS gene mutation in colorectal cancer" in 2008 and "Japanese Society of Medical Oncology Clinical Guidelines: RAS (KRAS/NRAS) mutation testing in colorectal cancer patients" in 2014. These guidelines have contributed to the proper use of KRAS and RAS mutation testing, respectively. Recently, clinical utility, particularly for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with BRAF V600E mutation or DNA mismatch-repair (MMR) deficiency, has been established. Therefore, the guideline members decided these genetic alterations should also be involved. The aim of this revision is to properly carry out testing for BRAF V600E mutation and MMR deficiency in addition to RAS mutation. The revised guidelines include the basic requirements for testing for these genetic alterations based on recent scientific evidence. Furthermore, because clinical utility of comprehensive genetic testing using next-generation sequencing and somatic gene testing of analyzing circulating tumor DNA has increasingly evolved with recent advancements in testing technology, we noted the current situation and prospects for these testing technologies and their clinical implementation in the revised guidelines. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  11. Fractography of clinically fractured, implant-supported dental computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing crowns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohbauer, Ulrich; Belli, Renan; Cune, Marco S; Schepke, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    Today, a substantial part of the dental crown production uses computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. A recent step in restorative dentistry is the replacement of natural tooth structure with pre-polymerized and machined resin-based methacrylic polymers.

  12. The clinical impact of continuing to prescribe antiretroviral therapy in patients with advanced AIDS who manifest no virologic or immunologic benefit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Wohl

    Full Text Available Despite the efficacy and tolerability of modern antiretroviral therapy (ART, many patients with advanced AIDS prescribed these regimens do not achieve viral suppression or immune reconstitution as a result of poor adherence, drug resistance, or both. The clinical outcomes of continued ART prescription for such patients have not been well characterized.We examined the causes and predictors of all-cause mortality, AIDS-defining conditions, and serious non-AIDS-defining events among a cohort of participants in a clinical trial of pre-emptive therapy for CMV disease. We focused on participants who, despite ART had failed to achieve virologic suppression and substantive immune reconstitution.233 ART-receiving participants entered with a median baseline CD4+ T cell count of 30/mm(3 and plasma HIV RNA of 5 log10 copies/mL. During a median 96 weeks of follow-up, 24.0% died (a mortality rate of 10.7/100 patient-years; 27.5% reported a new AIDS-defining condition, and 22.3% a new serious non-AIDS event. Of the deaths, 42.8% were due to an AIDS-defining condition, 44.6% were due to a non-AIDS-defining condition, and 12.5% were of unknown etiology. Decreased risk of mortality was associated with baseline CD4+ T cell count ≥25/mm(3 and lower baseline HIV RNA.Among patients with advanced AIDS prescribed modern ART who achieve neither virologic suppression nor immune reconstitution, crude mortality percentages appear to be lower than reported in cohorts of patients studied a decade earlier. Also, in contrast to the era before modern ART became available, nearly half of the deaths in our modern-era study were caused by serious non-AIDS-defining events. Even among the most advanced AIDS patients who were not obtaining apparent immunologic and virologic benefit from ART, continued prescription of these medications appears to alter the natural history of AIDS--improving survival and shifting the causes of death from AIDS- to non-AIDS-defining conditions.

  13. Psychological Distress amongst AIDS-Orphaned Children in Urban South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluver, Lucie; Gardner, Frances; Operario, Don

    2007-01-01

    Background: South Africa is predicted to have 2.3 million children orphaned by Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) by 2020 (Actuarial Society of South Africa, 2005). There is little knowledge about impacts of AIDS-related bereavement on children, to aid planning of services. This study aimed to investigate psychological consequences of AIDS…

  14. Solidarity and AIDS: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, N

    1991-01-01

    Perhaps more than any other disease in recent history, AIDS has taught a cruel and crucial lesson: the constraints on our response to this epidemic are as deep as our denial, as entrenched as the inequities that permeate our society, as circumscribed as our knowledge, and as unlimited as our compassion and our commitment to human rights. Elaborating on these themes, the final three articles in this Special Section on AIDS consider three widely divergent yet intimately connected topics: AIDS in Cuba, AIDS in Brazil, and global AIDS prevention in the 1990s. Together, they caution that if we persist in treating AIDS as a problem only of "others," no country will be spared the social and economic devastation that promises to be the cost of our contempt and our folly. Solidarity is not an option; it is a necessity. Without conscious recognition of the worldwide relationship between health, human rights, and social inequalities, our attempts to abate the spread of AIDS--and to ease the suffering that follows in its wake--most surely will fall short of our goals. Finally, as we mourn our dead, we must take to heart the words of Mother Jones, and "fight like hell for living." This is the politics of survival.

  15. The Lazarus Effect of AIDS Treatment: Lessons Learned and Lives Saved

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mubanda Rasmussen, Louise; Richey, Lisa Ann

    2012-01-01

    -religious role in Western societies. Working on behalf of humanitarian organizations to combat modern emergencies is the contemporary embodiment of an ideal, pure notion of “the good” that is not linked to “old religion” but mimics many of its dispositions and practices. This analysis is based on empirical data...... gathered during fieldwork as participants and observers in a Catholic AIDS treatment clinic and through interviews with service providers in Uganda. We use these data to think both creatively and systematically about the meanings and limitations of pastoral power and therapeutic citizenship....

  16. [Non-AIDS-associated cancer disorders. A novel scenario after over thirty years from HIV discovery? Clinical experience and literature appraisal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Roberto; Cascavilla, Alessandra; Calza, Leonardo

    2015-08-01

    Both natural history and epidemiological trend of HIV infection have been deeply modified by the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), around twenty years ago. However, despite a rapid drop of the incidence of the large majority of opportunistic infections, a slow, but continued increase of malignancies occurred, with particular evidence focused on cancers which are not strictly related to the definition of full blown AIDS (the so called non-AIDS-defining malignancies). The unique clinical occurrence of HIV infection complicated by even four non-AIDS-defining cancers prompted us to re-discuss the epidemiology and the possible pathogenesis, the clinical presentation, and the differential diagnosis of this pathologic presentation. On the ground of our experience in this field, and the available literature evidences, we discuss how this clinical occurrence is acting on HIV infection presentation during the HAART era of the third millennium. These changes need broad scale studies, and promise relevant consequences on etiopathogenetic, prevention, therapeutic, and management aspects of HIV disease in the next future.

  17. Trajectories of Japanese and South Korean Environmental Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonami, Aki; Müller, Anders Riel

    2014-01-01

    Environmental aid has become a major component of development aid. We analyzed the contingent characters of environmental aid of Japan and South Korea using the definition of Williams, which regards aid policy as donor driven and autobiographical of the donor agencies and societies from which...... they sprang. Both Japan and South Korea consider environmental aid as an important tool of their diplomacy. A combination of a moral obligation and domestic, international, political, and economic interests underpin both countries’ environmental aid policy. Seen from the stated policies and practices, both...... countries use accounts of their past as once- developing countries trying to catch up in their aid narrative. In this manner, the environmental aid of Japan and South Korea is autobiographic, reflecting their interpretation of their own development history and position in global politics....

  18. [Politicized sexualities: AIDS activism and sexual orientation in Portugal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana Cristina

    2002-01-01

    This article analyzes how both the Portuguese state and civil society have addressed the AIDS issue, focusing on participation by the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transsexual community (LGBT) in the struggle against AIDS. The article begins by describing the situation of LGBT individuals in Portugal during the 1990s, when the Portuguese LGBT movement emerged and grew, and then characterizes the evolution of HIV/AIDS in Portugal, analyzing the relationship between civil society and sexuality in general and the situation of the epidemic in the country in particular, considering key facts, nongovernmental organizations, and state initiatives. Special attention is given to the role played by LGBT organizations in the struggle against HIV. Finally, the article reflects on the future of the struggle against both AIDS and discrimination in the 21st century, considering recent events in the country and the guidelines recommended by international policies.

  19. Civil society, political mobilization, and the impact of HIV scale-up on health systems in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Richard G

    2009-11-01

    This article examines the role of civil society in shaping HIV and AIDS policies and programs in Brazil. It focuses on the historical context of the redemocratization of Brazilian society during the 1980s, when the initial response to the epidemic took shape, and emphasizes the role of social movements linked to the progressive Catholic Church, the sanitary reform movement in public health, and the emerging gay rights movement in the early response to the epidemic in Brazil. It highlights the broad-based civil society coalition that took shape over the course of the 1990s and the political alliances that were built up shortly after the 1996 International AIDS Conference in Vancouver, Canada, to pass legislation guaranteeing the right to access to antiretroviral treatment. It emphasizes the continued importance of civil society organizations-in particular, AIDS-related nongovernmental organizations-and leading AIDS activists in exerting continued pressure to guarantee the sustainability of treatment access and the impact that action focused on HIV and AIDS has had on the Brazilian public health system more broadly, particularly through strengthening health infrastructures and providing a model for health-related social mobilization.

  20. Measurement of leukocyte rheology in vascular disease: clinical rationale and methodology. International Society of Clinical Hemorheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wautier, J L; Schmid-Schönbein, G W; Nash, G B

    1999-01-01

    The measurement of leukocyte rheology in vascular disease is a recent development with a wide range of new opportunities. The International Society of Clinical Hemorheology has asked an expert panel to propose guidelines for the investigation of leukocyte rheology in clinical situations. This article first discusses the mechanical, adhesive and related functional properties of leukocytes (especially neutrophils) which influence their circulation, and establishes the rationale for clinically-related measurements of parameters which describe them. It is concluded that quantitation of leukocyte adhesion molecules, and of their endothelial receptors may assist understanding of leukocyte behaviour in vascular disease, along with measurements of flow resistance of leukocytes, free radical production, degranulation and gene expression. For instance, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) is abnormally present on endothelial cells in atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus and inflammatory conditions. Soluble forms of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) or VCAM can be found elevated in the blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis or infections disease. In the second part of the article, possible technical approaches are presented and possible avenues for leukocyte rheological investigations are discussed.

  1. Clinical and virological effects of high-dose recombinant interferon-alpha in disseminated AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, R.; Schattenkerk, J. K.; Boucher, C. A.; Bakker, P. J.; Veenhof, K. H.; Danner, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    The effectiveness and antiretroviral activities of interferon-alpha in AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma was assessed in a non-randomised, phase-II clinical trial. 28 patients were treated with high-dose (27-36 MU) human recombinant interferon-alpha 2a subcutaneously every day for 8 weeks. In patients

  2. Pediatric parenteral nutrition: clinical practice guidelines from the Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SENPE), the Spanish Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (SEGHNP) and the Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacy (SEFH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrón Giner, Consuelo; Cuervas-Mons Vendrell, Margarita; Galera Martínez, Rafael; Gómez López, Lilianne; Gomis Muñoz, Pilar; Irastorza Terradillos, Iñaki; Martínez Costa, Cecilia; Moreno Villares, José Manuel; Pérez-Portabella Maristany, Cleofé; Pozas Del Río, M ª Teresa; Redecillas Ferreiro, Susana E; Prieto Bozano, Gerardo; Grupo de Estandarización de la Senpe, Senpe

    2017-06-05

    Introduction:Parenteral nutrition (PN) in childhood is a treatment whose characteristics are highly variable depending on the age and pathology of the patient. Material and methods: The Standardization and Protocols Group of the Spanish Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SENPE) is an interdisciplinary group formed by members of the SENPE, the Spanish Society of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Pediatric Nutrition (SEGHNP) and the Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacy (SEFH) that intends to update this issue. For this, a detailed review of the literature has been carried out, looking for the evidences that allow us to elaborate a Clinical Practice Guide following the criteria of the Oxford Center for Evidence-Based Medicine. Results: This manuscript summarizes the recommendations regarding indications, access routes, requirements, modifi cations in special situations, components of the mixtures, prescription and standardization, preparation, administration, monitoring, complications and home NP. The complete document is published as a monographic number. Conclusions: This guide is intended to support the prescription of pediatric PN. It provides the basis for rational decisions in the context of the existing evidence. No guidelines can take into account all of the often compelling individual clinical circumstances.

  3. Examination of skin lesions for cancer : Which clinical decision aids and tools are available in general practice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelink, Cecile J. L.; Jonkman, Marcel F.; Van der Meer, Klaas; Van der Heide, Wouter K.

    2014-01-01

    Background While skin cancer incidence is rising throughout Europe, general practitioners (GP) feel unsure about their ability to diagnose skin malignancies. Objectives To evaluate whether the GP has sufficient validated clinical decision aids and tools for the examination of potentially malignant

  4. A global, incremental development method for a web-based prostate cancer treatment decision aid and usability testing in a Dutch clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuypers, Maarten; Lamers, Romy Ed; Kil, Paul Jm; The, Regina; Karssen, Klemens; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V; de Vries, Marieke

    2017-07-01

    Many new decision aids are developed while aspects of existing decision aids could also be useful, leading to a sub-optimal use of resources. To support treatment decision-making in prostate cancer patients, a pre-existing evidence-based Canadian decision aid was adjusted to Dutch clinical setting. After analyses of the original decision aid and routines in Dutch prostate cancer care, adjustments to the decision aid structure and content were made. Subsequent usability testing (N = 11) resulted in 212 comments. Care providers mainly provided feedback on medical content, and patients commented most on usability and summary layout. All participants reported that the decision aid was comprehensible and well-structured and would recommend decision aid use. After usability testing, final adjustments to the decision aid were made. The presented methods could be useful for cultural adaptation of pre-existing tools into other languages and settings, ensuring optimal usage of previous scientific and practical efforts and allowing for a global, incremental decision aid development process.

  5. The Relationship Between Core Members' Social Capital and Perceived and Externally Evaluated Prestige and Cooperation Among HIV/AIDS-Related Civil Society Organizations in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Danni; Xu, Xiaoru; Mei, Guangliang; Ma, Ying; Chen, Ren; Qin, Xia; Hu, Zhi

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the core members' social capital was associated with individually perceived and externally evaluated prestige and cooperation among the HIV/AIDS-related civil society organizations (CSOs). To accomplish this, a cross-sectional study using multistage sampling was carried out in eight provinces of China. Data were collected from the 327 core members via questionnaires and self-evaluated performance of the respondents were evaluated and measured. The interviews were conducted with all core members and the supervisory staff of the local Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that social support (adjusted odds ratio [a OR] = 1.87) and organizational commitment (a OR = 1.57) were significantly associated with a higher odds of prestige performance in self-evaluation. Furthermore, social support (a OR = 1.65), trust (a OR = 1.33), and organizational commitment (a OR = 1.52) were significantly correlated with cooperation performance. Trust was positively associated with the cooperation performance on external evaluation. These findings may provide a new perspective on challenges that the CSOs face in response to a growing HIV/AIDS epidemic in China. Social capital may increase performance and accelerate organizational growth, ultimately improving HIV/AIDS prevention and care.

  6. The 'end of AIDS' project: Mobilising evidence, bureaucracy, and big data for a final biomedical triumph over AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc-Madlala, Suzanne; Broomhall, Lorie; Fieno, John

    2017-12-04

    Efforts are currently underway by major orchestrators and funders of the global AIDS response to realise the vision of achieving an end to AIDS by 2030. Unlike previous efforts to provide policy guidance or to encourage 'best practice' approaches for combatting AIDS, the end of AIDS project involves the promotion of a clear set of targets, tools, and interventions for a final biomedical solution to the epidemic. In this paper, we examine the bureaucratic procedures of one major AIDS funder that helped to foster a common vision and mission amongst a global AIDS community with widely divergent views on how best to address the epidemic. We focus on the methods, movements, and materials that are central to the project of ending AIDS, including those related to biomedical forms of evidence and big data science. We argue that these approaches have limitations and social scientists need to pay close attention to the end of AIDS project, particularly in contexts where clinical interventions might transform clinical outcomes, but where the social, economic, and cultural determinants of HIV and AIDS remain largely intact and increasingly obscured.

  7. KEHIDUPAN SOSIAL DAN INTERAKSI ORANG DENGAN HIV-AIDS DI YOGYAKARTA

    OpenAIRE

    Listiana Listiana

    2016-01-01

    Stigma about HIV-AIDS disease that leads to PLWHA (People Living with HIV/AIDS), made its own challenges in conducting social processes include interaction. Interaction in society not only as in interactions with others, but with family and community is also becoming a force on for PLWHA (People Living with HIV/AIDS) to continue his social life can make. PLWHA (People Living with HIV/ AIDS) shows open attitude in conducting community interaction, though their hearts are always overshado...

  8. Kehidupan Sosial Dan Interaksi Orang Dengan Hiv-aids Di YOGYAKARTA

    OpenAIRE

    Listiana, Listiana

    2013-01-01

    Stigma about HIV-AIDS disease that leads to PLWHA (PeopleLiving with HIV/AIDS), made its own challenges in conductingsocial processes include interaction. Interaction in society not only as in interactions with others, but with family and community is also becoming a force on for PLWHA (People Living with HIV/AIDS) to continue his social life can make. PLWHA (People Living with HIV/ AIDS) shows open attitude in conducting community interaction, though their hearts are always overshadowed by t...

  9. Clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV and AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badowski, Melissa E; Perez, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, weight loss has been a common complaint for patients. The use of various definitions defining HIV wasting syndrome has made it difficult to determine its actual prevalence. Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, it is estimated that the prevalence of HIV wasting syndrome is between 14% and 38%. HIV wasting syndrome may stem from conditions affecting chewing, swallowing, or gastrointestinal motility, neurologic disease affecting food intake or the perception of hunger or ability to eat, psychiatric illness, food insecurity generated from psychosocial or economic concerns, or anorexia due to medications, malabsorption, infections, or tumors. Treatment of HIV wasting syndrome may be managed with appetite stimulants (megestrol acetate or dronabinol), anabolic agents (testosterone, testosterone analogs, or recombinant human growth hormone), or, rarely, cytokine production modulators (thalidomide). The goal of this review is to provide an in-depth evaluation based on existing clinical trials on the clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV/AIDS. Although total body weight gain varies with dronabinol use (-2.0 to 3.2 kg), dronabinol is a well-tolerated option to promote appetite stimulation. Further studies are needed with standardized definitions of HIV-associated weight loss and clinical outcomes, robust sample sizes, safety and efficacy data on chronic use of dronabinol beyond 52 weeks, and associated virologic and immunologic outcomes.

  10. American Society of Clinical Oncology position statement on obesity and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligibel, Jennifer A; Alfano, Catherine M; Courneya, Kerry S; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Burger, Robert A; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Fabian, Carol J; Gucalp, Ayca; Hershman, Dawn L; Hudson, Melissa M; Jones, Lee W; Kakarala, Madhuri; Ness, Kirsten K; Merrill, Janette K; Wollins, Dana S; Hudis, Clifford A

    2014-11-01

    Rates of obesity have increased significantly over the last three decades in the United States and globally. In addition to contributing to heart disease and diabetes, obesity is a major unrecognized risk factor for cancer. Obesity is associated with worsened prognosis after cancer diagnosis and also negatively affects the delivery of systemic therapy, contributes to morbidity of cancer treatment, and may raise the risk of second malignancies and comorbidities. Research shows that the time after a cancer diagnosis can serve as a teachable moment to motivate individuals to adopt risk-reducing behaviors. For this reason, the oncology care team--the providers with whom a patient has the closest relationships in the critical period after a cancer diagnosis--is in a unique position to help patients lose weight and make other healthy lifestyle changes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology is committed to reducing the impact of obesity on cancer and has established a multipronged initiative to accomplish this goal by 1) increasing education and awareness of the evidence linking obesity and cancer; 2) providing tools and resources to help oncology providers address obesity with their patients; 3) building and fostering a robust research agenda to better understand the pathophysiology of energy balance alterations, evaluate the impact of behavior change on cancer outcomes, and determine the best methods to help cancer survivors make effective and useful changes in lifestyle behaviors; and 4) advocating for policy and systems change to address societal factors contributing to obesity and improve access to weight management services for patients with cancer. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  11. Can the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System (SART CORS) be used to accurately report clinic total reproductive potential (TRP)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Judy E; Hickman, Timothy N; Kinzer, Donna; Penzias, Alan S; Ball, G David; Gibbons, William E

    2012-04-01

    To assess whether total reproductive potential (TRP), the chance of a live birth from each fresh cycle (fresh cycle plus frozen transfers), could be calculated from the national Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System (SART CORS) database and whether information not available in SART CORS resulted in significant changes to the TRP calculation. Retrospective study using SART CORS and clinic data. Three assisted reproductive technology clinics. Women undergoing ART. None. Two- and three-year TRPs for 2005 and 2006 were calculated according to patient age at cycle start by linking fresh to frozen cycles up to first live birth. Clinic records were used to adjust for (remove) frozen cycles that used more than one fresh cycle as a source of embryos and for any embryos donated to other patients or research or shipped to another facility before a live birth. TRP was higher than fresh per-cycle rates for most ages at all clinics, although accuracy was compromised when there were fewer than 20 cycles per category. Two- and 3-year TRPs differed in only 2 of 24 calculations. Adjusted TRPs differed less than three percentage points from unadjusted TRPs when volume was sufficient. Clinic TRP can be calculated from SART CORS. Data suggest that calculations of clinic TRP from the national dataset would be meaningful. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases: update of the treatment guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debast, S.B.; Bauer, M.P.; Kuijper, E.J.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    In 2009 the first European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infection (ESCMID) treatment guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) was published. The guideline has been applied widely in clinical practice. In this document an update and review on the comparative effectiveness

  13. European Society of Endocrinology Clinical Guideline: Treatment of chronic hypoparathyroidism in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollerslev, Jens; Rejnmark, Lars; Marcocci, Claudio; Shoback, Dolores M; Sitges-Serra, Antonio; van Biesen, Wim; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2015-08-01

    Hypoparathyroidism (HypoPT) is a rare (orphan) endocrine disease with low calcium and inappropriately low (insufficient) circulating parathyroid hormone levels, most often in adults secondary to thyroid surgery. Standard treatment is activated vitamin D analogues and calcium supplementation and not replacement of the lacking hormone, as in other hormonal deficiency states. The purpose of this guideline is to provide clinicians with guidance on the treatment and monitoring of chronic HypoPT in adults who do not have end-stage renal disease. We intend to draft a practical guideline, focusing on operationalized recommendations deemed to be useful in the daily management of patients. This guideline was developed and solely sponsored by The European Society of Endocrinology, supported by CBO (Dutch Institute for Health Care Improvement) and based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) principles as a methodological base. The clinical question on which the systematic literature search was based and for which available evidence was synthesized was: what is the best treatment for adult patients with chronic HypoPT? This systematic search found 1100 articles, which was reduced to 312 based on title and abstract. The working group assessed these for eligibility in more detail, and 32 full-text articles were assessed. For the final recommendations, other literature was also taken into account. Little evidence is available on how best to treat HypoPT. Data on quality of life and the risk of complications have just started to emerge, and clinical trials on how to optimize therapy are essentially non-existent. Most studies are of limited sample size, hampering firm conclusions. No studies are available relating target calcium levels with clinically relevant endpoints. Hence it is not possible to formulate recommendations based on strict evidence. This guideline is therefore mainly based on how patients are managed in clinical practice

  14. ANALYSIS OF HIV SUBTYPES AND CLINICAL STAGING OF HIV DISEASE/AIDS IN EAST JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Ismail

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 known to cause Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS disease are divided into several subtypes (A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, K and Circulating Recombinant Form (CRF. Different characteristics of subtype of the virus and its interaction with the host can affect the severity of the disease. This study was to analyze HIV-1 subtypes circulating in HIV/AIDS patients from the East Java region descriptively and to analyze its relationship with clinical stadiums of HIV/AIDS. Information from this research was expected to complement the data of mocular epidemiology of HIV in Indonesia. This study utilited blood plasma from patients who had been tested to be HIV positive who sected treatment to or were reffered to the Intermediate Care Unit of Infectious Disease (UPIPI Dr. Soetomo Hospital Surabaya from various area representing the East Java regions. Plasma was separated from blood samples by centrifugation for use in the the molecular biology examination including RNA extraction, nested PCR using specific primer for HIV gp120 env gene region, DNA purifying, DNA sequencing, and homology and phylogenetic analysis. Based on the nucleotide sequence of the HIV gp120 env gene, it was found that the most dominant subtypes in East Java were in one group of Circulating Recombinant Form (CRF that is CRF01_AE, CRF33_01B and CRF34_01B which was also found in Southeast Asia. In the phylogenetic tree, most of HIV samples (30 samples are in the same branch with CRF01_AE, CRF33_01B and CRF34_01B, except for one sample (HIV40 which is in the same branch with subtype B. HIV subtypes are associated with clinical stadiums (disease severity since samples from different stages of HIV disease have the same subtype.

  15. Previously Unidentified Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in HIV/AIDS Cases Associate with Clinical Parameters and Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Anokhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic background of an individual plays an important role in the progression of HIV infection to AIDS. Identifying previously unknown or uncharacterized single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that associate with disease progression may reveal important therapeutic targets and provide a greater understanding of disease pathogenesis. In the present study, we employed ultra-high multiplex PCR on an Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing platform to sequence 23 innate immune genes from 94 individuals with HIV/AIDS. This data was used to identify potential associations of SNPs with clinical parameters and disease progression. SNPs that associated with an increased viral load were identified in the genes for the interleukin 15 receptor (IL15RA, toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7, tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5, and two killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR2DL1 and KIR2DL3. Additionally, SNPs that associated with progression from HIV infection to AIDS were identified in two 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase genes (OAS2 and OAS3. In contrast, other SNPs identified in OAS2 and OAS3 genes, as well as in the TRIM5 and KIR2DS4 genes, were associated with a slower progression of disease. Taken together, our data demonstrates the utility of ultra-high multiplex PCR in identifying polymorphisms of potential clinical significance and further,identifies SNPs that may play a role in HIV pathogenesis.

  16. A Retrospective Study of Erectile Function and Use of Erectile Aids in Prostate Cancer Patients After Radical Prostatectomy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Martha Kirstine; Azawi, Nessn H; Andersen, Line Grønbaek

    2017-01-01

    -nerve-sparing RP had ESI 12 months after RP. Age older than 60.5 years, a high body mass index, comorbidity, and a high American Society of Anesthesiologists score were negative predictors of erectile function 12 months after RP. CONCLUSION: Twelve months after RP, 32.1% of men had ESI; half these men required...... the use of erectile aids. Age older than 60.5 years, a high body mass index, comorbidity, and a high American Society of Anesthesiologists score were negative predictors for ED 12 months after RP. Haahr MK, Azawi NH, Andersen LG, et al. A Retrospective Study of Erectile Function and Use of Erectile Aids......INTRODUCTION: Radical prostatectomy (RP) offers a good long-term cancer control for clinically localized prostate cancer. However, complications such as erectile dysfunction and substantial decreases quality of life of the afflicted men and their sexual partners. Identification of pre-, per...

  17. South-South Cooperation, North-South Aid and the Prospect of International Aid Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meibo Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available South-South Cooperation (SSC and North-South Aid (NSA arise from different historical conditions and there are great differences between their philosophies, principles and paradigms. Against the background of a changing global environment, developed countries realized that the original development aid architecture must be reformed on one hand, and that developing countries are increasingly important in the aid architecture on the other. Hence, Western donors began to rethink their aid principles and methods, and accepted the concept of development effectiveness gradually, an attempt to establish global development forum and global partnership including emerging donors, beneficiary countries, civil society and the private sector. Nevertheless, being developing countries themselves, emerging donors are faced with unsolved domestic poverty issues and imperfect aid management institutions, which means that the emerging donors are unable to take a dominant position in the current aid architecture. Hence, the future dialogue and cooperation between traditional and emerging donors should feature the principle that the responsibilities taken by each party are collective but not identical, with developing countries bearing the main responsibilities in promoting poverty reduction and economic development in developing countries. They should be mutually tolerant about the different philosophies and share useful experiences. Moreover, emerging donors should promote development capacity building in recipient countries through win-win cooperation and solve their domestic development issues at the same time.

  18. Current perceptions of the term Clinical Pharmacy and its relationship to Pharmaceutical Care: a survey of members of the European Society of Clinical Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreischulte, Tobias; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2016-12-01

    Background The definitions that are being used for the terms 'clinical pharmacy' and 'pharmaceutical care' seem to have a certain overlap. Responsibility for therapy outcomes seems to be especially linked to the latter term. Both terms need clarification before a proper definition of clinical pharmacy can be drafted. Objective To identify current disagreements regarding the term 'Clinical Pharmacy' and its relationship to 'Pharmaceutical Care' and to assess to which extent pharmacists with an interest in Clinical Pharmacy are willing to accept responsibility for drug therapy outcomes. Setting The membership of the European Society of Clinical Pharmacy. Methods A total of 1,285 individuals affiliated with the European Society of Clinical Pharmacy were invited by email to participate in an online survey asking participants to state whether certain professional activities, providers, settings, aims and general descriptors constituted (a) 'Clinical Pharmacy only', (b) 'Pharmaceutical Care only', (c) 'both' or (d) 'neither'. Further questions examined pharmacists' willingness to accept ethical or legal responsibility for drug therapy outcomes, under current and ideal working conditions. Main outcome measures Level of agreement with a number of statements. Results There was disagreement (responsibility under current/ideal working conditions were: safety (32.7%/64.3%), effectiveness (17.9%/49.2%), patient-centeredness (17.1%/46.2%), cost-effectiveness (20.3%/44.0%). Conclusions The survey identified key disagreements around the term 'Clinical Pharmacy' and its relationship to 'Pharmaceutical Care', which future discussions around a harmonised definition of 'Clinical Pharmacy' should aim to resolve. Further research is required to understand barriers and facilitators to pharmacists accepting responsibility for drug therapy outcomes.

  19. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, The Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and The American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology: Clinical Practice Guidelines-Anticoagulation During Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Baker, Robert A; Ferraris, Victor A; Greilich, Philip E; Fitzgerald, David; Roman, Philip; Hammon, John W

    2018-02-01

    Despite more than a half century of "safe" cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), the evidence base surrounding the conduct of anticoagulation therapy for CPB has not been organized into a succinct guideline. For this and other reasons, there is enormous practice variability relating to the use and dosing of heparin, monitoring heparin anticoagulation, reversal of anticoagulation, and the use of alternative anticoagulants. To address this and other gaps, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and the American Society of Extracorporeal Technology developed an Evidence Based Workgroup. This was a group of interdisciplinary professionals gathered to summarize the evidence and create practice recommendations for various aspects of CPB. To date, anticoagulation practices in CPB have not been standardized in accordance with the evidence base. This clinical practice guideline was written with the intent to fill the evidence gap and to establish best practices in anticoagulation therapy for CPB using the available evidence. To identify relevant evidence, a systematic review was outlined and literature searches were conducted in PubMed using standardized medical subject heading (MeSH) terms from the National Library of Medicine list of search terms. Search dates were inclusive of January 2000 to December 2015. The search yielded 833 abstracts, which were reviewed by two independent reviewers. Once accepted into the full manuscript review stage, two members of the writing group evaluated each of 286 full papers for inclusion eligibility into the guideline document. Ninety-six manuscripts were included in the final review. In addition, 17 manuscripts published before 2000 were included to provide method, context, or additional supporting evidence for the recommendations as these papers were considered sentinel publications. Members of the writing group wrote and developed recommendations based on review of the articles obtained and achieved

  20. Vancouver AIDS conference: special report. The role of the military: to protect society -- and themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, A; Winsbury, R

    1996-01-01

    Military personnel are at particularly high risk of becoming infected with HIV because they are in the age group at highest risk for infection, age 15-24 years; they are away from home for long periods of time; many feel invulnerable and ready to take risks; there are usually prostitutes and drugs in military areas; and troops have cash, but maybe not condoms, in their pockets. The level of attention given to HIV/AIDS in the military has grown over the course of the last few international AIDS conferences. One roundtable on HIV/AIDS in the armed forces was held at the 11th International Conference on AIDS held in Vancouver during July 7-12, 1996. A large-scale survey reported at the conference found the level of sexual activity to be significantly higher among US military personnel than in the civilian population. Even the oldest soldiers reported higher levels of multiple partner sex habits than the most sexually active young men in the UK and France. The data further indicate that significant numbers of those men who were infected continued to knowingly have unprotected sex. Data from Angola, Cambodia, Cameroon, the Central African Republic, Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Thailand, and Zimbabwe show significantly higher levels of HIV infection among military personnel compared to the civilian populations. The authors stress the important role the military can play in preventing the spread of HIV and the need to involve military personnel in AIDS prevention programs.

  1. Information and communication: a library's local response to HIV/AIDS in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyengo, Christine Wamunyima

    2010-03-01

    To document and describe the University of Zambia Medical library's responses to the fight against HIV/AIDS in Zambia. The methodology adopted was a case study approach combined with an analysis of the literature such as annual reports and official documents. This was augmented by personal reflections of the author having worked at the Medical Library. The University of Zambia Medical library has over the years instituted and implemented HIV/AIDS information provision programmes that include the provision of information in various formats -- print or electronic and, in addition, capacity building in HIV/AIDS information literacy skills. A library's social responsibility calls for it to be part of national responses to crises that arise in society. As HIV/AIDS has affected every aspect of Zambian society prevention, treatment, care and support there is an understanding that the library's role should be using the critical and strategic resource at its disposal - information -- as part of their contribution to the fight against HIV/AIDS. In this context, libraries should source, collect, organize and disseminate information on HIV/AIDS in a way that is easily accessible to researchers, HIV/AIDS programme implementation agencies and the ordinary public.

  2. The American Society of Clinical Oncology's Efforts to Support Global Cancer Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Saghir, Nagi S.; Cufer, Tanja; Cazap, Eduardo; de Guzman, Roselle; Othieno-Abinya, Nicholas Anthony; Sanchez, Jose Angel; Pyle, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Despite much progress in the management of malignant diseases, the number of new cases and cancer-related deaths continues to rise around the world. More than half of new cases occur in economically developing countries, where more than two thirds of cancer deaths are expected. However, implementation of all necessary steps to accomplish the dissemination of state-of-the-art prevention, diagnosis, and management will require increased allocation of resources, and, more importantly, harmonization of the efforts of hundreds of national and international public health agencies, policy-setting bodies, governments, pharmaceutical companies, and philanthropic organizations. More than 30% of the members of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) reside and practice outside US borders, and more than half of attendees at all of the scientific congresses and symposia organized by ASCO are international. As cancer has become an increasingly global disease, ASCO has evolved as a global organization. The ASCO Board of Directors currently includes members from France, Brazil, and Canada. In 2013, the ASCO Board of Directors identified a number of strategic priorities for the future. Recognizing the importance of non-US members to the society, their first strategic priority was improving the society's service to non-US members and defining these members' identity in the international oncology community. This article reviews current ASCO activities in the international arena and its future plans in global oncology. PMID:26578614

  3. 75 FR 41685 - Implementation of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    .... The actions we take now will build upon a legacy of global leadership, national commitment, and... our national response to HIV/AIDS. Today I am releasing a National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the United..., moreover, is not enough. Success will require the commitment of all parts of society, including businesses...

  4. Foreign Object in the Eye: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eye: First aid Foreign object in the eye: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff If you get a foreign object in your eye Wash your hands ... et al., eds. American Medical Association Handbook of First Aid and Emergency Care. New York, N.Y.: Random ...

  5. HIV / AIDS and the law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Since HIV is sexually transmitted, people living with AIDS and HIV (PWA/PHA) risk being stigmatized as immoral and promiscuous and they are often discriminated against in society. To this effect, the South African AIDS Law Project and Lawyers for Human Rights have developed a comprehensive resource manual detailing human rights with a special emphasis on issues relevant to PWA/PHA. The concept of the manual aimed to look at the legal and human rights questions that have been raised by the HIV/AIDS epidemic; inform people living with HIV/AIDS about their rights and the law; provide people working in businesses, trade unions, and nongovernmental organization with information about correct and incorrect responses to HIV/AIDS; and give victims of discrimination ideas on how to fight back. This manual initially introduces basic facts about HIV and AIDS and then describes the legal system and the Bill of Rights within the new South African Constitution. The main areas of focus in the manual include: 1) patient's medical rights, 2) employment rights, 3) women's rights, 4) the rights of lesbians and gay men, 5) the rights of youth and children, 6) the rights of prisoners, 7) social support for PWA, 8) HIV/AIDS and insurance law, 9) power of attorney and making wills, 10) criminal law, and 11) legal remedies, such as using the law to protect one's rights.

  6. Introduction to a Special Issue of the Journal of Immunological Methods: Building global resource programs to support HIV/AIDS clinical trial studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Ana M; Denny, Thomas N; O'Gorman, Maurice

    2014-07-01

    This Special Issue of the Journal of Immunological Methods includes 16 manuscripts describing quality assurance activities related to virologic and immunologic monitoring of six global laboratory resource programs that support international HIV/AIDS clinical trial studies: Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery (CAVD); Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology (CHAVI); External Quality Assurance Program Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL); HIV Vaccine Trial Network (HVTN); International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI); and Immunology Quality Assessment (IQA). The reports from these programs address the many components required to develop comprehensive quality control activities and subsequent quality assurance programs for immune monitoring in global clinical trials including: all aspects of processing, storing, and quality assessment of PBMC preparations used ubiquitously in HIV clinical trials, the development and optimization of assays for CD8 HIV responses and HIV neutralization, a comprehensive global HIV virus repository, and reports on the development and execution of novel external proficiency testing programs for immunophenotyping, intracellular cytokine staining, ELISPOT and luminex based cytokine measurements. In addition, there are articles describing the implementation of Good Clinical Laboratory Practices (GCLP) in a large quality assurance laboratory, the development of statistical methods specific for external proficiency testing assessment, a discussion on the ability to set objective thresholds for measuring rare events by flow cytometry, and finally, a manuscript which addresses a framework for the structured reporting of T cell immune function based assays. It is anticipated that this series of manuscripts covering a wide range of quality assurance activities associated with the conduct of global clinical trials will provide a resource for individuals and programs involved in improving the harmonization, standardization, accuracy, and sensitivity of

  7. Europe?s Shifting Response to HIV/AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite a history of championing HIV/AIDS as a human rights issue, and a rhetorical commitment to health as a human right, European states and institutions have shifted from a rights-based response to a risk management approach to HIV/AIDS since the economic recession of 2008. An interdisciplinary perspective is applied to analyze health policy changes at the national, regional, and global levels by drawing on data from key informant interviews, and institutional and civil society do...

  8. Official Executive Summary of an American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Gregory A; Girard, Timothy D; Kress, John P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This clinical practice guideline addresses six questions related to liberation from mechanical ventilation in critically ill adults. It is the result of a collaborative effort between the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST). METHODS: A mult...

  9. Diabetes Technology-Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Adults: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Anne L; Ahmann, Andrew J; Battelino, Tadej; Evert, Alison; Hirsch, Irl B; Murad, M Hassan; Winter, William E; Wolpert, Howard

    2016-11-01

    To formulate clinical practice guidelines for the use of continuous glucose monitoring and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in adults with diabetes. The participants include an Endocrine Society-appointed Task Force of seven experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, and the European Society of Endocrinology co-sponsored this guideline. The Task Force developed this evidence-based guideline using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. The Task Force commissioned one systematic review and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies. One group meeting, several conference calls, and e-mail communications enabled consensus. Committees and members of the Endocrine Society, the American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, and the European Society of Endocrinology reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of these guidelines. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and continuous glucose monitoring have an important role in the treatment of diabetes. Data from randomized controlled trials are limited on the use of medical devices, but existing studies support the use of diabetes technology for a wide variety of indications. This guideline presents a review of the literature and practice recommendations for appropriate device use.

  10. Automatic detection of pulmonary nodules at spiral CT: clinical application of a computer-aided diagnosis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wormanns, Dag; Fiebich, Martin; Saidi, Mustafa; Diederich, Stefan; Heindel, Walter

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) workstation with automatic detection of pulmonary nodules at low-dose spiral CT in a clinical setting for early detection of lung cancer. Eighty-eight consecutive spiral-CT examinations were reported by two radiologists in consensus. All examinations were reviewed using a CAD workstation with a self-developed algorithm for automatic detection of pulmonary nodules. The algorithm is designed to detect nodules with diameters of at least 5 mm. A total of 153 nodules were detected with at least one modality (radiologists in consensus, CAD, 85 nodules with diameter <5 mm, 68 with diameter ≥5 mm). The results of automatic nodule detection were compared to nodules detected with any modality as gold standard. Computer-aided diagnosis correctly identified 26 of 59 (38%) nodules with diameters ≥5 mm detected by visual assessment by the radiologists; of these, CAD detected 44% (24 of 54) nodules without pleural contact. In addition, 12 nodules ≥5 mm were detected which were not mentioned in the radiologist's report but represented real nodules. Sensitivity for detection of nodules ≥5 mm was 85% (58 of 68) for radiologists and 38% (26 of 68) for CAD. There were 5.8±3.6 false-positive results of CAD per CT study. Computer-aided diagnosis improves detection of pulmonary nodules at spiral CT and is a valuable second opinion in a clinical setting for lung cancer screening despite of its still limited sensitivity. (orig.)

  11. Clinical indications for computed tomographic colonography: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) Guideline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spada, Cristiano; Barbaro, Federico; Petruzziello, Lucio [Catholic University, Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Rome (Italy); Stoker, Jaap; Haan, Margriet C. de [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Alarcon, Onofre [Universidad de La Laguna, Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, Facultad de Medicina, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Bellini, Davide; Laghi, Andrea [Sapienza University of Rome, I.C.O.T. Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Latina (Italy); Bretthauer, Michael [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Health Economy and Health Management, University of Oslo, and Department of Transplantation Medicine, Gastroenterology Unit, Oslo (Norway); Dumonceau, Jean-Marc [Gedyt Endoscopy Center, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ferlitsch, Monika [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Internal Medicine III, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vienna (Austria); Halligan, Steve; Helbren, Emma; Plumb, Andrew; Taylor, Stuart A. [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Hellstrom, Mikael [Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Department of Radiology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Kuipers, Ernst J. [Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lefere, Philippe [Virtual Colonoscopy Teaching Centre, Hooglede (Belgium); AZ Delta, Roeselare (Belgium); Mang, Thomas [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Neri, Emanuele [University of Pisa, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Regge, Daniele [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo-Torino (Italy); Hassan, Cesare [Catholic University, Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Rome (Italy); Ospedale Nuovo Regina Margherita, Department of Gastroenterology, Rome (Italy)

    2014-10-03

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality [1, 2]. CRC screening by fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) has been shown to reduce CRC mortality [3, 4], and is currently used in several European countries. Colonoscopy is highly effective for detecting advanced neoplasia, and endoscopic polypectomy reduces subsequent CRCspecific incidence and mortality [5]. In Europe, colonoscopy is mainly used to investigate FOBT-positive or symptomatic patients, or as a preventive strategy in those with increased CRC risk [6]. Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) is a minimally invasive imaging technique that is highly accurate for detecting colorectal cancer (CRC) and adenomatous polyps. The technique is standardized [7], and CTC is more easily performed than barium enema. Evidence-based data suggest that CTC is the natural replacement for barium enema and a complementary rather than an alternative examination to colonoscopy. However, the clinical scenarios for which CTC is indicated remain unclear. To address this uncertainty - 20 years after the first presentation of CTC at a radiological meeting [8] - the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) decided to produce a common guideline regarding indications for CTC in clinical practice. Technical and quality issues of CTC have been deliberately excluded from this work as these have already been discussed separately [7].

  12. Clinical indications for computed tomographic colonography: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) Guideline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spada, Cristiano; Barbaro, Federico; Petruzziello, Lucio; Stoker, Jaap; Haan, Margriet C. de; Alarcon, Onofre; Bellini, Davide; Laghi, Andrea; Bretthauer, Michael; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Ferlitsch, Monika; Halligan, Steve; Helbren, Emma; Plumb, Andrew; Taylor, Stuart A.; Hellstrom, Mikael; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Lefere, Philippe; Mang, Thomas; Neri, Emanuele; Regge, Daniele; Hassan, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality [1, 2]. CRC screening by fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) has been shown to reduce CRC mortality [3, 4], and is currently used in several European countries. Colonoscopy is highly effective for detecting advanced neoplasia, and endoscopic polypectomy reduces subsequent CRCspecific incidence and mortality [5]. In Europe, colonoscopy is mainly used to investigate FOBT-positive or symptomatic patients, or as a preventive strategy in those with increased CRC risk [6]. Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) is a minimally invasive imaging technique that is highly accurate for detecting colorectal cancer (CRC) and adenomatous polyps. The technique is standardized [7], and CTC is more easily performed than barium enema. Evidence-based data suggest that CTC is the natural replacement for barium enema and a complementary rather than an alternative examination to colonoscopy. However, the clinical scenarios for which CTC is indicated remain unclear. To address this uncertainty - 20 years after the first presentation of CTC at a radiological meeting [8] - the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) decided to produce a common guideline regarding indications for CTC in clinical practice. Technical and quality issues of CTC have been deliberately excluded from this work as these have already been discussed separately [7].

  13. Clinical Utilization of Repeated Open Application Test Among American Contact Dermatitis Society Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gabrielle E; Botto, Nina; Butler, Daniel C; Murase, Jenny E

    2015-01-01

    The repeated open application test (ROAT) provides useful information regarding allergens in suspected cases of allergic contact dermatitis; however, standardized methodology has not been established. The aim of this study was to assess how ROAT is used in clinical and research settings. We distributed a survey regarding ROAT practice to the American Contact Dermatitis Society and conducted a literature review of ROAT utilization in research. A total of 67 American Contact Dermatitis Society members participated in the survey. Respondents most frequently recommend application of leave-on products twice daily (46.0%) and rinse-off products once daily (43.5%). The most commonly used anatomical sites include the forearm (38.7%) and antecubital fossa (32.3%). Most respondents continue ROAT for 1 (49.2%) or 2 weeks (31.7%). Literature review of 32 studies (26 leave-on, 6 rinse-off) revealed that application frequency is most common at twice daily for both leave-on (96.2%) and rinse-off (50.0%) products. The most common anatomical site is the forearm (62.5%), with an overall study duration of 3 to 4 weeks (65.6%). When comparing ROAT clinical and research practice, the majority trend was consistent for leave-on product application frequency and anatomical site, but not for rinse-off product application frequency, or overall duration. Further research is needed to determine best practice recommendations.

  14. Evaluating Protocol Lifecycle Time Intervals in HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Jeffrey T.; Dixon, Dennis; Varghese, Suresh; Cope, Marie T.; Marci, Joe; Kagan, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying efficacious interventions for the prevention and treatment of human diseases depends on the efficient development and implementation of controlled clinical trials. Essential to reducing the time and burden of completing the clinical trial lifecycle is determining which aspects take the longest, delay other stages, and may lead to better resource utilization without diminishing scientific quality, safety, or the protection of human subjects. Purpose In this study we modeled time-to-event data to explore relationships between clinical trial protocol development and implementation times, as well as identify potential correlates of prolonged development and implementation. Methods We obtained time interval and participant accrual data from 111 interventional clinical trials initiated between 2006 and 2011 by NIH’s HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Networks. We determined the time (in days) required to complete defined phases of clinical trial protocol development and implementation. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used to assess the rates at which protocols reached specified terminal events, stratified by study purpose (therapeutic, prevention) and phase group (pilot/phase I, phase II, and phase III/ IV). We also examined several potential correlates to prolonged development and implementation intervals. Results Even though phase grouping did not determine development or implementation times of either therapeutic or prevention studies, overall we observed wide variation in protocol development times. Moreover, we detected a trend toward phase III/IV therapeutic protocols exhibiting longer developmental (median 2 ½ years) and implementation times (>3years). We also found that protocols exceeding the median number of days for completing the development interval had significantly longer implementation. Limitations The use of a relatively small set of protocols may have limited our ability to detect differences across phase groupings. Some timing effects

  15. Colonialism, Biko and AIDS: reflections on the principle of beneficence in South African medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braude, Hillel David

    2009-06-01

    This paper examines the principle of beneficence in the light of moral and epistemological concerns that have crystallized in the South African context around clinical care. Three examples from the South African experience affecting the development of bioethics are examined: medical colonialism, the death in detention of Steve Biko, and the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Michael Gelfand's book [(1948). The sick African: a clinical study. Cape Town: Stewart Printing Company.] on African medical conditions captures the ambiguous nature of colonial medicine that linked genuine medical treatment with the civilizing mission. Biko's death was a key historical event that deeply implicated the medical profession under apartheid. The present HIV/AIDS epidemic presents the gravest social and political crisis for South African society. All three experiences influence the meaning and relevance of beneficence as a bioethics principle in the South African context. This paper argues for a South African bioethics informed by a critical humanism that takes account of the colonial past, and that does not model itself on an "original wound" or negation, but on positive care-giving practices.

  16. Computer Aided Education System SuperTest. Present and Prospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the testing and self-testing process for the Computer Aided Education System (CAES SuperTest, used at the Academy of Economic Studies of Chisinau, Moldova and recently implemented at the University of Bacau, Romania. We discuss here the future of this software, from the Information Society and Knowledge Society point of view.

  17. Patriarchy, Women and HIV/AIDS in Mapalala's "passed Like a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although HIV/AIDS affects both men and women, the infection rate amongst women over the years outstrips the number of men contracting this disease. The gravity of the situation has prompted many African writers to use the ready-made materials on HIV/AIDS in their society to create works of art. The purpose of this paper ...

  18. Validation of a prediction model that allows direct comparison of the Oxford Knee Score and American Knee Society clinical rating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maempel, J F; Clement, N D; Brenkel, I J; Walmsley, P J

    2015-04-01

    This study demonstrates a significant correlation between the American Knee Society (AKS) Clinical Rating System and the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) and provides a validated prediction tool to estimate score conversion. A total of 1022 patients were prospectively clinically assessed five years after TKR and completed AKS assessments and an OKS questionnaire. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated significant correlations between OKS and the AKS knee and function scores but a stronger correlation (r = 0.68, p Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  19. The clinical characteristics and prognostic significance of AID, miR-181b, and miR-155 expression in adult patients with de novo B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangquan; Cao, Yang; Dong, Weimin; Lin, Yan; Wang, Qi; Wu, Wei; Hua, Xiaoying; Ling, Yun; Xie, Xiaobao; Hu, Shaoyan; Cen, Jiannong; Gu, Weiying

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate clinical characteristics and prognostic significance of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) gene, miR-181b and miR-155 expression in de novo adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) patients. Results showed that AID and miR-155 expression were higher in B-ALL patients than healthy controls, while miR-181b expression was lower in B-ALL patients. In addition, Ph + B-ALLs had higher AID expression than Ph - B-ALLs, and its high expression was associated with BCR-ABL. Moreover, B-ALL patients with AID high or miR-181b low expression had a shorter overall survival (OS). AID high with miR-181b low , AID high with miR-155 low , miR-181b low , miR-155 low , AID high with miR-181b low and miR-155 low expression were associated with shorter OS. Combination of the three molecules are more accurate predictors for unfavorable OS compared with univariate group. Therefore, AID, miR-181b and miR-155 provide clinical prognosis of adult de novo B-ALL patients and may refine their molecular risk classification.

  20. Ovarian cancer clinical trial endpoints: Society of Gynecologic Oncology white paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Thomas J.; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Brady, Mark F.; Coleman, Robert L.; Einstein, Mark H.; Monk, Bradley J.; Mannel, Robert S.; Thigpen, J. Tate; Umpierre, Sharee A.; Villella, Jeannine A.; Alvarez, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the value of multiple clinical endpoints in the unique setting of ovarian cancer. Methods A clinical trial workgroup was established by the Society of Gynecologic Oncology to develop a consensus statement via multiple conference calls, meetings and white paper drafts. Results Clinical trial endpoints have profound effects on late phase clinical trial design, result interpretation, drug development, and regulatory approval of therapeutics. Selection of the optimal clinical trial endpoint is particularly provocative in ovarian cancer where long overall survival (OS) is observed. The lack of new regulatory approvals and the lack of harmony between regulatory bodies globally for ovarian cancer therapeutics are of concern. The advantages and disadvantages of the numerous endpoints available are herein discussed within the unique context of ovarian cancer where both crossover and post-progression therapies potentially uncouple surrogacy between progression-free survival (PFS) and OS, the two most widely supported and utilized endpoints. The roles of patient reported outcomes (PRO) and health related quality of life (HRQoL) are discussed, but even these widely supported parameters are affected by the unique characteristics of ovarian cancer where a significant percentage of patients may be asymptomatic. Original data regarding the endpoint preferences of ovarian cancer advocates is presented. Conclusions Endpoint selection in ovarian cancer clinical trials should reflect the impact on disease burden and unique characteristics of the treatment cohort while reflecting true patient benefit. Both OS and PFS have led to regulatory approvals and are clinically important. OS remains the most objective and accepted endpoint because it is least vulnerable to bias; however, the feasibility of OS in ovarian cancer is compromised by the requirement for large trial size, prolonged time-line for final analysis, and potential for unintended loss of treatment effect

  1. Ovarian cancer clinical trial endpoints: Society of Gynecologic Oncology white paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Thomas J; Armstrong, Deborah K; Brady, Mark F; Coleman, Robert L; Einstein, Mark H; Monk, Bradley J; Mannel, Robert S; Thigpen, J Tate; Umpierre, Sharee A; Villella, Jeannine A; Alvarez, Ronald D

    2014-01-01

    To explore the value of multiple clinical endpoints in the unique setting of ovarian cancer. A clinical trial workgroup was established by the Society of Gynecologic Oncology to develop a consensus statement via multiple conference calls, meetings and white paper drafts. Clinical trial endpoints have profound effects on late phase clinical trial design, result interpretation, drug development, and regulatory approval of therapeutics. Selection of the optimal clinical trial endpoint is particularly provocative in ovarian cancer where long overall survival (OS) is observed. The lack of new regulatory approvals and the lack of harmony between regulatory bodies globally for ovarian cancer therapeutics are of concern. The advantages and disadvantages of the numerous endpoints available are herein discussed within the unique context of ovarian cancer where both crossover and post-progression therapies potentially uncouple surrogacy between progression-free survival (PFS) and OS, the two most widely supported and utilized endpoints. The roles of patient reported outcomes (PRO) and health related quality of life (HRQoL) are discussed, but even these widely supported parameters are affected by the unique characteristics of ovarian cancer where a significant percentage of patients may be asymptomatic. Original data regarding the endpoint preferences of ovarian cancer advocates is presented. Endpoint selection in ovarian cancer clinical trials should reflect the impact on disease burden and unique characteristics of the treatment cohort while reflecting true patient benefit. Both OS and PFS have led to regulatory approvals and are clinically important. OS remains the most objective and accepted endpoint because it is least vulnerable to bias; however, the feasibility of OS in ovarian cancer is compromised by the requirement for large trial size, prolonged time-line for final analysis, and potential for unintended loss of treatment effect from active post-progression therapies

  2. Myths about AIDS in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariddh, M C

    1994-08-01

    HIV has been reported in the capital city of Cambodia, Phnom Penh, as well as in the northwestern provinces of Banteay Meanchey, Battambang, Pursat, and Kompong Chhnang. Unofficial reports indicate the presence of HIV in three northeastern provinces. According to World Health Organization data, 382 people were infected with HIV in Cambodia as of March 1994, but the national AIDS program estimates that 2000-4000 Cambodians may be HIV-seropositive. Small surveys in 1992 identified HIV infection rates to be 4.5% among patients of sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics and 9.2% among prostitutes. A seroprevalence rate of 4.3% was found in 1993 among clients of STD clinics and others requesting HIV testing. These rather marked levels of infection exist in Cambodia even though HIV was first identified in the country as recently as 1991 among screened blood from volunteer donors. By December 1993, the rate of positive results from blood donors had increased to 1.97%.; the rate of infection among blood donors is expected to double to approximately 4% in 1994. People in Cambodia variously believe that AIDS is nonexistent, AIDS is a problem of other countries, can be transmitted by mosquitoes, healthy people do not have AIDS, a cure exists for AIDS, AIDS can be contracted only from prostitutes, AIDS is the most severe state of syphilis, and AIDS is only a propaganda ploy of condom producers to market their products. It is therefore proving extremely difficult to convince people that AIDS is a truly threatening disease against which they should protect themselves, especially when symptoms are rarely present during the early stage of infection. Health education campaigns, videos, posters, and accurate reporting in the media will, however, help change minds and hopefully induce HIV-preventive behaviors. Of interest, the article notes that virtually every prostitute in Cambodia has at least two-three STDs.

  3. Key findings: a qualitative assessment of provider and patient perceptions of HIV/AIDS in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, James; Johnson, Anton F

    2009-01-01

    In 1997, at the Davos International Economic Forum, Nelson Mandela stated that "the poor, the vulnerable, the unschooled, the socially marginalized, the women, and the children, those who bear the burden of colonial legacy-these are the sectors of society which bear the burden of AIDS" (Richter, 2001). Nearly a decade later, that statement still holds true, especially in Mr. Mandela's home country. South Africa continues to have one of the world's highest prevalence ratios of HIV infection (UNAIDS, 2002). This paper explores the significance of perceptions, knowledge, practices, and attitudes toward HIV/AIDS in two important groups in South Africa: health care providers based in public health clinics and their patients. This paper will assess the provider-patient interaction from the perspective of members of the South African HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention community. The analysis will examine the results of in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with providers and patients, respectively, in two of South Africa's nine provinces. Between December 2002 and April 2003 in Guateng and KwaZulu-Natal provinces, we conducted (1) in-depth interviews of a spectrum of health care providers at five local public health clinics and (2) focus groups of patients who patronize those clinics. The results show that there are gaps in the HIV/AIDS knowledge of some of the health care providers and that the participants' health beliefs and practices are embedded in the social conditions in which they live and work, which has a ripple effect on their risk behaviors and trumps any intervention messages from their health care providers and larger public health intervention messages.

  4. Hospitalization Rates Among People With HIV/AIDS in New York City, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Rachael; Kersanske, Laura; Xia, Qiang; Daskalakis, Demetre; Braunstein, Sarah L

    2017-08-01

    Hospitalizations are an important indicator of healthcare quality and access for people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). This study assesses hospitalization rates among people with HIV/AIDS in New York City. We performed a deterministic match between people in the New York City HIV surveillance registry alive as of 1 January 2013 and diagnosed with HIV as of 31 December 2013 and patient-level inpatient hospitalization records during 2013. Event-level data were analyzed to determine characteristics of and reasons for hospitalizations. Primary diagnoses were classified using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification. We estimated hospitalization rates as the number of hospitalizations per 100 person-years for all causes, AIDS-defining illnesses, and non-AIDS-defining infections. Nearly one-fifth of hospitalizations were attributed to non-AIDS-defining infections, whereas AIDS-defining illness diagnoses were infrequent (3.6% of hospitalizations). Other common causes were cardiovascular (10.9%) and substance use (9.8%). The estimated all-cause hospitalization rate was 36.7 per 100 person-years. Higher all-cause hospitalization rates were observed among females (46.8 per 100 person-years), Black and Latino/Hispanic people (41.8 and 39.5 per 100 person-years, respectively), people living in high-poverty neighborhoods (47.4 per 100 person-years), and people with a history of injection drug use (74.9 per 100 person-years). The estimated AIDS-defining illness and non-AIDS-defining infection hospitalization rates were 1.3 and 7.2 per 100 person-years, respectively. People with HIV in New York City were frequently hospitalized. While AIDS-defining illnesses were relatively rare, non-AIDS-defining infection hospitalizations were more common. Disparities in hospitalization rates indicate a need for targeted improved primary care and comorbid disease management. © The Author 2017

  5. Trust, moral responsibility, the self, and well-ordered societies: the importance of basic philosophical concepts for clinical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccullough, Laurence B

    2002-02-01

    Although the work of clinical ethics is intensely practical, it employs and presumes philosophical concepts from the central branches of philosophy, including metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and political philosophy. This essay introduces this issue in the Journal on clinical ethics by considering how the papers and book reviews included in it illuminate four such concepts: trust, moral responsibility, the self and well-ordered societies.

  6. Epidemiology of AIDS in Africa--part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigielski, J P

    1988-03-01

    A recently completed study involving over 10,000 people from 6 Central African countries found seroprevalence rates generally under 1% for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); however, rates were significantly higher for urban residents, prostitutes and their sexual contacts, and patients attending sexually transmitted disease clinics. The 4 major modes of transmission of AIDS in Africa are sexual contact, perinatal transmission, transfusion of infected blood or blood products, and the reuse of equipment such as needles and syringes. In 1985, a 2nd AIDS virus, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-2, was discovered in West Africa--a finding with important implications for epidemiologic surveillance, screening programs, and clinical diagnostic testing. Although 45 of the 50 African countries have developed concrete public health policies and strategies for the prevention and control of AIDS, most nations of sub-Saharan Africa lack the economic and social resources to implement these programs effectively. Thus, international cooperation and a commitment on the part of the US and Western Europe to provide assistance will be essential. Needs must be addressed on 2 fronts: treatment of those already infected or suffering from the disease and containment of the AIDS epidemic. Public health efforts should focus initially on high risk behaviors through health education. At the same time, it should be recognized that AIDS is not the largest health issue facing Africans, and there is a complex interaction between AIDS and other health problems such as malnutrition, genital ulcers, diarrhea, and tuberculosis. An approach to AIDS requires an expansion of public health initiatives in areas such as clean water supplies, maternal-child health programs, nutrition and immunization programs, and sexually transmitted disease clinics.

  7. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of candidiasis: 2009 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pappas, P.G.; Kauffman, C.A.; Andes, D.; Benjamin Jr., D.K.; Calandra, T; Edwards, J.E.; Filler, S.G.; Fisher, J.F.; Kullberg, B.J.; Ostrosky-Zeichner, L.; Reboli, A.C.; Rex, J.H.; Walsh, T.J.; Sobel, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Guidelines for the management of patients with invasive candidiasis and mucosal candidiasis were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. These updated guidelines replace the previous guidelines published in the 15 January 2004 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases

  8. Epidemiological composition, clinical and treatment characteristics of the patient cohort of the german competence network for HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen K

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective As its central basis for research, the Competence Network for HIV/AIDS (KompNet established a nationwide cohort study on HIV-positive patients being in medical care in Germany. In this paper, we describe the epidemiological composition, and clinical as well as treatment characteristics of the KompNet cohort over time. Methods The KompNet cohort is an open, retrospective and prospective, multi-center, disease-specific and nationwide cohort study that started gathering data in June 2004. Semiannually, follow up visits of the patients are documented, covering a wide range of clinical and sociodemographic data. At enrolment and three years afterwards, an EDTA-sample is taken; a serum-sample is taken at every follow up. Results As of 20.10.2008, a total of 15,541 patients were enrolled by 44 documenting sites. In September 2007, the cohort size was reduced to ten outpatient clinics and fifteen private practitioners, covering a total of 9,410 patients. The documentation of these patients comprised 24,117 years of follow up-time since enrolment (mean: 2.6 years, 62,862 person years inclusive data documented retrospectively on course of HIV-infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART, mean: 6.7 years. Due to the short period of recruitment till now, rates of death (0.3%-0.8% and losses to follow up (1.1%-5.5% were low. 84.9% of patients were men. Main risk of transmission was sex between men (MSM: 62.9%. Mean age was 45 years. About two third of patients were classified as CDC-stage B or C. Therapy regimens of currently treated patients complied with recent guidelines. Trends of mean CD4 cell count/μl regarding the initial therapy and concerning the population under treatment reflected the developments and the changing standards of antiretroviral therapy over time. Conclusion The KompNet cohort covers about a quarter of all patients estimated as being under treatment in Germany. Its composition can be accounted approximately

  9. Aids and Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2004-12-02

    Dec 2, 2004 ... The correlation between HIV infection and surgery began to be highlighted only two ... expect greater clinical exposure to patients with. HIV/AIDS. .... fractures in HIV patient, although too little is known about the relationship ...

  10. Computer-aided diagnosis and artificial intelligence in clinical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Appelbaum, Daniel; Doi, Kunio

    2011-11-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) is rapidly entering the radiology mainstream. It has already become a part of the routine clinical work for the detection of breast cancer with mammograms. The computer output is used as a "second opinion" in assisting radiologists' image interpretations. The computer algorithm generally consists of several steps that may include image processing, image feature analysis, and data classification via the use of tools such as artificial neural networks (ANN). In this article, we will explore these and other current processes that have come to be referred to as "artificial intelligence." One element of CAD, temporal subtraction, has been applied for enhancing interval changes and for suppressing unchanged structures (eg, normal structures) between 2 successive radiologic images. To reduce misregistration artifacts on the temporal subtraction images, a nonlinear image warping technique for matching the previous image to the current one has been developed. Development of the temporal subtraction method originated with chest radiographs, with the method subsequently being applied to chest computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine bone scans. The usefulness of the temporal subtraction method for bone scans was demonstrated by an observer study in which reading times and diagnostic accuracy improved significantly. An additional prospective clinical study verified that the temporal subtraction image could be used as a "second opinion" by radiologists with negligible detrimental effects. ANN was first used in 1990 for computerized differential diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases in CAD. Since then, ANN has been widely used in CAD schemes for the detection and diagnosis of various diseases in different imaging modalities, including the differential diagnosis of lung nodules and interstitial lung diseases in chest radiography, CT, and position emission tomography/CT. It is likely that CAD will be integrated into picture archiving and

  11. Improvement of a Clinical Score for Necrotizing Fasciitis: 'Pain Out of Proportion' and High CRP Levels Aid the Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borschitz, Thomas; Schlicht, Svenja; Siegel, Ekkehard; Hanke, Eric; von Stebut, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rare mono-/polymicrobial skin infection that spreads to underlying tissues. NF is quickly progressing and leads to life threatening situations. Immediate surgical debridement together with i.v. antibiotic administration is required to avoid fatal outcome. Early diagnosis is often delayed due to underestimation or confusion with cellulitis. We now compared the initial clinical and laboratory presentation of NF and cellulitis in detail to assess if a typical pattern can be identified that aids timely diagnosis of NF and avoidance of fatal outcome. 138 different clinical and laboratory features of 29 NF patients were compared to those of 59 age- and gender matched patients with severe erysipelas requiring a subsequent hospitalization time of ≥10 days. Differences in clinical presentation were not obvious; however, NF patients suffered significantly more often from strong pain. NF patients exhibited dramatically elevated CRP levels (5-fold, p>0.001). The overall laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis (LRINEC) score was significantly higher in NF patients as compared to cellulitis. However, a modification of the score (alteration of laboratory parameters, addition of clinical parameters) led to a clear improvement of the score with a higher positive predictive value without losing specificity. In summary, clinical differentiation of NF from cellulitis appears to be hard. 'Pain out of proportion' may be an early sign for NF. An improvement of the LRINEC score emphasizing only relevant laboratory and clinical findings as suggested may aid the early diagnosis of NF in the future leading to improvement of disease outcome by enabling rapid adequate therapy.

  12. AIDS: there's hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    In 1993, 10 years after realizing that AIDS posed a threat to the future of mankind, social mobilization will improve the odds against AIDS. The objective is to create awareness about the virus, and to affect positive behavioral change through advocacy, communication, and grass-roots actions. The first goal is to change the societal attitude about the status of youth and women in order to understand that gender inequality fuels the pandemic. They are the most vulnerable groups, therefore their economic and social power must be improved. The Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women constitute a platform for broader action by governmental, nongovernmental, and religious institutions. In addition, these organizations need strong allies in society: 1) the media, which can communicate the importance of youth, women, and attitudes in the epidemic; 2) religious leaders, who can be powerful sources of advocacy for change in attitudes as well as support and care for AIDS-affected individuals and families; 3) policy makers, who can be crucial in changing existing policies and altering the allocation of government resources to youth and women; 4) human rights organizations, which play an important role in promoting the concept of health as a human right and for enhancing the understanding of AIDS in the context of discrimination and poverty; 5) the private sector, including commerce and industry, which can promote changes in attitude within the work force and AIDS prevention initiatives; and 6) parent-teacher groups and models for youth, who can educate them about socially acceptable and unacceptable behavior and can empower them to make responsible behavior choices.

  13. The American Society for Clinical Pathology's 2015 Wage Survey of Medical Laboratories in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Edna; Fisher, Patrick B

    2017-05-01

    To inform the pathology and laboratory field of the most recent national wage data from the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP). Historically, the results of this biennial survey have served as a basis for additional research on laboratory recruitment, retention, education, marketing, certification, and advocacy. The 2015 wage survey was conducted through collaboration between the ASCP's Institute of Science, Technology, and Policy in Washington, DC, and the ASCP Board of Certification in Chicago, Illinois. Electronic survey invitations were sent to individuals who are currently practicing in the field. Data reveal increased salaries since 2013 for all staff-level laboratory professionals surveyed except phlebotomists and pathologists' assistants. Laboratory assistants and phlebotomists, regardless of level, continue to have lower salaries while pathologists' assistants and administration personnel have higher salaries than the rest of the laboratory professions surveyed. Survey results put emphasis on strategic recruitment and retention by laboratory training programs and institutions that hire laboratory professionals. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. Parkinsonism and AIDS: a clinical comparative study before and after HAART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lucia Zuma de Rosso

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In 2002, after analyzing 28 HIV-positive patients with movement disorders we emphasized the decreasing not only of Parkinsonism but also of other involuntary movements in HIV patients in the last few years. The objective of this study is to compare the clinical results between HIV-positive patients with Parkinsonism before and after HAART. In 14 years (1986-1999 2,460 HIV-positive patients were seen in our Hospital 14 (0.6% of which presented with Parkinsonism. Eight years after (2000-2007 970 HIV positive patients were seen and only two (0.2% had Parkinsonism. We conclude that after the introduction of HAART there was an evident decrease in AIDS-related Parkinsonism.No ano de 2002, após analisarmos 28 pacientes HIV-positivos que apresentavam distúrbios do movimento, enfatizamos o declínio, não só do parkinsonismo, como também de outros movimentos involuntários em pacientes infectados pelo HIV nos últimos anos. O objetivo deste estudo é comparar os resultados clínicos entre pacientes HIV-positivos com parkinsonismo antes e depois da introdução do esquema HAART. Em 14 anos (1986-1999, 2.460 pacientes HIV-positivos foram avaliados em nosso Hospital dos quais 14 (0,6% apresentaram parkinsonismo. Nos oito anos seguintes (2000-2007, 970 pacientes HIV-positivos foram avaliados e somente dois (0,2% tinham parkinsonismo. Concluímos que após a introdução do esquema HAART houve evidente declínio do parkinsonismo secundário à AIDS.

  15. Artistic activities and cultural activism as responses to HIV/AIDS in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzyk, Susan

    2009-12-01

    Over the last two decades both the number and types of civil-society-led organisations involved in addressing HIV and AIDS have increased dramatically. In many cases, the work undertaken is thoughtfully researched, appropriately focused, and as a result produces positive outcomes. Yet questions can be raised about what civil society engagements involve, particularly at a micro level. An important element concerns the role of the arts in efforts to understand and address HIV and AIDS. This article examines ways that insight, analysis, and action around HIV and AIDS have unfolded through the purview of artistic activities undertaken by cultural activists in Harare, Zimbabwe-that is, arts-oriented engagements occurring beyond the boundaries of formally structured organisations. Artistic expressions, which often concern lived experiences, make clear the complex circumstances surrounding HIV and AIDS, and at the same time seek to act upon those circumstances. Understanding and addressing HIV and AIDS requires more than one form of knowledge. Drawing on data from 21 months of ethnographic research in Harare, I examine artistic expressions as legitimate forms of knowledge and as strategies for intervention.

  16. Breaking the culture of silence in checkmating HIV/AIDS as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In my investigation I set out to break the HIV/AIDS culture of silence and emphasize the role of the teacher as a researcher and critical change agent in an HIV/AIDS challenged society. My work demonstrates how teachers could play such a role by encouraging learners' participation in sport. The sport, I focussed on in my ...

  17. Opportunistic and other intestinal parasites among HIV/AIDS patients attending Gambi higher clinic in Bahir Dar city, North West Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemu, Abebe; Shiferaw, Yitayal; Getnet, Gebeyaw; Yalew, Aregaw; Addis, Zelalem

    2011-08-01

    To determine the magnitude of opportunistic and non-opportunistic intestinal parasitic infections among HIV/AIDS patients in Bahir Dar. Cross-sectional study was conducted among HIV/AIDS patients attending Gambi higher clinic from April1-May 30, 2009. Convenient sampling technique was employed to identify the study subjects and hence a total of 248 subjects were included. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic data of patients. Stool samples were examined by direct saline, iodine wet mount, formol-ether sedimentation concentration and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining technique. Out of 248 enrolled in the study, 171(69.0%) (90 males and 81 females) were infected with one or more intestinal parasites. The highest rate of intestinal parasites were observed among HIV/AIDS patients (80.3%, 151/188), and the infection rate of HIV negative individuals was 33.3% (20/60). Cryptosporidum parvum (43.6%), Isospora belli (15.5%) and Blastocystis hominis (10.5%) were opportunistic parasites that were found only in HIV/AIDS patients. Opportunistic parasite infections are common health problem among HIV/AIDS patients in the study area. Therefore, early detection and treatment of these parasites are important to improve the quality of life of HIV/AIDS patients. Copyright © 2011 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. DINAMIKA DEPRESI PADA PENDERITA AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imadduddin Parhani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a major mental health problem today. This is very important because people with depression productivity will decrease and this is very bad for a society and a country that is building. There are at least four chronic diseases that allow the depression sufferer, one of which is HIV and AIDS. Given the uncertainty over the fate of people living with HIV and AIDS had the potential to give rise to feelings of anxiety and depression. Someone who is infected with HIV and AIDS will be overcome by a feeling of dying, guilt about the behavior that makes infection, and taste sequestered by others.The cause of depression in people with HIV and AIDS by cognitive approach that is the mindset of people who deviate from the pattern of the logical interpretation or misinterprets an event or events, focusing on the negative situations that happened to him, and hope that pessimistic and negative about the future. Symptoms are raised is their depressed mood, decreased interest or pleasure in absolute terms, average of worthlessness or excessive guilt, thoughts of death. Response or reaction that occurs is refused, angry, and depressed when he learned he was infected with HIV and AIDS, and eventually be able to accept his situation. Efforts are being made to reduce depression are manifold. One is through social support to colleagues who also have HIV and AIDS.

  19. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Multimodality Imaging in Valvular Heart Disease : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, John U; Kort, Smadar; Mehran, Roxana; Schoenhagen, Paul; Soman, Prem

    2017-12-01

    This document is 1 of 2 companion appropriate use criteria (AUC) documents developed by the American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This document addresses the evaluation and use of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis and management of valvular heart disease, whereas the second, companion document addresses this topic with regard to structural heart disease. Although there is clinical overlap, the documents addressing valvular and structural heart disease are published separately, albeit with a common structure. The goal of the companion AUC documents is to provide a comprehensive resource for multimodality imaging in the context of valvular and structural heart disease, encompassing multiple imaging modalities.Using standardized methodology, the clinical scenarios (indications) were developed by a diverse writing group to represent patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included common applications and anticipated uses. Where appropriate, the scenarios were developed on the basis of the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines.A separate, independent rating panel scored the 92 clinical scenarios in this document on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that a modality is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Midrange scores of 4 to 6 indicate that a modality may be appropriate for the clinical scenario, and scores of 1 to 3 indicate that a modality is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario.The primary objective of the AUC is to provide a framework for the assessment of these scenarios by practices that will

  20. Infâncias, adolescências e AIDS Childhood, adolescence and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabete Franco Cruz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A epidemia da AIDS atinge crianças e adolescentes, demandando da sociedade a busca de respostas para seu cuidado, educação e saúde. Inúmeras ações, instituições e discursos começaram a emergir em nossa cultura, produzindo "verdades" sobre essa população. Utilizando o referencial teórico de Michael Foucault e dos estudos culturais, realizei um estudo com o objetivo de problematizar discursos sobre infância, adolescência e AIDS. Os resultados indicam que, nas práticas discursivas e não discursivas relativas às casas de apoio, sexualidade e revelação do diagnóstico, emergem modos de conceber a infância, a adolescência e a AIDS que vão "inventando" as crianças e adolescentes vivendo com HIV/AIDS. E que estes passam a narrar-se, a construir uma experiência de si mesmos através desses dispositivos que produzem subjetividades e que funcionam como uma tecnologia do eu. As discussões deste trabalho sinalizam para a necessidade de reflexão e revisão das práticas nessa área.The AIDS epidemic reaches children and adolescents, demanding from the society the search for answers to their care, education and health. Innumerable actions, institutions and discourses had started to emerge in our culture, producing "truths" about this population. Using the theoretical referential of Michael Foucault and the cultural studies I carried through a study with the objective of debate the discourses about childhood, adolescence and AIDS. The results indicate that, from the discourse practices and other ones related to support homes, sexuality and diagnosis' revelation, ways to conceive childhood, adolescence and AIDS emerge, "inventing" the children and adolescents living with HIV/AIDS. Also, these children and adolescents start to narrate themselves, and construct an experience of themselves through these devices that produce subjectivities, which function as a technology of the self. The discussions in this work point to the necessity of

  1. What is the quality of information on social oocyte cryopreservation provided by websites of Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology member fertility clinics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraham, Sarit; Machtinger, Ronit; Cahan, Tal; Sokolov, Amit; Racowsky, Catherine; Seidman, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate adequacy and adherence to American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) guidelines of internet information provided by Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART)-affiliated clinics regarding social oocyte cryopreservation (SOC). Systematic evaluation of websites of all SART member fertility clinics. The internet. None. All websites offering SOC services were scored using a 0-13 scale, based on 10 questions designed to assess website quality and adherence to the ASRM/SART guidelines. The websites were analyzed independently by two authors. Whenever disagreement occurred, a third investigator determined the score. Scores defined website quality as excellent, ≥9; moderate, 5-8; or poor, ≤4 points. Of the 387 clinics registered as SART members, 200 offered oocyte cryopreservation services for either medical or social reasons; 147 of these advertised SOC. The average website scores of those clinics offering SOC was 3.4 ± 2.1 (range, 2-11) points. There was no significant difference in scores between private versus academic clinics or clinics performing more or less than 500 cycles per year. The majority of the websites do not follow the SART/ASRM guidelines for SOC, indicating that there is a need to improve the type and quality of information provided on SOC by SART member websites. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Scientific and regulatory challenges in evaluating clinical trial protocols for HIV-1/AIDS vaccines - A review from a regulatory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Rebecca L; Zhou, TieQun; Knezevic, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Clinical development of prophylactic HIV/AIDS vaccines presents many scientific challenges that result in challenges for regulators reviewing clinical trial applications (CTAs). The World Health Organization (WHO) has the responsibility to provide technical support to these regulators. The search for an HIV/AIDS vaccine will only succeed through well-designed, -conducted and -controlled human efficacy studies reviewed and approved by regulators in countries worldwide, particularly in countries where the epidemic has hit hardest, such as in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. This review summarizes the current candidates in development and focuses on challenges regulators face when reviewing CTAs, such as the evolving landscape of "standard of prevention," trials in adolescents, adaptive trial designs, correlates of protection and their analysis, and access to successful vaccines. There are many unknowns in the field of HIV/AIDS vaccine development and often, there is not a clear right or wrong approach because of the scientific challenges described in this review. Consequently, regulators should not feel that decisions need be made in isolation, when there are many available international collaborative efforts and opportunities to seek expert advice. The WHO provides many such opportunities and support to regulators across the globe. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Computer-Aided Manufacturing Technology on Precision of Clinical Metal-Free Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Hong; Yeo, In-Sung; Wu, Benjamin M; Yang, Jae-Ho; Han, Jung-Suk; Kim, Sung-Hun; Yi, Yang-Jin; Kwon, Taek-Ka

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the marginal fit of metal-free crowns made by three different computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems. The maxillary left first premolar of a dentiform was prepared for all-ceramic crown restoration. Thirty all-ceramic premolar crowns were made, ten each manufactured by the Lava system, Cercon, and Cerec. Ten metal ceramic gold (MCG) crowns served as control. The marginal gap of each sample was measured under a stereoscopic microscope at 75x magnification after cementation. One-way ANOVA and the Duncan's post hoc test were used for data analysis at the significance level of 0.05. The mean (standard deviation) marginal gaps were 70.5 (34.4) μm for the MCG crowns, 87.2 (22.8) μm for Lava, 58.5 (17.6) μm for Cercon, and 72.3 (30.8) μm for Cerec. There were no significant differences in the marginal fit among the groups except that the Cercon crowns had significantly smaller marginal gaps than the Lava crowns (P < 0.001). Within the limitation of this study, all the metal-free restorations made by the digital CAD/CAM systems had clinically acceptable marginal accuracy.

  4. Pulmonary manifestation of AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, U.; Dinkel, E.; Laaff, H.; Wuertemberger, G.; Senn, H.; Vaith, P.; Kroepelin, T.; Freiburg Univ.; Freiburg Univ.; Freiburg Univ.; Freiburg Univ.

    1989-01-01

    We reviewed retrospectively the clinical records of 28 patients with AIDS staged group IV according to CDC-criteria. Among these, 19 had pulmonary disease: most of them (n=17) had pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (Pcp). 12/17 patients with proven Pcp displayed typical X-ray findings with diffuse perihilar interstitial infiltration sparing lung periphery. 3/17 had atypical features and 2 normal chest x-ray findings. These data are important to identify patients with pulmonary complications of AIDS. (orig.) [de

  5. Working memory and hearing aid processing: Literature findings, future directions, and clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela eSouza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Working memory—the ability to process and store information—has been identified as an important aspect of speech perception in difficult listening environments. Working memory can be envisioned as a limited-capacity system which is engaged when an input signal cannot be readily matched to a stored representation or template. This mismatch is expected to occur more frequently when the signal is degraded. Because working memory capacity varies among individuals, those with smaller capacity are expected to demonstrate poorer speech understanding when speech is degraded, such as in background noise. However, it is less clear whether (and how working memory should influence practical decisions, such as hearing treatment. Here, we consider the relationship between working memory capacity and response to specific hearing aid processing strategies. Three types of signal processing are considered, each of which will alter the acoustic signal: fast-acting wide-dynamic range compression, which smooths the amplitude envelope of the input signal; digital noise reduction, which may inadvertently remove speech signal components as it suppresses noise; and frequency compression, which alters the relationship between spectral peaks. For fast-acting wide-dynamic range compression, a growing body of data suggests that individuals with smaller working memory capacity may be more susceptible to such signal alterations, and may receive greater amplification benefit with low alteration processing. While the evidence for a relationship between wide-dynamic range compression and working memory appears robust, the effects of working memory on perceptual response to other forms of hearing aid signal processing are less clear cut. We conclude our review with a discussion of the opportunities (and challenges in translating information on individual working memory into clinical treatment, including clinically-feasible measures of working memory.

  6. Working Memory and Hearing Aid Processing: Literature Findings, Future Directions, and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Pamela; Arehart, Kathryn; Neher, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Working memory-the ability to process and store information-has been identified as an important aspect of speech perception in difficult listening environments. Working memory can be envisioned as a limited-capacity system which is engaged when an input signal cannot be readily matched to a stored representation or template. This "mismatch" is expected to occur more frequently when the signal is degraded. Because working memory capacity varies among individuals, those with smaller capacity are expected to demonstrate poorer speech understanding when speech is degraded, such as in background noise. However, it is less clear whether (and how) working memory should influence practical decisions, such as hearing treatment. Here, we consider the relationship between working memory capacity and response to specific hearing aid processing strategies. Three types of signal processing are considered, each of which will alter the acoustic signal: fast-acting wide-dynamic range compression, which smooths the amplitude envelope of the input signal; digital noise reduction, which may inadvertently remove speech signal components as it suppresses noise; and frequency compression, which alters the relationship between spectral peaks. For fast-acting wide-dynamic range compression, a growing body of data suggests that individuals with smaller working memory capacity may be more susceptible to such signal alterations, and may receive greater amplification benefit with "low alteration" processing. While the evidence for a relationship between wide-dynamic range compression and working memory appears robust, the effects of working memory on perceptual response to other forms of hearing aid signal processing are less clear cut. We conclude our review with a discussion of the opportunities (and challenges) in translating information on individual working memory into clinical treatment, including clinically feasible measures of working memory.

  7. The cost of antiretroviral treatment service for patients with HIV/AIDS in a central outpatient clinic in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen LT

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Long Thanh Nguyen,1 Bach Xuan Tran,2 Cuong Tuan Tran,1 Huong Thi Le,1 Son Van Tran1 1Authority of HIV/AIDS Control, Ministry of Health, Hanoi, Vietnam; 2Institute for Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam Introduction: Antiretroviral treatment (ART services are estimated to account for 30% of the total resources needed for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS control and prevention in Vietnam during the 2011–2020 timeframe. With international funding decreasing, determining the total cost of HIV/AIDS treatment is necessary in order to develop a master plan for the transition of ART services delivery and management. We analyzed the costs of HIV/AIDS treatment paid by both HIV programs and patients in a central outpatient clinic, and we explored factors associated with the capacity of patients to pay for this service. Methods: Patients (n=315 receiving ART in the Department of Infectious Diseases at Bach Mai Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam, were interviewed. Patient records and expenses were reviewed. Results: The total cost of ART per patient was US$611 (75% from health care providers, 25% from patients or their families. The cost of a second-line regimen was found to be 2.7 times higher than the first-line regimen cost. Most outpatients (73.3% were able to completely pay for all of their ART expenses. Capacity to pay for ART was influenced by five factors, including marital status, distance from house to clinic, patient's monthly income, household economic condition, and health insurance status. Most of the patients (84.8% would have been willing to pay for health insurance if a copayment scheme for ART were to be introduced. Conclusion: This study provides evidence on payment capacity of HIV/AIDS patients in Vietnam and supplies information on ART costs from both provider and patient perspectives. In particular, results from this study suggest that earlier access to ART

  8. A sexually transmitted disease: History of AIDS through philately.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatanoğlu, Emine Elif; Ataman, Ahmet Doğan

    2011-01-01

    AIDS has become the new plague; a disease that is not only physically and psychologically debilitating, but culturally and socially devastating as well. Like the plague, AIDS has caused fear, prejudice and even panic in society. Although there are remarkable improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease, AIDS continues its grim passage around the globe. After a slight downturn in the early 1990's, it then returned with a vengeance. By the end of the 20(th) century, AIDS was reliably estimated to have caused over 20 million deaths throughout the world. At the same time, 40 million people were estimated to be HIV positive. This paper provides an overview of the history of AIDS, including the discovery and its progress in the world through philately. Philately is the study of stamps and postal history and other related items. Philately involves more than just stamp collecting, it contains the study of the design and educational impact of a philatelic material. We have presented AIDS stamps produced world-wide to emphasize the history of AIDS.

  9. 2016 Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Coccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgiani, John N; Ampel, Neil M; Blair, Janis E; Catanzaro, Antonino; Geertsma, Francesca; Hoover, Susan E; Johnson, Royce H; Kusne, Shimon; Lisse, Jeffrey; MacDonald, Joel D; Meyerson, Shari L; Raksin, Patricia B; Siever, John; Stevens, David A; Sunenshine, Rebecca; Theodore, Nicholas

    2016-09-15

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. Infectious Diseases Society of America considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances.Coccidioidomycosis, also known as San Joaquin Valley fever, is a systemic infection endemic to parts of the southwestern United States and elsewhere in the Western Hemisphere. Residence in and recent travel to these areas are critical elements for the accurate recognition of patients who develop this infection. In this practice guideline, we have organized our recommendations to address actionable questions concerning the entire spectrum of clinical syndromes. These can range from initial pulmonary infection, which eventually resolves whether or not antifungal therapy is administered, to a variety of pulmonary and extrapulmonary complications. Additional recommendations address management of coccidioidomycosis occurring for special at-risk populations. Finally, preemptive management strategies are outlined in certain at-risk populations and after unintentional laboratory exposure. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Knowledge and attitude of Indian clinical dental students towards the dental treatment of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Marya, Charu Mohan; Sharma, Nilima; Mohanty, Vikrant; Marwah, Mohita; Oberoi, Avneet

    2014-12-01

    Oral health care of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a growing area of concern. Information on HIV- and AIDS-related knowledge among dental students provides a crucial foundation for efforts aimed at developing an appropriate dental curriculum on HIV and AIDS. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitude of Indian clinical dental students towards the treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS and perceived sources of information regarding HIV-related issues. Data were collected from clinical dental students (third year, fourth year and internship) from three dental institutions in Delhi National Capital Region (NCR). The questions assessed the knowledge and attitude towards treatment of patients with HIV and the perceived source of information related to HIV. The willingness to treat HIV-positive patients among dental students was 67.0%, and 74.20% were confident of treating a patient with HIV/AIDS. The potential problems in rendering treatment to these patients were effect on the attitude of other patients (49.90%) and staff fears (52.50%). The correct knowledge regarding the infection-control practice (barrier technique) was found among only 15.50% of respondents. The respondents had sufficient knowledge regarding the oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS. There was no correlation between the knowledge and attitude score, demonstrating a gap between knowledge and attitude among dental students regarding treatment of HIV-infected patients. Appropriate knowledge has to be delivered through the dental education curriculum, which can instil confidence in students about their ability to manage HIV-positive patients. © 2014 FDI World Dental Federation.

  11. HIV/AIDS, childhood and governance: sundering the bonds of human society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Tony

    2005-12-01

    There is a disharmonious resonance between the length of HIV infection in the individual human host and the length of a human generation. In brief, an infected person may have children, these may be orphaned and grow up to become infected, and afterwards they themselves may have children, who can be orphaned in turn. Hence, a basic unit of social structure in most human societies, the three-generation bond between grandparents, parents and the current generation - and on into the future - is repeatedly torn apart in the absence of treatment, a vaccine or behaviour change. This situation should be read against the threat of growing viral resistance. Certain implications of these processes for the future are outlined and discussed. The paper notes the uncertain future confronting societies that already have a relatively high number of orphans, and considers some otherwise unexpected possibilities, as well as the dangers of assuming that large-scale orphaning necessarily leads to social unrest and disorder.

  12. An official American thoracic society workshop report: developing performance measures from clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Jeremy M; Gould, Michael K; Krishnan, Jerry A; Wilson, Kevin C; Au, David H; Cooke, Colin R; Douglas, Ivor S; Feemster, Laura C; Mularski, Richard A; Slatore, Christopher G; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2014-05-01

    Many health care performance measures are either not based on high-quality clinical evidence or not tightly linked to patient-centered outcomes, limiting their usefulness in quality improvement. In this report we summarize the proceedings of an American Thoracic Society workshop convened to address this problem by reviewing current approaches to performance measure development and creating a framework for developing high-quality performance measures by basing them directly on recommendations from well-constructed clinical practice guidelines. Workshop participants concluded that ideally performance measures addressing care processes should be linked to clinical practice guidelines that explicitly rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, such as the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process. Under this framework, process-based performance measures would only be developed from strong recommendations based on high- or moderate-quality evidence. This approach would help ensure that clinical processes specified in performance measures are both of clear benefit to patients and supported by strong evidence. Although this approach may result in fewer performance measures, it would substantially increase the likelihood that quality-improvement programs based on these measures actually improve patient care.

  13. AID as Gift: an initial approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Cristiane da Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes that some of the key practices in the area of international cooperation for development can be better understood in terms of a gift regime. To this end, it compares ethnographic data relating to the modus operandi of the aid sector in East Timor with the legacies of Marcel Mauss and the recent production of M.A.U.S.S. International aid policies are shown to be important means for establishing hegemony in glocal negotiation spaces in which different actors construct identities and relations of alliance, honor and precedence. In this debate, it is argued that East Timor's biggest counter-gift to the international community has been to function as an instrument through which values cherished by aid donors, expressed in Western myths of good society, can once again be cultivated in the process of building a new national state.

  14. The organized sector mobilizes against AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra-kerpelman, K

    1995-01-01

    Representatives of English speaking African countries attended the International Labor Organization Tripartite Workshop on the Role of the Organized Sector in Reproductive Health and the Prevention of AIDS held in Uganda. AIDS has robbed these countries of lawyers, physicians, teachers, managers, and other skilled professionals, all of whom are difficult to replace. HIV/AIDS mainly affects persons in their most productive years (20-40 years) and in the higher socioeconomic groups. Professionals with AIDS become ill and die at a faster rate than their replacements can be trained. The young, less experienced work force translates into an increase in breakdowns, accidents, delays, and misjudgments. International and national efforts to control HIV/AIDS have not stopped the spread of HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). More than 8 million persons in SSA are HIV infected. 1.5 million in Uganda are HIV infected. As of October 1994, 30,000 persons in Zambia and 33,000 in Zimbabwe had AIDS. These numbers are just the tip of the iceberg due to underreporting. HIV/AIDS increases absenteeism among infected and healthy workers alike. It burdens the already existing scarce health care resources and equipment (e.g., in 1992, AIDS cases occupied 70% of hospital beds in Kigali, Rwanda). Unions, workers, and families must share knowledge about safer sex. The Zimbabwe Confederation of Trade Unions has had an HIV/AIDS education program since 1992. The Zambia Congress of Trade Unions strongly supports government efforts to sensitize the labor force and society to the effects of HIV/AIDS. The Federation of Uganda Employers has reached about 150,000 workers and more than 200 top executives through its AIDS prevention activities. Some company programs provide medical facilities for employees and their families. The Ubombo Ranches, Ltd. in Swaziland, a producer and processor of sugar cane, has a training-of-trainers program on HIV/AIDS and family planning for all village health workers and

  15. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Multimodality Imaging in Valvular Heart Disease: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, John U; Kort, Smadar; Mehran, Roxana; Schoenhagen, Paul; Soman, Prem; Dehmer, Greg J; Doherty, John U; Schoenhagen, Paul; Amin, Zahid; Bashore, Thomas M; Boyle, Andrew; Calnon, Dennis A; Carabello, Blase; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Conte, John; Desai, Milind; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Ferrari, Victor A; Ghoshhajra, Brian; Mehrotra, Praveen; Nazarian, Saman; Reece, T Brett; Tamarappoo, Balaji; Tzou, Wendy S; Wong, John B; Doherty, John U; Dehmer, Gregory J; Bailey, Steven R; Bhave, Nicole M; Brown, Alan S; Daugherty, Stacie L; Dean, Larry S; Desai, Milind Y; Duvernoy, Claire S; Gillam, Linda D; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Lindsay, Bruce D; Manning, Warren J; Mehrotra, Praveen; Patel, Manesh R; Sachdeva, Ritu; Wann, L Samuel; Winchester, David E; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2018-04-01

    This document is 1 of 2 companion appropriate use criteria (AUC) documents developed by the American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This document addresses the evaluation and use of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis and management of valvular heart disease, whereas the second, companion document addresses this topic with regard to structural heart disease. Although there is clinical overlap, the documents addressing valvular and structural heart disease are published separately, albeit with a common structure. The goal of the companion AUC documents is to provide a comprehensive resource for multimodality imaging in the context of valvular and structural heart disease, encompassing multiple imaging modalities. Using standardized methodology, the clinical scenarios (indications) were developed by a diverse writing group to represent patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included common applications and anticipated uses. Where appropriate, the scenarios were developed on the basis of the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines. A separate, independent rating panel scored the 92 clinical scenarios in this document on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that a modality is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Midrange scores of 4 to 6 indicate that a modality may be appropriate for the clinical scenario, and scores of 1 to 3 indicate that a modality is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario. The primary objective of the AUC is to provide a framework for the assessment of these scenarios by practices that will

  16. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases: update of the treatment guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debast, S B; Bauer, M P; Kuijper, E J

    2014-03-01

    In 2009 the first European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infection (ESCMID) treatment guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) was published. The guideline has been applied widely in clinical practice. In this document an update and review on the comparative effectiveness of the currently available treatment modalities of CDI is given, thereby providing evidence-based recommendations on this issue. A computerized literature search was carried out to investigate randomized and non-randomized trials investigating the effect of an intervention on the clinical outcome of CDI. The Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used to grade the strength of our recommendations and the quality of the evidence. The ESCMID and an international team of experts from 11 European countries supported the process. To improve clinical guidance in the treatment of CDI, recommendations are specified for various patient groups, e.g. initial non-severe disease, severe CDI, first recurrence or risk for recurrent disease, multiple recurrences and treatment of CDI when oral administration is not possible. Treatment options that are reviewed include: antibiotics, toxin-binding resins and polymers, immunotherapy, probiotics, and faecal or bacterial intestinal transplantation. Except for very mild CDI that is clearly induced by antibiotic usage antibiotic treatment is advised. The main antibiotics that are recommended are metronidazole, vancomycin and fidaxomicin. Faecal transplantation is strongly recommended for multiple recurrent CDI. In case of perforation of the colon and/or systemic inflammation and deteriorating clinical condition despite antibiotic therapy, total abdominal colectomy or diverting loop ileostomy combined with colonic lavage is recommended. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  17. Systemic therapy in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer:American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Ethan; Loblaw, D Andrew; Oliver, Thomas K; Carducci, Michael; Chen, Ronald C; Frame, James N; Garrels, Kristina; Hotte, Sebastien; Kattan, Michael W; Raghavan, Derek; Saad, Fred; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Walker-Dilks, Cindy; Williams, James; Winquist, Eric; Bennett, Charles L; Wootton, Ted; Rumble, R Bryan; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Virgo, Katherine S

    2014-10-20

    To provide treatment recommendations for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based recommendations informed by a systematic review of the literature. When added to androgen deprivation, therapies demonstrating improved survival, improved quality of life (QOL), and favorable benefit-harm balance include abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, and radium-223 ((223)Ra; for men with predominantly bone metastases). Improved survival and QOL with moderate toxicity risk are associated with docetaxel/prednisone. For asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men, improved survival with unclear QOL impact and low toxicity are associated with sipuleucel-T. For men who previously received docetaxel, improved survival, unclear QOL impact, and moderate to high toxicity risk are associated with cabazitaxel/prednisone. Modest QOL benefit (without survival benefit) and high toxicity risk are associated with mitoxantrone/prednisone after docetaxel. No benefit and excess toxicity are observed with bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib. Continue androgen deprivation (pharmaceutical or surgical) indefinitely. Abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, or (223)Ra should be offered; docetaxel/prednisone should also be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Sipuleucel-T may be offered to asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men. For men who have experienced progression with docetaxel, cabazitaxel may be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Mitoxantrone may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited clinical benefit and toxicity risk. Ketoconazole or antiandrogens (eg, bicalutamide, flutamide, nilutamide) may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited known clinical benefit. Bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib should not be offered. There is insufficient evidence to evaluate optimal sequences or

  18. Women and AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghal, P N

    1991-04-01

    In this article, Dr. P.N. Sehgal, former director of the National Institute of Communicable Diseases in Delhi, explains the steps that women need to take to protect themselves against AIDS and discusses some issues facing women who have already contracted the disease. Because of women's lack of status in the family and society, it is harder for them to ensure their safety. Women based at home often lack information on AIDS, and those women who are informed sometimes depend on their male partner for financial support, which means that they are forced to engage in unsafe sexual practices. Safer sexual practices can reduce the risk for women. Though varying in degree of safety, some safer practices include: monogamous relationships between uninfected partners; the use of condoms for all types of sexual intercourse; non-penetrative sex practices (hugging, kissing, masturbating); reducing the number of sexual partners; avoiding sex when either of the partners has open sores or any STD. Pregnant women should also receive information concerning AIDS, including: a baby born from an HIV-infected mother has a 20-40% of being infected; the risk of transmission is higher when the mother already shows signs of AIDS; and an infected baby may die within the first few years of life. the HIV transmission may occur prepartum or during birth itself, but the risk of transmission from breastfeeding is extremely low. Dr. Sehgal stresses the need for privacy and confidentiality when dealing with carriers of the disease or when carrying out HIV testing. Above all, the rights of HIV-infected people must be protected.

  19. The Significance of Sexuality and Intimacy in the Lives of Older African Americans With HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevedal, Andrea; Sankar, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Aging and HIV/AIDS research focuses primarily on standardized clinical, social, and behavioral measures, leaving unanswered questions about how this chronic and stigmatizing condition affects life course expectations and the meaning of aging with the disease. Utilizing Gaylene Becker's (1997) life course disruption theory, we explored older African Americans' experiences of living with HIV/AIDS. A purposive sample (N = 43) of seropositive African Americans aged 50 and older was selected from a parent study. Thirteen participants completed one semi-structured in-depth interview on life course expectations and experiences of living with HIV/AIDS. Interview transcripts were analyzed using standard qualitative coding and thematic analysis. Responding to broad, open-ended questions about the impact of HIV on life course expectations, participants emphasized how HIV limited their ability to experience sexuality and intimacy. Two major themes emerged, damaged sexuality and constrained intimacy. Older African Americans' discussions of living with HIV focused on the importance of and the challenges to sexuality and intimacy. Researchers and clinicians should be attentive to significant and ongoing HIV-related challenges to sexuality and intimacy facing older African Americans living with HIV/AIDS. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. An automated tuberculosis screening strategy combining X-ray-based computer-aided detection and clinical information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, Jaime; Sánchez, Clara I.; Philipsen, Rick H. H. M.; Maduskar, Pragnya; Dawson, Rodney; Theron, Grant; Dheda, Keertan; van Ginneken, Bram

    2016-04-01

    Lack of human resources and radiological interpretation expertise impair tuberculosis (TB) screening programmes in TB-endemic countries. Computer-aided detection (CAD) constitutes a viable alternative for chest radiograph (CXR) reading. However, no automated techniques that exploit the additional clinical information typically available during screening exist. To address this issue and optimally exploit this information, a machine learning-based combination framework is introduced. We have evaluated this framework on a database containing 392 patient records from suspected TB subjects prospectively recruited in Cape Town, South Africa. Each record comprised a CAD score, automatically computed from a CXR, and 12 clinical features. Comparisons with strategies relying on either CAD scores or clinical information alone were performed. Our results indicate that the combination framework outperforms the individual strategies in terms of the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (0.84 versus 0.78 and 0.72), specificity at 95% sensitivity (49% versus 24% and 31%) and negative predictive value (98% versus 95% and 96%). Thus, it is believed that combining CAD and clinical information to estimate the risk of active disease is a promising tool for TB screening.

  1. Exploring the Healthcare Environment and Associations with Clinical Outcomes of People Living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Mary; Coulter, Robert W S; Egan, James E; Friedman, Mackey Reuel; Meanley, Steven; Fisk, Stuart; Watson, Courtney; Kinsky, Suzanne

    2017-12-01

    Despite three decades of dramatic treatment breakthroughs in antiretroviral regimens, clinical outcomes for people living with HIV vary greatly. The HIV treatment cascade models the stages of care that people living with HIV go through toward the goal of viral suppression and demonstrates that <30% of those living with HIV/AIDS in the United States have met this goal. Although some research has focused on the ways that patient characteristics and patient-provider relationships contribute to clinical adherence and treatment success, few studies to date have examined the ways that contextual factors of care and the healthcare environment contribute to patient outcomes. Here, we present qualitative findings from a mixed-methods study to describe contextual and healthcare environment factors in a Ryan White Part C clinic that are associated with patients' abilities to achieve viral suppression. We propose a modification of Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization, and its more recent adaptation developed by Ulett et al., to describe the ways that clinic, system, and provider factors merge to create a system of care in which more than 86% of the patient population is virally suppressed.

  2. Effects of Computer-Aided Manufacturing Technology on Precision of Clinical Metal-Free Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Hong Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the marginal fit of metal-free crowns made by three different computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM systems. Materials and Methods. The maxillary left first premolar of a dentiform was prepared for all-ceramic crown restoration. Thirty all-ceramic premolar crowns were made, ten each manufactured by the Lava system, Cercon, and Cerec. Ten metal ceramic gold (MCG crowns served as control. The marginal gap of each sample was measured under a stereoscopic microscope at 75x magnification after cementation. One-way ANOVA and the Duncan’s post hoc test were used for data analysis at the significance level of 0.05. Results. The mean (standard deviation marginal gaps were 70.5 (34.4 μm for the MCG crowns, 87.2 (22.8 μm for Lava, 58.5 (17.6 μm for Cercon, and 72.3 (30.8 μm for Cerec. There were no significant differences in the marginal fit among the groups except that the Cercon crowns had significantly smaller marginal gaps than the Lava crowns (P<0.001.  Conclusions. Within the limitation of this study, all the metal-free restorations made by the digital CAD/CAM systems had clinically acceptable marginal accuracy.

  3. Survival differences in European patients with AIDS, 1979-89. The AIDS in Europe Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Pedersen, C; Clumeck, N

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine the pattern of survival and factors associated with the outcome of disease in patients with AIDS. DESIGN--Inception cohort. Data collected retrospectively from patients' charts. SETTING--52 clinical centres in 17 European countries. SUBJECTS--6578 adults diagnosed with AIDS....... The regional differences in survival were less pronounced for patients diagnosed in 1989 compared with earlier years. Improved survival in recent years was observed for patients with a variety of manifestations used to define AIDS but was significant only for patients diagnosed with Pneumocystis carinii...... pneumonia. The three year survival, however, remains unchanged over time. CONCLUSIONS--Survival of AIDS patients seems to vary within Europe, being shorter in southern than central and northern Europe. The magnitude of these differences, however, has declined gradually over time. Short term survival has...

  4. HIV-induced immune activation - pathogenesis and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stellbrink HJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This manuscript is communicated by the German AIDS Society (DAIG http://www.daignet.de. It summarizes a series of presentations and discussions during a workshop on immune activation due to HIV infection. The workshop was held on November 22nd 2008 in Hamburg, Germany. It was organized by the ICH Hamburg under the auspices of the German AIDS Society (DAIG e.V..

  5. A Qualitative Case Study of Smartphone-Connected Hearing Aids: Influences on Patients, Clinicians, and Patient-Clinician Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Stella L; Phelan, Shanon; Leonard, MaryAnn; Galster, Jason

    2017-06-01

    Innovations in hearing aid technology influence clinicians and individuals who use hearing aids. Little research, to date, explains the innovation adoption experiences and perspectives of clinicians and patients, which matter to a field like audiology, wherein technology innovation is constant. By understanding clinician and patient experiences with such innovations, the field of audiology may develop technologies and ways of practicing in a manner more responsive to patients' needs, and attentive to society's influence. The authors aimed to understand how new innovations influence clinician and patient experiences, through a study focusing on connected hearing aids. "Connected" refers to the wireless functional connection of hearing aids with everyday technologies like mobile phones and tablets. The authors used a qualitative collective case study methodology, borrowing from constructivist grounded theory for data collection and analysis methods. Specifically, the authors designed a collective case study of a connected hearing aid and smartphone application, composed of two cases of experience with the innovation: the case of clinician experiences, and the case of patient experiences. The qualitative sampling methods employed were case sampling, purposive within-case sampling, and theoretical sampling, and culminated in a total collective case n = 19 (clinician case n = 8; patient case n = 11). These data were triangulated with a supplementary sample of ten documents: relevant news and popular media collected during the study time frame. The authors conducted interviews with the patients and clinicians, and analyzed the interview and document data using the constant comparative method. The authors compared their two cases by looking at trends within, between, and across cases. The clinician case highlighted clinicians' heuristic-based candidacy judgments in response to the adoption of the connected hearing aids into their practice. The patient case revealed

  6. 'Checkmating HIV&AIDS': Using chess to break the silence in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, Omar

    2012-12-01

    In this article, I give an account of my 'Checkmating HIV&AIDS' action research project, which was an attempt to break the 'culture of silence' concerning HIV&AIDS and sex and sexuality in my classroom. In this project, I focused specifically on one code of sport, namely chess, and I point out and discuss the potential of using chess as an educational tool in addressing HIV&AIDS. It was found that learners enjoy playing chess and that it can be used in the Life Orientation classroom to promote HIV&AIDS awareness. This type of alternative awareness is relevant as learners in most schools were becoming fatigued by HIV&AIDS information overload. The project portrays the role of the teacher as a researcher and critical change agent in an HIV&AIDS-challenged society.

  7. Lessons for the control of AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, T H

    1987-11-15

    A balanced perspective that places acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the context of the social needs of a global society is needed to overcome the hysteria and stigmatizing that presently surrounds this public health issue. The migration of poor, rural, sexually active young people to urban centers in the Third World has clearly played a role in the dissemination of AIDS and other infectious diseases. It is necessary, however, to examine the major cause of such population movement--private enterprise. Migrant workers are used to perform menial jobs in the urban labor force. Another cause of population movements is war and political repression. The fact that young people are becoming increasingly mobile has serious implications for the control of AIDS, and this phenomenon cannot be addressed without looking at its causes. Similarly, the disproportionate mortality of minorities- -seen in the AIDS epidemic as well--calls for discrimination. To prevent and control AIDS, the 1st step is to increase understanding of its natural history and epidemiology. Then, lessons must be learned from successful public health programs rooted in a primary health care system, including the Expanded Program on Immunization and oral rehydration campaigns. Although funds should not be diverted from such programs to combat AIDS, their logistic structure should be studied. Above all, however, it must be kept in mind that the constructive influence of health education will be thwarted as long as social inequities remain.

  8. [The incidence, etiology and clinical significance of visceral mycoses in patients with AIDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, R; Nanetti, A; Mazzoni, A; Mastroianni, A; Chiodo, F

    1993-01-01

    The incidence, aetiology and clinical significance of visceral mycoses in HIV-infected subjects were evaluated by a retrospective survey of the clinical and microbiological records of 237 consecutive AIDS patients followed-up since 1984. Seventy-four patients out of 237 (31.2%) (56 males, 18 females; 55 IV drug abusers, 7 heterosexuals, 6 homobisexuals, 3 blood recipients and 3 children with congenitally-acquired HIV infection) presented 77 different episodes of visceral fungal infection as a whole, represented by candidiasis in 56 cases (oesophageal 45, pulmonary 5, sepsis 2, eye involvement 2, endocarditis and invasive oropharyngeal infection in the remaining 2 patients), cryptococcosis in 17 cases (meningoencephalitis in all subjects, with disseminated infection in 11 of them), and aspergillosis in 4 cases (pulmonary 2, cerebral and cranio-facial in the remaining 2 patients). In 57 out of 74 patients (77%), visceral mycoses were diagnostic or concurrent with the diagnosis of AIDS. Fungal diseases, as a whole, showed a significantly higher incidence (p drug abusers, whereas homobisexual men presented a significantly lower frequency (p test) than AIDS patients with other risk factors for HIV infection. The onset of cryptococcosis was significantly associated with the male sex (p test). All subjects suffering from a visceral mycosis were severely immunosuppressed, with a higher rate of neutropenia in patients developing Candida and Aspergillus spp. infection (23 out of 56 patients with visceral candidiasis and 3 out of 4 cases of aspergillosis had an absolute neutrophil count lower than 1500 cells/mm3), while a severe reduction in CD4+ lymphocyte count was more evident among patients with cryptococcosis (13 out of 17 patients had a CD4+ cell count lower than 50/mm3). After remission of the primary episode of fungal infection (obtained in 80.5% of cases), the incidence of relapse observed in a long follow-up period (mean time 57.6 +/- 39.2 weeks) was elevated both

  9. Usability evaluation of pharmacogenomics clinical decision support aids and clinical knowledge resources in a computerized provider order entry system: a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Emily Beth; Lee, Chia-Ju; Overby, Casey L; Abernethy, Neil; McCune, Jeannine; Smith, Joe W; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Pharmacogenomics (PGx) is positioned to have a widespread impact on the practice of medicine, yet physician acceptance is low. The presentation of context-specific PGx information, in the form of clinical decision support (CDS) alerts embedded in a computerized provider order entry (CPOE) system, can aid uptake. Usability evaluations can inform optimal design, which, in turn, can spur adoption. The study objectives were to: (1) evaluate an early prototype, commercial CPOE system with PGx-CDS alerts in a simulated environment, (2) identify potential improvements to the system user interface, and (3) understand the contexts under which PGx knowledge embedded in an electronic health record is useful to prescribers. Using a mixed methods approach, we presented seven cardiologists and three oncologists with five hypothetical clinical case scenarios. Each scenario featured a drug for which a gene encoding drug metabolizing enzyme required consideration of dosage adjustment. We used Morae(®) to capture comments and on-screen movements as participants prescribed each drug. In addition to PGx-CDS alerts, 'Infobutton(®)' and 'Evidence' icons provided participants with clinical knowledge resources to aid decision-making. Nine themes emerged. Five suggested minor improvements to the CPOE user interface; two suggested presenting PGx information through PGx-CDS alerts using an 'Infobutton' or 'Evidence' icon. The remaining themes were strong recommendations to provide succinct, relevant guidelines and dosing recommendations of phenotypic information from credible and trustworthy sources; any more information was overwhelming. Participants' median rating of PGx-CDS system usability was 2 on a Likert scale ranging from 1 (strongly agree) to 7 (strongly disagree). Usability evaluation results suggest that participants considered PGx information important for improving prescribing decisions; and that they would incorporate PGx-CDS when information is presented in relevant and

  10. Sexuality and Aging: discussions about AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Marinho da Silveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aging population as well as the sexual liberation has caused many taboos to be broken, and even greater access to drugs that stimulate sexual activity provided for the elderly a sense of greater security to maintain sexual activity, this has generated an increase in cases of AIDS in these individuals. AIDS is a disease caused by the HIV virus that affects the body's immune system and presented as one of the most complex and challenging ever faced by mankind pandemics. Sexuality in the elderly that was neglected by researchers, professionals and society in general, until very recently, today is cause for concern. Based on this, the objective of this study was a reflection on the process of aging of the population and a rising rate of HIV infection among the elderly. It is intended to emphasize that, despite its increase, this segment still appears to be invisible to the eyes of society and the state and that the frequency and quality of sexual activity has not been accompanied by information and actions for the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases that portion of the population.

  11. The effect of treatment with zidovudine with or without acyclovir on HIV p24 antigenaemia in patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C; Cooper, D A; Brun-Vézinet, F

    1992-01-01

    with AIDS, AIDS-related complex (ARC) or Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). DESIGN: Double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial of less than or equal to 6 months' therapy. SETTING: Samples were obtained from patients attending teaching hospital outpatient clinics in seven European countries and Australia....... SUBJECTS: One hundred and ninety-seven HIV-infected patients (60 with AIDS and 137 with ARC or KS). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Serum HIV p24-antigen levels measured using the Abbott HIV solid-phase enzyme immunoassay. RESULTS: Of 76 ARC/KS patients who were initially HIV p24-antigen-positive, one out of 25...

  12. ADAA end line report - MFS II country evaluations, Civil Society component

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, D.C.; Jacobs, J.; Terefa, W.; Getaw, H.; Getu, D.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the findings of the end line assessment of the African Development Aid Organisation (ADAA) that is a partner of Stichting Kinderpostzegels Nederland (SKN). It assesses ADAA’s contribution towards strengthening Civil Society in Ethiopia and it uses the CIVICUS analytical

  13. The use of biosimilar medicines in oncology - position statement of the Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology (SBOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, G S; Sternberg, C; Lopes, G; Chammas, R; Gifoni, M A C; Gil, R A; Araujo, D V

    2018-01-11

    A biosimilar is a biologic product that is similar to a reference biopharmaceutical product, the manufacturing process of which hinders the ability to identically replicate the structure of the original product, and therefore, it cannot be described as an absolute equivalent of the original medication. The currently available technology does not allow for an accurate copy of complex molecules, but it does allow the replication of similar molecules with the same activity. As biosimilars are about to be introduced in oncology practice, these must be evaluated through evidence-based medicine. This manuscript is a position paper, where the Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology (SBOC) aims to describe pertinent issues regarding the approval and use of biosimilars in oncology. As a working group on behalf of SBOC, we discuss aspects related to definition, labeling/nomenclature, extrapolation, interchangeability, switching, automatic substitution, clinical standards on safety and efficacy, and the potential impact on financial burden in healthcare. We take a stand in favor of the introduction of biosimilars, as they offer a viable, safe, and cost-effective alternative to the biopharmaceutical products currently used in cancer. We hope this document can provide valuable information to support therapeutic decisions that maximize the clinical benefit for the thousands of cancer patients in Brazil and can contribute to expedite the introduction of this new drug class in clinical practice. We expect the conveyed information to serve as a basis for further discussion in Latin America, this being the first position paper issued by a Latin American Oncology Society.

  14. Dermatology and HIV/AIDS in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Hu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS have greatly complicated dermatologic disease and the required care in most regions of Africa. Opportunistic infections, ectoparasites, Kaposi sarcoma, and skin manifestations of systemic infections are exceedingly common in patients with HIV/AIDS. Dermatologists have contributed significantly to our knowledge base about HIV/AIDS and have played an important educational role regarding the clinical manifestations historically. Because of the increased burden of skin disease in Africa due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic we must redouble our efforts to provide dermatology education to care providers in Africa. We review the burden of skin disease in Africa, how it relates to HIV/AIDS and global infectious disease, current educational strategies in Africa to address this need, and suggest potential solutions to move these efforts forward.

  15. Variability of bio-clinical parameters in Chinese-origin Rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus: a nonhuman primate AIDS model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although Chinese-origin Rhesus macaques (Ch RhMs infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV have been used for many years to evaluate the efficacy of AIDS vaccines and therapeutics, the bio-clinical variability of such a nonhuman primate AIDS model was so far not established. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By randomizing 150 (78 male and 72 female Ch RhMs with diverse MHC class I alleles into 3 groups (50 animals per group challenged with intrarectal (i.r. SIVmac239, intravenous (i.v. SIVmac239, or i.v. SIVmac251, we evaluated variability in bio-clinical endpoints for 118 weeks. All SIV-challenged Ch RhMs became seropositive for SIV during 1-2 weeks. Plasma viral load (VL peaked at weeks 1-2 and then declined to set-point levels as from week 5. The set-point VL was 30 fold higher in SIVmac239 (i.r. or i.v.-infected than in SIVmac251 (i.v.-infected animals. This difference in plasma VL increased overtime (>100 fold as from week 68. The rates of progression to AIDS or death were more rapid in SIVmac239 (i.r. or i.v.-infected than in SIVmac251 (i.v.-infected animals. No significant difference in bio-clinical endpoints was observed in animals challenged with i.r. or i.v. SIVmac239. The variability (standard deviation in peak/set-point VL was nearly one-half lower in animals infected with SIVmac239 (i.r. or i.v. than in those infected with SIVmac251 (i.v., allowing that the same treatment-related difference can be detected with one-half fewer animals using SIVmac239 than using SIVmac251. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide solid estimates of variability in bio-clinical endpoints needed when designing studies using the Ch RhM SIV model and contribute to the improving quality and standardization of preclinical studies.

  16. The American Society for Clinical Pathology's 2014 vacancy survey of medical laboratories in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Edna; Ali, Asma M; Soles, Ryan M; Lewis, D Grace

    2015-09-01

    To determine the extent and distribution of workforce shortages within the nation's medical laboratories. Historically, the results of this biennial survey have served as a basis for additional research on laboratory recruitment, retention, education, marketing, certification, and advocacy. The 2014 Vacancy Survey was conducted through collaboration between American Society for Clinical Pathology's Institute of Science, Technology, and Policy in Washington, DC, and the Evaluation, Measurement, and Assessment Department and Board of Certification in Chicago, Illinois. Data were collected via an Internet survey that was distributed to individuals who were able to report on staffing and certifications for their laboratories. Data reveal increased overall vacancy rates since 2012 for all departments surveyed except cytology and cytogenetics. Also, results show higher anticipated retirement rates for both staff and supervisors. Overall certification rates are highest among laboratory personnel in cytogenetics, hematology/coagulation, and flow cytometry departments and lowest among phlebotomy, specimen processing, and anatomic pathology. Factors such as retirement and the improving economy are driving the need for more laboratory professionals. Recruitment of qualified laboratory professionals in the workforce and students in laboratory programs will be the key in fulfilling the higher vacancies revealed from the survey results in 2014. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  17. Lung complications in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiske, R.; Buck, J.; Schneider, R.; Hannemann, T.; Krauss, B.

    1986-01-01

    A short description of epidemiologic and clinical facts correlated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is followed by a report on the manifestation of pulmonary infections mostly effected by pneumocystis carinii. Two examples out of four cases will demonstrate the radiographic appearance of the pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and clinical data. Only in rare cases does it seem possible to reduce the fatal outcome by early diagnosis. (orig.) [de

  18. Fertility Preservation for Patients With Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loren, Alison W.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Beck, Lindsay Nohr; Brennan, Lawrence; Magdalinski, Anthony J.; Partridge, Ann H.; Quinn, Gwendolyn; Wallace, W. Hamish; Oktay, Kutluk

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To update guidance for health care providers about fertility preservation for adults and children with cancer. Methods A systematic review of the literature published from March 2006 through January 2013 was completed using MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration Library. An Update Panel reviewed the evidence and updated the recommendation language. Results There were 222 new publications that met inclusion criteria. A majority were observational studies, cohort studies, and case series or reports, with few randomized clinical trials. After review of the new evidence, the Update Panel concluded that no major, substantive revisions to the 2006 American Society of Clinical Oncology recommendations were warranted, but clarifications were added. Recommendations As part of education and informed consent before cancer therapy, health care providers (including medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, gynecologic oncologists, urologists, hematologists, pediatric oncologists, and surgeons) should address the possibility of infertility with patients treated during their reproductive years (or with parents or guardians of children) and be prepared to discuss fertility preservation options and/or to refer all potential patients to appropriate reproductive specialists. Although patients may be focused initially on their cancer diagnosis, the Update Panel encourages providers to advise patients regarding potential threats to fertility as early as possible in the treatment process so as to allow for the widest array of options for fertility preservation. The discussion should be documented. Sperm and embryo cryopreservation as well as oocyte cryopreservation are considered standard practice and are widely available. Other fertility preservation methods should be considered investigational and should be performed by providers with the necessary expertise. PMID:23715580

  19. Results of an Integrative Analysis: A Call for Contextualizing HIV and AIDS Clinical Practice Guidelines to Support Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nancy; Kahwa, Eulalia; Hoogeveen, Katie

    2017-12-01

    Practice guidelines aim to improve the standard of care for people living with HIV/AIDS. Successfully implementing guidelines requires tailoring them to populations served and to social and organizational influences on care. To examine dimensions of context, which nurses and midwives described as having a significant impact on their care of patients living with HIV/AIDS in Kenya, Uganda, South Africa, and Jamaica and to determine whether HIV/AIDS guidelines include adaptations congruent with these dimensions of context. Two sets of data were used. The first came from a qualitative study. In-depth interviews were conducted with purposively selected nurses, midwives, and nurse managers from 21 districts in four study countries. A coding framework was iteratively developed and themes inductively identified. Context dimensions were derived from these themes. A second data set of published guidelines for HIV/AIDS care was then assembled. Guidelines were identified through Google and PubMed searches. Using a deductive integrative analysis approach, text related to context dimensions was extracted from guidelines and categorized into problem and strategy statements. Ninety-six individuals participated in qualitative interviews. Four discrete dimensions of context were identified: health workforce adequacy, workplace exposure risk, workplace consequences for nurses living with HIV/AIDS, and the intersection of work and family life. Guidelines most often acknowledged health human resource constraints and presented mitigation strategies to offset them, and least often discussed workplace consequences and the intersections of family and work life. Guidelines should more consistently acknowledge diverse implementation contexts, propose how recommendations can be adapted to these realities, and suggest what role frontline healthcare providers have in realizing the structural changes necessary for healthier work environments and better patient care. Guideline recommendations

  20. German guideline for the management of adverse reactions to ingested histamine: Guideline of the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI), the German Society for Pediatric Allergology and Environmental Medicine (GPA), the German Association of Allergologists (AeDA), and the Swiss Society for Allergology and Immunology (SGAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Imke; Ballmer-Weber, Barbara; Beyer, Kirsten; Fuchs, Thomas; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Klimek, Ludger; Lepp, Ute; Niggemann, Bodo; Saloga, Joachim; Schäfer, Christiane; Werfel, Thomas; Zuberbier, Torsten; Worm, Margitta

    2017-01-01

    Adverse food reactions are far more often perceived than objectively verified. In our scientific knowledge on non-allergic adverse reactions including the so called histamine intolerance, there are large deficits. Due to the fact that this disorder is increasingly discussed in the media and the internet, more and more people suspect it to be the trigger of their symptoms. The scientific evidence to support the postulated link between ingestion of histamine and adverse reactions is limited, and a reliable laboratory test for objective diagnosis is lacking. This position paper by the "Food Allergy" Working Group of the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI) in collaboration with the German Association of Allergologists (AeDA), the Society for Pediatric Allergology and Environmental Medicine (GPA), and the Swiss Society for Allergology and Immunology (SGAI) reviews the data on the clinical picture of adverse reactions to ingested histamine, summarizes important aspects and their consequences, and proposes a practical diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

  1. Trends in twitter use by physicians at the american society of clinical oncology annual meeting, 2010 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Aafia; Glodé, L Michael; Gillman, Matt; Miller, Robert S

    2012-05-01

    Social media channels such as Twitter are gaining increasing acceptance as mechanisms for instantaneous scientific dialogue. Professional medical societies such as ASCO are using social media to expand the reach of scientific communications at and around their scientific meetings. This article examines the how Twitter use by oncologists expanded at the ASCO Annual Meetings from 2010 to 2011. In both years, tweets that were specifically generated by physicians and that incorporated the official meeting hashtag were harvested from the public domain, and a discourse analysis was performed by three independent raters. Follow-up surveys were conducted to assess physician attitudes toward Twitter and its potential role in clinical practice. A combined total of 12,644 tweets were analyzed for 2010 and 2011. Although the number of physicians authoring tweets was small (14 in 2010, 34 in 2011), this group generated nearly 29% of the total meeting dialogue examined in this analysis in 2010 and 23% in 2011. Physicians used Twitter for reporting clinical news from scientific sessions, for discussions of treatment issues, for promotion, and to provide social commentary. The tangible impact of Twitter discussions on clinical practice remains unclear. Despite the 140-character limit, Twitter was successfully used by physicians at the 2010 and 2011 ASCO Annual Meetings to engage in clinical discussions, whether or not an author was on site as a live attendee. Twitter usage grew significantly from 2010 to 2011. Professional societies should monitor these phenomena to enhance annual meeting attendee user experience.

  2. [Clinical and bacteriological profiles of the urinary infections associated the VIH/AIDS in hospital area of Bamako, Mali].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, S; Oumar, A A; Dembele, J P; Noutache, J L; Fongoro, S; Maiga, I; Bougoudogo, F

    2007-01-01

    The syndrome of immunodepression is the bed of multiple infections of which urinary infections. The goal of this study was to determine the aspects clinical and bacteriological urinary infections during the AIDS with the service of the infectious diseases of the hospital of the Point G of February 1, 2003 to June 30 2005. The diagnosis of the urinary infection was retained on the basis of bacteria number > or =10(4) bacteriury and or leucocytes count > or =10(5)/mm3. The prevalence of the urinary infection was estimated at 8.85%. The principal clinical aspects were a symptomatic pyelonephritis 73.5%, the leucocytiury 11.8%, the cystitis 8.8%, and acute prostatitis 5.9%. Escherichia coli was the most frequent bacterium (46.7%). The sensitivity of the germs was 91.7% with the aminosides, 90.9% with the fluoroquinolones, from 63.6 to 80% respectively with the cephalosporines of first and second generation. Resistance to ampicilline, chloramphenicol and sulfamides was about 72 and 80%. The systematic research of the urinary infection is necessary during the AIDS and the antibiotherapy of choice in first intention in absence of etiologic possibility of diagnosis should be the aminosides and or the fluoroquinolones.

  3. Encounter Decision Aid vs. Clinical Decision Support or Usual Care to Support Patient-Centered Treatment Decisions in Osteoporosis: The Osteoporosis Choice Randomized Trial II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie LeBlanc

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis Choice, an encounter decision aid, can engage patients and clinicians in shared decision making about osteoporosis treatment. Its effectiveness compared to the routine provision to clinicians of the patient's estimated risk of fracture using the FRAX calculator is unknown.Patient-level, randomized, three-arm trial enrolling women over 50 with osteopenia or osteoporosis eligible for treatment with bisphosphonates, where the use of Osteoporosis Choice was compared to FRAX only and to usual care to determine impact on patient knowledge, decisional conflict, involvement in the decision-making process, decision to start and adherence to bisphosphonates.We enrolled 79 women in the three arms. Because FRAX estimation alone and usual care produced similar results, we grouped them for analysis. Compared to these, use of Osteoporosis Choice increased patient knowledge (median score 6 vs. 4, p = .01, improved understanding of fracture risk and risk reduction with bisphosphonates (p = .01 and p<.0001, respectively, had no effect on decision conflict, and increased patient engagement in the decision making process (OPTION scores 57% vs. 43%, p = .001. Encounters with the decision aid were 0.8 minutes longer (range: 33 minutes shorter to 3.0 minutes longer. There were twice as many patients receiving and filling prescriptions in the decision aid arm (83% vs. 40%, p = .07; medication adherence at 6 months was no different across arms.Supporting both patients and clinicians during the clinical encounter with the Osteoporosis Choice decision aid efficiently improves treatment decision making when compared to usual care with or without clinical decision support with FRAX results.clinical trials.gov NCT00949611.

  4. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice in First Aid Management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge, Attitude and Practice in First Aid Management of Epistaxis by ... A vast majority of these patients settle with simple standard first aid measures. ... The principal researcher administered a questionnaire to the clinical staffs who were ...

  5. Now that you want to take your HIV/AIDS vaccine/biological product research concept into the clinic: what are the "cGMP"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Rebecca L; Rangavajhula, Vijaya; Pullen, Jeffrey K; Butler, Chris; Mehra, Vijay; Shapiro, Stuart; Pensiero, Michael

    2015-04-08

    The Division of AIDS Vaccine Research Program funds the discovery and development of HIV/AIDS vaccine candidates. Basic researchers, having discovered a potential vaccine in the laboratory, next want to take that candidate into the clinic to test the concept in humans, to see if it translates. Many of them have heard of "cGMP" and know that they are supposed to make a "GMP product" to take into the clinic, but often they are not very familiar with what "cGMP" means and why these good practices are so important. As members of the Vaccine Translational Research Branch, we frequently get asked "can't we use the material we made in the lab in the clinic?" or "aren't Phase 1 studies exempt from cGMP?" Over the years, we have had many experiences where researchers or their selected contract manufacturing organizations have not applied an appropriate degree of compliance with cGMP suitable for the clinical phase of development. We share some of these experiences and the lessons learned, along with explaining the importance of cGMP, just what cGMP means, and what they can assure, in an effort to de-mystify this subject and facilitate the rapid and safe translational development of HIV vaccines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. A randomized, double-blind, phase I/II trial of tumor necrosis factor and interferon-gamma for treatment of AIDS-related complex (Protocol 025 from the AIDS Clinical Trials Group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosti, J M; Coombs, R W; Collier, A C; Paradise, M A; Benedetti, J K; Jaffe, H S; Corey, L

    1992-05-01

    To determine safety and efficacy of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related complex, a randomized, double-blind study was conducted. Twenty-five patients with AIDS-related complex and CD4 lymphocytes less than or equal to 500 x 10(6)/L attended an AIDS Clinical Trials Unit of a tertiary referral center. Patients were administered tumor necrosis factor (TNF) (10 micrograms/m2) or IFN gamma (10 micrograms/m2), or both intramuscularly three times weekly for 16 weeks. Side effects from all three preparations included fever, constitutional symptoms, and local reactions. No significant hematologic, hepatic, renal, or coagulation abnormalities were observed. CD4 lymphocyte counts, beta 2-microglobulin, p24 antigen levels, and anti-p24 antibody did not change significantly during therapy. Similarly, no significant change was noted in rates of HIV isolation from peripheral blood mononuclear cells or plasma. TNF and IFN gamma were tolerable after premedication with acetaminophen; however, no significant change in markers of human immunodeficiency virus infection was demonstrated. These cytokines alone do not appear to be of benefit, nor do they appear to hasten the progression of HIV infection.

  7. How to perform first aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloster, Annabella Satu; Johnson, Phillip John

    2016-01-13

    RATIONALE AND KEY POINTS: This article aims to help nurses to perform first aid in a safe, effective and patient-centred manner. First aid comprises a series of simple, potentially life-saving steps that an individual can perform with minimal equipment. Although it is not a legal requirement to respond to an emergency situation outside of work, nurses have a professional duty to respond and provide care within the limits of their competency. First aid is the provision of immediate medical assistance to an ill or injured person until definitive medical treatment can be accessed. First aid can save lives and it is essential that nurses understand the basic principles. REFLECTIVE ACTIVITY: Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. Your skill in performing first aid and any areas where you may need to extend your knowledge. 2. How reading this article will change your practice. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio .

  8. The Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society Ureteroscopy Global Study: Indications, Complications, and Outcomes in 11885 Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De La Rosette, Jean; Denstedt, John D; Geavlete, Petrisor A

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the current indications for ureteroscopy (URS) treatment, outcome in terms of stone-free rate, and intra- and postoperative complications using the modified Clavien grading system. Patients and Methods: The Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) collected...... prospective data as part of the URS Global Study for consecutive patients treated with URS at centers around the world for 1 year. URS was performed according to study protocol and local clinical practice guidelines. Stone size and location were recorded and postoperative outcome and complications, graded...

  9. Mandela calls for greater commitment and leadership in fighting AIDS. The World Economic Forum -- Policy and business in a world of HIV / AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macinnis R

    1997-01-01

    The 27th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, on February 3, 1997, was attended by 2000 political and financial leaders of countries and businesses around the world. The forum is the world's largest annual gathering of economic and political dignitaries. In his address to the forum, Nelson Mandela, president of South Africa, called for a global effort against AIDS and a strengthening of the world's political and business leaders' commitment against HIV/AIDS. The disease is creating global economic problems by affecting people in their prime productive and reproductive years. Mandela criticized political leaders for their limited actions in addressing the AIDS pandemic and called upon the world's business community to support government AIDS programs and help people affected by AIDS. All sectors and all spheres of society must be involved as equal partners in the war against HIV/AIDS, for neither the health sector nor government can meet the challenge on its own. If current HIV/AIDS trends continue in South Africa, AIDS will cost the country 1% of its domestic gross product by the year 2005, and up to 75% of the country's budget will be consumed by direct health costs related to HIV/AIDS. At a panel discussion preceding President Mandela's address, Dr. Peter Piot, executive director of UNAIDS, argued that the AIDS pandemic could have a devastating effect upon the global economy and urged business leaders to take strong action against the disease.

  10. CT of AIDS-related musculoskeletal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magid, D.; Fishman, E.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper characterizes musculoskeletal inflammatory diseases in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients and with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). CT, radiographic, and clinical data were reviewed in 10 patients, and patterns and features were compared with those in musculoskeletal infections occurring in non-AIDS patients. Infection was confirmed by means of biopsy or aspiration in eight cases and strongly suggested in the other two by blood cultures, cell counts, and other data

  11. Possibilities for social science research in the age of AIDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saharan Africa, and South Africa in particular, with adverse effect on individuals, families, schools, communities and society at large. Research is therefore required to provide a deeper understanding of the complexities of HIV and AIDS in order to ...

  12. Access to HIV/AIDS services for disabled persons in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helle Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    Abstract This project is based on five weeks’ ethnographically inspired fieldwork in May 2006 in the Republic of Uganda. The study started out with the hypothesis that there was some kind of discrimination going on in the interaction between health workers at HIV/AIDS clinics, and person with dis......Abstract This project is based on five weeks’ ethnographically inspired fieldwork in May 2006 in the Republic of Uganda. The study started out with the hypothesis that there was some kind of discrimination going on in the interaction between health workers at HIV/AIDS clinics, and person...... with disabilities (PWDs) coming for HIV/AIDS testing or treatment. However, problems with discriminatory attitudes towards PWDs could not be confirmed from my fieldwork observations at five different HIV/AIDS clinics in Uganda. That observation was confirmed in my interviews with PWDs and health workers. Health...... workers said that PWDs were entitled to the same care and treatment as everybody else. However, I observed that only few PWDs seem to attend those HIV/AIDS services, and the question arose why that is so. Problems with access and confidence (for example lack of sign language interpreters) are often...

  13. Breaking the Culture of Silence in Checkmating HIV/AIDS as a Teacher-Researcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, O.

    2010-01-01

    In my investigation I set out to break the HIV/AIDS culture of silence and emphasize the role of the teacher as a researcher and critical change agent in an HIV/AIDS challenged society. My work demonstrates how teachers could play such a role by encouraging learners' participation in sport. The sport, I focussed on in my action research project…

  14. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. Clinical study on the efficacy, acceptance, and safety of hearing aids in patients with mild to moderate presbyacusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanet, Phillipe; Guy, Martine; Allaert, Francois-André

    2018-04-17

    of the study: The primary objective of this trial was to demonstrate the effect of wearing a Hearing aid (HA) on improvement of hearing and comprehension in everyday life situations. This mono-centre phase IV open-label clinical trial was carried out on men or women 40 years old or more, presenting mild or moderate first-degree presbyacusis. Presbyacusis was diagnosed by performance of pure-tone audiometry in silence. The main criterion was the comparison of the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile (GHABP) before wearing HA and after a month of use and the secondary one was audiometric parameters. 47 patients, 60.0 ± 6.9 years old were included in the study. After 4 weeks, when wearing HA, no significant difficulty remains in the patients when they watch television (GHABP situation 1) or when they have a conversation without background noise (GHABP situation 2). To have a conversation in a busy street or a shop GHABP (situation 3) 4.4% of patients still have great difficulty, as are 2.2% of them when participating in a group conversation (GHABP situation 4). The GHABP score of residual disability for the whole of the 4 situations of difficulty is 1.3 ± 0.5, translating into no or only slight residual disability, in very significant amelioration of 1.3 ± 0.7 points (p: <0.0001), or 46.4% compared to the initial value. Audiometric parameters were also significantly improved. This study has allowed us to highlight from a clinical as well as an audiometric perspective the safety, effectiveness, as well as the important benefit of Sonalto® pre-set hearing aids on the improvement of hearing in patients presenting incipient presbyacusis.

  16. Clinical features of AIDS patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma with isolated bone marrow involvement: report of 12 cases at a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corti, Marcelo; Villafañe, Maria; Minue, Gonzalo; Campitelli, Ana; Narbaitz, Marina; Gilardi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    To study the main clinical and histopathological features of 12 patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) diagnosed primarily from bone marrow (BM) involvement. We included 12 acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients with HL assisted in the F. J. Muñiz Infectious Diseases Hospital since January 2002 to December 2013. The diagnosis of HL with primary BM involvement in patients was confirmed by clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical findings. All patients presented “B” symptoms and pancytopenia. All of them had stage IV neoplasm disease because of BM infiltration. The median of CD4 + T-cell counts was 114 cells/μL, and mixed cellularity (MC) was the most frequent histopathological subtype of 92% cases. When other causes are excluded, BM biopsy should be performed in AIDS patients with “B” symptoms and pancytopenia to evaluate BM infiltration by atypical lymphocytes

  17. Tracking the workforce: the American Society of Clinical Oncology workforce information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, M Kelsey; Kosty, Michael P; Bajorin, Dean F; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Goldstein, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    In anticipation of oncologist workforce shortages projected as part of a 2007 study, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) worked with a contractor to create a workforce information system (WIS) to assemble the latest available data on oncologist supply and cancer incidence and prevalence. ASCO plans to publish findings annually, reporting on new data and tracking trends over time. THE WIS REPORT IS COMPOSED OF THREE SECTIONS: supply, new entrants, and cancer incidence and prevalence. Tabulations of the number of oncologists in the United States are derived mainly from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. Information on fellows and residents in the oncology workforce pipeline come from published sources such as Journal of the American Medical Association. Incidence and prevalence estimates are published by the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute. The WIS reports a total of 13,084 oncologists working in the United States in 2011. Oncologists are defined as those physicians who designate hematology, hematology/oncology, or medical oncology as their specialty. The WIS compares the characteristics of these oncologists with those of all physicians and tracks emerging trends in the physician training pipeline. Observing characteristics of the oncologist workforce over time allows ASCO to identify, prioritize, and evaluate its workforce initiatives. Accessible figures and reports generated by the WIS can be used by ASCO and others in the oncology community to advocate for needed health care system and policy changes to help offset future workforce shortages.

  18. Tracking the Workforce: The American Society of Clinical Oncology Workforce Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, M. Kelsey; Kosty, Michael P.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Goldstein, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In anticipation of oncologist workforce shortages projected as part of a 2007 study, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) worked with a contractor to create a workforce information system (WIS) to assemble the latest available data on oncologist supply and cancer incidence and prevalence. ASCO plans to publish findings annually, reporting on new data and tracking trends over time. Methods: The WIS report is composed of three sections: supply, new entrants, and cancer incidence and prevalence. Tabulations of the number of oncologists in the United States are derived mainly from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. Information on fellows and residents in the oncology workforce pipeline come from published sources such as Journal of the American Medical Association. Incidence and prevalence estimates are published by the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute. Results: The WIS reports a total of 13,084 oncologists working in the United States in 2011. Oncologists are defined as those physicians who designate hematology, hematology/oncology, or medical oncology as their specialty. The WIS compares the characteristics of these oncologists with those of all physicians and tracks emerging trends in the physician training pipeline. Conclusion: Observing characteristics of the oncologist workforce over time allows ASCO to identify, prioritize, and evaluate its workforce initiatives. Accessible figures and reports generated by the WIS can be used by ASCO and others in the oncology community to advocate for needed health care system and policy changes to help offset future workforce shortages. PMID:23633965

  19. Zimbabwe's national AIDS levy: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Nisha; Kilmarx, Peter H; Dube, Freeman; Manenji, Albert; Dube, Medelina; Magure, Tapuwa

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a case study of the Zimbabwe National AIDS Trust Fund ('AIDS Levy') as an approach to domestic government financing of the response to HIV and AIDS. Data came from three sources: a literature review, including a search for grey literature, review of government documents from the Zimbabwe National AIDS Council (NAC), and key informant interviews with representatives of the Zimbabwean government, civil society and international organizations. The literature search yielded 139 sources, and 20 key informants were interviewed. Established by legislation in 1999, the AIDS Levy entails a 3% income tax for individuals and 3% tax on profits of employers and trusts (which excluded the mining industry until 2015). It is managed by the parastatal NAC through a decentralized structure of AIDS Action Committees. Revenues increased from inception to 2006 through 2008, a period of economic instability and hyperinflation. Following dollarization in 2009, annual revenues continued to increase, reaching US$38.6 million in 2014. By policy, at least 50% of funds are used for purchase of antiretroviral medications. Other spending includes administration and capital costs, HIV prevention, and monitoring and evaluation. Several financial controls and auditing systems are in place. Key informants perceived the AIDS Levy as a 'homegrown' solution that provided country ownership and reduced dependence on donor funding, but called for further increased transparency, accountability, and reduced administrative costs, as well as recommended changes to increase revenue. The Zimbabwe AIDS Levy has generated substantial resources, recently over US$35 million per year, and signals an important commitment by Zimbabweans, which may have helped attract other donor resources. Many key informants considered the Zimbabwe AIDS Levy to be a best practice for other countries to follow.

  20. The AIDS and Cancer Specimen Resource: Role in HIV/AIDS scientific discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGrath Michael S

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The AIDS Cancer and Specimen Resource (ACSR supports scientific discovery in the area of HIV/AIDS-associated malignancies. The ACSR was established as a cooperative agreement between the NCI (Office of the Director, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis and regional consortia, University of California, San Francisco (West Coast, George Washington University (East Coast and Ohio State University (Mid-Region to collect, preserve and disperse HIV-related tissues and biologic fluids and controls along with clinical data to qualified investigators. The available biological samples with clinical data and the application process are described on the ACSR web site. The ACSR tissue bank has more than 100,000 human HIV positive specimens that represent different processing (43, specimen (15, and anatomical site (50 types. The ACSR provides special biospecimen collections and prepares speciality items, e.g., tissue microarrays (TMA, DNA libraries. Requests have been greatest for Kaposi's sarcoma (32% and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (26%. Dispersed requests include 83% tissue (frozen and paraffin embedded, 18% plasma/serum and 9% other. ACSR also provides tissue microarrays of, e.g., Kaposi's sarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, for biomarker assays and has developed collaborations with other groups that provide access to additional AIDS-related malignancy specimens. ACSR members and associates have completed 63 podium and poster presentations. Investigators have submitted 125 letters of intent requests. Discoveries using ACSR have been reported in 61 scientific publications in notable journals with an average impact factor of 7. The ACSR promotes the scientific exploration of the relationship between HIV/AIDS and malignancy by participation at national and international scientific meetings, contact with investigators who have productive research in this area and identifying, collecting, preserving, enhancing, and dispersing HIV/AIDS

  1. A critical comparison of clinical decision instruments for computed tomographic scanning in mild closed traumatic brain injury in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Sherman C; Fabbri, Andrea; Servadei, Franco; Glick, Henry A

    2009-02-01

    A number of clinical decision aids have been introduced to limit unnecessary computed tomographic scans in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. These aids differ in the risk factors they use to recommend a scan. We compare the instruments according to their sensitivity and specificity and recommend ones based on incremental benefit of correctly classifying patients as having surgical, nonsurgical, or no intracranial lesions. We performed a secondary analysis of prospectively collected database from 7,955 patients aged 10 years or older with mild traumatic brain injury to compare sensitivity and specificity of 6 common clinical decision strategies: the Canadian CT Head Rule, the Neurotraumatology Committee of the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies, the New Orleans, the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study II (NEXUS-II), the National Institute of Clinical Excellence guideline, and the Scandinavian Neurotrauma Committee guideline. Excluded from the database were patients for whom the history of trauma was unclear, the initial Glasgow Coma Scale score was less than 14, the injury was penetrating, vital signs were unstable, or who refused diagnostic tests. Patients revisiting the emergency department within 7 days were counted only once. The percentage of scans that would have been required by applying each of the 6 aids were Canadian CT head rule (high risk only) 53%, Canadian (medium & high risk) 56%, the Neurotraumatology Committee of the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies 56%, New Orleans 69%, NEXUS-II 56%, National Institute of Clinical Excellence 71%, and the Scandinavian 50%. The 6 decision aids' sensitivities for surgical hematomas could not be distinguished statistically (P>.05). Sensitivity was 100% (95% confidence interval [CI] 96% to 100%) for NEXUS-II, 98.1% (95% CI 93% to 100%) for National Institute of Clinical Excellence, and 99.1% (95% CI 94% to 100%) for the other 4 clinical decision instruments. Sensitivity for

  2. Society of Interventional Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Picture yourself in L.A. Register now SIR Essentials Purchase/register Search SIR's entire catalog for educational ... Quality Improvement Clinical practice MACRA Matters Health Policy, Economics, Coding Toolkits Society of Interventional Radiology 3975 Fair ...

  3. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, The Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and The American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology: Clinical Practice Guidelines-Anticoagulation During Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Baker, Robert A; Ferraris, Victor A; Greilich, Philip E; Fitzgerald, David; Roman, Philip; Hammon, John W

    2018-02-01

    Despite more than a half century of "safe" cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), the evidence base surrounding the conduct of anticoagulation therapy for CPB has not been organized into a succinct guideline. For this and other reasons, there is enormous practice variability relating to the use and dosing of heparin, monitoring heparin anticoagulation, reversal of anticoagulation, and the use of alternative anticoagulants. To address this and other gaps, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and the American Society of Extracorporeal Technology developed an Evidence Based Workgroup. This was a group of interdisciplinary professionals gathered to summarize the evidence and create practice recommendations for various aspects of CPB. To date, anticoagulation practices in CPB have not been standardized in accordance with the evidence base. This clinical practice guideline was written with the intent to fill the evidence gap and to establish best practices in anticoagulation therapy for CPB using the available evidence. To identify relevant evidence, a systematic review was outlined and literature searches were conducted in PubMed using standardized medical subject heading (MeSH) terms from the National Library of Medicine list of search terms. Search dates were inclusive of January 2000 to December 2015. The search yielded 833 abstracts, which were reviewed by two independent reviewers. Once accepted into the full manuscript review stage, two members of the writing group evaluated each of 286 full papers for inclusion eligibility into the guideline document. Ninety-six manuscripts were included in the final review. In addition, 17 manuscripts published before 2000 were included to provide method, context, or additional supporting evidence for the recommendations as these papers were considered sentinel publications. Members of the writing group wrote and developed recommendations based on review of the articles obtained and achieved

  4. Epidemiological patterns of mortality due to visceral leishmaniasis and HIV/AIDS co-infection in Brazil, 2000-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Melo, Francisco Rogerlândio; Lima, Mauricélia da Silveira; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Ramos, Alberto Novaes; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2014-06-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL)-HIV/AIDS co-infection is an emerging health problem with high case fatality. This study presents the epidemiological and clinical aspects of deaths related to VL-HIV/AIDS co-infection in Brazil. This was a nationwide population-based study based on mortality data obtained from the Brazilian Mortality Information System. We included all deaths between 2000 and 2011 (about 12.5 million), and analyzed those in which VL and HIV/AIDS were mentioned in the same death certificate. VL and HIV/AIDS were mentioned in 272 deaths. HIV/AIDS was the underlying cause in 59.6% (162/272) of deaths by VL-HIV/AIDS co-infection, and VL the underlying cause in 39.3% (107/272). Predominating characteristics were: male gender (79.0%, 215/272), age 30-39 years (41.0%, 111/271), brown race/color (61.6%, 159/258) and residence in the Northeast region (47.4%, 129/272). Average annual age-adjusted mortality rate was 0.13 deaths/1 000 000 inhabitants. Deaths were distributed in 20 of 27 Brazilian states. There was an increasing trend of mortality (annual percent change: 16.4%). Infectious/parasitic (58.8%) and respiratory (51.1%) diseases/disorders, particularly sepsis, respiratory failure and pneumonia, were most commonly associated with deaths related to this co-infection. VL-HIV/AIDS co-infection is an increasing public health problem in Brazil. The systematic description of the epidemiological characteristics and magnitude of mortality related to VL-HIV/AIDS co-infection reflects the need to intensify control measures and disease surveillance. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. S4HARA: System for HIV/AIDS resource allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasry, Arielle; Carter, Michael W; Zaric, Gregory S

    2008-03-26

    HIV/AIDS resource allocation decisions are influenced by political, social, ethical and other factors that are difficult to quantify. Consequently, quantitative models of HIV/AIDS resource allocation have had limited impact on actual spending decisions. We propose a decision-support System for HIV/AIDS Resource Allocation (S4HARA) that takes into consideration both principles of efficient resource allocation and the role of non-quantifiable influences on the decision-making process for resource allocation. S4HARA is a four-step spreadsheet-based model. The first step serves to identify the factors currently influencing HIV/AIDS allocation decisions. The second step consists of prioritizing HIV/AIDS interventions. The third step involves allocating the budget to the HIV/AIDS interventions using a rational approach. Decision-makers can select from several rational models of resource allocation depending on availability of data and level of complexity. The last step combines the results of the first and third steps to highlight the influencing factors that act as barriers or facilitators to the results suggested by the rational resource allocation approach. Actionable recommendations are then made to improve the allocation. We illustrate S4HARA in the context of a primary healthcare clinic in South Africa. The clinic offers six types of HIV/AIDS interventions and spends US$750,000 annually on these programs. Current allocation decisions are influenced by donors, NGOs and the government as well as by ethical and religious factors. Without additional funding, an optimal allocation of the total budget suggests that the portion allotted to condom distribution be increased from 1% to 15% and the portion allotted to prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections be increased from 43% to 71%, while allocation to other interventions should decrease. Condom uptake at the clinic should be increased by changing the condom distribution policy from a pull system to a push

  6. My secret: the social meaning of HIV/AIDS stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judgeo, N; Moalusi, K P

    2014-01-01

    This study uses Goffman's [1963. Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity, New Jersey, Prentice-Hall] theory of stigma as an intellectual scaffold to help understand the social meaning of HIV/AIDS stigma from People Living with HIV/AIDS. The study adopts a qualitative approach because of its appropriateness for unravelling subjective phenomena such as the experiences of HIV/AIDS stigma. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 HIV-positive employees of a retailing company located in the Western Cape province of South Africa who volunteered to participate in the study. The participants with the discreditable stigma internalised society's prejudice towards those living with the virus. As a result, the participants relied on self-isolation and social withdrawal to cope with enacted stigma. Managing information about one's status and deciding whether, who, when, etc., to tell are crucial questions. The participants feared being devalued by family, friends, co-workers and the community. In concurrence with Goffman [1963], the HIV/AIDS stigma is seen as about relationships.

  7. Hearing aid fine-tuning based on Dutch descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielemans, Thijs; Pans, Donné; Chenault, Michelene; Anteunis, Lucien

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to derive an independent fitting assistant based on expert consensus. Two questions were asked: (1) what (Dutch) terms do hearing impaired listeners use nowadays to describe their specific hearing aid fitting problems? (2) What is the expert consensus on how to resolve these complaints by adjusting hearing aid parameters? Hearing aid dispensers provided descriptors that impaired listeners use to describe their reactions to specific hearing aid fitting problems. Hearing aid fitting experts were asked "How would you adjust the hearing aid if its user reports that the aid sounds…?" with the blank filled with each of the 40 most frequently mentioned descriptors. 112 hearing aid dispensers and 15 hearing aid experts. The expert solution with the highest weight value was considered the best solution for that descriptor. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to identify a factor structure in fitting problems. Nine fitting problems could be identified resulting in an expert-based, hearing aid manufacturer independent, fine-tuning fitting assistant for clinical use. The construction of an expert-based, hearing aid manufacturer independent, fine-tuning fitting assistant to be used as an additional tool in the iterative fitting process is feasible.

  8. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy among patients with renal anomalies: patient characteristics and outcomes; a subgroup analysis of the clinical research office of the endourological society global percutaneous nephrolithotomy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, Palle Jörn; Razvi, Hassan; Liatsikos, Evangelos

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the characteristics and outcomes of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in patients with and without renal malformations using the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PCNL Global Study database.......This study compared the characteristics and outcomes of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in patients with and without renal malformations using the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PCNL Global Study database....

  9. Prevalence of intestinal parasites and associated risk factors among HIV/AIDS patients with pre-ART and on-ART attending dessie hospital ART clinic, Northeast Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missaye, Assefa; Dagnew, Mulat; Alemu, Abebe; Alemu, Agersew

    2013-02-25

    Intestinal parasites are a major concern in most developing countries where HIV/AIDS case are concentrate and almost 80% of AIDS patients die of AIDS-related infections. In the absence of ART, HIV/AIDS patients in developing countries unfortunately continue to suffer from the consequences of opportunistic parasites. But this prevalence has dramatically decreased in countries where antiretroviral agents are widely available. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of intestinal parasite and risk factor among pre- ART and on ART adult HIV/ AIDS patients attending ART clinic in Dessie hospital. A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted among pre-ART and on ART adult HIV/AIDS patients of Dessie Hospital. A total of 272 (136 from each group) study subjects were selected by using systematic random sampling. Stool sample was collected and processed using direct wet mount, formol-ether concentration technique and modified Ziehl-Neelson staining techniques. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on Sociodemographic & associated risk factors. Data was entered and analyzed by using SPSS 16 software and logistic regressions were applied to assess any association between explanatory factors and outcome variables. The overall prevalence of IP in pre-ART and on-ART was 39% and 17.6%, respectively with significant decrease of intestinal parasite in the ART era (p intestinal parasite. The overall prevalence of IP was differ by ART status and opportunistic parasite like cryptosporidium spps were found in low CD4 counts in ART naive patients. This study identified some environmental and some clinical finding as determinant factor for IP infections. Therefore, public health measures and adherence to ART should be strengthened to improve the quality of life of these patients.

  10. Slow-release granisetron (APF530) versus palonosetron for chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting: analysis by American Society of Clinical Oncology emetogenicity criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftopoulos, Harry; Boccia, Ralph; Cooper, William; O'Boyle, Erin; Gralla, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    APF530 is a novel sustained-release formulation of granisetron. In a Phase III trial, APF530 500 mg was noninferior to palonosetron 0.25 mg in preventing acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) after moderately (MEC) or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) and delayed CINV after MEC, but not superior in preventing delayed CINV after HEC. Emetogenicity was classified by Hesketh criteria; this reanalysis uses newer American Society of Clinical Oncology criteria. Complete responses (no emesis or rescue medication) after cycle one were reanalyzed after reclassification of MEC and HEC by American Society of Clinical Oncology criteria. APF530 maintained noninferiority to palonosetron. Single-dose APF530 is a promising alternative to palonosetron for preventing acute and delayed CINV after MEC or HEC. The Clinicaltrials.gov identifier for this study is NCT00343460.

  11. Psychological distress amongst AIDS-orphaned children in urban South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluver, Lucie; Gardner, Frances; Operario, Don

    2007-08-01

    South Africa is predicted to have 2.3 million children orphaned by Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) by 2020 (Actuarial Society of South Africa, 2005). There is little knowledge about impacts of AIDS-related bereavement on children, to aid planning of services. This study aimed to investigate psychological consequences of AIDS orphanhood in urban township areas of Cape Town, South Africa, compared to control groups of children and adolescents orphaned by other causes, and non-orphans. One thousand and twenty-five children and adolescents (aged 10-19) were interviewed using socio-demographic questionnaires and standardised scales for assessing depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, peer problems, delinquency and conduct problems. Controlling for socio-demographic factors such as age, gender, formal/informal dwelling and age at orphanhood, children orphaned by AIDS were more likely to report symptoms of depression, peer relationship problems, post-traumatic stress, delinquency and conduct problems than both children orphaned by other causes and non-orphaned children. Anxiety showed no differences. AIDS-orphaned children were more likely to report suicidal ideation. Compared to Western norms, AIDS-orphaned children showed higher levels of internalising problems and delinquency, but lower levels of conduct problems. Children orphaned by AIDS may be a particularly vulnerable group in terms of emotional and, to a lesser extent, behavioural problems. Intervention programs are necessary to ameliorate the psychological sequelae of losing a parent to AIDS.

  12. Gender and HIV/AIDS in Bangladesh: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joydeb Garai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The HIV/AIDS epidemic portrays a growing health threat in the world. In Bangladesh, the prevalence rate of HIV/AIDS is not yet high but it is gradually becoming a threat especially for women and young girls due to gender disparity. This systematic review was conducted to explore the gender-specific vulnerability to HIV/AIDS in Bangladesh in order to suggest to policy makers the best way for the prevention of HIV/AIDS in Bangladesh as well as in other low income countries. Methods: Peer review articles were identified using a systematic search of two databases: Pubmed and Goggle Scholar. The search was limited to studies published in English between 1998 and 2016 and included a special focus on articles addressing the gender-specific risk factors to HIV/ AIDS. Discussion and Conclusion: This paper analyzes how women and girls in marginalized position in the society fall victim to HIV/AIDS due to gender disparities and other related issues. The findings of the study indicate that women and young girls are the most vulnerable to HIV/AIDS infection among the general people. Along with biological susceptibility, other major causes of this vulnerability of women and girls are gender inequality, sexual abuse and violence, social stigma, inability to decision making power, economic dependency and men’s sexual power and privilege over women. This paper helps policy makers and invites them to take special care to reduce gender inequality before implementing any policy for the prevention of HIV/AIDS in Bangladesh as well as in low income countries.

  13. Perfil clínico da Enterocolite por Citomegalovírus (CMV na síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida (Aids Clinical profile of Cytomegalovirus Colitis in AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.B. de Lima

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Múltiplos agentes estão envolvidos na etiopatogenia da diarréia em Aids. O exame de fezes e a colonoscopia são elementos decisivos para o diagnóstico específico. A enterocolite por CMV pode cursar com febre, emagrecimento, diarréia intermitente e hematoquesia. Outros agentes causadores de diarréia podem ter o mesmo espectro de apresentação. OBJETIVO: Definir o perfil clínico da enterocolite por CMV em pacientes com Aids, comparando os parâmetros clínicos, endoscópicos e de tempo de sobrevida entre dois grupos com diarréia crônica, grupo A com CMV e grupo B sem CMV. MÉTODOS: Foram acompanhados 48 pacientes com Aids e diarréia de duração maior que 30 dias, sendo 27 do grupo A e 21 do grupo B. Os parâmetros analisados foram idade, situação de risco, duração da diarréia, hematoquesia, intervalo de tempo entre diagnóstico da infecção por HIV e início de diarréia, achados endoscópicos e sobrevida. Foram realizados exames parasitológicos, culturas e colonoscopia com biópsias. Foi utilizado o teste "t-student" para amostras não pareadas e o teste Qui-Quadrado com correção de Yates para variáveis não paramétricas. Foram construídas curvas de sobrevida pelo método descrito por Kaplan-Meier e aplicado o teste de Mantel - Haenszel. Foi assumido como nível de significância estatística o valor de P menor que 0.05. RESULTADOS: O padrão endoscópico da infecção por CMV correspondeu a ulcerações associadas a hemorragia de submucosa 14 (51.8% P P > 0.001. Os outros parâmetros estudados não mostraram significância estatística. CONCLUSÕES: A presença de enterocolite por CMV em Aids é marcador de mau prognóstico e menor sobrevida. Existe um padrão endoscópico sugestivo da infecção por CMV.OBJECTIVE: To determine the clinical profile of CMV colitis in AIDS patients, comparing clinical, endoscopic parameters and survival time between 2 groups of AIDS patients having chronic diarrhea. Group A being CMV

  14. Now That You Want to Take Your HIV/AIDS Vaccine/Biological Product Research Concept into the Clinic: What are “cGMP”?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Rebecca L.; Rangavajhula, Vijaya; Pullen, Jeffrey K.; Butler, Chris; Mehra, Vijay; Shapiro, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    The Division of AIDS Vaccine Research Program funds the discovery and development of HIV/AIDS vaccine candidates. Basic researchers, having discovered a potential vaccine in the laboratory, next want to take that candidate into the clinic to test the concept in humans, to see if it translates. Many of them have heard of “cGMP” and know that they are supposed to make a “GMP product” to take into the clinic, but often they are not very familiar with what “cGMP” means and why these good practices are so important. As members of the Vaccine Translational Research Branch, we frequently get asked “can’t we use the material we made in the lab in the clinic?” or “aren’t Phase 1 studies exempt from cGMP?” Over the years, we have had many experiences where researchers or their selected contract manufacturing organizations have not applied an appropriate degree of compliance with cGMP suitable for the clinical phase of development. We share some of these experiences and the lessons learned, along with explaining the importance of cGMP, just what cGMP means, and what they can assure, in an effort to de-mystify this subject and facilitate the rapid and safe translational development of HIV vaccines. PMID:25698494

  15. Clinical outcomes and immune benefits of anti-epileptic drug therapy in HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krentz Hartmut B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs are frequently prescribed to persons with HIV/AIDS receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART although the extent of AED use and their interactions with cART are uncertain. Herein, AED usage, associated toxicities and immune consequences were investigated. Methods HIV replication was analysed in proliferating human T cells during AED exposure. Patients receiving AEDs in a geographically-based HIV care program were assessed using clinical and laboratory variables in addition to assessing AED indication, type, and cumulative exposures. Results Valproate suppressed proliferation in vitro of both HIV-infected and uninfected T cells (p 0.05 but AED exposures did not affect HIV production in vitro. Among 1345 HIV/AIDS persons in active care between 2001 and 2007, 169 individuals were exposed to AEDs for the following indications: peripheral neuropathy/neuropathic pain (60%, seizure/epilepsy (24%, mood disorder (13% and movement disorder (2%. The most frequently prescribed AEDs were calcium channel blockers (gabapentin/pregabalin, followed by sodium channel blockers (phenytoin, carbamazepine, lamotrigine and valproate. In a nested cohort of 55 AED-treated patients receiving cART and aviremic, chronic exposure to sodium and calcium channel blocking AEDs was associated with increased CD4+ T cell levels (p 0.05 with no change in CD8+ T cell levels over 12 months from the beginning of AED therapy. Conclusions AEDs were prescribed for multiple indications without major adverse effects in this population but immune status in patients receiving sodium or calcium channel blocking drugs was improved.

  16. Pulmonary infection in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seog Joon; Im, Jung Gi; Seong, Chang Kyu; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Han, Man Chung; Song, Jae Woo

    1998-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and radiological manifestations of pulmonary infection in patients with AIDS. We reviewed the medical records and analyzed retrospectively analysed the chest radiographs(n=3D24) and CT scans(n=3D11) of 26 patients with AIDS who had been followed up at our institute from 1987 to June 1998. Pulmonary infections were confirmed by sputum smear and culture(n=3D18), pleural examination(n=3D3), bronchoalveolar lavage(n=3D3), autopsy(n=3D4), transbronchial lung biopsy(n=3D1) or clinical history(n=3D9). The study group included 23 men and three women aged 25-54(average 35.2) years. We correlated the radiologic findings with CD4 lymphocyte counts. Pulmonary infections included tuberculosis(n=3D22), pneumocystis carinii pneumonia(n=3D9), cytomegalovirus(n=3D3), and unidentified bacterial pneumonia(n=3D2). Radiologically pulmonary tuberculosis was classified as primary tuberculosis(n=3D11;mean CD4 counts:41.3 cells/mm 3 ) and post-primary tuberculosis(n=3D11;mean CD4 counts:251.3cells/mm 3 ). CT findings of tuberculosis included lymphadenitis(n=3D6), bronchogenic spread(n=3D5), large consolidation(n=3D4), esophago-mediastinal fistula(n=3D2), and cavity(n=3D1). Tuberculosis in AIDS responded rapidly to anti-TB medication with complete or marked resolution of lesions within three months. Radiologic findings of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia included diffuse ground glass opacities, cysts, and reticular opacities. Tuberculosis was the most common infection in patients with AIDS in Korea, and this is attributed to the high prevalence of tuberculosis. Radiological findings varied with CD4+cell count, showing those of primary tuberculosis as a patient's CD4+ cell count decreased. Pulmonary tuberculosis in AIDS responded rapidly to anti-Tb medication. =20

  17. Nationwide surveillance of bacterial respiratory pathogens conducted by the surveillance committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy, the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases, and the Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology in 2012: General view of the pathogens' antibacterial susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihara, Katsunori; Watanabe, Akira; Aoki, Nobuki; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Masaki; Sato, Junko; Wakamura, Tomotaro; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Kadota, Junichi; Kiyota, Hiroshi; Iwata, Satoshi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Hanaki, Hideaki; Ohsaki, Yoshinobu; Fujiuchi, Satoru; Takahashi, Manabu; Takeuchi, Kenichi; Takeda, Hiroaki; Ikeda, Hideki; Miki, Makoto; Nakanowatari, Susumu; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Utagawa, Mutsuko; Nishiya, Hajime; Kawakami, Sayoko; Morino, Eriko; Takasaki, Jin; Mezaki, Kazuhisa; Chonabayashi, Naohiko; Tanaka, Chie; Sugiura, Hideko; Goto, Hajime; Saraya, Takeshi; Kurai, Daisuke; Katono, Yasuhiro; Inose, Rika; Niki, Yoshihito; Takuma, Takahiro; Kudo, Makoto; Ehara, Shigeru; Sato, Yoshimi; Tsukada, Hiroki; Watabe, Nobuei; Honma, Yasuo; Mikamo, Hiroshige; Yamagishi, Yuka; Nakamura, Atsushi; Ohashi, Minoru; Seki, Masafumi; Hamaguchi, Shigeto; Toyokawa, Masahiro; Fujikawa, Yasunori; Mitsuno, Noriko; Ukimura, Akira; Miyara, Takayuki; Nakamura, Takahito; Mikasa, Keiichi; Kasahara, Kei; Ui, Koji; Fukuda, Saori; Nakamura, Akihiro; Morimura, Mika; Yamashita, Mikio; Takesue, Yoshio; Wada, Yasunao; Sugimoto, Keisuke; Kusano, Nobuchika; Nose, Motoko; Mihara, Eiichirou; Kuwabara, Masao; Doi, Masao; Watanabe, Yaeko; Tokuyasu, Hirokazu; Hino, Satoshi; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Mukae, Hiroshi; Kawanami, Toshinori; Ota, Toshiyuki; Fujita, Masaki; Honda, Junichi; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Aoki, Yosuke; Fukuoka, Mami; Magarifuchi, Hiroki; Nagasawa, Zenzo; Kaku, Norihito; Fujita, Jiro; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao

    2017-09-01

    The nationwide surveillance on antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial respiratory pathogens from the patients in Japan was conducted by Japanese Society of Chemotherapy, Japanese association for infectious diseases and Japanese society for Clinical Microbiology in 2012. The isolates were collected from clinical specimens obtained from well-diagnosed adult patients with respiratory tract infections during the period between January and December in 2012 by three societies. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted at the central reference laboratory according to the method recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standard Institutes. Susceptibility testing was evaluated in 1236 strains (232 Staphylococcus aureus, 225 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 16 Streptococcus pyogenes, 231 Haemophilus influenzae, 147 Moraxella catarrhalis, 167 Klebsiella pneumoniae and 218 Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Ratio of methicillin-resistant S. aureus was 51.3%, and those of penicillin-intermediate S. pneumoniae was 0.4%. Among H. influenzae, 5.6% of them were found to be β-lactamase-producing ampicillin-resistant strains, and 37.2% to be β-lactamase-non-producing ampicillin-resistant strains. Extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae and multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa with metallo β-lactamase were 4.2% and 3.2%, respectively. Continuous national surveillance is important to determine the actual situation of the resistance shown by bacterial respiratory pathogens to antimicrobial agents. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Home-use cancer detecting band aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalevsky, Zeev; Rudnitsky, Arkady; Sheinman, Victor; Tzoy, Andrey; Toktosunov, Aitmamat; Adashov, Arkady

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel concept in which special band aid is developed for early detection of cancer. The band aid contains an array of micro needles with small detection array connected to each needle which inspects the color of the surface of the skin versus time after being pinched with the needles. We were able to show in pre-clinical trials that the color varies differently if the skin is close to tumor tissue.

  19. Executive Summary: 2016 Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Coccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgiani, John N; Ampel, Neil M; Blair, Janis E; Catanzaro, Antonino; Geertsma, Francesca; Hoover, Susan E; Johnson, Royce H; Kusne, Shimon; Lisse, Jeffrey; MacDonald, Joel D; Meyerson, Shari L; Raksin, Patricia B; Siever, John; Stevens, David A; Sunenshine, Rebecca; Theodore, Nicholas

    2016-09-15

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. Infectious Diseases Society of America considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances.Coccidioidomycosis, also known as San Joaquin Valley fever, is a systemic infection endemic to parts of the southwestern United States and elsewhere in the Western Hemisphere. Residence in and recent travel to these areas are critical elements for the accurate recognition of patients who develop this infection. In this practice guideline, we have organized our recommendations to address actionable questions concerning the entire spectrum of clinical syndromes. These can range from initial pulmonary infection, which eventually resolves whether or not antifungal therapy is administered, to a variety of pulmonary and extrapulmonary complications. Additional recommendations address management of coccidioidomycosis occurring for special at-risk populations. Finally, preemptive management strategies are outlined in certain at-risk populations and after unintentional laboratory exposure. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Jon D; Eskicioglu, Cagla; Weiser, Martin R; Feingold, Daniel L; Steele, Scott R

    2017-10-01

    The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons is dedicated to ensuring high-quality patient care by advancing the science, prevention, and management of disorders and diseases of the colon, rectum, and anus. The Clinical Practice Guidelines Committee is composed of society members who are chosen because they have demonstrated expertise in the specialty of colon and rectal surgery. This committee was created to lead international efforts in defining quality care for conditions related to the colon, rectum, and anus. This is accompanied by developing Clinical Practice Guidelines based on the best available evidence. These guidelines are inclusive and not prescriptive. Their purpose is to provide information on which decisions can be made, rather than to dictate a specific form of treatment. These guidelines are intended for the use of all practitioners, health care workers, and patients who desire information about the management of the conditions addressed by the topics covered in these guidelines. It should be recognized that these guidelines should not be deemed inclusive of all proper methods of care or exclusive of methods of care reasonably directed to obtaining the same results. The ultimate judgment regarding the propriety of any specific procedure must be made by the physician in light of all the circumstances presented by the individual patient.

  1. Primary Prevention of Cervical Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Resource-Stratified Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Arrossi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To provide resource-stratified (four tiers, evidence-based recommendations on the primary prevention of cervical cancer globally. Methods: The American Society of Clinical Oncology convened a multidisciplinary, multinational panel of oncology, obstetrics/gynecology, public health, cancer control, epidemiology/biostatistics, health economics, behavioral/implementation science, and patient advocacy experts. The Expert Panel reviewed existing guidelines and conducted a modified ADAPTE process and a formal consensus-based process with additional experts (consensus ratings group for one round of formal ratings. Results: Existing sets of guidelines from five guideline developers were identified and reviewed; adapted recommendations formed the evidence base. Five systematic reviews, along with cost-effectiveness analyses, provided evidence to inform the formal consensus process, which resulted in agreement of ≥ 75%. Recommendations: In all resource settings, two doses of human papillomavirus vaccine are recommended for girls age 9 to 14 years, with an interval of at least 6 months and possibly up to 12 to 15 months. Individuals with HIV positivity should receive three doses. Maximal and enhanced settings: if girls are age ≥ 15 years and received their first dose before age 15 years, they may complete the series; if no doses were received before age 15 years, three doses should be administered; in both scenarios, vaccination may be through age 26 years. Limited and basic settings: if sufficient resources remain after vaccinating girls age 9 to 14 years, girls who received one dose may receive additional doses between age 15 and 26 years. Maximal, enhanced, and limited settings: if ≥ 50% coverage in the priority female target population, sufficient resources, and cost effectiveness, boys may be vaccinated to prevent other noncervical human papillomavirus–related cancers and diseases. Basic settings: vaccinating boys is not recommended

  2. Primary Prevention of Cervical Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Resource-Stratified Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrossi, Silvina; Temin, Sarah; Garland, Suzanne; Eckert, Linda O'Neal; Bhatla, Neerja; Castellsagué, Xavier; Alkaff, Sharifa Ezat; Felder, Tamika; Hammouda, Doudja; Konno, Ryo; Lopes, Gilberto; Mugisha, Emmanuel; Murillo, Rául; Scarinci, Isabel C; Stanley, Margaret; Tsu, Vivien; Wheeler, Cosette M; Adewole, Isaac Folorunso; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2017-10-01

    To provide resource-stratified (four tiers), evidence-based recommendations on the primary prevention of cervical cancer globally. The American Society of Clinical Oncology convened a multidisciplinary, multinational panel of oncology, obstetrics/gynecology, public health, cancer control, epidemiology/biostatistics, health economics, behavioral/implementation science, and patient advocacy experts. The Expert Panel reviewed existing guidelines and conducted a modified ADAPTE process and a formal consensus-based process with additional experts (consensus ratings group) for one round of formal ratings. Existing sets of guidelines from five guideline developers were identified and reviewed; adapted recommendations formed the evidence base. Five systematic reviews, along with cost-effectiveness analyses, provided evidence to inform the formal consensus process, which resulted in agreement of ≥ 75%. In all resource settings, two doses of human papillomavirus vaccine are recommended for girls age 9 to 14 years, with an interval of at least 6 months and possibly up to 12 to 15 months. Individuals with HIV positivity should receive three doses. Maximal and enhanced settings: if girls are age ≥ 15 years and received their first dose before age 15 years, they may complete the series; if no doses were received before age 15 years, three doses should be administered; in both scenarios, vaccination may be through age 26 years. Limited and basic settings: if sufficient resources remain after vaccinating girls age 9 to 14 years, girls who received one dose may receive additional doses between age 15 and 26 years. Maximal, enhanced, and limited settings: if ≥ 50% coverage in the priority female target population, sufficient resources, and cost effectiveness, boys may be vaccinated to prevent other noncervical human papillomavirus-related cancers and diseases. Basic settings: vaccinating boys is not recommended. It is the view of the American Society of Clinical Oncology that

  3. [Study on discourse right construction of China's medical aid to Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Ying, Zhou; Yao, Deng; Kun, Yang

    2016-11-24

    To analyze the discourse right construction of China's medical aid to Africa, so as to provide evidences for improving the effect and sustainable development of China's medical aid to Africa. The documents of the discourse right that China constructed in the medical aid to Africa were selected at different periods as discourse samples. The achievement and deficiency were analyzed from four aspects, namely confident, charismatic, influential, and dominant. China's medical team made much in the discourse right construction in their aid to Africa, but some China's medical team members were still too cautious and too low-key. China's medical team gained the trust of the people of Africa, but the language communication difficulties still hampered in China's medical aid to Africa. Chinese medical team were widely praised by the African society, but in the west, some African media, even China's media still neglected to report China's doctors. China's international discourse right were greatly improved, but western countries still dominated the public opinion. China should refer to the actual situation of medical aid to Africa to strengthen the construction of discourse right.

  4. Annual congress of the South African Society of Pathologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The joint annual congress of the South African Society of Pathologists, International Academy of Pathology, South African Association of Clinical Biochemists and the Southern African Microbiology Society, was held from 13 to 15 July 1981 in Bloemfontein. This congress covered facets of clinical biochemistry, anatomical pathology, virology, microbiology, immunology and molecular biology

  5. 76 FR 30951 - Part C Early Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... Intervention Services Grant Under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services... White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C Funds for the Tutwiler Clinic. SUMMARY: HRSA will award non-competitively Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, Part C funds to the Tutwiler Clinic, Tutwiler, Mississippi, to support...

  6. Poverty, Migration and the Incidence of HIV/AIDS among Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is based on data from a clinic-based HIV/AIDS prevalence study with 150 ... to the gender discrimination embedded in Basotho culture, the acute lack of access to ... Keywords: Lesotho, HIV/AIDS, rural women, gender-based discrimination, ...

  7. EORTC recommended protocol for melanoma sentinel lymph node sectioning misclassifies up to 50% of the patients compared with complete step sectioning. Danish Society for Pathological Anatomy and Clinical Cytology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber-Hansen, Rikke; Hastrup, N; Clemmensen, O.

    2010-01-01

    EORTC recommended protocol for melanoma sentinel lymph node sectioning misclassifies up to 50% of the patients compared with complete step sectioning. Danish Society for Pathological Anatomy and Clinical Cytology......EORTC recommended protocol for melanoma sentinel lymph node sectioning misclassifies up to 50% of the patients compared with complete step sectioning. Danish Society for Pathological Anatomy and Clinical Cytology...

  8. An International Continence Society (ICS) report on the terminology for adult neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (ANLUTD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Jerzy B; Schurch, Brigitte; Hamid, Rizwan; Averbeck, Márcio; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Agrò, Enrico F; Dickinson, Tamara; Payne, Christopher K; Drake, Marcus J; Haylen, Bernie T

    2018-03-01

    The terminology for adult neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (ANLUTD) should be defined and organized in a clinically based consensus Report. This Report has been created by a Working Group under the auspices and guidelines of the International Continence Society (ICS) Standardization Steering Committee (SSC) assisted at intervals by external referees. All relevant definitions for ANLUTD were updated on the basis of research over the last 14 years. An extensive process of 18 rounds of internal and external review was involved to exhaustively examine each definition, with decision-making by collective opinion (consensus). A Terminology Report for ANLUTD, encompassing 97 definitions (42 NEW and 8 CHANGED, has been developed. It is clinically based with the most common diagnoses defined. Clarity and user-friendliness have been key aims to make it interpretable by practitioners and trainees in all the different groups involved not only in lower urinary tract dysfunction but additionally in many other medical specialties. A consensus-based Terminology Report for ANLUTD has been produced to aid clinical practice and research. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. World AIDS day 1991 observances urge sharing the challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Region of the Americas took part in World AIDS DAy 1991, whose theme, "Sharing the Challenge," urged all sectors of society to support AIDS-related education, services, and advocacy. The day of observance was intended to encourage the participation of public, private, nongovernmental, and religious leaders in promoting AIDS-related activities. Although World AIDS Day took place on December 1, activities in the Region of the Americans began from the last week of November and into the first week of December. Most of these activities were designed to educate the public on how to avoid infection, as well as inform and sensitize audiences on the health and social needs of those infected. These activities took the form of press conferences, exhibitions, lectures, public concerts, television adds, etc. One such activity, sponsored by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and held at its headquarters in Washington, D.C., focused on the AIDS crisis and the need for educational activities. The program opened with a speech by Dr. Carlyle Guerra de Macedo, PAHO's director, who warned against complacency in confronting the disease. US Surgeon General Antonia Novello also spoke at the occasion, addressing the growing threat of AIDS among women. Already, 12% of AIDS victims in the US are women, and heterosexual transmissions of AIDS will likely continued to increase. Pointing out that a vaccine is not expected in the short term, PAHO's Dr. David Brandling-Bennet stressed that the fight against AIDS depends on disseminating information. The PAHO meeting also featured a panel discussion composed of educators and health professionals, who discussed the educational responsibility of television in transmitting the AIDS-prevention message to the public.

  10. A framework for implementation, education, research and clinical use of ultrasound in emergency departments by the Danish Society for Emergency Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Christian B; Nielsen, Klaus; Riishede, Minna

    2014-01-01

    The first Danish Society for Emergency Medicine (DASEM) recommendations for the use of clinical ultrasound in emergency departments has been made. The recommendations describes what DASEM believes as being current best practice for training, certification, maintenance of acquired competencies...

  11. Effect of patient decision aid was influenced by presurgical evaluation among patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Laura; Taljaard, Monica; Dervin, Geoffrey; Trenaman, Logan; Tugwell, Peter; Pomey, Marie-Pascale; Stacey, Dawn

    2018-02-01

    Decision aids help patients make total joint arthroplasty decisions, but presurgical evaluation might influence the effects of a decision aid. We compared the effects of a decision aid among patients considering total knee arthroplasty at 2 surgical screening clinics with different evaluation processes. We performed a subgroup analysis of a randomized controlled trial. Patients were recruited from 2 surgical screening clinics: an academic clinic providing 20-minute physician consultations and a community clinic providing 45-minute physiotherapist/nurse consultations with education. We compared the effects of decision quality, decisional conflict and surgery rate using Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel χ 2 tests and the Breslow-Day test. We evaluated 242 patients: 123 from the academic clinic (61 who used the decision aid and 62 controls) and 119 from the community clinic (59 who used the decision aid and 60 controls). Results suggested a between-site difference in the effect of the decision aid on the patients' decision quality ( p = 0.09): at the academic site, patients who used the decision aid were more likely to make better-quality decisions than controls (54% v. 35%, p = 0.044), but not at the community site (47% v. 51%, p = 0.71). Fewer patients who used decision aids at the academic site than at the community site experienced decisional conflict ( p = 0.007) (33% v. 52%, p = 0.05 at the academic site and 40% v. 24%, p = 0.08 at the community site). The effect of the decision aid on surgery rates did not differ between sites ( p = 0.65). The decision aid had a greater effect at the academic site than at the community site, which provided longer consultations with more verbal education. Hence, decision aids might be of greater value when more extensive total knee arthroplasty presurgical assessment and counselling are either impractical or unavailable.

  12. Development of a new first-aid biochemical detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingfei; Liao, Haiyang; Su, Shilin; Ding, Hao; Liu, Suquan

    2016-10-01

    The traditional biochemical detector exhibits poor adaptability, inconvenient carrying and slow detection, which can't meet the needs of first-aid under field condition like natural or man-made disasters etc. Therefore a scheme of first-aid biochemical detector based on MOMES Micro Spectrometer, UV LED and Photodiode was proposed. An optical detection structure combined continuous spectrum sweep with fixed wavelength measurement was designed, which adopted mobile detection optical path consisting of Micro Spectrometer and Halogen Lamp to detect Chloride (Cl-), Creatinine (Cre), Glucose (Glu), Hemoglobin (Hb). The UV LED and Photodiode were designed to detect Potassium (K-), Carbon dioxide (CO2), Sodium (Na+). According to the field diagnosis and treatment requirements, we designed the embedded control hardware circuit and software system, the prototype of first-aid biochemical detector was developed and the clinical trials were conducted. Experimental results show that the sample's absorbance repeatability is less than 2%, the max coefficient of variation (CV) in the batch repeatability test of all 7 biochemical parameters in blood samples is 4.68%, less than the clinical requirements 10%, the correlation coefficient (R2) in the clinical contrast test with AU5800 is almost greater than 0.97. To sum up, the prototype meets the requirements of clinical application.

  13. Sexualidades politizadas: ativismo nas áreas da AIDS e da orientação sexual em Portugal Politicized sexualities: AIDS activism and sexual orientation in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Santos

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo analisa a forma como o Estado português e a sociedade civil têm tratado a questão da AIDS, enfatizando o envolvimento da comunidade lésbica, gay, bissexual e transexual (LGBT no combate ao vírus. Começamos pela descrição da situação dos membros dessa comunidade em Portugal ao longo da década de 90, período da emergência e consolidação do movimento LGBT português. Num segundo momento, caracterizamos a evolução do complexo HIV/AIDS no citado país, analisando a relação entre a sociedade civil e as questões relacionadas com a sexualidade em geral, por um lado, e a situação da epidemia, por outro, considerando fatos, iniciativas estatais e associações existentes. Num terceiro momento, consagramos especial atenção ao papel desempenhado pelas associações LGBT na luta contra o HIV/AIDS. Finalmente, refletimos acerca do futuro da luta contra a epidemia e a discriminação no século XXI, tendo em conta os desenvolvimentos verificados no País e as linhas orientadoras da política de combate à AIDS adotadas por organismos internacionais.This article analyzes how both the Portuguese state and civil society have addressed the AIDS issue, focusing on participation by the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transsexual community (LGBT in the struggle against AIDS. The article begins by describing the situation of LGBT individuals in Portugal during the 1990s, when the Portuguese LGBT movement emerged and grew, and then characterizes the evolution of HIV/AIDS in Portugal, analyzing the relationship between civil society and sexuality in general and the situation of the epidemic in the country in particular, considering key facts, nongovernmental organizations, and state initiatives. Special attention is given to the role played by LGBT organizations in the struggle against HIV. Finally, the article reflects on the future of the struggle against both AIDS and discrimination in the 21st century, considering recent events

  14. Public-private partnerships as a strategy against HIV/AIDS in South Africa: the influence of historical legacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunne, Viviane

    2009-09-01

    In the face of the extreme challenges posed by the South African HIV/AIDS epidemic, collaboration between public and private partners is often called for in an attempt to mobilise additional resources and generate synergies. This paper shows that the ability to successfully use public-private partnerships to address complex challenges, such as an HIV/AIDS epidemic, is influenced by the fabric of society, one important aspect being historical legacies. The first part of the article shows how South Africa's apartheid past affects the ability of public and private partners to collaborate in a response to HIV and AIDS today. It also takes into account how reconciliation and nation-building policies in the immediate post-transformation period have affected the ability to form and sustain partnerships concerning HIV/AIDS issues. The second part of the article analyses more recent developments regarding the information that these hold as to the feasibility of public-private partnerships and whether these continue to be affected by the legacies of the past. Two events with symbolic political value in South Africa, namely the 2010 FIFA World Cup soccer event and the recent changes in government, are systematically examined on the basis of three analytical queries, regarding: the impact of the event on nation-building and transcending cleavages in society; the event's impact on the ability to form public-private partnerships in general; and the role of HIV/AIDS in connection with the event. Conclusions are drawn a propos the influence of historic factors on the ability of South African society to effectively use public-private partnerships in the response to HIV and AIDS, and the continued dynamics and likely future directions of these partnerships.

  15. The role of civil society in health policy making in South Africa: a review of the strategies adopted by the Treatment Action Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabi, Stella C; Rieker, Mark

    2017-03-01

    The diagnosis of AIDS in 1982 in South Africa was followed by a rapid rise in the number of people living with the virus and dying from AIDS-related illnesses. The 2016 report by the Statistics South Africa indicated that about 7.03 million South Africans were infected with HIV/AIDS - the highest rate in the world. Despite the emergence of effective drugs in the mid-1990s, medical treatment remained unavailable in South Africa, particularly in public hospitals. This prompted civil society groups to establish platforms to discuss health policy change in South Africa. Prominent among these was the Treatment Action Campaign (TAC), formed in 1998, which aimed to advocate for improved HIV/AIDS health service delivery. The efforts succeeded in shaping the current HIV/AIDS policy through various initiatives such as the use of constitutional law in legal action against profiteering drug companies. This paper examines the role of civil society, and particularly the TAC engagement with the state in health policy making, and the subsequent implementation of health policy on HIV/AIDS in post-apartheid South Africa.

  16. CD4 descriptions at various clinical HIV/AIDS stages with tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis opportunistic infections at dr. Zainoel Abidin hospital in Banda Aceh, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaleh, A. S.; Fahrial; Siregar, M. L.; Jamil, K. F.

    2018-03-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) / Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a retrovirus that infects the human immune system. Damaged immunity in HIV/AIDS patients is marked by a decline in CD4 cells. Opportunistic infections appear differently, depending on the levels of immunosuppressive degrees, and the frequency of opportunistic infections in the environment. This study aims to describe the CD4 at various clinical stages of HIV/AIDS with tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis opportunistic infections (OI). Descriptive study with a cross-sectional design. This study is secondary data obtained from the medical records of patients with HIV/AIDS in the period of January 2011 - December 2015 at dr. Zainoel Abidin Hospital in Banda Aceh. The samples that met the inclusion criteria were 135 people with 63 cases were tuberculosis OI, 33 cases were non-tuberculosis and 39 cases were without OI. The study showed CD4 tuberculosis OI and 93.9% for non-tuberculosis OI.

  17. S4HARA: System for HIV/AIDS resource allocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Michael W

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV/AIDS resource allocation decisions are influenced by political, social, ethical and other factors that are difficult to quantify. Consequently, quantitative models of HIV/AIDS resource allocation have had limited impact on actual spending decisions. We propose a decision-support System for HIV/AIDS Resource Allocation (S4HARA that takes into consideration both principles of efficient resource allocation and the role of non-quantifiable influences on the decision-making process for resource allocation. Methods S4HARA is a four-step spreadsheet-based model. The first step serves to identify the factors currently influencing HIV/AIDS allocation decisions. The second step consists of prioritizing HIV/AIDS interventions. The third step involves allocating the budget to the HIV/AIDS interventions using a rational approach. Decision-makers can select from several rational models of resource allocation depending on availability of data and level of complexity. The last step combines the results of the first and third steps to highlight the influencing factors that act as barriers or facilitators to the results suggested by the rational resource allocation approach. Actionable recommendations are then made to improve the allocation. We illustrate S4HARA in the context of a primary healthcare clinic in South Africa. Results The clinic offers six types of HIV/AIDS interventions and spends US$750,000 annually on these programs. Current allocation decisions are influenced by donors, NGOs and the government as well as by ethical and religious factors. Without additional funding, an optimal allocation of the total budget suggests that the portion allotted to condom distribution be increased from 1% to 15% and the portion allotted to prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections be increased from 43% to 71%, while allocation to other interventions should decrease. Conclusion Condom uptake at the clinic should be increased by

  18. Prevalence of clinical oral manifestations and symptoms of HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Type of study: Cross-sectional study. Population: HIV/AIDS individuals attended at Sikonge hospital. Setting: ... However, the distribution and relative frequency of the different lesions is variable from that from other studies. There is need for ...

  19. HIV / AIDS, STDs and the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, H

    1995-01-01

    Even though the workplace is ideal for promoting HIV/STD (sexually transmitted disease) prevention to benefit workers and employers, many workplaces are not convinced that they should be involved in HIV/AIDS and STD education, prevention, and support. They do not realize that time and money spent on health programs save them money. Perhaps they do not feel obligated to protect the health of their employees. The AIDS epidemic adversely affects society and the economy at both the macro and micro level. AIDS tends to strike the productive age group, thereby seriously affecting the workplace. In many Sub-Saharan African countries, at least 20% of the urban workforce may be infected with HIV. Persons living with HIV include top management, skilled professionals, general hands, and farm laborers. HIV/AIDS costs for formal employment are assumed through reduced productivity; increased costs of occupational benefits and social security measures; loss of skilled labor, professionals, and managerial expertise as well as the experience among workers; increased costs of training and recruitment; and low morale from stigmatization, discrimination, and subsequent industrial relation problems. Needed are comprehensive HIV/AIDS and STD workplace programs that ensure the rights of persons with HIV and compassionate treatment of these persons. Trade union or other labor representatives, management, and appropriate government departments should work together and build on existing health legislation and policy to bring about effective negotiation and policy development concerning AIDS and employment. Training of peer educators, support services (counseling, STD referral and/or treatment), community action, management commitment, monitoring and evaluation, and supportive workplace conditions make for effective comprehensive workplace programs. Successful programs operate in fishing villages in Tanzania, tea plantations in India, the University of Papua New Guinea, and Ugandan army

  20. My secret: The social meaning of HIV/AIDS stigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judgeo, N.; Moalusi, K.P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study uses Goffman's [1963. Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity, New Jersey, Prentice-Hall] theory of stigma as an intellectual scaffold to help understand the social meaning of HIV/AIDS stigma from People Living with HIV/AIDS. The study adopts a qualitative approach because of its appropriateness for unravelling subjective phenomena such as the experiences of HIV/AIDS stigma. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 HIV-positive employees of a retailing company located in the Western Cape province of South Africa who volunteered to participate in the study. The participants with the discreditable stigma internalised society's prejudice towards those living with the virus. As a result, the participants relied on self-isolation and social withdrawal to cope with enacted stigma. Managing information about one's status and deciding whether, who, when, etc., to tell are crucial questions. The participants feared being devalued by family, friends, co-workers and the community. In concurrence with Goffman [1963. Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity, New Jersey, Prentice-Hall] the HIV/AIDS stigma is seen as about relationships. PMID:24980478

  1. [AIDS in Chile: a problem with multiple facets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormazabal, B

    1991-03-01

    Chile's 1st case of AIDS was diagnosed in 1984. Some 250 AIDS cases and 1600 HIV positive persons have since been reported, although the actual number by some estimates may reach 5000. Chile, although in the initial stages of the epidemic, already has a serious problem which at present can only be combatted through education. It will be necessary to convince the population that significant modifications of sexual behavior are needed to control the spread of the disease. Education for AIDS prevention is a priority of the National Commission on AIDS (CONASIDA), which is basing its program on the premise that stable monogamy is the most natural form of expression of a couple. Manuals for prevention are under development, and the 1st, for health workers and the general population, is in process of publication. A series of pamphlets and educational videos for workers in sexually transmitted disease clinics are under development. Educational materials are also being created for specific groups such as university students and agricultural workers and for groups at high risk. A social communications campaign has been prepared and approved by the authorities, and is awaiting funding for dissemination. Education of the population is also a concern for the Catholic Church, which views reinforcement of the family and its mission of providing sex education as a primary means of preventing AIDS. CONASIDA is also responsible for epidemiological study of AIDS in Chile through surveillance of sentinel groups and in quality control of the blood supply. Condoms are to be distributed in sexually transmitted disease clinics for the purpose of AIDS prevention.

  2. Dermatological manifestations in patients with HIV/AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Sahily De la Paz Peña; Leonides Rojas Barly; Reynaldo Hugo Remond Vázquez; Maira Lozano Lavernia

    2015-01-01

    In view of the frequency of the dermatological manifestations in patients who suffer from AIDS/HIV, and with the objective of describing their behaviour, a descriptive,observational, and cross sectional investigation was carried out in the cases of the AIDS provincial consultation at Ernesto Guevara General Teaching Hospital of Las Tunas from January, 2007 to June, 2008. The information was obtained from the survey, the dermatological examination, and the clinical charts. The sample was made ...

  3. AIDS prevention project among women in Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, L

    1993-01-01

    The recommendations of a staff member of the Paulina Luisi Movement and member of the Women's Global Network for Reproductive Rights were six-fold. Being a woman was considered a risk factor for AIDS. AIDS and HIV infection prevention must concentrate on prevention of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). 1) Women's organizations have the responsibility for sensitizing health professionals about STDs and AIDS and break the "culture of silence." 2) Women's health focus must actively include prevention of AIDS/HIV. 3) The Pap test must be included routinely as part of public and individual health services and conducted with high quality standards. 4) The flow of communication about women's health issues must be initiated between health professionals and women advocates with the objective of changing concepts and attitudes and of developing complementary strategies. 5) The strategy of promoting condom use and quality information does not address the larger issue of discrimination against women. Gender relations between spouses and between patient and doctor must be based on responsibility, reciprocity, and autonomy. Strategies must aim to combat the negativity in society that prevents responsible gender relations. 6) Professional women who have an awareness of gender issues must be engaged in international and governmental institutions with decision making power. Sex and women's health have been lesser priorities. The health system has responded to women as "objects" rather than subjects of attention. Women's position sexually and socially makes them more vulnerable to AIDS and HIV infections, which may be transmitted through a single sexual contact. STDs increase the risk of AIDS. Latin American women feel shame about STDS, while men respond to STDs as a condition of their sexual virility or potency. Treatment of STDS, much less AIDS prevention, is inadequate. The health system must stop treating women as objects and give them their right to health.

  4. Supine Versus Prone Position During Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: A Report from the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy Global Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Vadivia, José; M. Scarpa, Roberto; Duvdevani, Mordechai

    2011-01-01

    To determine differences in patients' characteristics, operative time and procedures, and perioperative outcomes between prone and supine positioning in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) using the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PCNL Global Study database....

  5. Audiovisual spoken word recognition as a clinical criterion for sensory aids efficiency in Persian-language children with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryadi-Zanjani, Mohammad Majid; Vahab, Maryam; Bazrafkan, Mozhdeh; Haghjoo, Asghar

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of audiovisual speech recognition as a clinical criterion of cochlear implant or hearing aid efficiency in Persian-language children with severe-to-profound hearing loss. This research was administered as a cross-sectional study. The sample size was 60 Persian 5-7 year old children. The assessment tool was one of subtests of Persian version of the Test of Language Development-Primary 3. The study included two experiments: auditory-only and audiovisual presentation conditions. The test was a closed-set including 30 words which were orally presented by a speech-language pathologist. The scores of audiovisual word perception were significantly higher than auditory-only condition in the children with normal hearing (Paudiovisual presentation conditions (P>0.05). The audiovisual spoken word recognition can be applied as a clinical criterion to assess the children with severe to profound hearing loss in order to find whether cochlear implant or hearing aid has been efficient for them or not; i.e. if a child with hearing impairment who using CI or HA can obtain higher scores in audiovisual spoken word recognition than auditory-only condition, his/her auditory skills have appropriately developed due to effective CI or HA as one of the main factors of auditory habilitation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Minimal Clinically Important Differences for American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society Score in Hallux Valgus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hiok Yang; Chen, Jerry Yongqiang; Zainul-Abidin, Suraya; Ying, Hao; Koo, Kevin; Rikhraj, Inderjeet Singh

    2017-05-01

    The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score is one of the most common and adapted outcome scales in hallux valgus surgery. However, AOFAS is predominantly physician based and not patient based. Although it may be straightforward to derive statistical significance, it may not equate to the true subjective benefit of the patient's experience. There is a paucity of literature defining MCID for AOFAS in hallux valgus surgery although it could have a great impact on the accuracy of analyzing surgical outcomes. Hence, the primary aim of this study was to define the Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID) for the AOFAS score in these patients, and the secondary aim was to correlate patients' demographics to the MCID. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study. A total of 446 patients were reviewed preoperatively and followed up for 2 years. An anchor question was asked 2 years postoperation: "How would you rate the overall results of your treatment for your foot and ankle condition?" (excellent, very good, good, fair, poor, terrible). The MCID was derived using 4 methods, 3 from an anchor-based approach and 1 from a distribution-based approach. Anchor-based approaches were (1) mean difference in 2-year AOFAS scores of patients who answered "good" versus "fair" based on the anchor question; (2) mean change of AOFAS score preoperatively and at 2-year follow-up in patients who answered good; (3) receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves method, where the area under the curve (AUC) represented the likelihood that the scoring system would accurately discriminate these 2 groups of patients. The distribution-based approach used to calculate MCID was the effect size method. There were 405 (90.8%) females and 41 (9.2%) males. Mean age was 51.2 (standard deviation [SD] = 13) years, mean preoperative BMI was 24.2 (SD = 4.1). Mean preoperative AOFAS score was 55.6 (SD = 16.8), with significant improvement to 85.7 (SD = 14.4) in 2 years ( P value

  7. Questioning diagnoses in clinical practice: a thematic analysis of clinical psychologists' accounts of working beyond diagnosis in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall-James, James; Coles, Steven

    2018-02-08

    The British Psychological Society proposes that clinical psychologists are well placed to move beyond psychiatric diagnoses and develop alternative practices. This study sought to explore what the application of these guiding principles looks like in clinical practice, the challenges faced and possible routes forward. A purpose-designed survey was completed by 305 respondents and a thematic analysis completed. Thematic analysis was used to identify five superordinate themes relating to individuals, relational, others, structures and society, comprising of a total of 21 group themes. The presented group themes highlight an array of approaches to practicing beyond diagnosis and factors that help and hinder such action; from scaffolding change, becoming leaders, relating to the multi-disciplinary team, restructuring services and the processes of change. A key concept was "playing the diagnostic game". "Playing the diagnostic game" enables psychologists to manage an array of tensions and anxieties: conflicts between belief and practice, relationships with colleagues, and dilemmas of position and power. It also potentially limits a concerted questioning of diagnosis and consideration of alternatives. An alternative conceptual framework for non-diagnostic practice is needed to aid the collective efforts of clinical psychologists developing their practice beyond diagnosis, some of which have been highlighted in this study. Until then, ways of mitigating the perceived threats to questioning diagnosis need further exploration, theorising and backing.

  8. Mesotherapy, definition, rationale and clinical role: a consensus report from the Italian Society of Mesotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammucari, M; Gatti, A; Maggiori, S; Bartoletti, C A; Sabato, A F

    2011-06-01

    Since its introduction in the 1950s, the use of mesotherapy has generated much interest among clinicians and patients. The Italian Society of Mesotherapy (SIM) brought together a panel of experts to review available evidence and to draw up a series of recommendations on the use of intradermal therapy (LIT) in clinical practice. There was overwhelming agreement among Consensus Group members that, when used correctly, LIT is a valuable therapeutic option in the treatment of painful, loco-regional conditions. They also emphasised that the clinical efficacy of LIT has been demonstrated in the management of chronic venous lymphatic insufficiency, oedematous fibrosclerotic panniculopathy and facial skin aging. The experts were unanimous on the use of LIT in vaccination. Mesotherapy is not a substitute for other therapeutic options and should only be used when the patient has been fully informed of its advantages and limitations. Likewise the procedure should only be carried out by an experienced qualified physician. Although there was widespread agreement among the Consensus Group on the place of LIT in several indications, the Authors reiterated the need for more large-scale clinical trials to determine the specific benefits and limitations in some areas of the application of intradermal therapy.

  9. Intelligent hearing aids: the next revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao Zhang; Mustiere, Fred; Micheyl, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    The first revolution in hearing aids came from nonlinear amplification, which allows better compensation for both soft and loud sounds. The second revolution stemmed from the introduction of digital signal processing, which allows better programmability and more sophisticated algorithms. The third revolution in hearing aids is wireless, which allows seamless connectivity between a pair of hearing aids and with more and more external devices. Each revolution has fundamentally transformed hearing aids and pushed the entire industry forward significantly. Machine learning has received significant attention in recent years and has been applied in many other industries, e.g., robotics, speech recognition, genetics, and crowdsourcing. We argue that the next revolution in hearing aids is machine intelligence. In fact, this revolution is already quietly happening. We will review the development in at least three major areas: applications of machine learning in speech enhancement; applications of machine learning in individualization and customization of signal processing algorithms; applications of machine learning in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of clinical tests. With the advent of the internet of things, the above developments will accelerate. This revolution will bring patient satisfactions to a new level that has never been seen before.

  10. Association between biological properties of human immunodeficiency virus variants and risk for AIDS and AIDS mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tersmette, M.; Lange, J. M.; de Goede, R. E.; de Wolf, F.; Eeftink-Schattenkerk, J. K.; Schellekens, P. T.; Coutinho, R. A.; Huisman, J. G.; Goudsmit, J.; Miedema, F.

    1989-01-01

    49 individuals seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody were studied longitudinally for the relation between in-vitro properties of their sequential HIV isolates and clinical course before and after the development of AIDS. They were classified into three groups according to the

  11. Computer-aided proximal caries diagnosis: correlation with clinical examination and histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Byung Cheol; Scheetz, James P.; Aarman, Allan G.

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of the LOGICON Caries Detector using RVG-4 and RVG-ui sensors, by comparing results of each detector to the results of clinical and histological examinations. Pairs of extracted teeth were radiographed, and a total of 57 proximal surfaces, which included both carious and non-carious situations, were analyzed. The RVG-4 produced 8-bit images, while the RVG-ui unit produced 12-bit images, which were taken in the high sensitivity mode. The images produced by the LOGICON were evaluated by a trained observer using both automated and manual caries detection software modes. Ground sections of the teeth established the actual absence or existence of caries. LOGICON-aided caries detection and depth discrimination of the RVG-4 and RVG-ui sensors were equally inconsistent irrespective of whether the LOGICON software was set to the automated or manual mode. Sensitivity ranged from 50% to 57% for caries penetration of the enamel-dentin junction. Care needs to be taken when using LOGICON in conjunction with RVG images as an adjunct for treatment planning dental caries. Even when applied by a trained observer, substantial discrepancies exist between the results of the LOGICON software-guided evalutation using RVG images and histologic examination.

  12. The AFFORD clinical decision aid to identify emergency department patients with atrial fibrillation at low risk for 30-day adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Tyler W; Storrow, Alan B; Jenkins, Cathy A; Abraham, Robert L; Liu, Dandan; Miller, Karen F; Moser, Kelly M; Russ, Stephan; Roden, Dan M; Harrell, Frank E; Darbar, Dawood

    2015-03-15

    There is wide variation in the management of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in the emergency department (ED). We aimed to derive and internally validate the first prospective, ED-based clinical decision aid to identify patients with AF at low risk for 30-day adverse events. We performed a prospective cohort study at a university-affiliated tertiary-care ED. Patients were enrolled from June 9, 2010, to February 28, 2013, and followed for 30 days. We enrolled a convenience sample of patients in ED presenting with symptomatic AF. Candidate predictors were based on ED data available in the first 2 hours. The decision aid was derived using model approximation (preconditioning) followed by strong bootstrap internal validation. We used an ordinal outcome hierarchy defined as the incidence of the most severe adverse event within 30 days of the ED evaluation. Of 497 patients enrolled, stroke and AF-related death occurred in 13 (3%) and 4 (aid included the following: age, triage vitals (systolic blood pressure, temperature, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, supplemental oxygen requirement), medical history (heart failure, home sotalol use, previous percutaneous coronary intervention, electrical cardioversion, cardiac ablation, frequency of AF symptoms), and ED data (2 hours heart rate, chest radiograph results, hemoglobin, creatinine, and brain natriuretic peptide). The decision aid's c-statistic in predicting any 30-day adverse event was 0.7 (95% confidence interval 0.65, 0.76). In conclusion, in patients with AF in the ED, Atrial Fibrillation and Flutter Outcome Risk Determination provides the first evidence-based decision aid for identifying patients who are at low risk for 30-day adverse events and candidates for safe discharge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Female commercial sex worker perspective on susceptibility of HIV-AIDS in Yogyakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmudah, Nurul; Dasuki, Djaswadi; Kurniawati, Herlin Fitriani

    2017-08-01

    Commercial sex worker is one of the groups with the highest level of susceptibility against HIV infection. They are 13,5 fold more prone to a living with HIV infection than the female of non commercial sex workers. Moreover, these commercial sex workers are also stigmatized with social sanction and discrimination against people with HIV-AIDS. The society mostly avoid them, deject them, isolate them, insult them, despise them, distrust them, and even go against the existence of those suffering from or infected by HIV-AIDS. Thus, stigmatizing and discrimination are basicly highly prohibited since they can incur higher social problems. It is also vital to handle the spread of HIV-AIDS in the society as soon as possible in the attempt of fighting against the spread of the disease. Hence, being broad minded, tolerant, and caring towards them as well as working hand in hand with the community are expected to diminish, minimize, and even eradicate the outbreak of HIV-AIDS. Caring towards those suffering from the infection without stigmatizing them and discriminating them will be one of the first measurements to take to improve what is needed to prevent the prevalence and spread of the disease. Thus, the primary objective of this research is to know the perception of female commercial sex workers on the susceptibility of HIV-AIDS in Yogyakarta. The research participants were selected from three localizations in Yogyakarta namely Pasar Kembang, Bongsuwung, and Giwangan. It is revealed that the participants had a good perception on the susceptibility of AIDS infection as seen from the fact there are free avalaible condoms for them to use everytime they have a sexual intercourse with the clients. All participants were aware of their high susceptibility against the infection of STIs/HIV/AIDS and thus they want to save their skin from those diseases. Also they had a good knowledge that having an intercourse without condom may get them infected.

  14. Securitizing HIV/AIDS: a game changer in state-societal relations in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Catherine Yuk-Ping

    2018-05-16

    China has experienced unprecedented economic growth since the 1980s. Despite this impressive economic development, this growth exists side by side with the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) crises and the persisting deficiencies in public health provision in China. Acknowledging the prevailing health problems, the Chinese government has encouraged the development of health non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to respond to the health challenges and address the gaps in public health provision of the government. HIV/AIDS-focused NGOs have been perceived as the most outstanding civil society group developed in China. Considering the low priority of health policies since the economic reform, the limitation of the "third sector" activity permitted in authoritarian China, together with the political sensitivity of the HIV/AIDS problem in the country, this article aims to explain the proliferation of HIV/AIDS-focused NGOs in China with the usage of the securitization framework in the field of international relations (IR). The research that underpins this article is based on a desk-based literature review as well as in-depth field interviews with individuals working in HIV/AIDS-focused NGOs in China. Face-to-face interviews for this research were conducted between January and May in 2011, and between December 2016 and January 2017, in China. Discourse analysis was in particular employed in the study of the security-threat framing process (securitization) of HIV/AIDS in China. This article argues that the proliferation of HIV/AIDS-related NGOs in China is largely attributed to the normative and technical effects of HIV/AIDS securitization ushered in by the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) and supported by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria (hereinafter Global Fund) observed in China. Despite depicting a positive scenario, the development of HIV/AIDS

  15. Nonbinding Legal Instruments in Governance for Global Health: Lessons from the Global AIDS Reporting Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Allyn; Alfvén, Tobias; Hougendobler, Daniel; Buse, Kent

    2014-01-01

    Recent debate over World Health Organization reform has included unprecedented attention to international lawmaking as a future priority function of the Organization. However, the debate is largely focused on the codification of new binding legal instruments. Drawing upon lessons from the success of the Global AIDS Reporting Mechanism, established pursuant to the United Nations' Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS, we argue that effective global health governance requires consideration of a broad range of instruments, both binding and nonbinding. A detailed examination of the Global AIDS Reporting Mechanism reveals that the choice of the nonbinding format makes an important contribution to its effectiveness. For instance, the flexibility and adaptability of the nonbinding format have allowed the global community to: (1) undertake commitments in a timely manner; (2) adapt and experiment in the face of a dynamic pandemic; and (3) grant civil society an unparalleled role in monitoring and reporting on state implementation of global commitments. UNAIDS' institutional support has also played a vital role in ensuring the continuing effectiveness of the Global AIDS Reporting Mechanism. Overall, the experience of the Global AIDS Reporting Mechanism evidences that, at times, nimbler nonbinding instruments can offer benefits over slower, more rigid binding legal approaches to governance, but depend critically, like all instruments, on the perceived legitimacy thereof. © 2014 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  16. WOCN Society Clinical Guideline: Management of the Adult Patient With a Fecal or Urinary Ostomy-An Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article provides an executive summary of the recommendations from the Clinical Guideline: Management of the Adult Patient With a Fecal or Urinary Ostomy, published by the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society (WOCN Society). It presents an overview of the process used to update and develop the guideline and lists specific recommendations from the guideline. We provide recommendations that include the following topics: stoma construction, preoperative education, stoma site marking, selection of an ostomy pouching system, postoperative education, postoperative management issues, follow-up care after discharge from the acute care setting, health-related quality of life, and stomal and peristomal complications. The intent of the guideline is to provide information that will assist healthcare providers to manage adult patients with ostomies, prevent or decrease complications, and improve patient outcomes. The full text of the published guideline, which includes available evidence supporting the recommendations and a complete reference list, is available in print and as a mobile application from the WOCN Society's online bookstore (http://www.wocn.org). Refer to Supplemental Digital Content 1 (available at: http://links.lww.com/JWOCN/A40) associated with this article for a complete reference list for the guideline.

  17. Paediatric HIV/AIDS in Abakaliki | Ojukwu | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The study was aimed at determining the mode of transmission, clinical presentation, and outcome of HIV infection in children admitted with clinical manifestations suspicious of HIV infection. It was also to examine whether the WHO clinical case definition for paediatric AIDS in Africa could help predict the infection ...

  18. [Quality assessment program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology. Analysis of results. 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orta Mira, Nieves; Guna Serrano, M del Remedio; Pérez, José L; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2006-10-01

    Quality assurance of the analytical processes performed at the clinical microbiology laboratory is mandatory and should be carried out by using external and internal quality control activities. External quality assessment programs allow intercomparison within laboratories, detection of errors, and evaluation of the suitability of some reagents or diagnostic kits for the purpose for which they were designed; these activities are also useful for continuous education. The program launched 15 years ago by the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology is based on sending typified materials along with a clinical and microbiological case related to these control materials. The spectrum of the samples is broad, including bacteriology (monthly and three-monthly), serology, mycology, parasitology, mycobacteria, virology, and molecular microbiology. After receiving the results from the participants, the program organization delivers an individual certificate comparing the results with those of a reference laboratory. Additionally, a report is generated by analyzing all the results sent by the participants; laboratories are also sent review articles on the subject of each assessment as a tool for continuous education in clinical microbiology. In this article, the most relevant conclusions and lessons from the 2005 assessments are presented.

  19. Culture as Cure: Civil Society and Moral Debates in KwaZulu-Natal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper addresses the nature of 'really existing' civil society and the workings of the public sphere in informal urban settlements on the outskirts of Durban. It focuses on debates over morality and the health of the community which have emerged locally in the context of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and highlights the positions ...

  20. Seminario latinoamericano de didactica de los medios audiovisuales (Latin American Seminar on Teaching with Audiovisual Aids).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eduplan Informa, 1971

    1971-01-01

    This seminar on the use of audiovisual aids reached several conclusions on the need for and the use of such aids in Latin America. The need for educational innovation in the face of a new society, a new type of communication, and a new vision of man is stressed. A new definition of teaching and learning as a fundamental process of communication is…

  1. Recommendations for designing and conducting veterinary clinical pathology biologic variation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Kathleen P; Baral, Randolph M; Dhand, Navneet K; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Jensen, Asger L

    2017-06-01

    The recent creation of a veterinary clinical pathology biologic variation website has highlighted the need to provide recommendations for future studies of biologic variation in animals in order to help standardize and improve the quality of published information and to facilitate review and selection of publications as standard references. The following recommendations are provided in the format and order commonly found in veterinary publications. A checklist is provided to aid in planning, implementing, and evaluating veterinary studies on biologic variation (Appendix S1). These recommendations provide a valuable resource for clinicians, laboratorians, and researchers interested in conducting studies of biologic variation and in determining the quality of studies of biologic variation in veterinary laboratory testing. © 2017 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  2. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, The Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and The American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology: Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Bypass--Temperature Management During Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Richard; Baker, Robert A; Likosky, Donald S; Grigore, Alina; Dickinson, Timothy A; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Hammon, John W

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the evidence-based literature supporting temperature management during adult cardiopulmonary bypass, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiology and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology tasked the authors to conduct a review of the peer-reviewed literature, including: 1) optimal site for temperature monitoring, 2) avoidance of hyperthermia, 3) peak cooling temperature gradient and cooling rate, and 4) peak warming temperature gradient and rewarming rate. Authors adopted the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association method for development clinical practice guidelines, and arrived at the following recommendations: CLASS I RECOMMENDATIONS: a)The oxygenator arterial outlet blood temperature is recommended to be utilized as a surrogate for cerebral temperature measurement during CPB. (Class I, Level C) b)To monitor cerebral perfusate temperature during warming, it should be assumed that the oxygenator arterial outlet blood temperature under-estimates cerebral perfusate temperature. (Class I, Level C) c)Surgical teams should limit arterial outlet blood temperature to<37°C to avoid cerebral hyperthermia. (Class 1, Level C) d)Temperature gradients between the arterial outlet and venous inflow on the oxygenator during CPB cooling should not exceed 10°C to avoid generation of gaseous emboli. (Class 1, Level C) e)Temperature gradients between the arterial outlet and venous inflow on the oxygenator during CPB rewarming should not exceed 10°C to avoid out-gassing when blood is returned to the patient. (Class 1, Level C) CLASS IIa a)Pulmonary artery or nasopharyngeal temperature recording is reasonable for weaning and immediate post-bypass temperature measurement. (Class IIa, Level C)b)Rewarming when arterial blood outlet temperature ≥30° C: i.To achieve the desired temperature for separation from bypass, it is reasonable to maintain a temperature gradient between

  3. Vida/SIDA: A Grassroots Response to AIDS in Chicago's Puerto Rican Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    Chicago's Puerto Rican community in West Town had a unique reaction to the spread of AIDS within its limits. They created their own institutions and tackled the epidemic themselves. In its infancy, Vida/SIDA, which translates as Life/AIDS, was solely an alternative health clinic for people with AIDS. Free of charge, it provided services such as…

  4. A deadly combination of AIDS, TB and cardiac tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahasrabudhe, Tushar Ramesh

    2013-05-22

    Immunocompromised status in AIDS makes differential diagnosis of any symptom very difficult for a clinician. Sharp clinical judgement and plenty of investigations may be needed to reach the diagnosis, as in this case. We hereby present a case of AIDS and active tuberculosis (TB) under treatment. The patient developed acute onset multifocal neurological symptoms following an episode of fever and diarrhoea. The MRI scan revealed numerous large cerebral infarcts. On investigations to evaluate brain infarcts, we made a diagnosis of left atrial cardiac tumour. Association of cardiac tumours with AIDS has only been rarely reported. It is uncertain if these can be opportunistic tumours in AIDS. The patient successfully came out of this deadly combination of diseases, viz AIDS, TB and large brain infarcts due to atrial tumour; with almost complete recovery.

  5. The European Respiratory Society and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons clinical guidelines for evaluating fitness for radical treatment (surgery and chemoradiotherapy) in patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Alessandro; Charloux, Anne; Bolliger, Chris T; Rocco, Gaetano; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Varela, Gonzalo; Licker, Marc; Ferguson, Mark K; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Clini, Enrico M; Win, Thida; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Goldman, Lee

    2009-07-01

    The European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) established a joint task force with the purpose to develop clinical evidence-based guidelines on evaluation of fitness for radical therapy in patients with lung cancer. The following topics were discussed, and are summarized in the final report along with graded recommendations: Cardiologic evaluation before lung resection; lung function tests and exercise tests (limitations of ppoFEV1; DLCO: systematic or selective?; split function studies; exercise tests: systematic; low-tech exercise tests; cardiopulmonary (high tech) exercise tests); future trends in preoperative work-up; physiotherapy/rehabilitation and smoking cessation; scoring systems; advanced care management (ICU/HDU); quality of life in patients submitted to radical treatment; combined cancer surgery and lung volume reduction surgery; compromised parenchymal sparing resections and minimally invasive techniques: the balance between oncological radicality and functional reserve; neoadjuvant chemotherapy and complications; definitive chemo and radiotherapy: functional selection criteria and definition of risk; should surgical criteria be re-calibrated for radiotherapy?; the patient at prohibitive surgical risk: alternatives to surgery; who should treat thoracic patients and where these patients should be treated?

  6. Aid and AIDS: a delicate cocktail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen, H.P.; Reuser, M.

    2008-01-01

    Development assistance targeting health overwhelmingly concentrates on HIV/AIDS. This column argues that that focus neglects critical demographic issues and degrades health infrastructure, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. The prime rule for AIDS aid should be “First, do no harm”.

  7. Development of a computer-aided clinical patient education system to provide appropriate individual nursing care for psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Kuan-Jui; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Chiu, Hung-Wen

    2012-06-01

    A lot of researches have proven that health education can help patients to maintain and improve their health. And it also shortens the time staying in hospital to save medication resource. Because the patients are willing to get healthcare knowledge to enhance the ability of self-care, they pay more attention to the health education. In Taiwan, the clinical nurses play an important role in patient education, and the health education take most time in their daily work. Such work includes the collection, production and delivery of education materials. To generate the correct and customized health education material is the key of success of patient education. In this study, we established a computer-aided health education contents generating system for psychiatric patients by integrating the databases for disease, medicine and nursing knowledge to assist nurse generating the customized health education document suitable for different patients. This system was evaluated by clinical nurses in usability and feasibility. This system is helpful for nurse to carry out the clinical health education to patients and further to encourage patient to pay attention to self-health.

  8. The value of haematological screening for AIDS in an at risk population

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The haematological variables measured by automated full blood count in matched homosexual and heterosexual men attending a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases (STD) were compared with those of normal controls and patients infected with the human T lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III). Homosexual and heterosexual men were statistically identical for all variables, but both differed noticeably from patients with clinical diagnoses of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS...

  9. [Hegemonic masculinity, vulnerability and the prevention of HIV/AIDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Joilson Santana; Gomes, Romeu; do Nascimento, Elaine Ferreira

    2012-02-01

    The study aims to examine the relationship between masculinity, vulnerability and the prevention of HIV/AIDS, based on reports from young men from the so-called urban working classes, taking into account not only the meanings attributed to prevention by these subjects, but also considering the dialectical relationship between the individual and society. The conceptual framework encompasses the three main aspects of hegemonic masculinity, prevention and vulnerability. This involves qualitative research based on the perspective of dialectical hermeneutics that uses the method of interpretation of meanings. The analysis yielded two main results, namely hegemonic masculinity as a vulnerability factor, and myths and prejudices as factors of vulnerability to HIV/AIDS. By way of conclusion, it reinforces the need for discussion of prevention encompassing the need to put on the agenda the construction of the sex/gender system around which to articulate the social meanings of masculinity and femininity that influence the structural plan of affective sexual relations in general and HIV/AIDS in particular.

  10. Management of patients with refractory angina: Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Pain Society joint guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillion, Michael; Arthur, Heather M; Cook, Allison; Carroll, Sandra L; Victor, J Charles; L'allier, Philippe L; Jolicoeur, E Marc; Svorkdal, Nelson; Niznick, Joel; Teoh, Kevin; Cosman, Tammy; Sessle, Barry; Watt-Watson, Judy; Clark, Alexander; Taenzer, Paul; Coyte, Peter; Malysh, Louise; Galte, Carol; Stone, James

    2012-01-01

    Refractory angina (RFA) is a debilitating disease characterized by cardiac pain resistant to conventional treatments for coronary artery disease including nitrates, calcium-channel and β-adrenoceptor blockade, vasculoprotective agents, percutaneous coronary interventions, and coronary artery bypass grafting. The mortality rate of patients living with RFA is not known but is thought to be in the range of approximately 3%. These individuals suffer severely impaired health-related quality of life with recurrent and sustained pain, poor general health status, psychological distress, impaired role functioning, and activity restriction. Effective care for RFA sufferers in Canada is critically underdeveloped. These guidelines are predicated upon a 2009 Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Position Statement which identified that underlying the problem of RFA management is the lack of a formalized, coordinated, interprofessional strategy between the cardiovascular and pain science/clinical communities. The guidelines are therefore a joint initiative of the CCS and the Canadian Pain Society (CPS) and make practice recommendations about treatment options for RFA that are based on the best available evidence. Concluding summary recommendations are also made, giving direction to future clinical practice and research on RFA management in Canada. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Summary of presentations from the 46th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology: focus on non-small cell lung cancer (2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Baggstrom, Maria Q; Somaiah, Neeta; Simon, George R; Govindan, Ramaswamy

    2011-01-01

    The promising results of crizotinib in molecularly selected patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumor cells had a novel fusion protein involving anaplastic lymphoma kinase presented at the 2010 American Society of Clinical Oncology reinforce once again the importance of understanding molecular heterogeneity of lung cancer and careful patient selection. Several other important issues were the subject of presentations related to lung cancer at the recently concluded American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting. The articles covered a wide variety of topics including optimal staging techniques to detect mediastinal nodal involvement, the role of platinum-based doublet chemotherapy in the management of elderly patients with advanced NSCLC, use of maintenance therapy with gemcitabine, and the impact of early introduction of organized palliative care in improving the quality of life of patients with advanced NSCLC. This report provides a brief overview of the presentations related to lung cancer that are relevant to clinical practice and future research.

  12. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Candidiasis: 2016 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Peter G; Kauffman, Carol A; Andes, David R; Clancy, Cornelius J; Marr, Kieren A; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Reboli, Annette C; Schuster, Mindy G; Vazquez, Jose A; Walsh, Thomas J; Zaoutis, Theoklis E; Sobel, Jack D

    2016-02-15

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Spectrum Of Opportunistic Infections In Aids Cases In A Tertiary Care Hospital In Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Shanker Joshi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study was carried out, 404 clinically suspected cases attending AIDS clinic at Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal to assess an occurance of opportunistic infections in AIDS cases. Study reveals that Tuberculosis (60%, Cryptospridiosis (13.33% and candidasis (11.11% are the predominant opportunistic infection in HIV/AIDS patients in the Pokharo village. Next common pathogen was found an ubiquitous yeast. Candida obtained from skin, oral cavity, oesophagus, sputum and stool. The least common documented documented infection was pneumocystis carini pneumonia (2.22%.

  14. AIDS and the law: opportunities and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, M

    1995-01-01

    Laws can only partially succeed in modifying behavior, especially with regard to sex, drug use, and other human pleasures. Effective and just laws to slow the spread of AIDS must therefore be based upon a thorough knowledge of the issues, not upon ignorance, fear, political expediency, or to meet the emotional demands of an often ignorant general population. Good laws, like good ethics, are founded in good data. The most effective response to the AIDS epidemic is neither prohibition nor punishment of individual behavior, but laws designed to truly affect human behavior and shape a society in which the spread of HIV is minimized. Central to an appropriate legislative response is the imperative of protecting the basic rights of individuals infected with HIV. An example of an enlightened, rational, and nondiscriminatory approach to checking the spread of HIV/AIDS while guaranteeing individual freedoms and rights is found in a report commissioned for the State Government of New South Wales. The following measures are recommended to bring state laws into harmony with the national HIV/AIDS strategy: decriminalize brothels, set regulations and public health standards for sex workers, cover sex workers under the Industrial Relations Act, ensure the privacy of HIV/AIDS patients and improve their redress against discrimination in the workplace, repeal laws which make it illegal to possess and administer drugs to oneself, investigate the therapeutic use of marijuana as a prescribed treatment for HIV/AIDS and other terminal illnesses, abandon compulsory testing for HIV in prisons, make condoms available to prisoners and sexually active children, establish a Natural Death Act to allow terminally ill patients to die with dignity, and give legal status to permanent relationships between homosexual couples.

  15. Health Services: Clinical. Pharmacy Aide. Instructor's Manual. Competency-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Julie; And Others

    This instructor's manual consists of materials for use in presenting a course in the occupational area of pharmacy aide. Included in the first part of the guide are a program master sequence; a master listing of instructional materials, equipment, and supplies; an overview of the competency-based vocational education (CBVE) system; and guidelines…

  16. American Society of Clinical Oncology/College Of American Pathologists guideline recommendations for immunohistochemical testing of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammond, M.E.; Hayes, D.F.; Dowsett, M.; Allred, D.C.; Hagerty, K.L.; Badve, S.; Fitzgibbons, P.L.; Francis, G.; Goldstein, N.S.; Hayes, M.; Hicks, D.G.; Lester, S.; Love, R.; Mangu, P.B.; McShane, L.; Miller, K.; Osborne, C.K.; Paik, S.; Perlmutter, J.; Rhodes, A.; Sasano, H.; Schwartz, J.N.; Sweep, F.C.; Taube, S.; Torlakovic, E.E.; Valenstein, P.; Viale, G.; Visscher, D.; Wheeler, T.; Williams, R.B.; Wittliff, J.L.; Wolff, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a guideline to improve the accuracy of immunohistochemical (IHC) estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) testing in breast cancer and the utility of these receptors as predictive markers. METHODS: The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of

  17. American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guideline recommendations for immunohistochemical testing of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammond, M.E.; Hayes, D.F.; Dowsett, M.; Allred, D.C.; Hagerty, K.L.; Badve, S.; Fitzgibbons, P.L.; Francis, G.; Goldstein, N.S.; Hayes, M.; Hicks, D.G.; Lester, S.; Love, R.; Mangu, P.B.; McShane, L.; Miller, K.; Osborne, C.K.; Paik, S.; Perlmutter, J.; Rhodes, A.; Sasano, H.; Schwartz, J.N.; Sweep, F.C.; Taube, S.; Torlakovic, E.E.; Valenstein, P.; Viale, G.; Visscher, D.; Wheeler, T.; Williams, R.B.; Wittliff, J.L.; Wolff, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a guideline to improve the accuracy of immunohistochemical (IHC) estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) testing in breast cancer and the utility of these receptors as predictive markers. METHODS: The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of

  18. Transformações da "aids aguda" para a "aids crônica": percepção corporal e intervenções cirúrgicas entre pessoas vivendo com HIV e aids From "acute AIDS" to "chronic AIDS": body perception and surgical interventions in people living with HIV and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatianna Meireles Dantas de Alencar

    2008-12-01

    the availability and use of new technologies that allowed for AIDS to transform into a chronic, clinically treatable disease, there are still important aspects lived by patients that reedit fears and difficulties similar to those of the initial periods of the epidemic, among others appearance-impairing physical stigma.

  19. Interventions to improve hearing aid use in adult auditory rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Fiona; Mackenzie, Emma; Elliott, Lynette; Jones, Simon; de Lusignan, Simon

    2016-08-18

    Acquired adult-onset hearing loss is a common long-term condition for which the most common intervention is hearing aid fitting. However, up to 40% of people fitted with a hearing aid either fail to use it or may not gain optimal benefit from it. This is an update of a review first published in The Cochrane Library in 2014. To assess the long-term effectiveness of interventions to promote the use of hearing aids in adults with acquired hearing loss fitted with at least one hearing aid. The Cochrane ENT Information Specialist searched the Cochrane ENT Trials Register; Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 5); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; ClinicalTrials.gov; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 13 June 2016. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions designed to improve or promote hearing aid use in adults with acquired hearing loss compared with usual care or another intervention. We excluded interventions that compared hearing aid technology. We classified interventions according to the 'chronic care model' (CCM). The primary outcomes were hearing aid use (measured as adherence or daily hours of use) and adverse effects (inappropriate advice or clinical practice, or patient complaints). Secondary patient-reported outcomes included quality of life, hearing handicap, hearing aid benefit and communication. Outcomes were measured over the short ( 12 to quality of evidence to be very low or low for the primary outcomes where data were available.The majority of participants were over 65 years of age with mild to moderate adult-onset hearing loss. There was a mix of new and experienced hearing aid users. Six of the studies (287 participants) assessed long-term outcomes.All 37 studies tested interventions that could be classified using the CCM as self-management support (ways to help someone to manage their hearing loss and hearing aid(s) better by giving

  20. The Infectious Diseases Society of America emerging infections network: bridging the gap between clinical infectious diseases and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Satish K; Beekmann, Susan E; Santibanez, Scott; Polgreen, Philip M

    2014-04-01

    In 1995, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention granted a Cooperative Agreement Program award to the Infectious Diseases Society of America to develop a provider-based emerging infections sentinel network, the Emerging Infections Network (EIN). Over the past 17 years, the EIN has evolved into a flexible, nationwide network with membership representing a broad cross-section of infectious disease physicians. The EIN has an active electronic mail conference (listserv) that facilitates communication among infectious disease providers and the public health community, and also sends members periodic queries (short surveys on infectious disease topics) that have addressed numerous topics relevant to both clinical infectious diseases and public health practice. The article reviews how the various functions of EIN contribute to clinical care and public health, identifies opportunities to further link clinical medicine and public health, and describes future directions for the EIN.

  1. Provider training and experience for people living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackal, Julia M; Tynan, Anne-Marie; Handford, Curtis D; Rzeznikiewiz, Damian; Agha, Ayda; Glazier, Richard

    2011-06-15

    The complexity of HIV/AIDS raises challenges for the effective delivery of care. It is important to ensure that the expertise and experience of care providers is of high quality. Training and experience of HIV/AIDS providers may impact not only individual patient outcomes but increasingly on health care costs as well. The objective of this review is to assess the effects of provider training and experience on people living with HIV/AIDS on the following outcomes: immunological (ie. viral load, CD4 count), medical (ie. mortality, proportion on antiretrovirals), psychosocial (ie. quality of life measures) and economic outcomes (ie health care costs). We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Dissertation Abstracts International (DAI), CINAHL, HealthStar, PsycInfo, PsycLit, Social Sciences Abstracts, and Sociological Abstracts from January 1, 1980 through May 29, 2009.  Electronic searches were performed for abstracts from major international AIDS conferences. Reference lists from pertinent articles, books and review articles were retrieved and reviewed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials, cohort, case control, cross-sectional studies and controlled before and after designs that examined the qualifications/training and patient volume of HIV/AIDS care of providers caring for persons known to be infected with HIV/AIDS were included. At least two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for further information as required. Assessment of confounding factors was undertaken independently by two reviewers. A total of four studies (one randomized controlled trial, three non- randomized studies) involving 8488 people living with HIV/AIDS were included. The main findings of this review demonstrated a trend to improved outcomes when treated by a provider with more training/expertise in HIV/AIDS care in the outpatient (clinic) setting. Due to the heterogeneity of the included studies, we could not perform a

  2. Social representation of hearing aids: cross-cultural study in India, Iran, Portugal, and the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchaiah V

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vinaya Manchaiah,1 Berth Danermark,2 Vinay,3 Tayebeh Ahmadi,4 David Tomé,5 Rajalakshmi Krishna,6 Per Germundsson7 1Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas, USA; 2Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; 3Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway; 4Department of Audiology, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 5Department of Audiology, School of Allied Health Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal; 6All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, University of Mysore, Mysore, India; 7The Department of Health and Welfare Studies, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden Background: The current study was aimed at understanding the social representation of hearing aids in India, Iran, Portugal, and the United Kingdom. We also compared these results to explore the cross-cultural differences and similarities among these countries. Methods: The study involved a cross-sectional design, and the data were collected from four different countries using the snowball sampling method. Data were analyzed using a content analysis to identify the most-similar categories of responses reported, a co-occurrences analysis to see which of these categories are reported commonly, and a chi-square analysis to study if there was any association between positive, neutral, and negative connotations among participants in different countries. Results: The current study revealed four different social representations of hearing aids from India, Iran, Portugal, and the United Kingdom, and also a global index. Conclusion: The study results provide very useful insights into how hearing aids are represented in the society. These findings may have important implications for public education and also for manufacturers from the viewpoint of designing and marketing hearing aids in different countries. Keywords: hearing aids

  3. 6. Disability and Quality Of Life among People Living With HIV AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Disability and Quality of Life among People Living. With HIV/AIDS in Ibadan, ... activities of daily living as well as challenges with. 7,8 ... infected individuals, their family and the society at large. ... Independence, Social Relationships, Environment ..... efavirenz on neuropsychological performance .... Acta paul. enferm. 2015 ...

  4. American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guideline recommendations for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 testing in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, Antonio C.; Hammond, M. Elizabeth H.; Schwartz, Jared N.; Hagerty, Karen L.; Allred, D. Craig; Cote, Richard J.; Dowsett, Mitchell; Fitzgibbons, Patrick L.; Hanna, Wedad M.; Langer, Amy; McShane, Lisa M.; Paik, Soonmyung; Pegram, Mark D.; Perez, Edith A.; Press, Michael F.; Rhodes, Anthony; Sturgeon, Catharine; Taube, Sheila E.; Tubbs, Raymond; Vance, Gail H.; van de Vijver, Marc; Wheeler, Thomas M.; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a guideline to improve the accuracy of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) testing in invasive breast cancer and its utility as a predictive marker. METHODS: The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of American Pathologists convened an expert panel,

  5. [Key points for esthetic rehabilitation of anterior teeth using chair-side computer aided design and computer aided manufacture technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Feng, H L

    2018-04-09

    With the rapid development of the chair-side computer aided design and computer aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) technology, its accuracy and operability of have been greatly improved in recent years. Chair-side CAD/CAM system may produce all kinds of indirect restorations, and has the advantages of rapid, accurate and stable production. It has become the future development direction of Stomatology. This paper describes the clinical application of the chair-side CAD/CAM technology for anterior aesthetic restorations from the aspects of shade and shape.

  6. Recommendations on disease management for patients with advanced human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer and brain metastases: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Naren; Temin, Sarah; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Crews, Jennie R; Davidson, Nancy E; Esteva, Francisco J; Giordano, Sharon H; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Krop, Ian; Levinson, Jennifer; Modi, Shanu; Patt, Debra A; Perez, Edith A; Perlmutter, Jane; Winer, Eric P; Lin, Nancy U

    2014-07-01

    To provide formal expert consensus-based recommendations to practicing oncologists and others on the management of brain metastases for patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) -positive advanced breast cancer. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) convened a panel of medical oncology, radiation oncology, guideline implementation, and advocacy experts and conducted a systematic review of the literature. When that failed to yield sufficiently strong quality evidence, the Expert Panel undertook a formal expert consensus-based process to produce these recommendations. ASCO used a modified Delphi process. The panel members drafted recommendations, and a group of other experts joined them for two rounds of formal ratings of the recommendations. No studies or existing guidelines met the systematic review criteria; therefore, ASCO conducted a formal expert consensus-based process. Patients with brain metastases should receive appropriate local therapy and systemic therapy, if indicated. Local therapies include surgery, whole-brain radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery. Treatments depend on factors such as patient prognosis, presence of symptoms, resectability, number and size of metastases, prior therapy, and whether metastases are diffuse. Other options include systemic therapy, best supportive care, enrollment onto a clinical trial, and/or palliative care. Clinicians should not perform routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to screen for brain metastases, but rather should have a low threshold for MRI of the brain because of the high incidence of brain metastases among patients with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. The Rate of Low Vision Aids Usage after Prescription at the Saba and Khazaneh Clinics in Low Vision Clients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Sadegh-Pour

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This research was aimed to determine the rate of low vision aids uses by low vision clients in their daily living. Materials & Methods: In this descriptive study that was done at the Saba and Khazaneh clinics, 50 people from low vision clients were selected by convenient sampling during 2005 & 2006. One questionnaire was completed by therapist at the first time of optometric examination and useful low vision aid (LVA has been prescript and given to clients. After three months (at least they should came back to center and fill the second form. The first form was about functional vision without LVA and second too, but by using of LVA. They have been compared to fulfill the result of research. Data were analyzed by Spearman correlation coefficient, Chi – square and Wilcoxon tests. Results: Spearman correlation coefficient between use of LVAs for near with duration and frequency of study were 0/491 and 0/520 with probability values such as P=0/003 and P=0/002 that shown significant relation. There was significant difference in traffic measure and environment knowing between before and after of far LVAs using (P=0/002 and their SCC was 0/499. There was significant relation between use of low vision aid and education after prescription (P=0/011. Conclusion: However the LVAs improve vision of low vision person, but many of them don’t use by different reasons.

  8. Gingival Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma Mimicking Hyperplastic Benignancy as the First Clinical Manifestation of AIDS: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Elvira Rozza-de-Menezes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an unusual case of gingival ALCL, which mimicked a benign hyperplastic lesion that occurred in a 57-year-old white man representing the first clinical manifestation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. The patient was referred to the Dental Clinic of PUCPR complaining of a lobulated nodule on the gingiva of his upper central incisors. The presence of advanced chronic periodontitis and dental plaque raised suspicion for a benignancy. An excisional biopsy was performed, and large pleomorphic cells with an abundant cytoplasm, sometimes containing prominent nucleoli and “Hallmark” cells, were observed through hematoxylin and eosin staining. The tumor cells showed strong CD30 expression, EMA, Ki-67, and LCA, and negative stain for p80NPM/ALK, CKAE1/AE3, CD20, CD3, CD56, and CD15. The final diagnosis was ALCL (ALK-negative. Further laboratory tests revealed positivity for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The patient was submitted to chemotherapy, but four months after diagnosis, the patient died due to pneumonia and respiratory failure. Oral anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL is a rare disorder. Only 5 cases involving the gingiva have been reported, and to our knowledge, this is the first case reported of the ALCL, which mimicked a hyperplastic benignancy as the first clinical manifestation of AIDS.

  9. [Evaluation of the status of patients with severe infection, criteria for intensive care unit admittance. Spanish Society for Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology. Spanish Society of Intensive and Critical Medicine and Coronary Units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaechea, Pedro M; Alvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Sánchez, Miguel; Torres, Antonio; Palomar, Mercedes; Fernández, Pedro; Miró, José M; Cisneros, José Miguel; Torres, Manuel

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that early attention in patients with serious infections is associated with a better outcome. Assistance in intensive care units (ICU) can effectively provide this attention; hence patients should be admitted to the ICU as soon as possible, before clinical deterioration becomes irreversible. The objective of this article is to compile the recommendations for evaluating disease severity in patients with infections and describe the criteria for ICU admission, updating the criteria published 10 years ago. A literature review was carried out, compiling the opinions of experts from the Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica (SEIMC, Spanish Society for Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology) and the Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Crítica y Unidades Coronarias (SEMICYUC, Spanish Society for Intensive Medicine, Critical Care and Coronary Units) as well as the working groups for infections in critically ill patients (GEIPC-SEIMC and GTEI-SEMICYUC). We describe the specific recommendations for ICU admission related to the most common infections affecting patients, who will potentially benefit from critical care. Assessment of the severity of the patient's condition to enable early intensive care is stressed.

  10. The menace of HIV/AIDS: The Role of Information Scientist/Librarians

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The illiteracy level of the society has risen to the point of inadequate access to information; information is the most potent weapon available to mankind to fight HIV/AIDS. This paper argues that given the vintage position of information scientist/librarians as custodians and disseminators of information. The Librarians are in ...

  11. 2017 Position Paper of the Italian Society for Cardiovascular Prevention (SIPREC) for an Updated Clinical Management of Hypercholesterolemia and Cardiovascular Risk: Executive Document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Massimo; Volpe, Roberto; Gallo, Giovanna; Presta, Vivianne; Tocci, Giuliano; Folco, Emanuela; Peracino, Andrea; Tremoli, Elena; Trimarco, Bruno

    2017-09-01

    The benefits achieved by implementing cardiovascular prevention strategies in terms of reduced incidence of atherosclerotic diseases and mortality are accepted, worldwide. In particular, the clinical management of hypercholesterolemia has a fundamental role for all preventive strategies, both in primary and secondary prevention, at each stage of cardiovascular risk. Since the net clinical benefit of lipid-lowering therapy largely depends on baseline individual cardiovascular risk profile, the assessment of individual risk is essential to establish type and intensity of both preventive and therapeutic strategies. Thus, the real challenge in a setting of clinical practice is not only to identify whom to treat among individuals at low-to-moderate risk, but mostly how much and how long to treat high or very-high risk patients. This manuscript, which reflects concepts and positions that have been published in a more extensive document of the Italian Society for Cardiovascular Prevention (SIPREC), deals with the diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients with dyslipidaemia, with an evidence-based approach adapted and updated from recent guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology and very recent results of randomized clinical trials. The purpose is to suggest a multidimensional and integrated actions aimed at eliminating or minimizing the impact of cardiovascular diseases and their related disabilities and mortality in patients with hypercholesterolemia.

  12. Neurophysiological localisation of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow: validation of diagnostic criteria developed by a taskforce of the Danish Society of Clinical Neurophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugdahl, Kirsten; Beniczky, Sándor; Wanscher, Benedikte

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study validates consensus criteria for localisation of ulnar neuropathy at elbow (UNE) developed by a taskforce of the Danish Society of Clinical Neurophysiology and compares them to the existing criteria from the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine...

  13. Lymphocyte transformation response to pokeweed mitogen as a predictive marker for development of AIDS and AIDS related symptoms in homosexual men with HIV antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, B; Lindhardt, B O; Gerstoft, J

    1987-01-01

    To identify factors that may predict the development of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS related symptoms various immunological measurements were studied in a group of homosexual men attending screening clinics for AIDS in Copenhagen. Fifty seven men whose ratio of T helper...... lymphocytes to T suppressor lymphocytes (CD4:CD8 ratio) was less than 1.0 before the study began were included. Forty two were positive for antibody to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), of whom 38 were reinvestigated after a median observation period of 10 months. Among the seropositive men...

  14. Interpersonal relationships and HIV/AIDS stigma in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the implications of interpersonal relationships to HIV/AIDS stigma in Chinese society. The data were collected by 67 open-ended individual interviews. The study shows that HIV/AIDS stigma goes beyond fears about the risk of infection. Two interrelated themes, the social categorisation and bao, constitute the underlying principles in the structure of discourse. On the one hand, people with HIV/AIDS are typically represented as a deviant outgroup. They are believed to be retributed by the Heaven. However, the differentiation between ingroup and outgroup is not just simply based on HIV/AIDS infection. Instead, the boundary between the two is penetrable and is mediated by blood ties. One the other hand, the double-entendre of bao is called to play with respect to ingroup and outgroup. When a close kinship is taken into account, the belief of divine retribution fades out, and the belief of worldly reciprocation foregrounds. People with HIV/AIDS in this case straddle the very fine line between outgroup and ingroup. They are considered to be outgroup in the sense that HIV/AIDS as a virus/disease (a third party found in their body is contagious, and the physical boundary between “them” and “us” is therefore needed. Yet they are considered to be the part of ingroup, because either they are innocent, or they make use of the profit for righteousness. In both cases, they deserve to be reciprocally cared for by their family. The reciprocity hereby acts as an invisible binding force between the infected and the uninfected within a close kinship.

  15. Current issues in medically assisted reproduction and genetics in Europe: research, clinical practice, ethics, legal issues and policy. European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Joyce C; Geraedts, Joep; Borry, Pascal; Cornel, Martina C; Dondorp, Wybo; Gianaroli, Luca; Harton, Gary; Milachich, Tanya; Kääriäinen, Helena; Liebaers, Inge; Morris, Michael; Sequeiros, Jorge; Sermon, Karen; Shenfield, Françoise; Skirton, Heather; Soini, Sirpa; Spits, Claudia; Veiga, Anna; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Viville, Stéphane; de Wert, Guido; Macek, Milan

    2013-11-01

    In March 2005, a group of experts from the European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology met to discuss the interface between genetics and assisted reproductive technology (ART), and published an extended background paper, recommendations and two Editorials. Seven years later, in March 2012, a follow-up interdisciplinary workshop was held, involving representatives of both professional societies, including experts from the European Union Eurogentest2 Coordination Action Project. The main goal of this meeting was to discuss developments at the interface between clinical genetics and ARTs. As more genetic causes of reproductive failure are now recognised and an increasing number of patients undergo testing of their genome before conception, either in regular health care or in the context of direct-to-consumer testing, the need for genetic counselling and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) may increase. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) thus far does not have evidence from randomised clinical trials to substantiate that the technique is both effective and efficient. Whole-genome sequencing may create greater challenges both in the technological and interpretational domains, and requires further reflection about the ethics of genetic testing in ART and PGD/PGS. Diagnostic laboratories should be reporting their results according to internationally accepted accreditation standards (International Standards Organisation - ISO 15189). Further studies are needed in order to address issues related to the impact of ART on epigenetic reprogramming of the early embryo. The legal landscape regarding assisted reproduction is evolving but still remains very heterogeneous and often contradictory. The lack of legal harmonisation and uneven access to infertility treatment and PGD/PGS fosters considerable cross-border reproductive care in Europe and beyond. The aim of this paper is to complement previous publications and provide

  16. Changing roles of academic societies due to globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehara, Shigeru; Aoki, Shigeki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Because of the globalization of environment around the academic society, the expected roles have changed significantly. In this short communication, we present the current situation in our international activities of the Japan Radiological Society, particularly in the academic activities and clinical practice. Establishing and reinforcing international network is one process of their promotion.

  17. The American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' consensus statement on rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thigpen, Charles A; Shaffer, Michael A; Gaunt, Bryce W; Leggin, Brian G; Williams, Gerald R; Wilcox, Reg B

    2016-04-01

    This is a consensus statement on rehabilitation developed by the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists. The purpose of this statement is to aid clinical decision making during the rehabilitation of patients after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The overarching philosophy of rehabilitation is centered on the principle of the gradual application of controlled stresses to the healing rotator cuff repair with consideration of rotator cuff tear size, tissue quality, and patient variables. This statement describes a rehabilitation framework that includes a 2-week period of strict immobilization and a staged introduction of protected, passive range of motion during weeks 2-6 postoperatively, followed by restoration of active range of motion, and then progressive strengthening beginning at postoperative week 12. When appropriate, rehabilitation continues with a functional progression for return to athletic or demanding work activities. This document represents the first consensus rehabilitation statement developed by a multidisciplinary society of international rehabilitation professionals specifically for the postoperative care of patients after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. ROLE ATTRIBUTED TO WOMEN IN ROMANIAN SOCIETY: THE PERSPECTIVE OF BOTH GENDER CATEGORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Cristina STANCIU

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Both nationally and internationally the woman is regarded as a vulnerable group. The causes are multiple - from the roles attributed to women during their evolution, their low professional integration with that of the man, the differences in the occupational categories occupied by women and men, their dependence on the man, at least in the past, but also her need to be defended. Women's roles in society have been different from one history to another, from one society to another, but they have had something in common - they have always put the woman in vulnerable groups. This was also the reason behind the development of special programs and aids for women. The programs aimed at either its professional integration or educational development, or even aids in cases of physical violence or other special cases. At national level, things did not differ from other countries. Also in Romania the woman is regarded as a vulnerable group, her evolution was ascending, occupying different roles from time to time. The purpose of this article is to analyze the current role of women in Romanian society and the professional evolution of women in Romanian society. As research methods, the quantitative ones were used: sociological inquiry based on questionnaire and qualitative methods: semi-structured interview and legislation analysis. The importance of the article results from the fact that it provides new recommendations on the implementation of measures to reduce violence among women, their professional integration and giving them the necessary support for the problems encountered. As novelty items we find: the problem addressed - the role of women in the Romanian society from a professional and social perspective, the application of interviews and the interpretation of the comparative results - on two different categories of people, both women and men.

  19. MR imaging of white matter lesions in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, W.L.; Longo, F.; Norman, D.

    1987-01-01

    Autopsy reports have shown white-matter abnormalities from infection of the brain by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the agent that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The authors observed abnormal signal on T2-weighted images in the white matter of approximately one third of all AIDS patients. Of 50 patients with white-matter lesions, approximately two thirds had no clinical or biopsy evidence of cytomegalovirus, toxoplasmosis, PML, or lymphoma. Several patients were shown at autopsy to have isolated evidence of HIV encephalitis. The authors conclude that white-matter lesions are common in AIDS and are frequently caused by infection with HIV. Some MR findings may be helpful in characterizing these lesions, but the various etiologies are often indistinguishable

  20. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF HIV/AIDS IN SOUTH AFRICA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    women attending antenatal clinics in 1998 and 1999. ... The Joint United ations Programme on HIV/ AIDS (UNAIDS) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) ... S of every 10 women, and 9 of every 10 children) live in sub-Saharan Africa.

  1. AID SELECTIVITY PRACTICE AND AID EFFECTIVENESS IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeniyi Jimmy Adedokun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Foreign aid strategies have undergone restructuring as donors adopt aid selectivity practice to improve aid effectiveness. This study investigates the impact of aid selectivity practice on aid effectiveness (aid-growth relationship in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA and several groups of countries within SSA from 1980 to 2012. Employing system generalized methods of moments (system GMM technique; the study produces strong evidence that there is significant improvement in aid effectiveness due to aid selectivity practice.

  2. ANALISIS HUBUNGAN PENGETAHUAN PENCEGAHAN HIV/AIDS DAN PERILAKU SEKS TIDAK AMAN PADA REMAJA USIA 15-24 TAHUN DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niniek Lely Pratiwi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: AIDS claimed to have caused death as much as 2.4 to 3.3 million in 2005, and more than 570,000 people of whom are children. One of the phases that have a high vulnerability to HIV/AIDS is adolescence, a period which has the highest social mobility than at any other age. Methods: This study aims to analyze the relationship of knowledge of behavior modes of transmission of HIV/AIDS with sexual behavior adolescents aged 15-24 years. Analysis method based on the type of data knowledge of HIV prevention and AIDS as an independent variable that teen sexual behavior as the dependent variable is nominal, then the test analysis through two stages of analysis, univariate, bivariate relationship between two variables for the analysis followed by analysis of the second stage of Regression binomial. The analysis results showed that there was a significant association significantly between knowledge of HIV/AIDS on the sexual behavior of adolescents first with a P value = 0.000. But there is no significant relationship between knowledge about HIV/AIDS with sexual behavior was first adolescents aged 15-24 years. Active participation among society as a cadre of reproductive health in the introduction of prevention of HIV/AIDS in target coverage to supervision, and monitoringin a variety of outreach activities at the risk of HIV/AIDS, including the facilitation of the existence of VCT tests for teens,parents, leaders society, health cadres. It Needs to increase the quantity of VCT tests easier so that people easier access extension to increase the preventive HIV/AIDS. Key words: HIVIAIDS, Sexual Behavior of Youth, VCT test

  3. Foreign aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Finn

    2008-01-01

    Foreign aid has evolved significantly since the Second World War in response to a dramatically changing global political and economic context. This article (a) reviews this process and associated trends in the volume and distribution of foreign aid; (b) reviews the goals, principles and instituti......Foreign aid has evolved significantly since the Second World War in response to a dramatically changing global political and economic context. This article (a) reviews this process and associated trends in the volume and distribution of foreign aid; (b) reviews the goals, principles...... and institutions of the aid system; and (c) discusses whether aid has been effective. While much of the original optimism about the impact of foreign aid needed modification, there is solid evidence that aid has indeed helped further growth and poverty reduction...

  4. Human Rights in the Fourth Decade of the HIV/AIDS Response: An Inspiring Legacy and Urgent Imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoch, Jamie; Piot, Peter

    2017-12-01

    More than 35 years since the HIV/AIDS pandemic began, HIV continues to cause almost two million new infections each year, and the "end of AIDS" by 2030 remains elusive. 1 Violations of human rights continue to fuel high rates of new infections among key populations and a generalized epidemic in much of sub-Saharan Africa. Meanwhile, as political shifts worldwide threaten not only HIV funding but also progress toward the globalization of human rights, civil society mobilization and advocacy founded firmly on human rights principles have a more vital role to play than ever. Encouragingly, there are numerous examples of successful integration of human rights-based approaches into HIV prevention and treatment initiatives, and evidence increasingly demonstrates that norms enshrining the respect, protection, and fulfillment of human rights can translate into improved public health. 2 This essay will succinctly trace the historic emergence of human rights as an issue at the heart of the HIV/AIDS response; it will then provide examples of progress and setbacks in recent years and consider the potential for rights promotion to address the structural drivers of HIV. Finally, it will consider how the primacy of human rights in HIV/AIDS has affected other fields of global health and will highlight the continuing imperative to work with civil society to protect and promote human rights to reduce the burden of HIV/AIDS.

  5. The Effects of Service-Delivery Model and Purchase Price on Hearing-Aid Outcomes in Older Adults: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, Larry E; Rogers, Sara E; Quigley, Tera M; Main, Anna K; Kinney, Dana L; Herring, Christine

    2017-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine efficacy of hearing aids in older adults using audiology best practices, to evaluate the efficacy of an alternative over-the-counter (OTC) intervention, and to examine the influence of purchase price on outcomes for both service-delivery models. The design of this study was a single-site, prospective, double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial with three parallel branches: (a) audiology best practices (AB), (b) consumer decides OTC model (CD), and (c) placebo devices (P). Outcome measures were obtained after a typical 6-week trial period with follow-up 4-week AB-based trial for those initially assigned to CD and P groups. Older adults from the general community were recruited via newspaper and community flyers to participate at a university research clinic. Participants were adults, ages 55-79 years, with mild-to-moderate hearing loss. There were 188 eligible participants: 163 enrolled as a volunteer sample, and 154 completed the intervention. All participants received the same high-end digital mini-behind-the-ear hearing aids fitted bilaterally. AB and P groups received best-practice services from audiologists; differing mainly in use of appropriate (AB) or placebo (P) hearing aid settings. CD participants self-selected their own pre-programmed hearing aids via an OTC model. Primary outcome measure was a 66-item self-report, Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (Cox & Gilmore, 1990). Secondary outcome measure was the Connected Speech Test (Cox, Alexander, & Gilmore, 1987) benefit. Additional measures of hearing-aid benefit, satisfaction, and usage were also obtained. Per-protocol analyses were performed. AB service-delivery model was found to be efficacious for most of the outcome measures, with moderate or large effect sizes (Cohen's d). CD service-delivery model was efficacious, with similar effect sizes. However, CD group had a significantly (p purchase hearing aids after the trial. Hearing aids are efficacious in

  6. The power of AIDS: kinship, mobility and the valuing of social and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drawing on fieldwork in Tanzania, I show how the Luo in the Mara region define HIV/AIDS as an outcome of modernity and globalisation, which to them have become embodied in processes of migration, the collapse of generational and gender hierarchies, and an increased immorality in contemporary society. While social ...

  7. 115-year-old society knows how to reach young scientists: ASM Young Ambassador Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karczewska-Golec, Joanna

    2015-12-25

    With around 40,000 members in more than 150 countries, American Society for Microbiology (ASM) faces the challenge of meeting very diverse needs of its increasingly international members base. The newly launched ASM Young Ambassador Program seeks to aid the Society in this effort. Equipped with ASM conceptual support and financing, Young Ambassadors (YAs) design and pursue country-tailored approaches to strengthen the Society's ties with local microbiological communities. In a trans-national setting, the active presence of YAs at important scientific events, such as 16th European Congress on Biotechnology, forges new interactions between ASM and sister societies. The paper presents an overview of the Young Ambassadors-driven initiatives at both global and country levels, and explores the topic of how early-career scientists can contribute to science diplomacy and international relations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Success of an International Learning Health Care System in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: The American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation Clinical Case Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Pere; Burns, Linda J; Litzow, Mark R; Juckett, Mark B; Komanduri, Krishna V; Lee, Stephanie J; Devlin, Sean M; Costa, Luciano J; Khan, Shakila; King, Andrea; Klein, Andreas; Krishnan, Amrita; Malone, Adriana; Mir, Muhammad; Moravec, Carina; Selby, George; Roy, Vivek; Cochran, Melissa; Stricherz, Melisa K; Westmoreland, Michael D; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Wood, William A

    2016-03-01

    The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) Clinical Case Forum (CCF) was launched in 2014 as an online secure tool to enhance interaction and communication among hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) professionals worldwide through the discussion of challenging clinical care issues. After 14 months, we reviewed clinical and demographical data of cases posted in the CCF from January 29, 2014 to March 18, 2015. A total of 137 cases were posted during the study period. Ninety-two cases (67%) were allogeneic HCT, 29 (21%) were autologous HCT, and in 16 (12%), the type of transplantation (autologous versus allogeneic) was still under consideration. The diseases most frequently discussed included non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL; n = 30, 22%), acute myeloid leukemia (n = 23, 17%), and multiple myeloma (MM; n = 20, 15%). When compared with the US transplantation activity reported by the US Department of Health and Human Services, NHL and acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases were over-represented in the CCF, whereas MM was under-represented (P educational and research perspectives. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Educational aids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenkeit, S.

    1989-01-01

    Educational aids include printed matter, aural media, visual media, audiovisual media and objects. A distinction is made between learning aids, which include blackboards, overhead projectors, flipcharts, wallcharts and pinboards, and learning aids, which include textbooks, worksheets, documentation and experimental equipment. The various aids are described and their use explained. The aids available at the School for Nuclear Technology of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre are described

  10. The social stigma of HIV–AIDS: society’s role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontomanolis, Emmanuel N; Michalopoulos, Spyridon; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Fasoulakis, Zacharias

    2017-01-01

    AIDS is a devastating and deadly disease that affects people worldwide and, like all infections, it comes without warning. Specifically, childbearing women with AIDS face constant psychological difficulties during their gestation period, even though the pregnancy itself may be normal and healthy. These women have to deal with the uncertainties and the stress that usually accompany a pregnancy, and they have to live with the reality of having a life-threatening disease; in addition to that, they also have to deal with discriminating and stigmatizing behaviors from their environment. It is well known that a balanced mental state is a major determining factor to having a normal pregnancy and constitutes the starting point for having a good quality of life. Even though the progress in both technology and medicine is rapid, infected pregnant women seem to be missing this basic requirement. Communities seem unprepared and uneducated to smoothly integrate these people in their societies, letting the ignorance marginalize and isolate these patients. For all the aforementioned reasons, it is imperative that society and medical professionals respond and provide all the necessary support and advice to HIV-positive child bearers, in an attempt to allay their fears and relieve their distress. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the difficulties patients with HIV infection have to deal with, in order to survive and merge into society, identify the main reasons for the low public awareness, discuss the current situation, and provide potential solutions to reducing the stigma among HIV patients. PMID:28694709

  11. Computational modelling of the impact of AIDS on business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Alan P

    2007-07-01

    An overview of computational modelling of the impact of AIDS on business in South Africa, with a detailed description of the AIDS Projection Model (APM) for companies, developed by the author, and suggestions for further work. Computational modelling of the impact of AIDS on business in South Africa requires modelling of the epidemic as a whole, and of its impact on a company. This paper gives an overview of epidemiological modelling, with an introduction to the Actuarial Society of South Africa (ASSA) model, the most widely used such model for South Africa. The APM produces projections of HIV prevalence, new infections, and AIDS mortality on a company, based on the anonymous HIV testing of company employees, and projections from the ASSA model. A smoothed statistical model of the prevalence test data is computed, and then the ASSA model projection for each category of employees is adjusted so that it matches the measured prevalence in the year of testing. FURTHER WORK: Further techniques that could be developed are microsimulation (representing individuals in the computer), scenario planning for testing strategies, and models for the business environment, such as models of entire sectors, and mapping of HIV prevalence in time and space, based on workplace and community data.

  12. Pulmonary lobar volumetry using novel volumetric computer-aided diagnosis and computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwano, Shingo; Kitano, Mariko; Matsuo, Keiji; Kawakami, Kenichi; Koike, Wataru; Kishimoto, Mariko; Inoue, Tsutomu; Li, Yuanzhong; Naganawa, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To compare the accuracy of pulmonary lobar volumetry using the conventional number of segments method and novel volumetric computer-aided diagnosis using 3D computed tomography images. METHODS We acquired 50 consecutive preoperative 3D computed tomography examinations for lung tumours reconstructed at 1-mm slice thicknesses. We calculated the lobar volume and the emphysematous lobar volume volumetry computer-aided diagnosis system could more precisely measure lobar volumes than the conventional number of segments method. Because semi-automatic computer-aided diagnosis and automatic computer-aided diagnosis were complementary, in clinical use, it would be more practical to first measure volumes by automatic computer-aided diagnosis, and then use semi-automatic measurements if automatic computer-aided diagnosis failed. PMID:23526418

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of the brain in adult HIV and AIDS patients; Magnetresonanztomografische Befunde des Gehirns bei adulten Patienten mit HIV und AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloska, S.P.; Schlegel, P.M.; Fischbach, R.; Heindel, W. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany); Husstedt, I.W.; Anneken, K.; Evers, S. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie, Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    The spectrum of pathology affecting the central nervous system (CNS) in patients suffering from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) includes not only the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection itself but also opportunistic infections and tumors secondary to AIDS. Despite progress in antiretroviral therapy and the subsequent decrease in the incidence of associated diseases, opportunistic infections and tumors secondary to the HIV infection continue to be the limiting factor in terms of survival with AIDS. Therefore, the therapeutic aim is permanent antiretroviral therapy as well as early diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic infections. Magnetic resonance imaging is often the diagnostic method of choice in suspected CNS pathology of HIV patients. In the following, the typical clinical and radiological features of several AIDS-related pathologies are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  14. Cerebral computerized tomography findings in AIDS patients; Cerebrale CT-funn ved AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hol, P.K.; Dunlop, O. [Ullevaal Sykehus, Oslo (Norway)

    1997-09-01

    A cerebral CT was performed in 82 of 525 AIDS patients, with positive findings in 46 cases. These findings included cerebral atrophy in 28 cases, pathological demyelinisation in two, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in one, toxoplasmoses in 11, lymphomas in seven, infarction in one and one subdural haematoma. The radiological findings are correlated to pathology and clinical symptoms. The authors point out the importance of these findings for correct interpretation of the CT scans. 11 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. AID SELECTIVITY PRACTICE AND AID EFFECTIVENESS IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

    OpenAIRE

    Adedokun, Adeniyi Jimmy; Abiodun O. Folawewo, Abiodun O.

    2017-01-01

    Foreign aid strategies have undergone restructuring as donors adopt aid selectivity practice to improve aid effectiveness. This study investigates the impact of aid selectivity practice on aid effectiveness (aid-growth relationship) in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and several groups of countries within SSA from 1980 to 2012. Employing system generalized methods of moments (system GMM) technique; the study produces strong evidence that there is significant improvement in aid effectiveness due to a...

  16. Sharing the spotlight in Durban: A report from IAS TB2016 at AIDS2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Whitaker

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is now recognized as the number one cause of death worldwide due to a single infectious pathogen and is the cause of death in one-third of people living with HIV worldwide. An inaugural pre-conference focused on TB (TB2016 was held at the International AIDS Society Conference AIDS2016. This report focuses on key messages from the TB2016 conference that are important for the medical, public health, activist, and scientific communities. Keywords: Tuberculosis, HIV, Epidemiology, Public health, Treatment, Prevention

  17. Clinical recommendations of cardiac magnetic resonance, Part I: ischemic and valvular heart disease: a position paper of the working group 'Applicazioni della Risonanza Magnetica' of the Italian Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquaro, Giovanni Donato; Di Bella, Gianluca; Castelletti, Silvia; Maestrini, Viviana; Festa, Pierluigi; Ait-Ali, Lamia; Masci, Pier Giorgio; Monti, Lorenzo; di Giovine, Gabriella; De Lazzari, Manuel; Cipriani, Alberto; Guaricci, Andrea I; Dellegrottaglie, Santo; Pepe, Alessia; Marra, Martina Perazzolo; Pontone, Gianluca

    2017-04-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has emerged as a reliable and accurate diagnostic tool for the evaluation of patients with cardiac disease in several clinical settings and with proven additional diagnostic and prognostic value compared with other imaging modalities. This document has been developed by the working group on the 'application of CMR' of the Italian Society of Cardiology to provide a perspective on the current state of technical advances and clinical applications of CMR and to inform cardiologists on how to implement their clinical and diagnostic pathways with the inclusion of this technique in clinical practice. The writing committee consisted of members of the working group of the Italian Society of Cardiology and two external peer reviewers with acknowledged experience in the field of CMR.

  18. Social/sexual norms and AIDS in the South. Ethics and the politics of aids: lessons for small cities and rural areas throughout the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, N K

    1991-01-01

    No one denies that the face of AIDS (the "AIDS profile") is changing, and it is clear that we are entering a new phase in our understanding of this disease. As the AIDS profile changes, however, we are seeing a change in attitudes about prevention. In this stage of the epidemic there seems to be a move toward adopting more coercive strategies for breaking the chain of transmission. One concern, obviously, is that newly HIV-infected persons will find that they have little capacity to demand recognition of their rights to consent, to be treated, to confidentiality, to move about freely in society, to work, and so on. Unfortunately, this bodes ill for newly infected persons in previously low-incidence areas. Two very recent studies suggest that rates of high-risk sexual behavior among homosexual/bisexual men in smaller cities and rural areas in the South are much higher than rates now reported for gay men in large city epicenters. This paper attempts to examine the implications of differences in social and sexual behavior norms in the South for the spread of AIDS/HIV and to suggest morally appropriate primary prevention strategies for working within them.

  19. Parent-teacher agreement on children's problems in 21 societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rescorla, Leslie A; Bochicchio, Lauren; Achenbach, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Parent-teacher cross-informant agreement, although usually modest, may provide important clinical information. Using data for 27,962 children from 21 societies, we asked the following: (a) Do parents report more problems than teachers, and does this vary by society, age, gender, or type of proble...

  20. ASCO 2007: “Translating Research into Practice”. Report from the 34th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camillo Porta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This year, for the 34th time in its history, the mastodontic machinery of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO once again welcomed thousand of members and participants from all over the world to the Society’s annual meeting, which, this year, took place in the ample and well-appointed, McCormick’s Convention Center in Chicago, Illinois...

  1. Estudo comparativo do LCR de pacientes com neurocriptococose sem AIDS e com AIDS Comparison between CSF samples from AIDS and non-AIDS patients with neurocryptococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Baptista dos Reis-Filho

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Até a década de 80, antes do surgimento da AIDS, a criptococose era relativamente rara. Verificou-se que esta doença afeta muito frequentemente os pacientes com AIDS e pode ser a primeira manifestação desta síndrome. O objetivo deste trabalho é o de comparar o resultado dos exames das amostras do LCR inicial na meningencefalite por criptococo entre pacientes com e sem AIDS. Este trabalho é baseado no estudo de 41 pacientes com neurocriptococose sem AIDS e de 23 pacientes com neurocriptococose e AIDS. Este estudo permitiu verificar que a reação inflamatória, no sistema nervoso, quando presente, foi de menor intensidade nos pacientes com AIDS; a reação inflamatória esteve presente em todos os pacientes sem AIDS e ausente em 21,7% dos pacientes com AIDS; o quadro inflamatório crônico, semelhante ao da meningencefalite tuberculosa, clássico nas meningencefalites por criptococo, ocorreu raramente nos pacientes com AIDS; em média, o número de criptococos no LCR foi maior nos pacientes com AIDS; pode ser feito diagnóstico presuntivo da AIDS quando o criptococo estiver presente no LCR que não apresenta alterações citológicas e bioquímicas.Neurocryptococcosis was a rare nervous system infection. With the rising number of patients with AIDS it became a very frequent disease. This infection is supposed to infect patients with some kind of immunodeficiency and the CSF alterations often simulate tuberculous meningitis. The purpose of this research was to compare the CSF changes in AIDS and non-AIDS patients with meningoencephalitis caused by Cr. neoformans. There were analysed 41 CSF samples from non-AIDS patients with neurocryptococcosis and 23 CSF samples from AIDS patients with neurocryptococcosis. The results of this research allowed to conclude that the inflammatory changes in the CSF from AIDS patients showed a lower intensity compared to those non-AIDS patients. These results showed as well, that the CSF samples from non-AIDS

  2. A deadly combination of AIDS, TB and cardiac tumour

    OpenAIRE

    Sahasrabudhe, Tushar Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Immunocompromised status in AIDS makes differential diagnosis of any symptom very difficult for a clinician. Sharp clinical judgement and plenty of investigations may be needed to reach the diagnosis, as in this case. We hereby present a case of AIDS and active tuberculosis (TB) under treatment. The patient developed acute onset multifocal neurological symptoms following an episode of fever and diarrhoea. The MRI scan revealed numerous large cerebral infarcts. On investigations to evaluate br...

  3. Aid Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Jones, Edward Samuel; Tarp, Finn

    of the main relationships; (ii) estimating the impact of aid on a range of final and intermediate outcomes; and (iii) quantifying a simplied representation of the full structural form, where aid impacts on growth through key intermediate outcomes. A coherent picture emerges: aid stimulates growth and reduces......Controversy over the aggregate impact of foreign aid has focused on reduced form estimates of the aid-growth link. The causal chain, through which aid affects developmental outcomes including growth, has received much less attention. We address this gap by: (i) specifying a structural model...... poverty through physical capital investment and improvements in health....

  4. Europe's Shifting Response to HIV/AIDS: From Human Rights to Risk Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Julia

    2016-12-01

    Despite a history of championing HIV/AIDS as a human rights issue, and a rhetorical commitment to health as a human right, European states and institutions have shifted from a rights-based response to a risk management approach to HIV/AIDS since the economic recession of 2008. An interdisciplinary perspective is applied to analyze health policy changes at the national, regional, and global levels by drawing on data from key informant interviews, and institutional and civil society documents. It is demonstrated that, in the context of austerity measures, member states such as the UK and Greece reduced commitments to rights associated with HIV/AIDS; at the regional level, the EU failed to develop rights-based approaches to address the vulnerabilities and health care needs of key populations affected by HIV/AIDS, particularly migrants and sex workers; and at the global level, the EU backtracked on commitments to global health and is prioritizing the intellectual property rights of pharmaceutical companies over the human rights of people living with HIV/AIDS. The focus within and from the EU is on containment, efficiency, and cost reduction. The rights of those most affected are no longer prioritized.

  5. The Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance: updated case definitions of oral disease endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiboski, C H; Patton, L L; Webster-Cyriaque, J Y; Greenspan, D; Traboulsi, R S; Ghannoum, M; Jurevic, R; Phelan, J A; Reznik, D; Greenspan, J S

    2009-07-01

    The Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance (OHARA) is part of the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG), the largest HIV clinical trials organization in the world. Its main objective is to investigate oral complications associated with HIV/AIDS as the epidemic is evolving, in particular, the effects of antiretrovirals on oral mucosal lesion development and associated fungal and viral pathogens. The OHARA infrastructure comprises: the Epidemiologic Research Unit (at the University of California San Francisco), the Medical Mycology Unit (at Case Western Reserve University) and the Virology/Specimen Banking Unit (at the University of North Carolina). The team includes dentists, physicians, virologists, mycologists, immunologists, epidemiologists and statisticians. Observational studies and clinical trials are being implemented at ACTG-affiliated sites in the US and resource-poor countries. Many studies have shared end-points, which include oral diseases known to be associated with HIV/AIDS measured by trained and calibrated ACTG study nurses. In preparation for future protocols, we have updated existing diagnostic criteria of the oral manifestations of HIV published in 1992 and 1993. The proposed case definitions are designed to be used in large-scale epidemiologic studies and clinical trials, in both US and resource-poor settings, where diagnoses may be made by non-dental healthcare providers. The objective of this article is to present updated case definitions for HIV-related oral diseases that will be used to measure standardized clinical end-points in OHARA studies, and that can be used by any investigator outside of OHARA/ACTG conducting clinical research that pertains to these end-points.

  6. Improving clinical trials for cardiovascular diseases: a position paper from the Cardiovascular Round Table of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Neville; Atar, Dan; Borentain, Maria; Breithardt, Günter; van Eickels, Martin; Endres, Matthias; Fraass, Uwe; Friede, Tim; Hannachi, Hakima; Janmohamed, Salim; Kreuzer, Jörg; Landray, Martin; Lautsch, Dominik; Le Floch, Chantal; Mol, Peter; Naci, Huseyin; Samani, Nilesh J; Svensson, Anders; Thorstensen, Cathrine; Tijssen, Jan; Vandzhura, Victoria; Zalewski, Andrew; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of mortality and morbidity in the world, but the pharmaceutical industry's willingness to invest in this field has declined because of the many challenges involved with bringing new cardiovascular drugs to market, including late-stage failures, escalating regulatory requirements, bureaucracy of the clinical trial business enterprise, and limited patient access after approval. This contrasts with the remaining burden of cardiovascular disease in Europe and in the world. Thus, clinical cardiovascular research needs to adapt to address the impact of these challenges in order to ensure development of new cardiovascular medicines. The present paper is the outcome of a two-day workshop held by the Cardiovascular Round Table of the European Society of Cardiology. We propose strategies to improve development of effective new cardiovascular therapies. These can include (i) the use of biomarkers to describe patients who will benefit from new therapies more precisely, achieving better human target validation; (ii) targeted, mechanism-based approaches to drug development for defined populations; (iii) the use of information technology to simplify data collection and follow-up in clinical trials; (iv) streamlining adverse event collection and reducing monitoring; (v) extended patent protection or limited rapid approval of new agents to motivate investment in early phase development; and (vi) collecting data needed for health technology assessment continuously throughout the drug development process (before and after approval) to minimize delays in patient access. Collaboration across industry, academia, regulators, and payers will be necessary to enact change and to unlock the existing potential for cardiovascular clinical drug development. A coordinated effort involving academia, regulators, industry, and payors will help to foster better and more effective conduct of clinical cardiovascular trials, supporting earlier

  7. The Bockus International Society of Gastroenterology: Historical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaun, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    The Bockus International Society of Gastroenterology was founded in 1958 in honour of Dr Henry L Bockus (1894–1982) by his former students, residents and fellows at the Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA. It was a celebrated tribute to Dr Bockus’ outstanding leadership in the development and teaching of clinical gastroenterology as a subspecialty, which was in its infancy in the post-World War II era. He established the first formal training course in clinical gastroenterology in America. His department of gastroenterology became the leading graduate school of clinical gastroenterology in the world, training many clinical gastroenterologists in America and from many regions around the world. For many years, Dr Bockus was the most prominent American in world gastroenterology. The Bockus Society holds biennial scientific congresses in different continents, thus continuing to foster Dr Bockus’ lifelong interest and vision to promote international medical friendship, and excellence in education and research collaboration. PMID:22506261

  8. The management of clinical laboratories in Europe: a FESCC survey. Forum of the European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kieviet, Wim; Blaton, Victor; Kovacs, Gabor L; Palicka, Vladimir; Pulkki, Kari

    2002-03-01

    The professional duties of the specialists in clinical chemistry differ from country to country in Europe. One of the main goals of the Strategic Plan of the Forum of the European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC; IFCC-Europe) is to promote a high scientific and professional standard in the field of clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine in Europe. This can be stimulated by the knowledge of the local conditions in each country and by striving towards a strong and harmonised position in all the European countries. In order to enhance the knowledge of the managerial situation of the specialists in clinical chemistry in Europe, FESCC launched a survey in September 2000. This survey provides information about the position of the specialists in clinical chemistry in the various disciplines in the medical laboratories and in hospitals, and about the advisory tasks and the managerial education during the post-graduate training in clinical chemistry. Of the 35 FESCC member countries 33 have participated in the survey (94%). The results show a rather heterogeneous situation in Europe caused by the local historical developments, the differences in academic background and the relative numbers of private and physicians' office laboratories. Large differences exist between the European countries in the disciplines of laboratory medicine that are headed by a specialist in clinical chemistry. In the different countries the clinical chemistry laboratories are headed by specialists in clinical chemistry in between 20% and 100% of the laboratories. The haematology, immunology, microbiology, therapeutic drug monitoring, molecular biology and haemostasis laboratories and departments of blood banking are headed by specialists in clinical chemistry in between 0% and 100% of the laboratories. The responsibilities for the various managerial tasks of the specialists in clinical chemistry show no uniformity in Europe. In the majority of the countries the

  9. The ineffable disease: exploring young people's discourses about HIV/AIDS in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffigna, Guendalina; Olson, Kärin

    2009-06-01

    The ongoing epidemic of HIV/AIDS in Western societies (in particular in North America), where most of the population knows about the disease and how it is transmitted, suggests that providing information is not enough to change unsafe conduct. More complex psychosocial processes, mainly still unexplored, seem to underlie the translation of health knowledge about the disease and the infection into safe practices. In this article we explore the discourse of young people in Alberta about HIV/AIDS and discuss ways in which this information might be used to shape preventive strategies. We conducted eight focus groups with young people 18 to 25 years of age living in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, and analyzed the data using psychosocial discourse analysis. The results confirm the role of young people's interpersonal exchanges in determining HIV/AIDS preventive conduct and show the importance of social discourses about HIV/AIDS in mediating the impact of preventive campaigns on young people's attitudes and beliefs.

  10. The Function of Vulnerable and at-risk Women in Prevention of HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Kolahi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Regarding little information about sexual behavior of vulnerable women to AIDS, mentioned in the second report of Ministry of Health and Medical Education (2006, this study has been conducted to determine the function of vulnerable and at-risk women to AIDS in Tehran in 2009.

     

    Methods: This descriptive study was done on 128 vulnerable and at-risk women who participated in this study in Tehran in 2009. The samples were a combination of available visitor passed to Drop-in Centers, behavioral or triangular clinic and those who were introduced by participant women through Respondent Driven Sampling. Data were collected by trained interviewers. Quantitative and qualitative descriptive statistics was reported as numbers, percentages, and, also, Mean and Standard deviation respectively. Analytical findings and determination of differentiations and correlation were evaluated based on Chi-squared test.

     

    Results: In this study only 22 (17.2% of participants mentioned that they have always used condom. Partner unwillingness was the most common reason (64% for not using condom. Twenty-four percent of participants have received free condom from triangular, Drop-in and health centers in the last year. Only 32(25% had done HIV test.

     

    Conclusion: The study showed the function of at-risk women in prevention of HIV/AIDS is not satisfactory. If the situation continues in this way, vulnerable women and society will be at more risk.

     

  11. Embryo transfer practices in the United States: a survey of clinics registered with the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungheim, Emily S; Ryan, Ginny L; Levens, Eric D; Cunningham, Alexandra F; Macones, George A; Carson, Kenneth R; Beltsos, Angeline N; Odem, Randall R

    2010-09-01

    To gain a better understanding of factors influencing clinicians' embryo transfer practices. Cross-sectional survey. Web-based survey conducted in December 2008 of individuals practicing IVF in centers registered with the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART). None. None. Prevalence of clinicians reporting following embryo transfer guidelines recommended by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), prevalence among these clinicians to deviate from ASRM guidelines in commonly encountered clinical scenarios, and practice patterns related to single embryo transfer. Six percent of respondents reported following their own, independent guidelines for the number of embryos to transfer after IVF. Of the 94% of respondents who reported routinely following ASRM embryo transfer guidelines, 52% would deviate from these guidelines for patient request, 51% for cycles involving the transfer of frozen embryos, and 70% for patients with previously failed IVF cycles. All respondents reported routinely discussing the risks of multiple gestations associated with standard embryo transfer practices, whereas only 34% reported routinely discussing single embryo transfer with all patients. Although the majority of clinicians responding to our survey reported following ASRM embryo transfer guidelines, at least half would deviate from these guidelines in a number of different situations. Copyright (c) 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  12. A mathematical model of the spread of the AIDS virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyman, J.M.; Stanley, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    A mathematical computer model of the spread of the AIDS epidemic in the US is being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This model predicts the spreading of the HIV infection, and subsequent development of clinical AIDS in various population groups. These groups are chosen according to age, frequency and type of sexual contact, population density, and region of the country. Type of sexual contact includes not only the heterosexual, homosexual differentiation but also repeated contacts with such primary partners as spouses. In conjunction with the computer model, we are developing a database containing relevant information on the natural history of the viral infection, the prevalence of the infection and of clinical AIDS in the population, the distribution of people into sexual behavior groups as a function of age and information on interregional contacts. The effects of variable infectiousness and sexual activity during the long period from infection to disease are found to have a major impact on the predictions of the model. 24 refs., 5 figs.

  13. A Retrospective Study of Erectile Function and Use of Erectile Aids in Prostate Cancer Patients After Radical Prostatectomy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Martha Kirstine; Azawi, Nessn H; Andersen, Line Grønbaek

    2017-01-01

    -nerve-sparing RP had ESI 12 months after RP. Age older than 60.5 years, a high body mass index, comorbidity, and a high American Society of Anesthesiologists score were negative predictors of erectile function 12 months after RP. CONCLUSION: Twelve months after RP, 32.1% of men had ESI; half these men required...... the use of erectile aids. Age older than 60.5 years, a high body mass index, comorbidity, and a high American Society of Anesthesiologists score were negative predictors for ED 12 months after RP. Haahr MK, Azawi NH, Andersen LG, et al. A Retrospective Study of Erectile Function and Use of Erectile Aids...

  14. Performance factors of mobile rich media job aids for community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez-Arango, Jose F; Iyengar, M Sriram; Dunn, Kim; Zhang, Jiajie

    2011-01-01

    To study and analyze the possible benefits on performance of community health workers using point-of-care clinical guidelines implemented as interactive rich media job aids on small-format mobile platforms. A crossover study with one intervention (rich media job aids) and one control (traditional job aids), two periods, with 50 community health workers, each subject solving a total 15 standardized cases per period per period (30 cases in total per subject). Error rate per case and task, protocol compliance. A total of 1394 cases were evaluated. Intervention reduces errors by an average of 33.15% (p = 0.001) and increases protocol compliance 30.18% (p technologies in general, and the use of rich media clinical guidelines on cell phones in particular, for the improvement of community health worker performance in developing countries.

  15. Sexual and reproductive health and rights: integration as a holistic and rights-based response to HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Carmen; Sippel, Serra

    2011-11-01

    For decades, donors, governments, and civil society have recognized the importance of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) in efforts to alleviate poverty and advance gender equality and women's rights. More recently, in the battle against HIV/AIDS--and given the unique challenges the pandemic presents for health and development--the global community has acknowledged the benefits of synergizing sexual and reproductive health and HIV/AIDS interventions. However, the United States has been slow to incorporate lessons learned from the international experience when it comes to integrating HIV/AIDS, SRHR, and gender equality in the fight against HIV/AIDS. This article highlights the importance of SRHR and lessons learned from SRHR-HIV integration to inform U.S. domestic and global AIDS strategies and interventions. Copyright © 2011 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Executive summary of the consensus statement on assistance to women with HIV infection in the health care sector. National AIDS Plan (PNS) and AIDS Study Group (GeSIDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this paper was to develop a consensus on clinical recommendations for health care assistance for women with HIV infection. To this end, a panel of experts, appointed by the Secretariat of the National AIDS Plan and GeSIDA was assembled, that included internal medicine physicians with expertise in the field of HIV infection, gynecologists, pediatricians and psychologists, with two members of the panel acting as coordinators. Scientific information was reviewed in publications and conference reports up to October 2012. In keeping with the criteria of the Infectious Disease Society of America, two levels of evidence were applied to support the proposed recommendations: the strength of the recommendation according to expert opinion (A, B, C) and the level of empirical evidence (I, II, III), already used in previous documents from SPNS/GESIDA. Multiple recommendations are provided for the clinical management of women with HIV infection, considering both the diagnostic and possible therapeutic strategies. This document presents recommendations for the treatment of women with HIV infection. This must be multidisciplinary, taking into account the differences that can be found in the diagnosis, development of disease and treatment between men and women. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. November 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 15, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with a lecture followed by case presentations. There were 15 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, allergy, infectious disease and radiology communities. At the beginning of the meeting several issues were discussed: 1. CME offered by the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (SWJPCC is currently offered to only the Southwest state thoracic societies and the Mayo Clinic. After discussion it was felt that this restriction of access was no longer appropriate and CME credits should be available to all. 2. Efforts continue to obtain CME for the Arizona Thoracic Society meetings. Our Chapter Representative, Dr. Gerry Schwartzberg, is approaching this with the American Thoracic Society. Locally, HonorHealth sent out a survey on CME needs. Members were encouraged …

  18. AIDS Myths and Myths about AIDS Myths : A Study about AIDS-related Perceptions in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Sivelä, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    This doctoral thesis, consisting of four separate articles and a summarizing report, discusses so-called South African AIDS myths also called AIDS beliefs, rumours, misconceptions and legends. AIDS myths have been put forth as an outcome of and a major reason behind the severe HIV/AIDS situation in South Africa. They are proposed to flourish among black South Africans living in impoverished townships and villages. In previous studies, the reasons and mechanisms behind AIDS myths have be...

  19. [Analysis of the results of the 2010 External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Gopegui Bordes, Enrique; Serrano, M del Remedio Guna; Orta Mira, Nieves; Ovies, María Rosario; Poveda, Marta; Cardona, Concepción Gimeno

    2011-12-01

    The External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology includes controls for bacteriology, serology, mycology, parasitology, mycobacteria, virology and molecular microbiology. This article presents the most important conclusions and lessons of the 2010 controls. As a whole, the results obtained in 2010 confirm the excellent skill and good technical standards found in previous years. However, erroneous results can be obtained in any laboratory and in clinically relevant determinations. The results of this program highlight the need to implement both internal and external controls to ensure maximal quality of microbiological tests(1). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical algorithms to aid osteoarthritis guideline dissemination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meneses, S. R. F.; Goode, A. P.; Nelson, A. E

    2016-01-01

    Background: Numerous scientific organisations have developed evidence-based recommendations aiming to optimise the management of osteoarthritis (OA). Uptake, however, has been suboptimal. The purpose of this exercise was to harmonize the recent recommendations and develop a user-friendly treatment...... algorithm to facilitate translation of evidence into practice. Methods: We updated a previous systematic review on clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for OA management. The guidelines were assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation for quality and the standards for developing...... to facilitate the implementation of guidelines in clinical practice are necessary. The algorithms proposed are examples of how to apply recommendations in the clinical context, helping the clinician to visualise the patient flow and timing of different treatment modalities. (C) 2016 Osteoarthritis Research...

  1. Need for multilevel strategies and enhanced acceptance of contraceptive use in order to combat the spread of HIV/AIDS in a Muslim society: a qualitative study of young adults in urban Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid-ul-Hasnain, Syed; Johansson, Eva; Gulzar, Saleema; Krantz, Gunilla

    2013-05-27

    This qualitative study explored knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and perceptions of sexual and reproductive health, focusing specifically on contraceptive use and HIV prevention among young unmarried men and women, 17-21 years, in urban Karachi, Pakistan. The main theme, identified as underlying meaning in the focus group discussions was "Societal norms and perceptions create barriers to knowledge and awareness about sexual and reproductive health matters among young adults". A knowledge gap was revealed concerning HIV/AIDS and contraceptive use among young males and females, who have to rely on media and peers for information seeking. Study participants perceived that HIV/AIDS is incurable and carries a social stigma. It was further revealed, that there is an opposition towards contraceptive use from religious leaders. Young adults in Pakistan are in need of improved knowledge about HIV/AIDS and contraceptive use. Youth clinics and schools/colleges may play a significant role in this regard. The religious leaders need to be informed about the beneficial effects of contraceptives and they should be part of any family planning/contraceptive use program to ensure better community acceptance. At the structural level there is an urgent need for policies targeting the issue of sexual and reproductive health, particularly HIV/AIDS information and contraceptive use to target the young population. The health care services should be able to respond by offering relevant services.

  2. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement: The Role of the Oncologist in Cancer Prevention and Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zon, Robin T.; Goss, Elizabeth; Vogel, Victor G.; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Jatoi, Ismail; Robson, Mark E.; Wollins, Dana S.; Garber, Judy E.; Brown, Powel; Kramer, Barnett S.

    2009-01-01

    Oncologists have a critical opportunity to utilize risk assessment and cancer prevention strategies to interrupt the initiation or progression of cancer in cancer survivors and individuals at high risk of developing cancer. Expanding knowledge about the natural history and prognosis of cancers positions oncologists to advise patients regarding the risk of second malignancies and treatment-related cancers. In addition, as recognized experts in the full spectrum of cancer care, oncologists are afforded opportunities for involvement in community-based cancer prevention activities. Although oncologists are currently providing many cancer prevention and risk assessment services to their patients, economic barriers exist, including inadequate or lack of insurance, that may compromise uniform patient access to these services. Additionally, insufficient reimbursement for existing and developing interventions may discourage patient access to these services. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the medical society representing cancer specialists involved in patient care and clinical research, is committed to supporting oncologists in their wide-ranging involvement in cancer prevention. This statement on risk assessment and prevention counseling, although not intended to be a comprehensive overview of cancer prevention describes the current role of oncologists in risk assessment and prevention; provides examples of risk assessment and prevention activities that should be offered by oncologists; identifies potential opportunities for coordination between oncologists and primary care physicians in prevention education and coordination of care for cancer survivors; describes ASCO's involvement in education and training of oncologists regarding prevention; and proposes improvement in the payment environment to encourage patient access to these services. PMID:19075281

  3. HIV/AIDS - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - HIV/AIDS ... information on AIDS : AIDS.gov -- www.aids.gov AIDS Info -- aidsinfo.nih.gov The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation -- www.kff.org/hivaids US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/hiv

  4. AIDS Awareness and Educating Adolescents about Contraception Techniques: A Sociological Study of Parents and Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanpreet Singh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on partially exploratory and partially descriptive research design to find out AIDS awareness and agreement of parents and teachers on educating adolescents about contraception techniques. For this study 60 parents and 60 teachers were interviewed from 10 different Govt. Senior Secondary schools in district Sangrur, Punjab, India. The random sampling technique was used. The knowledge of AIDS among parents was found partial. Mothers showed lesser knowledge of AIDS in comparison to fathers. Teachers showed comprehensive knowledge of AIDS. Majority of respondents disagree on educating adolescents about contraception techniques. But all responded reported to be in agreement to provide full knowledge about AIDS to adolescents. The education of contraception for adolescent found to be associated with the knowledge of prevention from unwanted pregnancy. Parents and teachers showed propensity to provide such education to adolescents which advocates sexual abstinence until marriage. The plausible reason to such perception could be that in most of Indian societies there is taboo on sex or sex related discussion. Keywords: Adolescents and AIDS; contraception knowledge to adolescents; teachers and AIDS; parents and AIDS DOI: 10.3126/dsaj.v4i0.4520 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol.4 2010 pp.193-210

  5. American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guideline recommendations for immunohistochemical testing of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer (unabridged version).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammond, M.E.; Hayes, D.F.; Dowsett, M.; Allred, D.C.; Hagerty, K.L.; Badve, S.; Fitzgibbons, P.L.; Francis, G.; Goldstein, N.S.; Hayes, M.; Hicks, D.G.; Lester, S.; Love, R.; Mangu, P.B.; McShane, L.; Miller, K.; Osborne, C.K.; Paik, S.; Perlmutter, J.; Rhodes, A.; Sasano, H.; Schwartz, J.N.; Sweep, F.C.; Taube, S.; Torlakovic, E.E.; Valenstein, P.; Viale, G.; Visscher, D.; Wheeler, T.; Williams, R.B.; Wittliff, J.L.; Wolff, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a guideline to improve the accuracy of immunohistochemical (IHC) estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) testing in breast cancer and the utility of these receptors as predictive markers. METHODS: The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of

  6. Report on the International Society for Laboratory Hematology Survey on guidelines to support clinical hematology laboratory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, C P M; Moffat, K A; George, T I; Proytcheva, M; Iorio, A

    2016-05-01

    Given the importance of evidence-based guidelines in health care, we surveyed the laboratory hematology community to determine their opinions on guideline development and their experience and interest in developing clinical hematology laboratory practice guidelines. The study was conducted using an online survey, distributed to members of the International Society for Laboratory Hematology (ISLH) in 2015, with analysis of collected, anonymized responses. A total of 245 individuals participated. Most worked in clinical and/or research laboratories (83%) or industry (11%). 42% felt there were gaps in current guidelines. The majority (58%) recommended that ISLH engages its membership in guideline development. Participants differed in their familiarity with, and use of, different organizations' guidelines. Participants felt it was important to follow best practice recommendations on guideline development, including engagement of experts, statement about conflict of interests and how they were managed, systematic review and grading evidence for recommendations, identifying recommendations lacking evidence or consensus, and public input and peer review of the guideline. Moreover, it was considered important to provide guidelines free of charge. Industry involvement in guidelines was considered less important. The clinical laboratory hematology community has high expectations of laboratory practice guidelines that are consistent with recent recommendations on evidence-based guideline development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Physicians' intentions and use of three patient decision aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Susan L

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decision aids are evidence based tools that assist patients in making informed values-based choices and supplement the patient-clinician interaction. While there is evidence to show that decision aids improve key indicators of patients' decision quality, relatively little is known about physicians' acceptance of decision aids or factors that influence their decision to use them. The purpose of this study was to describe physicians' perceptions of three decision aids, their expressed intent to use them, and their subsequent use of them. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of random samples of Canadian respirologists, family physicians, and geriatricians. Three decision aids representing a range of health decisions were evaluated. The survey elicited physicians' opinions on the characteristics of the decision aid and their willingness to use it. Physicians who indicated a strong likelihood of using the decision aid were contacted three months later regarding their actual use of the decision aid. Results Of the 580 eligible physicians, 47% (n = 270 returned completed questionnaires. More than 85% of the respondents felt the decision aid was well developed and that it presented the essential information for decision making in an understandable, balanced, and unbiased manner. A majority of respondents (>80% also felt that the decision aid would guide patients in a logical way, preparing them to participate in decision making and to reach a decision. Fewer physicians ( Conclusion Despite strong support for the format, content, and quality of patient decision aids, and physicians' stated intentions to adopt them into clinical practice, most did not use them within three months of completing the survey. There is a wide gap between intention and behaviour. Further research is required to study the determinants of this intention-behaviour gap and to develop interventions aimed at barriers to physicians' use of decision aids.

  8. Attitudes of pediatric intensive care unit physicians towards the use of cognitive aids: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Matthew J; Kramer, Chelsea; Tremblay, Sébastien; Côté, Luc

    2016-05-21

    Cognitive aids are increasingly recommended in clinical practice, yet little is known about the attitudes of physicians towards these tools. We employed a qualitative, descriptive design to explore physician attitudes towards cognitive aids in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Semi-structured interviews elicited the opinions of a convenience sample of practicing PICU physicians towards the use of cognitive aids. We analyzed interview data for thematic content to examine the three factors of intention to use cognitive aids as defined by the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), attitudes, social norms, and perceived control. Analysis of 14 interviews suggested that in the PICU setting, cognitive aids are widely used. Discovered themes related to their use touched on all three TPB factors of intention and included: aids are perceived to improve team communication; aids may improve patient safety; aids may hinder clinician judgment; physicians may resist implementation if it occurs prior to demonstration of benefit; effective adoption requires cognitive aids to be integrated into local workplace culture; and implementation should take physician concerns into account. Our sample of PICU physicians were open to cognitive aids in their practice, as long as such aids preserve the primacy of clinical judgment, focus on team communication, demonstrate effectiveness through preliminary testing, and are designed and implemented with the local culture and work environment in mind. Future knowledge translation efforts to implement cognitive aids would benefit from consideration of these issues.

  9. Evaluating Adaptation of a Cancer Clinical Trial Decision Aid for Rural Cancer Patients: A Mixed-Methods Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Swati; George, Nerissa; Monti, Denise; Robinson, Kathy; Politi, Mary C

    2018-06-03

    Rural-residing cancer patients often do not participate in clinical trials. Many patients misunderstand cancer clinical trials and their rights as participant. The purpose of this study is to modify a previously developed cancer clinical trials decision aid (DA), incorporating the unique needs of rural populations, and test its impact on knowledge and decision outcomes. The study was conducted in two phases. Phase I recruited 15 rural-residing cancer survivors in a qualitative usability study. Participants navigated the original DA and provided feedback regarding usability and implementation in rural settings. Phase II recruited 31 newly diagnosed rural-residing cancer patients. Patients completed a survey before and after using the revised DA, R-CHOICES. Primary outcomes included decisional conflict, decision self-efficacy, knowledge, communication self-efficacy, and attitudes towards and willingness to consider joining a trial. In phase I, the DA was viewed positively by rural-residing cancer survivors. Participants provided important feedback about factors rural-residing patients consider when thinking about trial participation. In phase II, after using R-CHOICES, participants had higher certainty about their choice (mean post-test = 3.10 vs. pre-test = 2.67; P = 0.025) and higher trial knowledge (mean percentage correct at post-test = 73.58 vs. pre-test = 57.77; P decision self-efficacy, communication self-efficacy, and attitudes towards or willingness to join trials. The R-CHOICES improved rural-residing patients' knowledge of cancer clinical trials and reduced conflict about making a trial decision. More research is needed on ways to further support decisions about trial participation among this population.

  10. [Adolescence and AIDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The myths and prejudices that distort the reality and hide the true causes and effects of natural and social phenomena related to sexuality have a fertile ground in AIDS, given its obvious link to sex. The alarming spread of AIDS has been 1 result of these myths and prejudices. Human beings are sexual by nature; genital organs determine sex and also induce sexual behavior. It is by not fairly well accepted that an individual's sexuality exists from birth. Puberty usually begins at 12-16 years for both sexes. The physical changes of puberty terminate in the ability of the female to conceive and the male to procreate. The sexual excitation of adolescents resulting from production of various hormones can only be eliminated by some type of sexual satisfaction or sublimation. Sexuality, according to Freud, is an organizing principle of the personality. The sexual organs exist not merely for reproduction but to provide pleasure. Puberty signifies entry into active sex life. But the ideological structure of society, perpetuated by the family, schools, religion, the mass media, and other social institutions, sends confused signals to adolescents, requiring abstinence and virginity until marriage for women while encouraging sexual adventures for men. Adolescents are confronted by their new sexual feelings in the midst of a virtual bombardment of visual sexual stimuli from the mass media. It becomes impossible for adolescents to satisfy the requirements of appearances while also resolving the problems and pressures of their newly gained sexual maturity. Many adolescents become sexually active, and the problem is not to prevent sexual activity but to improve the conditions under which it occurs. Adolescents, lacking education and information about sex, begin their sex lives without protection. AIDS has now been added to the list of dire consequences that can result. A true sex education beginning in the home is needed to enable young people to develop healthy and full sex

  11. Knowledge and awareness regarding menstruation and HIV/AIDS among schoolgoing adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rakhi; Anand, Puneet; Dhyani, Anuj; Bansal, Deshant

    2017-01-01

    Menstruation in our country is associated with various myths and restrictions leading to lack of awareness among adolescent girls. Insufficient menstrual hygiene practices are the cause of stress associated with menstruation and reproductive tract infections. Sexually transmitted infections and HIV/AIDS are not openly discussed in our society making adolescents vulnerable to them. To assess the knowledge of school going adolescent girls regarding menstrual hygiene and HIV/AIDS. Girls studying in class 8 th -12 th standard and who have attained menarche were included in the study. A predesigned questionnaire, which consisted of questions related to menstrual awareness and knowledge about HIV/AIDS was used for data collection. Data was analysed using SPSS software and results were interpreted into percentages. 282 girls took part in the study. Mean age of girls was 14.70 ± 1.5 years. Median age of girls was 15 years. Knowledge regarding menstrual hygiene and HIV/AIDS was found to be only satisfactory leaving a scope of improvement. Mother was the main source of information regarding both menstruation and HIV/AIDS. A comprehensive health education programme involving mothers is required to remove various misconceptions and taboos associated with menstruation and make it a pleasant experience for adolescent girls. Information, education and awareness programmes need to be strengthened to spread awareness regarding HIV/AIDS.

  12. Knowledge and awareness regarding menstruation and HIV/AIDS among schoolgoing adolescent girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhi Jain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Menstruation in our country is associated with various myths and restrictions leading to lack of awareness among adolescent girls. Insufficient menstrual hygiene practices are the cause of stress associated with menstruation and reproductive tract infections. Sexually transmitted infections and HIV/AIDS are not openly discussed in our society making adolescents vulnerable to them. Aim: To assess the knowledge of school going adolescent girls regarding menstrual hygiene and HIV/AIDS. Materials and Methods: Girls studying in class 8th-12th standard and who have attained menarche were included in the study. A predesigned questionnaire, which consisted of questions related to menstrual awareness and knowledge about HIV/AIDS was used for data collection. Data was analysed using SPSS software and results were interpreted into percentages. Results: 282 girls took part in the study. Mean age of girls was 14.70 ± 1.5 years. Median age of girls was 15 years. Knowledge regarding menstrual hygiene and HIV/AIDS was found to be only satisfactory leaving a scope of improvement. Mother was the main source of information regarding both menstruation and HIV/AIDS. Conclusion: A comprehensive health education programme involving mothers is required to remove various misconceptions and taboos associated with menstruation and make it a pleasant experience for adolescent girls. Information, education and awareness programmes need to be strengthened to spread awareness regarding HIV/AIDS.

  13. Information Entropy-Based Metrics for Measuring Emergences in Artificial Societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingsheng Tang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Emergence is a common phenomenon, and it is also a general and important concept in complex dynamic systems like artificial societies. Usually, artificial societies are used for assisting in resolving several complex social issues (e.g., emergency management, intelligent transportation system with the aid of computer science. The levels of an emergence may have an effect on decisions making, and the occurrence and degree of an emergence are generally perceived by human observers. However, due to the ambiguity and inaccuracy of human observers, to propose a quantitative method to measure emergences in artificial societies is a meaningful and challenging task. This article mainly concentrates upon three kinds of emergences in artificial societies, including emergence of attribution, emergence of behavior, and emergence of structure. Based on information entropy, three metrics have been proposed to measure emergences in a quantitative way. Meanwhile, the correctness of these metrics has been verified through three case studies (the spread of an infectious influenza, a dynamic microblog network, and a flock of birds with several experimental simulations on the Netlogo platform. These experimental results confirm that these metrics increase with the rising degree of emergences. In addition, this article also has discussed the limitations and extended applications of these metrics.

  14. Self-reported disability and handicap after hearing-aid fitting and benefit of hearing aids: comparison of fitting procedures, degree of hearing loss, experience with hearing aids and uni- and bilateral fittings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metselaar, Mick; Maat, Bert; Krijnen, Pieta; Verschuure, Hans; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Feenstra, Louw

    2009-01-01

    Self-reported outcome on hearing disability and handicap as well as overall health-related quality of life were measured after hearing-aid fitting in a large-scale clinical population. Fitting was performed according to two different procedures in a double-blind study design. We used a comparative

  15. Self-reported disability and handicap after hearing-aid fitting and benefit of hearing aids : comparison of fitting procedures, degree of hearing loss, experience with hearing aids and uni- and bilateral fittings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metselaar, Mick; Maat, Bert; Krijnen, Pieta; Verschuure, Hans; Dreschler, Wouter A; Feenstra, Louw

    Self-reported outcome on hearing disability and handicap as well as overall health-related quality of life were measured after hearing-aid fitting in a large-scale clinical population. Fitting was performed according to two different procedures in a double-blind study design. We used a comparative

  16. Evaluation of computer-aided detection and diagnosis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman; Armato, Samuel G; Bert, Alberto; Correale, Loredana; Delsanto, Silvia; Freedman, Matthew T; Fryd, David; Gur, David; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Huo, Zhimin; Jiang, Yulei; Morra, Lia; Paquerault, Sophie; Raykar, Vikas; Samuelson, Frank; Summers, Ronald M; Tourassi, Georgia; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Zheng, Bin; Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2013-08-01

    Computer-aided detection and diagnosis (CAD) systems are increasingly being used as an aid by clinicians for detection and interpretation of diseases. Computer-aided detection systems mark regions of an image that may reveal specific abnormalities and are used to alert clinicians to these regions during image interpretation. Computer-aided diagnosis systems provide an assessment of a disease using image-based information alone or in combination with other relevant diagnostic data and are used by clinicians as a decision support in developing their diagnoses. While CAD systems are commercially available, standardized approaches for evaluating and reporting their performance have not yet been fully formalized in the literature or in a standardization effort. This deficiency has led to difficulty in the comparison of CAD devices and in understanding how the reported performance might translate into clinical practice. To address these important issues, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) formed the Computer Aided Detection in Diagnostic Imaging Subcommittee (CADSC), in part, to develop recommendations on approaches for assessing CAD system performance. The purpose of this paper is to convey the opinions of the AAPM CADSC members and to stimulate the development of consensus approaches and "best practices" for evaluating CAD systems. Both the assessment of a standalone CAD system and the evaluation of the impact of CAD on end-users are discussed. It is hoped that awareness of these important evaluation elements and the CADSC recommendations will lead to further development of structured guidelines for CAD performance assessment. Proper assessment of CAD system performance is expected to increase the understanding of a CAD system's effectiveness and limitations, which is expected to stimulate further research and development efforts on CAD technologies, reduce problems due to improper use, and eventually improve the utility and efficacy of CAD in

  17. Two Different Percutaneous Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid Abutment Systems: Comparative Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Beldan; İşeri, Mete; Orhan, Kadir Serkan; Yılmazer, Ayça Başkadem; Enver, Necati; Ceylan, Didem; Kara, Ahmet; Güldiken, Yahya; Çomoğlu, Şenol

    2016-04-01

    To compare two different percutaneous bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) abutment systems regarding operation time, scar healing, quality of life, implant stability, audiologic results, and complications. The study involves a prospective multi-center clinical evaluation. Thirty-two consecutive patients who had undergone BAHA surgery from January 2011 to January 2013 in two tertiary centers were included in the study. The Glasgow Inventory Benefit Score was used to assess the patients at least 6 months after surgery. The operation time and complications were recorded. Implant stability quotient (ISQ) values were recorded using resonance frequency analysis. Holger's classification was used to evaluate skin reactions. The mean length of the operation was 39.2±4 min for standard abutment and 18.3±5.7 min for hydroxyapatite-coated abutment. ISQ scores were significantly better for standard abutment in all tests. The mean total Glasgow Inventory Benefit Score was 39.3±19 for the standard abutment and 46.3±24.5 for the hydroxyapatite-coated abutment groups, but there was no statistical significance between the two groups. There was no difference in audiological improvement between the two groups after surgery. Hydroxyapatite-coated abutment provided a shorter operation time that was significantly different from standard abutment. There were no significant differences between standard abutment and hydroxyapatite-coated abutment regarding audiologic improvement, quality of life, loading time, and complications.

  18. Site Characteristics Influencing the Translation of Clinical Research Into Clinical Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smed, Marie; Getz, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Investigative sites participating in clinical trials play an instrumental role in aiding market adoption. Site experiences in clinical research help physician investigators and research professionals gain familiarity with and exposure to investigational treatments. This knowledge may be passed...

  19. [The role of supply-side characteristics of services in AIDS mortality in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio; Serván-Mori, Edson; Silverman-Retana, Omar; Contreras-Loya, David; Romero-Martínez, Martín; Magis-Rodríguez, Carlos; Uribe-Zúñiga, Patricia; Lozano, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    To document the association between supply-side determinants and AIDS mortality in Mexico between 2008 and 2013. We analyzed the SALVAR database (system for antiretroviral management, logistics and surveillance) as well as data collected through a nationally representative survey in health facilities. We used multivariate logit regression models to estimate the association between supply-side characteristics, namely management, training and experience of health care providers, and AIDS mortality, distinguishing early and non-early mortality and controlling for clinical indicators of the patients. Clinic status of the patients (initial CD4 and viral load) explain 44.4% of the variability of early mortality across clinics and 13.8% of the variability in non-early mortality. Supply-side characteristics increase explanatory power of the models by 16% in the case of early mortality, and 96% in the case of non-early mortality. Aspects of management and implementation of services contribute significantly to explain AIDS mortality in Mexico. Improving these aspects of the national program, can similarly improve its results.

  20. Cultural Approach to HIV/AIDS Harm Reduction in Muslim Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasnain Memoona

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Muslim countries, previously considered protected from HIV/AIDS due to religious and cultural norms, are facing a rapidly rising threat. Despite the evidence of an advancing epidemic, the usual response from the policy makers in Muslim countries, for protection against HIV infection, is a major focus on propagating abstention from illicit drug and sexual practices. Sexuality, considered a private matter, is a taboo topic for discussion. Harm reduction, a pragmatic approach for HIV prevention, is underutilized. The social stigma attached to HIV/AIDS, that exists in all societies is much more pronounced in Muslim cultures. This stigma prevents those at risk from coming forward for appropriate counseling, testing, and treatment, as it involves disclosure of risky practices. The purpose of this paper is to define the extent of the HIV/AIDS problem in Muslim countries, outline the major challenges to HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment, and discuss the concept of harm reduction, with a cultural approach, as a strategy to prevent further spread of the disease. Recommendations include integrating HIV prevention and treatment strategies within existing social, cultural and religious frameworks, working with religious leaders as key collaborators, and provision of appropriate healthcare resources and infrastructure for successful HIV prevention and treatment programs in Muslim countries.

  1. Fear of AIDS and suicide in Finland: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; Henriksson, M; Leinikki, P

    1995-01-01

    health care contacts than the others. Suicidal fear and underlying depression were not being properly identified and treated. Despite recent improvement in media reporting, health education and identification of depression, clinical experience, help line calls and population surveys indicate that AIDS......This review presents data on HIV epidemiology and suicide mortality, and summarizes studies on fear of AIDS in completed suicides in Finland. Finland has a low prevalence of HIV and a high suicide mortality. A 12-month nationwide suicide population, 1987-88 (n = 1397, all HIV negative) at the time...... of a sensational media campaign against HIV included 28 (2%) cases with fear of AIDS as a contributing factor. Triggers of fear could be classified in 20 cases: persistent symptoms in 10, casual sex contacts in eight, and a TV programme in two. The AIDS fear cases were younger, had more major depression and more...

  2. Better together: reduced compliance after sequential versus simultaneous bilateral hearing aids fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Limor; Banai, Karen; Attias, Joseph; Karni, Avi

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of sequential versus simultaneous bilateral hearing aids fitting on patient compliance. Thirty-six older adults with hearing impairment participated in this study. Twelve were fitted with bilateral hearing aids simultaneously. The remaining participants were fitted sequentially: One hearing aid (to the left or to the right ear) was used initially; 1 month later, the other ear was also fitted with a hearing aid for bilateral use. Self-reports on usefulness and compliance were elicited after the first and second months of hearing aid use. In addition, the number of hours the hearing aids were used was extracted from the data loggings of each device. Simultaneous fitting resulted in high levels of compliance and consistent usage throughout the study period. Sequential fitting resulted in abrupt reduction in compliance and hours of use once the second hearing aid was added, both in the clinical scoring and in the data loggings. Simultaneous fitting of bilateral hearing aids results in better compliance compared with sequential fitting. The addition of a second hearing aid after a relatively short period of monaural use may lead to inconsistent use of both hearing aids.

  3. The history and development of the Human Genetics Society of Australasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Grant R

    2008-08-01

    The Human Genetics Society of Australasia is a vibrant professional society with more than 900 members that promotes and regulates the practice of human and medical genetics in Australia and New Zealand. The growth of human genetics was stimulated by the development of diagnostic clinical cytogenetics laboratories in the early to mid 1960s. This coincided with the recognition by medical specialists, mainly pediatricians, that genetic disorders, especially inborn errors of metabolism and birth defects, were of clinical interest and potentially challenging areas for their skills. The organization of professionals in human genetics was slow to evolve. There was an early Western Australian Human Genetics Society, and the cytogenetics community had begun to meet annually from about 1966 but was coordinated by a mailing list rather than as a formal organization. In 1976, as part of the celebrations of the Centenary Year of the Adelaide Children's Hospital, a clinical genetics meeting involving several high profile international speakers and most of the senior medical geneticists in Australia and New Zealand along with the annual meeting of the loose-knit cytogeneticists group agreed that a small working group be charged with setting up a Human Genetics Society. The society was formally incorporated in South Australia in 1977.

  4. Sociocultural dimensions of HIV/AIDS among Middle Eastern immigrants in the US: bridging culture with HIV/AIDS programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsanzadeh-Cheemeh, Parvaneh; Sadeque, Abul; Grimes, Richard M; Essien, E James

    2009-09-01

    The population of Middle Eastern immigrants in the US has been increasing dramatically over the past 30 years, growing from 200,000 in 1970 to 1.5 million in 2000. These immigrants and their descendants constitute an important new population of interest for public health and other social programmes. With this addition to the cultural diversity of American society, it is important for healthcare programmes to be responsive to the unique cultural needs of those of Middle Eastern origin and to include them in healthcare curricula. This need is particularly imperative for human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) intervention programmes, where the reduction of risky behaviours is essential to controlling the epidemic. When Middle Easterners emigrate to the US they must adjust to the American culture, which leads to preservation of some aspects of their culture and adjustment of behaviors to match American customs. This article aims to present sociocultural factors of HIV risk behaviours that are specific to Middle Eastern culture. The article also provides recommendations for HIV/AIDS-culturally appropriate intervention programmes.

  5. Aids em área rural de Minas Gerais: abordagem cultural AIDS in rural Minas Gerais state (Southeastern Brazil: a cultural approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Neves Guimarães

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever comportamentos facilitadores à exposição ao HIV/Aids em população rural. MÉTODOS: Pesquisa qualitativa realizada com 52 pacientes atendidos em ambulatório de DST/Aids, em 2002-2003. Foram feitas entrevistas abertas e semi-estruturadas em profundidade com os participantes (30 homens e 22 mulheres, conduzidas no ambulatório ou em suas residências, em municípios rurais da região norte de Minas Gerais. As entrevistas foram transcritas, analisadas em categorias: concepções da doença, trabalho, sociabilidade, informações prévias sobre a doença, modo de vida. A interpretação dos resultados baseou-se na análise de conteúdo. RESULTADOS: Na percepção dos entrevistados, a Aids era "doença de cidade grande" e de "forasteiro", desvinculada da cultura local. Todos os entrevistados se infectaram através de atividades heterossexuais ou homossexuais. A migração rural-urbana é aspecto relevante da infecção do HIV na região devido ao deslocamento em busca de trabalho. CONCLUSÕES: As noções populares de doença contribuem para vulnerabilidade à infecção pelo HIV. É necessário apreender noções culturais locais para melhor entender as categorias de pensamento dessa população, enfocando essas noções ao divulgar informações sobre a doença.OBJECTIVE: To describe behaviors facilitating HIV/AIDS exposure in rural population. METHODS: A qualitative study was conducted comprising 52 patients who attended a STD/AIDS outpatient clinic in 2002 and 2003. In-depth open and semi-structured interviews were carried out with subjects (30 males, 22 females at the clinic or at home in rural municipalities in the northern area of Minas Gerais state, Southeastern Brazil. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed considering categories such as disease, work, social life, prior HIV/AIDS knowledge, and lifestyle. Content analysis was used for result interpretation. RESULTS: Interviewees perceived AIDS as a "big city

  6. mHealth and memory aids: levels of smartphone ownership in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migo, Ellen M; Haynes, Becky I; Harris, Lara; Friedner, Kim; Humphreys, Kate; Kopelman, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    The use of mobile devices to deliver healthcare has not yet been exploited in neuropsychological rehabilitation. Smartphones have the potential to serve as multi-functional memory aids. To investigate whether patients attending a clinic for mixed memory problems own smartphones, to determine whether this could be a widely applicable medium to use as a memory aids device. A questionnaire on smartphone ownership was given to an opportunity sample of consecutive patients attending a neuropsychiatry and memory disorders outpatient clinic. Data were collected in 2012 and repeated 12 months later in 2013 to assess changes over time. Ownership of mobile phones was stable between 2012 (81%) and 2013 (85%), but ownership of smartphones showed a significant increase (from 26% to 40%). Age negatively predicted smartphone ownership. Despite cognitive or psychiatric problems, our patient group are as likely to own a mobile phone as a member of the general population. Ownership levels are at 40% and likely to increase in the future. Exploring how smartphones and their apps could function as memory aids is likely to be useful for a large enough number of patients to be clinically worthwhile.

  7. Aid Policy and the Macroeconomic Management of Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Addison, Tony; Tarp, Finn

    2015-01-01

    This is an introduction to the UNU-WIDER special issue of World Development on aid policy and the macroeconomic management of aid. We provide an overview of the 10 studies, grouping them under three sub-themes: the aid–growth relationship; the supply-side of aid (including its level, volatility......, and coordination of donors); and the macroeconomic framework around aid. The studies in the special issue demonstrate the centrality of research methodology, the importance of disaggregation, and the need to account for country-specific situations and problems. This introduction concludes that the sometimes “over...

  8. European AIDS Clinical Society Standard of Care meeting on HIV and related coinfections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mussini, C; Antinori, A; Bhagani, S

    2016-01-01

    . Substantial differences exist in Eastern Europe and Central Asia with respect to treatment coverage, regimen availability and continuity of drug supply. In 2012, tuberculosis case notification rates were 5-10 times higher in Eastern Europe compared with Western Europe, with an alarming proportion of newly...

  9. Pulmonary complications of AIDS: radiologic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.A.; Pomeranz, S.; Rabinowitz, J.G.; Rosen, M.J.; Train, J.S.; Norton, K.I.; Mendelson, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-two patients with pulmonary complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were studied over a 3-year period. The vast majority of the patients were homosexual; however, a significant number were intravenous drug abusers. Thirteen different organisms were noted, of which Pneumocystis carinii was by far the most common. Five patients had neoplasia. Most patients had initial abnormal chest films; however, eight patients subsequently shown to have Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia had normal chest films. A significant overlap in chest radiographic findings was noted among patients with different or multiple organisms. Lung biopsy should be an early consideration for all patients with a clinical history consistent with the pulmonary complications of AIDS. Of the 52 patients, 41 had died by the time this report was completed

  10. Development of a multimedia educational programme for first-time hearing aid users: a participatory design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Melanie; Leighton, Paul; Brandreth, Marian; Wharrad, Heather

    2018-05-02

    To develop content for a series of interactive video tutorials (or reusable learning objects, RLOs) for first-time adult hearing aid users, to enhance knowledge of hearing aids and communication. RLO content was based on an electronically-delivered Delphi review, workshops, and iterative peer-review and feedback using a mixed-methods participatory approach. An expert panel of 33 hearing healthcare professionals, and workshops involving 32 hearing aid users and 11 audiologists. This ensured that social, emotional and practical experiences of the end-user alongside clinical validity were captured. Content for evidence-based, self-contained RLOs based on pedagogical principles was developed for delivery via DVD for television, PC or internet. Content was developed based on Delphi review statements about essential information that reached consensus (≥90%), visual representations of relevant concepts relating to hearing aids and communication, and iterative peer-review and feedback of content. This participatory approach recognises and involves key stakeholders in the design process to create content for a user-friendly multimedia educational intervention, to supplement the clinical management of first-time hearing aid users. We propose participatory methodologies are used in the development of content for e-learning interventions in hearing-related research and clinical practice.

  11. International ERS/ESICM/ESCMID/ALAT guidelines for the management of hospital-acquired pneumonia and ventilator-associated pneumonia: Guidelines for the management of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP)/ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) of the European Respiratory Society (ERS), European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM), European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) and Asociación Latinoamericana del Tórax (ALAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Antoni; Niederman, Michael S; Chastre, Jean; Ewig, Santiago; Fernandez-Vandellos, Patricia; Hanberger, Hakan; Kollef, Marin; Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Luna, Carlos M; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Paiva, J Artur; Read, Robert C; Rigau, David; Timsit, Jean François; Welte, Tobias; Wunderink, Richard

    2017-09-01

    The most recent European guidelines and task force reports on hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) were published almost 10 years ago. Since then, further randomised clinical trials of HAP and VAP have been conducted and new information has become available. Studies of epidemiology, diagnosis, empiric treatment, response to treatment, new antibiotics or new forms of antibiotic administration and disease prevention have changed old paradigms. In addition, important differences between approaches in Europe and the USA have become apparent.The European Respiratory Society launched a project to develop new international guidelines for HAP and VAP. Other European societies, including the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, were invited to participate and appointed their representatives. The Latin American Thoracic Association was also invited.A total of 15 experts and two methodologists made up the panel. Three experts from the USA were also invited (Michael S. Niederman, Marin Kollef and Richard Wunderink).Applying the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methodology, the panel selected seven PICO (population-intervention-comparison-outcome) questions that generated a series of recommendations for HAP/VAP diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  12. Removable partial dentures: clinical concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenkamp, David M

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a review of the traditional clinical concepts for the design and fabrication of removable partial dentures (RPDs). Although classic theories and rules for RPD designs have been presented and should be followed, excellent clinical care for partially edentulous patients may also be achieved with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology and unique blended designs. These nontraditional RPD designs and fabrication methods provide for improved fit, function, and esthetics by using computer-aided design software, composite resin for contours and morphology of abutment teeth, metal support structures for long edentulous spans and collapsed occlusal vertical dimensions, and flexible, nylon thermoplastic material for metal-supported clasp assemblies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Chapter 6 – Computer-Aided Molecular Design and Property Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul; Zhang, L.; Kalakul, Sawitree

    2017-01-01

    for the initial stages of the design/development process. Therefore, computer-aided molecular design and property prediction techniques are two topics that play important roles in chemical product design, analysis, and application. In this chapter, an overview of the concepts, methods, and tools related......Today's society needs many chemical-based products for its survival, nutrition, health, transportation, agriculture, and the functioning of processes. Chemical-based products have to be designed/developed in order to meet these needs, while at the same time, they must be innovative and sustainable...... to these two topics are given. In addition, a generic computer-aided framework for the design of molecules, mixtures, and blends is presented. The application of the framework is highlighted for molecular products through two case studies involving the design of refrigerants and surfactants....

  14. Aid is dead. Long live aid!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Severino

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The concepts, targets, tools, institutions and modes of operation of official development assistance have been overtaken by the pace of change in a world marked by the combined momentum of demography, technology and economic growth.Aid can however recover, as social consequences of the globalization call for new forms of regulation. It will then be necessary to modify and diversify our target-setting processes, to update operating procedures, and to find better ways of measuring policy implementation. Aid volumes will certainly continue to grow, and we must transform the way aid is financed. Public and private aid stakeholders must recognize the importance of these transformations and be ready to support them, by questioning the methods as well as the objectives of the policies they are implementing. Otherwise, they will severely impede the emergence of the policies we need if we are to build a better world.

  15. Clinical characteristics and causes of visual impairment in a low vision clinic in northern Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkar, May M; Alzghoul, Eman A; Haddad, Mera F

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify causes of visual impairment among patients attending a low vision clinic in the north of Jordan and to study the relevant demographic characteristics of these patients. The retrospective study was conducted through a review of clinical records of 135 patients who attended a low vision clinic in Irbid. Clinical characteristics of the patients were collected, including age, gender, primary cause of low vision, best corrected visual acuity, and current prescribed low vision aids. Descriptive statistics analysis using numbers and percentages were calculated to summarize categorical and nominal data. A total of 135 patients (61 [45.2%] females and 74 [54.8%] males) were recruited in the study. Mean age ± standard deviation for the study population was 24.53 ± 16.245 years; age range was 5-90 years. Of the study population, 26 patients (19.3%) had mild visual impairment, 61 patients (45.2%) had moderate visual impairment, 27 patients (20.0%) had severe visual impairment, and 21 patients (15.6%) were blind. The leading causes of visual impairment across all age groups were albinism (31.9%) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) (18.5%). Albinism also accounted for the leading cause of visual impairment among the pediatric age group (0-15 years) while albinism, RP, and keratoconus were the primary causes of visual impairment for older patients. A total of 59 patients (43.7%) were given low vision aids either for near or distance. The only prescribed low vision aids for distances were telescopes. For near, spectacle-type low vision aid was the most commonly prescribed low vision aids. Low vision services in Jordan are still very limited. A national strategy programme to increase awareness of low vision services should be implemented, and health care policies should be enforced to cover low vision aids through the national medical insurance.

  16. Clinical Oncology Society of Australia position statement on the use of complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Lesley; Harris, Jessica; Katris, Paul; Cain, Michael; Dhillon, Haryana; Koczwara, Bogda; Olver, Ian; Robotin, Monica

    2014-12-01

    Health professionals involved in the clinical management of cancer are becoming increasingly aware that their patients use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). As cancer incidence and survival rates increase, use of CAM is also likely to increase. This paper outlines the position of the Clinical Oncology Society of Australia (COSA) on the use of CAM by cancer patients and provides guidance for health professionals involved with the treatment of cancer patients who are using or wish to use CAM. Key definitions and common communication scenarios are presented along with evidence-based recommended steps for health professionals when discussing CAM use. COSA encourages health professionals to focus on open discussion with their patients regarding CAM, to become familiar with reputable resources for CAM information, to discuss with patients the concept of evidence-based medicine, to recognize limitations to their knowledge of CAM and seek further advice when necessary, and to be respectful of the patients' right to autonomy. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Oral combination chemotherapy in the treatment of AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of an oral combination chemotherapy regimen administered to patients with AIDS-associated Hodgkin's disease. Design: Prospective, pilot phase II clinical trial. Setting: Consecutive patient recruitment occurred at two medical centers in the United States: Albany Medical Center, ...

  18. [AIDS and social justice: pharmaceutical industry and economics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Guzmán, José

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a broad look at the complicated framework of relationships between the third world and pharmaceutical companies. In the first part of the work reference is made to the poverty of these countries, their lack of education in terms of health, the scarcity of basic hygiene, and their greatly limited access to medicines, especially those for treating AIDS. The article then proceeds to the issue of the pharmaceutical companies' degree of responsibility for the reduced availability of medicines in certain areas of the world. One of the factors that most limits access to medicines is their price, and many sectors of society propose taking action on the patents of drugs (rescinding or limiting them) in order to lower their price. However, the problem of patent exemption is more complicated than it seems at first glance, and comes with its own risks. If, for lack of funds or the uncertainty concerning a return on the capital invested, pharmaceutical companies discontinue research and development of new drugs, AIDS therapy would worsen. It is imperative and urgent to develop new drugs against the AIDS because of its resistance to the drugs currently available. The article concludes with the pharmaceutical industry's effort to look for possible forms of collaboration with developing countries.

  19. The Impact of HIV/AIDS on the Socio-Economic Development in Kenya's Cooperative Sector: An Empirical Analysis of Cooperatives in Nairobi Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyongesa, D.J.W.; M'mboyi, F.

    2002-01-01

    A lot of stigma is attached to HIV/AIDS pandemic in Kenya. Many organizations have tried and continue trying to educate the public on this scourge. However, none of these organizations has thought of the cooperative sector. This research is unique because it examines the Impact of HIV/AIDS on the Socio-economic Development of Kenya's Cooperative sector. It is an empirical analysis of Cooperatives in Nairobi Province with special reference to the Savings and Credit Cooperatives (SACCOS). It was a joint research that examined HIV/AIDS from a multidisciplinary approach. The general objective was to identify and quantify the effects of HIV/AIDS on the performance of cooperative societies, particularly the impact of HIV/AIDS on savings, share capital, age groups and gender. Questionnaires were administered to a randomly selected sample of cooperative societies in the province. PCGIVE computer package was used to run regressions on simultaneous and recursive models. The findings clearly show that between 1991 and 2000 cooperatives in Nairobi province lost approximately USD 479 million due to HIV/AIDS pandemic. Besides, though savings, share capital and assets increased significantly, the scourge was negative the gains. Of the dead and the infected, females and ages between 18-48 were more affected by the epidemic. Policy specify recommendations vital for containment of HIV/AIDS in the cooperative sub sector of the Kenyan economy are made. These are with a view to classifying the appropriate roles of both public and private sectors in fighting the HIV/AIDS pandemic within the cooperative sector. Last but not least further areas of research are suggested

  20. Hearing aid fitting in older persons with hearing impairment: the influence of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss on hearing aid benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Hartmut; Rählmann, Sebastian; Walger, Martin; Margolf-Hackl, Sabine; Kießling, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    To examine the association of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss with clinically assessed hearing aid benefit in older hearing-impaired persons. Hearing aid benefit was assessed using objective measures regarding speech recognition in quiet and noisy environments as well as a subjective measure reflecting everyday situations captured using a standardized questionnaire. A broad range of general cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and intelligence were determined using different neuropsychological tests. Linear regression analyses were conducted with the outcome of the neuropsychological tests as well as age and hearing loss as independent variables and the benefit measures as dependent variables. Thirty experienced older hearing aid users with typical age-related hearing impairment participated. Most of the benefit measures revealed that the participants obtained significant improvement with their hearing aids. Regression models showed a significant relationship between a fluid intelligence measure and objective hearing aid benefit. When individual hearing thresholds were considered as an additional independent variable, hearing loss was the only significant contributor to the benefit models. Lower cognitive capacity - as determined by the fluid intelligence measure - was significantly associated with greater hearing loss. Subjective benefit could not be predicted by any of the variables considered. The present study does not give evidence that hearing aid benefit is critically associated with cognitive function in experienced hearing aid users. However, it was found that lower fluid intelligence scores were related to higher hearing thresholds. Since greater hearing loss was associated with a greater objective benefit, these results strongly support the advice of using hearing aids regardless of age and cognitive function to counter hearing loss and the adverse effects of age-related hearing impairment. Still, individual cognitive capacity might

  1. Specialized home care for patients with AIDS: an experiment in Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moons, M.; Kerkstra, A.; Biewenga, T.

    1994-01-01

    Patients with AIDs are permanently dependent on medical and technical nursing care. During a certain phase of the disease some of the patients have to visit the out-patient clinic of the hospital for regular treatment. It was noticed that AIDS patients find these visits a severe burden. Therefore in

  2. AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000594.htm HIV/AIDS To use the sharing features on this page, ... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. When a person becomes infected with HIV, the ...

  3. Clinical Outcome among Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients in a Multi-Ethnic Society in Singapore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wen Mak

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC is endemic among Chinese populations in Southeast Asia. However, the outcomes of non-Chinese NPC patients in Singapore are not well reported.To determine if non-Chinese NPC patients have a different prognosis and examine the clinical outcomes of NPC patients in a multi-ethnic society.Retrospective chart review of 558 NPC patients treated at a single academic tertiary hospital from 2002 to 2012. Survival and recurrence rates were analysed and predictive factors identified using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression model.Our cohort comprised 409 males (73.3% and 149 females (26.7% with a median age of 52 years. There were 476 Chinese (85.3%, 57 Malays (10.2%, and 25 of other ethnic groups (4.5%. Non-Chinese patients were more likely to be associated with advanced nodal disease at initial presentation (p = 0.049, compared with the Chinese. However, there were no statistical differences in their overall survival (OS or disease specific survival (DSS (p = 0.934 and p = 0.857 respectively. The 3-year and 5-year cohort OS and DSS rates were 79.3%, 70.7%, and 83.2%, 77.4% respectively. Advanced age (p<0.001, N2 disease (p = 0.036, N3 disease (p<0.001, and metastatic disease (p<0.001 at presentation were independently associated with poor overall survival. N2 disease (p = 0.032, N3 disease (p<0.001 and metastatic disease (p<0.001 were also independently associated with poor DSS. No predictive factors were associated with loco-regional recurrence after definitive treatment. Advanced age (p = 0.044, N2 disease (p = 0.033 and N3 disease (p<0.001 were independently associated with distant relapse.In a multi-ethnic society in Singapore, non-Chinese are more likely to present with advanced nodal disease. This however did not translate into poorer survival outcomes. Older patients with N2 or N3 disease are associated with a higher risk of distant relapse and poor overall survival.

  4. Diagnosis and Management of AIDS-related Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Johanson

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of illness associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS has been increasing since the initial description in 1981. While virtually all organ systems may be affected, the gastrointestinal tract appears to be a major target. Diarrhea is the most common symptom, affecting up to half of all AIDS patients during the course of their disease. Although diarrhea occurs frequently, its optimal management remains controversial. An extensive evaluation including stool studies and endoscopic biopsies of both the colon and small intestine has been widely recommended to identify all potential pathogenic organisms. An alternative approach is a more limited evaluation consisting of stool and blood cultures followed by symptomatic treatment with antidiarrheal agents if no specific organisms are identified. The clinical presentation of the most common opportunistic pathogens are reviewed, including several recently discovered organisms. Recommendations for treatment are followed by a brief discussion of management strategies used to care for patients with AIDS-related diarrhea.

  5. Pseudoaneurysms of large arteries associated with AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eli Piccinato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several vascular complications are known to occur in association with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS and recent publications have called attention to the development of pseudoaneurysms of large arteries in patients with AIDS. CASE REPORT: We report on 2 patients with AIDS aged 23 and 31 years with pseudoaneurysms of the abdominal aorta and common iliac arteries. After clinical and radiological evaluation by arteriography and computed tomography, the patients were submitted to aneurysmectomy, with the placement of a patch of dacron in the first case and the interposition of a right aorto-iliac and left femoral prosthesis in the second. The second patient developed new aneurysms of the right subclavian and left popliteal arteries 2 months after surgery. Proximal ligation of the right subclavian artery was performed to treat the first aneurysm and resection and interposition of a reversed saphenous vein was carried out to treat the pseudoaneurysm of the popliteal artery. Histopathological examination of the popliteal artery revealed necrotizing arteritis.

  6. Dermatological manifestations in patients with HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahily De la Paz Peña

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In view of the frequency of the dermatological manifestations in patients who suffer from AIDS/HIV, and with the objective of describing their behaviour, a descriptive,observational, and cross sectional investigation was carried out in the cases of the AIDS provincial consultation at Ernesto Guevara General Teaching Hospital of Las Tunas from January, 2007 to June, 2008. The information was obtained from the survey, the dermatological examination, and the clinical charts. The sample was made up of 43 patients, in which males and 31 to 40 age groups prevailed. There were no important quantity differences between the seropositive number and AIDS cases. The 27, 9% had dermatosis that made suspect the presence of the chronic retrovirus. The viral and the mycotic diseases were the most frequent ones, being the neoplastic type and drugreactions the least frequent ones. Other sexually transmitted diseases (STD appeared associated to the primary disease, mainly herpes simplex type II, and verruca acuminata.

  7. Current role of MDCT in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (2011). A clinical guideline of the Austrian Societies of Cardiology and Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hergan, K.; Globits, S.; Loewe, C.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical guideline of the Austrian Societies for Cardiology and Radiology on the actual role of MDCT in the diagnosis of coronary artery diseases includes the following issues: CT calcium scoring; CT angiography (CTA) of the coronaries; actually recommended application of MDCR; generally inappropriate use of the technique for specific patients; radiation exposure; structural and organizational framework.

  8. Evaluation of the Fracture Resistance of Computer‑aided Design ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... were milled using a CEREC 4 CAD/CAM system (Software Version, 4.2.0.57192). CAD/CAM crowns ... Computer‑aided Manufacturing Monolithic Crowns Prepared in. Different ..... Engineering long term clinical success of ...

  9. Framing, agenda setting, and disease phobia of AIDS-related coverage in the South Korean mass media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo

    2013-01-01

    There has been little research on the concrete role of the press in discourses on AIDS. This study investigated the AIDS discourses created by the major media. In particular, from the perspective of the agenda-setting theory, it examines differences in the framing of AIDS-related news depending on the political orientation and news sources of the press. This study analyzed the thematic frames and news sources implied by AIDS-related coverage. The 2 major media representing conservatism and progressivism were selected as the objects of analysis. As for the search engine for content analysis, the Korean Integrated Newspaper Database System was used, and 151 articles containing "AIDS" or "HIV" over 5 years from January 2005 to December 2010 were analyzed. According to the results of the analysis, there were the 6 following frames: aid/support, accident, human rights, risk, prevention, and biomedicine. Whereas the conservative press in South Korea continued to frame AIDS in the traditional way, the progressive press tended relatively more often to attempt new agenda setting, from the perspective of human rights and inequality. However, both newspaper companies tended mostly to select experts as the sources of AIDS news, thus continuing to exclude infectees and civil and society organizations.

  10. Guidelines for biomarker testing in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a national consensus of the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Carbonero, R; Vilardell, F; Jiménez-Fonseca, P; González-Campora, R; González, E; Cuatrecasas, M; Capdevila, J; Aranda, I; Barriuso, J; Matías-Guiu, X

    2014-03-01

    The annual incidence of neuroendocrine tumours in the Caucasian population ranges from 2.5 to 5 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours is a family of neoplasms widely variable in terms of anatomical location, hormone composition, clinical syndromes they cause and in their biological behaviour. This high complexity and clinical heterogeneity, together with the known difficulty of predicting their behaviour from their pathological features, are reflected in the many classifications that have been developed over the years in this field. This article reviews the main tissue and clinical biomarkers and makes recommendations for their use in medical practice. This document represents a consensus reached jointly by the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM) and the Spanish Society of Pathology (SEAP).

  11. Religious and spiritual coping in people living with HIV/Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Mourão Pinho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: evaluate the religiosity and the religious/spiritual coping of people living with HIV/Aids. Method: descriptive, cross-sectional study with quantitative approach, conducted in a reference HIV/Aids outpatient clinic in a university hospital of Recife-PE, Brazil, from June to November 2015. At total of 52 people living with HIV/Aids (PLWHA participated in the research, which employed own questionnaire, the Duke University Religion Index (DUREL, and the Religious/Spiritual Coping Scale (RCOPE. Results: the sample presented high indices of organizational religiosity (4.23±1.66, non-organizational religiosity (4.63±1.50, and intrinsic religiosity (13.13±2.84. Positive RCOPE was used in high mean scores (3.66±0.88, and negative RCOPE had low use (2.12 ± 0.74. In total, use of RCOPE was high (3.77±0.74, having predominated the positive RCOPE (NegRCOPE/PosRCOPE ratio=0.65±0.46. Conclusion: it is evident the importance of encouraging religious activity and RCOPE strategies, seen in the past as inappropriate interventions in clinical practice.

  12. Following the Rules Set by Accreditation Agencies and Governing Bodies to Maintain In-Compliance Status: Applying Critical Thinking Skills When Evaluating the Need for Change in the Clinical Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Karen M; Levy, Kimberly Y; Reese, Erika M

    2016-05-01

    Maintaining an in-compliance clinical laboratory takes continuous awareness and review of standards, regulations, and best practices. A strong quality assurance program and well informed leaders who maintain professional networks can aid in this necessary task. This article will discuss a process that laboratories can follow to interpret, understand, and comply with the rules and standards set by laboratory accreditation bodies. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.

  13. Preliminary support for a brief psychological intervention to improve first-time hearing aid use among adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Christopher J; Lees, Deborah; Lewis, Kathryn; Munro, Kevin J

    2017-11-01

    Suboptimal hearing aid use extorts significant social, health, and economic costs. The aims of this study were to (1) test the novel hypothesis that the threat associated with being diagnosed with hearing loss could be ameliorated with a self-affirmation manipulation and (2) gauge the feasibility of deploying the manipulation in routine clinical practice. Parallel groups randomized controlled trial with 10-week follow-up. Fifty people, newly prescribed with a hearing aid, completed either a questionnaire that included a brief self-affirming exercise or an identical questionnaire with no self-affirming exercise. The main outcome measure was derived from data logging automatically stored by the hearing aid. Perceived threat ('anxiety about ageing'), behavioural intention, and self-efficacy were measured as potential mediators. Objectively measured hours of daily hearing aid use were marginally higher in the intervention group compared with the control group (between-group difference = 1.94 hr, 95%CI = -1.24, 5.12, d = 0.43). At follow-up, participants in the intervention group were significantly less anxious about ageing and more accepting of older people than were participants in the control group (between-group difference = 0.75, 95%CI = 0.26, 1.22, d = 0.87). There was no statistically significant effect of the intervention on behavioural intention or self-efficacy. Although not statistically significant, the magnitude of the effect of the intervention on hearing aid use (d = 0.43) suggests that it would be worthwhile working towards a fully powered randomized controlled trial. The ability to reduce anxieties about ageing with this brief intervention could have far-reaching benefits for multiple patient and general population groups. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Hearing impairment is more disabling than diabetes, yet hearing aid use is suboptimal. Anxieties about ageing may undermine hearing aid use. What does

  14. Meta Analytic Measurement of HIV/AIDS Awareness, Prevention and Accepting Attitude toward People Living with HIV/AIDS in the Seven States of North East India

    OpenAIRE

    Dulumoni Das; Rupak Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Background: The HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to gather momentum in India, destroying innocent lives and imperilling future generations. Controlling spread of HIV is critical. Ignoring this will lead millions of Indians in grip of this pandemic. Despite valiant efforts by government agencies and heritable groups, large cross-sections of Indian society still lack information about the nature of the disease and how individuals can protect themselves against it. As a result, the epidemic is spread...

  15. Value-based design for the elderly : An application in the field of mobility aids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerema, Simone Theresa; van Velsen, Lex Stefan; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2016-01-01

    In the aging society, the need for the elderly to remain mobile and independent is higher than ever. However, many aids supporting mobility often fail to target real needs and lack acceptance. The aim of this study is to demonstrate how value-based design can contribute to the design of mobility

  16. Assessment and management of bone health in women with oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer receiving endocrine therapy: Position statement of the Endocrine Society of Australia, the Australian and New Zealand Bone & Mineral Society, the Australasian Menopause Society and the Clinical Oncology Society of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Mathis; Ramchand, Sabashini; Milat, Frances; Vincent, Amanda; Lim, Elgene; Kotowicz, Mark A; Hicks, Jill; Teede, Helena

    2018-05-09

    To formulate clinical consensus recommendations on bone health assessment and management of women with oestrogen receptor-positive early breast cancer receiving endocrine therapy. Representatives appointed by relevant Australian Medical Societies used a systematic approach for adaptation of guidelines (ADAPTE) to derive an evidence-informed position statement addressing five key questions. Women receiving adjuvant aromatase inhibitors and the subset of premenopausal woman on tamoxifen have accelerated bone loss and increased fracture risk. Both bisphosphonates and denosumab prevent bone loss, additionally denosumab has proven anti-fracture benefit. Women considering endocrine therapy need fracture risk assessment, including clinical risk factors, biochemistry and bone mineral density (BMD) measurement, with monitoring based on risk factors. Weight-bearing exercise, vitamin D and calcium sufficiency is recommended routinely. Antiresorptive treatment should be considered in women with prevalent or incident clinical or morphometric fractures, a T-score (or Z-scores in women <50 years) of <-2.0 at any site, or if annual bone loss is ≥5%, considering baseline BMD and other fracture risk factors. Duration of antiresorptive treatment can be individualised based on absolute fracture risk. Relative to their skeletal benefits, risks of adverse events with antiresorptive treatments are low. Skeletal health should be considered in the decision-making process regarding choice and duration of endocrine therapy. Before and during endocrine therapy, skeletal health should be assessed regularly, optimised by nonpharmacological intervention and where indicated antiresorptive treatment, in an individualised, multidisciplinary approach. Clinical trials are needed to better delineate long-term fracture risks of adjuvant endocrine therapy, and to determine the efficacy of interventions designed to minimise these risks. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This

  17. HIV, sex work, and civil society in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Joan

    2011-12-01

    Harm reduction programs for sex workers have been hampered by the prioritization of law enforcement over AIDS prevention. For example, the April 2010 "strike-hard" campaign against prostitution in Beijing, during which bars, nightclubs, saunas, and karaoke bars were raided, created an atmosphere that critically impeded human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) outreach activities for sex workers. In China, criminalization has limited the growth of a coherent and cohesive set of nongovernmental organization (NGO) actors working with sex workers to prevent HIV infection. Compared with other risk groups for HIV sexual transmission, such as men who have sex with men, the NGO community for sex workers is fragmented and poorly coordinated with government efforts, and basic rights for sex workers are often violated. This article examines civil society groups working on AIDS prevention and care for female sex workers in China and reviews constraints to their operations. China's HIV prevention programs for sex workers are compared with sex worker HIV prevention in other Asian states where more well-developed NGOs exist and criminalization has been better balanced with harm reduction approaches, and recommendations are offered on improving China's policies and programs.

  18. The Infectious Diseases Society of America Lyme guidelines: a cautionary tale about the development of clinical practice guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Lorraine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Flawed clinical practice guidelines may compromise patient care. Commercial conflicts of interest on panels that write treatment guidelines are particularly problematic, because panelists may have conflicting agendas that influence guideline recommendations. Historically, there has been no legal remedy for conflicts of interest on guidelines panels. However, in May 2008, the Attorney General of Connecticut concluded a ground-breaking antitrust investigation into the development of Lyme disease treatment guidelines by one of the largest medical societies in the United States, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA. Although the investigation found significant flaws in the IDSA guidelines development process, the subsequent review of the guidelines mandated by the settlement was compromised by a lack of impartiality at various stages of the IDSA review process. This article will examine the interplay between the recent calls for guidelines reform, the ethical canons of medicine, and due process considerations under antitrust laws as they apply to the formulation of the IDSA Lyme disease treatment guidelines. The article will also discuss pitfalls in the implementation of the IDSA antitrust settlement that should be avoided in the future.

  19. Assistência aos pacientes com HIV/Aids no Brasil Health care to HIV/AIDS patients in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareth Crisóstomo Portela

    2006-04-01

    Drug Logistics Management Systems of the National Program for STD/AIDS. The study results indicate good performance of the Brazilian ARV Access Program but access to treatment of opportunistic infections was, however, unsatisfactory. The rates covered by SUS for AIDS hospital admissions remained very low, on average around R$700 in 2004. Health care to HIV/AIDS patients has been considered a citizen's right strongly supported by an effective joint action of the Brazilian government and civil society. The current challenges are fine monitoring of processes and program results and ensuring sustainability of universal free ARV access.

  20. Parotid enlargement in children with AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soberman, N.; Leonidas, J.C.; Berdon, W.E.; Haller, J.O.; Posner, M.; Bonagura, V.

    1990-01-01

    PURPOSE: Painless parotid enlargement has been recently reported as a sign of AIDS, but little is known of the imaging characteristics of parotid involvement in affected children. The aim of this paper is to use US, CT and MR imaging to determine the anatomic changes of the parotid; study their possible association with pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia (PLH); and define the immunologic parameters and clinical course. Eighteen children were evaluated clinically, radiologically, and immunologically. All patients underwent US of the parotids and chest radiography; some children had CT of the chest and MR imaging of the parotids

  1. Aid and good governance: Examining aggregate unintended effects of aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Geske

    2018-06-01

    Although donors generally aim to improve governance in recipient countries by various means, critics claim that the aggregate effect of large aid flows is the deterioration of governance. Aid is said to weaken domestic accountability, sustain authoritarian regimes, increase political instability, weaken government capacities, and increase corruption. Conducting a systematic search in Web of Science, this paper reviews the empirical evidence for these unintended aggregate effects of aid on the political, administrative, and judicial dimensions of good governance. It finds that the negative effects of aid on governance are much exaggerated. The aggregate effect of aid on democracy has become more positive after the Cold War, and the effect of aid on government capacity and on reducing corruption has also improved over time. Furthermore, most studies show a positive effect of aid on political stability. These findings imply that donor intentions matter: donors that are serious about their intended effects on governance are able to mitigate the possible negative unintended effects of their aid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. TurbinAID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moradian, M.A.; Chow, M.P.; Osborne, R.L.; Jenkins, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Westinghouse Turbine Artificial Intelligence Diagnostics system or TurbinAID, can diagnose both thermodynamic and mechanical component anomalies within the turbine, and around the turbine cycle. any monitoring system can detect that a variable is in an abnormal state, but TurbinAID can also indicate the cause, and provide recommended corrective action(s). The TurbinAID Expert Systems utilize multiple sensor and variable inputs, and their interdependencies in the generation of a diagnosis. The system performs sensor validation as part of the data acquisition scheme. The TurbinAID system has been in operation for several years. This paper describes the monitoring and diagnostic functions provided by TurbinAID, and how the utility industry both nuclear and fossil, can utilize the system to enhance unit operation

  3. Assessment of Workplace Stigma and Discrimination among People Living with HIV/AIDS Attending Antiretroviral Clinics in Health Institutions in Enugu, Southeast Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguwa, E N; Arinze-Onyia, S U; Okwaraji, F; Modebe, I

    2015-05-06

    The onset of HIV/AIDS has increased stigma and discrimination at workplaces, making those with these ailments worried about going to work to avoid being victimized. Most previous works focussed on stigma and discrimination in the communities with little emphasis on what occurs in the workplaces. This study assessed the prevalence of workplace stigma and discrimination among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) attending antiretroviral (ARV) clinics in health institutions in Enugu, southeast Nigeria. A cross-sectional descriptive study was done between February and May of 2014 using a selfadministered questionnaire to assess 489 PLWHA attending ARV clinics. Out of 489 studied, 255 (52.1%) were females. About 23.7% said being HIV positive had affected their relationship with other workers and 20.7% were blamed for their condition. Some were not given time off to go to hospital (72.5%). The commonest fears of PLWHA were stigmatization/discrimination from other workers (78.1%) and dying from the disease (62.8%). Gender did not significantly affect the way PLWHA were stigmatized or discriminated against in their workplaces. However, those who were employed in private establishments were more likely to have their schedule changed due to their status compared to government employees ( p discriminating practices were not significantly different between government and private employees. The prevalence of stigma and discrimination in workplaces is high. Efforts should be made by agencies to reduce such social problems in the workplace since they can affect overall management and productivity.

  4. [A survey on AIDS knowledge rate and sexual behavior among men who have sex with men population at sexually transmitted disease clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Dan; Xie, Hongfu; Yi, Mei; Li, Ji; Chen, Mingliang; Feng, Hao; Cheng, Xiaoming; Zhang, Guiying

    2010-07-01

    To survey on men who have sex with men (MSM) population's sexual behaviors, condom-service condition, HIV related knowledge and other issues among MSM population at sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics to understand the characteristics of behaviors and offer suggestions for effective health education and behavior intervention. From January to December, 2009, we used anonymous questionnaires which involved in their mastery of demographic characteristics, sexual behavior, condom-service condition, HIV related knowledge, and so one, to investigate 200 MSM at 3 STD clinics of comprehensive hospital. The average age of informant was (26.7+/- 8.9) years and 121 individuals (62.6%) had confirmed with STD in recent one year. In the recent 6 months, the average number of homosexual partners was 9.2+/- 4.8 and 102 (52.8%) had heterosexual partners. In the sexual intercourse with homosexual, 123 individuals had anal intercourse (63.7 %) and 117 had oral intercourse (60.6%). In the sexual intercourse with heterosexual, 92 (90.2%) individuals had vaginal intercourse, 37 (36.2%) had anal intercourse, and 59 (57.8%) had oral sex behavior.There were a statistical difference between heterosexual and homosexual sex behaviors (Pcondom-using frequency had statistic difference in different sexual behaviors(χ²=188.396, Pcondom-using condition in sexual behaviors except the heterosexual anal intercourse. High AIDS knowledge mastery rate is found in our survey. The respondents get HIV/AIDS knowledge through various ways actively. There is no obvious relation between the mastery of HIV related knowledge and condom-using frequency. The ratio of non-protected sexual behaviors is high in heterosexuals. How to adopt effective methods for behavior intervention to MSM at STD clinic needs to be further studied.

  5. Physicians' intentions and use of three patient decision aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Ian D; Logan, Jo; Bennett, Carol L; Presseau, Justin; O'Connor, Annette M; Mitchell, Susan L; Tetroe, Jacqueline M; Cranney, Ann; Hebert, Paul; Aaron, Shawn D

    2007-01-01

    intention. Conclusion Despite strong support for the format, content, and quality of patient decision aids, and physicians' stated intentions to adopt them into clinical practice, most did not use them within three months of completing the survey. There is a wide gap between intention and behaviour. Further research is required to study the determinants of this intention-behaviour gap and to develop interventions aimed at barriers to physicians' use of decision aids. PMID:17617908

  6. Home Mechanical Ventilation: A Canadian Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    OpenAIRE

    McKim, Douglas A; Road, Jeremy; Avendano, Monica; Abdool, Steve; Côté, Fabien; Duguid, Nigel; Fraser, Janet; Maltais, François; Morrison, Debra L; O’Connell, Colleen; Petrof, Basil J; Rimmer, Karen; Skomro, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are surviving episodes of prolonged mechanical ventilation or benefitting from the recent availability of user-friendly noninvasive ventilators. Although many publications pertaining to specific aspects of home mechanical ventilation (HMV) exist, very few comprehensive guidelines that bring together all of the current literature on patients at risk for or using mechanical ventilatory support are available. The Canadian Thoracic Society HMV Guideline Committee ha...

  7. AIDS care: why and how should industry respond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, R

    2000-01-01

    This article reports the AIDS care response of industries to the rising AIDS epidemic in South Africa. It has been reported that during 1993-99 the rate of hospital bed occupancy doubled to over 8/1000 and that 50% of ill-health retirements in 1998 were due to AIDS. Important issues to be considered by industries are the medical separation due to ill health, poor health care services. The focus of HIV/AIDS care should be on the patient, family, care giver, community, and health services, and must be based on the principles of decentralization and integration of sustainable and cost-effective HIV/AIDS services. The development of a care package must be based on six dimensions; namely, appropriateness, acceptability, accessibility, effectiveness, efficiency, and equity. On the other hand, identification of indicators in relation to the components of the care package must include support groups and networks of people living with HIV; the provision of home-based care; responsiveness of the health system; the existence and application of clinical guidelines; and the effectiveness of referrals. Any organization with a commitment in providing care should establish a Care Task Team to develop a care strategy. It should focus on who can have access to the care, what the care consists of, and who will cover the cost. In addition, a review of the existing HIV/AIDS services must be done to identify shortfalls and highlight priority gaps.

  8. Student′s preference of various audiovisual aids used in teaching pre- and para-clinical areas of medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navatha Vangala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The formal lecture is among the oldest teaching methods that have been widely used in medical education. Delivering a lecture is made easy and better by use of audiovisual aids (AV aids such as blackboard or whiteboard, an overhead projector, and PowerPoint presentation (PPT. Objective: To know the students preference of various AV aids and their use in medical education with an aim to improve their use in didactic lectures. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out among 230 undergraduate medical students of first and second M.B.B.S studying at Malla Reddy Medical College for Women, Hyderabad, Telangana, India during the month of November 2014. Students were asked to answer a questionnaire on the use of AV aids for various aspects of learning. Results: This study indicates that students preferred PPT, the most for a didactic lecture, for better perception of diagrams and flowcharts. Ninety-five percent of the students (first and second M.B.B.S were stimulated for further reading if they attended a lecture augmented by the use of visual aids. Teacher with good teaching skills and AV aids (58% was preferred most than a teacher with only good teaching skills (42%. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that lecture delivered using PPT was more appreciated and preferred by the students. Furthermore, teachers with a proper lesson plan, good interactive and communicating skills are needed for an effective presentation of lecture.

  9. Abdominal ultrasound in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escribano, J.; Gonzalez, J.; Alvarez, M.; Rivero, S.; Raya, J.L.; Ruza, M.

    1998-01-01

    To analyze the ultrasonography findings in abdomen in the AIDS patients in our hospital, as well as the indications for this exploration, assessing the role of abdominal ultrasound (AU). The ultrasonographic and clinical findings in 527 patients who underwent a total of 715 explorations between 1992 and 1996 were studied. Hepatomegaly and/or splenomegaly, usually homogeneous, were observed in nearly half of the studies (45%); one third of the patients with marked splenomegaly presented visceral leishmaniasis. Focal lesions in liver and/or spleen, corresponding to angiomas, abscesses, lymphomatous lesions and metastasis, were detected in 5.7% of the explorations. Thirty-five percent of the AU revealed the presence of lymphadenopathy; nodes measuring over 2.5 cm were usually related to potential treatable infection or neoplasm. Thickening of the gallbladder wall did not usually indicate the presence of acute cholecystitis unless Murphy''s sign was also detected. Bile duct dilation and wall thickening was related to opportunistic cholangitis, and the increase in the echogenicity of the renal parenchyma was linked to AIDS-related nephropathy. Despite the fact that many of findings with AU are nonspecific, we consider that this approach should be the principal diagnostic technique in AIDS patients with suspected abdominal pathology or fever of unknown origin. (Author) 43 refs,

  10. The gender approach in community AIDS projects in Mozambique: agreement and disagreement between government and civil society Abordagem de gênero em projetos comunitários de combate à AIDS em Moçambique: convergências e desencontros entre governo e sociedade civil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilza Vieira Villela

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses some areas where government and civil society converge and clash in their gender approaches in community HIV/AIDS projects in Mozambique, based on an evaluative study conducted in 2006 encompassing 160 of the 1,124 NGO projects undertaken with the support of the country's national AIDS council, known as the Conselho Nacional de Combate ao SIDA (CNCS. An analysis of projects and official documents shows that, for the CNCS, the term "gender" represents a way of underscoring the epidemic's impact on women. In community projects, the gender approach often times finds expression in initiatives to mitigate the economic impact of the epidemic on widows. Initiatives aimed at men and at the population as a whole generally pay little attention to power relations between men and women or their affect on the epidemic. This suggests that any endeavor to transfer Western analytical techniques or forms of intervention for coping with the HIV/AIDS epidemic to other regions of the world demands painstaking efforts to translate these and adapt them to local cultural standards.Este artigo discute algumas convergências e desencontros entre governo e sociedade civil na abordagem de gênero de projetos comunitários de enfrentamento do HIV/AIDS em Moçambique. Baseia-se em material de pesquisa avaliativa realizada no país em 2006, incluindo 160 dos 1.124 projetos de organizações não governamentais desenvolvidos com apoio do Conselho Nacional de Combate ao SIDA (CNCS. A análise dos projetos e de documentos oficiais mostra que para o CNCS o termo gênero aparece destacando a dinâmica de epidemia em relação às mulheres. Nos projetos comunitários a abordagem de gênero muitas vezes será traduzida em ações de mitigação dos impactos econômicos da epidemia sobre viúvas. Atividades voltadas para a população masculina e para a população em geral pouco abordam as relações de poder entre homens e mulheres e suas conseq

  11. Women's rights and women's health during HIV/AIDS epidemics: the experience of women in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugassa, Begna F

    2009-08-01

    Twenty-five years have passed since HIV/AIDS was recognized as a major public health problem. Although billions of dollars are spent in research and development, we still have no medical cure or vaccination. In the early days of the epidemic, public health slogans suggested that HIV/AIDS does not discriminate. Now it is becoming clear that HIV/AIDS spreads most rapidly among poor, marginalized, women, colonized, and disempowered groups of people more than others. The HIV/AIDS epidemic is exacerbated by the social, economic, political, and cultural conditions of societies such as gender, racial, class, and other forms of inequalities. Sub-Saharan African countries are severely hit by HIV/AIDS. For these countries the pandemic of HIV/AIDS demands the need to travel extra miles. My objective in this article is to promote the need to go beyond the biomedical model of "technical fixes" and the traditional public health education tools, and come up with innovative ideas and strategic thinking to contain the epidemic. In this article, I argue that containing the HIV/AIDS epidemic and improving family and community health requires giving appropriate attention to the social illnesses that are responsible for exacerbating biological disorders.

  12. 2010 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Society of Echocardiography Guidelines for Training and Maintenance of Competency in Adult Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwash, Ian G; Basmadjian, Arsene; Bewick, David; Choy, Jonathan B; Cujec, Bibiana; Jassal, Davinder S; MacKenzie, Scott; Nair, Parvathy; Rudski, Lawrence G; Yu, Eric; Tam, James W

    2011-01-01

    Guidelines for the provision of echocardiography in Canada were jointly developed and published by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the Canadian Society of Echocardiography in 2005. Since their publication, recognition of the importance of echocardiography to patient care has increased, along with the use of focused, point-of-care echocardiography by physicians of diverse clinical backgrounds and variable training. New guidelines for physician training and maintenance of competence in adult echocardiography were required to ensure that physicians providing either focused, point-of-care echocardiography or comprehensive echocardiography are appropriately trained and proficient in their use of echocardiography. In addition, revision of the guidelines was required to address technological advances and the desire to standardize echocardiography training across the country to facilitate the national recognition of a physician's expertise in echocardiography. This paper summarizes the new Guidelines for Physician Training and Maintenance of Competency in Adult Echocardiography, which are considerably more comprehensive than earlier guidelines and address many important issues not previously covered. These guidelines provide a blueprint for physician training despite different clinical backgrounds and help standardize physician training and training programs across the country. Adherence to the guidelines will ensure that physicians providing echocardiography have acquired sufficient expertise required for their specific practice. The document will also provide a framework for other national societies to standardize their training programs in echocardiography and will provide a benchmark by which competency in adult echocardiography may be measured. Copyright © 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. E-cigarettes as smoking cessation aids: a survey among practitioners in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazuras, Lambros; Muzi, Milena; Grano, Caterina; Lucidi, Fabio

    2016-03-01

    To describe experiences with and beliefs about e-cigarettes as safe and useful aids for smoking cessation among healthcare professionals providing smoking cessation services. Using a cross-sectional design, anonymous structured questionnaires were completed by 179 healthcare professionals in public smoking cessation clinics across 20 regions in Italy. Service providers reported that considerably more smokers made inquiries about e-cigarettes in 2014 than in 2013. The most frequent inquiries concerned the ingredients, safety and effectiveness of e-cigarettes as smoking cessation aids. Clients used e-cigarettes to quit smoking, cut down the number of conventional cigarettes smoked, have a safe alternative to smoking, and protect their health while continuing to smoke. More than 60 % of service providers reported favourable beliefs about the safety and effectiveness of e-cigarettes, and believed that e-cigarettes are as effective as other smoking cessation aids, including pharmacotherapy. Despite limited empirical evidence, service providers in Italy viewed e-cigarettes, as safe and effective smoking cessation aids. More concerted efforts are needed to improve knowledge about e-cigarettes among service providers, to guide their clinical practice and decision-making with respect to e-cigarettes.

  14. European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) Guidelines for Ovarian Cancer Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Querleu, Denis; Planchamp, Francois; Chiva, Luis; Fotopoulou, Christina; Barton, Desmond; Cibula, David; Aletti, Giovanni; Carinelli, Silvestro; Creutzberg, Carien; Davidson, Ben; Harter, Philip; Lundvall, Lene; Marth, Christian; Morice, Philippe; Rafii, Arash; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Rockall, Andrea; Sessa, Christiana; van der Zee, Ate; Vergote, Ignace; duBois, Andreas

    Objective The aim of this study was to develop clinically relevant and evidence-based guidelines as part of European Society of Gynaecological Oncology's mission to improve the quality of care for women with gynecological cancers across Europe. Methods The European Society of Gynaecological Oncology

  15. Access to HIV/AIDS services for disabled persons in Uganda - problems of stigma and discrimination?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helle Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    This project is based on five weeks’ ethnographically inspired fieldwork in May 2006 in the Republic of Uganda. The study started out with the hypothesis that there was some kind of discrimination going on in the interaction between health workers at HIV/AIDS clinics, and person with disabilities...... (PWDs) coming for HIV/AIDS testing or treatment. However, problems with discriminatory attitudes towards PWDs could not be confirmed from my fieldwork observations at five different HIV/AIDS clinics in Uganda. That observation was confirmed in my interviews with PWDs and health workers. Health workers...... said that PWDs were entitled to the same care and treatment as everybody else. However, I observed that only few PWDs seem to attend those HIV/AIDS services, and the question arose why that is so. Problems with access and confidence (for example lack of sign language interpreters) are often reported...

  16. Psychological first-aid: a practical aide-memoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, J

    1995-07-01

    Despite advances made in recent years in medical first aid, psychiatric intervention, survival training and equipment design, many people still perish quickly during and immediately following a disastrous event. In this study, individuals and groups of survivors of life-threatening events were debriefed and the behavior of those who coped well during such a threat to life were compared with those who did not. The behaviors of those who coped well were distilled into a set of principles for psychological first aid; that is, a series of simple actions for use within a disaster which serves to recover victims to functional behavior as quickly as possible, thus increasing their chance for survival. These principles of psychological first aid have recently been introduced into basic first aid and survival training courses for both military and civilian units.

  17. Portuguese Society of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery/Portuguese Society of Cardiology recommendations for waiting times for cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, José; Pereira, Hélder; Sousa Uva, Miguel; Gavina, Cristina; Leite Moreira, Adelino; Loureiro, Maria José

    2015-11-01

    Appointed jointly by the Portuguese Society of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery (SPCCTV) and the Portuguese Society of Cardiology (SPC), the Working Group on Waiting Times for Cardiac Surgery was established with the aim of developing practical recommendations for clinically acceptable waiting times for the three critical phases of the care of adults with heart disease who require surgery or other cardiological intervention: cardiology appointments; the diagnostic process; and invasive treatment. Cardiac surgery has specific characteristics that are not comparable to other surgical specialties. It is important to reduce maximum waiting times and to increase the efficacy of systems for patient monitoring and tracking. The information in this document is mainly based on available clinical information. The methodology used to establish the criteria was based on studies on the natural history of heart disease, clinical studies comparing medical treatment with intervention, retrospective and prospective analyses of patients on waiting lists, and the opinions of experts and working groups. Following the first step, represented by publication of this document, the SPCCTV and SPC, as the bodies best suited to oversee this process, are committed to working together to define operational strategies that will reconcile the clinical evidence with the actual situation and with available resources. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical worthlessness of genetic prediction of common forms of diabetes mellitus and related chronic complications: A position statement of the Italian Society of Diabetology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzetti, R; Prudente, S; Copetti, M; Dauriz, M; Zampetti, S; Garofolo, M; Penno, G; Trischitta, V

    2017-02-01

    We are currently facing several attempts aimed at marketing genetic data for predicting multifactorial diseases, among which diabetes mellitus is one of the more prevalent. The present document primarily aims at providing to practicing physicians a summary of available data regarding the role of genetic information in predicting diabetes and its chronic complications. Firstly, general information about characteristics and performance of risk prediction tools will be presented in order to help clinicians to get acquainted with basic methodological information related to the subject at issue. Then, as far as type 1 diabetes is concerned, available data indicate that genetic information and counseling may be useful only in families with many affected individuals. However, since no disease prevention is possible, the utility of predicting this form of diabetes is at question. In the case of type 2 diabetes, available data really question the utility of adding genetic information on top of well performing, easy available and inexpensive non-genetic markers. Finally, the possibility of using the few available genetic data on diabetic complications for improving our ability to predict them will also be presented and discussed. For cardiovascular complication, the addition of genetic information to models based on clinical features does not translate in a substantial improvement in risk discrimination. For all other diabetic complications genetic information are currently very poor and cannot, therefore, be used for improving risk stratification. In all, nowadays the use of genetic testing for predicting diabetes and its chronic complications is definitively of little value in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Foreign aid and extremism in the Horn of Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farah, Abdulkadir Osman

    2014-01-01

    -state actors such as warlord militias and religious extremists. Such fragmented conflicting factions- most of them without clear national vision and project- have since received external aid. By instrumentally focusing and dealing with such divisive elements, donor countries aimed and hoped for potentially......-religious extremists. Such securitization approaches imposed terror and counter terror warfare on peaceful civil society efforts (Kaldor, 2013). In the Horn of Africa, Africans fight each other in proxy wars apparently sponsored by external actors. The approach therefore undermined civic constituents trying to re...

  20. India’s AIDS response: the missing voices of persons with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satendra Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available India has the third largest number of people living with HIV in the world. The UNAIDS Gap report has identified twelve risk groups that are especially vulnerable and have been left behind from the national AIDS response. Of these twelve, one is persons with disabilities. Disability is both a public health issue and a human rights issue; persons with disabilities are the world’s largest minority. Low awareness, sexual abuse, and lack of access to health services are the major reasons for people with disabilities being vulnerable. While the gap report is a landmark report, in that it compartmentalizes the risk groups, disability cannot be looked at in isolation. Since any of the other risk groups may include persons with disabilities, the issue is a complex one meriting greater attention. The National AIDS Control Organization has completely ignored this group of persons. To efficiently close the gap, an integrated and disability-inclusive HIV response is needed so that people with different types of disabilities, their caretakers, healthcare professionals and society are empowered to fight the collective battle against HIV/AIDS.

  1. [The adolescent manages fertility badly. Uncertainty and pursuit of self in a society in transition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diadhiou, F

    1990-08-01

    In Senegal, adolescents live in a socioeconomic climate that is between traditional society with its well-structured rites and customs and an extroverted modern society. They are often plunged into uncertainty and into a search of themselves. With a weak and not-yet-determined personality, sexuality erupts into their life experience. In Senegal, adolescent fertility, once encouraged by tradition, has become a social phenomenon which challenges all those interested in problems of youth. Major risks throughout the pregnancy and the puerperium confront adolescents. Complications may include grave vomiting, preeclampsia, hypertension and hemorrhaging, and more severe malaria than normal due to pregnancy. 12.9% of adolescent pregnancies end in miscarriage, 5.8% in premature births. Low birth weight and fetal death are also risk factors of adolescent pregnancy. Incomplete physical development exacerbates childbirth among adolescents, often leading to cesarean section, infection, and hemorrhaging. A combination of several risks appearing unexpectedly during pregnancy and during and after delivery can lead to a tragic death. During 1988-1989 at the gynecologic-obstetric clinic of the Aristide Le Dantac University Hospital Center of Dakar, adolescents comprised 8.1% of maternal deaths. If adolescents survive pregnancy, they may suffer after effects, e.g., genital scar tissue or psychological disorders. Infertility can also be an after effect. An unwanted pregnancy ended by illegal induced abortion can also lead to infertility. 2% of adolescents attending the clinic have common infections and/or sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). These infections almost always are a result of poor hygiene of the genital region. Family life education should prepare adolescents for sexuality and contraceptive use. Barrier methods can best prevent STDs and AIDS. Other contraceptive methods require compliance with strict rules. Emergency contraception should be reserved for cases of rape or

  2. Nursing research on a first aid model of double personnel for major burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weiwei; Shi, Kai; Jin, Zhenghua; Liu, Shuang; Cai, Duo; Zhao, Jingchun; Chi, Cheng; Yu, Jiaao

    2015-03-01

    This study explored the effect of a first aid model employing two nurses on the efficient rescue operation time and the efficient resuscitation time for major burn patients. A two-nurse model of first aid was designed for major burn patients. The model includes a division of labor between the first aid nurses and the re-organization of emergency carts. The clinical effectiveness of the process was examined in a retrospective chart review of 156 cases of major burn patients, experiencing shock and low blood volume, who were admitted to the intensive care unit of the department of burn surgery between November 2009 and June 2013. Of the 156 major burn cases, 87 patients who received first aid using the double personnel model were assigned to the test group and the 69 patients who received first aid using the standard first aid model were assigned to the control group. The efficient rescue operation time and the efficient resuscitation time for the patients were compared between the two groups. Student's t tests were used to the compare the mean difference between the groups. Statistically significant differences between the two groups were found on both measures (P's first aid model based on scientifically validated procedures and a reasonable division of labor can shorten the efficient rescue operation time and the efficient resuscitation time for major burn patients. Given these findings, the model appears to be worthy of clinical application.

  3. Audio-Visual Aid in Teaching "Fatty Liver"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Sambit; Kamath, Ullas; Rao, Guruprasad; Prakash, Jay; Mishra, Snigdha

    2016-01-01

    Use of audio visual tools to aid in medical education is ever on a rise. Our study intends to find the efficacy of a video prepared on "fatty liver," a topic that is often a challenge for pre-clinical teachers, in enhancing cognitive processing and ultimately learning. We prepared a video presentation of 11:36 min, incorporating various…

  4. Dentistry and HIV/AIDS related stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo, Jesus Eduardo; Treviño, Ana Cecilia; Violant, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    To analyze HIV/AIDS positive individual's perception and attitudes regarding dental services. One hundred and thirty-four subjects (30.0% of women and 70.0% of men) from Nuevo León, Mexico, took part in the study (2014). They filled out structured, analytical, self-administered, anonymous questionnaires. Besides the sociodemographic variables, the perception regarding public and private dental services and related professionals was evaluated, as well as the perceived stigma associated with HIV/AIDS, through a Likert-type scale. The statistical evaluation included a factorial and a non-hierarchical cluster analysis. Social inequalities were found regarding the search for public and private dental professionals and services. Most subjects reported omitting their HIV serodiagnosis and agreed that dentists must be trained and qualified to treat patients with HIV/AIDS. The factorial analysis revealed two elements: experiences of stigma and discrimination in dental appointments and feelings of concern regarding the attitudes of professionals or their teams concerning patients' HIV serodiagnosis. The cluster analysis identified three groups: users who have not experienced stigma or discrimination (85.0%); the ones who have not had those experiences, but feel somewhat concerned (12.7%); and the ones who underwent stigma and discrimination and feel concerned (2.3%). We observed a low percentage of stigma and discrimination in dental appointments; however, most HIV/AIDS patients do not reveal their serodiagnosis to dentists out of fear of being rejected. Such fact implies a workplace hazard to dental professionals, but especially to the very own health of HIV/AIDS patients, as dentists will not be able to provide them a proper clinical and pharmaceutical treatment.

  5. Dentistry and HIV/AIDS related stigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Eduardo Elizondo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze HIV/AIDS positive individual’s perception and attitudes regarding dental services.METHODS One hundred and thirty-four subjects (30.0% of women and 70.0% of men from Nuevo León, Mexico, took part in the study (2014. They filled out structured, analytical, self-administered, anonymous questionnaires. Besides the sociodemographic variables, the perception regarding public and private dental services and related professionals was evaluated, as well as the perceived stigma associated with HIV/AIDS, through a Likert-type scale. The statistical evaluation included a factorial and a non-hierarchical cluster analysis.RESULTS Social inequalities were found regarding the search for public and private dental professionals and services. Most subjects reported omitting their HIV serodiagnosis and agreed that dentists must be trained and qualified to treat patients with HIV/AIDS. The factorial analysis revealed two elements: experiences of stigma and discrimination in dental appointments and feelings of concern regarding the attitudes of professionals or their teams concerning patients’ HIV serodiagnosis. The cluster analysis identified three groups: users who have not experienced stigma or discrimination (85.0%; the ones who have not had those experiences, but feel somewhat concerned (12.7%; and the ones who underwent stigma and discrimination and feel concerned (2.3%.CONCLUSIONS We observed a low percentage of stigma and discrimination in dental appointments; however, most HIV/AIDS patients do not reveal their serodiagnosis to dentists out of fear of being rejected. Such fact implies a workplace hazard to dental professionals, but especially to the very own health of HIV/AIDS patients, as dentists will not be able to provide them a proper clinical and pharmaceutical treatment.

  6. Capacity Building for HIV/AIDS Prevention Trials | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) is funding the Africa HIV/AIDS Prevention Trials Capacity Building Program under the umbrella of the Global Health Research Initiative (GHRI). The aim of the program is to build the capacity of African researchers and institutions to conduct anticipated clinical trials ...

  7. Donor leucocyte imaging in patients with AIDS: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Doherty, M.J.; Kent and Canterbury Hospital; Revell, P.; Page, C.J.; Nunan, T.O.; Lee, S.; Mountford, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Four patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and fever were investigated using donor leucocyte scans. The lung/liver and lung/spleen uptake ratios in these patients were compared with the uptake ratios in donor leucocyte scans in seven neutropenic (non-AIDS) patients and five patients who had autologous leucocyte scans performed over the same time period. All scans used indium oxine In 111 labelled leucocytes except that for one AIDS patient which used technetium hexamethyl-propylene amine oxide Tc99m labelled donor leucocytes. There were no adverse reactions to the donor cell infusions. Two patients had repeat studies 8 weeks apart (from different donors) without ill effect. There were no differences in the 111 In uptake ratios between the three groups. There were three positive studies in the patients with AIDS, and these elucidated the cause of the pyrexia in all three. The negative case is more difficult to confirm, but the clinical course and the absence of focal disease on post-mortem have been taken to support the scan findings. There was no difference in the acceptibility of the technique or the distribution of the labelled leucocytes between the AIDS and non-AIDS patients. Donor leucocyte imaging of patients with AIDS is probably more effective and considerably less hazardous for technical staff than autologous leucocyte methods. This study demonstrates that the technique can be applied successfully to patients with AIDS. (orig.)

  8. Genetic Algorithms and Nucleation in VIH-AIDS transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranon, Armando

    2003-03-01

    VIH to AIDS transition has been modeled via a genetic algorithm that uses boom-boom principle and where population evolution is simulated with a cellular automaton based on SIR model. VIH to AIDS transition is signed by nucleation of infected cells and low probability of infection are obtained for different mutation rates in agreement with clinical results. A power law is obtained with a critical exponent close to the critical exponent of cubic, spherical percolation, colossal magnetic resonance, Ising Model and liquid-gas phase transition in heavy ion collisions. Computations were carried out at UAM-A Supercomputing Lab and author acknowledges financial support from Division of CBI at UAM-A.

  9. Peran Reliugisitas pada Penderita HIV dan AIDS yang mengalami Depresi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibyo Prasojo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Being HIV-positive (people with HIV and AIDS is a tough one in life, where complex problems are always faced daily, not just dealing with disease conditions, but disease conditions are accompanied by highly discriminatory social stigma. This stigma and discrimination often leads to depression resulting in a decrease in life spirits of people living with HIV and then bring the dominant effect of decreasing quality of life for people living with HIV. This study aims to reveal the role of religiosity in coping with depression in people with HIV and AIDS in terms of physical, psychological, social, and religiosity and factors that support the role of religiosity in coping with depression in people with HIV and AIDS. The research approach used is qualitative in the form of case studies. Subjects studied in the study are ODHA are running post-positive religiosity of HIV and AIDS consisting of 1 man and 2 women. Data collection techniques used are unstructured interviews and nonparticipant observation. While the research data collection tool used interview, observation, recorder and stationery. And the result of research data will be analyzed by using qualitative analysis technique. Based on the results of research that has been done can be stated that the role of religiosity in tackling Depression in HIV and AIDS Patients in RSUD Dr. H. Moch. Ansyari Saleh Banjarmasin is very large, seen from all subjects feel the change of attitude and view to get closer to God. Appreciate life in its true sense, enjoy life and resign to accepting circumstances. Factors that support the role of religiosity in people with HIV and AIDS in RSUD Dr. H. Moch. Ansyari Saleh Banjarmasin there are two namely: first internal factors, which are related to innate nature, and the second is external factors derived from the environment such as family and society.

  10. Music and hearing aids--an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasin, Marshall

    2012-09-01

    Modern digital hearing aids have provided improved fidelity over those of earlier decades for speech. The same however cannot be said for music. Most modern hearing aids have a limitation of their "front end," which comprises the analog-to-digital (A/D) converter. For a number of reasons, the spectral nature of music as an input to a hearing aid is beyond the optimal operating conditions of the "front end" components. Amplified music tends to be of rather poor fidelity. Once the music signal is distorted, no amount of software manipulation that occurs later in the circuitry can improve things. The solution is not a software issue. Some characteristics of music that make it difficult to be transduced without significant distortion include an increased sound level relative to that of speech, and the crest factor- the difference in dB between the instantaneous peak of a signal and its RMS value. Clinical strategies and technical innovations have helped to improve the fidelity of amplified music and these include a reduction of the level of the input that is presented to the A/D converter.

  11. Methodology for developing evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines: Joint recommendations by Korea society of radiology and national evidence-based healthcare collaborating agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sol Ji; Jo, Ae Jeong; Choi, Jin A [Div. for Healthcare Technology Assessment Research, National Evidence-Based Healthcare Collaborating Agency, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-01-15

    This paper is a summary of the methodology including protocol used to develop evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs) in Korea, led by the Korean Society of Radiology and the National Evidence-based Healthcare Collaborating Agency. This is the first protocol to reflect the process of developing diagnostic guidelines in Korea. The development protocol is largely divided into the following sections: set-up, process of adaptation, and finalization. The working group is composed of clinical imaging experts, and the developmental committee is composed of multidisciplinary experts to validate the methodology. The Korean CIGs will continue to develop based on this protocol, and these guidelines will act for decision supporting tools for clinicians as well as reduce medical radiation exposure.

  12. Methodology for developing evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines: Joint recommendations by Korea society of radiology and national evidence-based healthcare collaborating agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sol Ji; Jo, Ae Jeong; Choi, Jin A

    2017-01-01

    This paper is a summary of the methodology including protocol used to develop evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs) in Korea, led by the Korean Society of Radiology and the National Evidence-based Healthcare Collaborating Agency. This is the first protocol to reflect the process of developing diagnostic guidelines in Korea. The development protocol is largely divided into the following sections: set-up, process of adaptation, and finalization. The working group is composed of clinical imaging experts, and the developmental committee is composed of multidisciplinary experts to validate the methodology. The Korean CIGs will continue to develop based on this protocol, and these guidelines will act for decision supporting tools for clinicians as well as reduce medical radiation exposure

  13. Comparing Analog and Digital Hearing Aids in Reducing Hearing Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassem Mohammad Khani

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Comparing analog and digital hearing aids reducing disability caused by hearing deficiency among moderate to severe sensorineural hearing-impaired persons. Method and Material: This descriptive-analytic study was carried out on two groups of subjects participated in this study in some audiology clinics of hearing aid since May 2002 to October 2003. Twenty subjects wore analog hearing aids and twenty one subjects wore digital hearing aids. In this study , no subject had previous middle ear or psychological problems. APHAB questionnaire was completed before using hearing aid and 2 months after to determine benefit of hearing aid use. Results: Total score mean of APHAB inventory before and after use of analoge hearing aids were 52.215+6.420 and 32.300+3.443 respectively. Also total score mean of APHAB inventory before and after use of digital hearing aids were 54.9252+9.028 and 26.321+10.916 respectively. There was no significant difference between total mean score of APHAB inventory before and after using analog and digital hearing aids (P=0.058.While there was significant difference between total mean score of APHAB questionnaire before and after use of analog hearing aids (P<0.001 and also before and after use of digital hearing aids (P<0.001. Moreover age, gender , litracy level , occupation , degree of hearing loss and manner of hearing aid usage did not have significant effect on APHAB results. Configuration of loss had siginficant effect on aversiveness subscale before and after use of analog hearing aids (P=0.008. Previous experience and duration of hearing aid usage had significant effect on aversiveness subscale before and after use of digital hearing aids (P=0.043 and (P=0.024, respectively , while all of these three items did not have significant effect on total mean score of APHAB inventory and also total mean scores of three subscales of ease of communication , reverberation and background noise. Conclusion: Comparing to

  14. Personality and the subjective assessment of hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, R M; Alexander, G C; Gray, G

    1999-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the influence of patients' personality features on the responses they make to self-assessment items used to measure the outcome of a hearing aid fitting. If the personality of the hearing aid wearer has a significant influence on self-report outcome data, it would be important to explore the relevant personality variables and to be cognizant of their effects when using subjective outcome data to justify decisions about clinical services or other matters. This investigation explored the relationship between several personality attributes and responses to the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB). It found that more extroverted patients tend to report more hearing aid benefit in all speech communication situations. In addition, patients with a more external locus of control tend to have more negative reactions to loud environmental sounds, both with and without amplification. Anxiety also played a small additional role in determining APHAB responses. Although personality variables were found to explain a relatively small amount of the variance in APHAB responses (usually around 10%), these outcomes should alert practitioners and researchers to the potential effects of personality variables in all self-report data.

  15. Clinical characteristics and causes of visual impairment in a low vision clinic in northern Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakkar MM

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available May M Bakkar, Eman A Alzghoul, Mera F Haddad Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Department of Allied Medical Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan Aim: The aim of the study was to identify causes of visual impairment among patients attending a low vision clinic in the north of Jordan and to study the relevant demographic characteristics of these patients.Subjects and methods: The retrospective study was conducted through a review of clinical records of 135 patients who attended a low vision clinic in Irbid. Clinical characteristics of the patients were collected, including age, gender, primary cause of low vision, best corrected visual acuity, and current prescribed low vision aids. Descriptive statistics analysis using numbers and percentages were calculated to summarize categorical and nominal data.Results: A total of 135 patients (61 [45.2%] females and 74 [54.8%] males were recruited in the study. Mean age ± standard deviation for the study population was 24.53 ± 16.245 years; age range was 5–90 years. Of the study population, 26 patients (19.3% had mild visual impairment, 61 patients (45.2% had moderate visual impairment, 27 patients (20.0% had severe visual impairment, and 21 patients (15.6% were blind. The leading causes of visual impairment across all age groups were albinism (31.9% and retinitis pigmentosa (RP (18.5%. Albinism also accounted for the leading cause of visual impairment among the pediatric age group (0–15 years while albinism, RP, and keratoconus were the primary causes of visual impairment for older patients. A total of 59 patients (43.7% were given low vision aids either for near or distance. The only prescribed low vision aids for distances were telescopes. For near, spectacle-type low vision aid was the most commonly prescribed low vision aids.Conclusion: Low vision services in Jordan are still very limited. A national strategy programme to increase awareness of low vision

  16. Computer-aided detection in CT colonography: initial clinical experience using a prototype system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graser, A.; Geisbuesch, S.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.R.; Kolligs, F.T.; Schaefer, C.; Mang, T.

    2007-01-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) algorithms help to detect colonic polyps at CT colonography (CTC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of CAD versus an expert reader in CTC. One hundred forty individuals (67 men, 73 women; mean age, 59 years) underwent screening 64-MDCT colonography after full cathartic bowel cleansing without fecal tagging. One expert reader interpreted supine and prone scans using a 3D workstation with integrated CAD used as ''second reader.'' The system's sensitivity for the detection of polyps, the number of false-positive findings, and its running time were evaluated. Polyps were classified as small (≤5 mm), medium (6-9 mm), and large (≥10 mm). A total of 118 polyps (small, 85; medium, 19; large, 14) were found in 56 patients. CAD detected 72 polyps (61%) with an average of 2.2 false-positives. Sensitivity was 51% (43/85) for small, 90% (17/19) for medium, and 86% (12/14) for large polyps. For all polyps, per-patient sensitivity was 89% (50/56) for the radiologist and 73% (41/56) for CAD. For large and medium polyps, per-patient sensitivity was 100% for the radiologist, and 96% for CAD. In conclusion, CAD shows high sensitivity in the detection of clinically significant polyps with acceptable false-positive rates. (orig.)

  17. A theory-based decision aid for patients with cancer: results of feasibility and acceptability testing of DecisionKEYS for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollen, Patricia J; Gralla, Richard J; Jones, Randy A; Thomas, Christopher Y; Brenin, David R; Weiss, Geoffrey R; Schroen, Anneke T; Petroni, Gina R

    2013-03-01

    Appropriate utilization of treatment is a goal for all patients undergoing cancer treatment. Proper treatment maximizes benefit and limits exposure to unnecessary measures. This report describes findings of the feasibility and acceptability of implementing a short, clinic-based decision aid and presents an in-depth clinical profile of the participants. This descriptive study used a prospective, quantitative approach to obtain the feasibility and acceptability of a decision aid (DecisionKEYS for Balancing Choices) for use in clinical settings. It combined results of trials of patients with three different common malignancies. All groups used the same decision aid series. Participants included 80 patients with solid tumors (22 with newly diagnosed breast cancer, 19 with advanced prostate cancer, and 39 with advanced lung cancer) and their 80 supporters as well as their physicians and nurses, for a total of 160 participants and 10 health professionals. The decision aid was highly acceptable to patient and supporter participants in all diagnostic groups. It was feasible for use in clinic settings; the overall value was rated highly. Of six physicians, all found the interactive format with the help of the nurse as feasible and acceptable. Nurses also rated the decision aid favorably. This intervention provides the opportunity to enhance decision making about cancer treatment and warrants further study including larger and more diverse groups. Strengths of the study included a theoretical grounding, feasibility testing of a practical clinic-based intervention, and summative evaluation of acceptability of the intervention by patient and supporter pairs. Further research also is needed to test the effectiveness of the decision aid in diverse clinical settings and to determine if this intervention can decrease overall costs.

  18. Influence of Nurse Aide Absenteeism on Nursing Home Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G; Ferguson-Rome, Jamie C

    2015-08-01

    In this analysis, the association of nurse aide absenteeism with quality is examined. Absenteeism is the failure of nurse aides to report for work when they are scheduled to work. Data used in this investigation came from survey responses from 3,941 nursing homes; Nursing Home Compare; the Online System for Survey, Certification and Administrative Reporting data; and the Area Resource File. Staffing characteristics, quality indicators, facility, and market information from these data sources were all measured in 2008. The specific quality indicators examined are physical restraint use, catheter use, pain management, and pressure sores using negative binomial regression. An average rate of 9.2% for nurse aide absenteeism was reported in the prior week. We find that high levels of absenteeism are associated with poor performance on all four quality indicators examined. The investigation presented, to our knowledge, is one of the first examining the implications of absenteeism in nursing homes. Absenteeism can be a costly staffing issue, one of the potential costs identified in this analysis is an impact on quality of care. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Esophageal stenting for benign and malignant disease: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaander, Manon C W; Baron, Todd H; Siersema, Peter D; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Schumacher, Brigitte; Escorsell, Àngels; Garcia-Pagán, Juan-Carlos; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Conio, Massimo; de Ceglie, Antonella; Skowronek, Janusz; Nordsmark, Marianne; Seufferlein, Thomas; Van Gossum, André; Hassan, Cesare; Repici, Alessandro; Bruno, Marco J

    2016-10-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), endorsed by the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO), the European Society of Digestive Endoscopy (ESDO), and the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations for malignant disease 1 ESGE recommends placement of partially or fully covered self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) for palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia over laser therapy, photodynamic therapy, and esophageal bypass (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 2 For patients with longer life expectancy, ESGE recommends brachytherapy as a valid alternative or in addition to stenting in esophageal cancer patients with malignant dysphagia. Brachytherapy may provide a survival advantage and possibly a better quality of life compared to SEMS placement alone. (Strong recommendation, high quality evidence.) 3 ESGE recommends esophageal SEMS placement as the preferred treatment for sealing malignant tracheoesophageal or bronchoesophageal fistula (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 ESGE does not recommend the use of concurrent external radiotherapy and esophageal stent treatment. SEMS placement is also not recommended as a bridge to surgery or prior to preoperative chemoradiotherapy. It is associated with a high incidence of adverse events and alternative satisfactory options such as placement of a feeding tube are available. (Strong recommendation, low quality evidence.) Main recommendations for benign disease 1 ESGE recommends against the use of self-expandable stents (SEMSs) as first-line therapy for the management of benign esophageal strictures because of the potential for adverse events, the availability of alternative therapies, and costs (strong

  20. The clinical neuro-ophthalmology of vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashii, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    To diagnose a patient with a failing visual system, it is necessary to localize the site of the lesion in the system, and identify the etiology that has produced it. Physicians do not see diseases but just their manifestations. Clinical neuro-ophthalmology provides the basic principles on how to progress from manifestations to the diseases they indicate. The Frank B. Walsh Neuro-Ophthalmology Society (the Walsh Society) that originated in 1969 in the United States has been the center of clinical neuro-ophthalmology case studies throughout the world. In Japan, the Ronald M. Burde Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology Study Group (the RMB Society) was organized in 2001 to establish and promote a clinicopathologic conference in the style of the Walsh Society. On this occasion, Prof. Burde was invited to the Annual Japanese Ophthalmological Society meeting. Based on some illustrative cases presented at the annual meetings of the RMB society, this review was carried out to present the current knowledge of clinical neuro-ophthalmology. (author)

  1. Image-aided Suicide Gene Therapy Utilizing Multifunctional hTERT-targeting Adenovirus for Clinical Translation in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Hee; Kim, Kyung Tae; Lee, Sang-Jin; Hong, Seung-Hee; Moon, Ju Young; Yoon, Eun Kyung; Kim, Sukyoung; Kim, Eun Ok; Kang, Se Hun; Kim, Seok Ki; Choi, Sun Il; Goh, Sung Ho; Kim, Daehong; Lee, Seong-Wook; Ju, Mi Ha; Jeong, Jin Sook; Kim, In-Hoo

    2016-01-01

    Trans-splicing ribozyme enables to sense and reprogram target RNA into therapeutic transgene and thereby becomes a good sensing device for detection of cancer cells, judging from transgene expression. Previously we proposed PEPCK-Rz-HSVtk (PRT), hTERT targeting trans-splicing ribozyme (Rz) driven by liver-specific promoter phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) with downstream suicide gene, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gene therapy. Here, we describe success of a re-engineered adenoviral vector harboring PRT in obtaining greater antitumor activity with less off-target effect for clinical application as a theranostics. We introduced liver-selective apolipoprotein E (ApoE) enhancer to the distal region of PRT unit to augment activity and liver selectivity of PEPCK promoter, and achieved better transduction into liver cancer cells by replacement of serotype 35 fiber knob on additional E4orf1-4 deletion of E1&E3-deleted serotype 5 back bone. We demonstrated that our refined adenovirus harboring PEPCK/ApoE-Rz-HSVtk (Ad-PRT-E) achieved great anti-tumor efficacy and improved ability to specifically target HCC without damaging normal hepatocytes. We also showed noninvasive imaging modalities were successfully employed to monitor both how well a therapeutic gene (HSVtk) was expressed inside tumor and how effectively a gene therapy took an action in terms of tumor growth. Collectively, this study suggests that the advanced therapeutic adenoviruses Ad-PRT-E and its image-aided evaluation system may lead to the powerful strategy for successful clinical translation and the development of clinical protocols for HCC therapy.

  2. Decision Aid for Cigarette Smokers Scheduled for Elective Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, David O; LeBlanc, Annie; Kadimpati, Sandeep; Vickers, Kristin S; Shi, Yu; Montori, Victor M

    2015-07-01

    Decision aids can increase patient involvement in decision-making about health care. The study goal was to develop and test a decision aid for use by clinicians in discussion options for changing smoking behavior before and after elective surgery. In formative work, a decision aid was designed to facilitate patient-clinician discussion regarding three options: continue smoking, attempt a period of temporary abstinence, and attempt to quit smoking for good. A randomized, two-group pilot study was then conducted in smokers evaluated in preparation for elective surgery in a preoperative clinic to test the hypothesis that the decision aid would improve measures of decisional quality compared with usual care. The final decision aid consisted of three laminated cards. The front of each card included a colorful graphic describing each choice; the reverse including two to three pros and cons for each decision, a simple graphic illustrating the effects of smoking on the body, and a motivational phrase. In the randomized trial of 130 patients, the decision aid significantly (P < 0.05) improved measures of decisional quality and patient involvement in decision making (Cohen's d effect sizes of 0.76 and 1.20 for the Decisional Conflict Scale and Observing PatienT involvement In decisiON-making scale, respectively). However, the decision aid did not affect any aspect of perioperative smoking behavior, including the distribution of or adherence to choices. Although the use of a decision aid to facilitate clinician-patient discussions regarding tobacco use around the time of surgery substantially improved measures of decisional quality, it alone did not change perioperative tobacco use behavior.

  3. AIDS guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, R

    1986-04-30

    The Sun article, "Employers finding that AIDS in the workplace is a managerial nightmare" (April 3), did not accurately portray the status of AIDS in the workplace. The AIDS virus, HTLV III, is transmitted by body fluids, primarily semen and blood, and there is no known risk of transmitting the virus by casual contact in the workplace. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) released guidelines for child care workers last August. Guidelines on preventing transmission of AIDS in the workplace were issued by CDC in November 1985. These guidelines specifically discussed health care, personal service, and food service workers. The recommendations were against routine screening. Furthermore, employment should not be restricted on the basis of a positive HTLV III antibody test. A person with HTLV III infection should be exempt from the workplace only if there are circumstances interfering with job performance. In Maryland, the Governor's Task Force on AIDS has gone on record as endorsing CDC guidelines related to employment. Furthermore, the task force condemns discrimination based on the disease AIDS, AIDS Related Complex (ARC), or HTLV III infection. Increasingly AIDS patients are being considered legally disabled and therefore are protected by federal and state laws prohibiting discrimination on the basis of a handicap. Marylanders who are subjected to mandatory HTLV III screening in the workplace, or if discriminated against on the basis of HTLV III inefction, should contact the Maryland Commission on Human Relations, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, or the Health Education Resource Organization (HERO). All 3 of these resources guarantee confidentiality. It is only by employees reporting incidents that a nightmare in the workplace can be avoided in Maryland. full text

  4. Changing mortality profile among HIV-infected patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: shifting from AIDS to non-AIDS related conditions in the HAART era.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Grinsztejn

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We describe temporal trends in the mortality rates and factors associated with AIDS and non-AIDS related mortality at the Evandro Chagas Clinical Research Institute (IPEC, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ. METHODS: Adult patients enrolling from 1986 through 2009 with a minimum follow up of 60 days were included. Vital status was exhaustively checked using patients' medical charts, through active contact with individuals and family members and by linkage with the Rio de Janeiro Mortality database using a previously validated algorithm. The CoDe protocol was used to establish the cause of death. Extended Cox proportional hazards models were used for multivariate modeling. RESULTS: A total of 3530 individuals met the inclusion criteria, out of which 868 (24.6% deceased; median follow up per patient was 3.9 years (interquartile range 1.7-9.2 years. The dramatic decrease in the overall mortality rates was driven by AIDS-related causes that decreased from 9.19 deaths/100PYs n 1986-1991 to 1.35/100PYs in 2007-2009. Non-AIDS related mortality rates remained stable overtime, at around 1 death/100PYs. Immunodeficiency significantly increased the hazard of both AIDS-related and non-AIDS-related causes of death, while HAART use was strongly associated with a lower hazard of death from either cause. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm the remarkable decrease in AIDS-related mortality as the HIV epidemic evolved and alerts to the conditions not traditionally related to HIV/AIDS which are now becoming more frequent, needing careful monitoring.

  5. Computer-aided detection of lung nodules on chest CT: issues to be solved before clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Jin Mo

    2005-01-01

    Given the increasing resolution of modern CT scanners, and the requirements for large-scale lung-screening examinations and diagnostic studies, there is an increased need for the accurate and rep