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Sample records for aggressive tumor phenotype

  1. 3-Deazaneplanocin A suppresses aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatta, Mitsutoki; Naganuma, Kaori; Kato, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In tumor tissues, alterations of gene expression caused by aberrant epigenetic modifications confer phenotypic diversity on malignant cells. Although 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) has been shown to reactivate tumor suppressor genes in several cancer cells, it remains unclear whether DZNep attenuates the malignant phenotypes of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of DZNep on the expression of genes related to aggressive phenotypes, such as epithelial–mesenchymal transition, in OSCC cells. We found that DZNep reduced the cellular levels of polycomb group proteins (EZH2, SUZ12, BMI1, and RING1A) and the associated trimethylation of Lys27 on histone H3 and monoubiquitination of Lys119 on histone H2A in the poorly differentiated OSCC cell line SAS. Immunocytochemical staining demonstrated that DZNep induced the reorganization of filamentous actin and the membrane localization of E-cadherin associated with cell–cell adhesions. We also found an inhibitory effect of DZNep on cell proliferation using a WST assay. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that genes involved in the aggressive phenotypes (TWIST2, EGFR, ACTA2, TGFB1, WNT5B, and APLIN) were down-regulated, whereas epithelial phenotype genes (CDH1, CLDN4, IVL, and TGM1) were up-regulated in SAS cells treated with DZNep. Collectively, our findings suggest that DZNep reverses the aggressive characteristics of OSCC cells through the dynamic regulation of epithelial plasticity via the reprogramming of gene expression patterns. - Highlights: • DZNep reduced PcG proteins and associated histone modifications in OSCC cells. • DZNep enhanced cell–cell adhesion indicative of epithelial phenotype in OSCC cells. • DZNep suppressed the aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in OSCC cells. • DZNep activated the gene expression of epithelial markers in OSCC cells.

  2. 3-Deazaneplanocin A suppresses aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

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    Hatta, Mitsutoki, E-mail: hatta@college.fdcnet.ac.jp [Department of Physiological Science and Molecular Biology, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka (Japan); Naganuma, Kaori [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka (Japan); Kato, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Jun [Department of Physiological Science and Molecular Biology, Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2015-12-04

    In tumor tissues, alterations of gene expression caused by aberrant epigenetic modifications confer phenotypic diversity on malignant cells. Although 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) has been shown to reactivate tumor suppressor genes in several cancer cells, it remains unclear whether DZNep attenuates the malignant phenotypes of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of DZNep on the expression of genes related to aggressive phenotypes, such as epithelial–mesenchymal transition, in OSCC cells. We found that DZNep reduced the cellular levels of polycomb group proteins (EZH2, SUZ12, BMI1, and RING1A) and the associated trimethylation of Lys27 on histone H3 and monoubiquitination of Lys119 on histone H2A in the poorly differentiated OSCC cell line SAS. Immunocytochemical staining demonstrated that DZNep induced the reorganization of filamentous actin and the membrane localization of E-cadherin associated with cell–cell adhesions. We also found an inhibitory effect of DZNep on cell proliferation using a WST assay. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that genes involved in the aggressive phenotypes (TWIST2, EGFR, ACTA2, TGFB1, WNT5B, and APLIN) were down-regulated, whereas epithelial phenotype genes (CDH1, CLDN4, IVL, and TGM1) were up-regulated in SAS cells treated with DZNep. Collectively, our findings suggest that DZNep reverses the aggressive characteristics of OSCC cells through the dynamic regulation of epithelial plasticity via the reprogramming of gene expression patterns. - Highlights: • DZNep reduced PcG proteins and associated histone modifications in OSCC cells. • DZNep enhanced cell–cell adhesion indicative of epithelial phenotype in OSCC cells. • DZNep suppressed the aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in OSCC cells. • DZNep activated the gene expression of epithelial markers in OSCC cells.

  3. NF1 truncating mutations associated to aggressive clinical phenotype with elephantiasis neuromatosa and solid malignancies.

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    Ponti, Giovanni; Martorana, Davide; Pellacani, Giovanni; Ruini, Cristel; Loschi, Pietro; Baccarani, Alessio; De Santis, Giorgio; Pollio, Annamaria; Neri, Tauro Maria; Mandel, Victor Desmond; Maiorana, Antonio; Maccio, Livia; Maccaferri, Monia; Tomasi, Aldo

    2014-06-01

    Von Recklinghausen disease is a syndrome characterized by a wide phenotypic variability giving rise to both, cutaneous and visceral benign and malignant neoplasms. The first include cutaneous neurofibromas, subcutaneous and plexiform neurofibromas. The latter can undergo malignant transformation and/or determine elephantiasis neuromatosa. Visceral tumors may include malignant peripheral nerve sheet tumors, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, cerebral gliomas and abdominal neurofibromas. In the present study, the authors discuss the clinical and biomolecular characterization of a cohort of 20 families with a diagnosis of type 1 neurofibromatosis. Clinically, the cohort includes three probands with elephantiasis neuromatosa and a peculiarly high incidence of breast and gastrointestinal cancer. Among the 14 NF1 mutations documented, 10 encoding for a truncated protein have been associated to particularly aggressive clinical phenotypes including elephantiasis neuromatosa, malignant peripheral nerve sheet tumors, breast cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumors. This effect on protein synthesis, rather than the type of NF1 mutation, is the key to the explanation of the genotype-phenotype correlations in the context of neurofibromatosis type 1. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Multiparametric classification links tumor microenvironments with tumor cell phenotype.

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    Bojana Gligorijevic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While it has been established that a number of microenvironment components can affect the likelihood of metastasis, the link between microenvironment and tumor cell phenotypes is poorly understood. Here we have examined microenvironment control over two different tumor cell motility phenotypes required for metastasis. By high-resolution multiphoton microscopy of mammary carcinoma in mice, we detected two phenotypes of motile tumor cells, different in locomotion speed. Only slower tumor cells exhibited protrusions with molecular, morphological, and functional characteristics associated with invadopodia. Each region in the primary tumor exhibited either fast- or slow-locomotion. To understand how the tumor microenvironment controls invadopodium formation and tumor cell locomotion, we systematically analyzed components of the microenvironment previously associated with cell invasion and migration. No single microenvironmental property was able to predict the locations of tumor cell phenotypes in the tumor if used in isolation or combined linearly. To solve this, we utilized the support vector machine (SVM algorithm to classify phenotypes in a nonlinear fashion. This approach identified conditions that promoted either motility phenotype. We then demonstrated that varying one of the conditions may change tumor cell behavior only in a context-dependent manner. In addition, to establish the link between phenotypes and cell fates, we photoconverted and monitored the fate of tumor cells in different microenvironments, finding that only tumor cells in the invadopodium-rich microenvironments degraded extracellular matrix (ECM and disseminated. The number of invadopodia positively correlated with degradation, while the inhibiting metalloproteases eliminated degradation and lung metastasis, consistent with a direct link among invadopodia, ECM degradation, and metastasis. We have detected and characterized two phenotypes of motile tumor cells in vivo, which

  5. Warburg effect's manifestation in aggressive pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas: insights from a mouse cell model applied to human tumor tissue.

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    Stephanie M J Fliedner

    Full Text Available A glycolytic profile unifies a group of pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PHEOs/PGLs with distinct underlying gene defects, including von Hippel-Lindau (VHL and succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB mutations. Nevertheless, their tumor aggressiveness is distinct: PHEOs/PGLs metastasize rarely in VHL-, but frequently in SDHB-patients. To date, the molecular mechanisms causing the more aggressive phenotype in SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs remain largely unknown. Recently, however, an excellent model to study aggressive PHEOs (mouse tumor tissue (MTT cells has been developed from mouse PHEO cells (MPC. We employed this model for a proteomics based approach to identify changes characteristic for tumor aggressiveness, which we then explored in a homogeneous set of human SDHB- and VHL-PHEOs/PGLs. The increase of glucose transporter 1 in VHL, and of hexokinase 2 in VHL and SDHB, confirmed their glycolytic profile. In agreement with the cell model and in support of decoupling of glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, SDHB tumors showed increased lactate dehydrogenase levels. In SDHB-PGLs OXPHOS complex activity was increased at complex III and, as expected, decreased at complex II. Moreover, protein and mRNA expression of all tested OXPHOS-related genes were higher in SDHB- than in VHL-derived tumors. Although there was no direct evidence for increased reactive oxygen species production, elevated superoxide dismutase 2 expression may reflect elevated oxidative stress in SDHB-derived PHEOs/PGLs. For the first time, we show that despite dysfunction in complex II and evidence for a glycolytic phenotype, the Warburg effect does not seem to fully apply to SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs with respect to decreased OXPHOS. In addition, we present evidence for increased LDHA and SOD2 expression in SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs, proteins that have been proposed as promising therapeutic targets in other cancers. This study provides new insight into pathogenic mechanisms in

  6. Identification of markers associated with highly aggressive metastatic phenotypes using quantitative comparative proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terp, Mikkel Green; Lund, Rikke Raaen; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2012-01-01

    The spread of cancer cells from a primary tumor to form metastases at distant sites is a complex process that remains poorly defined. Certain tumor cells are more aggressive and thus lead to rapid development of multiple distant metastases. Here, we identify proteins associated with these aggress......The spread of cancer cells from a primary tumor to form metastases at distant sites is a complex process that remains poorly defined. Certain tumor cells are more aggressive and thus lead to rapid development of multiple distant metastases. Here, we identify proteins associated...

  7. Molecular biology of breast cancer metastasis Molecular expression of vascular markers by aggressive breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrix, Mary JC; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Kirschmann, Dawn A; Seftor, Richard EB

    2000-01-01

    During embryogenesis, the formation of primary vascular networks occurs via the processes of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. In uveal melanoma, vasculogenic mimicry describes the 'embryonic-like' ability of aggressive, but not nonaggressive, tumor cells to form networks surrounding spheroids of tumor cells in three-dimensional culture; these recapitulate the patterned networks seen in patients' aggressive tumors and correlates with poor prognosis. The molecular profile of these aggressive tumor cells suggests that they have a deregulated genotype, capable of expressing vascular phenotypes. Similarly, the embryonic-like phenotype expressed by the aggressive human breast cancer cells is associated with their ability to express a variety of vascular markers. These studies may offer new insights for consideration in breast cancer diagnosis and therapeutic intervention strategies

  8. Depletion of tumor-associated macrophages switches the epigenetic profile of pancreatic cancer infiltrating T cells and restores their anti-tumor phenotype.

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    Borgoni, Simone; Iannello, Andrea; Cutrupi, Santina; Allavena, Paola; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Novelli, Francesco; Cappello, Paola

    2018-01-01

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDA) is characterized by a complex tumor microenvironment that supports its progression, aggressiveness and resistance to therapies. The delicate interplay between cancer and immune cells creates the conditions for PDA development, particularly due to the functional suppression of T cell anti-tumor effector activity. However, some of the mechanisms involved in this process are still poorly understood. In this study, we analyze whether the functional and epigenetic profile of T cells that infiltrate PDA is modulated by the microenvironment, and in particular by tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). CD4 and CD8 T cells obtained from mice orthotopically injected with syngeneic PDA cells, and untreated or treated with Trabectedin, a cytotoxic drug that specifically targets TAMs, were sorted and analyzed by flow cytometry and characterized for their epigenetic profile. Assessment of cytokine production and the epigenetic profile of genes coding for IL10, T-bet and PD1 revealed that T cells that infiltrated PDA displayed activated Il10 promoter and repressed T-bet activity, in agreement with their regulatory phenotype (IL10 high /IFNγ low , PD1 high ). By contrast, in Trabectedin-treated mice, PDA-infiltrating T cells displayed repressed Il10 and Pdcd1 and activated T-bet promoter activity, in accordance with their anti-tumor effector phenotype (IL10 low /IFNγ high ), indicating a key role of TAMs in orchestrating functions of PDA-infiltrating T cells by modulating their epigenetic profile towards a pro-tumoral phenotype. These results suggest the targeting of TAMs as an efficient strategy to obtain an appropriate T cell anti-tumor immune response and open new potential combinations for PDA treatment.

  9. Cycling Hypoxia Induces a Specific Amplified Inflammatory Phenotype in Endothelial Cells and Enhances Tumor-Promoting Inflammation In Vivo

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    Céline Tellier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal architecture of the tumor blood network, as well as heterogeneous erythrocyte flow, leads to temporal fluctuations in tissue oxygen tension exposing tumor and stromal cells to cycling hypoxia. Inflammation is another feature of tumor microenvironment and is considered as a new enabling characteristic of tumor progression. As cycling hypoxia is known to participate in tumor aggressiveness, the purpose of this study was to evaluate its role in tumor-promoting inflammation. Firstly, we assessed the impact of cycling hypoxia in vitro on endothelial inflammatory response induced by tumor necrosis factor α. Results showed that endothelial cells exposed to cycling hypoxia displayed an amplified proinflammatory phenotype, characterized by an increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, namely, interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8; by an increased expression of adhesion molecules, in particular intercellular adhesion molecule–1 (ICAM-1; and consequently by an increase in THP-1 monocyte adhesion. This exacerbation of endothelial inflammatory phenotype occurs through nuclear factor–κB overactivation. Secondly, the role of cycling hypoxia was studied on overall tumor inflammation in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. Results showed that cycling hypoxia led to an enhanced inflammation in tumors as prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2, IL-6, CXCL1 (C-X-C motif ligand 1, and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (murine IL-8 functional homologs mRNA expression was increased and as a higher leukocyte infiltration was evidenced. Furthermore, cycling hypoxia–specific inflammatory phenotype, characterized by a simultaneous (baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis repeat-containing 5low/PTGS2high/ICAM-1high/IL-6high/IL-8high expression, is associated with a poor prognosis in human colon cancer. This new phenotype could thus be used in clinic to more precisely define prognosis for colon cancer patients. In conclusion, our findings evidenced for the first time the

  10. Locally aggressive and multifocal phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors: two unusual cases of tumor-induced osteomalacia.

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    Higley, Meghan; Beckett, Brooke; Schmahmann, Sandra; Dacey, Elizabeth; Foss, Erik

    2015-12-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) has long been recognized as a clinical paraneoplastic syndrome. The identification of a unique histopathologic entity, the phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor (PMT), as a distinct etiology for TIO has been a more recent discovery. The majority of published cases describe a solitary, non-aggressive appearing soft tissue or osseous lesions in patients with osteomalacia; aggressive appearing or multifocal lesions appear to be exceedingly rare. These tumors characteristically secrete fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). Elevated serum levels of FGF23 result in phosphate wasting and osteomalacia. In the majority of cases, laboratory abnormalities and clinical signs and symptoms of osteomalacia precede identification of the causative lesion by years. Following diagnosis, complete resection with wide margins to prevent local recurrence is most often curative. Imaging characteristics of PMT are diverse and remain incompletely defined, as the majority of previous publications are outside of the radiologic literature. We present multiple imaging modalities in two cases of patients with debilitating osteomalacia and unusual appearing PMTs: one with a locally aggressive lesion leading to pathologic fracture, the second presenting with exceedingly rare multifocal PMT.

  11. CXCR6, a newly defined biomarker of tissue-specific stem cell asymmetric self-renewal, identifies more aggressive human melanoma cancer stem cells.

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    Rouzbeh Taghizadeh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental problem in cancer research is identifying the cell type that is capable of sustaining neoplastic growth and its origin from normal tissue cells. Recent investigations of a variety of tumor types have shown that phenotypically identifiable and isolable subfractions of cells possess the tumor-forming ability. In the present paper, using two lineage-related human melanoma cell lines, primary melanoma line IGR39 and its metastatic derivative line IGR37, two main observations are reported. The first one is the first phenotypic evidence to support the origin of melanoma cancer stem cells (CSCs from mutated tissue-specific stem cells; and the second one is the identification of a more aggressive subpopulation of CSCs in melanoma that are CXCR6+.We defined CXCR6 as a new biomarker for tissue-specific stem cell asymmetric self-renewal. Thus, the relationship between melanoma formation and ABCG2 and CXCR6 expression was investigated. Consistent with their non-metastatic character, unsorted IGR39 cells formed significantly smaller tumors than unsorted IGR37 cells. In addition, ABCG2+ cells produced tumors that had a 2-fold greater mass than tumors produced by unsorted cells or ABCG2- cells. CXCR6+ cells produced more aggressive tumors. CXCR6 identifies a more discrete subpopulation of cultured human melanoma cells with a more aggressive MCSC phenotype than cells selected on the basis of the ABCG2+ phenotype alone.The association of a more aggressive tumor phenotype with asymmetric self-renewal phenotype reveals a previously unrecognized aspect of tumor cell physiology. Namely, the retention of some tissue-specific stem cell attributes, like the ability to asymmetrically self-renew, impacts the natural history of human tumor development. Knowledge of this new aspect of tumor development and progression may provide new targets for cancer prevention and treatment.

  12. Critical role of endoglin in tumor cell plasticity of Ewing sarcoma and melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pardali, E.; Schaft, van der D.W.J.; Wiercinska, E.; Gorter, A.; Hogendoorn, P.C.W.; Griffioen, A.W.; Dijke, ten P.

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cell plasticity enables certain types of highly malignant tumor cells to dedifferentiate and engage a plastic multipotent embryonic-like phenotype, which enables them to ‘adapt’ during tumor progression and escape conventional therapeutic strategies. This plastic phenotype of aggressive cancer

  13. Calcium Sensor, NCS-1, Promotes Tumor Aggressiveness and Predicts Patient Survival.

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    Moore, Lauren M; England, Allison; Ehrlich, Barbara E; Rimm, David L

    2017-07-01

    Neuronal Calcium Sensor 1 (NCS-1) is a multi-functional Ca 2+ -binding protein that affects a range of cellular processes beyond those related to neurons. Functional characterization of NCS-1 in neuronal model systems suggests that NCS-1 may influence oncogenic processes. To this end, the biological role of NCS-1 was investigated by altering its endogenous expression in MCF-7 and MB-231 breast cancer cells. Overexpression of NCS-1 resulted in a more aggressive tumor phenotype demonstrated by a marked increase in invasion and motility, and a decrease in cell-matrix adhesion to collagen IV. Overexpression of NCS-1 was also shown to increase the efficacy of paclitaxel-induced cell death in a manner that was independent of cellular proliferation. To determine the association between NCS-1 and clinical outcome, NCS-1 expression was measured in two independent breast cancer cohorts by the Automated Quantitative Analysis method of quantitative immunofluorescence. Elevated levels of NCS-1 were significantly correlated with shorter survival rates. Furthermore, multivariate analysis demonstrated that NCS-1 status was prognostic, independent of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER2, and lymph node status. These findings indicate that NCS-1 plays a role in the aggressive behavior of a subset of breast cancers and has therapeutic or biomarker potential. Implications: NCS-1, a calcium-binding protein, is associated with clinicopathologic features of aggressiveness in breast cancer cells and worse outcome in two breast cancer patient cohorts. Mol Cancer Res; 15(7); 942-52. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Disseminated breast cancer cells acquire a highly malignant and aggressive metastatic phenotype during metastatic latency in the bone.

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    Carolyn G Marsden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs in the bone marrow may exist in a dormant state for extended periods of time, maintaining the ability to proliferate upon activation, engraft at new sites, and form detectable metastases. However, understanding of the behavior and biology of dormant breast cancer cells in the bone marrow niche remains limited, as well as their potential involvement in tumor recurrence and metastasis. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the tumorigenicity and metastatic potential of dormant disseminated breast cancer cells (prior to activation in the bone marrow. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Total bone marrow, isolated from mice previously injected with tumorspheres into the mammary fat pad, was injected into the mammary fat pad of NUDE mice. As a negative control, bone marrow isolated from non-injected mice was injected into the mammary fat pad of NUDE mice. The resultant tumors were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Mouse lungs, livers, and kidneys were analyzed by H+E staining to detect metastases. The injection of bone marrow isolated from mice previously injected with tumorspheres into the mammary fat pad, resulted in large tumor formation in the mammary fat pad 2 months post-injection. However, the injection of bone marrow isolated from non-injected mice did not result in tumor formation in the mammary fat pad. The DTC-derived tumors exhibited accelerated development of metastatic lesions within the lung, liver and kidney. The resultant tumors and the majority of metastatic lesions within the lung and liver exhibited a mesenchymal-like phenotype. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Dormant DTCs within the bone marrow are highly malignant upon injection into the mammary fat pad, with the accelerated development of metastatic lesions within the lung, liver and kidney. These results suggest the acquisition of a more aggressive phenotype of DTCs during

  15. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

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    Vasseur, Sophie; Tomasini, Richard; Tournaire, Roselyne; Iovanna, Juan L. [INSERM U624, Stress Cellulaire, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, 163 Avenue de Luminy, BP 915,13288 Marseille cedex 9 (France)

    2010-12-16

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis.

  16. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasseur, Sophie; Tomasini, Richard; Tournaire, Roselyne; Iovanna, Juan L.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis

  17. Nature and Nurture: What Determines Tumor Metabolic Phenotypes?

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    Mayers, Jared R; Vander Heiden, Matthew G

    2017-06-15

    Understanding the genetic basis of cancer has led to therapies that target driver mutations and has helped match patients with more personalized drugs. Oncogenic mutations influence tumor metabolism, but other tumor characteristics can also contribute to their metabolic phenotypes. Comparison of isogenic lung and pancreas tumor models suggests that use of some metabolic pathways is defined by lineage rather than by driver mutation. Lung tumors catabolize circulating branched chain amino acids (BCAA) to extract nitrogen for nonessential amino acid and nucleotide synthesis, whereas pancreatic cancer obtains amino acids from catabolism of extracellular protein. These differences in amino acid metabolism translate into distinct pathway dependencies, as genetic disruption of the enzymes responsible for utilization of BCAA nitrogen limits the growth of lung tumors, but not pancreatic tumors. These data argue that some cancer metabolic phenotypes are defined by cancer tissue-of-origin and environment and that these features constrain the influence of genetic mutations on metabolism. A better understanding of the factors defining tumor nutrient utilization could be exploited to help improve cancer therapy. Cancer Res; 77(12); 3131-4. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Cancer Stem Cells and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT)-Phenotypic Cells: Are They Cousins or Twins?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Dejuan; Li, Yiwei; Wang, Zhiwei; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are cells within a tumor that possess the capacity to self-renew and maintain tumor-initiating capacity through differentiation into the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the whole tumor. These tumor-initiating cells could provide a resource for cells that cause tumor recurrence after therapy. Although the cell origin of CSCs remains to be fully elucidated, mounting evidence has demonstrated that Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), induced by different factors, is associated with tumor aggressiveness and metastasis and these cells share molecular characteristics with CSCs, and thus are often called cancer stem-like cells or tumor-initiating cells. The acquisition of an EMT phenotype is a critical process for switching early stage carcinomas into invasive malignancies, which is often associated with the loss of epithelial differentiation and gain of mesenchymal phenotype. Recent studies have demonstrated that EMT plays a critical role not only in tumor metastasis but also in tumor recurrence and that it is tightly linked with the biology of cancer stem-like cells or cancer-initiating cells. Here we will succinctly summarize the state-of-our-knowledge regarding the molecular similarities between cancer stem-like cells or CSCs and EMT-phenotypic cells that are associated with tumor aggressiveness focusing on solid tumors

  19. Cancer Stem Cells and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT-Phenotypic Cells: Are They Cousins or Twins?

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    Fazlul H. Sarkar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are cells within a tumor that possess the capacity to self-renew and maintain tumor-initiating capacity through differentiation into the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the whole tumor. These tumor-initiating cells could provide a resource for cells that cause tumor recurrence after therapy. Although the cell origin of CSCs remains to be fully elucidated, mounting evidence has demonstrated that Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT, induced by different factors, is associated with tumor aggressiveness and metastasis and these cells share molecular characteristics with CSCs, and thus are often called cancer stem-like cells or tumor-initiating cells. The acquisition of an EMT phenotype is a critical process for switching early stage carcinomas into invasive malignancies, which is often associated with the loss of epithelial differentiation and gain of mesenchymal phenotype. Recent studies have demonstrated that EMT plays a critical role not only in tumor metastasis but also in tumor recurrence and that it is tightly linked with the biology of cancer stem-like cells or cancer-initiating cells. Here we will succinctly summarize the state-of-our-knowledge regarding the molecular similarities between cancer stem-like cells or CSCs and EMT-phenotypic cells that are associated with tumor aggressiveness focusing on solid tumors.

  20. Exosomes from metastatic cancer cells transfer amoeboid phenotype to non-metastatic cells and increase endothelial permeability: their emerging role in tumor heterogeneity.

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    Schillaci, Odessa; Fontana, Simona; Monteleone, Francesca; Taverna, Simona; Di Bella, Maria Antonietta; Di Vizio, Dolores; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2017-07-05

    The goal of this study was to understand if exosomes derived from high-metastatic cells may influence the behavior of less aggressive cancer cells and the properties of the endothelium. We found that metastatic colon cancer cells are able to transfer their amoeboid phenotype to isogenic primary cancer cells through exosomes, and that this morphological transition is associated with the acquisition of a more aggressive behavior. Moreover, exosomes from the metastatic line (SW620Exos) exhibited higher ability to cause endothelial hyperpermeability than exosomes from the non metastatic line (SW480Exos). SWATH-based quantitative proteomic analysis highlighted that SW620Exos are significantly enriched in cytoskeletal-associated proteins including proteins activating the RhoA/ROCK pathway, known to induce amoeboid properties and destabilization of endothelial junctions. In particular, thrombin was identified as a key mediator of the effects induced by SW620Exos in target cells, in which we also found a significant increase of RhoA activity. Overall, our results demonstrate that in a heterogeneous context exosomes released by aggressive sub-clones can contribute to accelerate tumor progression by spreading malignant properties that affect both the tumor cell plasticity and the endothelial cell behavior.

  1. Microenvironment-dependent phenotypic changes in a SCID mouse model for malignant mesothelioma

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    Eva eDarai-Ramqvist

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive, therapy-resistant tumor. Mesothelioma cells may assume an epithelioid or a sarcomatoid phenotype, and presence of sarcomatoid cells predicts poor prognosis. In this study, we investigated differentiation of mesothelioma cells in a xenograft model, where mesothelioma cells of both phenotypes were induced to form tumors in SCID mice. Methods: Xenografts were established and thoroughly characterized using a comprehensive immunohistochemical panel, array comparative genomic hybridization of chromosome 3, fluorescent in situ hybridization and electron microscopy.Results: Epithelioid and sarcomatoid cells gave rise to xenografts of similar epithelioid morphology. While sarcomatoid-derived xenografts had higher growth rates, the morphology and expression of differentiation-related markers was similar between xenografts derived from both phenotypes. Array comparative genomic hybridization showed a convergent genotype for both xenografts, resembling the original aggressive sarcomatoid cell sub-line.Conclusions: Human mesothelioma xenografts from sarcomatoid and epithelioid phenotypes converged to a similar differentiation state, and genetic analyses suggested that clonal selection in the mouse microenvironment was a major contributing factor. This thoroughly characterized animal model can be used for further studies of molecular events underlying tumor cell differentiation.

  2. Step-wise and punctuated genome evolution drive phenotype changes of tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanenko, Aleksei; Andreieva, Svitlana; Korets, Kateryna; Mykytenko, Dmytro; Huleyuk, Nataliya; Vassetzky, Yegor; Kavsan, Vadym

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • There are the step-wise continuous and punctuated phases of cancer genome evolution. • The system stresses during the different phases may lead to very different responses. • Stable transfection of an empty vector can result in genome and phenotype changes. • Functions of a (trans)gene can be opposite/versatile in cells with different genomes. • Contextually, temozolomide can both promote and suppress tumor cell aggressiveness. - Abstract: The pattern of genome evolution can be divided into two phases: the step-wise continuous phase (step-wise clonal evolution, stable dominant clonal chromosome aberrations (CCAs), and low frequency of non-CCAs, NCCAs) and punctuated phase (marked by elevated NCCAs and transitional CCAs). Depending on the phase, system stresses (the diverse CIN promoting factors) may lead to the very different phenotype responses. To address the contribution of chromosome instability (CIN) to phenotype changes of tumor cells, we characterized CCAs/NCCAs of HeLa and HEK293 cells, and their derivatives after genotoxic stresses (a stable plasmid transfection, ectopic expression of cancer-associated CHI3L1 gene or treatment with temozolomide) by conventional cytogenetics, copy number alterations (CNAs) by array comparative genome hybridization, and phenotype changes by cell viability and soft agar assays. Transfection of either the empty vector pcDNA3.1 or pcDNA3.1-CHI3L1 into 293 cells initiated the punctuated genome changes. In contrast, HeLa-CHI3L1 cells demonstrated the step-wise genome changes. Increased CIN correlated with lower viability of 293-pcDNA3.1 cells but higher colony formation efficiency (CFE). Artificial CHI3L1 production in 293-CHI3L1 cells increased viability and further contributed to CFE. The opposite growth characteristics of 293-CHI3L1 and HeLa-CHI3L1 cells were revealed. The effect and function of a (trans)gene can be opposite and versatile in cells with different genetic network, which is defined by

  3. Step-wise and punctuated genome evolution drive phenotype changes of tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanenko, Aleksei, E-mail: a.a.stepanenko@gmail.com [Department of Biosynthesis of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Andreieva, Svitlana; Korets, Kateryna; Mykytenko, Dmytro [Department of Biosynthesis of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Huleyuk, Nataliya [Institute of Hereditary Pathology, National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Lviv 79008 (Ukraine); Vassetzky, Yegor [CNRS UMR8126, Université Paris-Sud 11, Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy, Villejuif 94805 (France); Kavsan, Vadym [Department of Biosynthesis of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • There are the step-wise continuous and punctuated phases of cancer genome evolution. • The system stresses during the different phases may lead to very different responses. • Stable transfection of an empty vector can result in genome and phenotype changes. • Functions of a (trans)gene can be opposite/versatile in cells with different genomes. • Contextually, temozolomide can both promote and suppress tumor cell aggressiveness. - Abstract: The pattern of genome evolution can be divided into two phases: the step-wise continuous phase (step-wise clonal evolution, stable dominant clonal chromosome aberrations (CCAs), and low frequency of non-CCAs, NCCAs) and punctuated phase (marked by elevated NCCAs and transitional CCAs). Depending on the phase, system stresses (the diverse CIN promoting factors) may lead to the very different phenotype responses. To address the contribution of chromosome instability (CIN) to phenotype changes of tumor cells, we characterized CCAs/NCCAs of HeLa and HEK293 cells, and their derivatives after genotoxic stresses (a stable plasmid transfection, ectopic expression of cancer-associated CHI3L1 gene or treatment with temozolomide) by conventional cytogenetics, copy number alterations (CNAs) by array comparative genome hybridization, and phenotype changes by cell viability and soft agar assays. Transfection of either the empty vector pcDNA3.1 or pcDNA3.1-CHI3L1 into 293 cells initiated the punctuated genome changes. In contrast, HeLa-CHI3L1 cells demonstrated the step-wise genome changes. Increased CIN correlated with lower viability of 293-pcDNA3.1 cells but higher colony formation efficiency (CFE). Artificial CHI3L1 production in 293-CHI3L1 cells increased viability and further contributed to CFE. The opposite growth characteristics of 293-CHI3L1 and HeLa-CHI3L1 cells were revealed. The effect and function of a (trans)gene can be opposite and versatile in cells with different genetic network, which is defined by

  4. Tumor necrosis is an important hallmark of aggressive endometrial cancer and associates with hypoxia, angiogenesis and inflammation responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredholt, Geir; Mannelqvist, Monica; Stefansson, Ingunn M; Birkeland, Even; Bø, Trond Hellem; Øyan, Anne M; Trovik, Jone; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Jonassen, Inge; Salvesen, Helga B; Wik, Elisabeth; Akslen, Lars A

    2015-11-24

    Tumor necrosis is associated with aggressive features of endometrial cancer and poor prognosis. Here, we investigated gene expression patterns and potential treatment targets related to presence of tumor necrosis in primary endometrial cancer lesions. By DNA microarray analysis, expression of genes related to tumor necrosis reflected multiple tumor-microenvironment interactions like tissue hypoxia, angiogenesis and inflammation pathways. A tumor necrosis signature of 38 genes and a related patient cluster (Cluster I, 67% of the cases) were associated with features of aggressive tumors such as type II cancers, estrogen receptor negative tumors and vascular invasion. Further, the tumor necrosis signature was increased in tumor cells grown in hypoxic conditions in vitro. Multiple genes with increased expression are known to be activated by HIF1A and NF-kB. Our findings indicate that the presence of tumor necrosis within primary tumors is associated with hypoxia, angiogenesis and inflammation responses. HIF1A, NF-kB and PI3K/mTOR might be potential treatment targets in aggressive endometrial cancers with presence of tumor necrosis.

  5. Serotonin₂A/C receptors mediate the aggressive phenotype of TLX gene knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez, Pablo; Valdovinos, Maria G; May, Michael E; Lloyd, Blair P; Couppis, Maria H; Kennedy, Craig H

    2013-11-01

    Deleting the tailless (TLX) gene in mice produces a highly aggressive phenotype yet to be characterized in terms of heterozygous animals or neurotransmitter mechanisms. We sought to establish pharmacological control over aggression and study the role of serotonin (5-HT)(2A/C) receptors in mediating changes in aggression. We analyzed aggression in mice heterozygous (+/-) or homozygous (-/-) for the TLX gene and wild-types (+/+) using a resident-intruder paradigm. No +/+ mice were aggressive, 36% of +/- TLX and 100% of -/- TLX mice showed aggression. Dose-effect functions were established for clozapine (0.1-1.5mg/kg, ip), ketanserin (0.3-1.25 mg/kg, ip), and (±)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane [(±)DOI] (0.5-2.0 mg/kg, ip). Injecting clozapine decreased the frequency and duration of attacks for +/- TLX and -/- TLX mice. Clozapine did not decrease grooming in either +/- TLX or -/- TLX mice but may have increased locomotion for -/- TLX mice. Injecting ketanserin, a 5-HT(2A/C) receptor antagonist, produced differential decreases in frequency and latency to aggression between genotypes and corresponding increases in locomotor behavior. Injecting (±)DOI, a 5-HT(2A/C) receptor agonist, increased the frequency and duration of attacks, decreased the latency to attacks, and decreased locomotion in +/- and -/- TLX mice. Results of the current study suggest aggression displayed by TLX null and heterozygous mice involves 5-HT(2A/C) receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Tumor progression: analysis of the instability of the metastatic phenotype, sensitivity to radiation and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The major complications for tumor therapy are 1) tumor spread (metastasis); 2) the mixed nature of tumors (heterogeneity); and 3) the capacity of tumors to evolve (progress). To study these tumor characteristics, the rat 13762NF mammary adenocarcinoma was cloned and studied for metastatic properties and sensitivities to therapy (chemotherapy, radiation and hyperthermia). The cell clones were heterogeneous and no correlation between metastatic potential and therapeutic sensitivities was observed. Further, these phenotypes were unstable during pasage in vitro; yet, the changes were clone dependent and reproducible using different cryoprotected cell stocks. To understand the phenotypic instability, subclones were isolated from low and high passage cell clones. The results demonstrated that 1) tumor cells are heterogeneous for multiple phenotypes; 2) tumor cells are unstable for multiple phenotypes; 3) the magnitude, direction and time of occurrence of phenotypic drift is clone dependent; 4) the sensitivity of cell clones to ionizing radiation (γ or heat) and chemotherapy agents is independent of their metastatic potential; 5) shifts in metastatic potential and sensitivity to therapy may occur simultaneously but are not linked; and 6) tumor cells independently diverge to form several subpopulations with unique phenotypic profiles

  7. The cellular ratio of immune tolerance (immunoCRIT) is a definite marker for aggressiveness of solid tumors and may explain tumor dissemination patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Türbachova (Ivana); T. Schwachula (Tim); I. Vasconcelos (Ines); A. Mustea (Alexander); T. Baldinger (Tina); K.A. Jones (Katherine); H. Bujard (Hermann); A. Olek (Alexander); A. Olek (Alexander); K. Gellhaus (Katharina); I. Braicu (Ioana); D. Könsgen (Dominique); C. Fryer (Christy); E. Ravot (Elisabetta); A. Hellwag (Alexander); N. Westerfeld (Nicole); O.J. Gruss (Oliver); M. Meissner (Markus); M. Hasan (Mazahir); M. Weber (Michael); U. Hoffmüller (Ulrich); S. Zimmermann (Sven); C. Loddenkemper (Christoph); S. Mahner (Sven); N. Babel (Nina); P.M.J.J. Berns (Els); R. Adams (Rod); R. Zeilinger (Robert); U. Baron (Udo); I. Vergote (Ignace); T. Maughan (Tim); F. Marme (Federick); T. Dickhaus (Thorsten); J. Sehouli (Jalid); A. Olek (Alexander)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe adaptive immune system is involved in tumor establishment and aggressiveness. Tumors of the ovaries, an immune-privileged organ, spread via transceolomic routes and rarely to distant organs. This is contrary to tumors of non-immune privileged organs, which often disseminate

  8. Microenvironmental independence associated with tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alexander R A; Hassanein, Mohamed; Branch, Kevin M; Lu, Jenny; Lobdell, Nichole A; Maier, Julie; Basanta, David; Weidow, Brandy; Narasanna, Archana; Arteaga, Carlos L; Reynolds, Albert B; Quaranta, Vito; Estrada, Lourdes; Weaver, Alissa M

    2009-11-15

    Tumor-microenvironment interactions are increasingly recognized to influence tumor progression. To understand the competitive dynamics of tumor cells in diverse microenvironments, we experimentally parameterized a hybrid discrete-continuum mathematical model with phenotypic trait data from a set of related mammary cell lines with normal, transformed, or tumorigenic properties. Surprisingly, in a resource-rich microenvironment, with few limitations on proliferation or migration, transformed (but not tumorigenic) cells were most successful and outcompeted other cell types in heterogeneous tumor simulations. Conversely, constrained microenvironments with limitations on space and/or growth factors gave a selective advantage to phenotypes derived from tumorigenic cell lines. Analysis of the relative performance of each phenotype in constrained versus unconstrained microenvironments revealed that, although all cell types grew more slowly in resource-constrained microenvironments, the most aggressive cells were least affected by microenvironmental constraints. A game theory model testing the relationship between microenvironment resource availability and competitive cellular dynamics supports the concept that microenvironmental independence is an advantageous cellular trait in resource-limited microenvironments.

  9. Ploidy, cytokinetics, and histology features of aggressive versus less aggressive uterine cervical squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.S.; Peters, L.J.; Adelson, M.; Williamson, K.D.; Sneige, N.; Katz, R.L.; Freedman, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The authors are investigating the interrelationships of flow cytometric measured ploidy, S-fraction with histology features of uterine cervical squamous cell cancers in an attempt to identify aggressive, high risk tumors and less aggressive tumors. Experimentally, pre-radiotherapy biopsy specimens are being studied using flow ploidy and cell-cycle analysis and microscopic scoring for histology features. The results to date for some 200 patients indicate that there are identifyable aggressive tumors, at high risk for 2 yr local control within each stage of disease and differentiation category (WD, MD, PD). These aggressive tumors usually have high degree DNA abnormalities (triploid or greater), high proliferative activity (%S≥20) compared to the less aggressive tumors characterized by diploid/near diploid DNA content, low to moderate %S (2-19, mean 12). Expression of high S-fraction appears to reflect high growth activity or growth potential and characterizes the aggressive tumors

  10. Morbidity and mortality of aggressive resection in patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Jeffrey A; Kivlen, Maryann; Li, Michelle; Schneider, Darren; Chuter, Timothy; Jensen, Robert T

    2003-08-01

    There is considerable controversy about the treatment of patients with malignant advanced neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas and duodenum. Aggressive surgery remains a potentially efficacious antitumor therapy but is rarely performed because of its possible morbidity and mortality. Aggressive resection of advanced neuroendocrine tumors can be performed with acceptable morbidity and mortality rates and may lead to extended survival. The medical records of patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors who underwent surgery between 1997 and 2002 by a single surgeon at the University of California, San Francisco, were reviewed in an institutional review board-approved protocol. Surgical procedure, pathologic characteristics, complications, mortality rates, and disease-free and overall survival rates were recorded. Disease-free survival was defined as no tumor identified on radiological imaging studies and no detectable abnormal hormone levels. Proportions were compared statistically using the Fisher exact test. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to estimate survival rates. Twenty patients were identified (11 men and 9 women). Of these, 10 (50%) had gastrinoma, 1 had insulinoma, and the remainder had nonfunctional tumors; 2 had multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, and 1 had von Hippel-Lindau disease. The mean age was 55 years (range, 34-72 years). In 10 patients (50%), tumors were thought to be unresectable according to radiological imaging studies because of multiple bilobar liver metastases (n = 6), superior mesenteric vein invasion (n = 3), and extensive nodal metastases (n = 1). Tumors were completely removed in 15 patients (75%). Surgical procedures included 8 proximal pancreatectomies (pancreatoduodenectomy or whipple procedure), 3 total pancreatectomies, 9 distal pancreatectomies, and 3 tumor enucleations from the pancreatic head. Superior mesenteric vein reconstruction was done in 3 patients. Liver resections were done in 6 patients, and an extended periaortic node

  11. Aggressive palliative surgery in metastatic phyllodes tumor: Impact on quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Kapali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic phyllodes tumor has very few treatment options. Phyllodes tumor in metastatic setting has limited role of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy or combined treatment. Most of the patients receive symptomatic management only. We present a case of metastatic phyllodes tumor managed with aggressive margin negative resection of primary tumor leading to palliation of almost all the symptoms, which eventually led to improved quality of life and probably to improved survival. The improved quality of life was objectively assessed with Hamilton depression rating scale. Surgery may be the only mode of palliation in selected patients that provides a better quality of life and directly or indirectly may lead to improved survival.

  12. Breast tumor copy number aberration phenotypes and genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridlyand, Jane; Jain, Ajay N; McLennan, Jane; Ziegler, John; Chin, Koei; Devries, Sandy; Feiler, Heidi; Gray, Joe W; Waldman, Frederic; Pinkel, Daniel; Albertson, Donna G; Snijders, Antoine M; Ylstra, Bauke; Li, Hua; Olshen, Adam; Segraves, Richard; Dairkee, Shanaz; Tokuyasu, Taku; Ljung, Britt Marie

    2006-01-01

    Genomic DNA copy number aberrations are frequent in solid tumors, although the underlying causes of chromosomal instability in tumors remain obscure. Genes likely to have genomic instability phenotypes when mutated (e.g. those involved in mitosis, replication, repair, and telomeres) are rarely mutated in chromosomally unstable sporadic tumors, even though such mutations are associated with some heritable cancer prone syndromes. We applied array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to the analysis of breast tumors. The variation in the levels of genomic instability amongst tumors prompted us to investigate whether alterations in processes/genes involved in maintenance and/or manipulation of the genome were associated with particular types of genomic instability. We discriminated three breast tumor subtypes based on genomic DNA copy number alterations. The subtypes varied with respect to level of genomic instability. We find that shorter telomeres and altered telomere related gene expression are associated with amplification, implicating telomere attrition as a promoter of this type of aberration in breast cancer. On the other hand, the numbers of chromosomal alterations, particularly low level changes, are associated with altered expression of genes in other functional classes (mitosis, cell cycle, DNA replication and repair). Further, although loss of function instability phenotypes have been demonstrated for many of the genes in model systems, we observed enhanced expression of most genes in tumors, indicating that over expression, rather than deficiency underlies instability. Many of the genes associated with higher frequency of copy number aberrations are direct targets of E2F, supporting the hypothesis that deregulation of the Rb pathway is a major contributor to chromosomal instability in breast tumors. These observations are consistent with failure to find mutations in sporadic tumors in genes that have roles in maintenance or manipulation of the genome

  13. Aerobic Glycolysis as a Marker of Tumor Aggressiveness: Preliminary Data in High Grade Human Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei G. Vlassenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Glucose metabolism outside of oxidative phosphorylation, or aerobic glycolysis (AG, is a hallmark of active cancer cells that is not directly measured with standard 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography (PET. In this study, we characterized tumor regions with elevated AG defined based on PET measurements of glucose and oxygen metabolism. Methods. Fourteen individuals with high-grade brain tumors underwent structural MR scans and PET measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF, oxygen (CMRO2 and glucose (CMRGlu metabolism, and AG, using 15O-labeled CO, O2 and H2O, and FDG, and were compared to a normative cohort of 20 age-matched individuals. Results. Elevated AG was observed in most high-grade brain tumors and it was associated with decreased CMRO2 and CBF, but not with significant changes in CMRGlu. Elevated AG was a dramatic and early sign of tumor growth associated with decreased survival. AG changes associated with tumor growth were differentiated from the effects of nonneoplastic processes such as epileptic seizures. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate that high-grade brain tumors exhibit elevated AG as a marker of tumor growth and aggressiveness. AG may detect areas of active tumor growth that are not evident on conventional FDG PET.

  14. Gastric Composite Tumor of Alpha Fetoprotein-Producing Carcinoma/Hepatoid Adenocarcinoma and Endocrine Carcinoma with Reference to Cellular Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-fetoprotein-producing carcinoma (AFPC/hepatoid adenocarcinoma (HAC and neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC are uncommon in the stomach. Composite tumors consisting of these carcinomas and their histologic phenotypes are not well known. Between 2002 and 2007, to estimate the prevalence of composite tumors consisting of tubular adenocarcinoma, AFPC/HAC and NEC, we reviewed specimens obtained from 294 consecutive patients treated surgically for gastric cancer. We examined histological phenotype of tumors of AFPC or NEC containing the composite tumor by evaluating immunohistochemical expressions of MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC6, CDX2, and SOX2. Immunohistochemically, AFPC/HAC dominantly showed the intestinal or mixed phenotype, and NEC frequently showed the gastric phenotype. In the composite tumor, the tubular and hepatoid components showed the gastric phenotype, and the neuroendocrine component showed the mixed type. The unique composite tumor predominantly showed the gastric phenotype, and the hepatoid and neuroendocrine components were considered to be differentiated from the tubular component.

  15. Influences of tumor stroma on the malignant phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Dau; Moeslund, Mette; Wandall, Hans H

    2008-01-01

    and laminin 5 was investigated. RESULTS: We found that expression of glycosylated oncofetal fibronectin was increased in the invasive phenotype of oral carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore we demonstrated that certain concentrations of collagen in the connective tissue equivalent, appears to stimulate......, fibronectin and laminin 5 are all characteristics of the tumor stroma. Less is, however, known of the significance of the biophysical properties of the tumor stroma. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how cellular and mechanical properties of the three-dimensional collagen matrix may...

  16. Nuclear DNA but not mtDNA controls tumor phenotypes in mouse cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Miho; Niikura, Mamoru; Ichikawa, Masami; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Nakada, Kazuto; Honma, Yoshio; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies showed high frequencies of homoplasmic mtDNA mutations in various human tumor types, suggesting that the mutated mtDNA haplotypes somehow contribute to expression of tumor phenotypes. We directly addressed this issue by isolating mouse mtDNA-less (ρ 0 ) cells for complete mtDNA replacement between normal cells and their carcinogen-induced transformants, and examined the effect of the mtDNA replacement on expression of tumorigenicity, a phenotype forming tumors in nude mice. The results showed that genome chimera cells carrying nuclear DNA from tumor cells and mtDNA from normal cells expressed tumorigenicity, whereas those carrying nuclear DNA from normal cells and mtDNA from tumor cells did not. These observations provided direct evidence that nuclear DNA, but not mtDNA, is responsible for carcinogen-induced malignant transformation, although it remains possible that mtDNA mutations and resultant respiration defects may influence the degree of malignancy, such as invasive or metastatic properties

  17. WE-EF-BRA-11: Precision Partial-Tumor Irradiation of Dorsal Rodent Mammary Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm, J [Duke Medical Physics Graduate Program, Durham, NC (United States); Boss, K [Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, North Carolina State University (United States); Dewhirst, M [Dpt of Radiation and Cancer Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Oldham, M [Dpt of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce a pre-clinical treatment technique on a micro-irradiator to treat specific volumes of dorsal mammary tumors in BALB/c mice while sparing lungs and spine. This technique facilitates pre-clinical investigation of tumor response to sub-optimal radiation treatments in which a portion of the tumor is unirradiated, known as a “marginal miss”. In-vitro data suggests that partial tumor radiations trigger a more aggressive phenotype in non-irradiated, regional tumor cells via bystander effects. As the lung tissue is spared, the impact of marginal miss on the development of pulmonary metastasis may be assessed. Methods: End to end test was performed on three BALB/c mice as proof of concept for larger studies. 1Gy was delivered on the micro-irradiator employing previously unexplored lateral parallel-opposed diamond and/or triangle-shaped beams. The margins of the treatment beam were defined using a combination of tumor palpation, barium fiducial markers, and real-time fluoroscopic images. The dose distribution was independently verified with kilovoltage beam Monte Carlo dose calculations with 7% statistical uncertainty and double exposure images. As a final step, the technique was used in a larger pre-clinical study (15Gy, 36 BALB/c mice) and lung metastasis in response to tumor irradiation of 100%, 50% and 0% was quantified. Results: For the Monte-Carlo dose calculations, the dose volume histograms established a maximum dose within the un-irradiated and radiated portions of the mammary tumor of 0.3Gy and 1.5Gy respectively, with a sharp gradient at the boundary. 100% of the lung volume received less than 0.5Gy. This technique proved suitable for a pre-clinical marginal miss study with 50% more lung metastases in partially-radiated mouse models compared to completely. Conclusion: We have developed a novel treatment technique for partial or full irradiation of dorsal mammary tumors incorporating lung sparing.The technique will be useful for exploring

  18. Clinicopathological characteristics of duodenal epithelial neoplasms: Focus on tumors with a gastric mucin phenotype (pyloric gland-type tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro Mitsuishi

    Full Text Available Epithelial tumors less commonly occur in the duodenum than in the stomach or large intestine. The clinicopathological characteristics of duodenal epithelial tumors remain a matter of debate. We therefore studied resected specimens to investigate the clinicopathological characteristics of duodenal epithelial tumors.Among duodenal epithelial tumors resected endoscopically or surgically in our hospital, we studied the clinicopathological characteristics of 110 adenomas or intramucosal carcinomas. The grade of atypia of all tumors was classified into 3 groups according to the World Health Organization (WHO 2010 classification. The tumors were immunohistochemically evaluated to determine the frequency of differentiation toward fundic glands.As for patient characteristics, there were 76 men (75.2% and 25 women (24.8%, with a median age of 65 years (range, 34 to 84. The tumors most commonly arose in the first to second part of the duodenum. Many lesions were flat, and the median tumor diameter was 8.0 mm. The lesions were classified into 2 types according to mucin phenotype: intestinal-type tumors (98 lesions, 89.1% and gastric-type tumors (12 lesions, 10.9%. Intestinal-type tumors were subdivided into 2 groups: tubular-type tumors (91 lesions, 82.7% and tubulovillous-type tumors (7 lesions, 6.4%. Gastric-type tumors were classified into 2 types: foveolar type (3 lesions, 2.7% and pyloric gland-type (PG tumors (9 lesions, 8.2%. The grade of atypia was significantly higher in gastric-type tumors (p<0.01. PG tumors were gastric-type tumors characterized by pyloric glands and findings suggesting differentiation toward fundic glands.About 10% of the duodenal tumors had a gastric-type mucin phenotype. Gastric-type tumors showed high-grade atypia. In particular, PG tumors showed similarities to PG tumors of the stomach, such as differentiation toward fundic glands.

  19. Tumors with unmethylated MLH1 and the CpG island methylator phenotype are associated with a poor prognosis in stage II colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tao; Liu, Yanliang; Li, Kai; Wan, Weiwei; Pappou, Emmanouil P; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Kerner, Zachary; Baylin, Stephen B; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Ahuja, Nita

    2016-12-27

    We previously developed a novel tumor subtype classification model for duodenal adenocarcinomas based on a combination of the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) and MLH1 methylation status. Here, we tested the prognostic value of this model in stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Tumors were assigned to CIMP+/MLH1-unmethylated (MLH1-U), CIMP+/MLH1-methylated (MLH1-M), CIMP-/MLH1-U, or CIMP-/MLH1-M groups. Age, tumor location, lymphovascular invasion, and mucin production differed among the four patient subgroups, and CIMP+/MLH1-U tumors were more likely to have lymphovascular invasion and mucin production. Kaplan-Meier analyses revealed differences in both disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) among the four groups. In a multivariate analysis, CIMP/MLH1 methylation status was predictive of both DFS and OS, and DFS and OS were shortest in CIMP+/MLH1-U stage II CRC patients. These results suggest that tumor subtype classification based on the combination of CIMP and MLH1 methylation status is informative in stage II CRC patients, and that CIMP+/MLH1-U tumors exhibit aggressive features and are associated with poor clinical outcomes.

  20. A basal stem cell signature identifies aggressive prostate cancer phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bryan A.; Sokolov, Artem; Uzunangelov, Vladislav; Baertsch, Robert; Newton, Yulia; Graim, Kiley; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M.; Witte, Owen N.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from numerous cancers suggests that increased aggressiveness is accompanied by up-regulation of signaling pathways and acquisition of properties common to stem cells. It is unclear if different subtypes of late-stage cancer vary in stemness properties and whether or not these subtypes are transcriptionally similar to normal tissue stem cells. We report a gene signature specific for human prostate basal cells that is differentially enriched in various phenotypes of late-stage metastatic prostate cancer. We FACS-purified and transcriptionally profiled basal and luminal epithelial populations from the benign and cancerous regions of primary human prostates. High-throughput RNA sequencing showed the basal population to be defined by genes associated with stem cell signaling programs and invasiveness. Application of a 91-gene basal signature to gene expression datasets from patients with organ-confined or hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer revealed that metastatic small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma was molecularly more stem-like than either metastatic adenocarcinoma or organ-confined adenocarcinoma. Bioinformatic analysis of the basal cell and two human small cell gene signatures identified a set of E2F target genes common between prostate small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and primary prostate basal cells. Taken together, our data suggest that aggressive prostate cancer shares a conserved transcriptional program with normal adult prostate basal stem cells. PMID:26460041

  1. A feasibility study for enrichment of highly aggressive cancer subpopulations by their biophysical properties via dielectrophoresis enhanced with synergistic fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Temple Anne; Cemazar, Jaka; Balani, Nikita; Sweeney, Daniel C; Schmelz, Eva M; Davalos, Rafael V

    2017-06-01

    A common problem with cancer treatment is the development of treatment resistance and tumor recurrence that result from treatments that kill most tumor cells yet leave behind aggressive cells to repopulate. Presented here is a microfluidic device that can be used to isolate tumor subpopulations to optimize treatment selection. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is a phenomenon where particles are polarized by an electric field and move along the electric field gradient. Different cell subpopulations have different DEP responses depending on their bioelectrical phenotype, which, we hypothesize, correlate with aggressiveness. We have designed a microfluidic device in which a region containing posts locally distorts the electric field created by an AC voltage and forces cells toward the posts through DEP. This force is balanced with a simultaneous drag force from fluid motion that pulls cells away from the posts. We have shown that by adjusting the drag force, cells with aggressive phenotypes are influenced more by the DEP force and trap on posts while others flow through the chip unaffected. Utilizing single-cell trapping via cell-sized posts coupled with a drag-DEP force balance, we show that separation of similar cell subpopulations may be achieved, a result that was previously impossible with DEP alone. Separated subpopulations maintain high viability downstream, and remain in a native state, without fluorescent labeling. These cells can then be cultured to help select a therapy that kills aggressive subpopulations equally or better than the bulk of the tumor, mitigating resistance and recurrence. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. GATA-4 and FOG-2 expression in pediatric ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors replicates embryonal gonadal phenotype: results from the TREP project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgone, Calogero; Cecchetto, Giovanni; Ferrari, Andrea; Bisogno, Gianni; Donofrio, Vittoria; Boldrini, Renata; Collini, Paola; Dall'Igna, Patrizia; Alaggio, Rita

    2012-01-01

    GATA proteins are a family of zinc finger transcription factors regulating gene expression, differentiation and proliferation in various tissues. The expression of GATA-4 and FOG-2, one of its modulators, was studied in pediatric Sex Cord-Stromal tumors of the ovary, in order to evaluate their potential role as diagnostic markers and prognostic factors. Clinical and histological data of 15 patients, enrolled into the TREP Project since 2000 were evaluated. When available, immunostaines for FOG-2, GATA-4, α-Inhibin, Vimentin and Pancytokeratin were also analyzed. In our series there were 6 Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumors (JGCT), 6 Sertoli-Leydig Cell Tumors (SLCT), 1 Cellular Fibroma, 1 Theca Cell Tumor and 1 Stromal Sclerosing Tumor (SST). Thirteen patients obtained a complete remission (CR), 1 reached a second CR after the removal of a metachronous tumor and 1 died of disease. Inhibin was detectable in 11/15, Vimentin in 13/15, Pancytokeratin in 6/15, GATA-4 in 5/13 and FOG-2 in 11/15. FOG-2 was highly expressed in 5/6 JGCT, while GATA-4 was weakly detectable only in 1 of the cases. SLCT expressed diffusely FOG-2 (4/6) and GATA-4 (3/5). GATA-4 and FOG-2 were detected in fibroma and thecoma but not in the SST. Pediatric granulosa tumors appear to express a FOG-2/GATA-4 phenotype in keeping with primordial ovarian follicles. High expression of GATA-4 does not correlate with aggressive behaviour as seen in adults, but it is probably involved in cell proliferation its absence can be associated with the better outcome of JGCT. SLCTs replicate the phenotype of Sertoli cells during embryogenesis in normal testis. In this group, the lack of expression of FOG-2 in tumors in advanced stages might reveal a hypothetical role in inhibiting GATA-4 cell proliferation pathway. In fibroma/thecoma group GATA-4 and FOG-2 point out the abnormal activation of GATA pathway and might be involved in the onset of these tumors.

  3. Elevated expression of Thoc1 is associated with aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer

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    Liu, Chenchen; Yue, Ben; Yuan, Chenwei; Zhao, Senlin; Fang, Changyi; Yu, Yang; Yan, Dongwang, E-mail: yandw70@163.com

    2015-12-04

    The THO complex 1 (Thoc1) is a nuclear matrix protein playing vital roles in transcription elongation and mRNA export. Recently, aberrant expression of Thoc1 has been reported in an increasing array of tumor types. However, the clinical significance of Thoc1 expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) is still unknown. The present study aimed to characterize the expression of Thoc1 in human CRC and evaluate its clinical significance. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting analyses showed that the mRNA and protein expression of Thoc1 in CRC specimens was significantly higher than that in adjacent normal colon mucosae. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was conducted to characterize the expression pattern of Thoc1 in 185 archived paraffin-embedded CRC specimens. Statistical analyses revealed that high levels of Thoc1 expression were associated with the clinical stages and tumor differentiation. CRC patients with high levels of Thoc1 expression had poorer overall-survival and disease-free survival, whereas those with lower levels of Thoc1 expression survived longer. Furthermore, multivariate Cox regression analyses demonstrated that Thoc1 expression remained an independent prognostic factor for increased disease recurrence and decreased survival. Our results suggest for the first time that Thoc1 is involved in the development and progression of CRC, and elevated expression of Thoc1 is associated with aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis in CRC. These findings may prove to be clinically useful for developing a new therapeutic target of CRC treatment.

  4. Phenotypic and Functional Properties of Tumor-Infiltrating Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gap Ryol Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (Treg cells maintain immune homeostasis by suppressing excessive immune responses. Treg cells induce tolerance against self- and foreign antigens, thus preventing autoimmunity, allergy, graft rejection, and fetus rejection during pregnancy. However, Treg cells also infiltrate into tumors and inhibit antitumor immune responses, thus inhibiting anticancer therapy. Depleting whole Treg cell populations in the body to enhance anticancer treatments will produce deleterious autoimmune diseases. Therefore, understanding the precise nature of tumor-infiltrating Treg cells is essential for effectively targeting Treg cells in tumors. This review summarizes recent results relating to Treg cells in the tumor microenvironment, with particular emphasis on their accumulation, phenotypic, and functional properties, and targeting to enhance the efficacy of anticancer treatment.

  5. Using tumor phenotype, histological tumor distribution, and mammographic appearance to explain the survival differences between screen-detected and clinically detected breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Shu-Lin; Chen, Sam Li-Sheng; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Chang, King-Jen; Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Fann, Jean Ching-Yuan; Tabár, László; Stephen, Duffy W; Smith, Robert A; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi

    2014-08-01

    In the era of mass screening for breast cancer with mammography, it has been noted that conventional tumor attributes and mammographic appearance are insufficient to account for the better prognosis of screen-detected tumors. Such prognostication may require additional updated pathological information regarding tumor phenotype (e.g., basal status) and histological tumor distribution (focality). We investigated this hypothesis using a Bayesian approach to analyze breast cancer data from Dalarna County, Sweden. We used data for tumors diagnosed in the Swedish Two-County Trial and early service screening period, 1977-1995, and from the mature service screening period, 1996-1998. In the early period of mammographic screening (1977-1995), the crude hazard ratio (HR) of breast cancer death for screen-detected cases compared with symptomatic ones was 0.22 (95% CI: 0.17-0.29) compared with 0.53 (95% CI: 0.34-0.76) when adjusted for conventional tumor attributes only. Using the data from the mature service screening period, 1996-1998, the HR was 0.23 (95% CI: 0.08-0.44) unadjusted and 0.71 (95% CI: 0.26-1.47) after adjustment for tumor phenotype, mammographic appearance, histological tumor distribution, and conventional tumor attributes. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for the prediction of breast cancer deaths using these variables without the detection mode was 0.82, only slightly less than that observed when additionally including the detection mode (AUC=0.83). Using Freedman statistics, conventional tumor attributes and mammographic appearances explained 58% (95% CI: 57.5-58.6%) of the difference of breast cancer survival between the screen-detected and the clinically detected breast cancers, whereas the corresponding figure was increased to 77% (95% CI: 75.6-77.6%) when adding the two information on tumor phenotype and histological tumor distribution. The results indicated that conventional tumor attributes and mammographic appearance are not sufficient to be

  6. Identification of Different Classes of Luminal Progenitor Cells within Prostate Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreet Agarwal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary prostate cancer almost always has a luminal phenotype. However, little is known about the stem/progenitor properties of transformed cells within tumors. Using the aggressive Pten/Tp53-null mouse model of prostate cancer, we show that two classes of luminal progenitors exist within a tumor. Not only did tumors contain previously described multipotent progenitors, but also a major population of committed luminal progenitors. Luminal cells, sorted directly from tumors or grown as organoids, initiated tumors of adenocarcinoma or multilineage histological phenotypes, which is consistent with luminal and multipotent differentiation potentials, respectively. Moreover, using organoids we show that the ability of luminal-committed progenitors to self-renew is a tumor-specific property, absent in benign luminal cells. Finally, a significant fraction of luminal progenitors survived in vivo castration. In all, these data reveal two luminal tumor populations with different stem/progenitor cell capacities, providing insight into prostate cancer cells that initiate tumors and can influence treatment response.

  7. Tumor Cells Express FcγRl Which Contributes to Tumor Cell Growth and a Metastatic Phenotype

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    M. Bud Nelson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available High levels of circulating immune complexes containing tumor-associated antigens are associated with a poor prognosis for individuals with cancer. The ability of B cells, previously exposed to tumor-associated antigens, to promote both in vitro and in vivo tumor growth formed the rationale to evaluate the mechanism by which immune complexes may promote tumor growth. In elucidating this mechanism, FcγRl expression by tumor cells was characterized by flow cytometry, polymerase chain reaction, and sequence analysis. Immune complexes containing shed tumor antigen and anti-shed tumor antigen Ab cross-linked FcγRl-expressing tumor cells, which resulted in an induction of tumor cell proliferation and of shed tumor antigen production. Use of selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors demonstrated that tumor cell proliferation induced by immune complex cross-linking of FcγRl is dependent on the tyrosine kinase signal transduction pathway. A selective inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase also inhibited this induction of tumor cell proliferation. These findings support a role for immune complexes and FcγRl expression by tumor cells in augmentation of tumor growth and a metastatic phenotype.

  8. Inference of Tumor Evolution during Chemotherapy by Computational Modeling and In Situ Analysis of Genetic and Phenotypic Cellular Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Almendro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We found that intratumor genetic diversity was tumor-subtype specific, and it did not change during treatment in tumors with partial or no response. However, lower pretreatment genetic diversity was significantly associated with pathologic complete response. In contrast, phenotypic diversity was different between pre- and posttreatment samples. We also observed significant changes in the spatial distribution of cells with distinct genetic and phenotypic features. We used these experimental data to develop a stochastic computational model to infer tumor growth patterns and evolutionary dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of integrated analysis of genotypes and phenotypes of single cells in intact tissues to predict tumor evolution.

  9. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almendro, Vanessa; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Randles, Amanda; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Marusyk, Andriy; Ametller, Elisabet; Gonzalez-Farre, Xavier; Muñoz, Montse; Russnes, Hege G.; Helland, Åslaug; Rye, Inga H.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Maruyama, Reo; Van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Dowsett, Mitchell; Jones, Robin L.; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Gascon, Pere; Gönen, Mithat; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We found that intratumor genetic diversity was tumor-subtype specific, and it did not change during treatment in tumors with partial or no response. However, lower pretreatment genetic diversity was significantly associated with pathologic complete response. In contrast, phenotypic diversity was different between pre- and post-treatment samples. We also observed significant changes in the spatial distribution of cells with distinct genetic and phenotypic features. We used these experimental data to develop a stochastic computational model to infer tumor growth patterns and evolutionary dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of integrated analysis of genotypes and phenotypes of single cells in intact tissues to predict tumor evolution

  10. A testosterone-related structural brain phenotype predicts aggressive behavior from childhood to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; McCracken, James T; Albaugh, Matthew D; Botteron, Kelly N; Hudziak, James J; Ducharme, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Structural covariance, the examination of anatomic correlations between brain regions, has emerged recently as a valid and useful measure of developmental brain changes. Yet the exact biological processes leading to changes in covariance, and the relation between such covariance and behavior, remain largely unexplored. The steroid hormone testosterone represents a compelling mechanism through which this structural covariance may be developmentally regulated in humans. Although steroid hormone receptors can be found throughout the central nervous system, the amygdala represents a key target for testosterone-specific effects, given its high density of androgen receptors. In addition, testosterone has been found to impact cortical thickness (CTh) across the whole brain, suggesting that it may also regulate the structural relationship, or covariance, between the amygdala and CTh. Here, we examined testosterone-related covariance between amygdala volumes and whole-brain CTh, as well as its relationship to aggression levels, in a longitudinal sample of children, adolescents, and young adults 6-22 years old. We found: (1) testosterone-specific modulation of the covariance between the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); (2) a significant relationship between amygdala-mPFC covariance and levels of aggression; and (3) mediation effects of amygdala-mPFC covariance on the relationship between testosterone and aggression. These effects were independent of sex, age, pubertal stage, estradiol levels and anxious-depressed symptoms. These findings are consistent with prior evidence that testosterone targets the neural circuits regulating affect and impulse regulation, and show, for the first time in humans, how androgen-dependent organizational effects may regulate a very specific, aggression-related structural brain phenotype from childhood to young adulthood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Distinct DNA Methylation Shift in a Subset of Glioma CpG Island Methylator Phenotypes during Tumor Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Ferreira de Souza

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Glioma diagnosis is based on histomorphology and grading; however, such classification does not have predictive clinical outcome after glioblastomas have developed. To date, no bona fide biomarkers that significantly translate into a survival benefit to glioblastoma patients have been identified. We previously reported that the IDH mutant G-CIMP-high subtype would be a predecessor to the G-CIMP-low subtype. Here, we performed a comprehensive DNA methylation longitudinal analysis of diffuse gliomas from 77 patients (200 tumors to enlighten the epigenome-based malignant transformation of initially lower-grade gliomas. Intra-subtype heterogeneity among G-CIMP-high primary tumors allowed us to identify predictive biomarkers for assessing the risk of malignant recurrence at early stages of disease. G-CIMP-low recurrence appeared in 9.5% of all gliomas, and these resembled IDH-wild-type primary glioblastoma. G-CIMP-low recurrence can be characterized by distinct epigenetic changes at candidate functional tissue enhancers with AP-1/SOX binding elements, mesenchymal stem cell-like epigenomic phenotype, and genomic instability. Molecular abnormalities of longitudinal G-CIMP offer possibilities to defy glioblastoma progression. : IDH-mutant lower-grade glioma glioblastoma often progresses to a more aggressive phenotype upon recurrence. de Souza et al. examines the intra-subtype heterogeneity of initial G-CIMP-high and use this information to identify predictive biomarkers for assessing the risk of recurrence and malignant transformation. Keywords: longitudinal gliomas, DNA methylation, IDH mutation, G-CIMP-high, intra-subtype heterogeneity, malignant transformation and recurrence, G-CIMP-low, stem cell-like glioblastoma, predictive biomarkers

  12. Predictive genomics: a cancer hallmark network framework for predicting tumor clinical phenotypes using genome sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Edwin; Zaman, Naif; Mcgee, Shauna; Milanese, Jean-Sébastien; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen

    2015-02-01

    Tumor genome sequencing leads to documenting thousands of DNA mutations and other genomic alterations. At present, these data cannot be analyzed adequately to aid in the understanding of tumorigenesis and its evolution. Moreover, we have little insight into how to use these data to predict clinical phenotypes and tumor progression to better design patient treatment. To meet these challenges, we discuss a cancer hallmark network framework for modeling genome sequencing data to predict cancer clonal evolution and associated clinical phenotypes. The framework includes: (1) cancer hallmarks that can be represented by a few molecular/signaling networks. 'Network operational signatures' which represent gene regulatory logics/strengths enable to quantify state transitions and measures of hallmark traits. Thus, sets of genomic alterations which are associated with network operational signatures could be linked to the state/measure of hallmark traits. The network operational signature transforms genotypic data (i.e., genomic alterations) to regulatory phenotypic profiles (i.e., regulatory logics/strengths), to cellular phenotypic profiles (i.e., hallmark traits) which lead to clinical phenotypic profiles (i.e., a collection of hallmark traits). Furthermore, the framework considers regulatory logics of the hallmark networks under tumor evolutionary dynamics and therefore also includes: (2) a self-promoting positive feedback loop that is dominated by a genomic instability network and a cell survival/proliferation network is the main driver of tumor clonal evolution. Surrounding tumor stroma and its host immune systems shape the evolutionary paths; (3) cell motility initiating metastasis is a byproduct of the above self-promoting loop activity during tumorigenesis; (4) an emerging hallmark network which triggers genome duplication dominates a feed-forward loop which in turn could act as a rate-limiting step for tumor formation; (5) mutations and other genomic alterations have

  13. Cancer-associated adipocytes promotes breast tumor radioresistance

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    Bochet, Ludivine; Meulle, Aline [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM U1048, 1 Avenue du Pr Jean Poulhes, BP 84225, F-31432 Toulouse Cedex (France); Imbert, Sandrine [CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Salles, Bernard [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Valet, Philippe [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, INSERM U1048, 1 Avenue du Pr Jean Poulhes, BP 84225, F-31432 Toulouse Cedex (France); Muller, Catherine, E-mail: muller@ipbs.fr [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), 205 route de Narbonne, BP 64182, F-31077 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Tumor-surrounding adipocytes contribute to breast cancer progression. {yields} Breast tumor cells previously co-cultivated with mature adipocytes exhibit radioresistance. {yields} Increased in Chk1 phosphorylation is observed in irradiated co-cultivated tumor cells. {yields} IL-6 is over-expressed in tumor cells co-cultivated with adipocytes. {yields} IL-6 exposure confers increased Chk1 phosphorylation and radioresistance in tumor cells. -- Abstract: Mature adipocytes are excellent candidates to influence tumor behavior through heterotypic signaling processes since these cells produce hormones, growth factors, cytokines and other molecules, a heterogeneous group of molecules named adipokines. Using a 2D coculture system, we demonstrate that breast tumor cells previously co-cultivated with mature adipocytes exhibit radioresistance and an earlier and higher increase in the effector kinase Chk1, a phenotype that was associated with decreased cell death as compared to tumor cells grown alone. Interestingly, the adipocytes-induced tumor changes taking place during the coculture time preceding the exposure to IR were sufficient to confer the radioresistant effect. Notorious among the changes brought by adipocytes was the significant increase of IL-6 expression in tumor cells, whose activity may well account for the observed tumor cell protection from IR toxicity. Indeed, our data confirmed the protective role of this cytokine as tumor cells incubated after irradiation with recombinant IL-6 exhibit an increased in Chk1 phosphorylation and a radioresistant phenotype, thus far recapitulating the effects observed in the presence of adipocytes. Our current study sheds light on a new role of tumor-surrounding adipocytes in fostering a radioresistant phenotype in breast tumors, a finding that might have important clinical implications in obese patients that frequently exhibit aggressive diseases.

  14. Imaging-genomics reveals driving pathways of MRI derived volumetric tumor phenotype features in Glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossmann, Patrick; Gutman, David A.; Dunn, William D. Jr; Holder, Chad A.; Aerts, Hugo J. W. L.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) tumors exhibit strong phenotypic differences that can be quantified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but the underlying biological drivers of these imaging phenotypes remain largely unknown. An Imaging-Genomics analysis was performed to reveal the mechanistic associations between MRI derived quantitative volumetric tumor phenotype features and molecular pathways. One hundred fourty one patients with presurgery MRI and survival data were included in our analysis. Volumetric features were defined, including the necrotic core (NE), contrast-enhancement (CE), abnormal tumor volume assessed by post-contrast T1w (tumor bulk or TB), tumor-associated edema based on T2-FLAIR (ED), and total tumor volume (TV), as well as ratios of these tumor components. Based on gene expression where available (n = 91), pathway associations were assessed using a preranked gene set enrichment analysis. These results were put into context of molecular subtypes in GBM and prognostication. Volumetric features were significantly associated with diverse sets of biological processes (FDR < 0.05). While NE and TB were enriched for immune response pathways and apoptosis, CE was associated with signal transduction and protein folding processes. ED was mainly enriched for homeostasis and cell cycling pathways. ED was also the strongest predictor of molecular GBM subtypes (AUC = 0.61). CE was the strongest predictor of overall survival (C-index = 0.6; Noether test, p = 4x10 −4 ). GBM volumetric features extracted from MRI are significantly enriched for information about the biological state of a tumor that impacts patient outcomes. Clinical decision-support systems could exploit this information to develop personalized treatment strategies on the basis of noninvasive imaging. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2659-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  15. Aggressive and multifocal pulmonary inflammatory myofiberblastic tumor in young woman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yang Sean; Chung, Myung Hee; Kim, Hyun Jung; Park, Ki Hoon; Kim, Jeanna; Kwon, Soon Suck; Yoo, Won Jong

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of pulmonary inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) showing aggressive and unusually rapid progression. A 27-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency room due to dry cough, fever and blood-tinged sputum that lasted one week. Initial chest radiograph and computed tomography scan revealed multifocal pulmonary nodules, which subsequently progressed into large necrotic masses within two months. She underwent a fine needle biopsy of the largest mass in the right middle lung zone which revealed inflammatory myofibroblastic cells consistent with IMT. The masses showed complete regression after six months of corticosteroid therapy. This unusual clinical manifestation could help explain the reactive inflammatory nature associated with IMTs

  16. Aggressive and multifocal pulmonary inflammatory myofiberblastic tumor in young woman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yang Sean; Chung, Myung Hee; Kim, Hyun Jung; Park, Ki Hoon; Kim, Jeanna; Kwon, Soon Suck; Yoo, Won Jong [Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    We report a case of pulmonary inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) showing aggressive and unusually rapid progression. A 27-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency room due to dry cough, fever and blood-tinged sputum that lasted one week. Initial chest radiograph and computed tomography scan revealed multifocal pulmonary nodules, which subsequently progressed into large necrotic masses within two months. She underwent a fine needle biopsy of the largest mass in the right middle lung zone which revealed inflammatory myofibroblastic cells consistent with IMT. The masses showed complete regression after six months of corticosteroid therapy. This unusual clinical manifestation could help explain the reactive inflammatory nature associated with IMTs.

  17. Contrast-enhanced dynamic and diffusion-weighted MR imaging at 3.0 T to assess aggressiveness of bladder cancer

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    Zhou, Guoxing, E-mail: sheasthospital@163.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China); Chen, Xiao, E-mail: chx_win@163.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China); Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210029 (China); Zhang, Jianhua [Department of Radiology, Shanghai East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China); Zhu, Jingqi, E-mail: zjh1830@easthospital.cn [Department of Radiology, Shanghai East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China); Zong, Genlin, E-mail: zgl0577@easthospital.cn [Department of Radiology, Shanghai East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China); Wang, Zhongqiu, E-mail: zhq2001us@163.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210029 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Wash out rate is associated with the aggressiveness of bladder cancer (BC). • Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value could be used to assess the aggressiveness of BC. • The diagnostic accuracy of aggressiveness of BC using ADC was better than semi-quantitative parameters. • Our data showed a good diagnostic performance of ADC and wash-out together in assessing BC aggressiveness. - Abstract: Background: Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI have been considered useful for pathological staging and histological grading in bladder cancer. To our knowledge, no study has combined the two imaging modalities together to assess aggressiveness of bladder cancer. Objective: To assess the clinical aggressiveness of bladder cancer with DCE MRI and DWI at 3.0 T. Materials and methods: A total of 59 patients with 69 pathologically confirmed tumor lesions were included in this study. All patients underwent MR examination at 3.0 T basing on DWI and DCE imaging. Tumor staging and histological grade were evaluated. The aggressiveness of bladder cancer was classified as low-, intermediate-, or high-aggressiveness according to its pathological phenotype. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value and semi-quantitative parameters (wash-in rate and wash-out rate) were determined. The correlation between clinical aggressiveness and ADC value, wash-in rate and wash-out rate were analyzed. In addition, the diagnostic accuracy of the diffusion and semi-quantitative parameters were estimated using receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC). Results: Aggressiveness of bladder cancer is negatively correlated with ADC value (r = −0.705, p < 0.0001) and wash-out rate (r = −0.719, p < 0.0001). The tumor ADC value is positively correlated with wash-out rate (r = 0.555, p < 0.0001). The diagnostic specificity and accuracy using tumor ADC value and wash-out for the tumor with size <24 mm were better than that

  18. Contrast-enhanced dynamic and diffusion-weighted MR imaging at 3.0 T to assess aggressiveness of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Guoxing; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhu, Jingqi; Zong, Genlin; Wang, Zhongqiu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Wash out rate is associated with the aggressiveness of bladder cancer (BC). • Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value could be used to assess the aggressiveness of BC. • The diagnostic accuracy of aggressiveness of BC using ADC was better than semi-quantitative parameters. • Our data showed a good diagnostic performance of ADC and wash-out together in assessing BC aggressiveness. - Abstract: Background: Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI have been considered useful for pathological staging and histological grading in bladder cancer. To our knowledge, no study has combined the two imaging modalities together to assess aggressiveness of bladder cancer. Objective: To assess the clinical aggressiveness of bladder cancer with DCE MRI and DWI at 3.0 T. Materials and methods: A total of 59 patients with 69 pathologically confirmed tumor lesions were included in this study. All patients underwent MR examination at 3.0 T basing on DWI and DCE imaging. Tumor staging and histological grade were evaluated. The aggressiveness of bladder cancer was classified as low-, intermediate-, or high-aggressiveness according to its pathological phenotype. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value and semi-quantitative parameters (wash-in rate and wash-out rate) were determined. The correlation between clinical aggressiveness and ADC value, wash-in rate and wash-out rate were analyzed. In addition, the diagnostic accuracy of the diffusion and semi-quantitative parameters were estimated using receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC). Results: Aggressiveness of bladder cancer is negatively correlated with ADC value (r = −0.705, p < 0.0001) and wash-out rate (r = −0.719, p < 0.0001). The tumor ADC value is positively correlated with wash-out rate (r = 0.555, p < 0.0001). The diagnostic specificity and accuracy using tumor ADC value and wash-out for the tumor with size <24 mm were better than that

  19. An aggressive osteoblastoma in the left iliac bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung Joon; Yang, Seoung Oh; Jo, Han Gi; Cho, Chul Koo; Ro, In Woo

    1986-01-01

    Osteoblastoma is an uncommon primary neoplasm of bone, accounting for 1% of primary bone tumors. Osteoblastomas are benign bone tumors, but recurrences and malignant transformation of osteoblastoma were reported. So Jaffe and Dorf-man proposed the term of 'aggressive osteoblastoma' in which the tumor had intermediate biological natures among the osteoblastomas. Aggressive osteoblastoma is very rare and biological, pathological features of it is different from the conventional osteoblastoma. We experienced one case of aggressive osteoblastoma in the left ilium and describes the radiological, pathological findings of an aggressive osteoblastoma with review of the literatures.

  20. A definition for aggressive disease in patients with HER-2 negative metastatic breast cancer: an expert consensus of the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, A; Lluch, A; Aba, E; Albanell, J; Antón, A; Álvarez, I; Ayala, F; Barnadas, A; Calvo, L; Ciruelos, E; Cortés, J; de la Haba, J; López-Vega, J M; Martínez, E; Muñoz, M; Peláez, I; Redondo, A; Rodríguez, Á; Rodríguez, C A; Ruíz, A; Llombart, A

    2017-05-01

    To converge on an expert opinion to define aggressive disease in patients with HER2-negative mBC using a modified Delphi methodology. A panel of 21 breast cancer experts from the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology agreed upon a survey which comprised 47 questions that were grouped into three sections: relevance for defining aggressive disease, aggressive disease criteria and therapeutic goals. Answers were rated using a 9-point Likert scale of relevance or agreement. Among the 88 oncologists that were invited to participate, 81 answered the first round (92%), 70 answered the second round (80%), and 67 answered the third round (76%) of the survey. There was strong agreement regarding the fact that identifying patients with aggressive disease needs to be adequately addressed to help practitioners to decide the best treatment options for patients with HER2-negative mBC. The factors that were considered to be strongly relevant to classifying patients with aggressive HER2-negative mBC were a high tumor burden, a disease-free interval of less than 12-24 months after surgery, the presence of progressive disease during adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy and having a triple-negative phenotype. The main therapeutic goals were controlling symptoms, improving quality of life and increasing the time to progression and overall survival. High tumor burden, time to recurrence after prior therapy and having a triple-negative phenotype were the prognostic factors for which the greatest consensus was found for identifying patients with aggressive HER2-negative mBC. Identifying patients with aggressive disease leads to different therapeutic approaches.

  1. Trading in your spindles for blebs: the amoeboid tumor cell phenotype in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Morley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa remains a principal cause of mortality in developed countries. Because no clinical interventions overcome resistance to androgen ablation therapy, management of castration resistance and metastatic disease remains largely untreatable. Metastasis is a multistep process in which tumor cells lose cell-cell contacts, egress from the primary tumor, intravasate, survive shear stress within the vasculature and extravasate into tissues to colonize ectopic sites. Tumor cells reestablish migratory behaviors employed during nonneoplastic processes such as embryonic development, leukocyte trafficking and wound healing. While mesenchymal motility is an established paradigm of dissemination, an alternate, 'amoeboid' phenotype is increasingly appreciated as relevant to human cancer. Here we discuss characteristics and pathways underlying the phenotype, and highlight our findings that the cytoskeletal regulator DIAPH3 governs the mesenchymal-amoeboid transition. We also describe our identification of a new class of tumor-derived microvesicles, large oncosomes, produced by amoeboid cells and with potential clinical utility in prostate and other cancers.

  2. Galectin-7 Expression Potentiates HER-2-Positive Phenotype in Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrée-Anne Grosset

    Full Text Available HER-2 positive tumors are among the most aggressive subtypes of breast cancer and are frequently associated with metastasis and poor outcome. As with other aggressive subtypes of breast cancer, these tumors are associated with abnormally high expression of galectin-7 (gal-7, which confers metastatic breast tumor cells with increased invasive behavior. Although previous studies in the rat model of breast tumorigenesis have shown that gal-7 is also increased in primary breast tumor, its contribution to the development of the primary breast tumors remains unclear. In the present work, we have used genetically-engineered gal-7-deficient mice to examine the role of gal-7 in the development of the mammary gland and of breast cancer. Using histological and immunohistological analysis of whole mammary glands at different stages of development, we detected no significant changes between normal and gal-7-deficient mice. To test the involvement of gal-7 in breast cancer, we next examined the effects of loss of gal-7 on mammary tumor development by crossing gal-7-deficient mice with the mammary tumor transgenic mouse strain FVB-Tg(MMTV-Erbb2NK1Mul/J. Finally, assessment of mice survival and tumor volume showed a delay of mammary tumor growth in the absence of systemic gal-7. These data suggest that gal-7 could potentiate the phenotype of HER-2 positive primary breast cancer.

  3. On complexity and homogeneity measures in predicting biological aggressiveness of prostate cancer; Implication of the cellular automata model of tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanase, Mihai; Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2015-12-01

    We propose a novel approach for the quantitative evaluation of aggressiveness in prostate carcinomas. The spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei was characterized by the global spatial fractal dimensions D0, D1, and D2. Two hundred eighteen prostate carcinomas were stratified into the classes of equivalence using results of ROC analysis. A simulation of the cellular automata mix defined a theoretical frame for a specific geometric representation of the cell nuclei distribution called a local structure correlation diagram (LSCD). The LSCD and dispersion Hd were computed for each carcinoma. Data mining generated some quantitative criteria describing tumor aggressiveness. Alterations in tumor architecture along progression were associated with some changes in both shape and the quantitative characteristics of the LSCD consistent with those in the automata mix model. Low-grade prostate carcinomas with low complexity and very low biological aggressiveness are defined by the condition D0 1.764 and Hd < 38. The novel homogeneity measure Hd identifies carcinomas with very low aggressiveness within the class of complexity C1 or carcinomas with very high aggressiveness in the class C7. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Oncogenic driver genes and the inflammatory microenvironment dictate liver tumor phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matter, Matthias S; Marquardt, Jens U; Andersen, Jesper B

    2016-01-01

    The majority of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) develops in the background of chronic liver inflammation caused by viral hepatitis and alcoholic or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. However, the impact of different types of chronic inflammatory microenvironments on the phenotypes of tumors generated...... with transcriptome profiles from human HCCs further demonstrated that AKT-CAT tumors generated in the context of chronic liver inflammation showed enrichment of poor prognosis gene sets or decrease of good prognosis gene sets. In contrast, DDC had a more subtle effect on AKT-NRAS(G12V) tumors and primarily enhanced...... by distinct oncogenes is largely unresolved. To address this issue, we generated murine liver tumors by constitutively active AKT-1 (AKT) and β-catenin (CAT) followed by induction of chronic liver inflammation by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 ). Also...

  5. Tumor phenotype and breast density in distinct categories of interval cancer: results of population-based mammography screening in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Laia; Salas, Dolores; Zubizarreta, Raquel; Baré, Marisa; Sarriugarte, Garbiñe; Barata, Teresa; Ibáñez, Josefa; Blanch, Jordi; Puig-Vives, Montserrat; Fernández, Ana; Castells, Xavier; Sala, Maria

    2014-01-10

    Interval cancers are tumors arising after a negative screening episode and before the next screening invitation. They can be classified into true interval cancers, false-negatives, minimal-sign cancers, and occult tumors based on mammographic findings in screening and diagnostic mammograms. This study aimed to describe tumor-related characteristics and the association of breast density and tumor phenotype within four interval cancer categories. We included 2,245 invasive tumors (1,297 screening-detected and 948 interval cancers) diagnosed from 2000 to 2009 among 645,764 women aged 45 to 69 who underwent biennial screening in Spain. Interval cancers were classified by a semi-informed retrospective review into true interval cancers (n = 455), false-negatives (n = 224), minimal-sign (n = 166), and occult tumors (n = 103). Breast density was evaluated using Boyd's scale and was conflated into: 75%. Tumor-related information was obtained from cancer registries and clinical records. Tumor phenotype was defined as follows: luminal A: ER+/HER2- or PR+/HER2-; luminal B: ER+/HER2+ or PR+/HER2+; HER2: ER-/PR-/HER2+; triple-negative: ER-/PR-/HER2-. The association of tumor phenotype and breast density was assessed using a multinomial logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. All statistical tests were two-sided. Forty-eight percent of interval cancers were true interval cancers and 23.6% false-negatives. True interval cancers were associated with HER2 and triple-negative phenotypes (OR = 1.91 (95% CI:1.22-2.96), OR = 2.07 (95% CI:1.42-3.01), respectively) and extremely dense breasts (>75%) (OR = 1.67 (95% CI:1.08-2.56)). However, among true interval cancers a higher proportion of triple-negative tumors was observed in predominantly fatty breasts (breasts (28.7%, 21.4%, 11.3% and 14.3%, respectively; cancers, extreme breast density being strongly associated with occult tumors (OR

  6. Estimation of salivary tumor necrosis factor-alpha in chronic and aggressive periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Sheeja S; Thomas, Hima; Jayakumar, N D; Sankari, M; Lakshmanan, Reema

    2015-09-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic bacterial infection characterized by persistent inflammation, connective tissue breakdown and alveolar bone destruction mediated by pro-inflammatory mediators. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is an important pro-inflammatory mediator that produced causes destruction of periodontal tissues. The aim of the study is to estimate the salivary TNF-α in chronic and aggressive periodontitis and control participants and further correlate the levels with clinical parameter such as gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment loss. The study population consisted of 75 subjects age ranging from 25 to 55 years attending the outpatient section of Department of Periodontics, Saveetha Dental College and Hospital. The study groups included Groups 1, 2, and 3 with participants with healthy periodontium (n = 25), generalized chronic periodontitis (n = 25) and generalized aggressive periodontitis (n = 25), respectively. Salivary samples from the participants were used to assess the TNF-α levels using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GI and PI were found to be significantly higher in chronic and aggressive periodontitis compared to the controls. The mean TNF-α value in chronic periodontitis patients (12.92 ± 17.21 pg/ml) was significantly higher than in control subjects (2.15 ± 3.60 pg/ml). Whereas, in aggressive periodontitis patients the mean TNF-α (7.23 ± 7.67) were not significantly different from chronic periodontitis or healthy subjects. Among periodontitis participants, aggressive periodontitis subjects exhibited a significant positive correlation between the salivary TNF-α and PPD. Salivary TNF-α levels are significantly higher in chronic periodontitis than in healthy subjects, but there was no significant correlation with the clinical parameters.

  7. SU-E-J-248: Contributions of Tumor and Stroma Phenotyping in Computer-Aided Diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H; Lan, L; Sennett, C; Giger, M [Univ Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To gain insight into the role of parenchyma stroma in the characterization of breast tumors by incorporating computerized mammographic parenchyma assessment into breast CADx in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions. Methods: This study was performed on 182 biopsy-proven breast mass lesions, including 76 benign and 106 malignant lesions. For each full-field digital mammogram (FFDM) case, our quantitative imaging analysis was performed on both the tumor and a region-of-interest (ROI) from the normal contralateral breast. The lesion characterization includes automatic lesion segmentation and feature extraction. Radiographic texture analysis (RTA) was applied on the normal ROIs to assess the mammographic parenchymal patterns of these contralateral normal breasts. Classification performance of both individual computer extracted features and the output from a Bayesian artificial neural network (BANN) were evaluated with a leave-one-lesion-out method using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis with area under the curve (AUC) as the figure of merit. Results: Lesion characterization included computer-extracted phenotypes of spiculation, size, shape, and margin. For parenchymal pattern characterization, five texture features were selected, including power law beta, contrast, and edge gradient. Merging of these computer-selected features using BANN classifiers yielded AUC values of 0.79 (SE=0.03) and 0.67 (SE=0.04) in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions using only tumor phenotypes and texture features from the contralateral breasts, respectively. Incorporation of tumor phenotypes with parenchyma texture features into the BANN yielded improved classification performance with an AUC value of 0.83 (SE=0.03) in the task of differentiating malignant from benign lesions. Conclusion: Combining computerized tumor and parenchyma phenotyping was found to significantly improve breast cancer diagnostic accuracy

  8. Boswellia sacra essential oil induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and suppresses tumor aggressiveness in cultured human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Gum resins obtained from trees of the Burseraceae family (Boswellia sp.) are important ingredients in incense and perfumes. Extracts prepared from Boswellia sp. gum resins have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects. Essential oil prepared by distillation of the gum resin traditionally used for aromatic therapy has also been shown to have tumor cell-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for preparing Boswellea sacra essential oil with the highest biological activity in inducing tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity and suppressing aggressive tumor phenotypes in human breast cancer cells. Methods Boswellia sacra essential oil was prepared from Omani Hougari grade resins through hydrodistillation at 78 or 100 oC for 12 hours. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Boswellia sacra essential oil-mediated cell viability and death were studied in established human breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, MDA-MB-231) and an immortalized normal human breast cell line (MCF10-2A). Apoptosis was assayed by genomic DNA fragmentation. Anti-invasive and anti-multicellular tumor properties were evaluated by cellular network and spheroid formation models, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to study Boswellia sacra essential oil-regulated proteins involved in apoptosis, signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. Results More abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, were present in Boswellia sacra essential oil prepared at 100 oC hydrodistillation. All three human breast cancer cell lines were sensitive to essential oil treatment with reduced cell viability and elevated cell death, whereas the immortalized normal human breast cell line was more resistant to essential oil treatment. Boswellia sacra

  9. Melanoma cells revive an embryonic transcriptional network to dictate phenotypic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, Niels; Berx, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Compared to the overwhelming amount of literature describing how epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-inducing transcription factors orchestrate cellular plasticity in embryogenesis and epithelial cells, the functions of these factors in non-epithelial contexts, such as melanoma, are less clear. Melanoma is an aggressive tumor arising from melanocytes, endowed with unique features of cellular plasticity. The reversible phenotype-switching between differentiated and invasive phenotypes is increasingly appreciated as a mechanism accounting for heterogeneity in melanoma and is driven by oncogenic signaling and environmental cues. This phenotypic switch is coupled with an intriguing and somewhat counterintuitive signaling switch of EMT-inducing transcription factors. In contrast to carcinomas, different EMT-inducing transcription factors have antagonizing effects in melanoma. Balancing between these different EMT transcription factors is likely the key to successful metastatic spread of melanoma.

  10. Glioma Cells in the Tumor Periphery Have a Stem Cell Phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe, Sune; Petterson, Stine Asferg; Dahlrot, Rikke Hedegaard

    2016-01-01

    and a panel of markers was used. The panel comprised of six stem cell-related markers (CD133, Musashi-1, Bmi-1, Sox-2, Nestin and Glut-3), a proliferation marker (Ki-67) as well as a chemo-resistance marker (MGMT). Computer-based automated classifiers were designed to measure the mIDH1 positive nucleus area......-fraction of the chosen markers. Moreover, orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts from five different patient-derived spheroid cultures were obtained and the tumor cells identified by human specific immunohistochemical markers. The results showed that tumor cells in the periphery of patient gliomas expressed stem cell...... in the periphery of patient gliomas have a stem cell phenotype, although it is less pronounced than in the tumor core. Novel therapies aiming at preventing recurrence should therefore take tumor stemness into account. Migrating cells in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts preserve expression and stem cell markers...

  11. Intra-adrenal murine TH-MYCN neuroblastoma tumors grow more aggressive and exhibit a distinct tumor microenvironment relative to their subcutaneous equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroesen, Michiel; Brok, Ingrid C; Reijnen, Daphne; van Hout-Kuijer, Maaike A; Zeelenberg, Ingrid S; Den Brok, Martijn H; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Adema, Gosse J

    2015-05-01

    In around half of the patients with neuroblastoma (NBL), the primary tumor is located in one of the adrenal glands. We have previously reported on a transplantable TH-MYCN model of subcutaneous (SC) growing NBL in C57Bl/6 mice for immunological studies. In this report, we describe an orthotopic TH-MYCN transplantable model where the tumor cells were injected intra-adrenally (IA) by microsurgery. Strikingly, 9464D cells grew out much faster in IA tumors compared to the subcutis. Tumors were infiltrated by equal numbers of lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Within the myeloid cell population, however, tumor-infiltrating macrophages were more abundant in IA tumors compared to SC tumors and expressed lower levels of MHC class II, indicative of a more immunosuppressive phenotype. Using 9464D cells stably expressing firefly luciferase, enhanced IA tumor growth could be confirmed using bioluminescence. Collectively, these data show that the orthotopic IA localization of TH-MYCN cells impacts the NBL tumor microenvironment, resulting in a more stringent NBL model to study novel immunotherapeutic approaches for NBL.

  12. Tumor phenotype and breast density in distinct categories of interval cancer: results of population-based mammography screening in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Interval cancers are tumors arising after a negative screening episode and before the next screening invitation. They can be classified into true interval cancers, false-negatives, minimal-sign cancers, and occult tumors based on mammographic findings in screening and diagnostic mammograms. This study aimed to describe tumor-related characteristics and the association of breast density and tumor phenotype within four interval cancer categories. Methods We included 2,245 invasive tumors (1,297 screening-detected and 948 interval cancers) diagnosed from 2000 to 2009 among 645,764 women aged 45 to 69 who underwent biennial screening in Spain. Interval cancers were classified by a semi-informed retrospective review into true interval cancers (n = 455), false-negatives (n = 224), minimal-sign (n = 166), and occult tumors (n = 103). Breast density was evaluated using Boyd’s scale and was conflated into: 75%. Tumor-related information was obtained from cancer registries and clinical records. Tumor phenotype was defined as follows: luminal A: ER+/HER2- or PR+/HER2-; luminal B: ER+/HER2+ or PR+/HER2+; HER2: ER-/PR-/HER2+; triple-negative: ER-/PR-/HER2-. The association of tumor phenotype and breast density was assessed using a multinomial logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Forty-eight percent of interval cancers were true interval cancers and 23.6% false-negatives. True interval cancers were associated with HER2 and triple-negative phenotypes (OR = 1.91 (95% CI:1.22-2.96), OR = 2.07 (95% CI:1.42-3.01), respectively) and extremely dense breasts (>75%) (OR = 1.67 (95% CI:1.08-2.56)). However, among true interval cancers a higher proportion of triple-negative tumors was observed in predominantly fatty breasts (breasts (28.7%, 21.4%, 11.3% and 14.3%, respectively; screening-detected cancers, extreme breast density

  13. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    prostatectomy samples, intraprostatic lipid as measured by MRSI and prostate tumor aggressiveness. 3) To quantify key metabolic intermediates involved in...lipid as measured by 1H MRSI, and prostate tumor aggressiveness; and 3) quantify the association between key metabolic intermediates involved in lipid

  14. Tumor aggressiveness and patient outcome in cancer of the pancreas assessed by dynamic 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelbaum, Ron; Frenkel, Alex; Haddad, Riad; Sikorski, Natalia; Strauss, Ludwig G; Israel, Ora; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the role of a quantitative dynamic PET model in pancreatic cancer as a potential index of tumor aggressiveness and predictor of survival. Seventy-one patients with (18)F-FDG-avid adenocarcinoma of the pancreas before treatment were recruited, including 27 with localized tumors (11 underwent pancreatectomy, and 16 had localized nonresectable tumors) and 44 with metastatic disease. Dynamic (18)F-FDG PET images were acquired over a 60-min period, followed by a whole-body PET/CT study. Quantitative data measurements were based on a 2-compartment model, and the following variables were calculated: VB (fractional blood volume in target area), K(1) and k(2) (kinetic membrane transport parameters), k(3) and k(4) (intracellular (18)F-FDG phosphorylation and dephosphorylation parameters, respectively), and (18)F-FDG INF (global (18)F-FDG influx). The single significant variable for overall survival (OS) in patients with localized disease was (18)F-FDG INF. Patients with a high (18)F-FDG INF (>0.033 min(-1)) had a median OS of 6 and 5 mo for nonresectable and resected tumors, respectively, versus 15 and 19 mo for a low (18)F-FDG INF in nonresectable and resected tumors, respectively (P measured by dynamic PET in newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer correlated with the aggressiveness of disease. The (18)F-FDG INF was the single most significant variable for OS in patients with localized disease, whether resectable or not.

  15. A Proteogenomic Approach to Understanding MYC Function in Metastatic Medulloblastoma Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome A. Staal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, and medulloblastoma is the most prevalent malignant childhood/pediatric brain tumor. Providing effective treatment for these cancers, with minimal damage to the still-developing brain, remains one of the greatest challenges faced by clinicians. Understanding the diverse events driving tumor formation, maintenance, progression, and recurrence is necessary for identifying novel targeted therapeutics and improving survival of patients with this disease. Genomic copy number alteration data, together with clinical studies, identifies c-MYC amplification as an important risk factor associated with the most aggressive forms of medulloblastoma with marked metastatic potential. Yet despite this, very little is known regarding the impact of such genomic abnormalities upon the functional biology of the tumor cell. We discuss here how recent advances in quantitative proteomic techniques are now providing new insights into the functional biology of these aggressive tumors, as illustrated by the use of proteomics to bridge the gap between the genotype and phenotype in the case of c-MYC-amplified/associated medulloblastoma. These integrated proteogenomic approaches now provide a new platform for understanding cancer biology by providing a functional context to frame genomic abnormalities.

  16. High CD49f expression is associated with osteosarcoma tumor progression: a study using patient-derived primary cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfornis, Patrice; Cai, David Z; Harris, Michael R; Walker, Ryan; Licini, David; Fernandes, Joseph D A; Orr, Griffin; Koganti, Tejaswi; Hicks, Chindo; Induru, Spandana; Meyer, Mark S; Khokha, Rama; Barr, Jennifer; Pochampally, Radhika R

    2014-08-01

    Overall prognosis for osteosarcoma (OS) is poor despite aggressive treatment options. Limited access to primary tumors, technical challenges in processing OS tissues, and the lack of well-characterized primary cell cultures has hindered our ability to fully understand the properties of OS tumor initiation and progression. In this study, we have isolated and characterized cell cultures derived from four central high-grade human OS samples. Furthermore, we used the cell cultures to study the role of CD49f in OS progression. Recent studies have implicated CD49f in stemness and multipotency of both cancer stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells. Therefore, we investigated the role of CD49f in osteosarcomagenesis. First, single cell suspensions of tumor biopsies were subcultured and characterized for cell surface marker expression. Next, we characterized the growth and differentiation properties, sensitivity to chemotherapy drugs, and anchorage-independent growth. Xenograft assays showed that cell populations expressing CD49f(hi) /CD90(lo) cell phenotype produced an aggressive tumor. Multiple lines of evidence demonstrated that inhibiting CD49f decreased the tumor-forming ability. Furthermore, the CD49f(hi) /CD90(lo) cell population is generating more aggressive OS tumor growth and indicating this cell surface marker could be a potential candidate for the isolation of an aggressive cell type in OSs. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Phenotype switching : tumor cell plasticity as a resistance mechanism and target for therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, K.; de Goeje, P.L.; Peeper, D.S.; van Amerongen, R.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in BRAF are present in the majority of patients with melanoma, rendering these tumors sensitive to targeted therapy with BRAF and MEK inhibitors. Unfortunately, resistance almost invariably develops. Recently, a phenomenon called "phenotype switching" has been identified as an escape

  18. Techniques in the management of juxta-articular aggressive and recurrent giant cell tumors around the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyadhara, S; Rao, S K

    2007-03-01

    Juxta-articular aggressive and recurrent giant cell tumors around the knee pose difficulties in management. This article reviews current problems and options in the management of these giant cell tumors. A systematic search was performed on juxta-articular aggressive and recurrent giant cell tumor. Additional information was retrieved from hand searching the literature and from relevant congress proceedings. We addressed the following issues: general consensus on early diagnosis and techniques in its management. In particular, we describe our results with resection arthrodesis performed combining the benefits of both interlocking intramedullary nail and Ilizarov fixator in the management of these tumors around the knee. Mean operative age of the 22 patients undergoing resection arthrodesis was 35.63 years. Seven lesions were in the tibia and fifteen in the femur. Mean length of the bone defect was 12.34 cm. The mean external fixator index was 7.44 days/cm and the distraction index was 7.88 days/cm. Mean period of follow-up for the patients was 64.5 months. The function of the affected limb was rated excellent in 10 and good and fair in six patients each as per Enneking criteria. No local recurrence of tumor was seen. Seven complications occurred in five patients. Two-ring construct, bifocal bone transport, and early definite plate osteosynthesis with additional bone grafting of the docking site at the end of distraction even before consolidation of the regenerate helps to reduce the problems of pin tract infections drastically. Thin-diameter long intramedullary nail in addition to preserving the endosteal blood supply also prevents mal-alignment of the regenerate. Thus resection arthrodesis using interlocking intramedullary nail and bone transport using Ilizarov fixator is cost effective and effective in achieving the desired goals of reconstruction with least complications in selected patients with specific indications.

  19. Induction of KIAA1199/CEMIP is associated with colon cancer phenotype and poor patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Stephen P; Myeroff, Lois L; Kariv, Revital; Platzer, Petra; Xin, Baozhong; Mikkola, Debra; Lawrence, Earl; Morris, Nathan; Nosrati, Arman; Willson, James K V; Willis, Joseph; Veigl, Martina; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Wang, Zhenghe; Markowitz, Sanford D

    2015-10-13

    Genes induced in colon cancer provide novel candidate biomarkers of tumor phenotype and aggressiveness. We originally identified KIAA1199 (now officially called CEMIP) as a transcript highly induced in colon cancer: initially designating the transcript as Colon Cancer Secreted Protein 1. We molecularly characterized CEMIP expression both at the mRNA and protein level and found it is a secreted protein induced an average of 54-fold in colon cancer. Knockout of CEMIPreduced the ability of human colon cancer cells to form xenograft tumors in athymic mice. Tumors that did grow had increased deposition of hyaluronan, linking CEMIP participation in hyaluronan degradation to the modulation of tumor phenotype. We find CEMIP mRNA overexpression correlates with poorer patient survival. In stage III only (n = 31) or in combined stage II plus stage III colon cancer cases (n = 73), 5-year overall survival was significantly better (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0003, respectively) among patients with low CEMIP expressing tumors than those with high CEMIP expressing tumors. These results demonstrate that CEMIP directly facilitates colon tumor growth, and high CEMIP expression correlates with poor outcome in stage III and in stages II+III combined cohorts. We present CEMIP as a candidate prognostic marker for colon cancer and a potential therapeutic target.

  20. Giant cell tumor of the bone: aggressive case initially treated with denosumab and intralesional surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Borstel, Donald; Strle, Nicholas A. [Oklahoma State University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Tulsa, OK (United States); Taguibao, Roberto A. [University of California, Irvine, UCI Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Orange, CA (United States); Burns, Joseph E. [University of California, Irvine, UCI Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) is a locally aggressive benign tumor, which has historically been treated with wide surgical excision. We report a case of a 29-year-old male with histology-proven GCTB of the distal ulna. The initial imaging study was a contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the left wrist, which was from an outside facility performed before presenting to our institution. On the initial MRI, the lesion had homogenous T2-hyperintense and T1-hypointense signal with expansive remodeling of the osseous contour. A radiographic study performed upon presentation to our institution 1 month later showed progression of the lesion with atypical imaging characteristics. After confirming the diagnosis, denosumab therapy was implemented allowing for reconstitution of bone and intralesional treatment. The patient was treated with five doses of denosumab over the duration of 7 weeks. Therapeutic changes of the GCTB were evaluated by radiography and a post-treatment MRI. This MRI was interpreted as suspicious for worsening disease due to the imaging appearance of intralesional signal heterogeneity, increased perilesional fluid-like signal, and circumferential cortical irregularity. However, on subsequent intralesional curettage and bone autografting 6 weeks later, no giant cells were seen on the specimen. Thus, the appearance on the MRI, rather than representing a manifestation of lesion aggressiveness or a non-responding tumor, conversely represented the imaging appearance of a positive response to denosumab therapy. On follow-up evaluation, 5 months after intralesional treatment, the patient had recurrent disease and is now scheduled for wide-excision with joint prosthesis. (orig.)

  1. Towards a transcriptome-based theranostic platform for unfavorable breast cancer phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobroff, Andrey S; D'Angelo, Sara; Eckhardt, Bedrich L; Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Nunes, Diana N; Kim, Kisu; Driessen, Wouter H P; Hajitou, Amin; Lomo, Lesley C; Barry, Marc; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Sahin, Aysegul; Woodward, Wendy A; Prossnitz, Eric R; Anderson, Robin L; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Brown-Glaberman, Ursa A; Royce, Melanie E; Ueno, Naoto T; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Marchiò, Serena; Gelovani, Juri G; Sidman, Richard L; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2016-10-24

    Inflammatory breast carcinoma (IBC) is one of the most lethal forms of human breast cancer, and effective treatment for IBC is an unmet clinical need in contemporary oncology. Tumor-targeted theranostic approaches are emerging in precision medicine, but only a few specific biomarkers are available. Here we report up-regulation of the 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) in two independent discovery and validation sets of specimens derived from IBC patients, suggesting translational promise for clinical applications. We show that a GRP78-binding motif displayed on either bacteriophage or adeno-associated virus/phage (AAVP) particles or loop-grafted onto a human antibody fragment specifically targets orthotopic IBC and other aggressive breast cancer models in vivo. To evaluate the theranostic value, we used GRP78-targeting AAVP particles to deliver the human Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase type-1 (HSVtk) transgene, obtaining simultaneous in vivo diagnosis through PET imaging and tumor treatment by selective activation of the prodrug ganciclovir at tumor sites. Translation of this AAVP system is expected simultaneously to image, monitor, and treat the IBC phenotype and possibly other aggressive (e.g., invasive and/or metastatic) subtypes of breast cancer, based on the inducible cell-surface expression of the stress-response chaperone GRP78, and possibily other cell-surface receptors in human tumors.

  2. Succinate Dehydrogenase B Subunit Immunohistochemical Expression Predicts Aggressiveness in Well Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Ileum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milione, Massimo [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan I-20133 (Italy); Pusceddu, Sara [Department of Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan I-20133 (Italy); Gasparini, Patrizia [Molecular Cytogenetics Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan I-20133 (Italy); Melotti, Flavia [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan I-20133 (Italy); Maisonneuve, Patrick [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan 20141 (Italy); Mazzaferro, Vincenzo [Division of Gastrointestinal Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan I-20133 (Italy); Braud, Filippo G. de [Department of Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan I-20133 (Italy); Pelosi, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.pelosi@unimi.it [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan I-20133 (Italy); Department of Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry, Università degli Studi, Facoltà di Medicina, Milan 20122 (Italy)

    2012-08-16

    Immunohistochemical loss of the succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) has recently been reported as a surrogate biomarker of malignancy in sporadic and familial pheocromocytomas and paragangliomas through the activation of hypoxia pathways. However, data on the prevalence and the clinical implications of SDHB immunoreactivity in ileal neuroendocrine tumors are still lacking. Thirty-one consecutive, advanced primary midgut neuroendocrine tumors and related lymph node or liver metastases from 24 males and seven females were immunohistochemically assessed for SDHB. All patients were G1 tumors (Ki-67 labeling index ≤2%). SDHB immunohistochemistry results were expressed as immunostaining intensity and scored as low or strong according to the internal control represented by normal intestinal cells. Strong positivity for SDHB, with granular cytoplasmatic reactivity, was found in 77% of primary tumors (T), whilst low SDHB expression was detected in 90% of metastases (M). The combined analysis (T+M) confirmed the loss of SDHB expression in 82% of metastases compared to 18% of primary tumors. SDHB expression was inversely correlated with Ki-67 labeling index, which accounted for 1.54% in metastastic sites and 0.7% in primary tumors. A correlation between SDHB expression loss, increased Ki-67 labeling index and biological aggressiveness was shown in advanced midgut neuroendocrine tumors, suggesting a role of tumor suppressor gene.

  3. Succinate Dehydrogenase B Subunit Immunohistochemical Expression Predicts Aggressiveness in Well Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Ileum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milione, Massimo; Pusceddu, Sara; Gasparini, Patrizia; Melotti, Flavia; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Braud, Filippo G. de; Pelosi, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Immunohistochemical loss of the succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) has recently been reported as a surrogate biomarker of malignancy in sporadic and familial pheocromocytomas and paragangliomas through the activation of hypoxia pathways. However, data on the prevalence and the clinical implications of SDHB immunoreactivity in ileal neuroendocrine tumors are still lacking. Thirty-one consecutive, advanced primary midgut neuroendocrine tumors and related lymph node or liver metastases from 24 males and seven females were immunohistochemically assessed for SDHB. All patients were G1 tumors (Ki-67 labeling index ≤2%). SDHB immunohistochemistry results were expressed as immunostaining intensity and scored as low or strong according to the internal control represented by normal intestinal cells. Strong positivity for SDHB, with granular cytoplasmatic reactivity, was found in 77% of primary tumors (T), whilst low SDHB expression was detected in 90% of metastases (M). The combined analysis (T+M) confirmed the loss of SDHB expression in 82% of metastases compared to 18% of primary tumors. SDHB expression was inversely correlated with Ki-67 labeling index, which accounted for 1.54% in metastastic sites and 0.7% in primary tumors. A correlation between SDHB expression loss, increased Ki-67 labeling index and biological aggressiveness was shown in advanced midgut neuroendocrine tumors, suggesting a role of tumor suppressor gene

  4. Cutaneous double-hit B-cell lymphoma: an aggressive form of B-cell lymphoma with a propensity for cutaneous dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, Cynthia M; Wang, Xuan; Subramaniyam, Shivakumar; Darras, Natasha; Mathew, Susan

    2014-04-01

    Diffuse large cell B-cell lymphoma of the skin is most commonly represented by diffuse large cell variants of primary cutaneous follicle center cell lymphoma and the leg-type lymphoma. In a minority of cases, the infiltrates are an expression of stage 4 disease of established extracutaneous B-cell lymphoma. We describe 3 patients with an aggressive form of B-cell lymphoma secondarily involving the skin. Two of the patients were in the ninth decade of life, whereas 1 patient was 34 years of age. In the elderly patients, there was an antecedent and/or concurrent history of follicular lymphoma, whereas in the younger patient, the tumor was a de novo presentation of this aggressive form of lymphoma. The elderly patients succumbed to their disease within less than a year from the time of diagnosis, whereas 1 patient is alive but with persistent and progressive disease despite chemotherapeutic intervention. The infiltrates in all 3 cases were diffuse and composed of large malignant hematopoietic cells that exhibited a round nucleus with a finely dispersed chromatin. Phenotypically, the tumor cells were Bcl-2 and CD10 positive, whereas Bcl-6 and Mum-1 showed variable positivity. One case showed combined Mum-1 positivity along with an acute lymphoblastic lymphoma phenotype, including the absence of CD20 expression. In each case, there was a c-MYC and BCL2/IGH rearrangement diagnostic of double-hit lymphoma. In one case, there was an additional BCL6 rearrangement, defining what is in essence triple-hit lymphoma. In conclusion, double-hit lymphoma is an aggressive form of B-cell neoplasia resistant to standard chemotherapy regimens, which in many but not all cases represents tumor progression in the setting of a lower grade B-cell malignancy.

  5. Glycolytic activity in breast cancer using 18F-FDG PET/CT as prognostic predictor: A molecular phenotype approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Vicente, A M; Soriano Castrejón, A; Amo-Salas, M; Lopez Fidalgo, J F; Muñoz Sanchez, M M; Alvarez Cabellos, R; Espinosa Aunion, R; Muñoz Madero, V

    2016-01-01

    To explore the relationship between basal (18)F-FDG uptake in breast tumors and survival in patients with breast cancer (BC) using a molecular phenotype approach. This prospective and multicentre study included 193 women diagnosed with BC. All patients underwent an (18)F-FDG PET/CT prior to treatment. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in tumor (T), lymph nodes (N), and the N/T index was obtained in all the cases. Metabolic stage was established. As regards biological prognostic parameters, tumors were classified into molecular sub-types and risk categories. Overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) were obtained. An analysis was performed on the relationship between semi-quantitative metabolic parameters with molecular phenotypes and risk categories. The effect of molecular sub-type and risk categories in prognosis was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier and univariate and multivariate tests. Statistical differences were found in both SUVT and SUVN, according to the molecular sub-types and risk classifications, with higher semi-quantitative values in more biologically aggressive tumors. No statistical differences were observed with respect to the N/T index. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that risk categories were significantly related to DFS and OS. In the multivariate analysis, metabolic stage and risk phenotype showed a significant association with DFS. High-risk phenotype category showed a worst prognosis with respect to the other categories with higher SUVmax in primary tumor and lymph nodes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  6. Loss of PDEF, a prostate-derived Ets factor is associated with aggressive phenotype of prostate cancer: Regulation of MMP 9 by PDEF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meacham Randall B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate-derived Ets factor (PDEF is expressed in tissues of high epithelial content including prostate, although its precise function has not been fully established. Conventional therapies produce a high rate of cure for patients with localized prostate cancer, but there is, at present, no effective treatment for intervention in metastatic prostate cancer. These facts underline the need to develop new approaches for early diagnosis of aggressive prostate cancer patients, and mechanism based anti-metastasis therapies that will improve the outlook for hormone-refractory prostate cancer. In this study we evaluated role of prostate-derived Ets factor (PDEF in prostate cancer. Results We observed decreased PDEF expression in prostate cancer cell lines correlated with increased aggressive phenotype, and complete loss of PDEF protein in metastatic prostate cancer cell lines. Loss of PDEF expression was confirmed in high Gleason Grade prostate cancer samples by immuno-histochemical methods. Reintroduction of PDEF profoundly affected cell behavior leading to less invasive phenotypes in three dimensional cultures. In addition, PDEF expressing cells had altered cell morphology, decreased FAK phosphorylation and decreased colony formation, cell migration, and cellular invasiveness. In contrast PDEF knockdown resulted in increased migration and invasion as well as clonogenic activity. Our results also demonstrated that PDEF downregulated MMP9 promoter activity, suppressed MMP9 mRNA expression, and resulted in loss of MMP9 activity in prostate cancer cells. These results suggested that loss of PDEF might be associated with increased MMP9 expression and activity in aggressive prostate cancer. To confirm results we investigated MMP9 expression in clinical samples of prostate cancer. Results of these studies show increased MMP9 expression correlated with advanced Gleason grade. Taken together our results demonstrate decreased PDEF expression

  7. Aggression and anxiety: social context and neurobiological links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga D Neumann

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Psychopathologies such as anxiety- and depression-related disorders are often characterized by impaired social behaviours including excessive aggression and violence. Excessive aggression and violence likely develop as a consequence of generally disturbed emotional regulation, such as abnormally high or low levels of anxiety. This suggests an overlap between brain circuitries and neurochemical systems regulating aggression and anxiety. In this review, we will discuss different forms of male aggression, rodent models of excessive aggression, and neurobiological mechanisms underlying male aggression in the context of anxiety. We will summarize our attempts to establish an animal model of high and abnormal aggression using rats selected for high (HAB versus low (LAB anxiety-related behaviour. Briefly, male LAB rats and, to a lesser extent, male HAB rats show high and abnormal forms of aggression compared with non-selected (NAB rats, making them a suitable animal model for studying excessive aggression in the context of extremes in innate anxiety. In addition, we will discuss differences in the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, brain arginine vasopressin, and the serotonin systems, among others, which contribute to the distinct behavioural phenotypes related to aggression and anxiety. Further investigation of the neurobiological systems in animals with distinct anxiety phenotypes might provide valuable information about the link between excessive aggression and disturbed emotional regulation, which is essential for understanding the social and emotional deficits that are characteristic of many human psychiatric disorders.

  8. Epigenetic up-regulation of ribosome biogenesis and more aggressive phenotype triggered by the lack of the histone demethylase JHDM1B in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbiati, Alice; Penzo, Marianna; Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Onofrillo, Carmine; Guerrieri, Ania Naila; Garagnani, Paolo; Franceschi, Claudio; Treré, Davide; Montanaro, Lorenzo

    2017-06-06

    The alterations of ribosome biogenesis and protein synthesis play a direct role in the development of tumors. The accessibility and transcription of ribosomal genes is controlled at several levels, with their epigenetic regulation being one of the most important. Here we explored the JmjC domain-containing histone demethylase 1B (JHDM1B) function in the epigenetic control of rDNA transcription. Since JHDM1B is a negative regulator of gene transcription, we focused on the effects induced by JHDM1B knock-down (KD). We studied the consequences of stable inducible JHDM1B silencing in cell lines derived from transformed and untransformed mammary epithelial cells. In these cellular models, prolonged JHDM1B downregulation triggered a surge of 45S pre-rRNA transcription and processing, associated with a re-modulation of the H3K36me2 levels at rDNA loci and with changes in DNA methylation of specific CpG sites in rDNA genes. We also found that after JHDM1B KD, cells showed a higher ribosome content: which were engaged in mRNA translation. JHDM1B KD and the consequent stimulation of ribosomes biogenesis conferred more aggressive features to the tested cellular models, which acquired a greater clonogenic, staminal and invasive potential. Taken together, these data indicate that the reduction of JHDM1B leads to a more aggressive cellular phenotype in mammary gland cells, by virtue of its negative regulatory activity on ribosome biogenesis.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging of Tumor Metabolic Markers for Cancer Diagnosis, Metabolic Phenotyping, and Characterization of Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhong He

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells display heterogeneous genetic characteristics, depending on the tumor dynamic microenvironment. Abnormal tumor vasculature and poor tissue oxygenation generate a fraction of hypoxic tumor cells that have selective advantages in metastasis and invasion and often resist chemo- and radiation therapies. The genetic alterations acquired by tumors modify their biochemical pathways, which results in abnormal tumor metabolism. An elevation in glycolysis known as the “Warburg effect” and changes in lipid synthesis and oxidation occur. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS has been used to study tumor metabolism in preclinical animal models and in clinical research on human breast, brain, and prostate cancers. This technique can identify specific genetic and metabolic changes that occur in malignant tumors. Therefore, the metabolic markers, detectable by MRS, not only provide information on biochemical changes but also define different metabolic tumor phenotypes. When combined with the contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, which has a high sensitivity for cancer diagnosis, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI improves the diagnostic specificity of malignant human cancers and is becoming an important clinical tool for cancer management and care. This article reviews the MRSI techniques as molecular imaging methods to detect and quantify metabolic changes in various tumor tissue types, especially in extracranial tumor tissues that contain high concentrations of fat. MRI/MRSI methods have been used to characterize tumor microenvironments in terms of blood volume and vessel permeability. Measurements of tissue oxygenation and glycolytic rates by MRS also are described to illustrate the capability of the MR technology in probing molecular information non-invasively in tumor tissues and its important potential for studying molecular mechanisms of human cancers in physiological conditions.

  10. Genetics of aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anholt, Robert R H; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2012-01-01

    Aggression mediates competition for food, mating partners, and habitats and, among social animals, establishes stable dominance hierarchies. In humans, abnormal aggression is a hallmark of neuropsychiatric disorders and can be elicited by environmental factors acting on an underlying genetic susceptibility. Identifying the genetic architecture that predisposes to aggressive behavior in people is challenging because of difficulties in quantifying the phenotype, genetic heterogeneity, and uncontrolled environmental conditions. Studies on mice have identified single-gene mutations that result in hyperaggression, contingent on genetic background. These studies can be complemented by systems genetics approaches in Drosophila melanogaster, in which mutational analyses together with genome-wide transcript analyses, artificial selection studies, and genome-wide analysis of epistasis have revealed that a large segment of the genome contributes to the manifestation of aggressive behavior with widespread epistatic interactions. Comparative genomic analyses based on the principle of evolutionary conservation are needed to enable a complete dissection of the neurogenetic underpinnings of this universal fitness trait.

  11. Overexpression of MDM2 protein in ameloblastomas as compared to adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

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    A Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent studies on odontogenic tumors have identified various molecular alterations responsible for their development, and determination of epithelial proliferation is a useful means of investigating the differences in biologic behavior of these tumors. One such specific marker to identify proliferative activity and tumor aggressiveness by immunohistochemistry (IHC is MDM2, 90-95kDa protein. Objective: This immunohistochemical study using MDM2 expression was undertaken to understand better the diverse biological activity of two groups of odontogenic tumors namely ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT based on their cell proliferation activity. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 cases, comprising of 36 ameloblastoma samples and 14 AOT samples, were subjected to heat-induced antigen retrieval method using citrate buffer in a pressure cooker. Consequently, the sections were stained with MDM2 monoclonal antibody and visualized using an LSAB+ kit. Results: In ameloblastomas, statistically significant association was seen between plexiform ameloblastomas, follicular ameloblastomas with granular cell changes, desmoplastic and unicystic variants. The predominant nuclear staining by MDM2 revealed overexpression in ameloblastomas as compared to AOT. Conclusion: The MDM2 overexpression noticed in plexiform ameloblastoma, follicular ameloblastoma with granular cell changes and acanthomatous ameloblastoma when compared to simple unicystic and desmoplastic ameloblastoma suggest a relatively enhanced proliferative phenotype of these solid multicystic variants of ameloblastomas. On overall comparison, higher expression was noted in ameloblastomas when compared to AOT. This indicates differences in the aggressive nature between these two groups of odontogenic tumors favoring the perception of a greater aggressive nature of ameloblastomas.

  12. Expression of EGFR Under Tumor Hypoxia: Identification of a Subpopulation of Tumor Cells Responsible for Aggressiveness and Treatment Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J., E-mail: i.hoogsteen@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Marres, Henri A.M.; Hoogen, Franciscus J.A. van den [Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head-Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rijken, Paul F.J.W.; Lok, Jasper; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and tumor hypoxia have been shown to correlate with worse outcome in several types of cancer including head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Little is known about the combination and possible interactions between the two phenomena. Methods and Materials: In this study, 45 cases of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were analyzed. All patients received intravenous infusions of the exogenous hypoxia marker pimonidazole prior to biopsy. Presence of EGFR, pimonidazole binding, and colocalization between EGFR and tumor hypoxia were examined using immunohistochemistry. Results: Of all biopsies examined, respectively, 91% and 60% demonstrated EGFR- and pimonidazole-positive areas. A weak but significant association was found between the hypoxic fractions of pimonidazole (HFpimo) and EGFR fractions (F-EGFR) and between F-EGFR and relative vascular area. Various degrees of colocalization between hypoxia and EGFR were found, increasing with distance from the vasculature. A high fraction of EGFR was correlated with better disease-free and metastasis-free survival, whereas a high degree of colocalization correlated with poor outcome. Conclusions: Colocalization of hypoxia and EGFR was demonstrated in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas, predominantly at longer distances from vessels. A large amount of colocalization was associated with poor outcome, which points to a survival advantage of hypoxic cells that are also able to express EGFR. This subpopulation of tumor cells might be indicative of tumor aggressiveness and be partly responsible for treatment resistance.

  13. Modeling the effects of space structure and combination therapies on phenotypic heterogeneity and drug resistance in solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorz, Alexander; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Clairambault, Jean; Escargueil, Alexandre; Perthame, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Histopathological evidence supports the idea that the emergence of phenotypic heterogeneity and resistance to cytotoxic drugs can be considered as a process of selection in tumor cell populations. In this framework, can we explain intra-tumor heterogeneity in terms of selection driven by the local cell environment? Can we overcome the emergence of resistance and favor the eradication of cancer cells by using combination therapies? Bearing these questions in mind, we develop a model describing cell dynamics inside a tumor spheroid under the effects of cytotoxic and cytostatic drugs. Cancer cells are assumed to be structured as a population by two real variables standing for space position and the expression level of a phenotype of resistance to cytotoxic drugs. The model takes explicitly into account the dynamics of resources and anticancer drugs as well as their interactions with the cell population under treatment. We analyze the effects of space structure and combination therapies on phenotypic heterogeneity and chemotherapeutic resistance. Furthermore, we study the efficacy of combined therapy protocols based on constant infusion and bang-bang delivery of cytotoxic and cytostatic drugs.

  14. Towards precision medicine-based therapies for glioblastoma: interrogating human disease genomics and mouse phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Gao, Zhen; Wang, Bingcheng; Xu, Rong

    2016-08-22

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain tumors. It has poor prognosis even with optimal radio- and chemo-therapies. Since GBM is highly heterogeneous, drugs that target on specific molecular profiles of individual tumors may achieve maximized efficacy. Currently, the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) projects have identified hundreds of GBM-associated genes. We develop a drug repositioning approach combining disease genomics and mouse phenotype data towards predicting targeted therapies for GBM. We first identified disease specific mouse phenotypes using the most recently discovered GBM genes. Then we systematically searched all FDA-approved drugs for candidates that share similar mouse phenotype profiles with GBM. We evaluated the ranks for approved and novel GBM drugs, and compared with an existing approach, which also use the mouse phenotype data but not the disease genomics data. We achieved significantly higher ranks for the approved and novel GBM drugs than the earlier approach. For all positive examples of GBM drugs, we achieved a median rank of 9.2 45.6 of the top predictions have been demonstrated effective in inhibiting the growth of human GBM cells. We developed a computational drug repositioning approach based on both genomic and phenotypic data. Our approach prioritized existing GBM drugs and outperformed a recent approach. Overall, our approach shows potential in discovering new targeted therapies for GBM.

  15. Chronic inhibition of tumor cell-derived VEGF enhances the malignant phenotype of colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, Naoko; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Nishida, Kensei; Kuwano, Yuki; Dang, Duyen T; Dang, Long H; Nikawa, Takeshi; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-a (VEGF)-targeted therapies have become an important treatment for a number of human malignancies. The VEGF inhibitors are actually effective in several types of cancers, however, the benefits are transiently, and the vast majority of patients who initially respond to the therapies will develop resistance. One of possible mechanisms for the acquired resistance may be the direct effect(s) of VEGF inhibitors on tumor cells expressing VEGF receptors (VEGFR). Thus, we investigated here the direct effect of chronic VEGF inhibition on phenotype changes in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. To chronically inhibit cancer cell-derived VEGF, human CRC cell lines (HCT116 and RKO) were chronically exposed (2 months) to an anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody (mAb) or were disrupted the Vegf gene (VEGF-KO). Effects of VEGF family members were blocked by treatment with a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (VEGFR-TKI). Hypoxia-induced apoptosis under VEGF inhibited conditions was measured by TUNEL assay. Spheroid formation ability was assessed using a 3-D spheroid cell culture system. Chronic inhibition of secreted/extracellular VEGF by an anti-VEGF mAb redundantly increased VEGF family member (PlGF, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2), induced a resistance to hypoxia-induced apoptosis, and increased spheroid formation ability. This apoptotic resistance was partially abrogated by a VEGFR-TKI, which blocked the compensate pathway consisted of VEGF family members, or by knockdown of Vegf mRNA, which inhibited intracellular function(s) of all Vegf gene products. Interestingly, chronic and complete depletion of all Vegf gene products by Vegf gene knockout further augmented these phenotypes in the compensate pathway-independent manner. These accelerated phenotypes were significantly suppressed by knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α that was up-regulated in the VEGF-KO cell lines. Our findings suggest that chronic inhibition of tumor cell-derived VEGF

  16. Aggressive tumor growth and clinical evolution in a patient with X-linked acro-gigantism syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Naves, Luciana A.; Daly, Adrian Francis; Dias, Luiz Augusto; Yuan, Bo; Zakir, Juliano Coelho Oliveira; Barra, Gustavo Barcellos; Palmeira, Leonor; Villa, Chiara; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Junior, Armindo Jreige; Neto, Florencio Figueiredo Cavalcante; Liu, Pengfei; Pellegata, Natalia S.; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Lupski, James R.

    2016-01-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly described disease caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 leading to copy number gain of GPR101. We describe the clinical progress of a sporadic male X-LAG syndrome patient with an Xq26.3 microduplication, highlighting the aggressive natural history of pituitary tumor growth in the absence of treatment. The patient first presented elsewhere aged 5 years 8 months with a history of excessive growth for >2 years. His height was 163 cm,...

  17. 11C-acetate for positron emission tomography imaging of clinical stage IA lung adenocarcinoma. Comparison with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose for imaging and evaluation of tumor aggressiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Hidekatsu; Nomori, Hiroaki; Uno, Kimiichi

    2009-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of positron emission tomography (PET) with 11 C-acetate (AC) for imaging lung adenocarcinoma and evaluating its tumor aggressiveness, AC- and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET were compared. One hundred and sixty-nine adenocarcinomas with clinical stage IA and 53 benign nodules were examined by both AC- and FDG-PET before surgery. The sensitivity and specificity for discriminating benign/adenocarcinoma were compared between AC- and FDG-PET. The AC and FDG uptakes were examined to determine the relationship with tumor aggressiveness, id est (i.e.), pathological tumor stage, lymphatic, vascular, or pleural involvement, and proliferative activity determined by Ki-67 staining score. While the sensitivity of AC-PET was significantly higher than FDG-PET for bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) and well-differentiated (W/D) adenocarcinoma (p<0.001 and 0.006, respectively), there was no significant difference for moderately or poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. The specificity was not different between them. While FDG uptakes were significantly higher in tumors with pathological advanced stages or those with lymphatic, vascular and/or pleural involvements than in tumors with pathological stage IA or those without these tumor involvements (p=0.04 to p<0.001), AC uptake did not show significant differences between the respective sub-groups except according to the tumor stage. While both AC and FDG uptakes showed a significant correlation with Ki-67 staining scores (p=0.03 and p<0.001, respectively), the correlation coefficient of former was lower than that of latter (p=0.07). While AC-PET can image BAC and W/D adenocarcinoma with a higher sensitivity than FDG-PET, it cannot evaluate tumor aggressiveness of clinical stage IA lung adenocarcinoma as well as FDG-PET. (author)

  18. Adoptively transferred human lung tumor specific cytotoxic T cells can control autologous tumor growth and shape tumor phenotype in a SCID mouse xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrone Soldano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-tumor efficacy of human immune effector cells, such as cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs, has been difficult to study in lung cancer patients in the clinical setting. Improved experimental models for the study of lung tumor-immune cell interaction as well as for evaluating the efficacy of adoptive transfer of immune effector cells are needed. Methods To address questions related to the in vivo interaction of human lung tumor cells and immune effector cells, we obtained an HLA class I + lung tumor cell line from a fresh surgical specimen, and using the infiltrating immune cells, isolated and characterized tumor antigen-specific, CD8+ CTLs. We then established a SCID mouse-human tumor xenograft model with the tumor cell line and used it to study the function of the autologous CTLs provided via adoptive transfer. Results The tumor antigen specific CTLs isolated from the tumor were found to have an activated memory phenotype and able to kill tumor cells in an antigen specific manner in vitro. Additionally, the tumor antigen-specific CTLs were fully capable of homing to and killing autologous tumors in vivo, and expressing IFN-γ, each in an antigen-dependent manner. A single injection of these CTLs was able to provide significant but temporary control of the growth of autologous tumors in vivo without the need for IL-2. The timing of injection of CTLs played an essential role in the outcome of tumor growth control. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of surviving tumor cells following CTL treatment indicated that the surviving tumor cells expressed reduced MHC class I antigens on their surface. Conclusion These studies confirm and extend previous studies and provide additional information regarding the characteristics of CTLs which can be found within a patient's tumor. Moreover, the in vivo model described here provides a unique window for observing events that may also occur in patients undergoing adoptive cellular

  19. Wilms tumors: genotypes and phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Segers (Heidi)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWilms tumor, or nephroblastoma, represents about 90% of all pediatric renal tumors and about 7% of all pediatric malignancies. Most Wilms tumors are unilateral, although in 5-10 % of the patients both kidneys are infected. Wilms tumor typically occurs between the age of 2 and 4 years,

  20. Macrophage phenotypic subtypes diametrically regulate epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Min; Ma, Bo; Shao, Hanshuang; Clark, Amanda M.; Wells, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic progression of breast cancer involves phenotypic plasticity of the carcinoma cells moving between epithelial and mesenchymal behaviors. During metastatic seeding and dormancy, even highly aggressive carcinoma cells take on an E-cadherin-positive epithelial phenotype that is absent from the emergent, lethal metastatic outgrowths. These phenotypes are linked to the metastatic microenvironment, though the specific cells and induction signals are still to be deciphered. Recent evidence suggests that macrophages impact tumor progression, and may alter the balance between cancer cell EMT and MErT in the metastatic microenvironment. Here we explore the role of M1/M2 macrophages in epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity of breast cancer cells by coculturing epithelial and mesenchymal cells lines with macrophages. We found that after polarizing the THP-1 human monocyte cell line, the M1 and M2-types were stable and maintained when co-cultured with breast cancer cells. Surprisingly, M2 macrophages may conferred a growth advantage to the epithelial MCF-7 cells, with these cells being driven to a partial mesenchymal phenotypic as indicated by spindle morphology. Notably, E-cadherin protein expression is significantly decreased in MCF-7 cells co-cultured with M2 macrophages. M0 and M1 macrophages had no effect on the MCF-7 epithelial phenotype. However, the M1 macrophages impacted the highly aggressive mesenchymal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells to take on a quiescent, epithelial phenotype with re-expression of E-cadherin. The M2 macrophages if anything exacerbated the mesenchymal phenotype of the MDA-MB-231 cells. Our findings demonstrate M2 macrophages might impart outgrowth and M1 macrophages may contribute to dormancy behaviors in metastatic breast cancer cells. Thus EMT and MErT are regulated by selected macrophage phenotype in the liver metastatic microenvironment. These results indicate macrophage could be a potential therapeutic target for limiting death due

  1. Tumor cell phenotype is sustained by selective MAPK oxidation in mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Galli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are major cellular sources of hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2, the production of which is modulated by oxygen availability and the mitochondrial energy state. An increase of steady-state cell H(2O(2 concentration is able to control the transition from proliferating to quiescent phenotypes and to signal the end of proliferation; in tumor cells thereby, low H(2O(2 due to defective mitochondrial metabolism can contribute to sustain proliferation. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs orchestrate signal transduction and recent data indicate that are present in mitochondria and regulated by the redox state. On these bases, we investigated the mechanistic connection of tumor mitochondrial dysfunction, H(2O(2 yield, and activation of MAPKs in LP07 murine tumor cells with confocal microscopy, in vivo imaging and directed mutagenesis. Two redox conditions were examined: low 1 microM H(2O(2 increased cell proliferation in ERK1/2-dependent manner whereas high 50 microM H(2O(2 arrested cell cycle by p38 and JNK1/2 activation. Regarding the experimental conditions as a three-compartment model (mitochondria, cytosol, and nuclei, the different responses depended on MAPKs preferential traffic to mitochondria, where a selective activation of either ERK1/2 or p38-JNK1/2 by co-localized upstream kinases (MAPKKs facilitated their further passage to nuclei. As assessed by mass spectra, MAPKs activation and efficient binding to cognate MAPKKs resulted from oxidation of conserved ERK1/2 or p38-JNK1/2 cysteine domains to sulfinic and sulfonic acids at a definite H(2O(2 level. Like this, high H(2O(2 or directed mutation of redox-sensitive ERK2 Cys(214 impeded binding to MEK1/2, caused ERK2 retention in mitochondria and restricted shuttle to nuclei. It is surmised that selective cysteine oxidations adjust the electrostatic forces that participate in a particular MAPK-MAPKK interaction. Considering that tumor mitochondria are dysfunctional, their inability to

  2. Macroscopic sessile tumor architecture is a pathologic feature of biologically aggressive upper tract urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsche, Hans-Martin; Novara, Giacomo; Burger, Maximilian; Gupta, Amit; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Kassouf, Wassim; Sircar, Kanishka; Zattoni, Filiberto; Walton, Tom; Tritschler, Stefan; Baba, Shiro; Bastian, Patrick J; Martínez-Salamanca, Juan I; Seitz, Christian; Otto, Wolfgang; Wieland, Wolf Ferdinand; Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Hartmann, Arndt; Shariat, Shahrokh F

    2012-09-01

    Macroscopic sessile tumor architecture was associated with adverse outcomes after radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) for upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). Before inclusion in daily clinical decision-making, the prognostic value of tumor architecture needs to be validated in an independent, external dataset. We tested whether macroscopic tumor architecture improves outcome prediction in an international cohort of patients. We retrospectively studied 754 patients treated with RNU for UTUC without neoadjuvant chemotherapy at 9 centers located in Asia, Canada, and Europe. Tumor architecture was macroscopically categorized as either papillary or sessile. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression analyses were used to address recurrence-free (RFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) estimates. Macroscopic sessile architecture was present in 20% of the patients. Its prevalence increased with advancing pathologic stage and it was significantly associated with established features of biologically aggressive UTUC, such as tumor grade, lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular invasion, and concomitant CIS (all P values architecture were 85% and 90%, compared with 58% and 66% for those with macroscopic sessile architecture, respectively (P values architecture was an independent predictor of both RFS (hazard ratio {HR}: 1.5; P = 0.036) and CSS (HR: 1.5; P = 0.03). We confirmed the independent prognostic value of macroscopic tumor architecture in a large, independent, multicenter UTUC cohort. It should be reported in every pathology report and included in post-RNU predictive models in order to refine current clinical decision making regarding follow-up protocol and adjuvant therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. HES1, a target of Notch signaling, is elevated in canine osteosarcoma, but reduced in the most aggressive tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Deanna D; Anfinsen, Kristin P; Pfaff, Liza E; Ehrhart, E J; Charles, J Brad; Bønsdorff, Tina B; Thamm, Douglas H; Powers, Barbara E; Jonasdottir, Thora J; Duval, Dawn L

    2013-07-01

    Hairy and enhancer of split 1 (HES1), a basic helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor, is a downstream target of Notch signaling. Notch signaling and HES1 expression have been linked to growth and survival in a variety of human cancer types and have been associated with increased metastasis and invasiveness in human osteosarcoma cell lines. Osteosarcoma (OSA) is an aggressive cancer demonstrating both high metastatic rate and chemotherapeutic resistance. The current study examined expression of Notch signaling mediators in primary canine OSA tumors and canine and human osteosarcoma cell lines to assess their role in OSA development and progression. Reverse transcriptase - quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was utilized to quantify HES1, HEY1, NOTCH1 and NOTCH2 gene expression in matched tumor and normal metaphyseal bone samples taken from dogs treated for appendicular OSA at the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Gene expression was also assessed in tumors from dogs with a disease free interval (DFI) of  300 days following treatment with surgical amputation followed by standard chemotherapy. Immunohistochemistry was performed to confirm expression of HES1. Data from RT-qPCR and immunohistochemical (IHC) experiments were analyzed using REST2009 software and survival analysis based on IHC expression employed the Kaplan-Meier method and log rank analysis. Unbiased clustered images were generated from gene array analysis data for Notch/HES1 associated genes. Gene array analysis of Notch/HES1 associated genes suggested alterations in the Notch signaling pathway may contribute to the development of canine OSA. HES1 mRNA expression was elevated in tumor samples relative to normal bone, but decreased in tumor samples from dogs with a DFI 300 days. NOTCH2 and HEY1 mRNA expression was also elevated in tumors relative to normal bone, but was not differentially expressed between the DFI tumor groups. Survival analysis confirmed an association between

  4. Transformation of a Silent Adrencorticotrophic Pituitary Tumor Into Central Nervous System Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon A. Miller MD, PhD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Silent adrenocorticotrophic pituitary adenomas are nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas that express adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH but do not cause the clinical or laboratory features of hypercortisolemia. Primary central nervous system (CNS melanoma is well documented, but rarely originates in the sellar region or pituitary gland. Here we report transformation of an aggressive silent adrenocorticotrophic pituitary adenoma that transformed into CNS melanoma and review other presentations of pituitary melanoma. A 37-year-old woman initially presented with apoplexy and an invasive nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenoma for which she underwent transphenoidal surgery. The patient underwent 3 subsequent surgeries as the tumor continued to progress. Pathology from the first 3 operations showed pituitary adenoma or carcinoma. Pathology from the final surgery showed melanoma and the magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of the tumor had changed to become consistent with CNS melanoma. Dermatologic and ophthalmologic examinations did not identify cutaneous or ocular melanoma. The patient’s disease progressed despite aggressive surgical, medical and radiologic treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating transformation of a primary pituitary tumor into melanoma. The mechanism of tumor transformation is unclear, but it is possible that a mutation in the original ACTH-producing tumor lead to increased cleavage of pro-opiomelanocortin or ACTH into α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, which in turn stimulated the expression of microopthalmia transcription factor, leading to melanocytic phenotype transformation.

  5. SU-D-207A-03: Potential Role of BOLD MRI in Discrimination of Aggressive Tumor Habitat in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, J; Lopez, C; Tschudi, Y; Breto, A; Padgett, K; Pollack, A; Stoyanova, R [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine whether blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) MRI signal measured in prostate cancer patients, in addition to quantitative diffusion and perfusion parameters from multiparametric (mp)MRI exams, can help discriminate aggressive and/or radioresistant lesions. Methods: Several ongoing clinical trials in our institution require mpMRI exam to determine eligibility (presence of identifiable tumor lesion on mpMRI) and prostate volumes for dose escalation. Upon consent, patients undergo fiducial markers placement and a T2*-weighted imaging at the time of CT sim to facilitate the fusion. In a retrospective analysis eleven clinical trial patients were identified who had undergone mpMRI on GE 3T magnet, followed by T2*-weighted imaging (time-period mean±SD = 48±20 days) using a consistent protocol (gradient echo, TR/TE=30/11.8ms, flip angle=12, matrix=256×256×75, voxel size=1.25×1.25×2.5mm). ROIs for prostate tumor lesions were automatically determined using ADC threshold ≤1200 µm2/s. Although the MR protocol was not intended for BOLD analysis, we utilized the T2*-weighted signal normalized to that in nearby muscle; likewise, T2-weighted lesion signal was normalized to muscle, following rigid registration of the T2 to T2* images. The ratio of these normalized signals, T2*/T2, is a measure of BOLD effect in the prostate tumors. Perfusion parameters (Ktrans, ve, kep) were also calculated. Results: T2*/T2 (mean±SE) was found to be substantially lower for Gleason score (GS) 8&9 (0.82±0.04) compared to GS 7 (1.08±0.07). A k-means cluster analysis of T2*/T2 versus kep = Ktrans/ve revealed two distinct clusters, one with higher T2*/T2 and lower kep, containing only GS 7 lesions, and another with lower T2*/T2 and higher kep, associated with tumor aggressiveness. This latter cluster contained all GS 8&9 lesions, as well as some GS 7. Conclusion: BOLD MRI, in addition to ADC and kep, may play a role (perhaps orthogonal to Gleason score) in

  6. Renal cell carcinoma primary cultures maintain genomic and phenotypic profile of parental tumor tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cifola, Ingrid; Magni, Fulvio; Signorini, Stefano; Battaglia, Cristina; Perego, Roberto A; Bianchi, Cristina; Mangano, Eleonora; Bombelli, Silvia; Frascati, Fabio; Fasoli, Ester; Ferrero, Stefano; Di Stefano, Vitalba; Zipeto, Maria A

    2011-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by recurrent copy number alterations (CNAs) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH), which may have potential diagnostic and prognostic applications. Here, we explored whether ccRCC primary cultures, established from surgical tumor specimens, maintain the DNA profile of parental tumor tissues allowing a more confident CNAs and LOH discrimination with respect to the original tissues. We established a collection of 9 phenotypically well-characterized ccRCC primary cell cultures. Using the Affymetrix SNP array technology, we performed the genome-wide copy number (CN) profiling of both cultures and corresponding tumor tissues. Global concordance for each culture/tissue pair was assayed evaluating the correlations between whole-genome CN profiles and SNP allelic calls. CN analysis was performed using the two CNAG v3.0 and Partek software, and comparing results returned by two different algorithms (Hidden Markov Model and Genomic Segmentation). A very good overlap between the CNAs of each culture and corresponding tissue was observed. The finding, reinforced by high whole-genome CN correlations and SNP call concordances, provided evidence that each culture was derived from its corresponding tissue and maintained the genomic alterations of parental tumor. In addition, primary culture DNA profile remained stable for at least 3 weeks, till to third passage. These cultures showed a greater cell homogeneity and enrichment in tumor component than original tissues, thus enabling a better discrimination of CNAs and LOH. Especially for hemizygous deletions, primary cultures presented more evident CN losses, typically accompanied by LOH; differently, in original tissues the intensity of these deletions was weaken by normal cell contamination and LOH calls were missed. ccRCC primary cultures are a reliable in vitro model, well-reproducing original tumor genetics and phenotype, potentially useful for future functional approaches

  7. Aggressive tumor growth and clinical evolution in a patient with X-linked acro-gigantism syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naves, Luciana A; Daly, Adrian F; Dias, Luiz Augusto; Yuan, Bo; Zakir, Juliano Coelho Oliveira; Barra, Gustavo Barcellos; Palmeira, Leonor; Villa, Chiara; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Júnior, Armindo Jreige; Neto, Florêncio Figueiredo Cavalcante; Liu, Pengfei; Pellegata, Natalia S; Stratakis, Constantine A; Lupski, James R; Beckers, Albert

    2016-02-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly described disease caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 leading to copy number gain of GPR101. We describe the clinical progress of a sporadic male X-LAG syndrome patient with an Xq26.3 microduplication, highlighting the aggressive natural history of pituitary tumor growth in the absence of treatment. The patient first presented elsewhere aged 5 years 8 months with a history of excessive growth for >2 years. His height was 163 cm, his weight was 36 kg, and he had markedly elevated GH and IGF-1. MRI showed a non-invasive sellar mass measuring 32.5 × 23.9 × 29.1 mm. Treatment was declined and the family was lost to follow-up. At the age of 10 years and 7 months, he presented again with headaches, seizures, and visual disturbance. His height had increased to 197 cm. MRI showed an invasive mass measuring 56.2 × 58.1 × 45.0 mm, with compression of optic chiasma, bilateral cavernous sinus invasion, and hydrocephalus. His thyrotrope, corticotrope, and gonadotrope axes were deficient. Surgery, somatostatin analogs, and cabergoline did not control vertical growth and pegvisomant was added, although vertical growth continues (currently 207 cm at 11 years 7 months of age). X-LAG syndrome is a new genomic disorder in which early-onset pituitary tumorigenesis can lead to marked overgrowth and gigantism. This case illustrates the aggressive nature of tumor evolution and the challenging clinical management in X-LAG syndrome.

  8. Contribution of an alveolar cell of origin to the aggressive phenotype of pregnancy-associated breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haricharan, Svasti; Hein, Sarah; Dong, Jie; Toneff, Michael; Aina, Olulana; Rao, Pulivarthi H.; Cardiff, Robert; Li, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancers (PABCs) are malignancies diagnosed during pregnancy or up to five years following parturition, and are usually aggressive, stroma-rich, and estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor-negative; but little is known about the cellular origin of PABCs or the mechanisms by which PABCs initiate. Using the RCAS retrovirus to deliver the ErbB2 oncogene into the mammary epithelium of our previous reported MMTV-tva transgenic mice, we detected human PABC-like tumors during pregnancy and lactation but not in involuted mice or in age-matched virgin mice. More importantly, by generating a WAP-tva transgenic line for expression of ErbB2 selectively in WAP+ mammary alveolar cells, we found that the resulting tumors exhibited the hallmarks of PABCs irrespective of the time since pregnancy and even in the absence of pregnancy. These data suggest that PABCs arise preferentially from an alveolar cell population that expands during pregnancy and lactation. This somatic mouse model may also be useful for preclinical testing of new prophylactic and therapeutic strategies against PABC. PMID:24317513

  9. Genetic and Epigenetic Tumor Suppressor Gene Silencing Are Distinct Molecular Phenotypes Driven by Growth Promoting Mutations in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen J. Marsit

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Both genetic and epigenetic alterations characterize human nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC, but the biological processes that create or select these alterations remain incompletely investigated. Our hypothesis posits that a roughly reciprocal relationship between the propensity for promoter hypermethylation and a propensity for genetic deletion leads to distinct molecular phenotypes of lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we examined promoter hypermethylation of 17 tumor suppressor genes, as a marker of epigenetic alteration propensity, and deletion events at the 3p21 region, as a marker of genetic alteration. To model the complex biology between these somatic alterations, we utilized an item response theory model. We demonstrated that tumors exhibiting LOH at greater than 30% of informative alleles in the 3p21 region have a significantly reduced propensity for hypermethylation. At the same time, tumors with activating KRAS mutations showed a significantly increased propensity for hypermethylation of the loci examined, a result similar to what has been observed in colon cancer. These data suggest that NSCLCs have distinct epigenetic or genetic alteration phenotypes acting upon tumor suppressor genes and that mutation of oncogenic growth promoting genes, such as KRAS, is associated with the epigenetic phenotype.

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of prostate health index to identify aggressive prostate cancer. An Institutional validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morote, J; Celma, A; Planas, J; Placer, J; Ferrer, R; de Torres, I; Pacciuci, R; Olivan, M

    2016-01-01

    New generations of tumor markers used to detect prostate cancer (PCa) should be able to discriminate men with aggressive PCa of those without PCa or nonaggressive tumors. The objective of this study has been to validate Prostate Health Index (PHI) as a marker of aggressive PCa in one academic institution. PHI was assessed in 357 men scheduled to prostatic biopsy between June of 2013 and July 2014 in one academic institution. Thereafter a subset of 183 men younger than 75 years and total PSA (tPSA) between 3.0 and 10.0 ng/mL, scheduled to it first prostatic biopsy, was retrospectively selected for this study. Twelve cores TRUS guided biopsy, under local anaesthesia, was performed in all cases. Total PSA, free PSA (fPSA), and [-2] proPSA (p2PSA) and prostate volume were determined before the procedure and %fPSA, PSA density (PSAd) and PHI were calculated. Aggressive tumors were considered if any Gleason 4 pattern was found. PHI was compared to %fPSA and PSAd through their ROC curves. Thresholds to detect 90%, 95% of all tumors and 95% and 100% of aggressive tumors were estimated and rates of unnecessary avoided biopsies were calculated and compared. The rate of PCa detection was 37.2% (68) and the rate of aggressive tumors was 24.6% (45). The PHI area under the curve was higher than those of %fPSA and PSAd to detect any PCa (0.749 vs 0.606 and 0.668 respectively) or to detect only aggressive tumors (0.786 vs 0.677 and 0.708 respectively), however, significant differences were not found. The avoided biopsy rates to detect 95% of aggressive tumors were 20.2% for PHI, 14.8% for %fPSA, and 23.5% for PSAd. Even more, to detect all aggressive tumors these rates dropped to 4.9% for PHI, 9.3% for %fPSA, and 7.9% for PSAd. PHI seems a good marker to PCa diagnosis. However, PHI was not superior to %fPSA and PSAd to identify at least 95% of aggressive tumors. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. MMP1, MMP9, and COX2 Expressions in Promonocytes Are Induced by Breast Cancer Cells and Correlate with Collagen Degradation, Transformation-Like Morphological Changes in MCF-10A Acini, and Tumor Aggressiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Chimal-Ramírez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated immune cells often lack immune effector activities, and instead they present protumoral functions. To understand how tumors promote this immunological switch, invasive and noninvasive breast cancer cell (BRC lines were cocultured with a promonocytic cell line in a Matrigel-based 3D system. We hypothesized that if communication exists between tumor and immune cells, coculturing would result in augmented expression of genes associated with tumor malignancy. Upregulation of proteases MMP1 and MMP9 and inflammatory COX2 genes was found likely in response to soluble factors. Interestingly, changes were more apparent in promonocytes and correlated with the aggressiveness of the BRC line. Increased gene expression was confirmed by collagen degradation assays and immunocytochemistry of prostaglandin 2, a product of COX2 activity. Untransformed MCF-10A cells were then used as a sensor of soluble factors with transformation-like capabilities, finding that acini formed in the presence of supernatants of the highly aggressive BRC/promonocyte cocultures often exhibited total loss of the normal architecture. These data support that tumor cells can modify immune cell gene expression and tumor aggressiveness may importantly reside in this capacity. Modeling interactions in the tumor stroma will allow the identification of genes useful as cancer prognostic markers and therapy targets.

  12. Aggressive angiomyxoma in the vulva: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeh, Su Kyoung; Ku, Young Mi; Whang, In Yong; Kim, Ki Tae

    2005-01-01

    Aggressive angiomyxoma is a rare benign tumor that originates in the pelvic or perineal organs of women. We report a case of an aggressive angiomyxoma as a huge vulvar mass, and present its clinical and image characteristics with a review of the literatures

  13. Reciprocal modulation of mesenchymal stem cells and tumor cells promotes lung cancer metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Fregni

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a multi-step process in which direct crosstalk between cancer cells and their microenvironment plays a key role. Here, we assessed the effect of paired tumor-associated and normal lung tissue mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs on the growth and dissemination of primary human lung carcinoma cells isolated from the same patients. We show that the tumor microenvironment modulates MSC gene expression and identify a four-gene MSC signature that is functionally implicated in promoting metastasis. We also demonstrate that tumor-associated MSCs induce the expression of genes associated with an aggressive phenotype in primary lung cancer cells and selectively promote their dissemination rather than local growth. Our observations provide insight into mechanisms by which the stroma promotes lung cancer metastasis. Keywords: Tumor-associated MSCs, lung cancer, metastasis, GREM1, LOXL2, ADAMTS12, ITGA11

  14. Aggressiveness Niche: Can It Be the Foster Ground for Cancer Metastasis Precursors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael M. ElShamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between tumor initiation and tumor progression can follow a linear projection in which all tumor cells are equally endowed with the ability to progress into metastasis. Alternatively, not all tumor cells are equal genetically and/or epigenetically, and only few cells are induced to become metastatic tumor cells. The location of these cells within the tumor can also impact the fate of these cells. The most inner core of a tumor where an elevated pressure of adverse conditions forms, such as necrosis-induced inflammation and hypoxia-induced immunosuppressive environment, seems to be the most fertile ground to generate such tumor cells with metastatic potential. Here we will call this necrotic/hypoxic core the “aggressiveness niche” and will present data to support its involvement in generating these metastatic precursors. Within this niche, interaction of hypoxia-surviving cells with the inflammatory microenvironment influenced by newly recruited mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs, and other types of cells and the establishment of bidirectional interactions between them elevate the aggressiveness of these tumor cells. Additionally, immune evasion properties induced in these cells most likely contribute in the formation and maintenance of such aggressiveness niche.

  15. The WIP1 oncogene promotes progression and invasion of aggressive medulloblastoma variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, M C; Remke, M; Lee, J; Gandhi, K; Schniederjan, M J; Kool, M; Northcott, P A; Pfister, S M; Taylor, M D; Castellino, R C

    2015-02-26

    Recent studies suggest that medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood, is comprised of four disease variants. The WIP1 oncogene is overexpressed in Group 3 and 4 tumors, which contain medulloblastomas with the most aggressive clinical behavior. Our data demonstrate increased WIP1 expression in metastatic medulloblastomas, and inferior progression-free and overall survival of patients with WIP1 high-expressing medulloblastoma. Microarray analysis identified upregulation of genes involved in tumor metastasis, including the G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4, in medulloblastoma cells with high WIP1 expression. Stimulation with the CXCR4 ligand SDF1α activated PI-3 kinase signaling, and promoted growth and invasion of WIP1 high-expressing medulloblastoma cells in a p53-dependent manner. When xenografted into the cerebellum of immunodeficient mice, medulloblastoma cells with stable or endogenous high WIP1 expression exhibited strong expression of CXCR4 and activated AKT in primary and invasive tumor cells. WIP1 or CXCR4 knockdown inhibited medulloblastoma growth and invasion. WIP1 knockdown also improved the survival of mice xenografted with WIP1 high-expressing medulloblastoma cells. WIP1 knockdown inhibited cell surface localization of CXCR4 by suppressing expression of the G protein receptor kinase 5, GRK5. Restoration of wild-type GRK5 promoted Ser339 phosphorylation of CXCR4 and inhibited the growth of WIP1-stable medulloblastoma cells. Conversely, GRK5 knockdown inhibited Ser339 phosphorylation of CXCR4, increased cell surface localization of CXCR4 and promoted the growth of medulloblastoma cells with low WIP1 expression. These results demonstrate crosstalk among WIP1, CXCR4 and GRK5, which may be important for the aggressive phenotype of a subclass of medulloblastomas in children.

  16. Continuity of aggressive antisocial behavior from childhood to adulthood: The question of phenotype definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofvander, Björn; Ossowski, Daniel; Lundström, Sebastian; Anckarsäter, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Aiming to clarify the adult phenotype of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), the empirical literature on its childhood background among the disruptive behaviour disorders, such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), conduct disorder (CD), or hyperkinetic conduct disorder (HKCD), was reviewed according to the Robins and Guze criteria for nosological validity. At least half of hyperactive children develop ODD and about a third CD (i.e. AD/HD+CD or HKCD) before puberty. About half of children with this combined problem constellation develop antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) in adulthood. Family and adoption/twin studies indicate that AD/HD and CD share a high heritability and that, in addition, there may be specific environmental effects for criminal behaviours. "Zones of rarity" delineating the disorders from each other, or from the normal variation, have not been identified. Neurophysiology, brain imaging, neurochemistry, neurocognition, or molecular genetics have not provided "external validity" for any of the diagnostic categories used today. Deficient mental functions, such as inattention, poor executive functions, poor verbal learning, and impaired social interaction (empathy), seem to form unspecific susceptibility factors. As none of today's proposed syndromes (e.g. AD/HD or psychopathy) seems to describe a natural category, a dimensional behavioural phenotype reflecting aggressive antisocial behaviours assessed by numbers of behaviours, the severity of their consequences and how early is their age at onset, which will be closely related to childhood hyperactivity, would bring conceptual clarity, and may form the basis for further probing into mental, cognitive, biological and treatment-related co-varying features.

  17. Identifying aggressive prostate cancer foci using a DNA methylation classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundbjerg, Kamilla; Chopra, Sameer; Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Duymich, Christopher; Lakshminarasimhan, Ranjani; Nichols, Peter W; Aron, Manju; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Ukimura, Osamu; Aron, Monish; Stern, Mariana; Gill, Parkash; Carpten, John D; Ørntoft, Torben F; Sørensen, Karina D; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Jones, Peter A; Duddalwar, Vinay; Gill, Inderbir; Liang, Gangning

    2017-01-12

    Slow-growing prostate cancer (PC) can be aggressive in a subset of cases. Therefore, prognostic tools to guide clinical decision-making and avoid overtreatment of indolent PC and undertreatment of aggressive disease are urgently needed. PC has a propensity to be multifocal with several different cancerous foci per gland. Here, we have taken advantage of the multifocal propensity of PC and categorized aggressiveness of individual PC foci based on DNA methylation patterns in primary PC foci and matched lymph node metastases. In a set of 14 patients, we demonstrate that over half of the cases have multiple epigenetically distinct subclones and determine the primary subclone from which the metastatic lesion(s) originated. Furthermore, we develop an aggressiveness classifier consisting of 25 DNA methylation probes to determine aggressive and non-aggressive subclones. Upon validation of the classifier in an independent cohort, the predicted aggressive tumors are significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases and invasive tumor stages. Overall, this study provides molecular-based support for determining PC aggressiveness with the potential to impact clinical decision-making, such as targeted biopsy approaches for early diagnosis and active surveillance, in addition to focal therapy.

  18. Intermittent hypoxia-induced changes in tumor-associated macrophages and tumor malignancy in a mouse model of sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendros, Isaac; Wang, Yang; Becker, Lev; Lennon, Frances E; Zheng, Jiamao; Coats, Brittney R; Schoenfelt, Kelly S; Carreras, Alba; Hakim, Fahed; Zhang, Shelley X; Farré, Ramon; Gozal, David

    2014-03-01

    An increased cancer aggressiveness and mortality have been recently reported among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Intermittent hypoxia (IH), a hallmark of OSA, enhances melanoma growth and metastasis in mice. To assess whether OSA-related adverse cancer outcomes occur via IH-induced changes in host immune responses, namely tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Lung epithelial TC1 cell tumors were 84% greater in mice subjected to IH for 28 days compared with room air (RA). In addition, TAMs in IH-exposed tumors exhibited reductions in M1 polarity with a shift toward M2 protumoral phenotype. Although TAMs from tumors harvested from RA-exposed mice increased TC1 migration and extravasation, TAMs from IH-exposed mice markedly enhanced such effects and also promoted proliferative rates and invasiveness of TC1 cells. Proliferative rates of melanoma (B16F10) and TC1 cells exposed to IH either in single culture or in coculture with macrophages (RAW 264.7) increased only when RAW 264.7 macrophages were concurrently present. Our findings support the notion that IH-induced alterations in TAMs participate in the adverse cancer outcomes reported in OSA.

  19. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Role of EZH2 in the Growth, Invasion, and Aggression of a Panel of Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikolas, Breanne D.W.; Figueiredo, Marxa L.; Wu, Lily

    2010-01-01

    Background Although most prostate cancers respond well to initial treatments, a fraction of prostate cancers are more aggressive and will recur and metastasize. At that point, there are few treatment options available. Significant efforts have been made to identify biomarkers that will identify these more aggressive cancers to tailor a more vigorous treatment in order to improve outcome. Polycomb Group protein Enhancer of Zeste 2 (EZH2) was found to be overexpressed in metastatic prostate tumors, and is considered an excellent candidate for such a biomarker. Scattered studies have found that EZH2 overexpression causes neoplastic transformation, invasion, and growth of prostate cells. However, these studies utilized different systems and cell lines, and so are difficult to correlate with one another. Methods In this study, a comprehensive evaluation of the phenotypic effects of EZH2 in a panel of five prostate cancer cell lines was performed. By using multiple cell lines, and examining overexpression and knockdown of EZH2 concurrently, a broad view of EZH2's role in prostate cancer was achieved. Results Overexpression of EZH2 led to more aggressive behaviors in all prostate cell lines tested. In contrast, downregulation of EZH2 reduced invasion and tumorigenicity of androgen-independent cell lines CWR22Rv1, PC3, and DU145, but not of androgen-dependent cell lines LAPC4 and LNCaP. Conclusions Findings from this study suggest androgen-independent prostate tumors are more dependent on EZH2 expression than androgen-dependent tumors. Our observations provide an explanation for the strong correlation between EZH2 overexpression and advanced stage, aggressive prostate cancers. PMID:20087897

  20. Renal cell carcinoma primary cultures maintain genomic and phenotypic profile of parental tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifola, Ingrid; Bianchi, Cristina; Mangano, Eleonora; Bombelli, Silvia; Frascati, Fabio; Fasoli, Ester; Ferrero, Stefano; Di Stefano, Vitalba; Zipeto, Maria A; Magni, Fulvio; Signorini, Stefano; Battaglia, Cristina; Perego, Roberto A

    2011-06-13

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by recurrent copy number alterations (CNAs) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH), which may have potential diagnostic and prognostic applications. Here, we explored whether ccRCC primary cultures, established from surgical tumor specimens, maintain the DNA profile of parental tumor tissues allowing a more confident CNAs and LOH discrimination with respect to the original tissues. We established a collection of 9 phenotypically well-characterized ccRCC primary cell cultures. Using the Affymetrix SNP array technology, we performed the genome-wide copy number (CN) profiling of both cultures and corresponding tumor tissues. Global concordance for each culture/tissue pair was assayed evaluating the correlations between whole-genome CN profiles and SNP allelic calls. CN analysis was performed using the two CNAG v3.0 and Partek software, and comparing results returned by two different algorithms (Hidden Markov Model and Genomic Segmentation). A very good overlap between the CNAs of each culture and corresponding tissue was observed. The finding, reinforced by high whole-genome CN correlations and SNP call concordances, provided evidence that each culture was derived from its corresponding tissue and maintained the genomic alterations of parental tumor. In addition, primary culture DNA profile remained stable for at least 3 weeks, till to third passage. These cultures showed a greater cell homogeneity and enrichment in tumor component than original tissues, thus enabling a better discrimination of CNAs and LOH. Especially for hemizygous deletions, primary cultures presented more evident CN losses, typically accompanied by LOH; differently, in original tissues the intensity of these deletions was weaken by normal cell contamination and LOH calls were missed. ccRCC primary cultures are a reliable in vitro model, well-reproducing original tumor genetics and phenotype, potentially useful for future functional approaches

  1. Nano-scaled particles of titanium dioxide convert benign mouse fibrosarcoma cells into aggressive tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuma, Kunishige; Sato, Yu; Ogawara, Satomi; Shirasawa, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Masanobu; Yoshitake, Jun; Yoshimura, Tetsuhiko; Iigo, Masaaki; Fujii, Junichi; Okada, Futoshi

    2009-11-01

    Nanoparticles are prevalent in both commercial and medicinal products; however, the contribution of nanomaterials to carcinogenesis remains unclear. We therefore examined the effects of nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) on poorly tumorigenic and nonmetastatic QR-32 fibrosarcoma cells. We found that mice that were cotransplanted subcutaneously with QR-32 cells and nano-sized TiO(2), either uncoated (TiO(2)-1, hydrophilic) or coated with stearic acid (TiO(2)-2, hydrophobic), did not form tumors. However, QR-32 cells became tumorigenic after injection into sites previously implanted with TiO(2)-1, but not TiO(2)-2, and these developing tumors acquired metastatic phenotypes. No differences were observed either histologically or in inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression between TiO(2)-1 and TiO(2)-2 treatments. However, TiO(2)-2, but not TiO(2)-1, generated high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell-free conditions. Although both TiO(2)-1 and TiO(2)-2 resulted in intracellular ROS formation, TiO(2)-2 elicited a stronger response, resulting in cytotoxicity to the QR-32 cells. Moreover, TiO(2)-2, but not TiO(2)-1, led to the development of nuclear interstices and multinucleate cells. Cells that survived the TiO(2) toxicity acquired a tumorigenic phenotype. TiO(2)-induced ROS formation and its related cell injury were inhibited by the addition of antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine. These results indicate that nano-sized TiO(2) has the potential to convert benign tumor cells into malignant ones through the generation of ROS in the target cells.

  2. Anti-thymocyte globulin could improve the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with highly aggressive T-cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J; Cai, Y; Jiang, J L; Wan, L P; Yan, S K; Wang, C

    2015-01-01

    The early experiment result in our hospital showed that anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) inhibited the proliferation of lymphoid tumor cells in the T-cell tumors. We used the ATG as the part of the conditioning regimen and to evaluate the long-term anti-leukemia effect, the safety and complication in the patients with highly aggressive T-cell lymphomas. Twenty-three patients were enrolled into this study. At the time of transplant, six patients reached first or subsequent complete response, three patients had a partial remission and 14 patients had relapsed or primary refractory disease. The conditioning regimen consisted of ATG, total body irradiation, toposide and cyclophosphamide. The complete remission rate after transplant was 95.7%. At a median follow-up time of 25 months, 16 (69.6%) patients are alive and free from diseases, including nine patients in refractory and progressive disease. Seven patients died after transplant, five from relapse and two from treatment-related complications. The incidence of grades II–IV acute graft-vs-host disease (GvHD) was 39.1%. The maximum cumulative incidence of chronic GvHD was 30%. The most frequent and severe conditioning-related toxicities observed in 8 out of 23 patients were grades III/IV infections during cytopenia. Thus, ATG-based conditioning is a feasible and effective alternative for patients with highly aggressive T-cell tumors

  3. Hypoxic tumor environments exhibit disrupted collagen I fibers and low macromolecular transport.

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    Samata M Kakkad

    Full Text Available Hypoxic tumor microenvironments result in an aggressive phenotype and resistance to therapy that lead to tumor progression, recurrence, and metastasis. While poor vascularization and the resultant inadequate drug delivery are known to contribute to drug resistance, the effect of hypoxia on molecular transport through the interstitium, and the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM in mediating this transport are unexplored. The dense mesh of fibers present in the ECM can especially influence the movement of macromolecules. Collagen 1 (Col1 fibers form a key component of the ECM in breast cancers. Here we characterized the influence of hypoxia on macromolecular transport in tumors, and the role of Col1 fibers in mediating this transport using an MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model engineered to express red fluorescent protein under hypoxia. Magnetic resonance imaging of macromolecular transport was combined with second harmonic generation microscopy of Col1 fibers. Hypoxic tumor regions displayed significantly decreased Col1 fiber density and volume, as well as significantly lower macromolecular draining and pooling rates, than normoxic regions. Regions adjacent to severely hypoxic areas revealed higher deposition of Col1 fibers and increased macromolecular transport. These data suggest that Col1 fibers may facilitate macromolecular transport in tumors, and their reduction in hypoxic regions may reduce this transport. Decreased macromolecular transport in hypoxic regions may also contribute to poor drug delivery and tumor recurrence in hypoxic regions. High Col1 fiber density observed around hypoxic regions may facilitate the escape of aggressive cancer cells from hypoxic regions.

  4. Inflammatory Cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor α Confers Precancerous Phenotype in an Organoid Model of Normal Human Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells

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    Joseph Kwong

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we established an in vitro organoid model of normal human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE cells. The spheroids of these normal HOSE cells resembled epithelial inclusion cysts in human ovarian cortex, which are the cells of origin of ovarian epithelial tumor. Because there are strong correlations between chronic inflammation and the incidence of ovarian cancer, we used the organoid model to test whether protumor inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α would induce malignant phenotype in normal HOSE cells. Prolonged treatment of tumor necrosis factor α induced phenotypic changes of the HOSE spheroids, which exhibited the characteristics of precancerous lesions of ovarian epithelial tumors, including reinitiation of cell proliferation, structural disorganization, epithelial stratification, loss of epithelial polarity, degradation of basement membrane, cell invasion, and overexpression of ovarian cancer markers. The result of this study provides not only an evidence supporting the link between chronic inflammation and ovarian cancer formation but also a relevant and novel in vitro model for studying of early events of ovarian cancer.

  5. Modeling evolutionary dynamics of epigenetic mutations in hierarchically organized tumors.

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    Andrea Sottoriva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC concept is a highly debated topic in cancer research. While experimental evidence in favor of the cancer stem cell theory is apparently abundant, the results are often criticized as being difficult to interpret. An important reason for this is that most experimental data that support this model rely on transplantation studies. In this study we use a novel cellular Potts model to elucidate the dynamics of established malignancies that are driven by a small subset of CSCs. Our results demonstrate that epigenetic mutations that occur during mitosis display highly altered dynamics in CSC-driven malignancies compared to a classical, non-hierarchical model of growth. In particular, the heterogeneity observed in CSC-driven tumors is considerably higher. We speculate that this feature could be used in combination with epigenetic (methylation sequencing studies of human malignancies to prove or refute the CSC hypothesis in established tumors without the need for transplantation. Moreover our tumor growth simulations indicate that CSC-driven tumors display evolutionary features that can be considered beneficial during tumor progression. Besides an increased heterogeneity they also exhibit properties that allow the escape of clones from local fitness peaks. This leads to more aggressive phenotypes in the long run and makes the neoplasm more adaptable to stringent selective forces such as cancer treatment. Indeed when therapy is applied the clone landscape of the regrown tumor is more aggressive with respect to the primary tumor, whereas the classical model demonstrated similar patterns before and after therapy. Understanding these often counter-intuitive fundamental properties of (non-hierarchically organized malignancies is a crucial step in validating the CSC concept as well as providing insight into the therapeutical consequences of this model.

  6. Glioblastoma models reveal the connection between adult glial progenitors and the proneural phenotype.

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    Liang Lei

    Full Text Available Tumor heterogeneity is a major obstacle for finding effective treatment of Glioblastoma (GBM. Based on global expression analysis, GBM can be classified into distinct subtypes: Proneural, Neural, Classical and Mesenchymal. The signatures of these different tumor subtypes may reflect the phenotypes of cells giving rise to them. However, the experimental evidence connecting any specific subtype of GBM to particular cells of origin is lacking. In addition, it is unclear how different genetic alterations interact with cells of origin in determining tumor heterogeneity. This issue cannot be addressed by studying end-stage human tumors.To address this issue, we used retroviruses to deliver transforming genetic lesions to glial progenitors in adult mouse brain. We compared the resulting tumors to human GBM. We found that different initiating genetic lesions gave rise to tumors with different growth rates. However all mouse tumors closely resembled the human Proneural GBM. Comparative analysis of these mouse tumors allowed us to identify a set of genes whose expression in humans with Proneural GBM correlates with survival.This study offers insights into the relationship between adult glial progenitors and Proneural GBM, and allows us to identify molecular alterations that lead to more aggressive tumor growth. In addition, we present a new preclinical model that can be used to test treatments directed at a specific type of GBM in future studies.

  7. [Construction of 2-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype in non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-kang; Wang, Xiao-yi; Xiong, Zeng; Zhou, Hui; Zhou, Jian-hua; Fu, Chun-yan; Li, Bo

    2008-08-01

    To construct a technological platform of 2-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype (2D-TAMP) expression. Thirty samples of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were collected after surgery. The corresponding sections of tumor tissue specimens to the slice of CT perfusion imaging were selected. Immunohistochemical staining,Gomori methenamine silver stain, and electron microscope observation were performed to build a technological platform of 2D-TMAP expression by detecting the morphology and the integrity of basement membrane of microvasculature, microvascular density, various microvascular subtype, the degree of the maturity and lumenization of microvasculature, and the characteristics of immunogenetics of microvasculature. The technological platform of 2D-TMAP expression was constructed successfully. There was heterogeneity in 2D-TMAP expression of non-small cell lung cancer. The microvascular of NSCLC had certain characteristics. 2D-TMAP is a key technology that can be used to observe the overall state of micro-environment in tumor growth.

  8. Genetic and Epigenetic Tumor Suppressor Gene Silencing are Distinct Molecular Phenotypes Driven by Growth Promoting Mutations in Non small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsit, C. J.; Kelsey, K. T.; Houseman, E. A.; Kelsey, K. T.; Houseman, E. A.; Nelson, H. H.

    2008-01-01

    Both genetic and epigenetic alterations characterize human non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but the biological processes that create or select these alterations remain incompletely investigated. Our hypothesis posits that a roughly reciprocal relationship between the propensity for promoter hyper methylation and a propensity for genetic deletion leads to distinct molecular phenotypes of lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we examined promoter hyper methylation of 17 tumor suppressor genes, as a marker of epigenetic alteration propensity, and deletion events at the 3p21 region, as a marker of genetic alteration. To model the complex biology between these somatic alterations, we utilized an item response theory model. We demonstrated that tumors exhibiting LOH at greater than 30% of informative alleles in the 3p21 region have a significantly reduced propensity for hyper methylation. At the same time, tumors with activating KRAS mutations showed a significantly increased propensity for hyper methylation of the loci examined, a result similar to what has been observed in colon cancer. These data suggest that NSCLCs have distinct epigenetic or genetic alteration phenotypes acting upon tumor suppressor genes and that mutation of oncogenic growth promoting genes, such as KRAS, is associated with the epigenetic phenotype.

  9. Inhibition of tumor vasculogenic mimicry and prolongation of host survival in highly aggressive gallbladder cancers by norcantharidin via blocking the ephrin type a receptor 2/focal adhesion kinase/paxillin signaling pathway.

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    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Vasculogenic mimicry (VM is a newly-defined tumor microcirculation pattern in highly aggressive malignant tumors. We recently reported tumor growth and VM formation of gallbladder cancers through the contribution of the ephrin type a receptor 2 (EphA2/focal adhesion kinase (FAK/Paxillin signaling pathways. In this study, we further investigated the anti-VM activity of norcantharidin (NCTD as a VM inhibitor for gallbladder cancers and the underlying mechanisms. In vivo and in vitro experiments to determine the effects of NCTD on tumor growth, host survival, VM formation of GBC-SD nude mouse xenografts, and vasculogenic-like networks, malignant phenotypes i.e., proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and migration of GBC-SD cells. Expression of VM signaling-related markers EphA2, FAK and Paxillin in vivo and in vitro were examined by immunofluorescence, western blotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, respectively. The results showed that after treatment with NCTD, GBC-SD cells were unable to form VM structures when injecting into nude mouse, growth of the xenograft was inhibited and these observations were confirmed by facts that VM formation by three-dimensional (3-D matrix, proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, migration of GBC-SD cells were affected; and survival time of the xenograft mice was prolonged. Furthermore, expression of EphA2, FAK and Paxillin proteins/mRNAs of the xenografts was downregulated. Thus, we concluded that NCTD has potential anti-VM activity against human gallbladder cancers; one of the underlying mechanisms may be via blocking the EphA2/FAK/Paxillin signaling pathway.

  10. Nano-Scaled Particles of Titanium Dioxide Convert Benign Mouse Fibrosarcoma Cells into Aggressive Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuma, Kunishige; Sato, Yu; Ogawara, Satomi; Shirasawa, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Masanobu; Yoshitake, Jun; Yoshimura, Tetsuhiko; Iigo, Masaaki; Fujii, Junichi; Okada, Futoshi

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles are prevalent in both commercial and medicinal products; however, the contribution of nanomaterials to carcinogenesis remains unclear. We therefore examined the effects of nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) on poorly tumorigenic and nonmetastatic QR-32 fibrosarcoma cells. We found that mice that were cotransplanted subcutaneously with QR-32 cells and nano-sized TiO2, either uncoated (TiO2−1, hydrophilic) or coated with stearic acid (TiO2−2, hydrophobic), did not form tumors. However, QR-32 cells became tumorigenic after injection into sites previously implanted with TiO2−1, but not TiO2−2, and these developing tumors acquired metastatic phenotypes. No differences were observed either histologically or in inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression between TiO2−1 and TiO2−2 treatments. However, TiO2−2, but not TiO2−1, generated high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell-free conditions. Although both TiO2−1 and TiO2−2 resulted in intracellular ROS formation, TiO2−2 elicited a stronger response, resulting in cytotoxicity to the QR-32 cells. Moreover, TiO2−2, but not TiO2−1, led to the development of nuclear interstices and multinucleate cells. Cells that survived the TiO2 toxicity acquired a tumorigenic phenotype. TiO2-induced ROS formation and its related cell injury were inhibited by the addition of antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine. These results indicate that nano-sized TiO2 has the potential to convert benign tumor cells into malignant ones through the generation of ROS in the target cells. PMID:19815711

  11. Effect of doxorubicin/pluronic SP1049C on tumorigenicity, aggressiveness, DNA methylation and stem cell markers in murine leukemia.

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    Daria Y Alakhova

    Full Text Available Pluronic block copolymers are potent sensitizers of multidrug resistant cancers. SP1049C, a Pluronic-based micellar formulation of doxorubicin (Dox has completed Phase II clinical trial and demonstrated safety and efficacy in patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction. This study elucidates the ability of SP1049C to deplete cancer stem cells (CSC and decrease tumorigenicity of cancer cells in vivo.P388 murine leukemia ascitic tumor was grown in BDF1 mice. The animals were treated with: (a saline, (b Pluronics alone, (c Dox or (d SP1049C. The ascitic cancer cells were isolated at different passages and examined for 1 in vitro colony formation potential, 2 in vivo tumorigenicity and aggressiveness, 3 development of drug resistance and Wnt signaling activation 4 global DNA methylation profiles, and 5 expression of CSC markers.SP1049C treatment reduced tumor aggressiveness, in vivo tumor formation frequency and in vitro clonogenic potential of the ascitic cells compared to drug, saline and polymer controls. SP1049C also prevented overexpression of BCRP and activation of Wnt-β-catenin signaling observed with Dox alone. Moreover, SP1049C significantly altered the DNA methylation profiles of the cells. Finally, SP1049C decreased CD133(+ P388 cells populations, which displayed CSC-like properties and were more tumorigenic compared to CD133(- cells.SP1049C therapy effectively suppresses the tumorigenicity and aggressiveness of P388 cells in a mouse model. This may be due to enhanced activity of SP1049C against CSC and/or altered epigenetic regulation restricting appearance of malignant cancer cell phenotype.

  12. Cysteine cathepsins B and X promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrović, Ana; Pečar Fonović, Urša; Kos, Janko

    2017-09-01

    Cathepsins B and X are lysosomal cysteine carboxypeptidases suggested as having a redundant role in cancer. They are involved in a number of processes leading to tumor progression but their role in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) remains unknown. We have investigated the contribution of both cathepsins B and X in EMT using tumor cell lines differing in their expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers and cell morphology. Higher levels of both cathepsins are shown to promote EMT and are associated with the mesenchymal-like cell phenotype. Moreover, simultaneous knockdown of the two peptidases triggers a reverse, mesenchymal to epithelial transition. Of the two cathepsins, cathepsin B appears to be the stronger promotor of EMT. Furthermore, we evaluated the involvement of cathepsin B and X in the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) signaling pathway, one of the key signaling mechanisms triggering EMT in cancer. In MCF-7 cells the expression of cathepsin B was shown to depend on their activation with TGF-β1 while, for cathepsin X, a TGF-β1 independent mechanism of induction during EMT is indicated. EMT is thus shown to be another mechanism linking cathepsins B and X with tumor progression. With silencing of their expression or inhibition of enzymatic activity, the tumor cells could be reverted to less aggressive epithelial-like phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. [Evaluation of three-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype heterogeneity in non-small cell carcinoma and its significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Liu, Jinkang; Chen, Shengxi; Xiong, Zeng; Zhou, Jianhua; Tong, Shiyu; Chen, Hao; Zhou, Moling

    2012-06-01

    To explore the degree, mechanism and clinical significance of three-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype heterogeneity (3D-TMAPH) in non-small cell carcinoma (NSCLC). Twenty-one samples of solitary pulmonary nodules were collected integrally. To establish two-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype (2D-TMAP) and three-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype (3D-TMAP), five layers of each nodule were selected and embedded in paraffin. Test indices included the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), EphB4, ephfinB2 and microvascular density marked by anti-CD34 (CD34-MVD). The degrees of 3D-TMAPH were evaluated by the coefficient of variation and extend of heterogeneity. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationships between 2D-TMAP, 3D-TMAP and clinicopathological features. 3D-TMAPH showed that 2D-TMAP heterogeneity was expressed in the tissues of NSCLC. The heterogeneities in the malignant nodules were significantly higher than those in the active inflammatory nodules and tubercular nodules. In addition, different degrees of heterogeneity of CD34-MVD and PCNA were found in NSCLC tissues. The coefficients of variation of CD34- MVD and PCNA were positively related to the degree of differentiation (all P0.05). The level of heterogeneity of various expression indexes (ephrinB2, EphB4, VEGF) in NSCLC tissues were inconsistent, but there were no significant differences in heterogeneity in NSCLC tissues with different histological types (P>0.05). 3D-TMAPH exists widely in the microenvironment during the genesis and development of NSCLC and has a significant impact on its biological complexity.

  14. Tumor stroma with senescence-associated secretory phenotype in steatohepatitic hepatocellular carcinoma.

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    Jee San Lee

    Full Text Available Senescence secretome was recently reported to promote liver cancer in an obese mouse model. Steatohepatitic hepatocellular carcinoma (SH-HCC, a new variant of HCC, has been found in metabolic syndrome patients, and pericellular fibrosis, a characteristic feature of SH-HCC, suggests that alteration of the tumor stroma might play an important role in SH-HCC development. Clinicopathological characteristics and tumor stroma showing senescence and senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP were investigated in 21 SH-HCCs and 34 conventional HCCs (C-HCCs. The expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, p21Waf1/Cif1, γ-H2AX, and IL-6 was investigated by immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence. SH-HCCs were associated with older age, higher body mass index, and a higher incidence of metabolic syndrome, compared to C-HCC (P <0.05, all. The numbers of α-SMA-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs (P = 0.049 and α-SMA-positive CAFs co-expressing p21Waf1/Cif1 (P = 0.038, γ-H2AX (P = 0.065, and IL-6 (P = 0.048 were greater for SH-HCCs than C-HCCs. Additionally, non-tumoral liver from SH-HCCs showed a higher incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and a higher number of α-SMA-positive stellate cells expressing γ-H2AX and p21Waf1/Cif1 than that from C-HCCs (P <0.05, all. In conclusion, SH-HCCs are considered to occur more frequently in metabolic syndrome patients. Therein, senescent and damaged CAFs, as well as non-tumoral stellate cells, expressing SASP including IL-6 may contribute to the development of SH-HCC.

  15. Isolation of stem-like cells from spontaneous feline mammary carcinomas: Phenotypic characterization and tumorigenic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, Federica; Wurth, Roberto [Section of Pharmacology, Dept. of Internal Medicine Di.M.I., and Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research - University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV, 2, 16132 Genova (Italy); Ratto, Alessandra; Campanella, Chiara; Vito, Guendalina [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Piemonte, Liguria e Valle D' Aosta, National Reference Center of Veterinary and Comparative Oncology (CEROVEC), Piazza Borgo Pila, 16129, Genova (Italy); Thellung, Stefano [Section of Pharmacology, Dept. of Internal Medicine Di.M.I., and Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research - University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV, 2, 16132 Genova (Italy); Daga, Antonio [Laboratory of Translational Oncology, IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino - IST- Istituto Nazionale Ricerca sul Cancro, L.go R. Benzi, 10, 16132 Genova Italy (Italy); Cilli, Michele [Animal Facility, IRCCS Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino - IST- Istituto Nazionale Ricerca sul Cancro, L.go R. Benzi, 10, 16132 Genova Italy (Italy); Ferrari, Angelo [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Piemonte, Liguria e Valle D' Aosta, National Reference Center of Veterinary and Comparative Oncology (CEROVEC), Piazza Borgo Pila, 16129, Genova (Italy); Florio, Tullio, E-mail: tullio.florio@unige.it [Section of Pharmacology, Dept. of Internal Medicine Di.M.I., and Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research - University of Genova, Viale Benedetto XV, 2, 16132 Genova (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    Current carcinogenesis theory states that only a small subset of tumor cells, the cancer stem cells or tumor initiating cells (TICs), are responsible for tumor formation and progression. Human breast cancer-initiating cells have been identified as CD44-expressing cells, which retain tumorigenic activity and display stem cell-like properties. Spontaneous feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) is an aggressive cancer, which shows biological similarities to the human tumor counterpart. We report the isolation and phenotypic characterization of FMC-derived stem/progenitor cells, showing in vitro self-renewal, long-lasting proliferation and in vivo tumorigenicity. Twenty-one FMC samples were collected, histologically classified and characterized for the expression of Ki67, EGFR, ER-{alpha} and CD44, by immunohistochemistry. By culture in stem cell permissive conditions, we isolated, from 13 FMCs, a CD44-positive subpopulation able to survive and proliferate in vitro as mammospheres of different sizes and morphologies. When injected in NOD/SCID mice, FMC stem-like cells initiate tumors, generating cell heterogeneity and recapitulating the original histotype. In serum-containing medium, spheroid cells showed differentiation properties as shown by morphological changes, the loss of CD44 expression and tumorigenic potential. These data show that stem-defined culture of FMC enriches for TICs and validate the use of these cells as a suitable model for comparative oncology studies of mammary biology and testing therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating TICs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Feline mammary carcinoma contain a sub-population of stem-like cells expressing CD44 Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These grow as spheres in serum-free medium and self-renew Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolated stem-like cancer cells initiate tumor in immunodeficient mice Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Xenografted tumors are phenotypically similar to the original tumor Black

  16. Isolation of stem-like cells from spontaneous feline mammary carcinomas: Phenotypic characterization and tumorigenic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, Federica; Wurth, Roberto; Ratto, Alessandra; Campanella, Chiara; Vito, Guendalina; Thellung, Stefano; Daga, Antonio; Cilli, Michele; Ferrari, Angelo; Florio, Tullio

    2012-01-01

    Current carcinogenesis theory states that only a small subset of tumor cells, the cancer stem cells or tumor initiating cells (TICs), are responsible for tumor formation and progression. Human breast cancer-initiating cells have been identified as CD44-expressing cells, which retain tumorigenic activity and display stem cell–like properties. Spontaneous feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) is an aggressive cancer, which shows biological similarities to the human tumor counterpart. We report the isolation and phenotypic characterization of FMC-derived stem/progenitor cells, showing in vitro self-renewal, long-lasting proliferation and in vivo tumorigenicity. Twenty-one FMC samples were collected, histologically classified and characterized for the expression of Ki67, EGFR, ER-α and CD44, by immunohistochemistry. By culture in stem cell permissive conditions, we isolated, from 13 FMCs, a CD44-positive subpopulation able to survive and proliferate in vitro as mammospheres of different sizes and morphologies. When injected in NOD/SCID mice, FMC stem-like cells initiate tumors, generating cell heterogeneity and recapitulating the original histotype. In serum-containing medium, spheroid cells showed differentiation properties as shown by morphological changes, the loss of CD44 expression and tumorigenic potential. These data show that stem-defined culture of FMC enriches for TICs and validate the use of these cells as a suitable model for comparative oncology studies of mammary biology and testing therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating TICs. -- Highlights: ► Feline mammary carcinoma contain a sub-population of stem-like cells expressing CD44 ► These grow as spheres in serum-free medium and self-renew ► Isolated stem-like cancer cells initiate tumor in immunodeficient mice ► Xenografted tumors are phenotypically similar to the original tumor ► Upon differentiation, cells grow as monolayers, loosing the tumorigenic potential

  17. Tumor-derived Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) correlates with poor prognoses of invasive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bin; Niu, Yun; Niu, Ruifang; Sun, Baocun; Hao, Xishan; Cao, Xuchen; Liu, Yanxue; Cao, Wenfeng; Zhang, Fei; Zhang, Shiwu; Li, Hongtao; Ning, Liansheng; Fu, Li

    2008-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) protein may promote breast tumor progression. However, its relevance to the progression of human breast cancer is yet to be established. Furthermore, it is not clear whether MMP-13 can be used as an independent breast cancer biomarker. This study was conducted to assess the expression profile of MMP-13 protein in invasive breast carcinomas to determine its diagnostic and prognostic significance, as well as its correlation with other biomarkers including estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), Her-2/neu, MMP-2, MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of MMP-1 and -2 (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue microarray containing specimens from 263 breast carcinomas. The intensity and the extent of IHC were scored by pathologists in blind fashion. The correlation of the gene expression profiles with patients' clinicopathological features and clinical outcomes were analyzed for statistical significance. MMP-13 protein was detected in the cytoplasm of the malignant cells and the peritumoral stromal cells. MMP-13 expression by tumor cells (p < 0.001) and stromal fibroblasts (p <0.001) both correlated with carcinoma infiltration of lymph nodes. MMP-13 also correlated with the expression of Her-2/neu (p = 0.015) and TIMP-1 (p < 0.010), respectively in tumor cells. Tumor-derived, but not stromal fibroblast-derived, MMP-13 correlated with aggressive tumor phenotypes. Moreover, high levels of MMP-13 expression were associated with decreased overall survival. In parallel, the prognostic value of MMP-13 expressed by peritumoral fibroblasts seems less significant. Our data suggest that lymph node status, tumor size, Her-2/neu expression, TIMP-1 and MMP-13 expression in cancer cells are independent prognostic factors. Tumor-derived, but not stromal fibroblast-derived, MMP-13 correlated with aggressive tumor phenotypes, and inversely correlated with the

  18. Child gluteal aggressive fibromatosis: a correlative study of CT findings and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Miao; Li Ziping; Meng Quanfei; Guo Yan; Ye Bingbing; Xiao Gang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate CT imaging in the diagnosis of child gluteal aggressive fibromatosis. Methods: CT manifestations of child gluteal aggressive fibromatosis were retrospectively analyzed. In total 7 males and 1 female, 2 to 11 years old, were enrolled in study. All cases had been confirmed by surgery and pathology. CT findings were correlatively studied with pathology. Results: Lesions located on the left side were noted in 7 cases, and a lesion located on right side was seen in the rest 1 cam The lesions were elliptical or lobulated on CT images. Three tumors originated from solitary muscle and multiple muscles were involved in other 5 cases. Tumors were well demarcated. Invasion to the adjacent structure was shown in 7 cases. All tumors were homogeneous in density in non-enhanced scan. Compared to the muscles in the same section, 5 tumors were iso -density and 3 tumors were hypo-density. Inside the lesions no hemorrhage, necrosis, cystic degeneration and calcification was revealed. After contrast medium was administrated, iso-dense and homogeneous enhancement as the adjacent muscles was seen in 1 tumor and apparent enhancement were demonstrated in 7 tumors. Seven tumors tended to grow along the longitudinal axis of muscles and infiltrated into fascial space. Atrophy resulting from compression was shown in the adjacent muscles in 6 cases. The major clinical manifestation was limp. Gluteal aggressive fibromatosis was confirmed by pathology in all cases. Conclusion: There are characteristics of child gluteal aggressive fibromatosis in age of onset, gender of the patients, site of the lesion and CT findings as well. CT manifestations were consistent with pathology. CT imaging is helpful in initial diagnosis and differential diagnosis, as well as in assessing the expansion of the tumor and involvement of the adjacent structures. (authors)

  19. Discontinuous Schedule of Bevacizumab in Colorectal Cancer Induces Accelerated Tumor Growth and Phenotypic Changes

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    Selma Becherirat

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Antiangiogenics administration in colorectal cancer patients seemed promising therapeutic approach. Inspite of early encouraging results, it however gave only modest clinical benefits. When AAG was administered with discontinuous schedule, the disease showed acceleration in certain cases. Though resistance to AAG has been extensively studied, it is not documented for discontinuous schedules. To simulate clinical situations, we subjected a patient-derived CRC subcutaneous xenograft in mice to three different protocols: 1 AAG (bevacizumab treatment for 30 days (group A (group B was the control, 2 bevacizumab treatment for 50 days (group C and bevacizumab for 30 days and 20 without treatment (group D, and 3 bevacizumab treatment for 70 days (group E and 70 days treatment with a drug-break period between day 30 and 50 (group F. The tumor growth was monitored, and at sacrifice, the vascularity of tumors was measured and the proangiogenic factors quantified. Tumor phenotype was studied by quantifying cancer stem cells. Interrupting bevacizumab during treatment accelerated tumor growth and revascularization. A significant increase of proangiogenic factors was observed when therapy was stopped. On withdrawal of bevacizumab, as also after the drug-break period, the plasmatic VEGF increased significantly. Similarly, a notable increase of CSCs after the withdrawal and drug-break period of bevacizumab was observed (P<.01. The present study indicates that bevacizumab treatment needs to be maintained because discontinuous schedules tend to trigger tumor regrowth, and increase tumor resistance and CSC heterogeneity.

  20. Changes in chromatin state reveal ARNT2 at a node of a tumorigenic transcription factor signature driving glioblastoma cell aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogeas, Alexandra; Morvan-Dubois, Ghislaine; El-Habr, Elias A; Lejeune, François-Xavier; Defrance, Matthieu; Narayanan, Ashwin; Kuranda, Klaudia; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Sayd, Salwa; Delaunay, Virgile; Dubois, Luiz G; Parrinello, Hugues; Rialle, Stéphanie; Fabrega, Sylvie; Idbaih, Ahmed; Haiech, Jacques; Bièche, Ivan; Virolle, Thierry; Goodhardt, Michele; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Junier, Marie-Pierre

    2018-02-01

    Although a growing body of evidence indicates that phenotypic plasticity exhibited by glioblastoma cells plays a central role in tumor development and post-therapy recurrence, the master drivers of their aggressiveness remain elusive. Here we mapped the changes in active (H3K4me3) and repressive (H3K27me3) histone modifications accompanying the repression of glioblastoma stem-like cells tumorigenicity. Genes with changing histone marks delineated a network of transcription factors related to cancerous behavior, stem state, and neural development, highlighting a previously unsuspected association between repression of ARNT2 and loss of cell tumorigenicity. Immunohistochemistry confirmed ARNT2 expression in cell sub-populations within proliferative zones of patients' glioblastoma. Decreased ARNT2 expression was consistently observed in non-tumorigenic glioblastoma cells, compared to tumorigenic cells. Moreover, ARNT2 expression correlated with a tumorigenic molecular signature at both the tissue level within the tumor core and at the single cell level in the patients' tumors. We found that ARNT2 knockdown decreased the expression of SOX9, POU3F2 and OLIG2, transcription factors implicated in glioblastoma cell tumorigenicity, and repressed glioblastoma stem-like cell tumorigenic properties in vivo. Our results reveal ARNT2 as a pivotal component of the glioblastoma cell tumorigenic signature, located at a node of a transcription factor network controlling glioblastoma cell aggressiveness.

  1. Surprisal analysis of Glioblastoma Multiform (GBM) microRNA dynamics unveils tumor specific phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadran, Sohila; Remacle, Francoise; Levine, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Gliomablastoma multiform (GBM) is the most fatal form of all brain cancers in humans. Currently there are limited diagnostic tools for GBM detection. Here, we applied surprisal analysis, a theory grounded in thermodynamics, to unveil how biomolecule energetics, specifically a redistribution of free energy amongst microRNAs (miRNAs), results in a system deviating from a non-cancer state to the GBM cancer -specific phenotypic state. Utilizing global miRNA microarray expression data of normal and GBM patients tumors, surprisal analysis characterizes a miRNA system response capable of distinguishing GBM samples from normal tissue biopsy samples. We indicate that the miRNAs contributing to this system behavior is a disease phenotypic state specific to GBM and is therefore a unique GBM-specific thermodynamic signature. MiRNAs implicated in the regulation of stochastic signaling processes crucial in the hallmarks of human cancer, dominate this GBM-cancer phenotypic state. With this theory, we were able to distinguish with high fidelity GBM patients solely by monitoring the dynamics of miRNAs present in patients' biopsy samples. We anticipate that the GBM-specific thermodynamic signature will provide a critical translational tool in better characterizing cancer types and in the development of future therapeutics for GBM.

  2. Increase of bcl-2 Protein Expression in Aggressive Basal Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck

    OpenAIRE

    Cláudia CAZAL; Mariana Roesch ELY; Ana Paula Veras SOBRAL; Wilton Wilney Nascimento PADILHA

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to verify the bcl-2 protein expression in 22 cutaneous basal cell carcinomas (BCC) of the head and neck, and to compare it with its aggressive behavior. Method: Tumors were histologically classified in non-aggressive (BCC 1) and aggressive (BCC 2) and then submitted to the immunohistochemistry technique with the streptavidin-biotin peroxidase method using the anti-bcl-2 antibody. Results: After proceeding to morphological analysis, sixteen tumors (72.7%) w...

  3. Biomimetic brain tumor niche regulates glioblastoma cells towards a cancer stem cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yung-Chiang; Lee, I-Chi; Chen, Pin-Yuan

    2018-05-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most malignant primary brain tumor and contains tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSCs), which support the progression of tumor growth. The selection of CSCs and facilitation of the brain tumor niches may assist the development of novel therapeutics for GBM. Herein, hydrogel materials composed of agarose and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HMC) in different concentrations were established and compared to emulate brain tumor niches and CSC microenvironments within a label-free system. Human GBM cell line, U-87 MG, was cultured on a series of HMC-agarose based culture system. Cell aggregation and spheroids formation were investigated after 4 days of culture, and 2.5% HMC-agarose based culture system demonstrated the largest spheroids number and size. Moreover, CD133 marker expression of GBM cells after 6 days of culture in 2.5% HMC-agarose based culture system was 60%, relatively higher than the control group at only 15%. Additionally, cells on 2.5% HMC-agarose based culture system show the highest chemoresistance, even at the high dose of 500 µM temozolomide for 72 h, the live cell ratio was still > 80%. Furthermore, the results also indicate that the expression of ABCG2 gene was up-regulated after culture in 2.5% HMC-agarose based culture system. Therefore, our results demonstrated that biomimetic brain tumor microenvironment may regulate GBM cells towards the CSC phenotype and expression of CSC characteristics. The microenvironment selection and spheroids formation in HMC-agarose based culture system may provide a label-free CSC selection strategy and drug testing model for future biomedical applications.

  4. Adipokines, myokines and cytokines in endometrial cancer patients: relations to obesity phenotype of excessive body mass and features of the tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev M. Berstein

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study serum content of a number of known adipokines, myokines and cytokines and compare obtained data with overweight phenotype and characteristics of tumor in untreated patients with endometrial cancer (EC Materials and methods. The study included 88 patients with a mean age 60.08±0.67 years and a mean body mass index (BMI 32.90±0.83. Patients were subjected to anthropometry and analysis of laboratory parameters, including serum level of leptin, adiponectin, omentin, prefilin (Pref-1, myostatin, irisin, IL-6 as well as insulinemia and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR. On the basis of combination of anthropometric and laboratory data patients with overweight (BMI >25.0 were subdivided into the groups with "standard" (S and conditionally "metabolically healthy" (MH phenotype. Results. Levels of leptin, insulin and adiponectin in the serum of patients with EC are associated with BMI value and demonstrate significant differences between S and MH groups. Levels of prefilin, myostatin, and IL-6 are not associated with an increase in BMI, but are also different in patients with S and MH phenotype of overweight.For levels oа irisin, omentin, and TNF-alphathere is no peculiar dependence both, the BMI, and of belonging to a group with S or MH phenotype. Omentin level in the serum is associated with less favorable tumor differentiation (MH group, while IL-6 level – with a more advanced stage of the tumor (all patients and group S. Conclusion. Adipokines, myokines and cytokines circulating in blood of EC patients vary in their connections with BMI or with "standard" or "metabolically healthy" phenotype of its excess. They vary also in relation to EC features, which in sum may have practical importance.

  5. Different angiogenic phenotypes in primary and secondary glioblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, Sibylle; Steiner, Hans-Herbert; Ahmadi, Rezvan; Zoubaa, Saida; Vasvari, Gergely; Bauer, Harry; Unterberg, Andreas; Herold-Mende, Christel

    2006-05-01

    Primary and secondary glioblastomas (pGBM, sGBM) are supposed to evolve through different genetic pathways, including EGF receptor and PDGF and its receptor and thus genes that are involved in tumor-induced angiogenesis. However, whether other angiogenic cytokines are also differentially expressed in these glioblastoma subtypes is not known so far, but this knowledge might be important to optimize an antiangiogenic therapy. Therefore, we studied the expression of several angiogenic cytokines, including VEGF-A, HGF, bFGF, PDGF-AB, PDGF-BB, G-CSF and GM-CSF in pGBMs and sGBMs as well as in gliomas WHO III, the precursor lesions of sGBMs. In tumor tissues, expression of all cytokines was observed albeit with marked differences concerning intensity and distribution pattern. Quantification of the cytokines in the supernatant of 30 tissue-corresponding glioma cultures revealed a predominant expression of VEGF-A in pGBMs and significantly higher expression levels of PDGF-AB in sGBMs. HGF and bFGF were determined in nearly all tumor cultures but with no GBM subtype or malignancy-related differences. Interestingly, GM-CSF and especially G-CSF were produced less frequently by tumor cells. However, GM-CSF secretion occurred together with an increased number of simultaneously secreted cytokines and correlated with a worse patient prognosis and may thus represent a more aggressive angiogenic phenotype. Finally, we confirmed an independent contribution of each tumor-derived cytokine analyzed to tumor-induced vascularization. Our data indicate that an optimal antiangiogenic therapy may require targeting of multiple angiogenic pathways that seem to differ markedly in pGBMs and sGBMs. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Functional Characterization and Drug Response of Freshly Established Patient-Derived Tumor Models with CpG Island Methylator Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Maletzki

    Full Text Available Patient-individual tumor models constitute a powerful platform for basic and translational analyses both in vitro and in vivo. However, due to the labor-intensive and highly time-consuming process, only few well-characterized patient-derived cell lines and/or corresponding xenografts exist. In this study, we describe successful generation and functional analysis of novel tumor models from patients with sporadic primary colorectal carcinomas (CRC showing CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP. Initial DNA fingerprint analysis confirmed identity with the patient in all four cases. These freshly established cells showed characteristic features associated with the CIMP-phenotype (HROC40: APCwt, TP53 mut, KRAS mut; 3/8 marker methylated; HROC43: APC mut, TP53 mut, KRAS mut; 4/8 marker methylated; HROC60: APCwt, TP53 mut, KRASwt; 4/8 marker methylated; HROC183: APC mut, TP53 mut, KRAS mut; 6/8 marker methylated. Cell lines were of epithelial origin (EpCAM+ with distinct morphology and growth kinetics. Response to chemotherapeutics was quite individual between cells, with stage I-derived cell line HROC60 being most susceptible towards standard clinically approved chemotherapeutics (e.g. 5-FU, Irinotecan. Of note, most cell lines were sensitive towards "non-classical" CRC standard drugs (sensitivity: Gemcitabin > Rapamycin > Nilotinib. This comprehensive analysis of tumor biology, genetic alterations and assessment of chemosensitivity towards a broad range of (chemo- therapeutics helps bringing forward the concept of personalized tumor therapy.

  7. Chemokine (C-X-C) ligand 1 (CXCL1) protein expression is increased in aggressive bladder cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Makito; Lawton, Adrienne; Goodison, Steve; Urquidi, Virginia; Gomes-Giacoia, Evan; Zhang, Ge; Ross, Shanti; Kim, Jeongsoon; Rosser, Charles J

    2013-01-01

    Chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), may regulate tumor epithelial-stromal interactions that facilitate tumor growth and invasion. Studies have linked CXCL1 expression to gastric, colon and skin cancers, but limited studies to date have described CXCL1 protein expression in human bladder cancer (BCa). CXCL1 protein expression was examined in 152 bladder tissue specimens (142 BCa) by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of CXCL1 was scored by assigning a combined score based on the proportion of cells staining and intensity of staining. CXCL1 expression patterns were correlated with clinicopathological features and follow-up data. CXCL1 protein expression was present in cancerous tissues, but was entirely absent in benign tissue. CXCL1 combined immunostaining score was significantly higher in high-grade tumors relative to low-grade tumors (p = 0.012). Similarly, CXCL1 combined immunostaining score was higher in high stage tumors (T2-T4) than in low stage tumors (Ta-T1) (p < 0.0001). An increase in the combined immunostaining score of CXCL1 was also associated with reduced disease-specific survival. To date, this is the largest study describing increased CXCL1 protein expression in more aggressive phenotypes in human BCa. Further studies are warranted to define the role CXCL1 plays in bladder carcinogenesis and progression

  8. Tachykinin expression levels correlate with caste-specific aggression in workers of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howe, Jack; Schiøtt, Morten; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    2016-01-01

    The tachykinins are a family of neuropeptides that influence a range of behavioral phenotypes in both vertebrates and invertebrates; they appear to have a conserved role in the processing of stimuli, and in the control of aggression in a wide range of animals. Expression of tachykinin in a cluster......, a species with multiple worker castes. After correction for differences in brain size among castes, we found that the most aggressive large worker caste had the highest Tachykinin expression levels, but that no such effect was apparent for breeding and virgin queens. To further evaluate these deviating...... results for the reproductive caste, we manipulated the aggression threshold of virgin-queens by removing their wings, which is known to make them express a soldier-like behavioral phenotype. Despite heightened aggression, expression levels of Tachykinin remained unaffected, suggesting that aggression...

  9. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic castrationresistant prostate cancer: a report from the PETRUS prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massard, Christophe; Oulhen, Marianne; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Auger, Nathalie; Foulon, Stéphanie; Abou-Lovergne, Aurélie; Billiot, Fanny; Valent, Alexander; Marty, Virginie; Loriot, Yohann; Fizazi, Karim; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Francoise

    2016-01-01

    Molecular characterization of cancer samples is hampered by tumor tissue availability in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. We reported the results of prospective PETRUS study of biomarker assessment in paired primary prostatic tumors, metastatic biopsies and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Among 54 mCRPC patients enrolled, 38 (70%) had biopsies containing more than 50% tumour cells. 28 (52%) patients were analyzed for both tissue samples and CTCs. FISH for AR-amplification and TMPRSS2-ERG translocation were successful in 54% and 32% in metastatic biopsies and primary tumors, respectively. By comparing CellSearch and filtration (ISET)-enrichment combined to four color immunofluorescent staining, we showed that CellSearch and ISET isolated distinct subpopulations of CTCs: CTCs undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, CTC clusters and large CTCs with cytomorphological characteristics but no detectable markers were isolated using ISET. Epithelial CTCs detected by the CellSearch were mostly lost during the ISET-filtration. AR-amplification was detected in CellSearch-captured CTCs, but not in ISET-enriched CTCs which harbor exclusively AR gain of copies. Eighty-eight percent concordance for ERG-rearrangement was observed between metastatic biopsies and CTCs even if additional ERG-alteration patterns were detected in ISET-enriched CTCs indicating a higher heterogeneity in CTCs. Molecular screening of metastatic biopsies is achievable in a multicenter context. Our data indicate that CTCs detected by the CellSearch and the ISET-filtration systems are not only phenotypically but also genetically different. Close attention must be paid to CTC characterization since neither approach tested here fully reflects the tremendous phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity present in CTCs from mCRPC patients. PMID:27391263

  10. Ethanol exposure induces the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype and lethal tumor metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Lin, Zhao; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Rubin, Emanuel; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how alcohol consumption promotes the onset of human breast cancer(s). One hypothesis is that ethanol induces metabolic changes in the tumor microenvironment, which then enhances epithelial tumor growth. To experimentally test this hypothesis, we used a co-culture system consisting of human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts. Here, we show that ethanol treatment (100 mM) promotes ROS production and oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts, which is sufficient to induce myofibroblastic differentiation. Oxidative stress in stromal fibroblasts also results in the onset of autophagy/mitophagy, driving the induction of ketone body production in the tumor microenvironment. Interestingly, ethanol has just the opposite effect in epithelial cancer cells, where it confers autophagy resistance, elevates mitochondrial biogenesis and induces key enzymes associated with ketone re-utilization (ACAT1/OXCT1). During co-culture, ethanol treatment also converts MCF7 cells from an ER(+) to an ER(-) status, which is thought to be associated with “stemness,” more aggressive behavior and a worse prognosis. Thus, ethanol treatment induces ketone production in cancer-associated fibroblasts and ketone re-utilization in epithelial cancer cells, fueling tumor cell growth via oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). This “two-compartment” metabolic model is consistent with previous historical observations that ethanol is first converted to acetaldehyde (which induces oxidative stress) and then ultimately to acetyl-CoA (a high-energy mitochondrial fuel), or can be used to synthesize ketone bodies. As such, our results provide a novel mechanism by which alcohol consumption could metabolically convert “low-risk” breast cancer patients to “high-risk” status, explaining tumor recurrence or disease progression. Hence, our findings have clear implications for both breast cancer prevention and therapy. Remarkably, our results

  11. Loss of Cdh1 and Trp53 in the uterus induces chronic inflammation with modification of tumor microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Stodden, Genna R.; Lindberg, Mallory E.; King, Mandy L.; Paquet, Maril?ne; MacLean, James A.; Mann, Jordan L.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lydon, John P.; Hayashi, Kanako

    2014-01-01

    Type II endometrial carcinomas are estrogen independent, poorly differentiated tumors that behave in an aggressive manner. Since TP53 mutation and CDH1 inactivation occur in 80% of human endometrial type II carcinomas, we hypothesized that mouse uteri lacking both Trp53 and Cdh1 would exhibit a phenotype indicative of neoplastic transformation. Mice with conditional ablation of Cdh1 and Trp53 (Cdh1d/dTrp53d/d ) clearly demonstrate architectural features characteristic of type II endometrial c...

  12. Computed tomography in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanem, Nadir; Altehoefer, Carsten; Winterer, Jan; Schaefer, Oliver; Springer, Oliver; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Furtwaengler, Alex

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the imaging characteristics of primary and recurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in computed tomography with respect to the tumor size. Computed tomography was performed in 35 patients with histologically confirmed gastrointestinal stromal tumors and analyzed retrospectively by two experienced and independent radiologist. The following morphologic tumor characteristics of primary (n=20) and (n=16) recurrent tumors were evaluated according to tumor size, shape, homogeneity, density compared with liver, contrast enhancement, presence of calcifications, ulcerations, fistula or distant metastases and the anatomical relationship to the intestinal wall, and the infiltration of adjacent visceral organs. Small GIST ( 5-10 cm) demonstrated an irregular shape, inhomogeneous density on unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images, a combined intra- and extraluminal tumor growth with aggressive findings, and infiltration of adjacent organs in 9 primary diagnosed and 2 recurrent tumors. Large GIST (>10 cm), which were observed in 8 primary tumors and 11 recurrent tumors, showed an irregular margin with inhomogeneous density and aggressive findings, and were characterized by signs of malignancy such as distant and peritoneal metastases. Small recurrent tumors had a similar appearance as compared with large primary tumors. Computed tomography gives additional information with respect to the relationship of gastrointestinal stromal tumor to the gastrointestinal wall and surrounding organs, and it detects distant metastasis. Primary and recurrent GIST demonstrate characteristic CT imaging features which are related to tumor size. Aggressive findings and signs of malignancy are found in larger tumors and in recurrent disease. Computed tomography is useful in detection and characterization of primary and recurrent tumors with regard to tumor growth pattern, tumor size, and varied appearances of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and indirectly

  13. Tachykinin expression levels correlate with caste-specific aggression in workers of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack eHowe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The tachykinins are a family of neuropeptides that influence a range of behavioral phenotypes in both vertebrates and invertebrates; they appear to have a conserved role in the processing of stimuli, and in the control of aggression in a wide range of animals. Expression of tachykinin in a cluster of neurons was recently shown to determine the stimulus response threshold for aggressive behavior in Drosophila (1. Varying response thresholds are often implicated in division of labor within social insect colonies, so we hypothesized that Tachykinin could play a role in the organization of colony defense by affecting individual response thresholds to non-nestmate stimuli. We used quantitative-PCR in combination with behavioral assays to test for associations between the expression of Tachykinin and its receptor, and the aggressive division of labor among the castes of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior, a species with multiple worker castes. After correction for differences in brain size among castes, we found that the most aggressive large worker caste had the highest Tachykinin expression levels, but that no such effect was apparent for breeding and virgin queens. To further evaluate these deviating results for the reproductive caste, we manipulated the aggression threshold of virgin-queens by removing their wings, which is known to make them express a soldier-like behavioral phenotype. Despite heightened aggression, expression levels of Tachykinin remained unaffected, suggesting that aggression levels in reproductive caste phenotypes are controlled by differential expression of other genes.

  14. Mesenchymal Tumors Can Derive from Ng2/Cspg4-Expressing Pericytes with β-Catenin Modulating the Neoplastic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Sato

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The cell of origin for most mesenchymal tumors is unclear. One cell type that contributes to this lineages is the pericyte, a cell expressing Ng2/Cspg4. Using lineage tracing, we demonstrated that bone and soft tissue sarcomas driven by the deletion of the Trp53 tumor suppressor, or desmoid tumors driven by a mutation in Apc, can derive from cells expressing Ng2/Cspg4. Deletion of the Trp53 tumor suppressor gene in these cells resulted in the bone and soft tissue sarcomas that closely resemble human sarcomas, while stabilizing β-catenin in this same cell type caused desmoid tumors. Comparing expression between Ng2/Cspg4-expressing pericytes lacking Trp53 and sarcomas that arose from deletion of Trp53 showed inhibition of β-catenin signaling in the sarcomas. Activation of β-catenin inhibited the formation and growth of sarcomas. Thus, pericytes can be a cell of origin for mesenchymal tumors, and β-catenin dysregulation plays an important role in the neoplastic phenotype.

  15. Individualizing management of aggressive fibromatoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spear, Matthew A.; Jennings, L. Candace; Mankin, Henry J.; Spiro, Ira J.; Springfield, Dempsy S.; Gebhardt, Mark C.; Rosenberg, Andrew E.; Efird, James T.; Suit, Herman D.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To examine prognostic indicators in aggressive fibromatoses that may be used to optimize case-specific management strategy. Methods and Materials: One hundred and seven fibromatoses presenting between 1971 and 1992 were analyzed. The following treatment modalities were utilized: (a) surgery alone for 51 tumors; (b) radiation alone for 15 tumors; and (c) radiation and surgery (combined modality) for 41 tumors. Outcome analysis was based on 5-year actuarial local control rates. Results: Control rates among surgery, radiation therapy, and combined modality groups were 69%, 93%, and 72%. Multivariate analysis identified age 60 Gy was seen in patients with unresected or gross residual disease. Of the patients, 23 with disease involving the plantar region had a control rate of 62%, with significantly worse outcomes in children. Conclusions: These results are consistent with those found in the relevent literature. They support primary resection with negative margins when feasible. Radiation is a highly effective alternative in situations where surgery would result in major functional or cosmetic defects. When negative surgical margins are not achieved in recurrent tumors, radiation is recommended. Perioperative radiation should be considered in other high-risk groups (recurrent disease, positive margins, and plantar tumors in young patients). Doses of 60-65 Gy for gross disease and 50-60 Gy for microscopic residual are recommended. Observation may be considered for primary tumors with disease remaining in situ when they are located such that progression would not cause significant morbidity. Although plantar lesions in children may represent a group at high risk for recurrence or aggressive behavior, the greater potential for radiation-induced morbidity in this group must also temper its use. Given the inconsistent nature and treatment response of this tumor, it is fundamental that treatment recommendations should be made based on the risk:benefit analysis for

  16. Clinicopathologic features of aggressive meningioma emphasizing the role of radiotherapy in treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engenhart-Cabillic, R.; Henzel, M. [Philipps Univ., Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology; Farhoud, A.; Sure, U.; Heinze, S.; Bertalanffy, H. [Philipps Univ., Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Mennel, H.D. [Philipps Univ., Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Neuropathology

    2006-11-15

    Background and Purpose: Although meningiomas are typically benign, they occasionally behave in an aggressive fashion and carry a less favorable prognosis. The aim of this study was to review the clinical, radiologic and histopathologic features of these aggressive variants as well as the outcome after multimodality therapy. Patients and Methods: 16 patients with atypical meningiomas (n=11) and anaplastic meningiomas (n=5) were treated in the Departments of Neurosurgery and Radiation Oncology at the University Hospital of Philipps University Marburg, Germany, between 1997 and 2003. Tumor grading was based on new WHO criteria. There were eleven men and five women with a mean age of 54 years. The median follow-up period was 34 months. Results: A total of 24 surgical procedures were performed for these 16 patients. Only seven patients underwent postoperative fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Patients with atypical meningioma received radiotherapy only for the recurrent disease. Six patients (37.5%) experienced tumor recurrence after a mean period of 27.2 months in spite of gross total resection. Radiographic findings suggestive of aggressiveness were observed mostly with WHO grade III meningiomas. By comparing the proliferation rate in four cases with atypical meningioma operated twice, the recurrent tumor had a higher proliferation rate than the first tumor in three cases. A special proliferation pattern was noticed in MIB-1 with anaplastic meningiomas. The mean overall survival period was 66.5 months. There was no mortality among patients with atypical meningioma, while four out of five patients with anaplastic meningioma died during follow-up. Conclusion: Considering the higher rate of recurrence in aggressive meningiomas even after radical surgical excision and the possibility that the recurrent tumor is more aggressive than the original one, surgery should be combined with postoperative fractionated radiotherapy to improve local tumor control. The peculiar

  17. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: A report from the PETRUS prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massard, Christophe; Oulhen, Marianne; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Auger, Nathalie; Foulon, Stéphanie; Abou-Lovergne, Aurélie; Billiot, Fanny; Valent, Alexander; Marty, Virginie; Loriot, Yohann; Fizazi, Karim; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Francoise

    2016-08-23

    Molecular characterization of cancer samples is hampered by tumor tissue availability in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. We reported the results of prospective PETRUS study of biomarker assessment in paired primary prostatic tumors, metastatic biopsies and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Among 54 mCRPC patients enrolled, 38 (70%) had biopsies containing more than 50% tumour cells. 28 (52%) patients were analyzed for both tissue samples and CTCs. FISH for AR-amplification and TMPRSS2-ERG translocation were successful in 54% and 32% in metastatic biopsies and primary tumors, respectively. By comparing CellSearch and filtration (ISET)-enrichment combined to four color immunofluorescent staining, we showed that CellSearch and ISET isolated distinct subpopulations of CTCs: CTCs undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, CTC clusters and large CTCs with cytomorphological characteristics but no detectable markers were isolated using ISET. Epithelial CTCs detected by the CellSearch were mostly lost during the ISET-filtration. AR-amplification was detected in CellSearch-captured CTCs, but not in ISET-enriched CTCs which harbor exclusively AR gain of copies. Eighty-eight percent concordance for ERG-rearrangement was observed between metastatic biopsies and CTCs even if additional ERG-alteration patterns were detected in ISET-enriched CTCs indicating a higher heterogeneity in CTCs.Molecular screening of metastatic biopsies is achievable in a multicenter context. Our data indicate that CTCs detected by the CellSearch and the ISET-filtration systems are not only phenotypically but also genetically different. Close attention must be paid to CTC characterization since neither approach tested here fully reflects the tremendous phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity present in CTCs from mCRPC patients.

  18. Spontaneous transformation of human granulosa cell tumours into an aggressive phenotype: a metastasis model cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Misa; Muraki, Miho; Takamatsu, Kiyoshi; Saito, Hidekazu; Seiki, Motoharu; Takahashi, Yuji

    2008-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumours (GCTs) are frequently seen in menopausal women and are relatively indolent. Although the physiological properties of normal granulosa cells have been studied extensively, little is known about the molecular mechanism of GCT progression. Here, we characterise the unique behavioural properties of a granulosa tumour cell line, KGN cells, for the molecular analysis of GCT progression. Population doubling was carried out to examine the proliferation capacity of KGN cells. Moreover, the invasive capacity of these cells was determined using the in vitro invasion assay. The expression level of tumour markers in KGN cells at different passages was then determined by Western blot analysis. Finally, the growth and metastasis of KGN cells injected subcutaneously (s.c.) into nude mice was observed 3 months after injection. During in vitro culture, the advanced passage KGN cells grew 2-fold faster than the early passage cells, as determined by the population doubling assay. Moreover, we found that the advanced passage cells were 2-fold more invasive than the early passage cells. The expression pattern of tumour markers, such as p53, osteopontin, BAX and BAG-1, supported the notion that with passage, KGN cells became more aggressive. Strikingly, KGN cells at both early and advanced passages metastasized to the bowel when injected s.c. into nude mice. In addition, more tumour nodules were formed when the advanced passage cells were implanted. KGN cells cultured in vitro acquire an aggressive phenotype, which was confirmed by the analysis of cellular activities and the expression of biomarkers. Interestingly, KGN cells injected s.c. are metastatic with nodule formation occurring mostly in the bowel. Thus, this cell line is a good model for analysing GCT progression and the mechanism of metastasis in vivo

  19. Ewing’s sarcoma: an uncommon breast tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawsen Meddeb

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ewing’s sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumors (EWS/PNET are rare malignant and aggressive tumors, usually seen in the trunk and lower limbs of children and young adults. They are uncommon in the breast. We report a case of a 43-year-old woman who developed a painless breast mass. An initial core needle biopsy concluded to a fibrocystic dystrophy contrasting with a rapidly growing mass; thus a large lumpectomy was done. Diagnosis of primary PNET of the breast was established, based on both histopathological examination and immunohistochemical findings. Surgical margins were positive, therefore, left modified radical mastectomy with axillary lymph nodes dissection was performed. The patient was given 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy containing cyclophosphamide, adriamycin and vincristine. Twenty months later, she is in life without recurrence or metastasis. EWS/PNET may impose a diagnostic challenge. Indeed, mammography and ultrasonography features are non specific. The histopathological pattern is variable depending on the degree of neuroectodermal differentiation. Immuno-phenotyping is necessary and genetic study is the only confirmatory tool of diagnosis showing a characteristic cytogenetic anomaly; t (11; 22 translocation.

  20. Tumor bulk as a prognostic factor for the management of localized aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a survey of the Japan lymphoma radiation therapy group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguchi, Masahiko; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Isobe, Kouichi; Hirota, Saeko; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasai, Keisuke; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the prognostic factors that specifically predict survival rates of patients with localized aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Methods and Materials: The survey was carried out at 25 radiation oncology institutions in Japan in 1998. The 5-year event-free (EFS) and overall survival rates (OAS) were calculated, and univariate and multivariate analyses were done to identify which of the following factors, namely, gender, age, performance status (PS), serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, Stage (I vs. II), tumor bulk (maximum diameter), and treatment, were significant from the viewpoint of prognosis. Results: A total of 1141 patients with Stage I and II NHL were treated by the Japanese Lymphoma Radiation Therapy Group between 1988 and 1992. Of them, 787 patients, who were treated using definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy for intermediate- and high-grade lymphomas in working formulation, constituted the core of this study. Primary tumors arose mainly from extranodal organs (71%) in the head and neck (Waldeyer's ring: 36% and sinonasal cavities: 9%). The factors associated with poorer prognosis were age over 60 years old (p < 0.0001), radiation therapy alone (p < 0.0001), PS = 2-4 (p = 0.0011), (sex male, p = 0.0078), a bulky tumor more than 6 cm in maximum diameter (p 0.0088), elevated LDH (p = 0.0117), and stage II (p = 0.0642). A median dose of 42 Gy was delivered mainly to the involved fields. Short-course chemotherapy was provided in 549 (70%) patients. The 5-year OAS and EFS rates for all patients were 71% and 67%, respectively. According to the stage-modified International Prognostic Index, the 5-year EFS of the patients with risk factors from 0 to 1 was 76%, 61% for patients with two risk factors, and 26% for patients with three or more risk factors. Conclusion: Extranodal presentation, especially Waldeyer's ring and sinonasal cavities, is encountered more frequently in Japan than in Western countries. Tumor bulk is

  1. SRC: marker or actor in prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaeminck-Guillem, Virginie; Gillet, Germain; Rimokh, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    A key question for urologic practitioners is whether an apparently organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa) is actually aggressive or not. The dilemma is to specifically identify among all prostate tumors the very aggressive high-grade cancers that will become life-threatening by developing extra-prostatic invasion and metastatic potential and the indolent cancers that will never modify a patient's life expectancy. A choice must be made between several therapeutic options to achieve the optimal personalized management of the disease that causes as little harm as possible to patients. Reliable clinical, biological, or pathological markers that would enable distinctions to be made between aggressive and indolent PCas in routine practice at the time of initial diagnosis are still lacking. The molecular mechanisms that explain why a PCa is aggressive or not are also poorly understood. Among the potential markers and/or actors in PCa aggressiveness, Src and other members of the Src kinase family, are valuable candidates. Activation of Src-dependent intracellular pathways is frequently observed in PCa. Indeed, Src is at the cross-roads of several pathways [including androgen receptor (AR), TGFbeta, Bcl-2, Akt/PTEN or MAPK, and ERK …], and is now known to influence some of the cellular and tissular events that accompany tumor progression: cell proliferation, cell motility, invasion, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, resistance to apoptosis, angiogenesis, neuroendocrine differentiation, and metastatic spread. Recent work even suggests that Src could also play a part in PCa initiation in coordination with the AR. The aim of this review is to gather data that explore the links between the Src kinase family and PCa progression and aggressiveness.

  2. Src: marker or actor of prostate cancer aggressiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie eVlaeminck-Guillem

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A key question for urologic practitioners is whether an apparently organ-confined prostate cancer is actually aggressive or not. The dilemma is to specifically identify among all prostate tumors the very aggressive high-grade cancers that will become life-threatening by developing extra-prostatic invasion and metastatic potential and the indolent cancers that will never modify a patient’s life expectancy. A choice must be made between several therapeutic options to achieve the optimal personalized management of the disease that causes as little harm as possible to patients. Reliable clinical, biological or pathological markers that would enable distinctions to be made between aggressive and indolen prostate cancers in routine practice at the time of initial diagnosis are still lacking. The molecular mechanisms that explain why a prostate cancer is aggressive or not are also poorly understood. Among the potential markers and/or actors in prostate cancer aggressiveness, Src and other members of the Src kinase family, are valuable candidates. Activation of Src-dependent intracellular pathways is frequently observed in prostate cancer. Indeed, Src is at the cross-roads of several pathways (including androgen receptor, TGFbeta, Bcl-2, Akt/PTEN or MAPK and ERK …, and is now known to influence some of the cellular and tissular events that accompany tumor progression: cell proliferation, cell motility, invasion, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, resistance to apoptosis, angiogenesis, neuroendocrine differentiation, and metastatic spread. Recent work even suggests that Src could also play a part in prostate cancer initiation in coordination with the androgen receptor. The aim of this review is to gather data that explores the links between the Src kinase family and prostate cancer progression and aggressiveness.

  3. "Primary" aggressive chondroblastoma of the humerus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alva N Kishore

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chondroblastomas are rare epiphyseal bone tumors. Very few cases with extra-cortical aggressive soft tissue invasion or metastasis are reported. Case presentation We report a 28 year-old adult male who presented with a large swelling over the left shoulder region. Pre-operative imaging revealed a large tumor arising from upper end of humerus with extensive soft tissue involvement necessitating a fore-quarter amputation. Patient received adjuvant radiation. Conclusions This patient is one of the largest chondroblastomas to be reported. Although chondroblastomas are typically benign, rarely they can be locally aggressive or metastatic. Early diagnosis and institution of proper primary therapy would prevent mutilating surgeries and recurrences.

  4. METALLOPROTEINS DURING DEVELOPMENT OF WALKER-256 CARCINOSARCOMA RESISTANT PHENOTYPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhun, V F; Lozovska, Yu V; Burlaka, A P; Ganusevich, I I; Shvets, Yu V; Lukianova, N Yu; Todor, I M; Demash, D V; Pavlova, A A; Naleskina, L A

    2015-01-01

    The study was focused on the detection of changes in serum and tumor metal-containing proteins in animals during development ofdoxorubicin-resistant phenotype in malignant cells after 12 courses of chemotherapy. We found that on every stage of resistance development there was a significant increase in content of ferritin and transferrin proteins (which take part in iron traffick and storage) in Walker-256 carc'inosarcoma tissue. We observed decreased serumferritin levels at the beginning stage of the resistance development and significant elevation of this protein levels in the cases withfully developed resistance phenotype. Transferrin content showed changes opposite to that offerritin. During the development of resistance phenotype the tumor tissue also exhibited increased 'free iron' concentration that putatively correlate with elevation of ROS generation and levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 active forms. The tumor non-protein thiol content increases gradually as well. The serum of animals with early stages of resistance phenotype development showed high ceruloplasmin activity and its significant reduction after loss of tumor sensitivity to doxorubicin. Therefore, the development of resistance phenotype in Walker-256 carcinosarcoma is accompanied by both the deregulation of metal-containing proteins in serum and tumor tissue and by the changes in activity of antioxidant defense system. Thus, the results of this study allow us to determine the spectrum of metal-containing proteins that are involved in the development of resistant tumor phenotype and that may be targeted for methods for doxorubicin sensitivity correction therapy.

  5. Alternative phenotypes of male mating behaviour in the two-spotted spider mite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sato, Y.; Sabelis, M.W.; Egas, M.; Faraji, F.

    2013-01-01

    Severe intraspecific competition for mates selects for aggressive individuals but may also lead to the evolution of alternative phenotypes that do not act aggressively, yet manage to acquire matings. The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, shows male mate-guarding behaviour and male-male

  6. Overexpression of Dimethylarginine Dimethylaminohydrolase Enhances Tumor Hypoxia: An Insight into the Relationship of Hypoxia and Angiogenesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassiliki Kostourou

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The oxygenation status of tumors derived from wild-type C6 glioma cells and clone D27 cells overexpressing dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH was assessed in vivo using a variety of direct and indirect assays of hypoxia. Clone D27 tumors exhibit a more aggressive and better-vascularized phenotype compared to wild-type C6 gliomas. Immunohistochemical analyses using the 2-nitroimidazole hypoxia marker pimonidazole, fiber optic OxyLite measurements of tumor pO2, and localized 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements of tumor bioenergetic status and pH clearly demonstrated that the D27 tumors were more hypoxic compared to C6 wild type. In the tumor extracts, only glucose concentrations were significantly lower in the D27 tumors. Elevated Glut-1 expression, a reliable functional marker for hypoxia-inducible factor-1-mediated metabolic adaptation, was observed in the D27 tumors. Together, the data show that overexpression of DDAH results in C6 gliomas that are more hypoxic compared to wild-type tumors, and point strongly to an inverse relationship of tumor oxygenation and angiogenesis in vivo-a concept now being supported by the enhanced understanding of oxygen sensing at the molecular level.

  7. Tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC) suppresses tumor growth and enhances chemosensitivity in human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hage-Sleiman, Rouba; Herveau, Stéphanie; Matera, Eva-Laure; Laurier, Jean-Fabien; Dumontet, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Microtubules are considered major therapeutic targets in patients with breast cancer. In spite of their essential role in biological functions including cell motility, cell division and intracellular transport, microtubules have not yet been considered as critical actors influencing tumor cell aggressivity. To evaluate the impact of microtubule mass and dynamics on the phenotype and sensitivity of breast cancer cells, we have targeted tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC), a crucial protein for the proper folding of α and β tubulins into polymerization-competent tubulin heterodimers. We developed variants of human breast cancer cells with increased content of TBCC. Analysis of proliferation, cell cycle distribution and mitotic durations were assayed to investigate the influence of TBCC on the cell phenotype. In vivo growth of tumors was monitored in mice xenografted with breast cancer cells. The microtubule dynamics and the different fractions of tubulins were studied by time-lapse microscopy and lysate fractionation, respectively. In vitro sensitivity to antimicrotubule agents was studied by flow cytometry. In vivo chemosensitivity was assayed by treatment of mice implanted with tumor cells. TBCC overexpression influenced tubulin fraction distribution, with higher content of nonpolymerizable tubulins and lower content of polymerizable dimers and microtubules. Microtubule dynamicity was reduced in cells overexpressing TBCC. Cell cycle distribution was altered in cells containing larger amounts of TBCC with higher percentage of cells in G2-M phase and lower percentage in S-phase, along with slower passage into mitosis. While increased content of TBCC had little effect on cell proliferation in vitro, we observed a significant delay in tumor growth with respect to controls when TBCC overexpressing cells were implanted as xenografts in vivo. TBCC overexpressing variants displayed enhanced sensitivity to antimicrotubule agents both in vitro and in xenografts. These

  8. Desmoid tumor of bone with enchondromatous nodules, mistaken for chondrosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Won-Jong [Musculoskeletal Oncology Study Group, Catholic University of Korea (Korea); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Uijongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, 65-1 Geumohdong, Uijongbu, Gyunggido, 480-130 (Korea); Kang, Yong-Koo; Lee, An-Hee [Musculoskeletal Oncology Study Group, Catholic University of Korea (Korea); Mirra, Joseph M. [Orthpaedic Oncology, Orthopaedic Hospital, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2003-04-01

    Desmoid tumor of bone, also termed desmoplastic fibroma or aggressive fibromatosis, is a rare, locally aggressive fibroblastic tumor. We present a 16-year-old male with a huge desmoid tumor involving the iliac wing. It was associated with enchondromatous nodules mimicking malignancy. The tumor in this patient was mistaken for chondrosarcoma and hemipelvectomy was performed. To our knowledge, such a case has not previously been documented fully in the English literature. The radiographic and pathologic findings and a possible mechanism of enchondromatous nodule formation in fibrous bone tumors are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Emergent Stratification in Solid Tumors Selects for Reduced Cohesion of Tumor Cells: A Multi-Cell, Virtual-Tissue Model of Tumor Evolution Using CompuCell3D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej H Swat

    Full Text Available Tumor cells and structure both evolve due to heritable variation of cell behaviors and selection over periods of weeks to years (somatic evolution. Micro-environmental factors exert selection pressures on tumor-cell behaviors, which influence both the rate and direction of evolution of specific behaviors, especially the development of tumor-cell aggression and resistance to chemotherapies. In this paper, we present, step-by-step, the development of a multi-cell, virtual-tissue model of tumor somatic evolution, simulated using the open-source CompuCell3D modeling environment. Our model includes essential cell behaviors, microenvironmental components and their interactions. Our model provides a platform for exploring selection pressures leading to the evolution of tumor-cell aggression, showing that emergent stratification into regions with different cell survival rates drives the evolution of less cohesive cells with lower levels of cadherins and higher levels of integrins. Such reduced cohesivity is a key hallmark in the progression of many types of solid tumors.

  10. Locally Aggressive Fibrous Dysplasia Mimicking Malign Calvarial Lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogul, Hayri; Keskin, Emine

    2018-05-01

    Fibrous dysplasia is an unusual benign bone tumor. It is divided into 3 groups as monostotic, polyostotic, and craniofacial form. The authors reported an unusual patient with fibrous dysplasia with an aggressive radiologic appearance.

  11. Ceramide species are elevated in human breast cancer and are associated with less aggressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Kazuki; Kawaguchi, Tsutomu; Tsuchida, Junko; Gabriel, Emmanuel; Qi, Qianya; Yan, Li; Wakai, Toshifumi; Takabe, Kazuaki; Nagahashi, Masayuki

    2018-01-01

    Sphingolipids have emerged as key regulatory molecules in cancer cell survival and death. Although important roles of sphingolipids in breast cancer progression have been reported in experimental models, their roles in human patients are yet to be revealed. The aim of this study was to investigate the ceramide levels and its biosynthesis pathways in human breast cancer patients. Breast cancer, peri-tumor and normal breast tissue samples were collected from surgical specimens from a series of 44 patients with breast cancer. The amount of sphingolipid metabolites in the tissue were determined by mass spectrometry. The Cancer Genome Atlas was used to analyze gene expression related to the sphingolipid metabolism. Ceramide levels were higher in breast cancer tissue compared to both normal and peri-tumor breast tissue. Substrates and enzymes that generate ceramide were significantly increased in all three ceramide biosynthesis pathways in cancer. Further, higher levels of ceramide in breast cancer were associated with less aggressive cancer biology presented by Ki-67 index and nuclear grade of the cancer. Interestingly, patients with higher gene expressions of enzymes in the three major ceramide synthesis pathways showed significantly worse prognosis. This is the first study to reveal the clinical relevance of ceramide metabolism in breast cancer patients. We demonstrated that ceramide levels in breast cancer tissue were significantly higher than those in normal tissue, with activation of the three ceramide biosynthesis pathways. We also identified that ceramide levels have a significant association with aggressive phenotype and its enzymes have prognostic impact on breast cancer patients. PMID:29731990

  12. BRCA1-IRIS Overexpression Promotes Formation of Aggressive Breast Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yoshiko; Luk, Hugh; Horio, David; Miron, Penelope; Griswold, Michael; Iglehart, Dirk; Hernandez, Brenda; Killeen, Jeffrey; ElShamy, Wael M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Women with HER2+ or triple negative/basal-like (TN/BL) breast cancers succumb to their cancer rapidly due, in part to acquired Herceptin resistance and lack of TN/BL-targeted therapies. BRCA1-IRIS is a recently discovered, 1399 residue, BRCA1 locus alternative product, which while sharing 1365 residues with the full-length product of this tumor suppressor gene, BRCA1/p220, it has oncoprotein-like properties. Here, we examine whether BRCA1-IRIS is a valuable treatment target for HER2+ and/or TN/BL tumors. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunohistochemical staining of large cohort of human breast tumor samples using new monoclonal anti-BRCA1-IRIS antibody, followed by correlation of BRCA1-IRIS expression with that of AKT1, AKT2, p-AKT, survivin and BRCA1/p220, tumor status and age at diagnosis. Generation of subcutaneous tumors in SCID mice using human mammary epithelial (HME) cells overexpressing TERT/LT/BRCA1-IRIS, followed by comparing AKT, survivin, and BRCA1/p220 expression, tumor status and aggressiveness in these tumors to that in tumors developed using TERT/LT/RasV12-overexpressing HME cells. Induction of primary and invasive rat mammary tumors using the carcinogen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (NMU), followed by analysis of rat BRCA1-IRIS and ERα mRNA levels in these tumors. High BRCA1-IRIS expression was detected in the majority of human breast tumors analyzed, which was positively correlated with that of AKT1-, AKT2-, p-AKT-, survivin, but negatively with BRCA1/p220 expression. BRCA1-IRIS-positivity induced high-grade, early onset and metastatic HER2+ or TN/BL tumors. TERT/LT/BRCA1-IRIS overexpressing HME cells formed invasive subcutaneous tumors that express high AKT1, AKT2, p-AKT and vimentin, but no CK19, p63 or BRCA1/p220. NMU-induced primary and invasive rat breast cancers expressed high levels of rat BRCA1-IRIS mRNA but low levels of rat ERα mRNA. Conclusion/Significance BRCA1-IRIS overexpression triggers aggressive breast tumor formation

  13. Does affective theory of mind contribute to proactive aggression in boys with conduct problems and psychopathic tendencies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillespie, S.; Kongerslev, Mickey; Sharp, Carla

    2018-01-01

    Adolescent psychopathic tendencies are associated with phenotypic increases in proactive aggression. However, the extent to which an understanding of others’ affective mental states, or affective theory of mind (ToM), contributes to proactive aggression remains unknown. We examined how performance...

  14. Metalloproteins during development of Walker-256 carcinosarcoma resistant phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Chekhun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was focused on the detection of changes in serum and tumor metal-containing proteins in animals during development of doxorubicin-resistant phenotype in malignant cells after 12 courses of chemotherapy. We found that on every stage of resistance development there was a significant increase in content of ferritin and transferrin proteins (which take part in iron traffick and storage in Walker-256 carcinosarcoma tissue. We observed decreased serum ferritin levels at the beginning stage of the resistance development and significant elevation of this protein levels in the cases with fully developed resistance phenotype. Transferrin content showed changes opposite to that of ferritin. During the development of resistance phenotype the tumor tissue also exhibited increased ‘free iron’ concentration that putatively correlate with elevation of ROS generation and levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 active forms. The tumor non-protein thiol content increases gradually as well. The serum of animals with early stages of resistance phenotype development showed high ceruloplasmin activity and its significant reduction after loss of tumor sensitivity to doxorubicin. Therefore, the development of resistance phenotype in Walker-256 carcinosarcoma is accompanied by both the deregulation of metal-containing proteins in serum and tumor tissue and by the changes in activity of antioxidant defense system. Thus, the results of this study allow us to determine the spectrum of metal-containing proteins that are involved in the development of resistant tumor phenotype and that may be targeted for methods for doxorubicin sensitivity correction therapy.

  15. CpG island methylator phenotype and its association with malignancy in sporadic duodenal adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lifeng; Guzzetta, Angela A; Fu, Tao; Chen, Jinming; Jeschke, Jana; Kwak, Ruby; Vatapalli, Rajita; Baylin, Stephen B; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Ahuja, Nita

    2014-05-01

    CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) has been found in multiple precancerous and cancerous lesions, including colorectal adenomas, colorectal cancers, and duodenal adenocarcinomas. There are no reports in the literature of a relationship between CIMP status and clinicopathologic features of sporadic duodenal adenomas. This study sought to elucidate the role of methylation in duodenal adenomas and correlate it with KRAS and BRAF mutations. CIMP+ (with more than 2 markers methylated) was seen in 33.3% of duodenal adenomas; 61% of these CIMP+ adenomas were CIMP-high (with more than 3 markers methylated). Furthermore, CIMP+ status significantly correlated with older age of patients, larger size and villous type of tumor, coexistent dysplasia and periampullary location. MLH1 methylation was seen in 11.1% of duodenal adenomas and was significantly associated with CIMP+ tumors, while p16 methylation was an infrequent event. KRAS mutations were frequent and seen in 26.3% of adenomas; however, no BRAF mutations were detected. Furthermore, CIMP-high status was associated with larger size and villous type of tumor and race (non-white). These results suggest that CIMP+ duodenal adenomas may have a higher risk for developing malignancy and may require more aggressive management and surveillance.

  16. In1-ghrelin, a splice variant of ghrelin gene, is associated with the evolution and aggressiveness of human neuroendocrine tumors: Evidence from clinical, cellular and molecular parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Adrados, Magdalena; Culler, Michael D.; Castaño, Justo P.; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin system comprises a complex family of peptides, receptors (GHSRs), and modifying enzymes [e.g. ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase (GOAT)] that control multiple pathophysiological processes. Aberrant alternative splicing is an emerging cancer hallmark that generates altered proteins with tumorigenic capacity. Indeed, In1-ghrelin and truncated-GHSR1b splicing variants can promote development/progression of certain endocrine-related cancers. Here, we determined the expression levels of key ghrelin system components in neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) and explored their potential functional role. Twenty-six patients with NETs were prospectively/retrospectively studied [72 samples from primary and metastatic tissues (30 normal/42 tumors)] and clinical data were obtained. The role of In1-ghrelin in aggressiveness was studied in vitro using NET cell lines (BON-1/QGP-1). In1-ghrelin, GOAT and GHSR1a/1b expression levels were elevated in tumoral compared to normal/adjacent tissues. Moreover, In1-ghrelin, GOAT, and GHSR1b expression levels were positively correlated within tumoral, but not within normal/adjacent samples, and were higher in patients with progressive vs. with stable/cured disease. Finally, In1-ghrelin increased aggressiveness (e.g. proliferation/migration) of NET cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a potential implication of ghrelin system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of NETs, and warrant further studies on their possible value for the future development of molecular biomarkers with diagnostic/prognostic/therapeutic value. PMID:26124083

  17. Loss of Cdh1 and Trp53 in the uterus induces chronic inflammation with modification of tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodden, G R; Lindberg, M E; King, M L; Paquet, M; MacLean, J A; Mann, J L; DeMayo, F J; Lydon, J P; Hayashi, K

    2015-05-07

    Type II endometrial carcinomas (ECs) are estrogen independent, poorly differentiated tumors that behave in an aggressive manner. As TP53 mutation and CDH1 inactivation occur in 80% of human endometrial type II carcinomas, we hypothesized that mouse uteri lacking both Trp53 and Cdh1 would exhibit a phenotype indicative of neoplastic transformation. Mice with conditional ablation of Cdh1 and Trp53 (Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d)) clearly demonstrate architectural features characteristic of type II ECs, including focal areas of papillary differentiation, protruding cytoplasm into the lumen (hobnailing) and severe nuclear atypia at 6 months of age. Further, Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d) tumors in 12-month-old mice were highly aggressive, and metastasized to nearby and distant organs within the peritoneal cavity, such as abdominal lymph nodes, mesentery and peri-intestinal adipose tissues, demonstrating that tumorigenesis in this model proceeds through the universally recognized morphological intermediates associated with type II endometrial neoplasia. We also observed abundant cell proliferation and complex angiogenesis in the uteri of Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d) mice. Our microarray analysis found that most of the genes differentially regulated in the uteri of Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d) mice were involved in inflammatory responses. CD163 and Arg1, markers for tumor-associated macrophages, were also detected and increased in the uteri of Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d) mice, suggesting that an inflammatory tumor microenvironment with immune cell recruitment is augmenting tumor development in Cdh1(d/d)Trp53(d/d) uteri. Further, inflammatory mediators secreted from CDH1-negative, TP53 mutant endometrial cancer cells induced normal macrophages to express inflammatory-related genes through activation of nuclear factor-κB signaling. These results indicate that absence of CDH1 and TP53 in endometrial cells initiates chronic inflammation, promotes tumor microenvironment development following the recruitment of macrophages

  18. Von Hippel-Lindau status influences phenotype of liver cancers arising from PTEN loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sendor AB

    2015-02-01

    aggressive tumor formation and widespread steatosis in mouse livers. Co-deletion of Vhl and Pten results in lower tumor burden with gene expression profiling suggesting a switch from a profile of lipid deposition to an expression profile more consistent with upregulation of the hypoxia response pathway. A relationship between tumor hypoxia signaling and altered hepatic steatotic response suggests that competing influences may alter tumor phenotypes.Keywords: Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL, phosphatase and tension homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN, cholangiocarcinoma (CC, hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma (HCC

  19. Imaging tumor hypoxia: Blood-borne delivery of imaging agents is fundamentally different in hypoxia subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vaupel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic tissue subvolumes are a hallmark feature of solid malignant tumors, relevant for cancer therapy and patient outcome because they increase both the intrinsic aggressiveness of tumor cells and their resistance to several commonly used anticancer strategies. Pathogenetic mechanisms leading to hypoxia are diverse, may coexist within the same tumor and are commonly grouped according to the duration of their effects. Chronic hypoxia is mainly caused by diffusion limitations resulting from enlarged intercapillary distances and adverse diffusion geometries and — to a lesser extent — by hypoxemia, compromised perfusion or long-lasting microregional flow stops. Conversely, acute hypoxia preferentially results from transient disruptions in perfusion. While each of these features of the tumor microenvironment can contribute to a critical reduction of oxygen availability, the delivery of imaging agents (as well as nutrients and anticancer agents may be compromised or remain unaffected. Thus, a critical appraisal of the effects of the various mechanisms leading to hypoxia with regard to the blood-borne delivery of imaging agents is necessary to judge their ability to correctly represent the hypoxic phenotype of solid malignancies.

  20. Multi-modality imaging of tumor phenotype and response to therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyflot, Matthew J.

    2011-12-01

    Imaging and radiation oncology have historically been closely linked. However, the vast majority of techniques used in the clinic involve anatomical imaging. Biological imaging offers the potential for innovation in the areas of cancer diagnosis and staging, radiotherapy target definition, and treatment response assessment. Some relevant imaging techniques are FDG PET (for imaging cellular metabolism), FLT PET (proliferation), CuATSM PET (hypoxia), and contrast-enhanced CT (vasculature and perfusion). Here, a technique for quantitative spatial correlation of tumor phenotype is presented for FDG PET, FLT PET, and CuATSM PET images. Additionally, multimodality imaging of treatment response with FLT PET, CuATSM, and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is presented, in a trial of patients receiving an antiangiogenic agent (Avastin) combined with cisplatin and radiotherapy. Results are also presented for translational applications in animal models, including quantitative assessment of proliferative response to cetuximab with FLT PET and quantification of vascular volume with a blood-pool contrast agent (Fenestra). These techniques have clear applications to radiobiological research and optimized treatment strategies, and may eventually be used for personalized therapy for patients.

  1. Photoperiod and aggression induce changes in ventral gland compounds exclusively in male Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendon, Nikki M; Soini, Helena A; Scotti, Melissa-Ann L; Weigel, Ellen R; Novotny, Milos V; Demas, Gregory E

    2016-05-01

    Chemical communication is a critical component of social behavior as it facilitates social encounters, allows for evaluation of the social partner, defines territories and resources, and advertises information such as sex and physiological state of an animal. Odors provide a key source of information about the social environment to rodents; however, studies identifying chemical compounds have thus far focused primarily on few species, particularly the house mouse. Moreover, considerably less attention has been focused on how environmental factors, reproductive phenotype, and behavioral context alter these compounds outside of reproduction. We examined the effects of photoperiod, sex, and social context on chemical communication in the seasonally breeding Siberian hamster. We sampled ventral gland secretions in both male and female hamsters before and after an aggressive encounter and identified changes in a range of volatile compounds. Next, we investigated how photoperiod, reproductive phenotype, and aggression altered ventral gland volatile compound composition across the sexes. Males exhibited a more diverse chemical composition, more sex-specific volatiles, and showed higher levels of excretion compared to females. Individual volatiles were also differentially excreted across photoperiod and reproductive phenotype, as well as differentially altered in response to an aggressive encounter. Female volatile compound composition, in contrast, did not differ across photoperiods or in response to aggression. Collectively, these data contribute to a greater understanding of context-dependent changes in chemical communication in a seasonally breeding rodent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mitochondrial mutations drive prostate cancer aggression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkins, Julia F.; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y.; Weischenfeldt, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear mutations are well known to drive tumor incidence, aggression and response to therapy. By contrast, the frequency and roles of mutations in the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome are poorly understood. Here we sequence the mitochondrial genomes of 384 localized prostate cancer...... in prostate cancer, and suggest interplay between nuclear and mitochondrial mutational profiles in prostate cancer....

  3. Knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha reduces proliferation, induces apoptosis and attenuates the aggressive phenotype of retinoblastoma WERI-Rb-1 cells under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Tian; Cheng, Hao; Zhu, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) plays a critical role in tumor cell adaption to hypoxia by inducing the transcription of numerous genes. The role of HIF-1α in malignant retinoblastoma remains unclear. We analyzed the role of HIF-1α in WERI-Rb-1 retinoblastoma cells under hypoxic conditions. CoCl2 (125 mmol/L) was added to the culture media to mimic hypoxia. HIF-1α was silenced using siRNA. Gene and protein expression were measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion were assayed using MTT, Transwell invasion, and cell adhesion assays respectively. Hypoxia significantly upregulated HIF-1α protein expression and the HIF-1α target genes VEGF, GLUT1, and Survivin mRNA. HIF-1α mRNA expression was not affected by hypoxia. Transfection of the siRNA expression plasmid pRNAT-CMV3.2/Neo-HIF-1α silenced HIF-1α by approximately 80% in hypoxic WERI-Rb-1 cells. The knockdown of HIF-1α under hypoxic conditions downregulated VEGF, GLUT1, and Survivin mRNA. It also inhibited proliferation, promoted apoptosis, induced the G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest, and reduced the adhesion and invasion of WERI-Rb-1 cells. HIF-1α plays a major role in the survival and aggressive phenotype of retinoblastoma cells under hypoxic conditions. Targeting HIF-1α may be a promising therapeutic strategy for human malignant retinoblastoma.

  4. Immunoreactivity for alpha-smooth muscle actin characterizes a potentially aggressive subgroup of little basal cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Faa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is a very common malignant skin tumor that rarely metastatizes, but is often locally aggressive. Several factors, like large size (more than 3 cm, exposure to ultraviolet rays, histological variants, level of infiltration and perineural or perivascular invasion, are associated with a more aggressive clinical course. These morphological features seem to be more determinant in mideface localized BCC, which frequently show a significantly higher recurrence rate. An immunohistochemical profile, characterized by reactivity of tumor cells for p53, Ki67 and alpha-SMA has been associated with a more aggressive behaviour in large BCCs. The aim of this study was to verify if also little (less than 3 cm basal cell carcinomas can express immunohistochemical markers typical for an aggressive behaviour.

  5. Cytomegalovirus infection induces a stem cell phenotype in human primary glioblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fornara, O; Bartek, J; Rahbar, A

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is associated with poor prognosis despite aggressive surgical resection, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Unfortunately, this standard therapy does not target glioma cancer stem cells (GCSCs), a subpopulation of GBM cells that can give rise to recurrent tumors. GBMs express...... human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) proteins, and previously we found that the level of expression of HCMV immediate-early (IE) protein in GBMs is a prognostic factor for poor patient survival. In this study, we investigated the relation between HCMV infection of GBM cells and the presence of GCSCs. Primary...... GBMs were characterized by their expression of HCMV-IE and GCSCs marker CD133 and by patient survival. The extent to which HCMV infection of primary GBM cells induced a GCSC phenotype was evaluated in vitro. In primary GBMs, a large fraction of CD133-positive cells expressed HCMV-IE, and higher co...

  6. Somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations in cancer escape purifying selection and high pathogenicity mutations lead to the oncocytic phenotype: pathogenicity analysis of reported somatic mtDNA mutations in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Luísa; Soares, Pedro; Máximo, Valdemar; Samuels, David C

    2012-01-01

    The presence of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in cancer cells has been interpreted in controversial ways, ranging from random neutral accumulation of mutations, to positive selection for high pathogenicity, or conversely to purifying selection against high pathogenicity variants as occurs at the population level. Here we evaluated the predicted pathogenicity of somatic mtDNA mutations described in cancer and compare these to the distribution of variations observed in the global human population and all possible protein variations that could occur in human mtDNA. We focus on oncocytic tumors, which are clearly associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The protein variant pathogenicity was predicted using two computational methods, MutPred and SNPs&GO. The pathogenicity score of the somatic mtDNA variants were significantly higher in oncocytic tumors compared to non-oncocytic tumors. Variations in subunits of Complex I of the electron transfer chain were significantly more common in tumors with the oncocytic phenotype, while variations in Complex V subunits were significantly more common in non-oncocytic tumors. Our results show that the somatic mtDNA mutations reported over all tumors are indistinguishable from a random selection from the set of all possible amino acid variations, and have therefore escaped the effects of purifying selection that act strongly at the population level. We show that the pathogenicity of somatic mtDNA mutations is a determining factor for the oncocytic phenotype. The opposite associations of the Complex I and Complex V variants with the oncocytic and non-oncocytic tumors implies that low mitochondrial membrane potential may play an important role in determining the oncocytic phenotype

  7. Central nervous system tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curran, W.J. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Intrinsic tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) pose a particularly challenging problem to practicing oncologists. These tumors rarely metastasize outside the CNS, yet even histologically benign tumors can be life-threatening due to their local invasiveness and strategic location. The surrounding normal tissues of the nervous system is often incapable of full functional regeneration, therefore prohibiting aggressive attempts to use either complete surgical resection or high doses of irradiation. Despite these limitations, notable achievements have recently been recorded in the management of these tumors

  8. RAC1 GTP-ase signals Wnt-beta-catenin pathway mediated integrin-directed metastasis-associated tumor cell phenotypes in triple negative breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Pradip; Carlson, Jennifer H; Jepperson, Tyler; Willis, Scooter; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Dey, Nandini

    2017-01-10

    RAC1 inhibition in MDA-MB231BR cells. In the light of our previous report that WP upregulation causes ID-MA phenotypes in TNBC tumor cells, here we provide the first mechanism based evidence to demonstrate that WP upregulation signals ID-MA tumor cell phenotypes in a RAC1-GTPase dependent manner involving exchange-factors like TIAM1 and VAV2. Our study demonstrates for the first time that beta-catenin-RAC1 cascade signals integrin-directed metastasis-associated tumor cell phenotypes in TNBC.

  9. Cancer Stem Cell Plasticity as Tumor Growth Promoter and Catalyst of Population Collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Poleszczuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly argued that cancer stem cells are not a cellular phenotype but rather a transient state that cells can acquire, either through intrinsic signaling cascades or in response to environmental cues. While cancer stem cell plasticity is generally associated with increased aggressiveness and treatment resistance, we set out to thoroughly investigate the impact of different rates of plasticity on early and late tumor growth dynamics and the response to therapy. We develop an agent-based model of cancer stem cell driven tumor growth, in which plasticity is defined as a spontaneous transition between stem and nonstem cancer cell states. Simulations of the model show that plasticity can substantially increase tumor growth rate and invasion. At high rates of plasticity, however, the cells get exhausted and the tumor will undergo spontaneous remission in the long term. In a series of in silico trials, we show that such remission can be facilitated through radiotherapy. The presented study suggests that stem cell plasticity has rather complex, nonintuitive implications on tumor growth and treatment response. Further theoretical, experimental, and integrated studies are needed to fully decipher cancer stem cell plasticity and how it can be harnessed for novel therapeutic approaches.

  10. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH activity does not select for cells with enhanced aggressive properties in malignant melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Prasmickaite

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malignant melanoma is an exceptionally aggressive, drug-resistant and heterogeneous cancer. Recently it has been shown that melanoma cells with high clonogenic and tumourigenic abilities are common, but markers distinguishing such cells from cells lacking these abilities have not been identified. There is therefore no definite evidence that an exclusive cell subpopulation, i.e. cancer stem cells (CSC, exists in malignant melanoma. Rather, it is suggested that multiple cell populations are implicated in initiation and progression of the disease, making it of importance to identify subpopulations with elevated aggressive properties. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In several other cancer forms, Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH, which plays a role in stem cell biology and resistance, is a valuable functional marker for identification of cells that show enhanced aggressiveness and drug-resistance. Furthermore, the presence of ALDH(+ cells is linked to poor clinical prognosis in these cancers. By analyzing cell cultures, xenografts and patient biopsies, we showed that aggressive melanoma harboured a large, distinguishable ALDH(+ subpopulation. In vivo, ALDH(+ cells gave rise to ALDH(- cells, while the opposite conversion was rare, indicating a higher abilities of ALDH(+ cells to reestablish tumour heterogeneity with respect to the ALDH phenotype. However, both ALDH(+ and ALDH(- cells demonstrated similarly high abilities for clone formation in vitro and tumour initiation in vivo. Furthermore, both subpopulations showed similar sensitivity to the anti-melanoma drugs, dacarbazine and lexatumumab. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that ALDH does not distinguish tumour-initiating and/or therapy-resistant cells, implying that the ALDH phenotype is not associated with more-aggressive subpopulations in malignant melanoma, and arguing against ALDH as a "universal" marker. Besides, it was shown that the ability to reestablish tumour heterogeneity is not

  11. RKIP inhibition in cervical cancer is associated with higher tumor aggressive behavior and resistance to cisplatin therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Martinho

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide, being high-risk group the HPV infected, the leading etiological factor. The raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP has been associated with tumor progression and metastasis in several human neoplasms, however its role on cervical cancer is unclear. In the present study, 259 uterine cervix tissues, including cervicitis, cervical intraepithelial lesions and carcinomas, were analyzed for RKIP expression by immunohistochemistry. We found that RKIP expression was significantly decreased during malignant progression, being highly expressed in non-neoplastic tissues (54% of the samples; 73/135, and expressed at low levels in the cervix invasive carcinomas (∼15% (19/124. Following in vitro downregulation of RKIP, we observed a viability and proliferative advantage of RKIP-inhibited cells over time, which was associated with an altered cell cycle distribution and higher colony number in a colony formation assay. An in vitro wound healing assay showed that RKIP abrogation is associated with increased migratory capability. RKIP downregulation was also associated with an increased vascularization of the tumors in vivo using a CAM assay. Furthermore, RKIP inhibition induced cervical cancer cells apoptotic resistance to cisplatin treatment. In conclusion, we described that RKIP protein is significantly depleted during the malignant progression of cervical tumors. Despite the lack of association with patient clinical outcome, we demonstrate, in vitro and in vivo, that loss of RKIP expression can be one of the factors that are behind the aggressiveness, malignant progression and chemotherapy resistance of cervical cancer.

  12. Biotinidase is a novel marker for papillary thyroid cancer aggressiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony K-C So

    Full Text Available Biotinidase was identified in secretome analysis of thyroid cancer cell lines using proteomics. The goal of the current study was to analyze the expression of biotinidase in thyroid cancer tissues and fine needle aspiration (FNA samples to evaluate its diagnostic and prognostic potential in thyroid cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of biotinidase was carried out in 129 papillary thyroid cancer (PTC, 34 benign thyroid tissues and 43 FNA samples and correlated with patients' prognosis. Overall biotinidase expression was decreased in PTC compared to benign nodules (p = 0.001. Comparison of aggressive and non-aggressive PTC showed decrease in overall biotinidase expression in the former (p = 0.001. Loss of overall biotinidase expression was associated with poor disease free survival (p = 0.019, Hazards ratio (HR = 3.1. We examined the effect of subcellular compartmentalization of nuclear and cytoplasmic biotinidase on patient survival. Decreased nuclear expression of biotinidase was observed in PTC as compared to benign tissues (p<0.001. Upon stratification within PTC, nuclear expression was reduced in aggressive as compared to non-aggressive tumors (p<0.001. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significant association of loss of nuclear biotinidase expression with reduced disease free survival (p = 0.014, HR = 5.4. Cytoplasmic biotinidase expression was reduced in aggressive thyroid cancers in comparison with non-aggressive tumors (p = 0.002, Odds ratio (OR = 0.29 which was evident by its significant association with advanced T stage (p = 0.003, OR = 0.28, nodal metastasis (p<0.001, OR = 0.16, advanced TNM stage (p<0.001, OR = 0.21 and extrathyroidal extension (p = 0.001, OR = 0.23. However, in multivariate analysis extrathyroidal extension emerged as the most significant prognostic marker for aggressive thyroid carcinomas (p = 0.015, HR = 12.8. In conclusion, loss of overall

  13. Induction of erythropoiesis by hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors without promotion of tumor initiation, progression, or metastasis in a VEGF-sensitive model of spontaneous breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Todd W; Sternlicht, Mark D; Klaus, Stephen J; Neff, Thomas B; Liu, David Y

    2017-01-01

    The effects of pharmacological hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stabilization were investigated in the MMTV-Neundl-YD5 (NeuYD) mouse model of breast cancer. This study first confirmed the sensitivity of this model to increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), using bigenic NeuYD;MMTV-VEGF-25 mice. Tumor initiation was dramatically accelerated in bigenic animals. Bigenic tumors were also more aggressive, with shortened doubling times and increased lung metastasis as compared to NeuYD controls. In separate studies, NeuYD mice were treated three times weekly from 7 weeks of age until study end with two different HIF prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors (HIF-PHIs), FG-4497 or roxadustat (FG-4592). In NeuYD mice, HIF-PHI treatments elevated erythropoiesis markers, but no differences were detected in tumor onset or the phenotypes of established tumors. PMID:28331872

  14. Overexpression of the A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase ADAM15 is linked to a Small but Highly Aggressive Subset of Prostate Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Burdelski

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase (ADAM family of endopeptidases plays a role in many solid cancers and includes promising targets for anticancer therapies. Deregulation of ADAM15 has been linked to tumor aggressiveness and cell line studies suggest that ADAM15 overexpression may also be implicated in prostate cancer. To evaluate the impact of ADAM15 expression and its relationship with key genomic alterations, a tissue microarray containing 12,427 prostate cancers was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. ADAM15 expression was compared to phenotype, prognosis and molecular features including TMPRSS2:ERG fusion and frequent deletions involving PTEN, 3p, 5q and 6q. Normal prostate epithelium did not show ADAM15 staining. In prostate cancers, negative, weak, moderate, and strong ADAM15 staining was found in 87.7%, 3.7%, 5.6%, and 3.0% of 9826 interpretable tumors. Strong ADAM15 staining was linked to high Gleason grade, advanced pathological tumor stage, positive nodal stage and resection margin. ADAM15 overexpression was also associated with TMPRSS2:ERG fusions and PTEN deletions (P < .0001 but unrelated to deletions of 3p, 5q and 6q. In univariate analysis, high ADAM15 expression was strongly linked to PSA recurrence (P < .0001. However, in multivariate analyses this association was only maintained if the analysis was limited to preoperatively available parameters in ERG-negative cancers. The results of our study demonstrate that ADAM15 is strongly up regulated in a small but highly aggressive fraction of prostate cancers. In these tumors, ADAM15 may represent a suitable drug target. In a preoperative scenario, ADAM15 expression measurement may assist prognosis assessment, either alone or in combination with other markers.

  15. Staurosporine and extracellular matrix proteins mediate the conversion of small cell lung carcinoma cells into a neuron-like phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Murmann

    Full Text Available Small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs represent highly aggressive tumors with an overall five-year survival rate in the range of 5 to 10%. Here, we show that four out of five SCLC cell lines reversibly develop a neuron-like phenotype on extracellular matrix constituents such as fibronectin, laminin or thrombospondin upon staurosporine treatment in an RGD/integrin-mediated manner. Neurite-like processes extend rapidly with an average speed of 10 µm per hour. Depending on the cell line, staurosporine treatment affects either cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase or induction of polyploidy. Neuron-like conversion, although not accompanied by alterations in the expression pattern of a panel of neuroendocrine genes, leads to changes in protein expression as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. It is likely that SCLC cells already harbour the complete molecular repertoire to convert into a neuron-like phenotype. More extensive studies are needed to evaluate whether the conversion potential of SCLC cells is suitable for therapeutic interventions.

  16. Phenotypic characterization of telomerase-immortalized primary non-malignant and malignant tumor-derived human prostate epithelial cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Yongpeng; Li Hongzhen; Miki, Jun; Kim, Kee-Hong; Furusato, Bungo; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Chu, Wei-Sing; McLeod, David G.; Srivastava, Shiv; Ewing, Charles M.; Isaacs, William B.; Rhim, Johng S.

    2006-01-01

    In vitro human prostate cell culture models are critical for clarifying the mechanism of prostate cancer progression and for testing preventive and therapeutic agents. Cell lines ideal for the study of human primary prostate tumors would be those derived from spontaneously immortalized tumor cells; unfortunately, explanted primary prostate cells survive only short-term in culture, and rarely immortalize spontaneously. Therefore, we recently have generated five immortal human prostate epithelial cell cultures derived from both the benign and malignant tissues of prostate cancer patients with telomerase, a gene that prevents cellular senescence. Examination of these cell lines for their morphologies and proliferative capacities, their abilities to grow in low serum, to respond to androgen stimulation, to grow above the agar layer, to form tumors in SCID mice, suggests that they may serve as valid, useful tools for the elucidation of early events in prostate tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the chromosome alterations observed in these immortalized cell lines expressing aspects of the malignant phenotypes imply that these cell lines accurately recapitulate the genetic composition of primary tumors. These novel in vitro models may offer unique models for the study of prostate carcinogenesis and also provide the means for testing both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents

  17. Colorectal Cancer "Methylator Phenotype": Fact or Artifact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Anacleto

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that human colorectal tumors can be classified into two groups: one in which methylation is rare, and another with methylation of several loci associated with a "CpG island methylated phenotype (CIMP," characterized by preferential proximal location in the colon, but otherwise poorly defined. There is considerable overlap between this putative methylator phenotype and the well-known mutator phenotype associated with microsatellite instability (MSI. We have examined hypermethylation of the promoter region of five genes (DAPK, MGMT, hMLH1, p16INK4a, and p14ARF in 106 primary colorectal cancers. A graph depicting the frequency of methylated loci in the series of tumors showed a continuous, monotonically decreasing distribution quite different from the previously claimed discontinuity. We observed a significant association between the presence of three or more methylated loci and the proximal location of the tumors. However, if we remove from analysis the tumors with hMLH1 methylation or those with MSI, the significance vanishes, suggesting that the association between multiple methylations and proximal location was indirect due to the correlation with MSI. Thus, our data do not support the independent existence of the so-called methylator phenotype and suggest that it rather may represent a statistical artifact caused by confounding of associations.

  18. Cadmium-109 uptake by tumors derived from Balb C/3T3 cell lines with varying degrees of the transformed phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, K.; Alazraki, N.; Winge, D.; Lynch, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    To determine if tumors are rich in metallothionein, the authors measured the vivo uptake of subcutaneously-injected carrier-free cadmium-109 in tumors and in normal tissues of Balb/C mice. The tumors were grown in the mice from cultured Balb/3T3 cells transformed by the Moloney murine sarcoma virus. Uptake of cadmium-109 per gram of tissue was greatest for liver, kidney, and spleen. However, tumor uptake of cadmium-109 was markedly greater than that in blood, skeletal muscle, bones, intestine or adipose tissue. B Sephadex G-75 chromatography, the radioactivity in tumor and in liver lysates eluted with cytochrome-C, a molecule similar in molecular weight to metal-lothionein. To determine if metallothionein levels are related to the degree of malignancy of tumors, cadmium-109 uptake in the tumors from the virally-transformed cells was compared to that in tumors from non-transformed Balb/3T3 cells and two derivative chemically transformed cell lines. There was strong correlation between the substrate-independent growth in soft agarose of the four cell lines, the rate of growth of the corresponding tumors, and the amount of cadmium-109 uptake in the tumors. The authors conclude that metallothionein levels may be elevated in tumors as a function of the degree of expression of the transformed phenotype

  19. Prevalence of papillomaviruses, polyomaviruses, and herpesviruses in triple-negative and inflammatory breast tumors from algeria compared with other types of breast cancer tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilys Corbex

    Full Text Available The possible role of viruses in breast cancer etiology remains an unresolved question. We hypothesized that if some viruses are involved, it may be in a subgroup of breast cancers only. Epidemiological arguments drove our interest in breast cancer subgroups that are more frequent in Africa, namely inflammatory breast cancer (IBC and triple-negative breast cancer. We tested whether viral prevalence was significantly higher in these subgroups.One hundred fifty-five paraffin-embedded malignant breast tumors were randomly selected at the pathology laboratory of the University Hospital of Annaba (Algeria to include one third of IBC and two thirds of non-IBC. They were tested for the presence of DNA from 61 viral agents (46 human papillomaviruses, 10 polyomaviruses, and 5 herpesviruses using type-specific multiplex genotyping assays, which combine multiplex PCR and bead-based Luminex technology.Viral DNA was found in 22 (17.9% of 123 tumors. The most prevalent viruses were EBV1 and HPV16. IBC tumors carried significantly more viruses (any type than non-IBC tumors (30% vs. 13%, p<0.04. Similarly, triple-negative tumors displayed higher virus-positivity than non-triple-negative tumors (44% vs. 14%, p<0.009.Our results suggest an association between the presence of viral DNA and aggressive breast cancer phenotypes (IBC, triple-negative. While preliminary, they underline the importance of focusing on subgroups when studying viral etiology in breast cancer. Further studies on viruses in breast cancer should be conducted in much larger samples to confirm these initial findings.

  20. Polyomavirus-Negative Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A More Aggressive Subtype Based on Analysis of 282 Cases Using Multimodal Tumor Virus Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshiri, Ata S; Doumani, Ryan; Yelistratova, Lola; Blom, Astrid; Lachance, Kristina; Shinohara, Michi M; Delaney, Martha; Chang, Oliver; McArdle, Susan; Thomas, Hannah; Asgari, Maryam M; Huang, Meei-Li; Schwartz, Stephen M; Nghiem, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the proportion of Merkel cell carcinomas (MCCs) that contain the Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) and the clinical significance of tumor viral status. To address these controversies, we detected MCPyV large T antigen using immunohistochemistry with two distinct antibodies and MCPyV DNA using quantitative PCR. Tumors were called MCPyV-positive if two or more of these three assays indicated presence of this virus. A total of 53 of 282 (19%) MCC tumors in this cohort were virus-negative using this multimodal system. Immunohistochemistry with the CM2B4 antibody had the best overall performance (sensitivity = 0.882, specificity = 0.943) compared with the multimodal classification. Multivariate analysis including age, sex, and immunosuppression showed that, relative to MCC patients with virus-positive tumors, virus-negative MCC patients had significantly increased risk of disease progression (hazard ratio = 1.77, 95% confidence interval = 1.20-2.62) and death from MCC (hazard ratio = 1.85, 95% confidence interval = 1.19-2.89). We confirm that approximately 20% of MCCs are not driven by MCPyV and that such virus-negative MCCs, which can be quite reliably identified by immunohistochemistry using the CM2B4 antibody alone, represent a more aggressive subtype that warrants closer clinical follow-up. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Angiosarcoma of penis: Case report of an aggressive penile cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Priyadarshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiosarcoma is a very rare mesenchymal tumor of penis. Though extremely unusual, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients presenting with a penile growth or a localized subcutaneous penile lesions as they are very aggressive and there is a high chance of recurrence. One such case is reported here, which was aggressively treated with total penectomy and the patient did not show any recurrence in 2 years of follow-up.

  2. [Mesh structure of two-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype heterogeneity in non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zeng; Zhou, Hui; Liu, Jin-Kang; Hu, Cheng-Ping; Zhou, Mo-Ling; Xia, Yu; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2009-11-01

    To investigate the structural characteristics and clinical significance of two-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype (2D-TMAP) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Thirty surgical specimens of NSCLC were collected. The sections of the tumor tissues corresponding to the slice of CT perfusion imaging were selected to construct the 2D-TMAP expression. Spearman correlation analysis was used to examine the relation between the 2D-TMAP expression and the clinicopathological features of NSCLC. A heterogeneity was noted in the 2D-TMAP expression of NSCLC. The microvascular density (MVD) in the area surrounding the tumor was higher than that in the central area, but the difference was not statistically significant. The density of the microvessels without intact lumen was significantly greater in the surrounding area than in the central area (P=0.030). The total MVD was not correlated to tumor differentiation (r=0.042, P=0.831). The density of the microvessels without intact lumen in the surrounding area was positively correlated to degree of tumor differentiation and lymph node metastasis (r=0.528 and 0.533, P=0.041 and 0.028, respectively), and also to the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), ephrinB2, EphB4, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) (r=0.504, 0.549, 0.549, and 0.370; P=0.005, 0.002, 0.002, and 0.048, respectively). The degree of tumor differentiation was positively correlated to PCNA and VEGF expression (r=0.604 and 0.370, P=0.001 and 0.048, respectively), but inversely to the integrity of microvascular basement membrane (r=-0.531, P=0.033). The 2D-TMAP suggests the overall state of the micro-environment for tumor growth. The 2D-TMAP of NSCLC regulates angiogenesis and tumor cell proliferation through a mesh-like structure, and better understanding of the characteristics and possible mechanism of 2D-TMAP expression can be of great clinical importance.

  3. Dynamic contrast-enhanced case-control analysis in 3T MRI of prostate cancer can help to characterize tumor aggressiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz-Requena, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.sanz@quironsalud.es [Biomedical Engineering, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Radiology Department, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); GIBI230, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria y Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Martí-Bonmatí, Luis [Radiology Department, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); GIBI230, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria y Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Pérez-Martínez, Rosario [Radiology Department, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); García-Martí, Gracián [Biomedical Engineering, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Radiology Department, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); GIBI230, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria y Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Valencia (Spain); CIBER-SAM, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    areas in the peripheral prostate. Normalized K{sup trans}, upslope and AUC60 values might characterize tumor aggressiveness.

  4. CpG island methylation phenotype (CIMP) in oral cancer: associated with a marked inflammatory response and less aggressive tumour biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Richard J; Hall, Gillian L; Lowe, Derek; Bowers, Naomi L; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Field, John K; Woolgar, Julia A; Risk, Janet M

    2007-10-01

    Studies in several tumour sites highlight the significance of the CpG island methylation phenotype (CIMP), with distinct features of histology, biological aggression and outcome. We utilise pyrosequencing techniques of quantitative methylation analysis to investigate the presence of CIMP in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) for the first time, and evaluate its correlation with allelic imbalance, pathology and clinical behaviour. Tumour tissue, control tissue and PBLs were obtained from 74 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse methylation patterns in 75-200 bp regions of the CpG rich gene promoters of 10 genes with a broad range of cellular functions. Allelic imbalance was investigated using a multiplexed panel of 11 microsatellite markers. Corresponding variables, histopathological staging and grading were correlated with these genetic and epigenetic aberrations. A cluster of tumours with a greater degree of promoter methylation than would be predicted by chance alone (P=0.001) were designated CIMP+ve. This group had less aggressive tumour biology in terms of tumour thickness (p=0.015) and nodal metastasis (P=0.012), this being apparently independent of tumour diameter. Further, it seems that these CIMP+ve tumours excited a greater host inflammatory response (P=0.019). The exact mechanisms underlying CIMP remain obscure but the association with a greater inflammatory host response supports existing theories relating these features in other tumour sites. As CIMP has significant associations with other well documented prognostic indicators, it may prove beneficial to include methylation analyses in molecular risk modelling of tumours.

  5. Experimental Functional Analysis of Aggression in Children with Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Rachel; Shaw, Rebecca; Burrow, Caroline; Horsler, Kate; Allen, Debbie; Oliver, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Background: Kinship theory suggests that genomic imprinting could account for phenotypic behaviors that increase (in the case of Angelman syndrome) or decrease (for Prader-Willi syndrome) the drive to access social resources (adult contact) depending on the imprinting parent-of-origin. Difficult to manage behaviors, such as aggression that is…

  6. Intra-tumor heterogeneity in breast cancer has limited impact on transcriptomic-based molecular profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, Govindasamy-Muralidharan; Rantalainen, Mattias; Stålhammar, Gustav; Lövrot, John; Ullah, Ikram; Alkodsi, Amjad; Ma, Ran; Wedlund, Lena; Lindberg, Johan; Frisell, Jan; Bergh, Jonas; Hartman, Johan

    2017-11-29

    Transcriptomic profiling of breast tumors provides opportunity for subtyping and molecular-based patient stratification. In diagnostic applications the specimen profiled should be representative of the expression profile of the whole tumor and ideally capture properties of the most aggressive part of the tumor. However, breast cancers commonly exhibit intra-tumor heterogeneity at molecular, genomic and in phenotypic level, which can arise during tumor evolution. Currently it is not established to what extent a random sampling approach may influence molecular breast cancer diagnostics. In this study we applied RNA-sequencing to quantify gene expression in 43 pieces (2-5 pieces per tumor) from 12 breast tumors (Cohort 1). We determined molecular subtype and transcriptomic grade for all tumor pieces and analysed to what extent pieces originating from the same tumors are concordant or discordant with each other. Additionally, we validated our finding in an independent cohort consisting of 19 pieces (2-6 pieces per tumor) from 6 breast tumors (Cohort 2) profiled using microarray technique. Exome sequencing was also performed on this cohort, to investigate the extent of intra-tumor genomic heterogeneity versus the intra-tumor molecular subtype classifications. Molecular subtyping was consistent in 11 out of 12 tumors and transcriptomic grade assignments were consistent in 11 out of 12 tumors as well. Molecular subtype predictions revealed consistent subtypes in four out of six patients in this cohort 2. Interestingly, we observed extensive intra-tumor genomic heterogeneity in these tumor pieces but not in their molecular subtype classifications. Our results suggest that macroscopic intra-tumoral transcriptomic heterogeneity is limited and unlikely to have an impact on molecular diagnostics for most patients.

  7. Pilot study utilizing Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography for glycolytic phenotyping of canine mast cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Lynn R; Thamm, Doug H; Selmic, Laura E; Ehrhart, E J; Randall, Elissa

    2018-03-23

    The goal of this prospective pilot study was to use naturally occurring canine mast cell tumors of various grades and stages as a model for attempting to determine how glucose uptake and markers of biologic behavior are correlated. It was hypothesized that enhanced glucose uptake, as measured by 2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-d-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F18 FDG PET-CT), would correlate with histologic grade. Dogs were recruited for this study from a population referred for treatment of cytologically or histologically confirmed mast cell tumors. Patients were staged utilizing standard of care methods (abdominal ultrasound and three view thoracic radiographs), followed by a whole body F18 FDG PET-CT. Results of the F18 FDG PET-CT were analyzed for possible metastasis and standard uptake value maximum (SUV max ) of identified lesions. Incisional or excisional biopsies of the accessible mast cell tumors were obtained and histology performed. Results were then analyzed to look for a possible correlation between the grade of mast cell tumors and SUV max . A total of nine animals were included in the sample. Findings indicated that there was a correlation between grade of mast cell tumors and SUV max as determined by F18 FDG PET-CT (p-value = 0.073, significance ≤ 0.1). Based on the limited power of this study, it is felt that further research to examine the relationship between glucose utilization and biologic aggressiveness in canine mast cell tumors is warranted. This study was unable to show that F18 FDG PET-CT was a better staging tool than standard of care methods. © 2018 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  8. Mild expression differences of MECP2 influencing aggressive social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantra, Martesa; Hammer, Christian; Kästner, Anne; Dahm, Liane; Begemann, Martin; Bodda, Chiranjeevi; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Giegling, Ina; Stepniak, Beata; Castillo Venzor, Aracely; Konte, Bettina; Erbaba, Begun; Hartmann, Annette; Tarami, Asieh; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter; Rujescu, Dan; Mannan, Ashraf U; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2014-05-01

    The X-chromosomal MECP2/Mecp2 gene encodes methyl-CpG-binding protein 2, a transcriptional activator and repressor regulating many other genes. We discovered in male FVB/N mice that mild (~50%) transgenic overexpression of Mecp2 enhances aggression. Surprisingly, when the same transgene was expressed in C57BL/6N mice, transgenics showed reduced aggression and social interaction. This suggests that Mecp2 modulates aggressive social behavior. To test this hypothesis in humans, we performed a phenotype-based genetic association study (PGAS) in >1000 schizophrenic individuals. We found MECP2 SNPs rs2239464 (G/A) and rs2734647 (C/T; 3'UTR) associated with aggression, with the G and C carriers, respectively, being more aggressive. This finding was replicated in an independent schizophrenia cohort. Allele-specific MECP2 mRNA expression differs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by ~50% (rs2734647: C > T). Notably, the brain-expressed, species-conserved miR-511 binds to MECP2 3'UTR only in T carriers, thereby suppressing gene expression. To conclude, subtle MECP2/Mecp2 expression alterations impact aggression. While the mouse data provides evidence of an interaction between genetic background and mild Mecp2 overexpression, the human data convey means by which genetic variation affects MECP2 expression and behavior.

  9. COMT Val158 Met moderates the link between rank and aggression in a non-human primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutleb, D R; Roos, C; Noll, A; Ostner, J; Schülke, O

    2018-04-01

    The COMT Val 158 Met polymorphism is one of the most widely studied genetic polymorphisms in humans implicated in aggression and the moderation of stressful life event effects. We screened a wild primate population for polymorphisms at the COMT Val 158 Met site and phenotyped them for aggression to test whether the human polymorphism exists and is associated with variation in aggressive behavior. Subjects were all adults from 4 study groups (37 males, 40 females) of Assamese macaques (Macaca assamensis) in their natural habitat (Phu Khieo Wildlife Sanctuary, Thailand). We collected focal animal behavioral data (27 males, 36 females, 5964 focal hours) and fecal samples for non-invasive DNA analysis. We identified the human COMT Val 158 Met polymorphism (14 Met/Met, 41 Val/Met and 22 Val/Val). Preliminary results suggest that COMT genotype and dominance rank interact to influence aggression rates. Aggression rates increased with rank in Val/Val, but decreased in Met/Met and Val/Met individuals, with no significant main effect of COMT genotype on aggression. Further support for the interaction effect comes from time series analyses revealing that when changing from lower to higher rank position Val/Val individuals decreased, whereas Met/Met individuals increased their aggression rate. Contradicting the interpretation of earlier studies, we show that the widely studied Val 158 Met polymorphism in COMT is not unique to humans and yields similar behavioral phenotypes in a non-human primate. This study represents an important step towards understanding individual variation in aggression in a wild primate population and may inform human behavioral geneticists about the evolutionary roots of inter-individual variation in aggression. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  10. Case report 351: Aggressive osteoblastoma of the third lumbar vertebra

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    Abdelwahab, I.F.; Frankel, V.H.; Klein, M.J.

    1986-02-01

    In summary, a case is presented of an aggressive osteoblastoma affecting the third lumbar vertebra in a 65-year-old man. Because of the age of the patient, the aggressive, destructive nature of the tumor and the extensive involvement of the vertebral body, metastatic carcinoma as well as several primary malignancies were entertained in the differential diagnosis (e.g. plasmacytoma, chordoma, primary lymphoma of bone). However, the destructive, expanding nature of the lesion, the focal calcification within the area of destroyed bone, the production of new bone with dense sclerosis, raised the possibility of an osteoblastoma, despite the advanced age of the patient. Without the histological material, the type of osteoblastoma (aggressive) could not be diagnosed. (orig./SHA).

  11. Case report 351: Aggressive osteoblastoma of the third lumbar vertebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, I.F.; Frankel, V.H.; Klein, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    In summary, a case is presented of an aggressive osteoblastoma affecting the third lumbar vertebra in a 65-year-old man. Because of the age of the patient, the aggressive, destructive nature of the tumor and the extensive involvement of the vertebral body, metastatic carcinoma as well as several primary malignancies were entertained in the differential diagnosis (e.g. plasmacytoma, chordoma, primary lymphoma of bone). However, the destructive, expanding nature of the lesion, the focal calcification within the area of destroyed bone, the production of new bone with dense sclerosis, raised the possibility of an osteoblastoma, despite the advanced age of the patient. Without the histological material, the type of osteoblastoma (aggressive) could not be diagnosed. (orig./SHA)

  12. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition, enhances tumor aggressiveness and predicts clinical outcome in resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funamizu, Naotake; Hu, Chaoxin; Lacy, Curtis; Schetter, Aaron; Zhang, Geng; He, Peijun; Gaedcke, Jochen; Ghadimi, Michael B; Ried, Thomas; Yfantis, Harris G; Lee, Dong H; Subleski, Jeffrey; Chan, Tim; Weiss, Jonathan M; Back, Timothy C; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Hanna, Nader; Alexander, H Richard; Maitra, Anirban; Hussain, S Perwez

    2013-02-15

    MIF is a proinflammatory cytokine and is implicated in cancer. A higher MIF level is found in many human cancer and cancer-prone inflammatory diseases, including chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. We tested the hypothesis that MIF contributes to pancreatic cancer aggressiveness and predicts disease outcome in resected cases. Consistent with our hypothesis we found that an elevated MIF mRNA expression in tumors was significantly associated with poor outcome in resected cases. Multivariate Cox-regression analysis further showed that MIF is independently associated with patients' survival (HR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.17-4.37, p = 0.015). Mechanistic analyses revealed that MIF overexpression decreased E-cadherin and increased vimentin mRNA and protein levels in pancreatic cancer cell lines, consistent with the features of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Furthermore, MIF-overexpression significantly increased ZEB1/2 and decreased miR-200b expression, while shRNA-mediated inhibition of MIF increased E-cadherin and miR-200b expression, and reduced the expression of ZEB1/2 in Panc1 cells. Re-expression of miR-200b in MIF overexpressing cells restored the epithelial characteristics, as indicated by an increase in E-cadherin and decrease in ZEB1/2 and vimentin expression. A reduced sensitivity to the chemotherapeutic drug, gemcitabine, occurred in MIF-overexpressing cells. Indicative of an increased malignant potential, MIF over-expressing cells showed significant increase in their invasion ability in vitro, and tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model. These results support a role of MIF in disease aggressiveness, indicating its potential usefulness as a candidate target for designing improved treatment in pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  13. Psychophysiological correlates of aggression and violence: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Christopher J

    2008-08-12

    This paper reviews existing psychophysiological studies of aggression and violent behaviour including research employing autonomic, electrocortical and neuroimaging measures. Robust physiological correlates of persistent aggressive behaviour evident in this literature include low baseline heart rate, enhanced autonomic reactivity to stressful or aversive stimuli, enhanced EEG slow wave activity, reduced P300 brain potential response and indications from structural and functional neuroimaging studies of dysfunction in frontocortical and limbic brain regions that mediate emotional processing and regulation. The findings are interpreted within a conceptual framework that draws on two integrative models in the literature. The first is a recently developed hierarchical model of impulse control (externalizing) problems, in which various disinhibitory syndromes including aggressive and addictive behaviours of different kinds are seen as arising from common as well as distinctive aetiologic factors. This model represents an approach to organizing these various interrelated phenotypes and investigating their common and distinctive aetiologic substrates. The other is a neurobiological model that posits impairments in affective regulatory circuits in the brain as a key mechanism for impulsive aggressive behaviour. This model provides a perspective for integrating findings from studies employing different measures that have implicated varying brain structures and physiological systems in violent and aggressive behaviour.

  14. Overexpression of CDC25B, CDC25C and phospho-CDC25C (Ser216 in vulvar squamous cell carcinomas are associated with malignant features and aggressive cancer phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flørenes Vivi

    2010-05-01

    malignant features and aggressive cancer phenotypes. However, the CDC25s isoforms were not independently correlated to prognosis.

  15. Overexpression of CDC25B, CDC25C and phospho-CDC25C (Ser216) in vulvar squamous cell carcinomas are associated with malignant features and aggressive cancer phenotypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhihui; Trope, Claes G; Flørenes, Vivi Ann; Suo, Zhenhe; Nesland, Jahn M; Holm, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    CDC25 phosphatases are important regulators of the cell cycle. Their abnormal expression detected in a number of tumors implies that their dysregulation is involved in malignant transformation. However, the role of CDC25s in vulvar cancer is still unknown. To shed light on their roles in the pathogenesis and to clarify their prognostic values, expression of CDC25A, CDC25B and CDC25C in a large series of vulvar squamous cell carcinomas were examined. Expression of CDC25A, CDC25B, CDC25C and phosphorylated (phospho)-CDC25C (Ser216) were examined in 300 vulvar carcinomas using immunohistochemistry. Western blot analysis was utilized to demonstrate CDC25s expression in vulvar cancer cell lines. Kinase and phosphatase assays were performed to exclude cross reactivity among CDC25s isoform antibodies. High nuclear CDC25A and CDC25B expression were observed in 51% and 16% of the vulvar carcinomas, respectively, whereas high cytoplasmic CDC25C expression was seen in 63% of the cases. In cytoplasm, nucleus and cytoplasm/nucleus high phospho-CDC25C (Ser216) expression was identified in 50%, 70% and 77% of the carcinomas, respectively. High expression of CDC25s correlated significantly with malignant features, including poor differentiation and infiltration of vessel for CDC25B, high FIGO stage, presence of lymph node metastases, large tumor diameter, poor differentiation for CDC25C and high FIGO stage, large tumor diameter, deep invasion and poor differentiation for phospho-CDC25C (Ser216). In univariate analysis, high expression of phospho-CDC25C (Ser216) was correlated with poor disease-specific survival (p = 0.04). However, such an association was annulled in multivariate analysis. Our results suggest that CDC25C and phospho-CDC25C (Ser216) play a crucial role and CDC25B a minor role in the pathogenesis and/or progression of vulvar carcinomas. CDC25B, CDC25C and phospho-CDC25C (Ser216) were associated with malignant features and aggressive cancer phenotypes. However, the

  16. Primary primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Dipankar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET is a small round cell malignant tumor of neuroectodermal origin. Most of the PNETs occur in the central nervous system (CNS. PNETs recognized outside of CNS are diagnosed as peripheral PNET (pPNET. This tumor which expresses MIC-2 gene (CD99 seems to be least aggressive after complete tumor resection. We describe a rare case of PNET in a young girl.

  17. Non-invasive estimation of prostate cancer aggressiveness using diffusion-weighted MRI and 3D proton MR spectroscopy at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thörmer, Gregor; Otto, Josephin; Horn, Lars-Christian; Garnov, Nikita; Do, Minh; Franz, Toni; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Moche, Michael; Kahn, Thomas; Busse, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Clinical management of prostate cancer increasingly aims to distinguish aggressive types that require immediate and radical treatment from indolent tumors that are candidates for watchful waiting. This requires reliable and reproducible parameters to effectively control potential cancer progression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may provide a non-invasive means for this purpose. To assess the value of diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy for the prediction of prostate cancer (PCa) aggressiveness. In 39 of 64 consecutive patients who underwent endorectal 3-T MRI prior to radical prostatectomy, prostate specimens were analyzed as whole-mount step sections. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), normalized ADC (nADC: tumor/healthy tissue), choline/citrate (CC), and (choline + creatine)/citrate (CCC) ratios were correlated with Gleason scores (GS) from histopathological results. The power to discriminate low (GS ≤ 6) from higher-risk (GS ≥ 7) tumors was assessed with receiver operating characteristics (area under the curve [AUC]). Resulting threshold values were used by a blinded reader to distinguish between aggressive and indolent tumors. Ninety lesions (1 × GS = 5, 41 × GS = 6, 36 × GS = 7, 12 × GS = 8) were considered. nADC (AUC = 0.90) showed a higher discriminatory power than ADC (AUC = 0.79). AUC for CC and CCC were 0.73 and 0.82, respectively. Using either nADC  1.3, as well as both criteria for aggressive PCa, the reader correctly identified aggressive and indolent tumors in 31 (79%), 28 (72%), and 33 of 39 patients (85%), respectively. Predictions of tumor aggressiveness from TRUS-guided biopsies were correct in 27 of 36 patients (75%). The combination of a highly sensitive normalized ADC with a highly specific CCC was found to be well suited to prospectively estimate PCa aggressiveness with a similar diagnostic accuracy as biopsy results. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica

  18. An aggressive angiomyxoma of vulva - A rare entity - A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu Prasad Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive angiomyxoma is a rare, locally invasive mesenchymal tumor predominantly presenting in women of reproductive age and also having a moderate-to-high risk for local relapse. Hence, it needs to be differentiated from other mesenchymal tumors occurring in this region. We present here a case of a 40-year-old female presenting with a large, fleshy, pedunculated mass on the right labia majora.

  19. RNAi phenotype profiling of kinases identifies potential therapeutic targets in Ewing's sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Shilpi; Gonzales, Irma M; Hagelstrom, R Tanner; Beaudry, Christian; Choudhary, Ashish; Sima, Chao; Tibes, Raoul; Mousses, Spyro; Azorsa, David O

    2010-08-18

    Ewing's sarcomas are aggressive musculoskeletal tumors occurring most frequently in the long and flat bones as a solitary lesion mostly during the teen-age years of life. With current treatments, significant number of patients relapse and survival is poor for those with metastatic disease. As part of novel target discovery in Ewing's sarcoma, we applied RNAi mediated phenotypic profiling to identify kinase targets involved in growth and survival of Ewing's sarcoma cells. Four Ewing's sarcoma cell lines TC-32, TC-71, SK-ES-1 and RD-ES were tested in high throughput-RNAi screens using a siRNA library targeting 572 kinases. Knockdown of 25 siRNAs reduced the growth of all four Ewing's sarcoma cell lines in replicate screens. Of these, 16 siRNA were specific and reduced proliferation of Ewing's sarcoma cells as compared to normal fibroblasts. Secondary validation and preliminary mechanistic studies highlighted the kinases STK10 and TNK2 as having important roles in growth and survival of Ewing's sarcoma cells. Furthermore, knockdown of STK10 and TNK2 by siRNA showed increased apoptosis. In summary, RNAi-based phenotypic profiling proved to be a powerful gene target discovery strategy, leading to successful identification and validation of STK10 and TNK2 as two novel potential therapeutic targets for Ewing's sarcoma.

  20. The role of F18-FDG PET scans in predicting micropapillary thyroid cancer aggressiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, E. H.; Cho, H. J.; Kim, T. S.; Kang, W. J.; Yun, M. J.; Lee, J. D.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose is to evaluate F18-FDG PET in predicting micropapillary thyroid cancer aggressiveness. 41 patients (38 female, mean age 50y) who had PET before total thyroidectomy between 2002.1∼2007.8 were reviewed. Patients with thyroiditis and multiple nodules were excluded. Thyroid nodules were visually analyzed into groups with increased and no FDG uptake. Peak SUV ratio of liver-to-nodule (pSUV ratio) was taken. pSUV ratio was correlated with nodule size and micropapillary cancer aggressiveness. Perithyroid extension and/or LN metastasis was used as an indicator of micropapillary cancer aggressiveness 20 patients had 0.89 and nodules with increased FDG uptake, with an average pSUV ratio of 1.67 0.15. 21 patients had nodules that were not visible, average size of 0.66 cm 0.24. FDG uptake and nodule size correlation was with an average size of 0.52 cm significant (p=0.051). The nodules were divided into two groups using a cut-off value of pSUV ratio of 0.9. 19 patients had nodules with a pSUV ratio of 0.9 or higher, and 15 of the 19 patients had perithyroid extension and/or LN metastasis. 22 patients had nodules with pSUV ratio lower than 0.9 and 7 of these patients had perithyroid extension and/or LN metastasis. Patients with higher pSUV ratio showed more perithyroid extension or LN metastasis than those with lower pSUV ratio (p=0.01). A total of 8 patients had LN metastasis, but none were visualized on PET. Higher FDG uptake seems to be significantly correlated with tumor aggressiveness in micropapillary thyroid carcinomas. But FDG uptakes in primary tumors were also correlated with tumor size. In other words, larger nodules tend to show aggressive behavior in micropapillary thyroid carcinomas and FDG it self may not be an independent factor for tumor aggressiveness. Also, PET shows an extremely poor sensitivity for the detection of LN metastasis. Therefore, PET may not have any role in the evaluation of patients with micropapillary thyroid carcinomas

  1. The role of F18-FDG PET scans in predicting micropapillary thyroid cancer aggressiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, E. H.; Cho, H. J.; Kim, T. S.; Kang, W. J.; Yun, M. J.; Lee, J. D. [Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The purpose is to evaluate F18-FDG PET in predicting micropapillary thyroid cancer aggressiveness. 41 patients (38 female, mean age 50y) who had PET before total thyroidectomy between 2002.1{approx}2007.8 were reviewed. Patients with thyroiditis and multiple nodules were excluded. Thyroid nodules were visually analyzed into groups with increased and no FDG uptake. Peak SUV ratio of liver-to-nodule (pSUV ratio) was taken. pSUV ratio was correlated with nodule size and micropapillary cancer aggressiveness. Perithyroid extension and/or LN metastasis was used as an indicator of micropapillary cancer aggressiveness 20 patients had 0.89 and nodules with increased FDG uptake, with an average pSUV ratio of 1.67 0.15. 21 patients had nodules that were not visible, average size of 0.66 cm 0.24. FDG uptake and nodule size correlation was with an average size of 0.52 cm significant (p=0.051). The nodules were divided into two groups using a cut-off value of pSUV ratio of 0.9. 19 patients had nodules with a pSUV ratio of 0.9 or higher, and 15 of the 19 patients had perithyroid extension and/or LN metastasis. 22 patients had nodules with pSUV ratio lower than 0.9 and 7 of these patients had perithyroid extension and/or LN metastasis. Patients with higher pSUV ratio showed more perithyroid extension or LN metastasis than those with lower pSUV ratio (p=0.01). A total of 8 patients had LN metastasis, but none were visualized on PET. Higher FDG uptake seems to be significantly correlated with tumor aggressiveness in micropapillary thyroid carcinomas. But FDG uptakes in primary tumors were also correlated with tumor size. In other words, larger nodules tend to show aggressive behavior in micropapillary thyroid carcinomas and FDG it self may not be an independent factor for tumor aggressiveness. Also, PET shows an extremely poor sensitivity for the detection of LN metastasis. Therefore, PET may not have any role in the evaluation of patients with micropapillary thyroid carcinomas.

  2. Large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma originating from the uterine endometrium: a report on magnetic resonance features of 2 cases with very rare and aggressive tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuko Makihara

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC of the female genital tract are aggressive and uncommon tumors, which usually involve the uterine cervix and ovary, and are seen very rarely in the endometrium. Only less than 10 cases of large cell NEC (LCNEC of the endometrium have been reported in the literature and their radiological findings are not well described. We report here two cases of pathologically proven LCNEC of the uterine endometrium. In both cases, the uterine body was enlarged and the tumor occupied part of the uterine cavity. Endometrial mass exhibited heterogeneous high intensity on T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR images, and diffusion-weighted MR images revealed high intensity throughout the tumor, consistent with malignancy. LCNEC is a highly malignant neoplasm without particular findings in terms of diagnostic imaging and pathology, so its preoperative definitive diagnosis is very difficult. However, when laboratory test, pathologic diagnosis and MR imaging suggest a poorly differentiated uterine malignancy, positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan should be performed as a general assessment to help with diagnosis.

  3. Hypoxia in tumors: pathogenesis-related classification, characterization of hypoxia subtypes, and associated biological and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaupel, Peter; Mayer, Arnulf

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a hallmark of tumors leading to (mal-)adaptive processes, development of aggressive phenotypes and treatment resistance. Based on underlying mechanisms and their duration, two main types of hypoxia have been identified, coexisting with complex spatial and temporal heterogeneities. Chronic hypoxia is mainly caused by diffusion limitations due to enlarged diffusion distances and adverse diffusion geometries (e.g., concurrent vs. countercurrent microvessels, Krogh- vs. Hill-type diffusion geometry) and, to a lesser extent, by hypoxemia (e.g., in anemic patients, HbCO formation in heavy smokers), and a compromised perfusion or flow stop (e.g., due to disturbed Starling forces or intratumor solid stress). Acute hypoxia mainly results from transient disruptions in perfusion (e.g., vascular occlusion by cell aggregates), fluctuating red blood cell fluxes or short-term contractions of the interstitial matrix. In each of these hypoxia subtypes oxygen supply is critically reduced, but perfusion-dependent nutrient supply, waste removal, delivery of anticancer or diagnostic agents, and repair competence can be impaired or may not be affected. This detailed differentiation of tumor hypoxia may impact on our understanding of tumor biology and may aid in the development of novel treatment strategies, tumor detection by imaging and tumor targeting, and is thus of great clinical relevance.

  4. Combined inhibition of p38 and Akt signaling pathways abrogates cyclosporine A-mediated pathogenesis of aggressive skin SCCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arumugam, Aadithya; Walsh, Stephanie B.; Xu, Jianmin; Afaq, Farrukh [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p38 and Akt are the crucial molecular targets in the pathogenesis of SCCs in OTRs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined inhibition of these targets diminished tumor growth by 90%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of these targets act through downregulating mTOR signaling pathway. -- Abstract: Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) are the most common neoplasm in organ transplant recipients (OTRs). These cancers are more invasive and metastatic as compared to those developed in normal cohorts. Previously, we have shown that immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporine A (CsA) directly alters tumor phenotype of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) by activating TGF-{beta} and TAK1/TAB1 signaling pathways. Here, we identified novel molecular targets for the therapeutic intervention of these SCCs. We observed that combined blockade of Akt and p38 kinases-dependent signaling pathways in CsA-promoted human epidermoid carcinoma A431 xenograft tumors abrogated their growth by more than 90%. This diminution in tumor growth was accompanied by a significant decrease in proliferation and an increase in apoptosis. The residual tumors following the combined treatment with Akt inhibitor triciribine and p38 inhibitors SB-203580 showed significantly diminished expression of phosphorylated Akt and p38 and these tumors were less invasive and highly differentiated. Diminished tumor invasiveness was associated with the reduced epithelial-mesenchymal transition as ascertained by the enhanced E-cadherin and reduced vimentin and N-cadherin expression. Consistently, these tumors also manifested reduced MMP-2/9. The decreased p-Akt expression was accompanied by a significant reduction in p-mTOR. These data provide first important combinatorial pharmacological approach to block the pathogenesis of CsA-induced highly aggressive cutaneous neoplasm in OTRs.

  5. Roles for miR-375 in Neuroendocrine Differentiation and Tumor Suppression via Notch Pathway Suppression in Merkel Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Karan J; Zhang, Xiao; Vidal, Ricardo; Paré, Geneviève C; Feilotter, Harriet E; Tron, Victor A

    2016-04-01

    Dysfunction of key miRNA pathways regulating basic cellular processes is a common driver of many cancers. However, the biological roles and/or clinical applications of such pathways in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare but lethal cutaneous neuroendocrine (NE) malignancy, have yet to be determined. Previous work has established that miR-375 is highly expressed in MCC tumors, but its biological role in MCC remains unknown. Herein, we show that elevated miR-375 expression is a specific feature of well-differentiated MCC cell lines that express NE markers. In contrast, miR-375 is strikingly down-regulated in highly aggressive, undifferentiated MCC cell lines. Enforced miR-375 expression in these cells induced NE differentiation, and opposed cancer cell viability, migration, invasion, and survival, pointing to tumor-suppressive roles for miR-375. Mechanistically, miR-375-driven phenotypes were caused by the direct post-transcriptional repression of multiple Notch pathway proteins (Notch2 and RBPJ) linked to cancer and regulation of cell fate. Thus, we detail a novel molecular axis linking tumor-suppressive miR-375 and Notch with NE differentiation and cancer cell behavior in MCC. Our findings identify miR-375 as a putative regulator of NE differentiation, provide insight into the cell of origin of MCC, and suggest that miR-375 silencing may promote aggressive cancer cell behavior through Notch disinhibition. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ethanol exposure induces the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype and lethal tumor metabolism: implications for breast cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Rubin, Emanuel; Lisanti, Michael P

    2013-01-15

    Little is known about how alcohol consumption promotes the onset of human breast cancer(s). One hypothesis is that ethanol induces metabolic changes in the tumor microenvironment, which then enhances epithelial tumor growth. To experimentally test this hypothesis, we used a co-culture system consisting of human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts. Here, we show that ethanol treatment (100 mM) promotes ROS production and oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts, which is sufficient to induce myofibroblastic differentiation. Oxidative stress in stromal fibroblasts also results in the onset of autophagy/mitophagy, driving the induction of ketone body production in the tumor microenvironment. Interestingly, ethanol has just the opposite effect in epithelial cancer cells, where it confers autophagy resistance, elevates mitochondrial biogenesis and induces key enzymes associated with ketone re-utilization (ACAT1/OXCT1). During co-culture, ethanol treatment also converts MCF7 cells from an ER(+) to an ER(-) status, which is thought to be associated with "stemness," more aggressive behavior and a worse prognosis. Thus, ethanol treatment induces ketone production in cancer-associated fibroblasts and ketone re-utilization in epithelial cancer cells, fueling tumor cell growth via oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). This "two-compartment" metabolic model is consistent with previous historical observations that ethanol is first converted to acetaldehyde (which induces oxidative stress) and then ultimately to acetyl-CoA (a high-energy mitochondrial fuel), or can be used to synthesize ketone bodies. As such, our results provide a novel mechanism by which alcohol consumption could metabolically convert "low-risk" breast cancer patients to "high-risk" status, explaining tumor recurrence or disease progression. Hence, our findings have clear implications for both breast cancer prevention and therapy. Remarkably, our results also show that

  7. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its precursor (proBDNF) in genetically defined fear-induced aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilchibaeva, Tatiana V; Kondaurova, Elena M; Tsybko, Anton S; Kozhemyakina, Rimma V; Popova, Nina K; Naumenko, Vladimir S

    2015-09-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its precursor (proBDNF) and BDNF mRNA levels were studied in the brain of wild rats selectively bred for more than 70 generations for either high level or for the lack of affective aggressiveness towards man. Significant increase of BDNF mRNA level in the frontal cortex and increase of BDNF level in the hippocampus of aggressive rats was revealed. In the midbrain and hippocampus of aggressive rats proBDNF level was increased, whereas BDNF/proBDNF ratio was reduced suggesting the prevalence and increased influence of proBDNF in highly aggressive rats. In the frontal cortex, proBDNF level in aggressive rats was decreased. Thus, considerable structure-specific differences in BDNF and proBDNF levels as well as in BDNF gene expression between highly aggressive and nonaggressive rats were shown. The data suggested the implication of BDNF and its precursor proBDNF in the mechanism of aggressiveness and in the creation of either aggressive or nonaggressive phenotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A mesenchymal-like phenotype and expression of CD44 predict lack of apoptotic response to sorafenib in liver tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Joan; Malfettone, Andrea; Cepeda, Edgar B; Vilarrasa-Blasi, Roser; Bertran, Esther; Raimondi, Giulia; Fabra, Àngels; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Fernández-Salguero, Pedro; Fernández-Rodríguez, Conrado M; Giannelli, Gianluigi; Sancho, Patricia; Fabregat, Isabel

    2015-02-15

    The multikinase inhibitor sorafenib is the only effective drug in advanced cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, response differs among patients and effectiveness only implies a delay. We have recently described that sorafenib sensitizes HCC cells to apoptosis. In this work, we have explored the response to this drug of six different liver tumor cell lines to define a phenotypic signature that may predict lack of response in HCC patients. Results have indicated that liver tumor cells that show a mesenchymal-like phenotype, resistance to the suppressor effects of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and high expression of the stem cell marker CD44 were refractory to sorafenib-induced cell death in in vitro studies, which correlated with lack of response to sorafenib in nude mice xenograft models of human HCC. In contrast, epithelial-like cells expressing the stem-related proteins EpCAM or CD133 were sensitive to sorafenib-induced apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. A cross-talk between the TGF-β pathway and the acquisition of a mesenchymal-like phenotype with up-regulation of CD44 expression was found in the HCC cell lines. Targeted CD44 knock-down in the mesenchymal-like cells indicated that CD44 plays an active role in protecting HCC cells from sorafenib-induced apoptosis. However, CD44 effect requires a TGF-β-induced mesenchymal background, since the only overexpression of CD44 in epithelial-like HCC cells is not sufficient to impair sorafenib-induced cell death. In conclusion, a mesenchymal profile and expression of CD44, linked to activation of the TGF-β pathway, may predict lack of response to sorafenib in HCC patients. © 2014 UICC.

  9. Role of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC: is tumor budding the missing link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eKaramitopoulou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC ranks as the fourth commonest cause of cancer death while its incidence is increasing worldwide. For all stages, survival at 5 years is <5%. The lethal nature of pancreatic cancer is attributed to its high metastatic potential to the lymphatic system and distant organs. Lack of effective therapeutic options contributes to the high mortality rates of PDAC. Recent evidence suggests that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT plays an important role to the disease progression and development of drug resistance in PDAC. Tumor budding is thought to reflect the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT which allows neoplastic epithelial cells to acquire a mesenchymal phenotype thus increasing their capacity for migration and invasion and help them become resistant to apoptotic signals. In a recent study by our own group the presence and prognostic significance of tumor budding in PDAC were investigated and an association between high-grade budding and aggressive clinicopathological features of the tumors as well as worse outcome of the patients was found. The identification of EMT phenotypic targets may help identifying new molecules so that future therapeutic strategies directed specifically against them could potentially have an impact on drug resistance and invasiveness and hence improve the prognosis of PDAC patients. The aim of this short review is to present an insight on the morphological and molecular aspects of EMT and on the factors that are involved in the induction of EMT in PDAC.

  10. Triple-negative breast cancer: present challenges and new perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Podo, Franca; Buydens, Lutgarde M. C.; Degani, Hadassa; Hilhorst, Riet; Klipp, Edda; Gribbestad, Ingrid S.; van Huffel, Sabine; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; Luts, Jan; Monleon, Daniel; Postma, Geert J.; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Santoro, Filippo; Wouters, Hans; Russnes, Hege G.; Sørlie, Therese; Tagliabue, Elda; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2010-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC), characterized by absence of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and lack of overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), are typically associated with poor prognosis, due to aggressive tumor phenotype(s), only partial

  11. S100A16 promotes differentiation and contributes to a less aggressive tumor phenotype in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapkota, Dipak; Bruland, Ove; Parajuli, Himalaya; Osman, Tarig A.; Teh, Muy-Teck; Johannessen, Anne C.; Costea, Daniela Elena

    2015-01-01

    Altered expression of S100A16 has been reported in human cancers, but its biological role in tumorigenesis is not fully understood. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance and functional role of S100A16 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) suppression. S100A16 mRNA and/or protein levels were examined by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry in whole- and laser microdissected-specimens of normal human oral mucosa (NHOM, n = 65), oral dysplastic lesions (ODL, n = 21), OSCCs (n = 132) and positive cervical nodes (n = 17). S100A16 protein expression in OSCC was examined for correlations with clinicopathological variables and patient survival. S100A16 was over-expressed and knocked-down in OSCC-derived (CaLH3 and H357) cells by employing retroviral constructs to investigate its effects on cell proliferation, sphere formation and three dimensional (3D)-organotypic invasive abilities in vitro and tumorigenesis in a mouse xenograft model. Both S100A16 mRNA and protein levels were found to be progressively down-regulated from NHOM to ODL and OSCC. Low S100A16 protein levels in OSCC significantly correlated with reduced 10-year overall survival and poor tumor differentiation. Analysis of two external OSCC microarray datasets showed a positive correlation between the mRNA expression levels of S100A16 and keratinocyte differentiation markers. CaLH3 and H357 cell fractions enriched for differentiated cells either by lack of adherence to collagen IV or FACS sorting for low p75NTR expression expressed significantly higher S100A16 mRNA levels than the subpopulations enriched for less differentiated cells. Corroborating these findings, retroviral mediated S100A16 over-expression and knock-down in CaLH3 and H357 cells led to respective up- and down-regulation of differentiation markers. In vitro functional studies showed significant reduction in cell proliferation, sphere formation and 3D-invasive abilities of CaLH3 and H357 cells upon S100A16 over

  12. Neuroendocrine tumor of the skin of head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stošić Srboljub

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Merkel cell carcinom is a rare neuroendrocine tumor of skin which manifests it self through aggressive growth and early regional metastasis. It develops mainly in older population. Locally, the tumor spreads intracutaneously. Case report. We showed two cases (females of 89 and 70 years old hospitalized within the last two years. The first patient was treated surgically three times. After the surgery, the patient was treated with radio therapy, and died 3 years from the beginning of the treatment. The second patient with this neuroendocrine tumor with the high malignancy potential and huge regional metastasis, was treated surgically, and died a month and a half after the operation. Conclusion. These two cases confirmed the aggressive and recidivant growth of this tumor with the difficult pathologic investigation, and the extremely bad prognosis inspite of the treatment.

  13. Phenotypic characterization of glioblastoma identified through shape descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Desrosiers, Christian; Toews, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes quantitatively describing the shape of glioblastoma (GBM) tissue phenotypes as a set of shape features derived from segmentations, for the purposes of discriminating between GBM phenotypes and monitoring tumor progression. GBM patients were identified from the Cancer Genome Atlas, and quantitative MR imaging data were obtained from the Cancer Imaging Archive. Three GBM tissue phenotypes are considered including necrosis, active tumor and edema/invasion. Volumetric tissue segmentations are obtained from registered T1˗weighted (T1˗WI) postcontrast and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI modalities. Shape features are computed from respective tissue phenotype segmentations, and a Kruskal-Wallis test was employed to select features capable of classification with a significance level of p < 0.05. Several classifier models are employed to distinguish phenotypes, where a leave-one-out cross-validation was performed. Eight features were found statistically significant for classifying GBM phenotypes with p <0.05, orientation is uninformative. Quantitative evaluations show the SVM results in the highest classification accuracy of 87.50%, sensitivity of 94.59% and specificity of 92.77%. In summary, the shape descriptors proposed in this work show high performance in predicting GBM tissue phenotypes. They are thus closely linked to morphological characteristics of GBM phenotypes and could potentially be used in a computer assisted labeling system.

  14. Expression of FAP, ADAM12, WISP1, and SOX11 is heterogeneous in aggressive fibromatosis and spatially relates to the histologic features of tumor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misemer, Benjamin S; Skubitz, Amy P N; Carlos Manivel, J; Schmechel, Stephen C; Cheng, Edward Y; Henriksen, Jonathan C; Koopmeiners, Joseph S; Corless, Christopher L; Skubitz, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) represents a group of tumors with a variable and unpredictable clinical course, characterized by a monoclonal proliferation of myofibroblastic cells. The optimal treatment for AF remains unclear. Identification and validation of genes whose expression patterns are associated with AF may elucidate biological mechanisms in AF, and aid treatment selection. This study was designed to examine the protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) of four genes, ADAM12, FAP, SOX11, and WISP1, that were found in an earlier study to be uniquely overexpressed in AF compared with normal tissues. Digital image analysis was performed to evaluate inter- and intratumor heterogeneity, and correlate protein expression with histologic features, including a histopathologic assessment of tumor activity, defined by nuclear chromatin density ratio (CDR). AF tumors exhibited marked inter- and intratumor histologic heterogeneity. Pathologic assessment of tumor activity and digital assessment of average nuclear size and CDR were all significantly correlated. IHC revealed protein expression of all four genes. IHC staining for ADAM12, FAP, and WISP1 correlated with CDR and was higher, whereas SOX11 staining was lower in tumors with earlier recurrence following excision. All four proteins were expressed, and the regional variation in tumor activity within and among AF cases was demonstrated. A spatial correlation between protein expression and nuclear morphology was observed. IHC also correlated with the probability of recurrence following excision. These proteins may be involved in AF pathogenesis and the corresponding pathways could serve as potential targets of therapy

  15. Higher serum concentrations of vimentin and DAKP1 are associated with aggressive breast tumour phenotypes in Ghanaian women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arko-Boham, Benjamin; Lomotey, Justice Tanihu; Tetteh, Emmanuel Nomo; Tagoe, Emmanuel Ayitey; Aryee, Nii Ayite; Owusu, Ewurama Ampadu; Okai, Isaac; Blay, Richard Michael; Clegg-Lamptey, Joe-Nat

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer, the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women and leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, exhibits aggressive behavior in indigenous African women evidenced by high histologic grade tumours with low hormone receptor positivity. Aggressive breast cancers grow quickly, easily

  16. U-251 revisited: genetic drift and phenotypic consequences of long-term cultures of glioblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torsvik, Anja; Stieber, Daniel; Enger, Per Øyvind; Golebiewska, Anna; Molven, Anders; Svendsen, Agnete; Westermark, Bengt; Niclou, Simone P; Olsen, Thale Kristin; Chekenya Enger, Martha; Bjerkvig, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that in vitro subculture represents a selection pressure on cell lines, and over time this may result in a genetic drift in the cancer cells. In addition, long-term cultures harbor the risk of cross-contamination with other cell lines. The consequences may have major impact on experimental results obtained in various laboratories, where the cell lines no longer reflect the original tumors that they are supposed to represent. Much neglected in the scientific community is a close monitoring of cell cultures by regular phenotypic and genetic characterization. In this report, we present a thorough characterization of the commonly used glioblastoma (GBM) model U-251, which in numerous publications has been wrongly identified as U-373, due to an earlier cross-contamination. In this work, the original U-251 and three subclones of U-251, commonly referred to as U-251 or U-373, were analyzed with regard to their DNA profile, morphology, phenotypic expression, and growth pattern. By array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), we show that only the original low-passaged U-251 cells, established in the 1960s, maintain a DNA copy number resembling a typical GBM profile, whereas all long-term subclones lost the typical GBM profile. Also the long-term passaged subclones displayed variations in phenotypic marker expression and showed an increased growth rate in vitro and a more aggressive growth in vivo. Taken together, the variations in genotype and phenotype as well as differences in growth characteristics may explain different results reported in various laboratories related to the U-251 cell line

  17. Unravelling the neurophysiological basis of aggression in a fish model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hickmore Tamsin FA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggression is a near-universal behaviour with substantial influence on and implications for human and animal social systems. The neurophysiological basis of aggression is, however, poorly understood in all species and approaches adopted to study this complex behaviour have often been oversimplified. We applied targeted expression profiling on 40 genes, spanning eight neurological pathways and in four distinct regions of the brain, in combination with behavioural observations and pharmacological manipulations, to screen for regulatory pathways of aggression in the zebrafish (Danio rerio, an animal model in which social rank and aggressiveness tightly correlate. Results Substantial differences occurred in gene expression profiles between dominant and subordinate males associated with phenotypic differences in aggressiveness and, for the chosen gene set, they occurred mainly in the hypothalamus and telencephalon. The patterns of differentially-expressed genes implied multifactorial control of aggression in zebrafish, including the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial-system, serotonin, somatostatin, dopamine, hypothalamo-pituitary-interrenal, hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal and histamine pathways, and the latter is a novel finding outside mammals. Pharmacological manipulations of various nodes within the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial-system and serotonin pathways supported their functional involvement. We also observed differences in expression profiles in the brains of dominant versus subordinate females that suggested sex-conserved control of aggression. For example, in the HNS pathway, the gene encoding arginine vasotocin (AVT, previously believed specific to male behaviours, was amongst those genes most associated with aggression, and AVT inhibited dominant female aggression, as in males. However, sex-specific differences in the expression profiles also occurred, including differences in aggression-associated tryptophan hydroxylases

  18. Epigenetic reversion of breast carcinoma phenotype is accompaniedby DNA sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandal, Tone; Valyi-Nagy, Klara; Spencer, Virginia A.; Folberg,Robert; Bissell, Mina J.; Maniotis, Andrew J.

    2006-07-19

    The importance of microenvironment and context in regulation of tissue-specific genes is finally well established. DNA exposure to, or sequestration from, nucleases can be used to detect differences in higher order chromatin structure in intact cells without disturbing cellular or tissue architecture. To investigate the relationship between chromatin organization and tumor phenotype, we utilized an established 3-D assay where normal and malignant human breast cells can be easily distinguished by the morphology of the structures they make (acinus-like vs tumor-like, respectively). We show that these phenotypes can be distinguished also by sensitivity to AluI digestion where the malignant cells are resistant to digestion relative to non-malignant cells. Reversion of the T4-2 breast cancer cells by either cAMP analogs, or a phospatidylinositol 3-kinase (P13K) inhibitor not only reverted the phenotype, but also the chromatin sensitivity to AluI. By using different cAMP-analogs, we show that the cAMP-induced phenotypic reversion, polarization, and shift in DNA organization act through a cAMP-dependent-protein-kinase A-coupled signaling pathway. Importantly, inhibitory antibody to fibronectin also reverted the malignant phenotype, polarized the acini, and changed chromatin sequestration. These experiments show not only that modifying the tumor microenvironment can alter the organization of tumor cells but also that architecture of the tissues and the global chromatin organization are coupled and yet highly plastic.

  19. Aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonnaer, F.; Cima, M.; Arntz, A.R.; Cima, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aggression, violence and deviant behavior are terms frequently used interchangeable, but relate to different theoretical concepts. Therefore, this chapter starts with a definition of aggression. Furthermore, several theories regarding the development of aggression will be presented. According to

  20. Tumor Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages: Secreted Proteins as Potential Targets for Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Baay, Marc; Brouwer, Anja; Pauwels, Patrick; Peeters, Marc; Lardon, Filip

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory pathways, meant to defend the organism against infection and injury, as a byproduct, can promote an environment which favors tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), which constitute a significant part of the tumor-infiltrating immune cells, have been linked to the growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis of a variety of cancers, most likely through polarization of TAMs to the M2 (alternative) phenotype. The interaction between tumor cells and macrophages pro...

  1. Aggressive Digital Papillary Adenocarcinoma in a Young Female-a Rare Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gole, Gautam Nandkumar; Tati, Shekhar Y; Deshpande, Ashok Kumar; Gole, Sheetal G

    2011-06-01

    A 20 year old female presented with a recurrent soft tissue swelling over the medial aspect of proximal phalanx of left little finger. It had recurred one year after excision. There was no lymphadenopathy or bony involvement. Previous histopathology reports were not available. After excision histopathological diagnosis was aggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma. Later Ray's amputation of little finger was planned. Aggressive digital papillary adenocarcinomas are rare sweat gland tumors which occur on hands, fingers, and toes. They have high local recurrence rate and may metastasize to lungs and lymph nodes.

  2. Malignant rhabdoid tumor of the liver: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Oita

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT is a rare and aggressive malignancy associated with poor outcomes. MRT of the liver is even rarer, and little information has been described. We report the case of an 8-month-old boy with MRT of the liver. The tumor showed aggressive progression despite a multidisciplinary approach, and the patient died due to multiple organ failure 14 days after admission. Autopsy revealed the liver tumor and multiple metastases with negative immunohistochemistry for INI1/BAF47. A review of 53 cases of pediatric MRT of the liver is provided.

  3. CT findings in a case of female pelvis aggressive angiomyxoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, P.P.; Martinez, M.G.; Lopez, A.R.; Facal, P.L.; Pulido, C.T.M.

    1995-01-01

    Aggressive angiomyxoma is an uncommon mesenchymal tumor with a clear predominance in females and a high tendency for local recurrence after its removal. The CT characteristics of pelvic angiomyxoma in a 52-year-old woman are presented in order to increase the knowledge of the diagnostic possibilities. (orig.)

  4. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Yu; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According to quantitative PCR analysis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C mRNA expression increased with differentiation of osteoclast-like cells. To investigate whether VEGF-C expression is responsible for tumor growth and macrophage infiltration, HeLa cells overexpressing VEGF-C (HeLa-VC) were established and transplanted into mice. Tumors composed of HeLa-VC mimicked the phenotype of the tumors containing OGCs. Furthermore, the vascular permeability of tumor microvessels also increased in tumors containing OGCs and to some extent in VEGF-C-expressing tumors. These results suggest that macrophage infiltration and vascular permeability are possible mediators in these tumors. These

  5. Lipocalin 2 expression is associated with aggressive features of endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannelqvist, Monica; Akslen, Lars A; Stefansson, Ingunn M; Wik, Elisabeth; Kusonmano, Kanthida; Raeder, Maria B; Øyan, Anne M; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Moses, Marsha A; Salvesen, Helga B

    2012-01-01

    Increased expression of lipocalin 2 (LCN2) has been observed in several cancers. The aim of the present study was to investigate LCN2 in endometrial cancer in relation to clinico-pathologic phenotype, angiogenesis, markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and patient survival. Immunohistochemical staining was performed using a human LCN2 antibody on a population-based series of endometrial cancer patients collected in Hordaland County (Norway) during 1981-1990 (n = 256). Patients were followed from the time of primary surgery until death or last follow-up in 2007. The median follow-up time for survivors was 17 years. Gene expression data from a prospectively collected endometrial cancer series (n = 76) and a publicly available endometrial cancer series (n = 111) was used for gene correlation studies. Expression of LCN2 protein, found in 49% of the cases, was associated with non-endometrioid histologic type (p = 0.001), nuclear grade 3 (p = 0.001), >50% solid tumor growth (p = 0.001), ER and PR negativity (p = 0.028 and 0.006), and positive EZH2 expression (p < 0.001). LCN2 expression was significantly associated with expression of VEGF-A (p = 0.021), although not with other angiogenesis markers examined (vascular proliferation index, glomeruloid microvascular proliferation, VEGF-C, VEGF-D or bFGF2 expression). Further, LCN2 was not associated with several EMT-related markers (E-cadherin, N-cadherin, P-cadherin, β-catenin), nor with vascular invasion (tumor cells invading lymphatic or blood vessels). Notably, LCN2 was significantly associated with distant tumor recurrences, as well as with the S100A family of metastasis related genes. Patients with tumors showing no LCN2 expression had the best outcome with 81% 5-year survival, compared to 73% for intermediate and 38% for the small subgroup with strong LCN2 staining (p = 0.007). In multivariate analysis, LCN2 expression was an independent prognostic factor in addition to histologic grade and FIGO stage

  6. Benign and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Adam D.; Datir, Abhijit; Langley, Travis [Emory University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Atlanta, GA (United States); Tresley, Jonathan [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Clifford, Paul D.; Jose, Jean; Subhawong, Ty K. [University of Miami, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Pain and focal masses in the foot and ankle are frequently encountered and often initiate a workup including imaging. It is important to differentiate benign lesions from aggressive benign or malignant lesions. In this review, multiple examples of osseous and soft tissue tumors of the foot and ankle will be presented. Additionally, the compartmental anatomy of the foot and ankle will be discussed in terms of its relevance for percutaneous biopsy planning and eventual surgery. Finally, a general overview of the surgical management of benign, benign aggressive and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle will be discussed. (orig.)

  7. Brain tumor-targeted drug delivery strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Wei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the application of aggressive surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy in clinics, brain tumors are still a difficult health challenge due to their fast development and poor prognosis. Brain tumor-targeted drug delivery systems, which increase drug accumulation in the tumor region and reduce toxicity in normal brain and peripheral tissue, are a promising new approach to brain tumor treatments. Since brain tumors exhibit many distinctive characteristics relative to tumors growing in peripheral tissues, potential targets based on continuously changing vascular characteristics and the microenvironment can be utilized to facilitate effective brain tumor-targeted drug delivery. In this review, we briefly describe the physiological characteristics of brain tumors, including blood–brain/brain tumor barriers, the tumor microenvironment, and tumor stem cells. We also review targeted delivery strategies and introduce a systematic targeted drug delivery strategy to overcome the challenges.

  8. Alterations of the spindle checkpoint pathway in clinicopathologically aggressive CpG island methylator phenotype clear cell renal cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Eri; Gotoh, Masahiro; Tian, Ying; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Ono, Masaya; Matsuda, Akio; Takahashi, Yoriko; Miyata, Sayaka; Totsuka, Hirohiko; Chiku, Suenori; Komiyama, Motokiyo; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Kenji; Yamada, Tesshi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Kanai, Yae

    2015-12-01

    CpG-island methylator phenotype (CIMP)-positive clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) are characterized by accumulation of DNA hypermethylation of CpG islands, clinicopathological aggressiveness and poor patient outcome. The aim of this study was to clarify the molecular pathways participating in CIMP-positive renal carcinogenesis. Genome (whole-exome and copy number), transcriptome and proteome (two-dimensional image converted analysis of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) analyses were performed using tissue specimens of 87 CIMP-negative and 14 CIMP-positive clear cell RCCs and corresponding specimens of non-cancerous renal cortex. Genes encoding microtubule-associated proteins, such as DNAH2, DNAH5, DNAH10, RP1 and HAUS8, showed a 10% or higher incidence of genetic aberrations (non-synonymous single-nucleotide mutations and insertions/deletions) in CIMP-positive RCCs, whereas CIMP-negative RCCs lacked distinct genetic characteristics. MetaCore pathway analysis of CIMP-positive RCCs revealed that alterations of mRNA or protein expression were significantly accumulated in six pathways, all participating in the spindle checkpoint, including the "The metaphase checkpoint (p = 1.427 × 10(-6))," "Role of Anaphase Promoting Complex in cell cycle regulation (p = 7.444 × 10(-6))" and "Spindle assembly and chromosome separation (p = 9.260 × 10(-6))" pathways. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression levels for genes included in such pathways, i.e., AURKA, AURKB, BIRC5, BUB1, CDC20, NEK2 and SPC25, were significantly higher in CIMP-positive than in CIMP-negative RCCs. All CIMP-positive RCCs showed overexpression of Aurora kinases, AURKA and AURKB, and this overexpression was mainly attributable to increased copy number. These data suggest that abnormalities of the spindle checkpoint pathway participate in CIMP-positive renal carcinogenesis, and that AURKA and AURKB may be potential therapeutic targets in more aggressive CIMP-positive RCCs.

  9. Galectin-3 as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Tumors Arising from Malignant Endothelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim D. Johnson

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Angiosarcoma (ASA in humans, hemangiosarcoma (HSA in dogs are deadly neoplastic diseases characterized by an aggressive growth of malignant cells with endothelial phenotype, widespread metastasis, poor response to chemotherapy. Galectin-3 (Gal-3, a p-galactoside-binding lectin implicated in tumor progression, metastasis, endothelial cell biology, angiogenesis, regulation of apoptosis, neoplastic cell response to cytotoxic drugs, has not been studied before in tumors arising from malignant endothelia. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Gal-3 could be widely expressed in human ASA, canine HSA, could play an important role in malignant endothelial cell biology. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that 100% of the human ASA (10 of 10, canine HSA (17 of 17 samples analyzed expressed Gal-3. Two carbohydrate-based Gal-3 inhibitors, modified citrus pectin (MCP, lactulosyl-l-leucine (LL, caused a dose-dependent reduction of SVR murine ASA cell clonogenic survival through the inhibition of Gal-3 antiapoptotic function. Furthermore, both MCP, LL sensitized SVR cells to the cytotoxic drug doxorubicin to a degree sufficient to reduce the in vitro IC50 of doxorubicin by 10.7-fold, 3.64old, respectively. These results highlight the important role of Gal-3 in the biology of ASA, identify Gal-3 as a potential therapeutic target in tumors arising from malignant endothelial cells.

  10. Glial tumors with neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul-Kee; Phi, Ji Hoon; Park, Sung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    Immunohistochemical studies for neuronal differentiation in glial tumors revealed subsets of tumors having both characteristics of glial and neuronal lineages. Glial tumors with neuronal differentiation can be observed with diverse phenotypes and histologic grades. The rosette-forming glioneuronal tumor of the fourth ventricle and papillary glioneuronal tumor have been newly classified as distinct disease entities. There are other candidates for classification, such as the glioneuronal tumor without pseudopapillary architecture, glioneuronal tumor with neuropil-like islands, and the malignant glioneuronal tumor. The clinical significance of these previously unclassified tumors should be confirmed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Management Strategies for Aggressive Cushing's Syndrome: From Macroadenomas to Ectopics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozza, Carlotta; Graziadio, Chiara; Giannetta, Elisa; Lenzi, Andrea; Isidori, Andrea M.

    2012-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a rare but severe clinical condition represented by an excessive endogenous cortisol secretion and hence excess circulating free cortisol, characterized by loss of the normal feedback regulation and circadian rhythm of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis due to inappropriate secretion of ACTH from a pituitary tumor (Cushing's disease, CD) or an ectopic source (ectopic ACTH secretion, EAS). The remaining causes (20%) are ACTH independent. As soon as the diagnosis is established, the therapeutic goal is the removal of the tumor. Whenever surgery is not curative, management of patients with CS requires a major effort to control hypercortisolemia and associated symptoms. A multidisciplinary approach that includes endocrinologists, neurosurgeons, oncologists, and radiotherapists should be adopted. This paper will focus on traditional and novel medical therapy for aggressive ACTH-dependent CS. Several drugs are able to reduce cortisol levels. Their mechanism of action involves blocking adrenal steroidogenesis (ketoconazole, metyrapone, aminoglutethimide, mitotane, etomidate) or inhibiting the peripheral action of cortisol through blocking its receptors (mifepristone “RU-486”). Other drugs include centrally acting agents (dopamine agonists, somatostatin receptor agonists, retinoic acid, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ “PPAR-γ” ligands) and novel chemotherapeutic agents (temozolomide and tyrosine kinase inhibitors) which have a significant activity against aggressive pituitary or ectopic tumors. PMID:22934113

  12. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozic, D; Nagulic, M; Ostojic, J

    2006-01-01

    We present the short-term follow-up magnetic resonance (MR) studies and 1H-MR spectroscopy in a child with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve associated with other less aggressive cranial nerve schwannomas. The tumor revealed perineural extension and diffuse nerve...

  13. Adolescents’ Aggression to Parents: Longitudinal Links with Parents’ Physical Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolin, Gayla; Baucom, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether parents’ previous physical aggression (PPA) exhibited during early adolescence is associated with adolescents’ subsequent parent-directed aggression even beyond parents’ concurrent physical aggression (CPA); to investigate whether adolescents’ emotion dysregulation and attitudes condoning child-to-parent aggression moderate associations. Methods Adolescents (N = 93) and their parents participated in a prospective, longitudinal study. Adolescents and parents reported at waves 1–3 on four types of parents’ PPA (mother-to-adolescent, father-to-adolescent, mother-to-father, father-to-mother). Wave 3 assessments also included adolescents’ emotion dysregulation, attitudes condoning aggression, and externalizing behaviors. At waves 4 and 5, adolescents and parents reported on adolescents’ parent-directed physical aggression, property damage, and verbal aggression, and on parents’ CPA Results Parents’ PPA emerged as a significant indicator of adolescents’ parent-directed physical aggression (odds ratio [OR]: 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0–1.55; p = .047), property damage (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.1–1.5, p = .002), and verbal aggression (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.15–1.6, p controlling for adolescents’ sex, externalizing behaviors, and family income. When controlling for parents’ CPA, previous mother-to-adolescent aggression still predicted adolescents’ parent-directed physical aggression (OR: 5.56, 95% CI: 1.82–17.0, p = .003), and father-to-mother aggression predicted adolescents’ parent-directed verbal aggression (OR: 1.86, 95% CI: 1.0–3.3, p = .036). Emotion dysregulation and attitudes condoning aggression did not produce direct or moderated effects. Conclusions Adolescents’ parent-directed aggression deserves greater attention in discourse about lasting, adverse effects of even minor forms of parents’ physical aggression. Future research should investigate parent-directed aggression as an early

  14. Adolescents' aggression to parents: longitudinal links with parents' physical aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolin, Gayla; Baucom, Brian R

    2014-11-01

    To investigate whether parents' previous physical aggression (PPA) exhibited during early adolescence is associated with adolescents' subsequent parent-directed aggression even beyond parents' concurrent physical aggression (CPA) and to investigate whether adolescents' emotion dysregulation and attitudes condoning child-to-parent aggression moderate associations. Adolescents (N = 93) and their parents participated in a prospective longitudinal study. Adolescents and parents reported at waves 1-3 on four types of parents' PPA (mother to adolescent, father to adolescent, mother to father, and father to mother). Wave 3 assessments also included adolescents' emotion dysregulation, attitudes condoning aggression, and externalizing behaviors. At waves 4 and 5, adolescents and parents reported on adolescents' parent-directed physical aggression, property damage, and verbal aggression and on parents' CPA. Parents' PPA emerged as a significant indicator of adolescents' parent-directed physical aggression (odds ratio [OR]: 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0-1.55; p = .047), property damage (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.1-1.5, p = .002), and verbal aggression (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.15-1.6, p controlling for adolescents' sex, externalizing behaviors, and family income. When controlling for parents' CPA, previous mother-to-adolescent aggression still predicted adolescents' parent-directed physical aggression (OR: 5.56, 95% CI: 1.82-17.0, p = .003), and father-to-mother aggression predicted adolescents' parent-directed verbal aggression (OR: 1.86, 95% CI: 1.0-3.3, p = .036). Emotion dysregulation and attitudes condoning aggression did not produce direct or moderated the effects. Adolescents' parent-directed aggression deserves greater attention in discourse about lasting, adverse effects of even minor forms of parents' physical aggression. Future research should investigate parent-directed aggression as an early signal of aggression into adulthood. Copyright © 2014 Society for

  15. Expression of FAP, ADAM12, WISP1, and SOX11 is heterogeneous in aggressive fibromatosis and spatially relates to the histologic features of tumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misemer, Benjamin S; Skubitz, Amy P N; Carlos Manivel, J; Schmechel, Stephen C; Cheng, Edward Y; Henriksen, Jonathan C; Koopmeiners, Joseph S; Corless, Christopher L; Skubitz, Keith M

    2014-02-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) represents a group of tumors with a variable and unpredictable clinical course, characterized by a monoclonal proliferation of myofibroblastic cells. The optimal treatment for AF remains unclear. Identification and validation of genes whose expression patterns are associated with AF may elucidate biological mechanisms in AF, and aid treatment selection. This study was designed to examine the protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) of four genes, ADAM12, FAP, SOX11, and WISP1, that were found in an earlier study to be uniquely overexpressed in AF compared with normal tissues. Digital image analysis was performed to evaluate inter- and intratumor heterogeneity, and correlate protein expression with histologic features, including a histopathologic assessment of tumor activity, defined by nuclear chromatin density ratio (CDR). AF tumors exhibited marked inter- and intratumor histologic heterogeneity. Pathologic assessment of tumor activity and digital assessment of average nuclear size and CDR were all significantly correlated. IHC revealed protein expression of all four genes. IHC staining for ADAM12, FAP, and WISP1 correlated with CDR and was higher, whereas SOX11 staining was lower in tumors with earlier recurrence following excision. All four proteins were expressed, and the regional variation in tumor activity within and among AF cases was demonstrated. A spatial correlation between protein expression and nuclear morphology was observed. IHC also correlated with the probability of recurrence following excision. These proteins may be involved in AF pathogenesis and the corresponding pathways could serve as potential targets of therapy. © 2013 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Mid-face location of primary basal cell carcinoma related to cancer aggressivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasetyadi Mawardi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the aggressiveness of basal cell carcinoma (BCC on the mid-face location. Methods: A total of 30 patients were diagnosed using specimen biopsy with hematoxylineosin stain at Moewardi Public Hospital in Surakarta, Central Java, Indonesia. The age, gender distribution, site of the lesion, as well as clinic-pathological appearance were analyzed. Results: There were 30 patients consisting of 46.7% males and 53.3% females with ages ranging from 33 to 91 years old and with the most common occupation, such as farmers (53.6% and housewives (26.7%. Morpheaform subtypes BCC were more frequent than other types. Based on the predilection, most of the BCC were found to be in the mid-face (76.7% and using determined criteria of histopathological examination, the aggressive appearance was 77% and non-aggressive BCC was 23%. The BCC on the mid-face location was more aggressive than the other sites (P < 0.05. Conclusions: BCC is the most common skin tumor in humans with rare metastases, which might cause significant damage due to its local recurrences and aggressiveness. BCC on the mid-face is significantly more aggressive than that on the other predilection sites.

  17. STAT1 pathway mediates amplification of metastatic potential and resistance to therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai N Khodarev

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traditionally IFN/STAT1 signaling is connected with an anti-viral response and pro-apoptotic tumor-suppressor functions. Emerging functions of a constitutively activated IFN/STAT1 pathway suggest an association with an aggressive tumor phenotype. We hypothesized that tumor clones that constitutively overexpress this pathway are preferentially selected by the host microenvironment due to a resistance to STAT1-dependent cytotoxicity and demonstrate increased metastatic ability combined with increased resistance to genotoxic stress. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report that clones of B16F1 tumors grown in the lungs of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice demonstrate variable transcriptional levels of IFN/STAT1 pathway expression. Tumor cells that constitutively overexpress the IFN/STAT1 pathway (STAT1(H genotype are selected by the lung microenvironment. STAT1(H tumor cells also demonstrate resistance to IFN-gamma (IFNgamma, ionizing radiation (IR, and doxorubicin relative to parental B16F1 and low expressors of the IFN/STAT1 pathway (STAT1(L genotype. Stable knockdown of STAT1 reversed the aggressive phenotype and decreased both lung colonization and resistance to genotoxic stress. CONCLUSIONS: Our results identify a pathway activated by tumor-stromal interactions thereby selecting for pro-metastatic and therapy-resistant tumor clones. New therapies targeted against the IFN/STAT1 signaling pathway may provide an effective strategy to treat or sensitize aggressive tumor clones to conventional cancer therapies and potentially prevent distant organ colonization.

  18. [Familial retinoblastoma: cytogenetic study of the tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo Batanero, M; Manzanal Martínez, A; Ayuso García, C; Benítez Ortiz, J

    1990-05-01

    We report a case of familiar retinoblastoma, in which both mother and daughter show bilateral retinoblastoma. The cytogenetic study, in both peripheral blood lymphocytes and tumoral tissue did not show alterations on the 13 chromosome, although we found a complex kariotype in tumoral tissue defined by three celular lines. In all of them appears a marker in which the 6 chromosome is involved (der 6). The derivated of 6 chromosome are markers highly characteristic of the retinoblastoma cases, and can be related with the aggressivity of tumor and the appearance of the second tumors.

  19. Desmoid Tumor of the Pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerleman, Roxana; Mortensen, Michael Bau; Detlefsen, Sönke

    2015-01-01

    Desmoid tumors, also known as desmoid-type fibromatoses or aggressive fibromatoses, are clonal fibroblastic proliferations that arise in the deep soft tissues. They are characterized by infiltrative growth, a tendency toward local recurrence and the inability to metastasize. We present a case of ...

  20. Interaction of mammographic breast density with menopausal status and postmenopausal hormone use in relation to the risk of aggressive breast cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghjyan, Lusine; Tamimi, Rulla M; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Scott, Christopher G; Jensen, Matthew R; Pankratz, V Shane; Brandt, Kathy; Visscher, Daniel; Norman, Aaron; Couch, Fergus; Shepherd, John; Fan, Bo; Chen, Yunn-Yi; Ma, Lin; Beck, Andrew H; Cummings, Steven R; Kerlikowske, Karla; Vachon, Celine M

    2017-09-01

    We examined the associations of mammographic breast density with breast cancer risk by tumor aggressiveness and by menopausal status and current postmenopausal hormone therapy. This study included 2596 invasive breast cancer cases and 4059 controls selected from participants of four nested case-control studies within four established cohorts: the Mayo Mammography Health Study, the Nurses' Health Study, Nurses' Health Study II, and San Francisco Mammography Registry. Percent breast density (PD), absolute dense (DA), and non-dense areas (NDA) were assessed from digitized film-screen mammograms using a computer-assisted threshold technique and standardized across studies. We used polytomous logistic regression to quantify the associations of breast density with breast cancer risk by tumor aggressiveness (defined as presence of at least two of the following tumor characteristics: size ≥2 cm, grade 2/3, ER-negative status, or positive nodes), stratified by menopausal status and current hormone therapy. Overall, the positive association of PD and borderline inverse association of NDA with breast cancer risk was stronger in aggressive vs. non-aggressive tumors (≥51 vs. 11-25% OR 2.50, 95% CI 1.94-3.22 vs. OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.70-2.43, p-heterogeneity = 0.03; NDA 4th vs. 2nd quartile OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.41-0.70 vs. OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.59-0.85, p-heterogeneity = 0.07). However, there were no differences in the association of DA with breast cancer by aggressive status. In the stratified analysis, there was also evidence of a stronger association of PD and NDA with aggressive tumors among postmenopausal women and, in particular, current estrogen+progesterone users (≥51 vs. 11-25% OR 3.24, 95% CI 1.75-6.00 vs. OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.25-2.98, p-heterogeneity = 0.01; NDA 4th vs. 2nd quartile OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.21-0.85 vs. OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.35-0.89, p-heterogeneity = 0.01), even though the interaction was not significant. Our findings suggest that associations of mammographic

  1. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sherman, Larry

    2003-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are aggressive, difficult to treat tumors that occur in type I neurofibromatosis patients with an increased incidence compared to the general population...

  2. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sherman, Larry

    2001-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are aggressive, difficult to treat tumors that occur in type I neurofibromatosis patients with an increased incidence compared to the general population...

  3. Primitive neuroectodermal tumors of kidney: Our experience in a tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, A; Mahapatra, S K; Nayak, B; Saini, A K; Biswas, B

    2016-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) are rare highly aggressive neoplasms. The diagnosis is made by histopathology with the support of immunohistochemistry (IHC) and cytogenetics. The aggressive multimodality treatment is recommended for the management of these tumors. The purpose of our study is to review our experiences in the diagnoses and treatment of PNET of the kidneys. We retrospectively reviewed the data of all the patients, who were treated for the PNET of the kidneys at our institute between April and March 2011 and compared with the available literature. A total of eight patients were treated for PNET of the kidney. Out of the eight patients, four were males and four females. Nearly 50% of our patients had inferior vena caval thrombus at the time of presentation. The diagnosis was made on histopathology supported by IHC. Out of the eight patients, one patient had intraoperative death due to massive pulmonary thromboembolism and another died on the 7th post-operative day due to disseminated intravascular coagulation and multiorgan failure. Rest six patients were treated with post-operative chemotherapy or a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. For these six patients, overall median survival was 45 months with a 3 year disease-free survival of 66% and 5 year survival of 44%. PNET of the kidneys are rare peripheral neuroectodermal tumors with an aggressive clinical course. These tumors carry a very poor prognosis. An aggressive treatment approach using a combination of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy is recommended for a reasonable survival in these tumors.

  4. New Brain Tumor Entities Emerge from Molecular Classification of CNS-PNETs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, Dominik; Orr, Brent A.; Toprak, Umut H.; Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T. W.; Capper, David; Sill, Martin; Buchhalter, Ivo; Northcott, Paul A.; Leis, Irina; Ryzhova, Marina; Koelsche, Christian; Pfaff, Elke; Allen, Sariah J.; Balasubramanian, Gnanaprakash; Worst, Barbara C.; Pajtler, Kristian W.; Brabetz, Sebastian; Johann, Pascal D.; Sahm, Felix; Reimand, Jüri; Mackay, Alan; Carvalho, Diana M.; Remke, Marc; Phillips, Joanna J.; Perry, Arie; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Drissi, Rachid; Fouladi, Maryam; Giangaspero, Felice; Łastowska, Maria; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Pietsch, Torsten; Hagel, Christian; Gojo, Johannes; Lötsch, Daniela; Berger, Walter; Slavc, Irene; Haberler, Christine; Jouvet, Anne; Holm, Stefan; Hofer, Silvia; Prinz, Marco; Keohane, Catherine; Fried, Iris; Mawrin, Christian; Scheie, David; Mobley, Bret C.; Schniederjan, Matthew J.; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna M.; Dahiya, Sonika; Kramm, Christof M.; von Bueren, André O.; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Herold-Mende, Christel; Frühwald, Michael C.; Milde, Till; Hasselblatt, Martin; Wesseling, Pieter; Rößler, Jochen; Schüller, Ulrich; Ebinger, Martin; Schittenhelm, Jens; Frank, Stephan; Grobholz, Rainer; Vajtai, Istvan; Hans, Volkmar; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Zitterbart, Karel; Collins, V. Peter; Aronica, Eleonora; Varlet, Pascale; Puget, Stephanie; Dufour, Christelle; Grill, Jacques; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Wolter, Marietta; Schuhmann, Martin U.; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; van Meter, Timothy; Monoranu, Camelia-Maria; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Snuderl, Matija; Forrester, Lynn Ann; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; van Sluis, Peter; Wolf, Stephan; Mikkelsen, Tom; Gajjar, Amar; Aldape, Kenneth; Moore, Andrew S.; Taylor, Michael D.; Jones, Chris; Jabado, Nada; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Eils, Roland; Schlesner, Matthias; Lichter, Peter; von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M.; Ellison, David W.; Korshunov, Andrey; Kool, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS-PNETs) are highly aggressive, poorly differentiated embryonal tumors occurring predominantly in young children but also affecting adolescents and adults. Herein, we demonstrate that a significant proportion of institutionally

  5. New Brain Tumor Entities Emerge from Molecular Classification of CNS-PNETs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, Dominik; Orr, Brent A.; Toprak, Umut H.; Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T W; Capper, David; Sill, Martin; Buchhalter, Ivo; Northcott, Paul A.; Leis, Irina; Ryzhova, Marina; Koelsche, Christian; Pfaff, Elke; Allen, Sariah J.; Balasubramanian, Gnanaprakash; Worst, Barbara C.; Pajtler, Kristian W.; Brabetz, Sebastian; Johann, Pascal D.; Sahm, Felix; Reimand, Jüri; Mackay, Alan; Carvalho, Diana M.; Remke, Marc; Phillips, Joanna J.; Perry, Arie; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Drissi, Rachid; Fouladi, Maryam; Giangaspero, Felice; Łastowska, Maria; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Pietsch, Torsten; Hagel, Christian; Gojo, Johannes; Lötsch, Daniela; Berger, Walter; Slavc, Irene; Haberler, Christine; Jouvet, Anne; Holm, Stefan; Hofer, Silvia; Prinz, Marco; Keohane, Catherine; Fried, Iris; Mawrin, Christian; Scheie, David; Mobley, Bret C.; Schniederjan, Matthew J.; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna M.; Dahiya, Sonika; Kramm, Christof M.; Von Bueren, André O.; Von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Herold-Mende, Christel; Frühwald, Michael C.; Milde, Till; Hasselblatt, Martin; Wesseling, Pieter; Rößler, Jochen; Schüller, Ulrich; Ebinger, Martin; Schittenhelm, Jens; Frank, Stephan; Grobholz, Rainer; Vajtai, Istvan; Hans, Volkmar; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Zitterbart, Karel; Collins, V. Peter; Aronica, Eleonora; Varlet, Pascale; Puget, Stephanie; Dufour, Christelle; Grill, Jacques; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Wolter, Marietta; Schuhmann, Martin U.; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; Van Meter, Timothy; Monoranu, Camelia Maria; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Snuderl, Matija; Forrester, Lynn Ann; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; Van Sluis, Peter; Wolf, Stephan; Mikkelsen, Tom; Gajjar, Amar; Aldape, Kenneth; Moore, Andrew S.; Taylor, Michael D.; Jones, Chris; Jabado, Nada; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Eils, Roland; Schlesner, Matthias; Lichter, Peter; Von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M.; Ellison, David W.; Korshunov, Andrey; Kool, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS-PNETs) are highly aggressive, poorly differentiated embryonal tumors occurring predominantly in young children but also affecting adolescents and adults. Herein, we demonstrate that a significant proportion of

  6. Aggression Can be Contagious: Longitudinal Associations between Proactive Aggression and Reactive Aggression Among Young Twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Daniel J.; Richmond, Ashley; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Laursen, Brett; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined sibling influence over reactive and proactive aggression in a sample of 452 same-sex twins (113 male dyads, 113 female dyads). Between and within siblings influence processes were examined as a function of relative levels of parental coercion and hostility to test the hypothesis that aggression contagion between twins occurs only among dyads who experience parental coerciveness. Teacher reports of reactive and proactive aggression were collected for each twin in kindergarten (M = 6.04 years; SD = 0.27) and in first grade (M = 7.08 years; SD = 0.27). Families were divided into relatively low, average, and relatively high parental coercion-hostility groups on the basis of maternal reports collected when the children were 5 years old. In families with relatively high levels of parental coercion-hostility, there was evidence of between-sibling influence, such that one twin’s reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin’s reactive aggression from ages 6 to 7, and one twin’s proactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin’s proactive aggression from ages 6 to 7. There was also evidence of within-sibling influence such that a child’s level of reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the same child’s proactive aggression at age 7, regardless of parental coercion-hostility. The findings provide new information about the etiology of reactive and proactive aggression and individual differences in their developmental interplay. PMID:25683448

  7. CXCL12 MODULATION OF CXCR4 AND CXCR7 ACTIVITY IN HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA STEM-LIKE CELLS AND REGULATION OF THE TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto eWurth

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are crucial autocrine and paracrine players in tumor development. In particular, CXCL12, through its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7, affects tumor progression by controlling cancer cell survival, proliferation and migration, and, indirectly, via angiogenesis or recruiting immune cells.Glioblastoma (GBM is the most prevalent primary malignant brain tumor in adults and despite current multimodal therapies it remains almost incurable. The aggressive and recurrent phenotype of GBM is ascribed to high growth rate, invasiveness to normal brain, marked angiogenesis, ability to escape the immune system and resistance to standard of care therapies. Tumor molecular and cellular heterogeneity severely hinders GBM therapeutic improvement. In particular, a subpopulation of chemo- and radio-therapy resistant tumorigenic cancer stem–like cells (CSCs is believed to be the main responsible for tumor cell dissemination to the brain.GBM cells display heterogeneous expression levels of CXCR4 and CXCR7 that are overexpressed in CSCs, representing a molecular correlate for the invasive potential of GBM. The microenvironment contribution in GBM development is increasingly emphasized. An interplay exists between CSCs, differentiated GBM cells, and the microenvironment, mainly through secreted chemokines (e.g. CXCL12 causing recruitment of fibroblasts, endothelial, mesenchymal and inflammatory cells to the tumor, via specific receptors such as CXCR4.This review covers recent developments on the role of CXCL12/CXCR4-CXCR7 networks in GBM progression and the potential translational impact of their targeting. The biological and molecular understanding of the heterogeneous GBM cell behavior, phenotype and signaling is still limited. Progress in the identification of chemokine-dependent mechanisms that affect GBM cell survival, trafficking and chemo-attractive functions, opens new perspectives for development of more specific therapeutic approaches that include

  8. Transcriptional response to hypoxia in human tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lal, A.; Peters, H.; Croix, B. St.; Haroon, Z.A.; Dewhirst, M.W.; Strausberg, R.L.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Riggins, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The presence of hypoxic regions within solid tumors is associated with a more malignant tumor phenotype and worse prognosis. To obtain a blood supply and protect against cellular damage and death, oxygen-deprived cells in tumors alter gene expression, resulting in resistance to therapy.

  9. Predictive value of CpG island methylator phenotype for tumor recurrence in hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma following liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Shu-Sen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP, in which multiple genes concordantly methylated, has been demonstrated to be associated with progression, recurrence, as well as overall survival in some types of cancer. Methods We examined the promoter methylation status of seven genes including P16, CDH1, GSTP1, DAPK, XAF1, SOCS1 and SYK in 65 cases of HCC treated with LT by methylation-specific PCR. CIMP+ was defined as having three or more genes that are concordantly methylated. The relationship between CIMP status and clinicopathological parameters, as well as tumor recurrence was further analyzed. Results CIMP+ was more frequent in HCC with AFP > 400 ng/ml than those with AFP ≤ 400 ng/ml (P = 0.017. In addition, patients with CIMP+ were prone to have multiple tumor numbers than those with CIMP- (P = 0.007. Patients with CIMP+ tumors had significantly worse recurrence-free survival (RFS than patients with CIMP-tumors by Kaplan-Meier estimates (P = 0.004. Multivariate analysis also revealed that CIMP status might be a novel independent prognostic factor of RFS for HCC patients treated with LT (HR: 3.581; 95% CI: 1.473-8.710, P = 0.005. Conclusion Our results suggested that CIMP could serve as a new prognostic biomarker to predict the risk of tumor recurrence in HCC after transplantation.

  10. Predictive value of CpG island methylator phenotype for tumor recurrence in hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma following liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Li-Ming; Zhang, Feng; Zhou, Lin; Yang, Zhe; Xie, Hai-Yang; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2010-01-01

    CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), in which multiple genes concordantly methylated, has been demonstrated to be associated with progression, recurrence, as well as overall survival in some types of cancer. We examined the promoter methylation status of seven genes including P16, CDH1, GSTP1, DAPK, XAF1, SOCS1 and SYK in 65 cases of HCC treated with LT by methylation-specific PCR. CIMP+ was defined as having three or more genes that are concordantly methylated. The relationship between CIMP status and clinicopathological parameters, as well as tumor recurrence was further analyzed. CIMP+ was more frequent in HCC with AFP > 400 ng/ml than those with AFP ≤ 400 ng/ml (P = 0.017). In addition, patients with CIMP+ were prone to have multiple tumor numbers than those with CIMP- (P = 0.007). Patients with CIMP+ tumors had significantly worse recurrence-free survival (RFS) than patients with CIMP-tumors by Kaplan-Meier estimates (P = 0.004). Multivariate analysis also revealed that CIMP status might be a novel independent prognostic factor of RFS for HCC patients treated with LT (HR: 3.581; 95% CI: 1.473-8.710, P = 0.005). Our results suggested that CIMP could serve as a new prognostic biomarker to predict the risk of tumor recurrence in HCC after transplantation

  11. Tumor vaccine composed of C-class CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and irradiated tumor cells induces long-term antitumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerkovnik Petra

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An ideal tumor vaccine should activate both effector and memory immune response against tumor-specific antigens. Beside the CD8+ T cells that play a central role in the generation of a protective immune response and of long-term memory, dendritic cells (DCs are important for the induction, coordination and regulation of the adaptive immune response. The DCs can conduct all of the elements of the immune orchestra and are therefore a fundamental target and tool for vaccination. The present study was aimed at assessing the ability of tumor vaccine composed of C-class CpG ODNs and irradiated melanoma tumor cells B16F1 followed by two additional injections of CpG ODNs to induce the generation of a functional long-term memory response in experimental tumor model in mice (i.p. B16F1. Results It has been shown that the functional memory response in vaccinated mice persists for at least 60 days after the last vaccination. Repeated vaccination also improves the survival of experimental animals compared to single vaccination, whereas the proportion of animals totally protected from the development of aggressive i.p. B16F1 tumors after vaccination repeated three times varies between 88.9%-100.0%. Additionally, the long-term immune memory and tumor protection is maintained over a prolonged period of time of at least 8 months. Finally, it has been demonstrated that following the vaccination the tumor-specific memory cells predominantly reside in bone marrow and peritoneal tissue and are in a more active state than their splenic counterparts. Conclusions In this study we demonstrated that tumor vaccine composed of C-class CpG ODNs and irradiated tumor cells followed by two additional injections of CpG ODNs induces a long-term immunity against aggressive B16F1 tumors.

  12. Hypoxia in Tumor Angiogenesis and Metastasis: Evaluation of VEGF and MMP Over-expression and Down-Regulation of HIF-1alpha with RNAi in Hypoxic Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shruti

    increase with the increase in the HIF1α levels. Gelatin and PEG-modified gelatin nanoparticles were successfully prepared having a particle size in the range of 200 to 300 nm in diameter. Cell uptake studies showed that both types of nanoparticles could be efficiently internalized in tumor cells with a maximum intracellular concentrations reaching after 6 hours of incubation. Cytotoxicity analysis using MTS (formazan) assay showed that there was no significant change in cell viability upon treatment with any of the nanoparticle formulations relative to untreated control. Comparative analysis of gelatin nanoparticles and lipofectamine transfection of HIF1α-siRNA, shows a higher HIF1α knockdown for gelatin nanoparticles. Conclusion: Use of HIF1α siRNA for the treatment of cancer cells that overly express HIF1α has shown great therapeutic potential as shown by the results. The expression of VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 decreases with the decrease of HIF1α expression. This may indicate the reversal of the aggressive phenotype of the tumors with HIF1α knockdown. HIF1α-siRNA, hence shows great potential for the therapy of aggressive tumors, however in vivo studies need to be carried out to validate these findings.

  13. IDH Mutations: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation and Prognostic Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IDH1/2 mutation is the most frequent genomic alteration found in gliomas, affecting 40% of these tumors and is one of the earliest alterations occurring in gliomagenesis. We investigated a series of 1305 gliomas and showed that IDH mutation is almost constant in 1p19q codeleted tumors. We found that the distribution of IDH1R132H, IDH1nonR132H, and IDH2 mutations differed between astrocytic, mixed, and oligodendroglial tumors, with an overrepresentation of IDH2 mutations in oligodendroglial phenotype and an overrepresentation of IDH1nonR132H in astrocytic tumors. We stratified grade II and grade III gliomas according to the codeletion of 1p19q and IDH mutation to define three distinct prognostic subgroups: 1p19q and IDH mutated, IDH mutated—which contains mostly TP53 mutated tumors, and none of these alterations. We confirmed that IDH mutation with a hazard ratio = 0.358 is an independent prognostic factor of good outcome. These data refine current knowledge on IDH mutation prognostic impact and genotype-phenotype associations.

  14. Alpha-CaMKII plays a critical role in determining the aggressive behavior of human osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daft, Paul G; Yuan, Kaiyu; Warram, Jason M; Klein, Michael J; Siegal, Gene P; Zayzafoon, Majd

    2013-04-01

    Osteosarcoma is among the most frequently occurring primary bone tumors, primarily affecting adolescents and young adults. Despite improvements in osteosarcoma treatment, more specific molecular targets are needed as potential therapeutic options. One target of interest is α-Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (α-CaMKII), a ubiquitous mediator of Ca(2+)-linked signaling, which has been shown to regulate tumor cell proliferation and differentiation. Here, we investigate the role of α-CaMKII in the growth and tumorigenicity of human osteosarcoma. We show that α-CaMKII is highly expressed in primary osteosarcoma tissue derived from 114 patients, and is expressed in varying levels in different human osteosarcoma (OS) cell lines [MG-63, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)/HOS, and 143B). To examine whether α-CaMKII regulates osteosarcoma tumorigenic properties, we genetically inhibited α-CaMKII in two osteosarcoma cell lines using two different α-CaMKII shRNAs delivered by lentiviral vectors and overexpressed α-CaMKII by retrovirus. The genetic deletion of α-CaMKII by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in MG-63 and 143B cells resulted in decreased proliferation (50% and 41%), migration (22% and 25%), and invasion (95% and 90%), respectively. The overexpression of α-CaMKII in HOS cells resulted in increased proliferation (240%), migration (640%), and invasion (10,000%). Furthermore, α-CaMKII deletion in MG-63 cells significantly reduced tumor burden in vivo (65%), whereas α-CaMKII overexpression resulted in tumor formation in a previously nontumor forming osteosarcoma cell line (HOS). Our results suggest that α-CaMKII plays a critical role in determining the aggressive phenotype of osteosarcoma, and its inhibition could be an attractive therapeutic target to combat this devastating adolescent disease. ©2013 AACR.

  15. A case of a desmoid tumor with an uretertumoral fisttula detected on renal scintigraphy

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    Yoo, Hyun Woo; Lee, Kyu Taek; Lee, Sang Mi [Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Desmoid tumors are rare benign tumors with aggressive fibroblastic proliferation. Although desmoid tumors do not metastasize, they have locally aggressive features and can cause a urinary fistula. Here, we report a case of a 35-year-old woman with Gardner syndrome who was diagnosed with an intra-abdominal desmoid tumor 1 year previously and who presented with a newly developed cystic mass lesion on a computed tomography scan. The cystic mass lesion was clinically diagnosed as an urinoma from the right ureterotumoral fistula; thus, surgical resection of the mass lesion was planned. However, Tc-99m diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid renal scintigraphy revealed bilateral ureterotumoral fistulas; hence, the treatment plan was changed to conservative management.

  16. Methylome-wide Sequencing Detects DNA Hypermethylation Distinguishing Indolent from Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Bhasin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A critical need in understanding the biology of prostate cancer is characterizing the molecular differences between indolent and aggressive cases. Because DNA methylation can capture the regulatory state of tumors, we analyzed differential methylation patterns genome-wide among benign prostatic tissue and low-grade and high-grade prostate cancer and found extensive, focal hypermethylation regions unique to high-grade disease. These hypermethylation regions occurred not only in the promoters of genes but also in gene bodies and at intergenic regions that are enriched for DNA-protein binding sites. Integration with existing RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq and survival data revealed regions where DNA methylation correlates with reduced gene expression associated with poor outcome. Regions specific to aggressive disease are proximal to genes with distinct functions from regions shared by indolent and aggressive disease. Our compendium of methylation changes reveals crucial molecular distinctions between indolent and aggressive prostate cancer.

  17. Integrin α5β1, the Fibronectin Receptor, as a Pertinent Therapeutic Target in Solid Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffner, Florence; Ray, Anne Marie; Dontenwill, Monique, E-mail: monique.dontenwill@unistra.fr [UMR 7213 CNRS, Laboratoire de Biophotonique et Pharmacologie, Tumoral signaling and therapeutic targets, Université de Strasbourg, Faculté de Pharmacie, 67401 Illkirch (France)

    2013-01-15

    Integrins are transmembrane heterodimeric proteins sensing the cell microenvironment and modulating numerous signalling pathways. Changes in integrin expression between normal and tumoral cells support involvement of specific integrins in tumor progression and aggressiveness. This review highlights the current knowledge about α5β1 integrin, also called the fibronectin receptor, in solid tumors. We summarize data showing that α5β1 integrin is a pertinent therapeutic target expressed by tumoral neovessels and tumoral cells. Although mainly evaluated in preclinical models, α5β1 integrin merits interest in particular in colon, breast, ovarian, lung and brain tumors where its overexpression is associated with a poor prognosis for patients. Specific α5β1 integrin antagonists will be listed that may represent new potential therapeutic agents to fight defined subpopulations of particularly aggressive tumors.

  18. Linking patient outcome to high throughput protein expression data identifies novel regulators of colorectal adenocarcinoma aggressiveness [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5ad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christi L. French

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A key question in cancer systems biology is how to use molecular data to predict the biological behavior of tumors from individual patients. While genomics data have been heavily used, protein signaling data are more directly connected to biological phenotype and might predict cancer phenotypes such as invasion, metastasis, and patient survival. In this study, we mined publicly available data for colorectal adenocarcinoma from the Cancer Genome Atlas and identified protein expression and signaling changes that are statistically associated with patient outcome. Our analysis identified a number of known and potentially new regulators of colorectal cancer. High levels of insulin growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2 were associated with both recurrence and death, and this was validated by immunohistochemical staining of a tissue microarray for a secondary patient dataset. Interestingly, GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3 was the protein most frequently associated with death in our analysis, and GATA3 expression was significantly decreased in tumor samples from stage I-II deceased patients. Experimental studies using engineered colon cancer cell lines show that exogenous expression of GATA3 decreases three-dimensional colony growth and invasiveness of colon cancer cells but does not affect two-dimensional proliferation. These findings suggest that protein data are useful for biomarker discovery and identify GATA3 as a regulator of colorectal cancer  aggressiveness.

  19. Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotypes Reveal Cell-Nonautonomous Functions of Oncogenic RAS and the p53 Tumor Suppressor

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    Copp& #233; , Jean-Philippe; Patil, Christopher; Rodier, Francis; Sun, Yu; Munoz, Denise; Goldstein, Joshua; Nelson, Peter; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2008-10-24

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial-mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment.

  20. A 17-gene assay to predict prostate cancer aggressiveness in the context of Gleason grade heterogeneity, tumor multifocality, and biopsy undersampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Eric A; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Simko, Jeffry P; Falzarano, Sara M; Maddala, Tara; Chan, June M; Li, Jianbo; Cowan, Janet E; Tsiatis, Athanasios C; Cherbavaz, Diana B; Pelham, Robert J; Tenggara-Hunter, Imelda; Baehner, Frederick L; Knezevic, Dejan; Febbo, Phillip G; Shak, Steven; Kattan, Michael W; Lee, Mark; Carroll, Peter R

    2014-09-01

    Prostate tumor heterogeneity and biopsy undersampling pose challenges to accurate, individualized risk assessment for men with localized disease. To identify and validate a biopsy-based gene expression signature that predicts clinical recurrence, prostate cancer (PCa) death, and adverse pathology. Gene expression was quantified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for three studies-a discovery prostatectomy study (n=441), a biopsy study (n=167), and a prospectively designed, independent clinical validation study (n=395)-testing retrospectively collected needle biopsies from contemporary (1997-2011) patients with low to intermediate clinical risk who were candidates for active surveillance (AS). The main outcome measures defining aggressive PCa were clinical recurrence, PCa death, and adverse pathology at prostatectomy. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate the association between gene expression and time to event end points. Results from the prostatectomy and biopsy studies were used to develop and lock a multigene-expression-based signature, called the Genomic Prostate Score (GPS); in the validation study, logistic regression was used to test the association between the GPS and pathologic stage and grade at prostatectomy. Decision-curve analysis and risk profiles were used together with clinical and pathologic characteristics to evaluate clinical utility. Of the 732 candidate genes analyzed, 288 (39%) were found to predict clinical recurrence despite heterogeneity and multifocality, and 198 (27%) were predictive of aggressive disease after adjustment for prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score, and clinical stage. Further analysis identified 17 genes representing multiple biological pathways that were combined into the GPS algorithm. In the validation study, GPS predicted high-grade (odds ratio [OR] per 20 GPS units: 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-3.7; p<0.001) and high-stage (OR per 20 GPS units: 1.9; 95% CI, 1

  1. Subjective aggression during alcohol and cannabis intoxication before and after aggression exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa Fernandes Perna, E B; Theunissen, E L; Kuypers, K P C; Toennes, S W; Ramaekers, J G

    2016-09-01

    Alcohol and cannabis use have been implicated in aggression. Alcohol consumption is known to facilitate aggression, whereas a causal link between cannabis and aggression has not been clearly demonstrated. This study investigated the acute effects of alcohol and cannabis on subjective aggression in alcohol and cannabis users, respectively, following aggression exposure. Drug-free controls served as a reference. It was hypothesized that aggression exposure would increase subjective aggression in alcohol users during alcohol intoxication, whereas it was expected to decrease subjective aggression in cannabis users during cannabis intoxication. Heavy alcohol (n = 20) and regular cannabis users (n = 21), and controls (n = 20) were included in a mixed factorial study. Alcohol and cannabis users received single doses of alcohol and placebo or cannabis and placebo, respectively. Subjective aggression was assessed before and after aggression exposure consisting of administrations of the point-subtraction aggression paradigm (PSAP) and the single category implicit association test (SC-IAT). Testosterone and cortisol levels in response to alcohol/cannabis treatment and aggression exposure were recorded as secondary outcome measures. Subjective aggression significantly increased following aggression exposure in all groups while being sober. Alcohol intoxication increased subjective aggression whereas cannabis decreased the subjective aggression following aggression exposure. Aggressive responses during the PSAP increased following alcohol and decreased following cannabis relative to placebo. Changes in aggressive feeling or response were not correlated to the neuroendocrine response to treatments. It is concluded that alcohol facilitates feelings of aggression whereas cannabis diminishes aggressive feelings in heavy alcohol and regular cannabis users, respectively.

  2. Evaluation of Tumor Heterogeneity of Prostate Carcinoma by Flow- and Image DNA Cytometry and Histopathological Grading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naining Wang

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Heterogeneity of prostate carcinoma is one of the reasons for pretreatment underestimation of tumor aggressiveness. We studied tumor heterogeneity and the probability of finding the highest tumor grade and DNA aneuploidy with relation to the number of biopsies. Material and methods. Specimens simulating core biopsies from five randomly selected tumor areas from each of 16 Böcking’s grade II and 23 grade III prostate carcinomas were analyzed for tumor grade and DNA ploidy by flow‐ and fluorescence image cytometry (FCM, FICM. Cell cycle composition was measured by FCM. Results. By determination of ploidy and cell cycle composition, morphologically defined tumors can further be subdivided. Heterogeneity of tumor grade and DNA ploidy (FCM was 54% and 50%. Coexistence of diploid tumor cells in aneuploid specimens represents another form of tumor heterogeneity. The proportion of diploid tumor cells decreased significantly with tumor grade and with increase in the fraction of proliferating cell of the aneuploid tumor part. The probability of estimating the highest tumor grade or aneuploidy increased from 40% for one biopsy to 95% for 5 biopsies studied. By combining the tumor grade with DNA ploidy, the probability of detecting a highly aggressive tumor increased from 40% to 70% and 90% for one and two biopsies, respectively. Conclusion. Specimens of the size of core biopsies can be used for evaluation of DNA ploidy and cell cycle composition. Underestimation of aggressiveness of prostate carcinoma due to tumor heterogeneity is minimized by simultaneous study of the tumor grade and DNA ploidy more than by increasing the number of biopsies. The biological significance of coexistent diploid tumor cell in aneuploid lesions remains to be evaluated.

  3. Tumor Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages: Secreted Proteins as Potential Targets for Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baay, Marc; Brouwer, Anja; Pauwels, Patrick; Peeters, Marc; Lardon, Filip

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory pathways, meant to defend the organism against infection and injury, as a byproduct, can promote an environment which favors tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), which constitute a significant part of the tumor-infiltrating immune cells, have been linked to the growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis of a variety of cancers, most likely through polarization of TAMs to the M2 (alternative) phenotype. The interaction between tumor cells and macrophages provides opportunities for therapy. This paper will discuss secreted proteins as targets for intervention. PMID:22162712

  4. Tumor Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages: Secreted Proteins as Potential Targets for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Baay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory pathways, meant to defend the organism against infection and injury, as a byproduct, can promote an environment which favors tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs, which constitute a significant part of the tumor-infiltrating immune cells, have been linked to the growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis of a variety of cancers, most likely through polarization of TAMs to the M2 (alternative phenotype. The interaction between tumor cells and macrophages provides opportunities for therapy. This paper will discuss secreted proteins as targets for intervention.

  5. GLI1 is a central mediator of EWS/FLI1 signaling in Ewing tumors.

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    Jay Joo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ewing Sarcoma Family Tumors (ESFT consist of the classical pathologic entities of Ewing Sarcoma and peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor. Occurring largely in the childhood through young adult years, these tumors have an unsurpassed propensity for metastasis and have no defined cell of origin. The biology of these aggressive malignancies centers around EWS/FLI1 and related EWS/ETS chimeric transcription factors, which are largely limited to this tumor class. Much progress has been made in the identification of a network of loci whose expression is modulated by EWS/FLI1 and its congeners. To date, little progress has been made in reconstructing the sequence of direct and indirect events that produce this network of modulated loci. The recent identification of GLI1 as an upregulated target of EWS/ETS transcription factors suggests a target which may be a more central mediator in the ESFT signaling network. In this paper, we further define the relationship of EWS/FLI1 expression and GLI1 upregulation in ESFT. This relationship is supported with data from primary tumor specimens. It is consistently observed across multiple ESFT cell lines and with multiple means of EWS/FLI1 inhibition. GLI1 inhibition affects tumor cell line phenotype whether shRNA or endogenous or pharmacologic inhibitors are employed. As is seen in model transformation systems, GLI1 upregulation by EWS/FLI1 appears to be independent of Hedgehog stimulation. Consistent with a more central role in ESFT pathogenesis, several known EWS/FLI1 targets appear to be targeted through GLI1. These findings further establish a central role for GLI1 in the pathogenesis of Ewing Tumors.

  6. Management Strategies for Aggressive Cushing's Syndrome: From Macroadenomas to Ectopics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlotta Pozza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cushing’s syndrome (CS is a rare but severe clinical condition represented by an excessive endogenous cortisol secretion and hence excess circulating free cortisol, characterized by loss of the normal feedback regulation and circadian rhythm of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis due to inappropriate secretion of ACTH from a pituitary tumor (Cushing’s disease, CD or an ectopic source (ectopic ACTH secretion, EAS. The remaining causes (20% are ACTH independent. As soon as the diagnosis is established, the therapeutic goal is the removal of the tumor. Whenever surgery is not curative, management of patients with CS requires a major effort to control hypercortisolemia and associated symptoms. A multidisciplinary approach that includes endocrinologists, neurosurgeons, oncologists, and radiotherapists should be adopted. This paper will focus on traditional and novel medical therapy for aggressive ACTH-dependent CS. Several drugs are able to reduce cortisol levels. Their mechanism of action involves blocking adrenal steroidogenesis (ketoconazole, metyrapone, aminoglutethimide, mitotane, etomidate or inhibiting the peripheral action of cortisol through blocking its receptors (mifepristone “RU-486”. Other drugs include centrally acting agents (dopamine agonists, somatostatin receptor agonists, retinoic acid, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ “PPAR-γ” ligands and novel chemotherapeutic agents (temozolomide and tyrosine kinase inhibitors which have a significant activity against aggressive pituitary or ectopic tumors.

  7. Loss of PTEN expression is associated with aggressive behavior and poor prognosis in Middle Eastern triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Shaham; Siraj, Abdul K; Prabhakaran, Sarita; Jehan, Zeenath; Ajarim, Dahish; Al-Dayel, Fouad; Tulbah, Asma; Al-Kuraya, Khawla S

    2015-06-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor that negatively regulates the PI3 K-AKT signaling pathway which is involved in the pathogenesis of many different tumor types and serves as a prognostic marker in breast cancer. However, the significance of the role of PTEN in Middle Eastern ethnic breast cancer has not been explored especially with the fact that breast cancer originating from this ethnic population tend to behave more aggressively than breast cancer in the west. In this study, we analyzed PTEN alteration in a tissue microarray format containing more than 1000 primary breast cancers with clinical follow-up data. Tissue Microarray sections were analyzed for protein expression and copy number change using immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Loss of PTEN immunostaining was observed in 77 % of the cases. PTEN loss was significantly associated with large tumor size (p = 0.0030), high grade (p = 0.0281), tumor recurrence (p = 0.0333), and triple-negative breast cancers (p = 0.0086). PTEN loss in triple-negative breast cancers was significantly associated with rapid tumor cell proliferation (p = 0.0396) and poor prognosis (p = 0.0408). PTEN deletion was found only in 60 cases (6.4 %). Loss of PTEN protein expression occurs at high frequency in Middle Eastern breast cancer. PTEN inactivation may potentially lead to an aggressive behavior of tumor cells through stimulation of tumor cell proliferation. Furthermore, PTEN signaling pathway might be used as potential therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancers since loss of its expression is shown to be significantly associated with this aggressive subtype of breast cancer.

  8. Tumor cell heterogeneity in Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC: phenotypical and functional differences associated with Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT and DNA methylation changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Krohn

    Full Text Available Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC is a specific subtype of lung cancer presenting as highly metastatic disease with extremely poor prognosis. Despite responding initially well to chemo- or radiotherapy, SCLC almost invariably relapses and develops resistance to chemotherapy. This is suspected to be related to tumor cell subpopulations with different characteristics resembling stem cells. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT is known to play a key role in metastatic processes and in developing drug resistance. This is also true for NSCLC, but there is very little information on EMT processes in SCLC so far. SCLC, in contrast to NSCLC cell lines, grow mainly in floating cell clusters and a minor part as adherent cells. We compared these morphologically different subpopulations of SCLC cell lines for EMT and epigenetic features, detecting significant differences in the adherent subpopulations with high levels of mesenchymal markers such as Vimentin and Fibronectin and very low levels of epithelial markers like E-cadherin and Zona Occludens 1. In addition, expression of EMT-related transcription factors such as Snail/Snai1, Slug/Snai2, and Zeb1, DNA methylation patterns of the EMT hallmark genes, functional responses like migration, invasion, matrix metalloproteases secretion, and resistance to chemotherapeutic drug treatment all differed significantly between the sublines. This phenotypic variability might reflect tumor cell heterogeneity and EMT during metastasis in vivo, accompanied by the development of refractory disease in relapse. We propose that epigenetic regulation plays a key role during phenotypical and functional changes in tumor cells and might therefore provide new treatment options for SCLC patients.

  9. Transgenic up-regulation of alpha-CaMKII in forebrain leads to increased anxiety-like behaviors and aggression

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    Hasegawa Shunsuke

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated essential roles for alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (alpha-CaMKII in learning, memory and long-term potentiation (LTP. However, previous studies have also shown that alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice display a dramatic decrease in anxiety-like and fearful behaviors, and an increase in defensive aggression. These findings indicated that alpha-CaMKII is important not only for learning and memory but also for emotional behaviors. In this study, to understand the roles of alpha-CaMKII in emotional behavior, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing alpha-CaMKII in the forebrain and analyzed their behavioral phenotypes. Results We generated transgenic mice overexpressing alpha-CaMKII in the forebrain under the control of the alpha-CaMKII promoter. In contrast to alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice, alpha-CaMKII overexpressing mice display an increase in anxiety-like behaviors in open field, elevated zero maze, light-dark transition and social interaction tests, and a decrease in locomotor activity in their home cages and novel environments; these phenotypes were the opposite to those observed in alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice. In addition, similarly with alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice, alpha-CaMKII overexpressing mice display an increase in aggression. However, in contrast to the increase in defensive aggression observed in alpha-CaMKII (+/- heterozygous knockout mice, alpha-CaMKII overexpressing mice display an increase in offensive aggression. Conclusion Up-regulation of alpha-CaMKII expression in the forebrain leads to an increase in anxiety-like behaviors and offensive aggression. From the comparisons with previous findings, we suggest that the expression levels of alpha-CaMKII are associated with the state of emotion; the expression level of alpha-CaMKII positively correlates with the anxiety state and strongly affects

  10. Intratumoral macrophages contribute to epithelial-mesenchymal transition in solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonde, Anne-Katrine; Tischler, Verena; Kumar, Sushil; Soltermann, Alex; Schwendener, Reto A

    2012-01-01

    Several stromal cell subtypes including macrophages contribute to tumor progression by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) at the invasive front, a mechanism also linked to metastasis. Tumor associated macrophages (TAM) reside mainly at the invasive front but they also infiltrate tumors and in this process they mainly assume a tumor promoting phenotype. In this study, we asked if TAMs also regulate EMT intratumorally. We found that TAMs through TGF-β signaling and activation of the β-catenin pathway can induce EMT in intratumoral cancer cells. We depleted macrophages in F9-teratocarcinoma bearing mice using clodronate-liposomes and analyzed the tumors for correlations between gene and protein expression of EMT-associated and macrophage markers. The functional relationship between TAMs and EMT was characterized in vitro in the murine F9 and mammary gland NMuMG cells, using a conditioned medium culture approach. The clinical relevance of our findings was evaluated on a tissue microarray cohort representing 491 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Gene expression analysis of F9-teratocarcinomas revealed a positive correlation between TAM-densities and mesenchymal marker expression. Moreover, immunohistochemistry showed that TAMs cluster with EMT phenotype cells in the tumors. In vitro, long term exposure of F9-and NMuMG-cells to macrophage-conditioned medium led to decreased expression of the epithelial adhesion protein E-cadherin, activation of the EMT-mediating β-catenin pathway, increased expression of mesenchymal markers and an invasive phenotype. In a candidate based screen, macrophage-derived TGF-β was identified as the main inducer of this EMT-associated phenotype. Lastly, immunohistochemical analysis of NSCLC patient samples identified a positive correlation between intratumoral macrophage densities, EMT markers, intraepithelial TGF-β levels and tumor grade. Data presented here identify a novel role for macrophages in EMT

  11. Aggression-related alcohol expectancies and barroom aggression among construction tradespeople.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkiewicz, Lucy; Smith, Georgia; Burn, Michele; Litherland, Steven; Wells, Samantha; Graham, Kathryn; Miller, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have investigated the relationship of barroom aggression with both general and barroom-specific alcohol expectancies. The present study investigated these associations in a rarely studied and high-risk population: construction tradespeople. Male construction tradespeople (n = 211) aged 18-35 years (M = 21.91, SD = 4.08 years) participated in a face-to-face questionnaire assessing general and barroom-specific alcohol expectancies and perpetration of physical and verbal barroom aggression as well as control variables, age, alcohol consumption and trait aggression. Sequential logistic regression analyses revealed that general alcohol-aggression expectancies of courage or dominance were not predictive of either verbal or physical barroom aggression after controlling for age, alcohol consumption and trait aggression. However, barroom-specific alcohol expectancies were associated with both verbal and physical barroom aggression, with positive associations found for expected hyper-emotionality and protective effects for expected cognitive impairment. In a population where rates of risky drinking and barroom aggression are high, specific expectations about the effects of drinking in bars may influence subsequent aggressive behaviour in bars. [Zinkiewicz L, Smith G, Burn M, Litherland S, Wells S, Graham K, Miller P. Aggression-related alcohol expectancies and barroom aggression among construction tradespeople. Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;35:549-556]. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  12. A systems genetics approach identifies CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2 as novel aggressive prostate cancer susceptibility genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra A Williams

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Although prostate cancer typically runs an indolent course, a subset of men develop aggressive, fatal forms of this disease. We hypothesize that germline variation modulates susceptibility to aggressive prostate cancer. The goal of this work is to identify susceptibility genes using the C57BL/6-Tg(TRAMP8247Ng/J (TRAMP mouse model of neuroendocrine prostate cancer. Quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping was performed in transgene-positive (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ F2 intercross males (n = 228, which facilitated identification of 11 loci associated with aggressive disease development. Microarray data derived from 126 (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ F2 primary tumors were used to prioritize candidate genes within QTLs, with candidate genes deemed as being high priority when possessing both high levels of expression-trait correlation and a proximal expression QTL. This process enabled the identification of 35 aggressive prostate tumorigenesis candidate genes. The role of these genes in aggressive forms of human prostate cancer was investigated using two concurrent approaches. First, logistic regression analysis in two human prostate gene expression datasets revealed that expression levels of five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, LPCAT2, RNASEH2A, and ZNF322 were positively correlated with aggressive prostate cancer and two genes (CCL19 and HIST1H1A were protective for aggressive prostate cancer. Higher than average levels of expression of the five genes that were positively correlated with aggressive disease were consistently associated with patient outcome in both human prostate cancer tumor gene expression datasets. Second, three of these five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2 harbored polymorphisms associated with aggressive disease development in a human GWAS cohort consisting of 1,172 prostate cancer patients. This study is the first example of using a systems genetics approach to successfully identify novel susceptibility genes for aggressive prostate cancer. Such

  13. Molecular Subtyping of Serous Ovarian Tumors Reveals Multiple Connections to Intrinsic Breast Cancer Subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Johansson, Ida; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2014-01-01

    expressed between benign and malignant serous ovarian tumors, with cell cycle processes enriched in the malignant subgroup. Borderline tumors were split between the two clusters. Significant correlations between the malignant serous tumors and the highly aggressive ovarian cancer signatures, and the basal...

  14. Signaling aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular Biology In Young Women With Breast Cancer: From Tumor Gene Expression To DNA Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Flores-Ramos, Liliana; Castro-Sánchez, Andrea; Peña-Curiel, Omar; Mohar-Betancourt, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Young women with breast cancer (YWBC) represent roughly 15% of breast cancer (BC) cases in Latin America and other developing regions. Breast tumors occurring at an early age are more aggressive and have an overall worse prognosis compared to breast tumors in postmenopausal women. The expression of relevant proliferation biomarkers such as endocrine receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 appears to be unique in YWBC. Moreover, histopathological, molecular, genetic, and genomic studies have shown that YWBC exhibit a higher frequency of aggressive subtypes, differential tumor gene expression, increased genetic susceptibility, and specific genomic signatures, compared to older women with BC. This article reviews the current knowledge on tumor biology and genomic signatures in YWBC.

  16. Inflammatory Pseudotumors of the Lung in Children: Aggressive Types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, J.; Guzman de Villoria, J. A.; Casonava, A.; Zabalza, M. R.

    2003-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumors are tumorations which can present themselves very aggressively in children. Three patients were studied as illustration. Each was diagnosed with inflammatory pseudotumors of the lung after surgical intervention and open lung biopsy, which each case being very different in terms of clinical and radiological manifestations and evolution. Basic Radiological procedures and CT were performed in all three cases and MR in two. While the results were not specific, they did provide some means for arriving at a diagnosis, the common trait among them being the manifestation of primarily aggressive behavior. In conclusion, although inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung general y presents itself as a solitary peripheral mass of benign character which generally evolves favorable after surgery, it sometimes behaves in a primarily aggressive way which could hinder, or render impossible, any forthcoming surgical intervention. Imaging techniques tend to provide findings which are varied and unspecific. In this regard, MR is more advantageous than CT for determining not only the relationship between the mass and its adjacent structures, but also for the detection and follow up of relapses. (Author) 40 refs

  17. Can histogram analysis of MR images predict aggressiveness in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Riccardo; Maris, Bogdan; Cardobi, Nicolò; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; Gobbo, Stefano; Capelli, Paola; Ortolani, Silvia; Cingarlini, Sara; Paiella, Salvatore; Landoni, Luca; Butturini, Giovanni; Regi, Paolo; Scarpa, Aldo; Tortora, Giampaolo; D'Onofrio, Mirko

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate MRI derived whole-tumour histogram analysis parameters in predicting pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm (panNEN) grade and aggressiveness. Pre-operative MR of 42 consecutive patients with panNEN >1 cm were retrospectively analysed. T1-/T2-weighted images and ADC maps were analysed. Histogram-derived parameters were compared to histopathological features using the Mann-Whitney U test. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by ROC-AUC analysis; sensitivity and specificity were assessed for each histogram parameter. ADC entropy was significantly higher in G2-3 tumours with ROC-AUC 0.757; sensitivity and specificity were 83.3 % (95 % CI: 61.2-94.5) and 61.1 % (95 % CI: 36.1-81.7). ADC kurtosis was higher in panNENs with vascular involvement, nodal and hepatic metastases (p= .008, .021 and .008; ROC-AUC= 0.820, 0.709 and 0.820); sensitivity and specificity were: 85.7/74.3 % (95 % CI: 42-99.2 /56.4-86.9), 36.8/96.5 % (95 % CI: 17.2-61.4 /76-99.8) and 100/62.8 % (95 % CI: 56.1-100/44.9-78.1). No significant differences between groups were found for other histogram-derived parameters (p >.05). Whole-tumour histogram analysis of ADC maps may be helpful in predicting tumour grade, vascular involvement, nodal and liver metastases in panNENs. ADC entropy and ADC kurtosis are the most accurate parameters for identification of panNENs with malignant behaviour. • Whole-tumour ADC histogram analysis can predict aggressiveness in pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. • ADC entropy and kurtosis are higher in aggressive tumours. • ADC histogram analysis can quantify tumour diffusion heterogeneity. • Non-invasive quantification of tumour heterogeneity can provide adjunctive information for prognostication.

  18. Advancement of Phenotype Transformation of Cancer-associated Fibroblasts: 
from Genetic Alterations to Epigenetic Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dali CHEN

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the field of human cancer research, even though the vast majority attentions were paid to tumor cells as “the seeds”, the roles of tumor microenvironments as “the soil” are gradually explored in recent years. As a dominant compartment of tumor microenvironments, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs were discovered to correlated with tumorigenesis, tumor progression and prognosis. And the exploration of the mechanisms of CAF phenotype transformation would conducive to the further understand of the CAFs function in human cancers. As we known that CAFs have four main origins, including epithelial cells, endothelial cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and local mesenchymal cells. However, researchers found that all these origins finally conduct similiar phenotypes from intrinsic to extrinsic ones. Thus, what and how a mechanism can conduct the phenotype transformation of CAFs with different origins? Two viewpoints are proposed to try to answer the quetsion, involving genetic alterations and epigenetic modifications. This review will systematically summarize the advancement of mechanisms of CAF phenotype transformations in the aspect of genentic and epigenetic modifications.

  19. Aggression By Whom–Aggression Toward Whom: Behavioral Predictors of Same- and Other-Gender Aggression in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanish, Laura D.; Sallquist, Julie; DiDonato, Matthew; Fabes, Richard A.; Martin, Carol Lynn

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed girls’ and boys’ dominance-related behaviors (aggressive, commanding, submissive, and neutral behaviors) as they naturally occurred during interactions with male and female peers and evaluated the possibility that such behaviors elicit aggression from peers. Using a focal observational procedure, young girls’ and boys’ (N = 170; 54% boys) naturally occurring dominance-related behaviors and male and female peers’ aggressive responses to those behaviors were recorded multiple times each week across the academic year. Findings suggested that same-gender aggression occurred at similar rates as other-gender aggression once tendencies toward gender segregated play were controlled. Additionally, there were both gender-based similarities and differences in children’s use of dominance-related behaviors in peer interactions and as antecedents for peers’ aggression. The findings have implications for the literatures on aggression and gendered peer interactions. PMID:22369337

  20. Polymorphisms in the AR and PSA genes as markers of susceptibility and aggressiveness in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuasne, Hellen; Rodrigues, Iara Sant'Ana; Fuganti, Paulo Emílio

    2010-01-01

    The study of genes involved in androgen pathway can contribute to a better knowledge of prostate cancer. Our aim was to examine if polymorphisms in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and androgen receptor (AR) genes were involved in prostate cancer risk and aggressiveness. Genotypes were determined...... by PCR-RFLP (PSA) or using a 377 ABI DNA Sequencer (AR). PSA(G/G) genotype (OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.06–2.99) and AR short CAG repeats (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.21–2.96) increased risk for prostate cancer and were related with tumor aggressiveness. About 38.3% of tumors showed microsatellite instability....... In conclusion, polymorphisms in these genes may be indicated as potential biomarkers for prostate cancer....

  1. Neuroendocrine tumors of the gallbladder: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezi Silvia

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Primary gallbladder neuroendocrine tumors are extremely rare, representing 0.2% of all neuroendocrine tumors. The diagnosis is incidental in most cases. Case presentation We describe the case of a 57-year-old Caucasian man who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy for the evaluation of a gallbladder polyp that had been incidentally detected by ultasonography. Histologically, his lesion was composed of monomorphic cells that contained small round nuclei and that were organized in small nodular, trabecular, and acinar structures. His cells were positive for chromogranin A and synaptophysin, and a diagnosis of "typical" carcinoid of the gallbladder was made. His post-operative computerized axial tomography, 111In-pentetreotide scintigraphy, and hormone-specific marker results were negative. He is disease-free 45 months after surgical treatment. Conclusions Characteristic pathological findings of the gallbladder neuroendocrine tumors predict the prognosis. Whereas classical carcinoids of the gallbladder only rarely have a metastatic or invasive phenotype, the "atypical" variants are more aggressive and are associated with a poorer prognosis. Given the difficulty in distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions in the pre-surgical setting, we tend to consider each polypoid-like lesion of the gallbladder to be a high-risk lesion if it is larger than 1 cm and, as a result, to emphasize the need for cholecystectomy in all cases, relying on the pathological and immunohistochemistry analyses for the final diagnosis.

  2. Aggressive surgical management of craniopharyngiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manmohan Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment of craniopharyngiomas is challenging and despite advancements it continues to pose a challenge. Proponents of subtotal resection in conjunction with radiotherapy argue that this less aggressive approach can yield appropriate results with the lower morbidity. On the contrary, other argument is that gross total resection is superior. Though surgical management of craniopharyngioma is challenging due to its location and important surrounding neurovascular structures, optimal surgical results can be expected following radical surgical excision. Radical excision of craniopharyngiomas is associated with excellent long-term recurrence free survival. Radiation induced long-term complications can be altogether avoided by excising these tumors completely.

  3. Novel Treatment Shrinks Ovarian Tumors in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have developed a new approach for treating tumors that express mutant versions of the p53 protein, which are present in more than half of all cancers, including an aggressive and common subtype of ovarian cancer.

  4. Agreeableness and alcohol-related aggression: the mediating effect of trait aggressivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cameron A; Parrott, Dominic J; Giancola, Peter R

    2009-12-01

    This study investigated the mediating effect of trait aggressivity on the relation between agreeableness and alcohol-related aggression in a laboratory setting. Participants were 116 healthy male social drinkers between 21 and 30 years of age. Agreeableness and trait aggressivity were measured using the Big Five Inventory and the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire, respectively. Following the consumption of an alcohol or no-alcohol control beverage, participants completed a modified version of the Taylor Aggression Paradigm, in which electric shocks were received from and administered to a fictitious opponent during a competitive task. Aggression was operationalized as the proportion of the most extreme shocks delivered to the fictitious opponent under conditions of low and high provocation. Results indicated that lower levels of agreeableness were associated with higher levels of trait aggressivity. In turn, higher levels of trait aggressivity predicted extreme aggression in intoxicated, but not sober, participants under low, but not high, provocation. Findings highlight the importance of examining determinants of intoxicated aggression within a broader theoretical framework of personality.

  5. A PAUF-neutralizing antibody targets both carcinoma and endothelial cells to impede pancreatic tumor progression and metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Jin [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); New Drug Development Center, Osong Medical Innovation Foundation, Cheongwon, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Suhwan [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Na Young; Hwang, Yeonsil; Min, Hye Jin; Yoo, Kyung-Sook; Park, Eun Hye; Kim, Seokho [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Hwa [BK21-plus, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Woo [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok, E-mail: sskoh@dau.ac.kr [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biological Sciences, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • PMAb83, a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, impaired tumor progression in vivo. • PMAb83 attenuated aggressiveness of tumor cells and suppressed angiogenesis. • PMAb83 in combination with gemcitabine conferred improved survival of mouse model. - Abstract: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Here we evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, PMAb83, to provide a therapeutic intervention to treat the disease. PMAb83 reduced tumor growth and distant metastasis in orthotopically xenografted mice of human PDAC cells. PMAb83 treatment retarded proliferation along with weakened aggressiveness traits of the carcinoma cells. AKT/β-catenin signaling played a role in the carcinoma cell proliferation and the treated xenograft tumors exhibited reduced levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Moreover PMAb83 abrogated the PAUF-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, reducing the density of CD31{sup +} vessels in the treated tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, PMAb83 conferred enhanced survival of xenografted mice by about twofold compared to gemcitabine alone. Taken together, our findings show that PMAb83 treatment decreases the aggressiveness of carcinoma cells and suppresses tumor vascularization, which culminates in mitigated tumor growth and metastasis with improved survival in PDAC mouse models.

  6. A PAUF-neutralizing antibody targets both carcinoma and endothelial cells to impede pancreatic tumor progression and metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Su Jin; Chang, Suhwan; Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Na Young; Hwang, Yeonsil; Min, Hye Jin; Yoo, Kyung-Sook; Park, Eun Hye; Kim, Seokho; Chung, Young-Hwa; Park, Young Woo; Koh, Sang Seok

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PMAb83, a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, impaired tumor progression in vivo. • PMAb83 attenuated aggressiveness of tumor cells and suppressed angiogenesis. • PMAb83 in combination with gemcitabine conferred improved survival of mouse model. - Abstract: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Here we evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, PMAb83, to provide a therapeutic intervention to treat the disease. PMAb83 reduced tumor growth and distant metastasis in orthotopically xenografted mice of human PDAC cells. PMAb83 treatment retarded proliferation along with weakened aggressiveness traits of the carcinoma cells. AKT/β-catenin signaling played a role in the carcinoma cell proliferation and the treated xenograft tumors exhibited reduced levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Moreover PMAb83 abrogated the PAUF-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, reducing the density of CD31 + vessels in the treated tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, PMAb83 conferred enhanced survival of xenografted mice by about twofold compared to gemcitabine alone. Taken together, our findings show that PMAb83 treatment decreases the aggressiveness of carcinoma cells and suppresses tumor vascularization, which culminates in mitigated tumor growth and metastasis with improved survival in PDAC mouse models

  7. THE EFFECT OF ASCORBIC ACID ON PATHOHISTOLOGICAL TUMOR CHARACTERISTICS AND PHENOTYPE CHARACTERISTICS OF LYMPHOCYTES DURING THE DEVELOPMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL MAMMARY CARCINOMA IN MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voja Pavlovic

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available TIn our previous study we demonstrated that high doses of ascorbic acid prolonged the survival of mice with experimental mammary carcinoma. In this work we studied, ussing the same model, pathohistological characteristics of the tumor and phenotypic changes of lymphocyte subsets in the spleen. Experiments were performed on CBA/H mice. The growh of experimental tumor was induced by injection of mammary adenocarcinoma cells intramuscularly at the femoral region of mice. The animals were divided into control group and three experimental groups (I, II and III. Mice from experimental groups were treated peroraly with 10, 100 and 1000 mg/kg body mass (b.m. of ascorbic acid, respectively, whereas control mice received physiological saline. Mice were sacrified after 7, 14 and 21 days from the beginning of the experiment. Total tumor mass and its pathohistological characteristics, spleen mass and cellularity as well as relative and total numbers of T cells, B cells and T cell subsets (CD4+ and CD8+ in the spleen, were analyzed. High doses of ascorbic acid decreased tumor mass, stimulated proliferation of fibroblasts and formation of capsula arround the tumor, induced tumor necrosis and increased the number of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. Changes of lymphocyte subsets and their numbers varied depending on the applied dose of ascorbic acid and the time elapsed following tumor induction. The most prominent changes, manifested by an increase in the number of CD4+ T cells were observed on the 14th day in II experimental group. Our results suggest that the beneficial effect of ascorbic acid on experimental tumorogenesis in our model was the consequence of its influence on the tumor and on the immune system.

  8. A Phenotypic Cell-Binding Screen Identifies a Novel Compound Targeting Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luxi; Long, Chao; Youn, Jonghae; Lee, Jiyong

    2018-06-11

    We describe a "phenotypic cell-binding screen" by which therapeutic candidate targeting cancer cells of a particular phenotype can be isolated without knowledge of drug targets. Chemical library beads are incubated with cancer cells of the phenotype of interest in the presence of cancer cells lacking the phenotype of interest, and then the beads bound to only cancer cells of the phenotype of interest are selected as hits. We have applied this screening strategy in discovering a novel compound (LC129-8) targeting triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). LC129-8 displayed highly specific binding to TNBC in cancer cell lines and patient-derived tumor tissues. LC129-8 exerted anti-TNBC activity by inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition, downregulating cancer stem cell activity and blocking in vivo tumor growth.

  9. Normative beliefs about aggression and cyber aggression among young adults: a longitudinal investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michelle F; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined normative beliefs about aggression (e.g., face-to-face, cyber) in relation to the engagement in cyber aggression 6 months later among 126 (69 women) young adults. Participants completed electronically administered measures assessing their normative beliefs, face-to-face and cyber aggression at Time 1, and cyber aggression 6 months later (Time 2). We found that men reported more cyber relational and verbal aggression when compared to women. After controlling for each other, Time 1 face-to-face relational aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression, whereas Time 1 face-to-face verbal aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber verbal aggression. Normative beliefs regarding cyber aggression was positively related to both forms of cyber aggression 6 months later, after controlling for normative beliefs about face-to-face aggression. Furthermore, a significant two-way interaction between Time 1 cyber relational aggression and normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression was found. Follow-up analysis showed that Time 1 cyber relational aggression was more strongly related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression when young adults held higher normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression. A similar two-way interaction was found for cyber verbal aggression such that the association between Time 1 and Time 2 cyber verbal aggression was stronger at higher levels of normative beliefs about cyber verbal aggression. Results are discussed in terms of the social cognitive and behavioral mechanisms associated with the engagement of cyber aggression. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Multiple sporadic colorectal cancers display a unique methylation phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Gonzalo

    Full Text Available Epigenetics are thought to play a major role in the carcinogenesis of multiple sporadic colorectal cancers (CRC. Previous studies have suggested concordant DNA hypermethylation between tumor pairs. However, only a few methylation markers have been analyzed. This study was aimed at describing the epigenetic signature of multiple CRC using a genome-scale DNA methylation profiling. We analyzed 12 patients with synchronous CRC and 29 age-, sex-, and tumor location-paired patients with solitary tumors from the EPICOLON II cohort. DNA methylation profiling was performed using the Illumina Infinium HM27 DNA methylation assay. The most significant results were validated by Methylight. Tumors samples were also analyzed for the CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP; KRAS and BRAF mutations and mismatch repair deficiency status. Functional annotation clustering was performed. We identified 102 CpG sites that showed significant DNA hypermethylation in multiple tumors with respect to the solitary counterparts (difference in β value ≥0.1. Methylight assays validated the results for 4 selected genes (p = 0.0002. Eight out of 12(66.6% multiple tumors were classified as CIMP-high, as compared to 5 out of 29(17.2% solitary tumors (p = 0.004. Interestingly, 76 out of the 102 (74.5% hypermethylated CpG sites found in multiple tumors were also seen in CIMP-high tumors. Functional analysis of hypermethylated genes found in multiple tumors showed enrichment of genes involved in different tumorigenic functions. In conclusion, multiple CRC are associated with a distinct methylation phenotype, with a close association between tumor multiplicity and CIMP-high. Our results may be important to unravel the underlying mechanism of tumor multiplicity.

  11. An MRI Method To Map Tumor Hypoxia Using Red Blood Cells Loaded with a pO2-Responsive Gd-Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, Enza; Ferrauto, Giuseppe; Gianolio, Eliana; Lanzardo, Stefania; Carrera, Carla; Fedeli, Franco; Aime, Silvio

    2015-08-25

    Hypoxia is a typical hallmark of many solid tumors and often leads to therapy resistance and the development of a more aggressive cancer phenotype. Oxygen content in tissues has been evaluated using numerous different methods for several imaging modalities, but none has yet reached the required standard of spatial and temporal resolution. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) appears to be the technique of choice and several pO2-responsive probes have been designed for it over the years. In vivo translation is often hampered in Gd-relaxation agents as it is not possible to separate effects that arise from changes in local concentration from those associated with responsive properties. A novel procedure for the MRI based assessment of hypoxia is reported herein. The method relies on the combined use of Gd-DOTP- and Gd-HPDO3A-labeled red blood cells (RBCs) where the first probe acts as a vascular oxygenation-responsive agent, while the second reports the local labeled RBC concentration in a transplanted breast tumor mouse model. The MRI assessment of oxygenation state has been validated by photoacoustic imaging and ex vivo immunofluorescence. The method refines tumor staging in preclinical models and makes possible an accurate monitoring of the relationship between oxygenation and tumor growth.

  12. Broad spectrum of neuropsychiatric phenotypes associated with white matter disease in PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Tugce B; Davila, Jorge; Lewis, Denice; Boafo, Addo; Sell, Erick; Richer, Julie; Nikkel, Sarah M; Armour, Christine M; Tomiak, Eva; Lines, Matthew A; Sawyer, Sarah L

    2018-01-01

    White matter lesions have been described in patients with PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS). How these lesions correlate with the neurocognitive features associated with PTEN mutations, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or developmental delay, has not been well established. We report nine patients with PTEN mutations and white matter changes on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), eight of whom were referred for reasons other than developmental delay or ASD. Their clinical presentations ranged from asymptomatic macrocephaly with normal development/intellect, to obsessive compulsive disorder, and debilitating neurological disease. To our knowledge, this report constitutes the first detailed description of PTEN-related white matter changes in adult patients and in children with normal development and intelligence. We present a detailed assessment of the neuropsychological phenotype of our patients and discuss the relationship between the wide array of neuropsychiatric features and observed white matter findings in the context of these individuals. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. CONCEPT ANALYSIS: AGGRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jianghong

    2004-01-01

    The concept of aggression is important to nursing because further knowledge of aggression can help generate a better theoretical model to drive more effective intervention and prevention approaches. This paper outlines a conceptual analysis of aggression. First, the different forms of aggression are reviewed, including the clinical classification and the stimulus-based classification. Then the manifestations and measurement of aggression are described. Finally, the causes and consequences of ...

  14. Podoplanin expression in peritumoral keratinocytes predicts aggressive behavior in extramammary Paget's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Zaigen; Konishi, Eiichi; Kanemaru, Mai; Isohisa, Taro; Arita, Takahiro; Kawai, Minako; Tsutsumi, Miho; Mizutani, Hiromi; Takenaka, Hideya; Ozawa, Toshiyuki; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Katoh, Norito; Asai, Jun

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated podoplanin expression in several tumors, which has been associated with lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis. Podoplanin expression in peritumoral cells such as cancer-associated fibroblasts also correlates with tumor progression in several cancers. However, podoplanin expression and its association with extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) remain unclear. In this study, we examined whether the presence of podoplanin expression in tumor cells or peritumoral basal keratinocytes correlated with aggressive behavior in patients with EMPD and investigated the mechanisms of podoplanin-mediated tumor invasion in this disorder. Skin samples of 37 patients with EMPD were investigated by immunohistochemical analysis. The functions of podoplanin in keratinocytes were examined in vitro by RT-PCR and with invadopodia gelatin-degradation assays using HaCaT cells. Podoplanin was not identified in tumor cells in all cases. Podoplanin expression in peritumoral basal keratinocytes was observed in 25 patients (67.6%). In in situ EMPD, 50% of cases (9 in 18) exhibited podoplanin-positive keratinocytes, whereas 84.2% (16 in 19) demonstrated positive staining in invasive EMPD (P<0.05). Podoplanin expression in peritumoral keratinocytes was also associated with tumor thickness (P<0.005). By immunohistochemical analysis, podoplanin-positive peritumoral keratinocytes were found to be negative for E-cadherin, one of the major adhesion molecules of keratinocytes, which might contribute to tumor invasion into the dermis through a crack in the basal cell layer induced by down-regulation of cell adhesion therein. We further found that podoplanin-positive keratinocytes exhibited invadopodia, which are thought to function in the migration of cancer cells through tissue barriers, indicating that podoplanin-positive peritumoral basal keratinocytes might assist tumor invasion by degrading the extracellular matrix. The presence of podoplanin expression in

  15. Genetic Susceptibility Factors in Aggressive Breast Cancer in African-American Women and the Effects of Carcinogens and Modifiers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crawford, Keith

    1999-01-01

    .... Sigma 2 selective agents CB64D and CB 184 possess similar potency in MCF-7 breast tumor cells and breast tumors with mutations in the p53 tumor Suppressor gene that are phenotypically resistant...

  16. Mesenchymal stem cell 1 (MSC1-based therapy attenuates tumor growth whereas MSC2-treatment promotes tumor growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth S Waterman

    Full Text Available Currently, there are many promising clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in cell-based therapies of numerous diseases. Increasingly, however, there is a concern over the use of MSCs because they home to tumors and can support tumor growth and metastasis. For instance, we established that MSCs in the ovarian tumor microenvironment promoted tumor growth and favored angiogenesis. In parallel studies, we also developed a new approach to induce the conventional mixed pool of MSCs into two uniform but distinct phenotypes we termed MSC1 and MSC2.Here we tested the in vitro and in vivo stability of MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes as well as their effects on tumor growth and spread. In vitro co-culture of MSC1 with various cancer cells diminished growth in colony forming units and tumor spheroid assays, while conventional MSCs or MSC2 co-culture had the opposite effect in these assays. Co-culture of MSC1 and cancer cells also distinctly affected their migration and invasion potential when compared to MSCs or MSC2 treated samples. The expression of bioactive molecules also differed dramatically among these samples. MSC1-based treatment of established tumors in an immune competent model attenuated tumor growth and metastasis in contrast to MSCs- and MSC2-treated animals in which tumor growth and spread was increased. Also, in contrast to these groups, MSC1-therapy led to less ascites accumulation, increased CD45+leukocytes, decreased collagen deposition, and mast cell degranulation.These observations indicate that the MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes may be convenient tools for the discovery of critical components of the tumor stroma. The continued investigation of these cells may help ensure that cell based-therapy is used safely and effectively in human disease.

  17. Heterozygous Germline Mutations in the CBL Tumor-Suppressor Gene Cause a Noonan Syndrome-like Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Simone; De Luca, Alessandro; Stellacci, Emilia; Rossi, Cesare; Checquolo, Saula; Lepri, Francesca; Caputo, Viviana; Silvano, Marianna; Buscherini, Francesco; Consoli, Federica; Ferrara, Grazia; Digilio, Maria C.; Cavaliere, Maria L.; van Hagen, Johanna M.; Zampino, Giuseppe; van der Burgt, Ineke; Ferrero, Giovanni B.; Mazzanti, Laura; Screpanti, Isabella; Yntema, Helger G.; Nillesen, Willy M.; Savarirayan, Ravi; Zenker, Martin; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gelb, Bruce D.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2010-01-01

    RAS signaling plays a key role in controlling appropriate cell responses to extracellular stimuli and participates in early and late developmental processes. Although enhanced flow through this pathway has been established as a major contributor to oncogenesis, recent discoveries have revealed that aberrant RAS activation causes a group of clinically related developmental disorders characterized by facial dysmorphism, a wide spectrum of cardiac disease, reduced growth, variable cognitive deficits, ectodermal and musculoskeletal anomalies, and increased risk for certain malignancies. Here, we report that heterozygous germline mutations in CBL, a tumor-suppressor gene that is mutated in myeloid malignancies and encodes a multivalent adaptor protein with E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, can underlie a phenotype with clinical features fitting or partially overlapping Noonan syndrome (NS), the most common condition of this disease family. Independent CBL mutations were identified in two sporadic cases and two families from among 365 unrelated subjects who had NS or suggestive features and were negative for mutations in previously identified disease genes. Phenotypic heterogeneity and variable expressivity were documented. Mutations were missense changes altering evolutionarily conserved residues located in the RING finger domain or the linker connecting this domain to the N-terminal tyrosine kinase binding domain, a known mutational hot spot in myeloid malignancies. Mutations were shown to affect CBL-mediated receptor ubiquitylation and dysregulate signal flow through RAS. These findings document that germline mutations in CBL alter development to cause a clinically variable condition that resembles NS and that possibly predisposes to malignancies. PMID:20619386

  18. Clinical features and prognostic factors for survival in patients with poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma and comparison to the patients with the aggressive variants of papillary thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Tae-Sik; Kim, Tae-Yong; Kim, Kyung-Won

    2007-01-01

    We performed this study to compare the clinicopathologic features and outcomes between the patients with poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma (PDTC) and the patients with the aggressive variants of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). To evaluate the prognostic factors for survival of the patients with PDTC, we selected 49 patients with PDTC and 23 patients with the aggressive variants of PTC from three hospitals during the recent 15 years. The five-year survival rate and clinicopathologic features of the patients with PDTC were not different from those of the patients with the aggressive variants of PTC. Univariate analysis revealed the significant poor prognostic factors for survival of the patients with PDTC and the aggressive variants of PTC as follows: an age more than 45 years, a tumor size larger than 4 cm, the presence of tumor invasion to extrathyroidal tissue or the trachea, the presence of cervical lymph node invasion, the presence of distant metastasis, the absence of high-dose radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy, and tumor, nodes and metastasis (TNM) stage II, III and IV. Distant metastasis and high-dose RAI therapy were independent significant predictors for survival of the patients with PDTC and the aggressive variants of PTC on multivariate analysis. However, distant metastasis was the only independent significant predictors for survival of the patients with PDTC excluding patients with the aggressive variants of PTC. (author)

  19. The Microenvironment in Gliomas: Phenotypic Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Schiffer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The microenvironment of malignant gliomas is described according to its definition in the literature. Beside tumor cells, a series of stromal cells (microglia/macrophages, pericytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, normal and reactive astrocytes represents the cell component, whereas a complex network of molecular signaling represents the functional component. Its most evident expressions are perivascular and perinecrotic niches that are believed to be the site of tumor stem cells or progenitors in the tumor. Phenotypically, both niches are not easily recognizable; here, they are described together with a critical revision of their concept. As for perinecrotic niches, an alternative interpretation is given about their origin that regards the tumor stem cells as the residue of those that populated hyperproliferating areas in which necroses develop. This is based on the concept that the stem-like is a status and not a cell type, depending on the microenvironment that regulates a conversion of tumor non-stem cells and tumor stem cells through a cell reprogramming.

  20. Infiltration of M2 Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Tumor Malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kazumasa; Hiroi, Miki; Shimada, Jun; Ohmori, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are a major cellular component in the tumor microenvironment of many solid tumors. The functional competence of TAMs varies depending on the type of tumors and their respective microenvironments. The classically activated M1 macrophages exhibit antitumor functions, whereas the alternatively activated M2 macrophages exhibit protumor functions that contribute to tumor development and progression. Although TAMs have been detected in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), little is known about their phenotype. In the present study, we performed an immunohistochemical analysis to identify TAMs in surgically resected specimens from 50 patients with OSCC and evaluated the relationship between infiltrated TAMs and the pathological grade of OSCC. Positive staining for CD163, which has been used as a marker for M2 macrophages, was observed in OSCC specimens, and the percentages of CD163 + cells were significantly increased based on the pathological grade. CD163 + cells were detected in the tumor stroma in grade I tumors, whereas an increase in the CD163 + cells in the tumor nest was observed in higher grades of tumors. Although infiltrated CD4 + and CD8 + T cells were detected in all pathological grades of OSCC, no correlation between the infiltrated T cells and the CD163 + TAMs was observed. These results indicate that the infiltrated TAMs in OSCC have an M2 phenotype and that the M2 macrophages may participate in the development of OSCC

  1. Infiltration of M2 Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Tumor Malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Kazumasa [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Diagnosis and Therapeutics, Meikai University of School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0283 (Japan); Hiroi, Miki [Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Oral Biology and Tissue Engineering, Meikai University School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0283 (Japan); Shimada, Jun [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Diagnosis and Therapeutics, Meikai University of School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0283 (Japan); Ohmori, Yoshihiro, E-mail: ohmori@dent.meikai.ac.jp [Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Oral Biology and Tissue Engineering, Meikai University School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0283 (Japan)

    2011-09-28

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are a major cellular component in the tumor microenvironment of many solid tumors. The functional competence of TAMs varies depending on the type of tumors and their respective microenvironments. The classically activated M1 macrophages exhibit antitumor functions, whereas the alternatively activated M2 macrophages exhibit protumor functions that contribute to tumor development and progression. Although TAMs have been detected in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), little is known about their phenotype. In the present study, we performed an immunohistochemical analysis to identify TAMs in surgically resected specimens from 50 patients with OSCC and evaluated the relationship between infiltrated TAMs and the pathological grade of OSCC. Positive staining for CD163, which has been used as a marker for M2 macrophages, was observed in OSCC specimens, and the percentages of CD163{sup +} cells were significantly increased based on the pathological grade. CD163{sup +} cells were detected in the tumor stroma in grade I tumors, whereas an increase in the CD163{sup +} cells in the tumor nest was observed in higher grades of tumors. Although infiltrated CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells were detected in all pathological grades of OSCC, no correlation between the infiltrated T cells and the CD163{sup +} TAMs was observed. These results indicate that the infiltrated TAMs in OSCC have an M2 phenotype and that the M2 macrophages may participate in the development of OSCC.

  2. A Distinct DNA Methylation Shift in a Subset of Glioma CpG Island Methylator Phenotypes during Tumor Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Camila Ferreira; Sabedot, Thais S; Malta, Tathiane M; Stetson, Lindsay; Morozova, Olena; Sokolov, Artem; Laird, Peter W; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Iavarone, Antonio; Snyder, James; deCarvalho, Ana; Sanborn, Zachary; McDonald, Kerrie L; Friedman, William A; Tirapelli, Daniela; Poisson, Laila; Mikkelsen, Tom; Carlotti, Carlos G; Kalkanis, Steven; Zenklusen, Jean; Salama, Sofie R; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Noushmehr, Houtan

    2018-04-10

    Glioma diagnosis is based on histomorphology and grading; however, such classification does not have predictive clinical outcome after glioblastomas have developed. To date, no bona fide biomarkers that significantly translate into a survival benefit to glioblastoma patients have been identified. We previously reported that the IDH mutant G-CIMP-high subtype would be a predecessor to the G-CIMP-low subtype. Here, we performed a comprehensive DNA methylation longitudinal analysis of diffuse gliomas from 77 patients (200 tumors) to enlighten the epigenome-based malignant transformation of initially lower-grade gliomas. Intra-subtype heterogeneity among G-CIMP-high primary tumors allowed us to identify predictive biomarkers for assessing the risk of malignant recurrence at early stages of disease. G-CIMP-low recurrence appeared in 9.5% of all gliomas, and these resembled IDH-wild-type primary glioblastoma. G-CIMP-low recurrence can be characterized by distinct epigenetic changes at candidate functional tissue enhancers with AP-1/SOX binding elements, mesenchymal stem cell-like epigenomic phenotype, and genomic instability. Molecular abnormalities of longitudinal G-CIMP offer possibilities to defy glioblastoma progression. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, Ehsan; Kuppen, Peter Jk; Aghdaei, Hamid Asadzadeh; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    It is clear that colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through multiple genetic and epigenetic pathways. These pathways may be determined on the basis of three molecular features: (i) mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes, leading to a DNA microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype, (ii) mutations in APC and other genes that activate Wnt pathway, characterized by chromosomal instability (CIN) phenotype, and (iii) global genome hypermethylation, resulting in switch off of tumor suppressor genes, indicated as CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Each of these pathways is characterized by specific pathological features, mechanisms of carcinogenesis and process of tumor development. The molecular aspects of these pathways have been used clinically in the diagnosis, screening and management of patients with colorectal cancer. In this review we especially describe various aspects of CIMP, one of the important and rather recently discovered pathways that lead to colorectal cancer.

  4. Tumour-associated microglia/macrophages predict poor prognosis in high-grade gliomas and correlate with an aggressive tumour subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M D; Dahlrot, R H; Boldt, H B

    2018-01-01

    (+) TAMs co-expressed proteins related to tumour aggressiveness including matrix metallopeptidase-14 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to use automated quantitative immunofluorescence to determine the prognostic impact of TAMs. Our results suggest that M2-like TAMs hold......AIMS: Glioblastomas are highly aggressive and treatment resistant. Increasing evidence suggests that tumour-associated macrophages/microglia (TAMs) facilitate tumour progression by acquiring a M2-like phenotype. Our objective was to investigate the prognostic value of TAMs in gliomas using...

  5. Tumor-Associated Macrophages as Major Players in the Tumor Microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanmee, Theerawut; Ontong, Pawared; Konno, Kenjiro; Itano, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    During tumor progression, circulating monocytes and macrophages are actively recruited into tumors where they alter the tumor microenvironment to accelerate tumor progression. Macrophages shift their functional phenotypes in response to various microenvironmental signals generated from tumor and stromal cells. Based on their function, macrophages are divided broadly into two categories: classical M1 and alternative M2 macrophages. The M1 macrophage is involved in the inflammatory response, pathogen clearance, and antitumor immunity. In contrast, the M2 macrophage influences an anti-inflammatory response, wound healing, and pro-tumorigenic properties. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) closely resemble the M2-polarized macrophages and are critical modulators of the tumor microenvironment. Clinicopathological studies have suggested that TAM accumulation in tumors correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Consistent with that evidence, experimental and animal studies have supported the notion that TAMs can provide a favorable microenvironment to promote tumor development and progression. In this review article, we present an overview of mechanisms responsible for TAM recruitment and highlight the roles of TAMs in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, immunosuppression, and chemotherapeutic resistance. Finally, we discuss TAM-targeting therapy as a promising novel strategy for an indirect cancer therapy

  6. Tumor-Associated Macrophages as Major Players in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanmee, Theerawut [Institute of Advanced Technology, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Ontong, Pawared [Division of Engineering (Biotechnology), Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Konno, Kenjiro [Department of Animal Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Itano, Naoki, E-mail: itanon@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Technology, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Division of Engineering (Biotechnology), Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Department of Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2014-08-13

    During tumor progression, circulating monocytes and macrophages are actively recruited into tumors where they alter the tumor microenvironment to accelerate tumor progression. Macrophages shift their functional phenotypes in response to various microenvironmental signals generated from tumor and stromal cells. Based on their function, macrophages are divided broadly into two categories: classical M1 and alternative M2 macrophages. The M1 macrophage is involved in the inflammatory response, pathogen clearance, and antitumor immunity. In contrast, the M2 macrophage influences an anti-inflammatory response, wound healing, and pro-tumorigenic properties. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) closely resemble the M2-polarized macrophages and are critical modulators of the tumor microenvironment. Clinicopathological studies have suggested that TAM accumulation in tumors correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Consistent with that evidence, experimental and animal studies have supported the notion that TAMs can provide a favorable microenvironment to promote tumor development and progression. In this review article, we present an overview of mechanisms responsible for TAM recruitment and highlight the roles of TAMs in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, immunosuppression, and chemotherapeutic resistance. Finally, we discuss TAM-targeting therapy as a promising novel strategy for an indirect cancer therapy.

  7. Mesothelioma tumor cells modulate dendritic cell lipid content, phenotype and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne K Gardner

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play an important role in the generation of anti-cancer immune responses, however there is evidence that DCs in cancer patients are dysfunctional. Lipid accumulation driven by tumor-derived factors has recently been shown to contribute to DC dysfunction in several human cancers, but has not yet been examined in mesothelioma. This study investigated if mesothelioma tumor cells and/or their secreted factors promote increases in DC lipid content and modulate DC function. Human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs were exposed to human mesothelioma tumor cells and tumor-derived factors in the presence or absence of lipoproteins. The data showed that immature MoDCs exposed to mesothelioma cells or factors contained increased lipid levels relative to control DCs. Lipid accumulation was associated with reduced antigen processing ability (measured using a DQ OVA assay, upregulation of the co-stimulatory molecule, CD86, and production of the tolerogenic cytokine, IL-10. Increases in DC lipid content were further enhanced by co-exposure to mesothelioma-derived factors and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, but not low-density lipoproteins. In vivo studies using a murine mesothelioma model showed that the lipid content of tumor-infiltrating CD4+ CD8α- DCs, CD4- CD8α- DCs DCs and plasmacytoid DCs increased with tumor progression. Moreover, increasing tumor burden was associated with reduced proliferation of tumor-antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes. This study shows that mesothelioma promotes DC lipid acquisition, which is associated with altered activation status and reduced capacity to process and present antigens, which may impair the ability of DCs to generate effective anti mesothelioma T cell responses.

  8. Higher serum concentrations of vimentin and DAKP1 are associated with aggressive breast tumour phenotypes in Ghanaian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arko-Boham, Benjamin; Lomotey, Justice Tanihu; Tetteh, Emmanuel Nomo; Tagoe, Emmanuel Ayitey; Aryee, Nii Ayite; Owusu, Ewurama Ampadu; Okai, Isaac; Blay, Richard Michael; Clegg-Lamptey, Joe-Nat

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer, the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women and leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, exhibits aggressive behavior in indigenous African women evidenced by high histologic grade tumours with low hormone receptor positivity. Aggressive breast cancers grow quickly, easily metastasize and recur and often have unfavourable outcomes. The current study investigated candidate genes that may regulate tumour aggression in Ghanaian women. We hypothesize that increased expression and function of certain genes other than the widely-held view attributing breast cancer aggression in African populations to their younger population age may be responsible for the aggressive nature of tumours. Employing ELISA, we assayed for vimentin and death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) from thawed archived (stored at -80 °C) serum samples obtained from 40 clinically confirmed Ghanaian breast cancer patients and 40 apparently healthy controls. Patients' clinical records and tumour parameters matching the samples were retrieved from the database of the hospital. ANOVA was used to compare means of serum protein concentration among groups while Chi-square analysis was used for the categorical data sets with p -value ≤0.05 considered significant. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine the association between protein concentration and tumour parameters. Of the 80 samples, 27 (33.8%) and 53 (66.2%) were from young (<35 years) and old (≥35 years), respectively. Vimentin and DAPK1 concentration were higher in patients than controls with higher levels in "young" age group than "old" age group. Vimentin concentration was highest in grade 3 tumours followed by grade 2 and 1 but that for DAPK1 was not significant. For vimentin, tumour area strongly correlated with tumour grade ( r  = 0.696, p  < 0.05) but weakly correlated with tumour stage ( r  = 0.420, p  < 0.05). Patient's age correlated with DAPK1 concentration ( r  = 0

  9. Giant Cell Tumor of the Thoracic Spine Presenting as a Posterior Mediastinal Tumor with Benign Pulmonary Metastases: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hun [Daegu Fatima Hospital College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Rho, Byung Hak; Bahn, Young Eun; Choi, Won Il [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    Giant cell tumor of bone is a benign, but potentially aggressive lesion that can show local recurrence and metastases. We report here on a case of a 29-year-old man who presented with an incidentally found mediastinal mass. Chest radiography and computed tomography showed a huge mediastinal mass with bilateral pulmonary nodules and the diagnosis of giant cell tumor with benign pulmonary metastasis was confirmed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of primary thoracic spinal giant cell tumor manifesting as a huge mediastinal mass with pulmonary metastases

  10. Recurrent Aggressive Angiomyxoma*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suelene Suassuna Silvestre de Alencar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: aggressive angiomyxoma is a highly aggressive, rare neoplasm of the mesen- chymal tissue with a high recurrence rate. It represents an important differential diagnosis of pelvic tumors in women of reproductive age. This study aims to describe a case of ag- gressive angiomyxoma.Case report: woman, 37 years old, complained about a bulge on the right perianal region, and anal itching and burning, bleeding, tenesmus and incontinence. The proctologic examina- tion confirmed the perianal bulge and extrinsic compression of the posterior wall of the rectum. Computed tomography (CT of the pelvis showed a well-defined pelvic mass ex- tending to the right rectal area. Exploratory laparotomy showed a mass of fibro elastic con- sistency adjacent to the pelvic organs and closely attached to the distal rectum, and per- formed a resection of the pelvic tumor afterward. Anatomopathological analysis revealed an aggressive angiomyxoma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the pelvis showed signs of recurrence in the pelvic cavity on the right side of the rectum. A surgical procedure was performed to resect the lesion. After an asymptomatic period, the MRI showed solid growths located in the right ischiorectal fossa. A new surgical procedure identified only retention cysts in the pelvis and right ischiorectal fossa, only lysis of adhesions was per- formed. The patient is currently undergoing follow-up without disease recurrence. Resumo: Introdução: o angiomixoma agressivo é uma rara neoplasia do tecido mesenquimal de gran- de agressividade e alta taxa de recorrência. Representa um importante diagnóstico diferen- cial de tumorações pélvicas de mulheres em idade reprodutiva. Este estudo objetiva relatar um caso de angiomixoma agressivo.Relato de caso: mulher, 37 anos, com queixa de abaulamento em região perianal direita, além de prurido e ardor anal, sangramento, tenesmo e incontinência anal. Exame procto- lógico confirmou o abaulamento

  11. Mechanical phenotyping of cells and extracellular matrix as grade and stage markers of lung tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzetta, Valeria; Musella, Ida; Rapa, Ida; Volante, Marco; Netti, Paolo A; Fusco, Sabato

    2017-07-15

    The mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) regulates the properties, functions and healthiness of the tissues. When this is disturbed it changes the mechanical state of the tissue components, singularly or together, and cancer, along with other diseases, may start and progress. However, the bi-univocal mechanical interplay between cells and the ECM is still not properly understood. In this study we show how a microrheology technique gives us the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. The mechanical phenotyping was performed on the surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung. A correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Our findings suggest a sort of asymmetric modification of the mechanical properties of the cells and the extra-cellular matrix in the tumor, being the more compliant cell even though it resides in a stiffer matrix. Overall, the simultaneous mechanical characterization of the tissues constituents (cells and ECM) provided new support for diagnosis and offered alternative points of analysis for cancer mechanobiology. When the integrity of the mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix is disturbed cancer, along with other diseases, may initiate and progress. Here, we show how a new technique gives the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. It was applied on surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung and a correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Behavioural Phenotype of Smith-Magenis Syndrome: Evidence for a Gene-Environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, L.; Oliver, C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Behaviour problems and a preference for adult contact are reported to be prominent in the phenotype of Smith-Magenis syndrome. In this study we examined the relationship between social interactions and self-injurious and aggressive/disruptive behaviour in Smith-Magenis syndrome to explore potential operant reinforcement of problem…

  13. Current Perspectives on Desmoid Tumors: The Mayo Clinic Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joglekar, Siddharth B.; Rose, Peter S.; Sim, Franklin; Okuno, Scott; Petersen, Ivy

    2011-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are a rare group of locally aggressive, non malignant tumors of fibroblastic origin that can lead to significant morbidity due to local invasion. Despite advances in the understanding of these tumors, their natural history is incompletely understood and the optimal treatment is still a matter of debate. Local control is the main goal of treatment and there has been a change in philosophy regarding the management of these tumors from aggressive surgical resection to function preservation. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to plan local control with acceptable morbidity. The current Mayo Clinic algorithm for the treatment of these tumors is based on institutional experience and the available evidence in the literature: asymptomatic/non progressive lesions away from vital structures are managed with observation and regular imaging; primary or recurrent desmoid tumors which are symptomatic or progressive or near vital structures are managed with wide surgical resection when wide surgical margins are possible with minimal functional and cosmetic loss. When positive or close surgical margins are likely, surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy or definitive radiotherapy is preferred. If likely functional or cosmetic deficit is unacceptable, radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. Unresectable lesions are considered for radiotherapy, chemotherapy or newer modalities however an unresectable lesion associated with a painful, functionless, infected extremity is managed with an amputation

  14. Current Perspectives on Desmoid Tumors: The Mayo Clinic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Okuno

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Desmoid tumors are a rare group of locally aggressive, non malignant tumors of fibroblastic origin that can lead to significant morbidity due to local invasion. Despite advances in the understanding of these tumors, their natural history is incompletely understood and the optimal treatment is still a matter of debate. Local control is the main goal of treatment and there has been a change in philosophy regarding the management of these tumors from aggressive surgical resection to function preservation. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to plan local control with acceptable morbidity. The current Mayo Clinic algorithm for the treatment of these tumors is based on institutional experience and the available evidence in the literature: asymptomatic/non progressive lesions away from vital structures are managed with observation and regular imaging; primary or recurrent desmoid tumors which are symptomatic or progressive or near vital structures are managed with wide surgical resection when wide surgical margins are possible with minimal functional and cosmetic loss. When positive or close surgical margins are likely, surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy or definitive radiotherapy is preferred. If likely functional or cosmetic deficit is unacceptable, radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. Unresectable lesions are considered for radiotherapy, chemotherapy or newer modalities however an unresectable lesion associated with a painful, functionless, infected extremity is managed with an amputation.

  15. Tumor inherent interferons: Impact on immune reactivity and immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockwell, Natasha K; Parker, Belinda S

    2018-04-19

    Immunotherapy has revolutionized cancer treatment, with sustained responses to immune checkpoint inhibitors reported in a number of malignancies. Such therapeutics are now being trialed in aggressive or advanced cancers that are heavily reliant on untargeted therapies, such as triple negative breast cancer. However, responses have been underwhelming to date and are very difficult to predict, leading to an inability to accurately weigh up the benefit-to-risk ratio for their implementation. The tumor immune microenvironment has been closely linked to immunotherapeutic response, with superior responses observed in patients with T cell-inflamed or 'hot' tumors. One class of cytokines, the type I interferons, are a major dictator of tumor immune infiltration and activation. Tumor cell inherent interferon signaling dramatically influences the immune microenvironment and the expression of immune checkpoint proteins, hence regulators and targets of this pathway are candidate biomarkers of immunotherapeutic response. In support of a link between IFN signaling and immunotherapeutic response, the combination of type I interferon inducers with checkpoint immunotherapy has recently been demonstrated critical for a sustained anti-tumor response in aggressive breast cancer models. Here we review evidence that links type I interferons with a hot tumor immune microenvironment, response to checkpoint inhibitors and reduced risk of metastasis that supports their use as biomarkers and therapeutics in oncology. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Hyperpolarized 13C MR Markers of Renal Tumor Aggressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    production in the presence of oxygen (11, 12). Increased glycolysis facilitates the uptake and incorporation of nutrients and biomass needed for cell... shell coil; (d) Hyperpolarized lactate images overlaid on T2 weighted anatomical images, clearly depicting the tumor voxels (Figure 5). As shown in

  17. Drivers’ Age, Gender, Driving Experience, and Aggressiveness as Predictors of Aggressive Driving Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perepjolkina Viktorija

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen a growing interest in the problem of aggressive driving. In the presentstudy two demographic variables (gender and age, two non-psychological driving-experiencerelated variables (annual mileage and legal driving experience in years and aggressiveness asa personality trait (including behavioural and affective components as psychological variableof individual differences were examined as potential predictors of aggressive driving. The aimof the study was to find out the best predictors of aggressive driving behaviour. The study wasbased on an online survey, and 228 vehicle drivers in Latvia participated in it. The questionnaireincluded eight-item Aggressive Driving Scale (Bone & Mowen, 2006, short Latvian versionof the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (AQ; Buss & Perry, 1992, and questions gainingdemographic and driving experience information. Gender, age and annual mileage predictedaggressive driving: being male, young and with higher annual driving exposure were associatedwith higher scores on aggressive driving. Dispositional aggressiveness due to anger componentwas a significant predictor of aggressive diving score. Physical aggression and hostility wereunrelated to aggressive driving. Altogether, the predictors explained a total of 28% of thevariance in aggressive driving behaviour. Findings show that dispositional aggressiveness,especially the anger component, as well as male gender, young age and higher annual mileagehas a predictive validity in relation to aggressive driving. There is a need to extend the scope ofpotential dispositional predictors pertinent to driving aggression.

  18. Intra-abdominal desmoplastic small cell tumor in a girl : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Seok

    1998-01-01

    Desmoplastic small cell tumor is a rare primary intra-abdominal disease with a predilection for the adolescent boy. This aggressive tumor involved multiple intraperitoneal organs, peritoneal, mesentery and omental seedings, and sometimes retroperitoneal extension. The author reports a case of this rare tumor, demonstrated by CT, MRI and US, in a 14-year-old girl. (author). 9 refs., 2 figs

  19. Aggressive behavior and anaplasia in pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma: a plea for a revision of the current WHO classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahramancetin, Nesibe; Tihan, Tarik

    2013-11-01

    Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) is a rare astrocytic neoplasm that commonly affects children and young adults, and presents with seizures. PXA is typically supratentorial with a predilection to the temporal lobe, and often involves the cortex and the meninges. PXAs have a favorable prognosis with a 10-year survival probability of >70%, and are WHO grade II neoplasms. Recent observations and studies demonstrate that PXAs are clinically, histologically and genetically distinct. Some PXAs recur and exhibit aggressive clinical behavior. In such cases, certain histological and clinical factors could account for the aggressive behavior. However, the histological features that predict adverse outcome are poorly defined. In the current WHO classification of CNS tumors, there is no option for a high-grade PXA, even if the tumor had numerous recurrences and poor outcome. In this review, we focus on aggressive clinical behavior and anaplasia in PXA, and discuss how our current experience suggests modifications in the current WHO classification. We also review recent discoveries on the molecular characteristics of PXA that could help us better understand their biological behavior.

  20. Differential expression of metabolic genes in tumor and stromal components of primary and metastatic loci in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina V Chaika

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States with a five-year survival rate of 6%. It is characterized by extremely aggressive tumor growth rate and high incidence of metastasis. One of the most common and profound biochemical phenotypes of animal and human cancer cells is their ability to metabolize glucose at high rates, even under aerobic conditions. However, the contribution of metabolic interrelationships between tumor cells and cells of the surrounding microenvironment to the progression of cancer is not well understood. We evaluated differential expression of metabolic genes and, hence, metabolic pathways in primary tumor and metastases of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma.We analyzed the metabolic gene (those involved in glycolysis, tri-carboxylic acid pathway, pentose-phosphate pathway and fatty acid metabolism expression profiles of primary and metastatic lesions from pancreatic cancer patients by gene expression arrays. We observed two principal results: genes that were upregulated in primary and most of the metastatic lesions; and genes that were upregulated only in specific metastatic lesions in a site-specific manner. Immunohistochemical (IHC analyses of several metabolic gene products confirmed the gene expression patterns at the protein level. The IHC analyses also revealed differential tumor and stromal expression patterns of metabolic enzymes that were correlated with the metastasis sites.Here, we present the first comprehensive studies that establish differential metabolic status of tumor and stromal components and elevation of aerobic glycolysis gene expression in pancreatic cancer.

  1. Recent Progress in the Medical Therapy of Pituitary Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Langlois

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Management of pituitary tumors is multidisciplinary, with medical therapy playing an increasingly important role. With the exception of prolactin-secreting tumors, surgery is still considered the first-line treatment for the majority of pituitary adenomas. However, medical/pharmacological therapy plays an important role in controlling hormone-producing pituitary adenomas, especially for patients with acromegaly and Cushing disease (CD. In the case of non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFAs, pharmacological therapy plays a minor role, the main objective of which is to reduce tumor growth, but this role requires further studies. For pituitary carcinomas and atypical adenomas, medical therapy, including chemotherapy, acts as an adjuvant to surgery and radiation therapy, which is often required to control these aggressive tumors. In the last decade, knowledge about the pathophysiological mechanisms of various pituitary adenomas has increased, thus novel medical therapies that target specific pathways implicated in tumor synthesis and hormonal over secretion are now available. Advancement in patient selection and determination of prognostic factors has also helped to individualize therapy for patients with pituitary tumors. Improvements in biochemical and “tumor mass” disease control can positively affect patient quality of life, comorbidities and overall survival. In this review, the medical armamentarium for treating CD, acromegaly, prolactinomas, NFA, and carcinomas/aggressive atypical adenomas will be presented. Pharmacological therapies, including doses, mode of administration, efficacy, adverse effects, and use in special circumstances are provided. Medical therapies currently under clinical investigation are also briefly discussed.

  2. TNF Counterbalances the Emergence of M2 Tumor Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Kratochvill

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer can involve non-resolving, persistent inflammation where varying numbers of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs infiltrate and adopt different activation states between anti-tumor M1 and pro-tumor M2 phenotypes. Here, we resolve a cascade causing differential macrophage phenotypes in the tumor microenvironment. Reduction in TNF mRNA production or loss of type I TNF receptor signaling resulted in a striking pattern of enhanced M2 mRNA expression. M2 gene expression was driven in part by IL-13 from eosinophils co-recruited with inflammatory monocytes, a pathway that was suppressed by TNF. Our data define regulatory nodes within the tumor microenvironment that balance M1 and M2 populations. Our results show macrophage polarization in cancer is dynamic and dependent on the balance between TNF and IL-13, thus providing a strategy for manipulating TAMs.

  3. Treatment of nasopharyngeal tumors: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, G.; Dessard-Diana, B.; Vignot, S.; Mazeron, J.J.; Noel, G.; Mazeron, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The conventional radiotherapy and the associated treatments improved the prognostic of nasopharyngeal cancer. A better selection of the patients who must have a more aggressive treatment also probably contributed to this improvement. Even if a relation could be found between the locoregional relapse rate and the distant relapse rate, these two events remain often independent. It results from it that the improvement of local control rate necessarily does not result in a better control of the disease. The patients with a locally advanced tumor, with or not an invasion of the base of the skull and/or neurological symptoms, must have an aggressive locally treatment. This probably includes the increase in dose delivered to the tumor via a more conformational radiotherapy, a brachytherapy, radiotherapy in stereotaxic conditions or other techniques. Dose within the tumor must be at least 70 Gy and the prophylactic nodal dose, at least 50 Gy. CT scan and MRI are essential for delineating the volumes of interest. The protocols of hyperfractionated radiotherapy did not give convincing results. Association with chemotherapy allowed, on the other hand, an improvement of the prognostic locally advanced cancers. Neo-adjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy was largely used to attempt to limit the risks of systemic dissemination, but an improvement of results was not clearly demonstrated. An improvement of the rates of survival and control of the disease, on the other hand, was observed in a certain number of studies with the chemoradiotherapy. In the event of locoregional relapse, an aggressive attitude can allow the control of the disease in the absence of systemic dissemination. Salvage treatments are, however, disappointing for when distant relapse occurs which suggests. (author)

  4. Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor: an unusual presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandhi, Chirag D.; Krieger, Mark D.; McComb, J. Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Atypical teratoid/ rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) of the central nervous system is a rare, highly aggressive malignancy of infancy. Although it is reported infrequently in the literature, it has often been histologically confused with a primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET)/medulloblastoma (MB) but has a much worse prognosis. We present an infant with two AT/RT tumors, one suprasellar in location and the other within the vermis without evidence of tumor elsewhere. What makes this case unusual is that there were two separate lesions in different cranial compartments, with no evidence of subarachnoid seeding. In addition, the lesions had different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics even though they were histologically the same. (orig.)

  5. CD133 expression is not restricted to stem cells, and both CD133+ and CD133– metastatic colon cancer cells initiate tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmelkov, Sergey V.; Butler, Jason M.; Hooper, Andrea T.; Hormigo, Adilia; Kushner, Jared; Milde, Till; St. Clair, Ryan; Baljevic, Muhamed; White, Ian; Jin, David K.; Chadburn, Amy; Murphy, Andrew J.; Valenzuela, David M.; Gale, Nicholas W.; Thurston, Gavin; Yancopoulos, George D.; D’Angelica, Michael; Kemeny, Nancy; Lyden, David; Rafii, Shahin

    2008-01-01

    Colon cancer stem cells are believed to originate from a rare population of putative CD133+ intestinal stem cells. Recent publications suggest that a small subset of colon cancer cells expresses CD133, and that only these CD133+ cancer cells are capable of tumor initiation. However, the precise contribution of CD133+ tumor-initiating cells in mediating colon cancer metastasis remains unknown. Therefore, to temporally and spatially track the expression of CD133 in adult mice and during tumorigenesis, we generated a knockin lacZ reporter mouse (CD133lacZ/+), in which the expression of lacZ is driven by the endogenous CD133 promoters. Using this model and immunostaining, we discovered that CD133 expression in colon is not restricted to stem cells; on the contrary, CD133 is ubiquitously expressed on differentiated colonic epithelium in both adult mice and humans. Using Il10–/–CD133lacZ mice, in which chronic inflammation in colon leads to adenocarcinomas, we demonstrated that CD133 is expressed on a full gamut of colonic tumor cells, which express epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). Similarly, CD133 is widely expressed by human primary colon cancer epithelial cells, whereas the CD133– population is composed mostly of stromal and inflammatory cells. Conversely, CD133 expression does not identify the entire population of epithelial and tumor-initiating cells in human metastatic colon cancer. Indeed, both CD133+ and CD133– metastatic tumor subpopulations formed colonospheres in in vitro cultures and were capable of long-term tumorigenesis in a NOD/SCID serial xenotransplantation model. Moreover, metastatic CD133– cells form more aggressive tumors and express typical phenotypic markers of cancer-initiating cells, including CD44 (CD44+CD24–), whereas the CD133+ fraction is composed of CD44lowCD24+ cells. Collectively, our data suggest that CD133 expression is not restricted to intestinal stem or cancer-initiating cells, and during the metastatic

  6. VEGFR-1 Overexpression Identifies a Small Subgroup of Aggressive Prostate Cancers in Patients Treated by Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Christina Tsourlakis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The VEGFR-1 is suggested to promote tumor progression. In the current study we analyzed prevalence and prognostic impact of the VEGFR-1 by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing more than 3000 prostate cancer specimens. Results were compared to tumor phenotype, ETS-related gene (ERG status, and biochemical recurrence. Membranous VEGFR-1 expression was detectable in 32.6% of 2669 interpretable cancers and considered strong in 1.7%, moderate in 6.7% and weak in 24.2% of cases. Strong VEGFR-1 expression was associated with TMPRSS2:ERG fusion status as determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and immunohistochemistry (p < 0.0001 each. Elevated VEGFR-1 expression was linked to high Gleason grade and advanced pT stage in TMPRSS2:ERG negative cancers (p = 0.0008 and p = 0.001, while these associations were absent in TMPRSS2:ERG positive cancers. VEGFR-1 expression was also linked to phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN deletions. A comparison with prostate specific antigen (PSA recurrence revealed that the 1.7% of prostate cancers with the highest VEGFR-1 levels had a strikingly unfavorable prognosis. This could be seen in all cancers, in the subsets of TMPRSS2:ERG positive or negative, PTEN deleted or undeleted carcinomas (p < 0.0001 each. High level VEGFR-1 expression is infrequent in prostate cancer, but identifies a subgroup of aggressive cancers, which may be candidates for anti-VEGFR-1 targeted therapy.

  7. Induction of erythropoiesis by hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors without promotion of tumor initiation, progression, or metastasis in a VEGF-sensitive model of spontaneous breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seeley TW

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Todd W Seeley, Mark D Sternlicht, Stephen J Klaus, Thomas B Neff, David Y Liu Therapeutics R&D, FibroGen, Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA Abstract: The effects of pharmacological hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF stabilization were investigated in the MMTV-Neundl-YD5 (NeuYD mouse model of breast cancer. This study first confirmed the sensitivity of this model to increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, using bigenic NeuYD;MMTV-VEGF-25 mice. Tumor initiation was dramatically accelerated in bigenic animals. Bigenic tumors were also more aggressive, with shortened doubling times and increased lung metastasis as compared to NeuYD controls. In separate studies, NeuYD mice were treated three times weekly from 7 weeks of age until study end with two different HIF prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors (HIF-PHIs, FG-4497 or roxadustat (FG-4592. In NeuYD mice, HIF-PHI treatments elevated erythropoiesis markers, but no differences were detected in tumor onset or the phenotypes of established tumors. Keywords: cancer progression, erythropoiesis, hypoxia-inducible factor, hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors, vascular endothelial growth factor, MMTV-Neu breast cancer model

  8. Targeted nanodiamonds as phenotype-specific photoacoustic contrast agents for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ti; Cui, Huizhong; Fang, Chia-Yi; Cheng, Kun; Yang, Xinmai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Forrest, M Laird

    2015-03-01

    The aim is to develop irradiated nanodiamonds (INDs) as a molecularly targeted contrast agent for high-resolution and phenotype-specific detection of breast cancer with photoacoustic (PA) imaging. The surface of acid treated radiation-damaged nanodiamonds was grafted with PEG to improve its stability and circulation time in blood, followed by conjugation to an anti-HER2 peptide with a final nanoparticle size of approximately 92 nm. Immunocompetent mice bearing orthotopic HER2-positive or negative tumors were administered INDs and PA imaged using an 820-nm near-infrared laser. PA images demonstrated that INDs accumulate in tumors and completely delineated the entire tumor within 10 h. HER2 targeting significantly enhanced imaging of HER2-positive tumors. Pathological examination demonstrated INDs are nontoxic. PA technology is adaptable to low-cost bedside medicine, and with new contrast agents described herein, PA can achieve high-resolution (sub-mm) and phenotype-specific monitoring of cancer growth.

  9. The therapeutic implications of plasticity of the cancer stem cell phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Leder

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell hypothesis suggests that tumors contain a small population of cancer cells that have the ability to undergo symmetric self-renewing cell division. In tumors that follow this model, cancer stem cells produce various kinds of specified precursors that divide a limited number of times before terminally differentiating or undergoing apoptosis. As cells within the tumor mature, they become progressively more restricted in the cell types to which they can give rise. However, in some tumor types, the presence of certain extra- or intracellular signals can induce committed cancer progenitors to revert to a multipotential cancer stem cell state. In this paper, we design a novel mathematical model to investigate the dynamics of tumor progression in such situations, and study the implications of a reversible cancer stem cell phenotype for therapeutic interventions. We find that higher levels of dedifferentiation substantially reduce the effectiveness of therapy directed at cancer stem cells by leading to higher rates of resistance. We conclude that plasticity of the cancer stem cell phenotype is an important determinant of the prognosis of tumors. This model represents the first mathematical investigation of this tumor trait and contributes to a quantitative understanding of cancer.

  10. Desmoplastic Tumor Microenvironment and Immunotherapy in Cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Dan; Lewinska, Monika; Andersen, Jesper B

    2018-01-01

    connective tissue which surrounds and infiltrates the tumor epithelium. This desmoplastic environment presents a clinical challenge, limiting drug delivery and supporting the growth of the tumor mass. In this review we attempt to highlight key pathways involved in cell to cell communication between the tumor......Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a dismal disease which often is diagnosed at a late stage where the tumor is locally advanced, metastatic, and, as a result, is associated with low resectability. The heterogeneity of this cancer type is a major reason why the majority of patients fail to respond...... to therapy, and surgery remains their only curative option. Among patients who undergo surgical intervention, such tumors typically recur in 50% of cases within 1year. Thus, CCA is among the most aggressive and chemoresistant malignancies. CCA is characterized by marked tumor reactive stroma, a fibrogenic...

  11. Pathways to romantic relational aggression through adolescent peer aggression and heavy episodic drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodin, Erica M; Sukhawathanakul, Paweena; Caldeira, Valerie; Homel, Jacqueline; Leadbeater, Bonnie

    2016-11-01

    Adolescent peer aggression is a well-established correlate of romantic relational aggression; however, the mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. Heavy episodic drinking (or "binge" alcohol use) was examined as both a prior and concurrent mediator of this link in a sample of 282 12-18 year old interviewed four times over 6 years. Path analyses indicated that early peer relational and physical aggression each uniquely predicted later romantic relational aggression. Concurrent heavy episodic drinking fully mediated this effect for peer physical aggression only. These findings highlight two important mechanisms by which peer aggression may increase the risk of later romantic relational aggression: a direct pathway from peer relational aggression to romantic relational aggression and an indirect pathway through peer physical aggression and concurrent heavy episodic drinking. Prevention programs targeting romantic relational aggression in adolescence and young adulthood may benefit from interventions that target multiple domains of risky behavior, including the heavy concurrent use of alcohol. Aggr. Behav. 42:563-576, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase β (LPAATβ promotes the tumor growth of human osteosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farbod Rastegar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of bone with poorly characterized molecular pathways important in its pathogenesis. Increasing evidence indicates that elevated lipid biosynthesis is a characteristic feature of cancer. We sought to investigate the role of lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase β (LPAATβ, aka, AGPAT2 in regulating the proliferation and growth of human osteosarcoma cells. LPAATβ can generate phosphatidic acid, which plays a key role in lipid biosynthesis as well as in cell proliferation and survival. Although elevated expression of LPAATβ has been reported in several types of human tumors, the role of LPAATβ in osteosarcoma progression has yet to be elucidated.Endogenous expression of LPAATβ in osteosarcoma cell lines is analyzed by using semi-quantitative PCR and immunohistochemical staining. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of LPAATβ and silencing LPAATβ expression is employed to determine the effect of LPAATβ on osteosarcoma cell proliferation and migration in vitro and osteosarcoma tumor growth in vivo. We have found that expression of LPAATβ is readily detected in 8 of the 10 analyzed human osteosarcoma lines. Exogenous expression of LPAATβ promotes osteosarcoma cell proliferation and migration, while silencing LPAATβ expression inhibits these cellular characteristics. We further demonstrate that exogenous expression of LPAATβ effectively promotes tumor growth, while knockdown of LPAATβ expression inhibits tumor growth in an orthotopic xenograft model of human osteosarcoma.Our results strongly suggest that LPAATβ expression may be associated with the aggressive phenotypes of human osteosarcoma and that LPAATβ may play an important role in regulating osteosarcoma cell proliferation and tumor growth. Thus, targeting LPAATβ may be exploited as a novel therapeutic strategy for the clinical management of osteosarcoma. This is especially attractive given the availability of selective

  13. Relational Aggression and Physical Aggression among Adolescent Cook Islands Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Angela; Smith, Lisa F.

    2016-01-01

    Both physical and relational aggression are characterised by the intent to harm another. Physical aggression includes direct behaviours such as hitting or kicking; relational aggression involves behaviours designed to damage relationships, such as excluding others, spreading rumours, and delivering threats and verbal abuse. This study extended…

  14. Clear cell carcinoma of the ovary mimicking struma ovarii and carcinoid tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alduaij, Ahmad; Quddus, M Ruhul

    2011-04-01

    Clear cell carcinomas are considered as high-grade tumor often with poor prognosis. We describe 2 cases of clear cell carcinomas of the ovary mimicking benign or less aggressive tumors encountered in the female genital track. The first case is mimicking a benign monodermal teratoma, the so-called struma ovarii, and the second mimicking a carcinoid tumor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Longitudinal Relations between Beliefs Supporting Aggression,Anger Regulation, and Dating Aggression among Early Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Terri N; Garthe, Rachel C; Goncy, Elizabeth A; Carlson, Megan M; Behrhorst, Kathryn L

    2017-05-01

    Dating aggression occurs frequently in early to mid-adolescence and has negative repercussions for psychosocial adjustment and physical health. The patterns of behavior learned during this developmental timeframe may persist in future dating relationships, underscoring the need to identify risk factors for this outcome. The current study examined longitudinal relations between beliefs supporting aggression, anger regulation, and dating aggression. Participants were 176 middle school students in sixth, seventh, and eighth grade (50 % female; 82 % African American). No direct effects were found between beliefs supporting reactive or proactive aggression and dating aggression. Beliefs supporting reactive aggression predicted increased rates of anger dysregulation, and beliefs supporting proactive aggression led to subsequent increases in anger inhibition. Anger dysregulation and inhibition were associated with higher frequencies of dating aggression. An indirect effect was found for the relation between beliefs supporting reactive aggression and dating aggression via anger dysregulation. Another indirect effect emerged for the relation between beliefs supporting proactive aggression and dating aggression through anger inhibition. The study's findings suggested that beliefs supporting proactive and reactive aggression were differentially related to emotion regulation processes, and identified anger dysregulation and inhibition as risk factors for dating aggression among adolescents.

  16. Parents' Aggressive Influences and Children's Aggressive Problem Solutions with Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Sarah; Margolin, Gayla

    2007-01-01

    This study examined children's aggressive and assertive solutions to hypothetical peer scenarios in relation to parents' responses to similar hypothetical social scenarios and parents' actual marital aggression. The study included 118 children ages 9 to 10 years old and their mothers and fathers. Children's aggressive solutions correlated with…

  17. Podocalyxin expression in malignant astrocytic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayatsu, Norihito; Kaneko, Mika Kato; Mishima, Kazuhiko; Nishikawa, Ryo; Matsutani, Masao; Price, Janet E.; Kato, Yukinari

    2008-01-01

    Podocalyxin is an anti-adhesive mucin-like transmembrane sialoglycoprotein that has been implicated in the development of aggressive forms of cancer. Podocalyxin is also known as keratan sulfate (KS) proteoglycan. Recently, we revealed that highly sulfated KS or another mucin-like transmembrane sialoglycoprotein podoplanin/aggrus is upregulated in malignant astrocytic tumors. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between podocalyxin expression and malignant progression of astrocytic tumors. In this study, 51 astrocytic tumors were investigated for podocalyxin expression using immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and quantitative real-time PCR. Immunohistochemistry detected podocalyxin on the surface of tumor cells in six of 14 anaplastic astrocytomas (42.9%) and in 17 of 31 glioblastomas (54.8%), especially around proliferating endothelial cells. In diffuse astrocytoma, podocalyxin expression was observed only in vascular endothelial cells. Podocalyxin might be associated with the malignant progression of astrocytic tumors, and be a useful prognostic marker for astrocytic tumors

  18. "Mixed germ cell testicular tumor" in an adult female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udasimath Shivakumarswamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The androgen insensitivity (testicular feminization syndrome was described by Morris in phenotypic females with 46XY karyotype, presenting with primary amenorrhea, adequate breast development, and absent or scanty pubic or axillary hair. Gonads consist usually of seminiferous tubules without spermatogenesis. These patients have a 5-10% risk of developing germ cell tumors, usually after the complete development of secondary female sexual characteristics. We hereby report a case considered as a female with married life of 15 years, who was operated for severe abdominal pain. Phenotype characters were that of female. Microscopic examination of the tumor from the abdomen revealed germinoma and yolk sac tumor with adjacent seminiferous tubules. Karyotyping showed 46XY. Final diagnosis of malignant mixed germ cell tumor in androgen insensitivity syndrome was made. Surveillance may be the most appropriate option when these conditions are initially diagnosed in adulthood to prevent development of germ cell tumors.

  19. Iron Handling in Tumor-Associated Macrophages—Is There a New Role for Lipocalin-2?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Jung

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis is a multistep process. Besides somatic mutations in tumor cells, stroma-associated immunity is a major regulator of tumor growth. Tumor cells produce and secrete diverse mediators to create a local microenvironment that supports their own survival and growth. It is becoming apparent that iron acquisition, storage, and release in tumor cells is different from healthy counterparts. It is also appreciated that macrophages in the tumor microenvironment acquire a tumor-supportive, anti-inflammatory phenotype that promotes tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Apparently, this behavior is attributed, at least in part, to the ability of macrophages to support tumor cells with iron. Polarization of macrophages by apoptotic tumor cells shifts the profile of genes involved in iron metabolism from an iron sequestering to an iron-release phenotype. Iron release from macrophages is supposed to be facilitated by ferroportin. However, lipid mediators such as sphingosine-1-phosphate, released form apoptotic tumor cells, upregulate lipocalin-2 (Lcn-2 in macrophages. This protein is known to bind siderophore-complexed iron and thus, may participate in iron transport in the tumor microenvironment. We describe how macrophages handle iron in the tumor microenvironment, discuss the relevance of an iron-release macrophage phenotype for tumor progression, and propose a new role for Lcn-2 in tumor-associated macrophages.

  20. Aggressive angiomyxoma of the vulva in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Pahwa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive angiomyxoma is a rare, slow-growing mesenchymal neoplasm with a tendency to recur. It mainly involves the pelvis, vulva, perineum, vagina, and urinary bladder in adult women of reproductive age group. We describe a 26-year-old female with large swellings of both labia majora which was histologically diagnosed as aggressive angiomyxoma. She also had systemic lupus erythematosus. The swelling was surgically removed and she had no recurrence at 1-year follow-up. Although it is a rare tumor, it must be considered as a differential diagnosis for any mass in the perineum or soft tissue of the pelvis. Long-term follow-up is necessary for early diagnosis of local recurrence.

  1. Exogenous incorporation of neugc-rich mucin augments n-glycolyl sialic acid content and promotes malignant phenotype in mouse tumor cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso Daniel F

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbohydrates embedded in the plasma membrane are one of the main actors involved in the communication of cells with the microenvironment. Neuraminic sialic acids are glycocalyx sugars that play important roles in the modulation of malignant cell behaviour. N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NeuGc is synthesized by the cytidine monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase (CMAH, an enzyme expressed in all mammals except humans. In mice, this sugar is synthesized in several somatic tissues. Methods We used the B16 melanoma and F3II mammary carcinoma mouse tumor cell lines. By CMAH directed RT-PCR and NeuGc detection with the specific anti-NeuGc-GM3 antibody 14F7 we evaluated enzyme and ganglioside expression in tumor cells, respectively. Expression of NeuGc-GM3 ganglioside was reached by in vitro incubation with NeuGc-rich bovine submaxillary mucin and evaluated by slot-blot and immunohistochemistry assays using the 14F7 antibody. Tumor cells treated with mucin or purified NeuGc were injected s.c. and i.v. in syngeneic mice to evaluate tumor and metastatic growth. Results In the present work we demonstrated the absence of expression of CMAH enzyme in B16 melanoma and F3II mammary carcinoma cells. In vitro incubation of these NeuGc-negative cells with NeuGc-rich mucin increased the presence of NeuGc in cell membranes for at least 48-72 h, as a component of the GM3 ganglioside. Preincubation with NeuGc-rich mucin reduced tumor latency and increased the metastatic potential of tumor cells in syngeneic animals. Similar results were obtained when cells were incubated with purified NeuGc alone. Conclusion Our results indicate that B16 and F3II mouse tumor cell lines do not express NeuGc in cell membranes but they are able to incorporate NeuGc from an exogenous source, contributing to the malignant phenotype of melanoma and mammary carcinoma cells.

  2. Phenotypes selected during chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Mandsberg, Lotte F; Wang, Hengzhuang

    2012-01-01

    During chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can survive for long periods of time under the challenging selective pressure imposed by the immune system and antibiotic treatment as a result of its biofilm mode of growth and adaptive evolution mediated by g...... the importance of biofilm prevention strategies by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy before phenotypic diversification during chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis....

  3. Fractional laser exposure induces neutrophil infiltration (N1 phenotype into the tumor and stimulates systemic anti-tumor immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi Kawakubo

    Full Text Available Ablative fractional photothermolysis (aFP using a CO2 laser generates multiple small diameter tissue lesions within the irradiation field. aFP is commonly used for a wide variety of dermatological indications, including treatment of photodamaged skin and dyschromia, drug delivery and modification of scars due to acne, surgical procedures and burns. In this study we explore the utility of aFP for treating oncological indications, including induction of local tumor regression and inducing anti-tumor immunity, which is in marked contrast to current indications of aFP.We used a fractional CO2 laser to treat a tumor established by BALB/c colon carcinoma cell line (CT26.CL25, which expressed a tumor antigen, beta-galactosidase (beta-gal. aFP treated tumors grew significantly slower as compared to untreated controls. Complete remission after a single aFP treatment was observed in 47% of the mice. All survival mice from the tumor inoculation rejected re-inoculation of the CT26.CL25 colon carcinoma cells and moreover 80% of the survival mice rejected CT26 wild type colon carcinoma cells, which are parental cells of CT26.CL25 cells. Histologic section of the FP-treated tumors showed infiltrating neutrophil in the tumor early after aFP treatment. Flow cytometric analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes showed aFP treatment abrogated the increase in regulatory T lymphocyte (Treg, which suppresses anti-tumor immunity and elicited the expansion of epitope-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes, which were required to mediate the tumor-suppressing effect of aFP.We have demonstrated that aFP is able to induce a systemic anti-tumor adaptive immunity preventing tumor recurrence in a murine colon carcinoma in a mouse model. This study demonstrates a potential role of aFP treatments in oncology and further studies should be performed.

  4. Circulating tumor cells: utopia or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Condelli, Valentina; Troiani, Laura; Aieta, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be considered a sign of tumor aggressiveness, but highly sensitive and specific methods of CTC detection are necessary owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs in peripheral blood. This review summarizes recent studies on tumor biology, with particular attention to the metastatic cascade, and the molecular characterization and clinical significance of CTCs. Recent technological approaches to enrich and detect these cells and challenges of CTCs for individualized cancer treatment are also discussed. This review also provides an insight into the positive and negative features of the future potential applications of CTC detection, which sometimes remains still a 'utopia', but its actual utility remains among the fastest growing research fields in oncology.

  5. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor with clear cell changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeta Mohanty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT has a limited biological profile and been an attention-grabbing tumor for a century for its origin. Though described earlier, it was widely accepted after Harbitz from Norway reported about this uncommon benign tumor in 1915. There has been a long debate as whether this tumor is a hamartoma or a neoplasm. Here, we present a case of AOT in a 20-year-old female with details of clinical, radiological and histological features along with clear cell changes, signifying AOT to be more aggressive in nature than assessed from earlier literature. Thus, we did an extensive search of PubMed literature on AOT with all its histopathological features associated until date to find the report of clear cell changes yet.

  6. The influence of classroom aggression and classroom climate on aggressive-disruptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Duane E; Bierman, Karen L; Powers, C J

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that early classroom experiences influence the socialization of aggression. Tracking changes in the aggressive behavior of 4,179 children from kindergarten to second-grade (ages 5-8), this study examined the impact of 2 important features of the classroom context--aggregate peer aggression and climates characterized by supportive teacher-student interactions. The aggregate aggression scores of children assigned to first-grade classrooms predicted the level of classroom aggression (assessed by teacher ratings) and quality of classroom climate (assessed by observers) that emerged by the end of Grade 1. Hierarchical linear model analyses revealed that first-grade classroom aggression and quality of classroom climate made independent contributions to changes in student aggression, as students moved from kindergarten to second grade. Implications for policy and practice are discussed. © 2011 The Authors. Child Development © 2011 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  7. Kidney cancer progression linked to shifts in tumor metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators in The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network have uncovered a connection between how tumor cells use energy from metabolic processes and the aggressiveness of the most common form of kidney cancer, clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

  8. Intra- Versus Intersex Aggression: Testing Theories of Sex Differences Using Aggression Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfer, Ralf; Hewstone, Miles

    2015-08-01

    Two theories offer competing explanations of sex differences in aggressive behavior: sexual-selection theory and social-role theory. While each theory has specific strengths and limitations depending on the victim's sex, research hardly differentiates between intrasex and intersex aggression. In the present study, 11,307 students (mean age = 14.96 years; 50% girls, 50% boys) from 597 school classes provided social-network data (aggression and friendship networks) as well as physical (body mass index) and psychosocial (gender and masculinity norms) information. Aggression networks were used to disentangle intra- and intersex aggression, whereas their class-aggregated sex differences were analyzed using contextual predictors derived from sexual-selection and social-role theories. As expected, results revealed that sexual-selection theory predicted male-biased sex differences in intrasex aggression, whereas social-role theory predicted male-biased sex differences in intersex aggression. Findings suggest the value of explaining sex differences separately for intra- and intersex aggression with a dual-theory framework covering both evolutionary and normative components. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Relationship between boys' normative beliefs about aggression and their physical, verbal, and indirect aggressive behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Si Huan; Ang, Rebecca P

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the contribution of general normative beliefs about aggression and specific normative beliefs about retaliatory aggression in predicting physical, verbal, and indirect aggressive behaviors. Two hundred and forty-nine Grade 4 and Grade 5 boys completed the Normative Beliefs about Aggression Scale (NOBAGS) and provided self-reports on the frequency of their physical, verbal, and indirect aggressive behaviors. A series of hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that general normative beliefs about aggression contributed significantly in predicting all three types of aggressive behaviors. When general normative beliefs about aggression were controlled for, specific normative beliefs about retaliatory aggression against males but not specific normative beliefs about retaliatory aggression against females, contributed significantly to predict physical, verbal, and indirect aggressive behaviors. Implications for intervention programs are discussed.

  10. Specific features of Brodie’s tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Denchik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brodie’s tumors are comparatively rare in oncological care and difficult-to-diagnose masses with an unpredictable course, predilection for recurrences, and a high probability of malignization. These tumors have a two-component structure with the predominant develop- ment of a connective tissue component that is absolute in sarcomas and, in a group of fibroepithelial tumors, combines with the parallel development of epithelial tissue.The etiology of Brodie’s tumor is unclear, so is its pathogenesis. Molecular genetic studies have shown that the carriers of germ line missence-mutation R1699W in the BRCA1 gene have an increased risk of developing malignant Brodie’s tumor, but allele losses at the D22S264 locus of the TP5 gene determine the progression of the disease. Deletion of the short-arm of chromosome 1 (1p and allelic imbalance are associated with the more aggressive course and recurrences of Brodie’s tumor.A complex clinicomorphological and molecular genetic study will help answer some questions concerning the diagnosis and treatment of Brodie’s tumors.

  11. Hearing regulates Drosophila aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteven, Marijke; Vanden Broeck, Lies; Geurten, Bart; Zwarts, Liesbeth; Decraecker, Lisse; Beelen, Melissa; Göpfert, Martin C; Heinrich, Ralf; Callaerts, Patrick

    2017-02-21

    Aggression is a universal social behavior important for the acquisition of food, mates, territory, and social status. Aggression in Drosophila is context-dependent and can thus be expected to involve inputs from multiple sensory modalities. Here, we use mechanical disruption and genetic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster to identify hearing as an important sensory modality in the context of intermale aggressive behavior. We demonstrate that neuronal silencing and targeted knockdown of hearing genes in the fly's auditory organ elicit abnormal aggression. Further, we show that exposure to courtship or aggression song has opposite effects on aggression. Our data define the importance of hearing in the control of Drosophila intermale aggression and open perspectives to decipher how hearing and other sensory modalities are integrated at the neural circuit level.

  12. Wilms tumor in adult: case report; Tumor de Wilms em adulto: relato de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque, Mauro Guimaraes; Vieira, Sabas Carlos; Rego, Cristiane Fortes Napoleao do [Universidade Estadual do Piaui (UESPI), Teresina, PI (Brazil); Fortes, Emanuel Augusto de C.; Santana, Gerusia Ibiapina [Hospital Sao Marcos, Teresina, PI (Brazil)]. E-mail: sabasvieira@uol.com.br

    2004-07-01

    Wilms' tumor is the renal tumor with the higher incidence on the childhood, however it rarely occurs in adults.The incidence in this group is estimated at about 1% of all the cases and they have an obscure prognosis. In this report is related a new case in a 52 years old man presenting intensive abdominal pain associated by weightiness. Abdominal ultrasound revealed expansive and complex lesion with indefinite contour in the left flank. Computed tomography of abdomen demonstrated solid lesion on antero-superior pole of the left kidney invading para-vertebral musculature, peri and para-renal spaces. Total nephrectomy and the histopathologic analysis were realized. A nephroblastoma (Wilms' tumor) in stage II without anaplasia was diagnosed by the anatomopathological studies.Local radiotherapy was applied. Thereafter was diagnosed pulmonary and hepatic metastasis, and then initiated the chemotherapy with adriamycin, actinomycin and vincristine. The prognosis of Wilms' tumor is worse in adult and it requires an aggressive therapeutic and follow up. (author)

  13. Adult Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma Mimicking a Cortical Brain Tumor: MR Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jong Chang; Weon, Young Cheol; Suh, Jae Hee; Kim, Young; Hwang, Jae Cheol [Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    A pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) is a recently identified low-grade neoplasm that was previously classified as a pilocytic astrocytoma (PA), yet demonstrates unique histological features and more aggressive behavior. Although a PMA is generally a tumor of early childhood and typically occurs in the hypothalamic/chiasmatic region, it can mimic cortical tumors, especially in adults. We report the MR findings of a PMA presenting as a cortical brain tumor in an adult with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1)

  14. Novel T cells with improved in vivo anti-tumor activity generated by RNA electroporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The generation of T cells with maximal anti-tumor activities will significantly impact the field of T-cell-based adoptive immunotherapy. In this report, we found that OKT3/IL-2-stimulated T cells were phenotypically more heterogeneous, with enhanced anti-tumor activity in vitro and when locally administered in a solid tumor mouse model. To further improve the OKT3/IL-2-based T cell manufacturing procedure, we developed a novel T cell stimulation and expansion method in which peripheral blood mononuclear cells were electroporated with mRNA encoding a chimeric membrane protein consisting of a single-chain variable fragment against CD3 and the intracellular domains of CD28 and 4-1BB (OKT3-28BB. The expanded T cells were phenotypically and functionally similar to T cells expanded by OKT3/IL-2. Moreover, co-electroporation of CD86 and 4-1BBL could further change the phenotype and enhance the in vivo anti-tumor activity. Although T cells expanded by the co-electroporation of OKT3-28BB with CD86 and 4-1BBL showed an increased central memory phenotype, the T cells still maintained tumor lytic activities as potent as those of OKT3/IL-2 or OKT3-28BB-stimulated T cells. In different tumor mouse models, T cells expanded by OKT3-28BB RNA electroporation showed anti-tumor activities superior to those of OKT3/IL-2 T cells. Hence, T cells with both a less differentiated phenotype and potent tumor killing ability can be generated by RNA electroporation, and this T cell manufacturing procedure can be further optimized by simply co-delivering other splices of RNA, thus providing a simple and cost-effective method for generating high-quality T cells for adoptive immunotherapy.

  15. Social Information Processing, Experiences of Aggression in Social Contexts, and Aggressive Behavior in Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Lösel, Friedrich; Bliesener, Thomas; Bender, Doris

    2013-01-01

    This study examines social information processing and experiences of aggression in social contexts as predictors of different forms of aggressive behavior. A sample of 102 boys (aggressive, average, competent, and victimized students) was investigated with a prospective design in Grade 7/8 and again in Grade 9/10. Results show an aggressive-impulsive response repertoire strongly predicted self-reported and teacher-reported physical aggression, verbal aggression, violent offenses, general aggr...

  16. Tumor Heterogeneity and Drug Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucerova, L.; Skolekova, S.; Kozovska, Z.

    2015-01-01

    New generation of sequencing methodologies revealed unexpected complexity and genomic alterations linked with the tumor subtypes. This diversity exists across the tumor types, histologic tumor subtypes and subsets of the tumor cells within the same tumor. This phenomenon is termed tumor heterogeneity. Regardless of its origin and mechanisms of development it has a major impact in the clinical setting. Genetic, phenotypic and expression pattern diversity of tumors plays critical role in the selection of suitable treatment and also in the prognosis prediction. Intratumoral heterogeneity plays a key role in the intrinsic and acquired chemoresistance to cytotoxic and targeted therapies. In this review we focus on the mechanisms of intratumoral and inter tumoral heterogeneity and their relationship to the drug resistance. Understanding of the mechanisms and spatiotemporal dynamics of tumor heterogeneity development before and during the therapy is important for the ability to design individual treatment protocols suitable in the given molecular context. (author)

  17. Implicit cognitive aggression among young male prisoners: Association with dispositional and current aggression.

    OpenAIRE

    Ireland, Jane Louise; Adams, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The current study explores associations between implicit and explicit aggression in young adult male prisoners, seeking to apply the Reflection-Impulsive Model and indicate parity with elements of the General Aggression Model and Social Cognition. Implicit cognitive aggressive processing is not an area that has been examined among prisoners. Two hundred and sixty two prisoners completed an implicit cognitive aggression measure (PUZZLE Test) and explicit aggression measures, covering current b...

  18. Sequence comparison of prefrontal cortical brain transcriptome from a tame and an aggressive silver fox (Vulpes vulpes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Qi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two strains of the silver fox (Vulpes vulpes, with markedly different behavioral phenotypes, have been developed by long-term selection for behavior. Foxes from the tame strain exhibit friendly behavior towards humans, paralleling the sociability of canine puppies, whereas foxes from the aggressive strain are defensive and exhibit aggression to humans. To understand the genetic differences underlying these behavioral phenotypes fox-specific genomic resources are needed. Results cDNA from mRNA from pre-frontal cortex of a tame and an aggressive fox was sequenced using the Roche 454 FLX Titanium platform (> 2.5 million reads & 0.9 Gbase of tame fox sequence; >3.3 million reads & 1.2 Gbase of aggressive fox sequence. Over 80% of the fox reads were assembled into contigs. Mapping fox reads against the fox transcriptome assembly and the dog genome identified over 30,000 high confidence fox-specific SNPs. Fox transcripts for approximately 14,000 genes were identified using SwissProt and the dog RefSeq databases. An at least 2-fold expression difference between the two samples (p Conclusions Transcriptome sequencing significantly expanded genomic resources available for the fox, a species without a sequenced genome. In a very cost efficient manner this yielded a large number of fox-specific SNP markers for genetic studies and provided significant insights into the gene expression profile of the fox pre-frontal cortex; expression differences between the two fox samples; and a catalogue of potentially important gene-specific sequence variants. This result demonstrates the utility of this approach for developing genomic resources in species with limited genomic information.

  19. Sequence comparison of prefrontal cortical brain transcriptome from a tame and an aggressive silver fox (Vulpes vulpes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Two strains of the silver fox (Vulpes vulpes), with markedly different behavioral phenotypes, have been developed by long-term selection for behavior. Foxes from the tame strain exhibit friendly behavior towards humans, paralleling the sociability of canine puppies, whereas foxes from the aggressive strain are defensive and exhibit aggression to humans. To understand the genetic differences underlying these behavioral phenotypes fox-specific genomic resources are needed. Results cDNA from mRNA from pre-frontal cortex of a tame and an aggressive fox was sequenced using the Roche 454 FLX Titanium platform (> 2.5 million reads & 0.9 Gbase of tame fox sequence; >3.3 million reads & 1.2 Gbase of aggressive fox sequence). Over 80% of the fox reads were assembled into contigs. Mapping fox reads against the fox transcriptome assembly and the dog genome identified over 30,000 high confidence fox-specific SNPs. Fox transcripts for approximately 14,000 genes were identified using SwissProt and the dog RefSeq databases. An at least 2-fold expression difference between the two samples (p fox transcriptome. Conclusions Transcriptome sequencing significantly expanded genomic resources available for the fox, a species without a sequenced genome. In a very cost efficient manner this yielded a large number of fox-specific SNP markers for genetic studies and provided significant insights into the gene expression profile of the fox pre-frontal cortex; expression differences between the two fox samples; and a catalogue of potentially important gene-specific sequence variants. This result demonstrates the utility of this approach for developing genomic resources in species with limited genomic information. PMID:21967120

  20. Pulmonary emphysema and tumor microenvironment in primary lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Junichi; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Sano, Fumiho; Hayashi, Masataro; Nishimoto, Arata; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2016-02-01

    To clarify the relationship between the presence of pulmonary emphysema and tumor microenvironment and their significance for the clinicopathologic aggressiveness of non-small cell lung cancer. The subjects included 48 patients with completely resected and pathologically confirmed stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Quantitative computed tomography was used to diagnose pulmonary emphysema, and immunohistochemical staining was performed to evaluate the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression status in the intratumoral stromal cells as well as the microvessel density (MVD). Positive MMP-9 staining in the intratumoral stromal cells was confirmed in 17 (35%) of the 48 tumors. These 17 tumors were associated with a high MVD, frequent lymphovascular invasion, a high proliferative activity, and high postoperative recurrence rate (all, P pulmonary emphysema (P = 0.02). Lung cancers arising from pulmonary emphysema were also associated with a high MVD, proliferative activity, and postoperative recurrence rate (all, P < 0.05). The MMP-9 expression in intratumoral stromal cells is associated with the clinicopathologic aggressiveness of lung cancer and is predominantly identified in tumors arising in emphysematous lungs. Further studies regarding the biological links between the intratumoral and extratumoral microenvironment will help to explain why lung cancers originating in emphysematous lung tissues are associated with a poor prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Loss of Hfe Leads to Progression of Tumor Phenotype in Primary Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnana-Prakasam, Jaya P.; Veeranan-Karmegam, Rajalakshmi; Coothankandaswamy, Veena; Reddy, Sushma K.; Martin, Pamela M.; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Smith, Sylvia B.; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Hemochromatosis is a disorder of iron overload arising mostly from mutations in HFE. HFE is expressed in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and Hfe−/− mice develop age-related iron accumulation and retinal degeneration associated with RPE hyperproliferation. Here, the mechanism underlying the hyperproliferative phenotype in RPE was investigated. Methods. Cellular senescence was monitored by β-galactosidase activity. Gene expression was monitored by real-time PCR. Survivin was analyzed by Western blot and immunofluorescence. Migration and invasion were monitored using appropriate kits. Glucose transporters (GLUTs) were monitored by 3-O-methyl-D-glucose uptake. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) were studied by monitoring catalytic activity and acetylation status of histones H3/H4. Results. Hfe−/− RPE cells exhibited slower senescence rate and higher survivin expression than wild type cells. Hfe−/− cells migrated faster and showed greater glucose uptake and increased expression of GLUTs. The expression of HDACs and DNA methyltransferase (DNMTs) also was increased. Similarly, RPE cells from hemojuvelin (Hjv)-knockout mice, another model of hemochromatosis, also had increased expression of GLUTs, HDACs, and DNMTs. The expression of Slc5a8 was decreased in Hfe−/− RPE cells, but treatment with a DNA methylation inhibitor restored the transporter expression, indicating involvement of DNA methylation in the silencing of Slc5a8 in Hfe−/− cells. Conclusions. RPE cells from iron-overloaded mice exhibit several features of tumor cells: decreased senescence, enhanced migration, increased glucose uptake, and elevated levels of HDACs and DNMTs. These features are seen in Hfe−/− RPE cells as well as in Hjv−/− RPE cells, providing a molecular basis for the hyperproliferative phenotype of Hfe−/− and Hjv−/− RPE cells. PMID:23169885

  2. Patterns of intracranial glioblastoma recurrence after aggressive surgical resection and adjuvant management. Retrospective analysis of 43 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Yoshiyuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Iseki, Hiroshi; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2012-01-01

    The present retrospective study evaluated the recurrence patterns after aggressive surgical removal of intracranial glioblastomas in 43 consecutive adult patients. The resection rate of the enhanced lesion on magnetic resonance imaging was 100% and 95-99% in 22 and 21 cases, respectively. All patients received postoperative fractionated radiotherapy (60 Gy in 30 fractions) with additional chemotherapy (25 cases) or vaccine therapy (18 cases). During follow-up (median 17 months), tumor recurrence was identified in 33 patients, most frequently regional within the wall of the resection cavity (20 cases). No clinical factor differed significantly between the groups of patients with regional or marginal tumor progression (N=22) and patients with distant or multiple recurrences (N=8). Progression-free survival did not differ significantly between these two groups (p=0.27). However, overall survival was significantly longer (p=0.04) in patients with regional or marginal tumor progression, and constituted 90% and 54% at 1 and 2 years after surgery, respectively, compared to 75% and 0% in patients with distant or multiple recurrences. Aggressive surgical resection and adjuvant management of intracranial glioblastoma may change its recurrence pattern. Tumor progression appears in the wall of the resection cavity or within 2 cm from its margin in approximately half of patients. (author)

  3. Media depictions of physical and relational aggression: connections with aggression in young adults' romantic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Sarah M; Nelson, David A; Graham-Kevan, Nicola; Tew, Emily; Meng, K Nathan; Olsen, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Various studies have found that viewing physical or relational aggression in the media can impact subsequent engagement in aggressive behavior. However, this has rarely been examined in the context of relationships. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to examine the connection between viewing various types of aggression in the media and perpetration of aggression against a romantic partner. A total of 369 young adults completed a variety of questionnaires asking for their perpetration of various forms of relationship aggression. Participants' exposure to both physical and relational aggression in the media was also assessed. As a whole, we found a relationship between viewing aggression in the media and perpetration of aggression; however, this depended on the sex of the participant and the type of aggression measured. Specifically, exposure to physical violence in the media was related to engagement in physical aggression against their partner only for men. However, exposure to relational aggression in the media was related to romantic relational aggression for both men and women.

  4. Phenotypic integration and the evolution of signal repertoires: A case study of treefrog acoustic communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Michael S; Höbel, Gerlinde

    2018-03-01

    Animal signals are inherently complex phenotypes with many interacting parts combining to elicit responses from receivers. The pattern of interrelationships between signal components reflects the extent to which each component is expressed, and responds to selection, either in concert with or independently of others. Furthermore, many species have complex repertoires consisting of multiple signal types used in different contexts, and common morphological and physiological constraints may result in interrelationships extending across the multiple signals in species' repertoires. The evolutionary significance of interrelationships between signal traits can be explored within the framework of phenotypic integration, which offers a suite of quantitative techniques to characterize complex phenotypes. In particular, these techniques allow for the assessment of modularity and integration, which describe, respectively, the extent to which sets of traits covary either independently or jointly. Although signal and repertoire complexity are thought to be major drivers of diversification and social evolution, few studies have explicitly measured the phenotypic integration of signals to investigate the evolution of diverse communication systems. We applied methods from phenotypic integration studies to quantify integration in the two primary vocalization types (advertisement and aggressive calls) in the treefrogs Hyla versicolor , Hyla cinerea, and Dendropsophus ebraccatus . We recorded male calls and calculated standardized phenotypic variance-covariance ( P ) matrices for characteristics within and across call types. We found significant integration across call types, but the strength of integration varied by species and corresponded with the acoustic similarity of the call types within each species. H. versicolor had the most modular advertisement and aggressive calls and the least acoustically similar call types. Additionally, P was robust to changing social competition

  5. Macrophage Polarization Contributes to the Anti-Tumoral Efficacy of Mesoporous Nanovectors Loaded with Albumin-Bound Paclitaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fransisca Leonard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Therapies targeted to the immune system, such as immunotherapy, are currently shaping a new, rapidly developing branch of promising cancer treatments, offering the potential to change the prognosis of previously non-responding patients. Macrophages comprise the most abundant population of immune cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME and can undergo differentiation into functional phenotypes depending on the local tissue environment. Based on these functional phenotypes, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs can either aid tumor progression (M2 phenotype or inhibit it (M1 phenotype. Presence of M2 macrophages and a high ratio of M2/M1 macrophages in the TME are clinically associated with poor prognosis in many types of cancers. Herein, we evaluate the effect of macrophage phenotype on the transport and anti-cancer efficacy of albumin-bound paclitaxel (nAb-PTX loaded into porous silicon multistage nanovectors (MSV. Studies in a coculture of breast cancer cells (3D-spheroid with macrophages and in vivo models were conducted to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of MSV-nAb-PTX as a function of macrophage phenotype. Association with MSV increased drug accumulation within the macrophages and the tumor spheroids, shifting the inflammation state of the TME toward the pro-inflammatory, anti-tumorigenic milieu. Additionally, the treatment increased macrophage motility toward cancer cells, promoting the active transport of therapeutic nanovectors into the tumor lesion. Consequently, apoptosis of cancer cells was increased and proliferation decreased in the MSV-nAb-PTX-treated group as compared to controls. The results also confirmed that the tested system shifts the macrophage differentiation toward an M1 phenotype, possessing an anti-proliferative effect toward the breast cancer cells. These factors were further incorporated into a mathematical model to help analyze the synergistic effect of the macrophage polarization state on the efficacy of MSV

  6. The Importance of Clinical and Diagnostic Markers of Aggression of Non-Functional Pituitary Adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.M. Urmanova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sixty patients with non-functional pituitary adenomas were observed. Most patients had large-cell chromophobe pituitary adenomas (81.6%. Small-cell chromophobe adenomas occurred in 10 % cases. Only 1 patient (3.3 % had giant carcinoma with regrowth and metastasis into the brain. Markers of aggression of non-functional pituitary adenomas are the young age of a patient, expressed first symptoms of disease manifestation, large size of tumor, asymmetry and deformation of pituitary, invasion of tumor to the neighboring tissues/arteries/cavernous sinus, presence of small cell and dark-cell chromophobe adenoma, panhypopituitarism.

  7. Aggression and self-esteem

    OpenAIRE

    Fleischmann, Otakar

    2008-01-01

    In the research we focus on problems of self-esteem and aggress. The aim was to discover and describe if by university students an important relation between self-esteem and aggress exists, if there are some differences in self-esteem and aggress between women and men and individuals with pedagogical and non-pedagogical professional polarization. The self-esteem was followed on different levels- general, low, medium and high level as well as aggress levels. Besides general aggress we followed...

  8. Quantitative {sup 18}F-DOPA PET/CT in pheochromocytoma. The relationship between tumor secretion and its biochemical phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amodru, Vincent; Brue, Thierry; Castinetti, Frederic [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Endocrinology, Conception University Hospital, Marseille (France); Guerin, Carole; Sebag, Frederic [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Endocrine Surgery, Conception University Hospital, Marseille (France); Delcourt, Sarkis; Taieb, David [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, La Timone University Hospital, European Center for Research in Medical Imaging, Marseille (France); Romanet, Pauline [Aix-Marseille University, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Conception Hospital and CNRS, CRN2M UMR 7286, Marseille (France); Loundou, Anderson [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Public Health, EA3279 Self-perceived Health Assessment Research Unit, La Timone University, Marseille (France); Viana, Bruna; Pacak, Karel [National Institutes of Health, Section on Medical Neuroendocrinology, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2018-02-15

    {sup 18}F-FDOPA illustrates the properties of uptake and storage of catecholamines in pheochromocytomas (PHEOs). Until now, the relationship between {sup 18}F-FDOPA quantitative parameters and a PHEO secretory profile has not been specifically evaluated. Fifty-six patients (56% females, median age: 47.5 yrs) with non-metastatic PHEO, evaluated by {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT, were included in this retrospective study. Forty-five patients had negative genetic testing (80.4%); five patients (8.9%) had RET, two patients (3.6%) had SDHB, two had SDHD (3.6%), one patient (1.8%) had NF1, and one patient had a VHL (1.8%) mutation. Correlation between {sup 18}F-FDOPA metabolic parameters (tumor SUVmax, tumor SUVmean, tumor SUVmax/liver SUVmax, MTV 42%, total lesion uptake), urinary metanephrines (MNs), and plasma chromogranin A (CgA) were evaluated. All patients had positive {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT. On univariate analysis, there was a strong correlation between all metabolic parameters and urinary MNs and plasma chromogranin A (CgA). The highest correlations were observed between total lesion (TL) uptake and the value of urinary MNs regardless of their nature (p = 8.10{sup -15} and r = 0.80) and between MTV 42% and plasma CgA levels (p = 2.10{sup -9}, r = 0.74). On multivariate analysis, the correlation of uptake parameters and CgA levels did not persist further due to the relation of CgA and tumor diameter. A correlation between TL uptake and the normetanephrine/metanephrine ratio (NMN/MN) was also found, a finding that was in accordance with in vitro studies, which were found to have a higher catecholamine content in epinephrine producing PHEOs. This retrospective study shows a correlation between {sup 18}F-FDOPA uptake, especially using TL uptake, urinary MNs, and a PHEO biochemical phenotype. This illustrates that beyond its localization value, {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET further enables PHEO characterization at a specific metabolic level. (orig.)

  9. Targeted Nanodiamonds as Phenotype Specific Photoacoustic Contrast Agents for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ti; Cui, Huizhong; Fang, Chia-Yi; Cheng, Kun; Yang, Xinmai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Forrest, M. Laird

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim is to develop irradiated nanodiamonds (INDs) as a molecularly-targeted contrast agent for high resolution and phenotype-specific detection of breast cancer with photoacoustic (PA) imaging. Materials & Methods The surface of acid treated radiation-damaged nanodiamonds was grafted with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to improve its stability and circulation time in blood, followed by conjugation to an anti-Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) peptide (KCCYSL) with a final nanoparticle size of ca. 92 nm. Immunocompetent mice bearing orthotopic HER2 positive or negative tumors were administered INDs and PA imaged using an 820-nm near infrared laser. Results PA images demonstrated that INDs accumulate in tumors and completely delineated the entire tumor within 10 hours. HER2 targeting significantly enhanced imaging of HER2-positive tumors. Pathological examination demonstrated INDs are non-toxic. Conclusions PA technology is adaptable to low-cost bedside medicine, and with new contrast agents described herein, PA can achieve high resolution (sub-mm) and phenotype specific monitoring of cancer growth. PMID:25723091

  10. CT and MR imaging in atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors of the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warmuth-Metz, Monika [University of Wuerzburg, Reference Centre for Neuroradiology of the German Society for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (GPOH), Department of Neuroradiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie der Universitaet Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Bison, Brigitte [University of Wuerzburg, Reference Centre for Neuroradiology of the German Society for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (GPOH), Department of Neuroradiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Dannemann-Stern, Elke; Kortmann, Rolf [University of Tuebingen, Reference Centre for Radiooncology of the German Society for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (GPOH), Department of Radiooncology, Tuebingen (Germany); Rutkowski, Stefan [University of Wuerzburg, Study Centre of the HIT-Studies of the German Society for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (GPOH), Department of Pediatrics, Wuerzburg (Germany); Pietsch, Torsten [University of Bonn, German Reference Centre for Neuropathology, Bonn (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (ATRT) are rare aggressive neoplasms of the CNS affecting predominantly very young children. We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings of 9 CT and 32 MR examinations of the brain and spine of 33 children. Of the 33 tumors, 11 were located in the infratentorial compartment, 16 in the supratentorial compartment, 5 in both cranial compartments, and 1 in the lower thoracic spinal cord. The mean age of the children with infratentorial or infra- and supratentorial tumors was significantly lower than the mean age of the children with purely supratentorial tumors. Heterogeneity on imaging, large size and high tumor stages are striking features reflecting the aggressive nature of this histopathological entity. Although not present in the majority of children, a distinct and unusual pattern of a wavy band-like enhancement surrounding a central hypointensity was present in 12 of 32 children (38%) in whom contrast medium was used. To the best of our knowledge this is the largest number of imaging examinations of ATRTs so far reported. A rather unusual pattern of contrast enhancement may be typical of ATRTs. (orig.)

  11. Treatment of giant cell tumor of bone: Current concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Puri Ajay; Agarwal Manish

    2007-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone though one of the commonest bone tumors encountered by an orthopedic surgeon continues to intrigue treating surgeons. Usually benign, they are locally aggressive and may occasionally undergo malignant transformation. The surgeon needs to strike a balance during treatment between reducing the incidence of local recurrence while preserving maximal function. Differing opinions pertaining to the use of adjuvants for extension of curettage, the relative role of bone ...

  12. Aggressive atypical ameloblastic fibrodentinoma: Report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish B Giraddi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastic fibroma and related lesions constitute a group of lesions, which range in biologic behaviour from true neoplasms to hamartomas. This group of lesions is also sometimes referred to as mixed odontogenic tumors and usually includes ameloblastic fibroma, ameloblastic fibrodentinoma and ameloblastic fibro-odontoma. Despite numerous efforts however, there is still considerable confusion concerning the nature and interrelationship of these mixed odontogenic tumors and related lesions. The malignant counterpart of these lesions namely aameloblastic fibrosarcoma, ameloblastic dentinosarcoma and ameloblastic odontosarcoma respectively are said to arise secondarily in their benign counterpart or de novo. Recurrence of the benign lesion raises the risk towards malignant transformation therefore a radical surgery should be planned inspite of enucleation or curettage. Here we present a case of an aggressive ameloblastic fibrodentinoma which was radically excised in the light of clinical and histological presentation followed by reconstruction of mandible.

  13. Aggressive behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Didden, H.C.M.; Lindsay, W.R.; Lang, R.B.; Sigafoos, J.; Deb, S.; Wiersma, J.; Peters-Scheffer, N.C.; Marschik, P.B.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Lancioni, G.E.; Singh, N.N.

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is common in individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs), and it is most often targeted for intervention. Psychological, contextual, and biological risk factors may contribute to the risk of aggressive behavior. Risk factors are gender (males), level of

  14. Aggressive Angiomyxoma of the Vulva: A Bizarre Perineal Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamantia Zizi-Sermpetzoglou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Aggressive angiomyxoma is a rare, slowly growing, and benign tumour of mesenchymal origin, which affects women of reproductive age and is associated with a high risk of local recurrence. Case Presentation. A case of a 47-year-old white female is presented herein, with a large polypoid, gelatinous mass on the right labia majora, measuring 26 × 21 × 6 cm. Histopathologically, the lesion was composed of spindle and stellate-shaped cells embedded in a myxoid matrix. Another specific feature was the presence of variable-sized thin-walled capillaries and thick-walled vascular channels. The patient underwent wide local excision of the tumour with clear margins and developed local recurrence 18 months later. Discussion. Aggressive angiomyxoma of the vulva needs to be distinguished from benign myxoid tumors with a low risk of local recurrence as well as from malignant myxoid neoplasms. Usually wide local excision with tumour-free margins and occasionally hormonal manipulation is the treatment of choice.

  15. Aggressive laryngeal fibromatosis: A case report and brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enam Murshed Khan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a rare case of aggressive fibromatosis of the larynx occurring in a 72-year-old man. The lesion manifested with complaints of dyspnea and stridor. A computerized tomographic scan of the neck revealed irregular polypoidal growth invading right vocal cord, crossing midline. A malignant tumor was suspected. Although several laryngoscopy-driven biopsies were negative for malignancy, total laryngectomy was done since the lesion was not deemed amenable to conservative therapy. Tissue sections featured a moderately cellular lesion composed of spindle cells with bland, elongated nuclei, enmeshed in a variably collagenized ground substance. The spindle cells were immunopositive for vimentin and negative for cytokeratins, PGP-9.5, smooth muscle antigen, CD68, desmin, and S-100 protein and Ki-67 of 4%. No further therapy was administered. Based on the available literature, our data confirm that aggressive laryngeal fibromatosis in adult patients is a locally infiltrating disease. Total laryngectomy with clear margins is needed as to avoid the high risk of local recurrence.

  16. G-protein inwardly rectifying potassium channel 1 (GIRK 1) gene expression correlates with tumor progression in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takanami, Iwao; Inoue, Yoshimasa; Gika, Masatoshi

    2004-01-01

    G-protein inwardly rectifying potassium channel 1 (GIRK1) is thought to play a role in cell proliferation in cancer, and GIRK1 gene expression level may define a more aggressive phenotype. We detected GIRK1 expression in tissue specimens from patients with non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) and assessed their clinical characteristics. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses, we quantified the expression of GIRK1 in 72 patients with NSCLCs to investigate the relationship between GIRK1 expression and clinicopathologic factors and prognosis. In 72 NSCLC patients, 50 (69%) samples were evaluated as having high GIRK1 gene expression, and 22 (31%) were evaluated as having low GIRK1 gene expression. GIRK1 gene expression was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis, stage (p = 0.0194 for lymph node metastasis; p = 0.0207 for stage). The overall and stage I survival rates for patients with high GIRK1 gene expressed tumors was significantly worse than for those individuals whose tumors had low GIRK1 expression (p = 0.0004 for the overall group; p = 0.0376 for stage I). These data indicate that GIRK1 may contribute to tumor progression and GIRK1 gene expression can serve as a useful prognostic marker in the overall and stage I NSCLCs

  17. Tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters in colorectal cancer.

    KAUST Repository

    Cima, Igor; Kong, Say Li; Sengupta, Debarka; Tan, Iain B; Phyo, Wai Min; Lee, Daniel; Hu, Min; Iliescu, Ciprian; Alexander, Irina; Goh, Wei Lin; Rahmani, Mehran; Suhaimi, Nur-Afidah Mohamed; Vo, Jess H; Tai, Joyce A; Tan, Joanna H; Chua, Clarinda; Ten, Rachel; Lim, Wan Jun; Chew, Min Hoe; Hauser, Charlotte; van Dam, Rob M; Lim, Wei-Yen; Prabhakar, Shyam; Lim, Bing; Koh, Poh Koon; Robson, Paul; Ying, Jackie Y; Hillmer, Axel M; Tan, Min-Han

    2016-01-01

    Clusters of tumor cells are often observed in the blood of cancer patients. These structures have been described as malignant entities for more than 50 years, although their comprehensive characterization is lacking. Contrary to current consensus, we demonstrate that a discrete population of circulating cell clusters isolated from the blood of colorectal cancer patients are not cancerous but consist of tumor-derived endothelial cells. These clusters express both epithelial and mesenchymal markers, consistent with previous reports on circulating tumor cell (CTC) phenotyping. However, unlike CTCs, they do not mirror the genetic variations of matched tumors. Transcriptomic analysis of single clusters revealed that these structures exhibit an endothelial phenotype and can be traced back to the tumor endothelium. Further results show that tumor-derived endothelial clusters do not form by coagulation or by outgrowth of single circulating endothelial cells, supporting a direct release of clusters from the tumor vasculature. The isolation and enumeration of these benign clusters distinguished healthy volunteers from treatment-naïve as well as pathological early-stage (≤IIA) colorectal cancer patients with high accuracy, suggesting that tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters could be used as a means of noninvasive screening for colorectal cancer. In contrast to CTCs, tumor-derived endothelial cell clusters may also provide important information about the underlying tumor vasculature at the time of diagnosis, during treatment, and throughout the course of the disease.

  18. Tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters in colorectal cancer.

    KAUST Repository

    Cima, Igor

    2016-06-29

    Clusters of tumor cells are often observed in the blood of cancer patients. These structures have been described as malignant entities for more than 50 years, although their comprehensive characterization is lacking. Contrary to current consensus, we demonstrate that a discrete population of circulating cell clusters isolated from the blood of colorectal cancer patients are not cancerous but consist of tumor-derived endothelial cells. These clusters express both epithelial and mesenchymal markers, consistent with previous reports on circulating tumor cell (CTC) phenotyping. However, unlike CTCs, they do not mirror the genetic variations of matched tumors. Transcriptomic analysis of single clusters revealed that these structures exhibit an endothelial phenotype and can be traced back to the tumor endothelium. Further results show that tumor-derived endothelial clusters do not form by coagulation or by outgrowth of single circulating endothelial cells, supporting a direct release of clusters from the tumor vasculature. The isolation and enumeration of these benign clusters distinguished healthy volunteers from treatment-naïve as well as pathological early-stage (≤IIA) colorectal cancer patients with high accuracy, suggesting that tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters could be used as a means of noninvasive screening for colorectal cancer. In contrast to CTCs, tumor-derived endothelial cell clusters may also provide important information about the underlying tumor vasculature at the time of diagnosis, during treatment, and throughout the course of the disease.

  19. Relational aggression in marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Jason S; Nelson, David A; Yorgason, Jeremy B; Harper, James M; Ashton, Ruth Hagmann; Jensen, Alexander C

    2010-01-01

    Drawing from developmental theories of relational aggression, this article reports on a study designed to identify if spouses use relationally aggressive tactics when dealing with conflict in their marriage and the association of these behaviors with marital outcomes. Using a sample of 336 married couples (672 spouses), results revealed that the majority of couples reported that relationally aggressive behaviors, such as social sabotage and love withdrawal, were a part of their marital dynamics, at least to some degree. Gender comparisons of partner reports of their spouse's behavior revealed that wives were significantly more likely to be relationally aggressive than husbands. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that relational aggression is associated with lower levels of marital quality and greater marital instability for both husbands and wives. Implications are drawn for the use of relational aggression theory in the future study of couple conflict and marital aggression. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. LACTB, a novel epigenetic silenced tumor suppressor, inhibits colorectal cancer progression by attenuating MDM2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Kaixuan; Chen, Xiaoxiang; Hu, Xiuxiu; Liu, Xiangxiang; Xu, Tao; Sun, Huiling; Pan, Yuqin; He, Bangshun; Wang, Shukui

    2018-06-13

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common aggressive malignancies. Like other solid tumors, inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes occur during CRC development and progression. Recently, a novel tumor suppressor, LACTB, was proposed to inhibit tumor progression, but the functional and clinical significance of this tumor suppressor in CRC remains unexplored. Herein, we found LACTB was significantly downregulated in CRC due to promoter methylation and histone deacetylation, which was associated with metastasis and advanced clinical stage. CRC patients with low LACTB expression had poorer overall survival and LACTB also determined to be an independent prognostic factor for poorer outcome. Ectopic expression of LACTB suppressed CRC cells proliferation, migration, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in vitro and inhibited CRC growth and metastasis in vivo, while knockout of LACTB by CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technique resulted in an opposite phenotype. Interestingly, LACTB could exert antitumorigenic effect only in HCT116 and HCT8 cells harboring wild-type TP53, but not in HT29 and SW480 cells harboring mutant TP53 or HCT116 p53 -/- cells. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that LACTB could directly bind to the C terminus of p53 to inhibit p53 degradation by preventing MDM2 from interacting with p53. Moreover, ablation of p53 attenuated the antitumorigenic effects of LACTB overexpression in CRC. Collectively, our findings successfully demonstrate for the first time that LACTB is a novel epigenetic silenced tumor suppressor through modulating the stability of p53, supporting the pursuit of LACTB as a potential therapeutic target for CRC.

  1. Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the Stomach: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Woon Ju; Cho, June Sik; Shin, Kyung Sook; Jeong, Hyung Yong; Noh; Seung Moo; Song, Kyu Sang

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors (peripheral PNETs) are very rare and highly aggressive soft tissue malignancies originating from the neural crest. To the best of our knowledge, only a few cases of peripheral PNETs of the stomach have been reported in the literature. We report a case of large peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the stomach with MDCT findings in a 22-year-old man presenting epigastric pain and vomiting

  2. Aggressive Angiomyxoma of the Vulva: a Distinct Clinical Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgi Bakaris

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive angiomyxoma is a rare mesenchmal tumour arising from connective tissue of the perineum or the lower pelvis, and affect predominantly young women. Our case was 20-year-old female who was operated for a vulvar mass clinically misdiagnosed as Polyp . Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen revealed, haphazardly scattered spindle or stellate shaped mesenchymal cells and vessels of medium size having dilated lumens within a loose hyposellular myxoid stroma No mitoses were evident.The spindle-or stellate-shaped tumor cells were diffusely positive for vimentin, but negative for cytokeratin, S-100 protein, and myoglobin and and #945;-smooth muscle actin by immunohistochemistry. These histologic and immunohistochemical findings were compatible with diagnosis of AA. Clinically AA is mixed with Bartholin's duct cyst, vulvar abscess, lipoma, vaginal cysts in diagnosis AA of the vulva must be distinguished from the more common benign and malignant myxoid tumors including myxoma, myxoid neurofibroma, pseudosarcoma, myxoid liposarcoma, myxoid leiomyosarcoma and other soft tissue tumors with secondary myxoid changes. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(4.000: 803-806

  3. Cruel intentions on television and in real life: can viewing indirect aggression increase viewers' subsequent indirect aggression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Sarah M; Archer, John; Eslea, Mike

    2004-07-01

    Numerous studies have shown that viewing violence in the media can influence an individual's subsequent aggression, but none have examined the effect of viewing indirect aggression. This study examines the immediate effect of viewing indirect and direct aggression on subsequent indirect aggression among 199 children ages 11 to 14 years. They were shown an indirect, direct, or no-aggression video and their subsequent indirect aggression was measured by negative evaluation of a confederate and responses to a vignette. Participants viewing indirect or direct aggression gave a more negative evaluation of and less money to a confederate than participants viewing no-aggression. Participants viewing indirect aggression gave less money to the confederate than those viewing direct aggression. Participants viewing indirect aggression gave more indirectly aggressive responses to an ambiguous situation and participants viewing direct aggression gave more directly aggressive responses. This study provides the first evidence that viewing indirect aggression in the media can have an immediate impact on subsequent aggression.

  4. Radiation-induced senescence-like phenotype in proliferating and plateau-phase vascular endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Kaori; Sakimoto, Ippei; Kataoka, Keiko; Ohta, Keisuke; Miura, Masahiko

    2007-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation (IR) on tumor angiogenesis still remain largely unknown. In this study, we found that IR (8 Gy) induces a high-frequency (80-90%) senescence-like phenotype in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) undergoing exponential growth. This finding allowed us to characterize the IR-induced senescence-like (IRSL) phenotype by examining the gene expression profiles and in vitro angiogenic activities of these ECs. The expression levels of genes associated with cell cycle progression and DNA replication were remarkably reduced in the IRSL ECs. Additionally, the in vitro invasion and migration activities of these cells through Matrigel were significantly suppressed. We also found that confluent ECs exhibited a high-frequency IRSL phenotype when they were replated immediately after irradiation, whereas incubation in plateau-phase conditions reduced the induction of this phenotype and enhanced colony formation. The kinetics of DNA double-strand break repair, which showed a faster time course in confluent ECs than in growing ECs, may contribute to the protective mechanism associated with the IRSL phenotype. These results imply that the IRSL phenotype may be important for determining the angiogenic activity of ECs following irradiation. The present study should contribute to the understanding of the effects of IR on tumor angiogenesis

  5. "Latent" infection with Toxoplasma gondii: association with trait aggression and impulsivity in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Thomas B; Brenner, Lisa A; Cloninger, C Robert; Langenberg, Patricia; Igbide, Ajirioghene; Giegling, Ina; Hartmann, Annette M; Konte, Bettina; Friedl, Marion; Brundin, Lena; Groer, Maureen W; Can, Adem; Rujescu, Dan; Postolache, Teodor T

    2015-01-01

    Latent chronic infection with Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii), a common neurotropic pathogen, has been previously linked with suicidal self-directed violence (SSDV). We sought to determine if latent infection with T. gondii is associated with trait aggression and impulsivity, intermediate phenotypes for suicidal behavior, in psychiatrically healthy adults. Traits of aggression and impulsivity were analyzed in relationship to IgG antibody seropositivity for T. gondii and two other latent neurotropic infections, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) and cytomegalovirus (CMV). One thousand community-residing adults residing in the Munich metropolitan area with no Axis I or II conditions by SCID for DSM-IV (510 men, 490 women, mean age 53.6 ± 15.8, range 20-74). Plasma samples were tested for IgG antibodies to T. gondii, HSV-1 and CMV by ELISA. Self-reported ratings of trait aggression scores (Questionnaire for Measuring Factors of Aggression [FAF]) and trait impulsivity (Sensation-Seeking Scale-V [SSS-V]) were analyzed using linear multivariate methods. T. gondii IgG seropositivity was significantly associated with higher trait reactive aggression scores among women (p impulsive sensation-seeking (SSS-V Disinhibition) among younger men (p impulsivity, personality traits considered as endophenotypes for SSDV, are associated with latent T. gondii infection in a gender and age-specific manner, and could be further investigated as prognostic and treatment targets in T. gondii-positive individuals at risk for SSDV. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Immuno phenotype of blood lymphocytes in radiation-associated Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butenko, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    Immuno phenotype of peripheral blood lymphocytes has been studied in Hodgkin's disease including patients exposed to radionuclides of the characteristic Chernobyl pattern. The group of patients under study has been characterized by decreasing T- and NK-cell immunity, such a decrease being more pronounced in radiation-associated Hodgkin's lymphoma. The data obtained as well as the evidence of Epstein-Barr virus activation could explain the aggressiveness of the disease in such patients and the difficulties in their treatment

  7. Aggression in children with behavioural/emotional difficulties: seeing aggression on television and video games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofan, Oana; Paul, Moli; Weich, Scott; Spencer, Nicholas

    2014-11-18

    Mental health professionals are often asked to give advice about managing children's aggression. Good quality evidence on contributory environmental factors such as seeing aggression on television and in video games is relatively lacking, although societal and professional concerns are high. This study investigated possible associations between seeing aggression in such media and the aggressive behaviour of children attending specialist outpatient child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS). In this mixed methods study, forty-seven British children aged 7-11 years with behavioural/emotional difficulties attending CAMHS and their carers participated in a survey; twenty purposively-selected children and a parent/carer of theirs participated in a qualitative study, involving semi-structured interviews, analysed using the Framework Analysis Approach; findings were integrated. Children attending CAMHS exhibit clinically significant aggression, of varying types and frequency. They see aggression in multiple real and virtual settings. Verbal aggression was often seen, frequently exhibited and strongly associated with poor peer relationships and low prosocial behaviour. Children did not think seeing aggression influences their own behaviour but believed it influences others. Carers regarded aggression as resulting from a combination of inner and environmental factors and seeing aggression in real-life as having more impact than television/video games. There is yet no definitive evidence for or against a direct relationship between aggression seen in the media and aggression in children with behavioural/emotional difficulties. Future research should take an ecological perspective, investigating individual, developmental and environmental factors. Carers, professional organisations and policy makers should address aggression seen in all relevant area of children's lives, primarily real-life and secondly virtual environments.

  8. High expression of TRF2, SOX10, and CD10 in circulating tumor microemboli detected in metastatic melanoma patients. A potential impact for the assessment of disease aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Elodie; Ilie, Marius; Bence, Coraline; Butori, Catherine; Selva, Eric; Lalvée, Salomé; Bonnetaud, Christelle; Poissonnet, Gilles; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Bahadoran, Philippe; Brest, Patrick; Gilson, Eric; Ballotti, Robert; Hofman, Véronique; Hofman, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Circulating tumors cells (CTCs) can be detected in the blood of metastatic melanoma patients (MMPs) both as isolated circulating tumor cells (iCTCs) and circulating tumor microemboli (CTMs), but their clinical significance remains unknown. The aim of this work was to evaluate the prognostic impact in metastatic cutaneous melanoma of CTMs and iCTCs identified by a cytomorphological approach using the isolation by size of tumor cell (ISET) method. We characterized the phenotype of CTCs using anti-PS100, anti-SOX10, anti-CD10, and anti-TRF2 antibodies. 128 MMPs and 37 control healthy individuals with benign nevi were included in this study. Results were compared to the follow-up of patients. 109/128 (85%) MMPs showed CTCs, 44/128 (34%) with 2 to 6 CTMs and 65/128 (51%) with 4 to 9 iCTCs. PS100 expression was homogeneous in iCTCs and heterogeneous in CTMs. SOX10, CD10, and TRF2 were mainly expressed in CTMs. None of the control subjects demonstrated circulating malignant tumor cells. Overall survival was significantly decreased in patients with CTMs, independently of the therapeutic strategies. In conclusion, the presence of CTMs is an independent predictor of shorter survival from the time of diagnosis of MMPs. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Targeting Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α in a New Orthotopic Model of Glioblastoma Recapitulating the Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigim, Fares; Cavanaugh, Jill; Patel, Anoop P; Curry, William T; Esaki, Shin-ichi; Kasper, Ekkehard M; Chi, Andrew S; Louis, David N; Martuza, Robert L; Rabkin, Samuel D; Wakimoto, Hiroaki

    2015-07-01

    Tissue hypoxia and necrosis represent pathophysiologic and histologic hallmarks of glioblastoma (GBM). Although hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) plays crucial roles in the malignant phenotypes of GBM, developing HIF-1α-targeted agents has been hampered by the lack of a suitable preclinical model that recapitulates the complex biology of clinical GBM. We present a new GBM model, MGG123, which was established from a recurrent human GBM. Orthotopic xenografting of stem-like MGG123 cells reproducibly generated lethal tumors that were characterized by foci of palisading necrosis, hypervascularity, and robust stem cell marker expression. Perinecrotic neoplastic cells distinctively express HIF-1α and are proliferative in both xenografts and the patient tissue. The xenografts contain scattered hypoxic foci that were consistently greater than 50 μm distant from blood vessels, indicating intratumoral heterogeneity of oxygenation. Hypoxia enhanced HIF-1α expression in cultured MGG123 cells, which was abrogated by the HIF-1α inhibitors digoxin or ouabain. In vivo, treatment of orthotopic MGG123 xenografts with digoxin decreased HIF-1α expression, vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels, and CD34-positive vasculature within the tumors, and extended survival of mice bearing the aggressive MGG123 GBM. This preclinical tumor model faithfully recapitulates the GBM-relevant hypoxic microenvironment and stemness and is a suitable platform for studying disease biology and developing hypoxia-targeted agents.

  10. No Effect of NGAL/lipocalin-2 on Aggressiveness of Cancer in the MMTV-PyMT/FVB/N Mouse Model for Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Elisabeth P; Glenthøj, Andreas; Häger, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    tumor volume, or to the number of metastases. Histology and gelatinolytic activity of the mammary tumors did not differ between wild-type and lipocalin-2-deficient mice. We conclude that NGAL/lipocalin-2 does not invariably affect the aggressiveness of breast cancers as assessed in mouse models, thus......NGAL/lipocalin-2 is a siderophore-binding protein that is highly expressed in several cancers. It is suggested to confer a proliferative advantage to cancer cells. Its expression has been correlated with aggressiveness of breast cancer as determined both in patients and in mouse breast cancer...... models. This was recently confirmed in two mouse models of spontaneous breast cancer in wild-type and lipocalin-2-deficient mice. We used a similar strategy using a different mouse strain. Lipocalin-2-deficient mice and mouse mammary tumor virus-polyoma middle T antigen (MMTV-PyMT) mice were crossed...

  11. Aggression-related brain function assessed with the Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm in fMRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Anine P; Cunha-Bang, Sofi da; Carré, Justin M

    2017-01-01

    The Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm (PSAP) measures aggressive behavior in response to provocations. The aim of the study was to implement the PSAP in a functional neuroimaging environment (fMRI) and evaluate aggression-related brain reactivity including response to provocations and associa......The Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm (PSAP) measures aggressive behavior in response to provocations. The aim of the study was to implement the PSAP in a functional neuroimaging environment (fMRI) and evaluate aggression-related brain reactivity including response to provocations...... and associations with aggression within the paradigm. Twenty healthy participants completed two 12-min PSAP sessions within the scanner. We evaluated brain responses to aggressive behavior (removing points from an opponent), provocations (point subtractions by the opponent), and winning points. Our results showed...... with the involvement of these brain regions in emotional and impulsive behavior. Striatal reactivity may suggest an involvement of reward during winning and stealing points....

  12. Desensitization to media violence: links with habitual media violence exposure, aggressive cognitions, and aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahé, Barbara; Möller, Ingrid; Huesmann, L Rowell; Kirwil, Lucyna; Felber, Juliane; Berger, Anja

    2011-04-01

    This study examined the links between desensitization to violent media stimuli and habitual media violence exposure as a predictor and aggressive cognitions and behavior as outcome variables. Two weeks after completing measures of habitual media violence exposure, trait aggression, trait arousability, and normative beliefs about aggression, undergraduates (N = 303) saw a violent film clip and a sad or a funny comparison clip. Skin conductance level (SCL) was measured continuously, and ratings of anxious and pleasant arousal were obtained after each clip. Following the clips, participants completed a lexical decision task to measure accessibility of aggressive cognitions and a competitive reaction time task to measure aggressive behavior. Habitual media violence exposure correlated negatively with SCL during violent clips and positively with pleasant arousal, response times for aggressive words, and trait aggression, but it was unrelated to anxious arousal and aggressive responding during the reaction time task. In path analyses controlling for trait aggression, normative beliefs, and trait arousability, habitual media violence exposure predicted faster accessibility of aggressive cognitions, partly mediated by higher pleasant arousal. Unprovoked aggression during the reaction time task was predicted by lower anxious arousal. Neither habitual media violence usage nor anxious or pleasant arousal predicted provoked aggression during the laboratory task, and SCL was unrelated to aggressive cognitions and behavior. No relations were found between habitual media violence viewing and arousal in response to the sad and funny film clips, and arousal in response to the sad and funny clips did not predict aggressive cognitions or aggressive behavior on the laboratory task. This suggests that the observed desensitization effects are specific to violent content.

  13. Muscle fibers inside a fat tumor: A non-specific imaging finding of benignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donato, M.; Vanel, D.; Alberghini, M.; Mercuri, M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The differential diagnosis between benign and low-grade well-differentiated malignant lipomatous tumors might be very difficult for both the radiologist and the pathologist, although it has practical consequences. Among the criteria, muscular fibers detected inside the lesion are considered radiologically and histologically as a reliable sign of a benign intramuscular lipoma. New genetic criteria are now available. We report two cases of fat tumors containing muscular fibers both radiologically and histologically, but which are definitely malignant, considering genetic criteria. Material and methods: Two cases of soft tissue fat tumors, containing muscular fibers on imaging examinations as well as histologically, had an aggressive behaviour, suggesting malignancy. Genetic criteria were therefore used to confirm the clinical impression. Results: MDM2 and CDK4 confirmed the malignancy in the two cases. Conclusion: Intra lesional muscular fibers detected on imaging or histological examinations should not be considered as a completely reliable sign of a benign intramuscular lipoma. In case of atypical clinical behaviour, genetic criteria should be used to prove the aggressiveness of the tumor.

  14. Renal Medullary Carcinoma with an Aggressive Clinical Course: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhumati R. Kalavar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal medullary carcinoma (RMC is a rare, yet aggressive malignancy of the kidney that is found predominantly in young patients with African descent and sickle cell hemoglobinopathies and most specifically sickle cell trait. Due to its aggressive nature, most cases have metastasis or local invasion at the time of diagnosis. Prognosis is extremely poor with survival less than 1 year after diagnosis. Here we present a case of metastatic RMC in a 29-year-old African female. Despite chemotherapy with cisplatin, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel, and initial shrinkage of the tumor, the patient died 5 months after diagnosis.

  15. Tumor hypoxia at the micro-regional level: clinical relevance and predictive value of exogenous and endogenous hypoxic cell markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Tumor oxygenation is recognized as an important determinant of the outcome of radiotherapy and possibly also of other treatment modalities in a number of tumor types and in particular in squamous cell carcinomas. The hypoxic status of various solid tumors has been related to a poor prognosis due to tumor progression towards a more malignant phenotype, with increased metastatic potential, and an increased resistance to treatment. It has been demonstrated in head and neck cancer that hypoxic radioresistance can be successfully counteracted by hypoxia modifying approaches. The microregional distribution and the level of tumor hypoxia depend on oxygen consumption and temporal and spatial variations in blood supply. It is unclear if severely hypoxic cells can resume clonogenicity when O 2 and nutrients become available again as a result of (treatment related) changes in the tumor microenvironment. Non-terminally differentiated hypoxic cells that are capable of proliferation are important for outcome because of their resistance to radiotherapy and possibly other cytotoxic treatments. Various exogenous and endogenous markers for hypoxia are currently available and can be studied in relation to each other, the tumor architecture and the tumor microenvironment. Use of nitroimidazole markers with immunohistochemical detection allows studying tumor cell hypoxia at the microscopic level. Co-registration with other microenvironmental parameters, such as vascular architecture (vascular density), blood perfusion, tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis, offers the possibility to obtain a comprehensive functional image of tumor patho-physiology and to study the effects of different modalities of cancer treatment. Conclusion: A number of functional microregional parameters have emerged that are good candidates for future use as indicators of tumor aggressiveness and treatment response. The key question is whether these parameters can be used as tools for

  16. The role of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in radiation-induced tumor cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilalta, Marta; Brune, Jourdan; Rafat, Marjan; Soto, Luis; Graves, Edward E

    2018-03-13

    Recently it has been observed in preclinical models that that radiation enhances the recruitment of circulating tumor cells to primary tumors, and results in tumor regrowth after treatment. This process may have implications for clinical radiotherapy, which improves control of a number of tumor types but which, despite continued dose escalation and aggressive fractionation, is unable to fully prevent local recurrences. By irradiating a single tumor within an animal bearing multiple lesions, we observed an increase in tumor cell migration to irradiated and unirradiated sites, suggesting a systemic component to this process. Previous work has identified the cytokine GM-CSF, produced by tumor cells following irradiation, as a key effector of this process. We evaluated the ability of systemic injections of a PEGylated form of GM-CSF to stimulate tumor cell migration. While increases in invasion and migration were observed for tumor cells in a transwell assay, we found that daily injections of PEG-GM-CSF to tumor-bearing animals did not increase migration of cells to tumors, despite the anticipated changes in circulating levels of granulocytes and monocytes produced by this treatment. Combination of PEG-GM-CSF treatment with radiation also did not increase tumor cell migration. These findings suggest that clinical use of GM-CSF to treat neutropenia in cancer patients will not have negative effects on the aggressiveness of residual cancer cells. However, further work is needed to characterize the mechanism by which GM-CSF facilitates systemic recruitment of trafficking tumor cells to tumors.

  17. Pediatric hepatic rhabdoid tumor: A rare cause of abdominal mass in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Kapral, MD

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric hepatic rhabdoid tumors are rare tumors of the liver, with few cases reported in the literature. These aggressive tumors can be difficult to differentiate from hepatoblastomas on imaging alone, and surgical biopsy combined with special immunohistochemical stains can assist in differentiating these 2 tumor types. We present a case of hepatic rhabdoid tumor in a 7-month-old female infant, which was originally thought to be a hepatoblastoma; however, using BAF47 staining for INI-1 we were able to diagnose a rhabdoid tumor and affect the patient's medical oncologic therapy. Earlier detection and a better understanding of the imaging features of hepatic rhabdoid tumor may aid in improved patient management and treatment planning. Keywords: Rhabdoid tumor, INI-1, Hepatoblastoma, Pediatric, Rhabdomyosarcoma

  18. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress Immune Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Ly, Nancy Ngoc Giao; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R.; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcome, compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of pre-invasive foci. Methods We investigated the effects of radiation in p48Cre;LSL-KrasG12D (KC) and p48Cre;LSLKrasG12D;LSL-Trp53R172H (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2–12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from invasive and pre-invasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype, compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8+ T cells than controls and greater numbers of CD4+ T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. An antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Conclusions Radiation exposure causes macrophages in PDAs

  19. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Kavita; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Fareed, Wamiq; Zafar, Muhammad

    2015-06-01

    Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/conttrollers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors.

  20. EP4 as a Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Human Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Majumder

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, also called seven-transmembrane or heptahelical receptors are a superfamily of cell surface receptor proteins that bind to many extracellular ligands and transmit signals to an intracellular guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G-protein. When a ligand binds, the receptor activates the attached G-protein by causing the exchange of Guanosine-5′-triphosphate (GTP for guanosine diphosphate (GDP. They play a major role in many physiological functions, as well as in the pathology of many diseases, including cancer progression and metastasis. Only a few GPCR members have been exploited as targets for developing drugs with therapeutic benefit in cancer. Present review briefly summarizes the signaling pathways utilized by the EP (prostaglandin E receptor family of GPCR, their physiological and pathological roles in carcinogenesis, with special emphasis on the roles of EP4 in breast cancer progression. We make a case for EP4 as a promising newer therapeutic target for treating breast cancer. We show that an aberrant over-expression of cyclooxygenase (COX-2, which is an inflammation-associated enzyme, occurring in 40–50% of breast cancer patients leads to tumor progression and metastasis due to multiple cellular events resulting from an increased prostaglandin (PG E2 production in the tumor milieu. They include inactivation of host anti-tumor immune cells, such as Natural Killer (NK and T cells, increased immuno-suppressor function of tumor-associated macrophages, promotion of tumor cell migration, invasiveness and tumor-associated angiogenesis, due to upregulation of multiple angiogenic factors including Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF-A, increased lymphangiogenesis (due to upregulation of VEGF-C/D, and a stimulation of stem-like cell (SLC phenotype in cancer cells. All of these events were primarily mediated by activation of the Prostaglandin (PG E receptor EP4 on tumor or host cells. We show that

  1. A Case of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor with Rhabdomyoblastic Differentiation: Malignant Triton Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Mae

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST constitute a rare variety of soft tissue sarcomas thought to originate from Schwann cells or pluripotent cells of the neural crest. Malignant triton tumor (MTT, a very rare, highly aggressive soft tissue tumor, is a subgroup of MPNST and is comprised of malignant Schwann cells coexisting with malignant rhabdomyoblasts. We herein report the case of a 24-year-old man who presented a subcutaneous mass in his right thigh. The mass was removed surgically in its entirety and radiation therapy was applied locally to prevent tumor regrowth. Nonetheless, the patient died 10 months after surgery from metastases to the lung and brain. He presented neither cafe-au-lait spots nor cutaneous neurofibromas. The histopathology showed a transition from a neurofibroma to an MTT, making this the second report of an MTT arising from a neurofibroma without neurofibromatosis type 1, an autosomal dominant disorder with which 50-70% of tumors reported in previous studies were associated. A histopathological examination using immunostaining with desmin confirmed this diagnosis. MTT has a poorer prognosis than MPNST and should therefore be regarded as a distinct clinical entity.

  2. Activation of the kinin B1 receptor attenuates melanoma tumor growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Dillenburg-Pilla

    Full Text Available Melanoma is a very aggressive tumor that does not respond well to standard therapeutic approaches, such as radio- and chemotherapies. Furthermore, acquiring the ability to metastasize in melanoma and many other tumor types is directly related to incurable disease. The B1 kinin receptor participates in a variety of cancer-related pathophysiological events, such as inflammation and angiogenesis. Therefore, we investigated whether this G protein-coupled receptor plays a role in tumor progression. We used a murine melanoma cell line that expresses the kinin B1 receptor and does not express the kinin B2 receptor to investigate the precise contribution of activation of the B1 receptor in tumor progression and correlated events using various in vitro and in vivo approaches. Activation of the kinin B1 receptor in the absence of B2 receptor inhibits cell migration in vitro and decreases tumor formation in vivo. Moreover, tumors formed from cells stimulated with B1-specific agonist showed several features of decreased aggressiveness, such as smaller size and infiltration of inflammatory cells within the tumor area, higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines implicated in the host anti-tumor immune response, lower number of cells undergoing mitosis, a poorer vascular network, no signs of invasion of surrounding tissues or metastasis and increased animal survival. Our findings reveal that activation of the kinin B1 receptor has a host protective role during murine melanoma tumor progression, suggesting that the B1 receptor could be a new anti-tumor GPCR and provide new opportunities for therapeutic targeting.

  3. The General Aggression Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, Johnie J.; Anderson, Craig A.; Bushman, Brad J.

    The General Aggression Model (GAM) is a comprehensive, integrative, framework for understanding aggression. It considers the role of social, cognitive, personality, developmental, and biological factors on aggression. Proximate processes of GAM detail how person and situation factors influence

  4. Genetic and epigenetic modifications of Sox2 contribute to the invasive phenotype of malignant gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta M Alonso

    Full Text Available We undertook this study to understand how the transcription factor Sox2 contributes to the malignant phenotype of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most aggressive primary brain tumor. We initially looked for unbalanced genomic rearrangements in the Sox2 locus in 42 GBM samples and found that Sox2 was amplified in 11.5% and overexpressed in all the samples. These results prompted us to further investigate the mechanisms involved in Sox2 overexpression in GBM. We analyzed the methylation status of the Sox2 promoter because high CpG density promoters are associated with key developmental genes. The Sox2 promoter presented a CpG island that was hypomethylated in all the patient samples when compared to normal cell lines. Treatment of Sox2-negative glioma cell lines with 5-azacitidine resulted in the re-expression of Sox2 and in a change in the methylation status of the Sox2 promoter. We further confirmed these results by analyzing data from GBM cases generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas project. We observed Sox2 overexpression (86%; N = 414, Sox2 gene amplification (8.5%; N = 492, and Sox 2 promoter hypomethylation (100%; N = 258, suggesting the relevance of this factor in the malignant phenotype of GBMs. To further explore the role of Sox2, we performed in vitro analysis with brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs and established glioma cell lines. Downmodulation of Sox2 in BTSCs resulted in the loss of their self-renewal properties. Surprisingly, ectopic expression of Sox2 in established glioma cells was not sufficient to support self-renewal, suggesting that additional factors are required. Furthermore, we observed that ectopic Sox2 expression was sufficient to induce invasion and migration of glioma cells, and knockdown experiments demonstrated that Sox2 was essential for maintaining these properties. Altogether, our data underscore the importance of a pleiotropic role of Sox2 and suggest that it could be used as a therapeutic target in GBM.

  5. The General Aggression Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Johnie J; Anderson, Craig A; Bushman, Brad J

    2018-02-01

    The General Aggression Model (GAM) is a comprehensive, integrative, framework for understanding aggression. It considers the role of social, cognitive, personality, developmental, and biological factors on aggression. Proximate processes of GAM detail how person and situation factors influence cognitions, feelings, and arousal, which in turn affect appraisal and decision processes, which in turn influence aggressive or nonaggressive behavioral outcomes. Each cycle of the proximate processes serves as a learning trial that affects the development and accessibility of aggressive knowledge structures. Distal processes of GAM detail how biological and persistent environmental factors can influence personality through changes in knowledge structures. GAM has been applied to understand aggression in many contexts including media violence effects, domestic violence, intergroup violence, temperature effects, pain effects, and the effects of global climate change. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Callous-unemotional traits, proactive aggression, and treatment outcomes of aggressive children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blader, Joseph C; Pliszka, Steven R; Kafantaris, Vivian; Foley, Carmel A; Crowell, Judith A; Carlson, Gabrielle A; Sauder, Colin L; Margulies, David M; Sinha, Christa; Sverd, Jeffrey; Matthews, Thomas L; Bailey, Brigitte Y; Daviss, W Burleson

    2013-12-01

    Stimulant treatment improves impulse control among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Decreased aggression often accompanies stimulant pharmacotherapy, suggesting that impulsiveness is integral to aggressive behavior in these children. However, children with high callous-unemotional (CU) traits and proactive aggression may benefit less from ADHD pharmacotherapy, because their aggressive behavior seems more purposeful and deliberate. This study's objective was to determine whether pretreatment CU traits and proactive aggression affect treatment outcomes among aggressive children with ADHD receiving stimulant monotherapy. We implemented a stimulant optimization protocol with 160 children 6 to 13 years of age (mean [SD] age of 9.31 [2.02] years; 78.75% male) with ADHD, oppositional defiant or conduct disorder, and significant aggressive behavior. Family-focused behavioral intervention was provided concurrently. The primary outcome was the Retrospective Modified Overt Aggression Scale. The Antisocial Process Screening Device and the Aggression Scale, also completed by parents, measured CU traits and proactive aggression, respectively. Analyses examined moderating effects of CU traits and proactive aggression on outcomes. In all, 82 children (51%) experienced remission of aggressive behavior. Neither CU traits nor proactive aggression predicted remission (CU traits: odds ratio [OR] = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.80-1.11; proactive aggression, OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.86-1.29). Children whose overall aggression remitted showed decreases in CU traits (effect size = -0.379, 95% CI = -0.60 to -0.16) and proactive aggression (effect size = -0.463, 95% CI = -0.69 to -0.23). Findings suggest that pretreatment CU traits and proactive aggression do not forecast worse outcomes for aggressive children with ADHD receiving optimized stimulant pharmacotherapy. With such treatment, CU traits and proactive aggression may decline alongside other behavioral improvements

  7. Transcriptome sequencing in prostate cancer identifies inter-tumor heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Mendonca

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Given the dearth of gene mutations in prostate cancer, [1] ,[2] it is likely that genomic rearrangements play a significant role in the evolution of prostate cancer. However, in the search for recurrent genomic alterations, "private alterations" have received less attention. Such alterations may provide insights into the evolution, behavior, and clinical outcome of an individual tumor. In a recent report in "Genome Biology" Wyatt et al. [3] defines unique alterations in a cohort of high-risk prostate cancer patient with a lethal phenotype. Utilizing a transcriptome sequencing approach they observe high inter-tumor heterogeneity; however, the genes altered distill into three distinct cancer-relevant pathways. Their analysis reveals the presence of several non-ETS fusions, which may contribute to the phenotype of individual tumors, and have significance for disease progression.

  8. Central nervous system tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, P.R.; Fike, J.R.; Hoopes, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tumors are relatively common in veterinary medicine, with most diagnoses occurring in the canine and feline species. Numerous tumor types from various cells or origins have been identified with the most common tumors being meningiomas and glial cell tumors. Radiation therapy is often used as an aid to control the clinical signs associated with these neoplasms. In general, these tumors have a very low metastatic potential, such that local control offers substantial benefit. Experience in veterinary radiation oncology would indicate that many patients benefit from radiation treatment. Current practice indicates the need for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging studies. These highly beneficial studies are used for diagnosis, treatment planning, and to monitor treatment response. Improvements in treatment planning and radiation delivered to the tumor, while sparing the normal tissues, should improve local control and decrease potential radiation related problems to the CNS. When possible, multiple fractions of 3 Gy or less should be used. The tolerance dose to the normal tissue with this fractionation schedule is 50 to 55 Gy. The most common and serious complications of radiation for CNS tumors is delayed radiation myelopathy and necrosis. Medical management of the patient during radiation therapy requires careful attention to anesthetic protocols, and medications to reduce intracranial pressure that is often elevated in these patients. Canine brain tumors have served as an experimental model to test numerous new treatments. Increased availability of advanced imaging modalities has spawned increased detection of these neoplasms. Early detection of these tumors with appropriate aggressive therapy should prove beneficial to many patients

  9. Tailored Beta-catenin mutational approach in extra-abdominal sporadic desmoid tumor patients without therapeutic intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broekhoven, Danique L.M. van; Grünhagenl, Dirk J.; Dalen, Thijs van; Coevorden, Frits van; Bonenkamp, Han J.; Been, Lukas B.; Bemelmans, Marc H.A.; Dijkstra, Sander D.S.; Colombo, Chiara; Gronchi, Alessandro; Verhoef, Cornelis

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of the classical treatment modalities surgery and radiotherapy in the treatment of aggressive fibromatosis is presently disputed and there is a shift towards a more conservative approach. The aim of the present study is to objectify